HURRICANE

Planning Guide

WALKER, LOUISIANA
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DEAR RESIDENTS

AND

BUSINESSES,

In an effort to assist you in preparing for this hurricane season, we ask that you read the follow“The City of Walker has ing information thorprepared for this oughly to be properly hurricane season. Our prepared in the event mission is to provide of a hurricane. quality of life services Hurricane season with little or no starts June 1st and condisruption. “ tinues through November 30th. Hurricanes are once again projected to threaten the State of Louisiana and our community. Meteorologists are now predicting 18 named storms during the season; the team anticipates 10 hurricanes with five expected to develop into major hurricanes. The City of Walker has prepared for this hurricane season. Our mission is to provide quality of life services with little or no disruption. Should a storm sweep through our community, contained in this packet are all of the needed contact information. Our intentions are to bring together preparedness and awareness to allow for a safe 2010 hurricane season. Please visit our website at www.walker.la.us or the State’s website for Hurricane Preparation at www.getagameplan.org for additional information.

Bobby Font Mayor Town of Walker

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C O N TA C T

I N F O R M A T I O N

24 Hour Hotline During Hurricanes (Local Assistance) Walker Municipal Building Department of Public Works (Trees in Roadway, Debris Piles) Walker Police Department Livingston Parish Sheriff’s Office Livingston Parish Office of Emergency Preparedness Governor’s Office of Homeland Security & Em. Preparedness Louisiana Chapter of the American Red Cross Fire Department National Weather Service Forecast Office Louisiana State Police Louisiana State Police Road Closure Hotline Louisiana Attorney General Hurricane Hotline American Red Cross—National American Red Cross—Local Entergy / Report a Power Outage Demco / Report a Power Outage

225-665-8990 225-665-4356 225-665-2467 225-664-3125 225-686-2241 225-686-3066 225-925-7500 225-291-4533 225-664-7102 504-522-7330 225-925-6325 1-800-469-4828 1-800-351-4889 1-866-438-4636 225-291-4533 1-800-968-8243 1-800-262-0221

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TA B L E From the Mayor Contact Information

O F

C O N T E N T S

3 4
7 8-9 10-11 13 14-15 18-19 21 22-23 24-25 27

Before the Storm.....................................
Hurricane 101 Emergency Kit First Aid Kit Pet Safety Family Disaster Plan Business Plan

During the Storm...................................
Shelter in Place Generator Safety Power Lines

After the Storm......................................
Debris Clean up

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In the event a hurricane is forecasted to hit your area, please take the following precautions:
1. Keep tuned to a local radio or television station for the latest Weather Service advisories as well as special instructions from local government. 2. Keep cars fueled should evacuation be necessary. Also, service stations may be inoperable after the storm. 3. Board up windows or protect them with storm shutters or tape. Danger to small windows is mainly from wind-driven debris. Larger windows may be broken by wind pressure. Although tape may not keep a window from breaking, it is an effective way of preventing flying glass. 4. Secure outdoor objects that might be blown away. Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch furniture, and a number of other harmless items become deadly missiles in hurricane winds.

5. Be alert for tornado watches and warnings as tornadoes are often spawned by hurricanes. Should your area receive a tornado warning, seek inside shelter immediately, preferably below ground level.

6. If local government advises an evacuation of your area, DO SO IMMEDIATELY.
Keep your car radio on to listen for further instructions, such as the locations of emergency shelters.

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HURRICANE 101
Understanding the threat level a hurricane presents is very important. Below is a model depicting the Saffir-Simpson chart explaining the threat level associated with each type of hurricane.
TROPICAL STORM
Winds: 39-73 mph Wind Effects: scattered trees down, scattered power outages, some roads blocked due to downed trees and power lines. For example, neighborhoods could lose power for several days.

SAFFIRISIMPSON HURRICANE SCALE
CATEGORY 1
Winds: 74 - 95 mph Winds Effects: damage to mobile homes and some homes of frame construction. Numerous trees down and widespread power outages. Roads blocked due to downed trees and power lines. Loose outdoor items will become airborne projectiles. Forexampie, an area as large as a county could experience near total power loss.

CATEGORY 2
Winds: 96 - 110 mph Wind Effects: severe damage to the majority of mobile homes and homes of frame construction. Many trees down. Well-constructed homes will have damage to shingles, siding and gutters. Extensive damage to power lines and widespread power outages. Airborne debns could injure or kill. Damage could extend well inland. For example, multiple localities could experience near total loss of power and water from several days

CATEGORY 3
Winds: 111 - 130 mph Wind Effects: nearly all mobile homes destroyed. Severe damage to most homes, Including structural collapse. Airborne debris will injure or kill. Severe damage to most low-rise apartment buildings with partial roof and wall failure. Damage could extend well inland. For example, large portions of the affected area could experience total power and water loss for more than a week.

CATEGORY 4
Winds: 131 - 155 mph Wind Effects: catastrophic damage to residential structures. Most of the affected area will be uninhabitable for weeks or longer. Nearly all industrial buildings and low-rise apartment buildings severely damaged or destroyed. Nearly all trees and power poles downed. Damage could extend well inland. For example, large portions of the affected area will experience total power and water loss for weeks and possibly months.

!!!~'I!I!I!!!!!

CATEGORY 5
Winds: 156+ mph Wind Effects: similar to Category 4.

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One way to prepare for a disaster is to assemble an Emergency Kit. It is important to prepare before the storm because once the storm hits you will not be able to shop for supplies.

The Town of Walker provides sandbags for the elderly and the disabled. To receive these please call 665-8990. All others should call the Fire Department at 664-7102.

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Water - at least 1 gallon daily per person for 3 to 7 days Food - at least enough for 3 to 7 days — non-perishable packaged or canned food / juices — foods for infants or the elderly — snack foods — non-electric can opener — cooking tools / fuel — paper plates / plastic utensils Blankets / Pillows, etc. Clothing - seasonal / rain gear/ sturdy shoes First Aid Kit / Medicines / Prescription Drugs Special Items - for babies and the elderly Toiletries / Hygiene items / Moisture wipes Flashlight / Batteries Radio - Battery operated and NOAA weather radio Telephones - Fully charged cell phone with extra battery and a traditional (not cordless) telephone set Cash (with some small bills) and Credit Cards - Banks and ATMs may not be available for extended periods Toys, Books and Games Important documents - in a waterproof container or watertight resealable plastic bag; insurance, medical records, bank account numbers, Social Security card, etc.

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Be Red Cross Ready
Get a Kit. Make a Plan. Be Informed.

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A well-stocked first aid kit is a handy thing to have. To be prepared for emergencies, keep a first aid kit in your home and in your car. Carry a first aid kit with you or know where you can find one. Find out the location of first aid kits where you work. First aid kits come in many shapes and sizes. You can purchase one from the Red Cross Store or your local American Red Cross chapter. Your local drug store may sell them. You may also make your own. Some kits are designed for specific activities, such as hiking, camping or boating. Whether you buy a first aid kit or put one together, make sure it has all the items you may need. Include any personal items such as medications and emergency phone numbers or other items your health-care provider may suggest. Check the kit regularly. Make sure the flashlight batteries work. Check expiration dates and replace any used or out-of-date contents.

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FIRST AID

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2 absorbent compress dressings (5 x 9 inches) 25 adhesive bandages (assorted sizes) 1 adhesive cloth tape (10 yards x 1 inch) 5 antibiotic ointment packets (approximately 1 gram) 5 antiseptic wipe packets 2 packets of aspirin (81 mg each) 1 blanket (space blanket) 1 breathing barrier (with one-way valve) 1 instant cold compress 2 pair of non-latex gloves (size: large) 2 hydrocortisone ointment packets (approximately 1 gram each) Scissors 1 roller bandage (3 inches wide) 1 roller bandage (4 inches wide) 5 sterile gauze pads (3 x 3 inches) 5 sterile gauze pads (4 x 4 inches) Oral thermometer (non-mercury/non-glass) 2 triangular bandages Tweezers First aid instruction booklet

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Baby Items
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Other Special Items
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Important Family Documents Medications Insulin Contacts & Supplies Extra Eye Glasses Medical Records

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PET SAFETY
BEFORE THE DISASTER
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Make sure that your pets are current on their vaccinations. Pet shelters may require proof of vaccines. Keep a collar with identification on your pet and have a leash on hand to control your pet. Have a properly-sized pet carrier for each animal - carriers should be large enough for the animal to stand and turn around. Plan your evacuation strategy and don't forget your pet! Specialized pet shelters, veterinary clinics and friends and relatives out of harm's way are ALL potential refuges for your pet during a disaster. The Town of Walker’s Animal Shelter does not shelter pets for disasters.

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DURING THE DISASTER
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Bring pets indoor well in advance of a storm - reassure them and remain calm.

AFTER THE DISASTER
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Walk pets on a leash until they become re-oriented to their home - often familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and pets could easily be confused and become lost. Also, downed power lines, reptiles brought in with high water and debris can all pose a threat for animals after a disaster. If pets cannot be found after a disaster, contact the local animal control office to find out where lost animals can be recovered. Bring along a picture of your pet if possible. After a disaster animals can become aggressive or defensive - monitor their behavior.

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P E T D I S A S T E R S U P P LY K I T
• Proper identification including immunization records • Ample supply of food and water • A carrier or cage • Medications • Muzzle, collar and leash

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Escape Routes
Draw a floor plan of your home. Use a blank sheet of paper for each floor. Mark two escape routes from each room. Make sure children understand the drawings. Post a copy of the drawings at eye level in each child’s room.

Where to Meet
Establish a place to meet in the event of an emergency, such as a fire. Record the locations in the box below:
SF.asy~you and. Your CIiildJoen

Can Do To Prepare
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Communication
Discuss how your family will stay in contact if separated by a disaster. Choose an out-of-state friend as a check in contact for everyone to call since it will probably be easier to call long distance rather than across town.

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Learn about potential emergencies. Create a family disaster plan. Practice the plan. Talk about what might happen and what the family will do in a disaster. Have a communications plan.

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Disaster Plan Worksheet
Post your completed worksheet in a conspicuous place for quick reference by family members, guests, and babysitters. It may help save a life!

Emergency Communications Plan ...
Emergency Contacts Out of Area Contact Person

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Post these numbers next to all phones. Review with all family members. Carry this information in purse, briefcase, etc.

Name Homephone Work phone _ _

Family name Address Cross street Horne phone(s) Work phone(s) Doctor Doctor Neighbor Neighbor Neighbor Our chil dren: Name Name Name Age __ School Age __ School Age __ School Signed 1. 1. 2. 2. _ _ _ The above people, as well as my spouse and children, know the family's secret password. My children have been told not to go anywhere with any person who does not know this password. _ [have authorized these people to pick up my child from school:

School Plan

Local family contact Homephone Work phone _ _

Call 9-1-1 ONlY in case of life-threatening emergency or fire.

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Evacuation Plan

lfyou were told to evacuate, what do you take? Personalize the following list, if you had to leave in: 5 minutes: Item Radio Address books Vital medication Emergency Supply Kit Vital documents Business/computer records Damp towel for the smoke Pets Location

EMERGENCY

• • • • • • • •

• • • •
60 minutes (1 hour): Item Photo albums, negatives Vital documents Business records Financial records Stocks and bonds Location

• • • • •

• • • •
If you have a car or truck: Item Family heirlooms Clothing Computer Original art Pet supplies Location

• • • • •


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Every family member should carry a copy of this important information:

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BUSINESS PLAN Be ready.
How quickly your company can get back to business after a hurricane, tornado, fire or flood often depends on emergency planning done today. Start planning now to improve the likelihood that your company will survive and recover.

CONTINUITY OF OPERA TIONS PLANNING
1. Carefully assess how your company functions, both internally and externally, to determine which staff, materials, procedures and equipment are absolutely necessary to keep the business operating. 2. Review your business process flow chart if one exists. 3. Identify operations critical to survival and recovery. 4. Include emergency payroll, expedited financial decision-making and accounting systems to track and document costs in the event of a disaster. 5. Establish procedures for succession of management. Include at least one person who is not at the company headquarters, if applicable. 6. Identify your suppliers, shippers, resources and other businesses you must interact with on a daily basis. 7. Develop professional relationships with more than one company to use in case your primary contractor cannot service your needs. A disaster that shuts down a key supplier can be devastating to your business. 8. Create a contact list for existing critical business contractors and others you plan to use in an emergency. Keep this list with other important documents on file, in your emergency supply kit and at an off-site location. 9. Plan what you will do if your building, plant or store is not accessible. This type of planning is often referred to as a continuity of operations plan, or COOP, and includes all facets of your business. 10. Consider if you can run the business from a different location or from your home. 11. Develop relationships with other companies to use their facilities in case a disaster makes your location unusable.

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12. Plan for payroll continuity. 13. Decide who should participate in putting together your emergency plan. 14. Include co-workers from all levels in planning and as active members of the emergency management team. 15. Consider a broad cross-section of people from throughout your organization, but focus on those with expertise vital to daily business functions. These will likely include people with technical skills as well as managers and executives. 16. Define crisis management procedures and individual responsibilities in advance. 17. Make sure those involved know what they are supposed to do. 18. Train others in case you need back-up help. 19. Coordinate with others. 20. Meet with other businesses in your building or industrial complex. 21. Talk with first responders, emergency managers, community organizations and utility providers. 22. Plan with your suppliers, shippers and others you regularly do business with. 23. Share your plans and encourage other businesses to set in motion their own continuity planning and offer to help others. 24. Review your emergency plans annually. Just as your business changes over time, so do your preparedness needs. When you hire new employees or when there are changes in how your company functions, you should update your plans and inform your people.

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S TAY I N D O O R S !
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If the calm eye of the hurricane passes through the area, continue to stay indoors unless it is absolutely necessary to leave. Use flashlights instead of candles or kerosene lamps. Please be aware that emergency devices will become inactive. Take necessary precautions. Use caution when cooking if flames are present. A gust of wind through a door or window could start an accidental fire, and the fire department may not readily be available while hurricane winds are blowing. Use the telephone for emergencies only. Conserve refrigeration. Open the refrigerator /freezer door as little as possible. Remain indoors until the official “all clear” has been given

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How to Shelter-in-Place At Home: i i i i
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Close and lock all windows and exterior doors. If you are told there is danger of explosion, close the window shades, blinds, or curtains. Turn off all fans, heating and air conditioning systems. Close the fireplace damper. Get your family disaster supplies kit and make sure the radio is working. Go to an interior room without windows that’s above ground level. In the case of a chemical threat, an above-ground location is preferable because some chemicals are heavier than air, and may seep into basements even if the windows are closed. Bring your pets with you, and be sure to bring additional food and water supplies for them. It is ideal to have a hard-wired telephone in the room you select. Call your emergency contact and have the phone available if you need to report a lifethreatening condition. Cellular telephone equipment may be overwhelmed or damaged during an emergency.
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Use duct tape and plastic sheeting (heavier than food wrap) to seal all cracks around the door and any vents into the room.
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Keep listening to your radio or television until you are told all is safe or you are told to evacuate. Local officials may call for evacuation in specific areas at greatest risk in your community.
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Carbon Monoxide Hazards
When used in a confined space, generators can produce high levels of CO within minutes. When you use a portable generator, remember that you cannot see or smell CO. Even if you do not smell exhaust fumes, you may still be exposed to CO.

A DANGER
Using a gen.erator indoors CAN KILL YO U IN MINUTES. Generator exhaust contains carbon monoxide. a poison you cannot see or smell. This is

NEVE R use inside a home or garage, EVE N IF doors and wind(lws are open,

Only use OUTSIDE and far away from windows, doors, and vents.

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Danger labels are required on all portable generators manufactured or imported on or after May 14, 2007. i If you start to feel sick, dizzy, or weak while using a generator, get to fresh air RIGHT AWAY. DO NOT DELAY. The CO from generators can rapidly kill you. Follow these safety tips to protect against CO poisoning:
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NEVER use a generator inside homes, garages, crawlspaces, sheds, or similar areas, even when using fans or opening doors and windows for ventilation. Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can quickly build up in these areas and can linger for hours, even after the generator has shut off. Follow the instructions that come with your generator. Locate the unit outdoors and far from doors, windows, and vents that could allow CO to come indoors. Install battery-operated CO alarms or plug-in CO alarms with battery back-up in your home, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. CO alarms should be certified to the requirements of the latest safety standards (UL 2034, IAS 6-96, or CSA 6.19.01). Test batteries monthly. To avoid CO poisoning when using generators: Never run generators indoors, including garages, basements, crawlspaces and sheds.

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Get to fresh air right away if you start to feel dizzy or weak.
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G E N E R AT O R S A F E T Y

Electrical Hazards
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Generators pose a risk of shock and electrocution, especially if they are operated in wet conditions. If you must use a generator when it is wet outside, protect the generator from moisture to help avoid the shock/electrocution hazard, but do so without operating the generator indoors or near openings to any building that can be occupied in order to help avoid the CO hazard. Operate the generator under an open, canopy-like structure on a dry surface where water cannot reach it or puddle or drain under it. Dry your hands, if wet, before touching the generator. Connect appliances to the generator using heavy-duty extension cords that are specifically designed for outdoor use. Make sure the wattage rating for each cord exceeds the total wattage of all appliances connected to it. Use extension cords that are long enough to allow the generator to be placed outdoors and far away from windows, doors and vents to the home or to other structures that could be occupied. Check that the entire length of each cord is free of cuts or tears and that the plug has all three prongs. Protect the cord from getting pinched or crushed if it passes through a window or doorway. NEVER try to power the house wiring by plugging the generator into a wall outlet, a practice known as “backfeeding.” This is extremely dangerous and presents an electrocution risk to utility workers and neighbors served by the same utility transformer. It also bypasses some of the built-in household circuit protection devices.

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Fire Hazards
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Never store fuel for your generator in the home. Gasoline, propane, kerosene, and other flammable liquids should be stored outside of living areas in properly-labeled, non-glass safety containers. Do not store them near a fuelburning appliance, such as a natural gas water heater in a garage.

Before refueling the generator, turn it off and let it cool down. Gasoline spilled on hot engine parts could ignite.

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, a po 'er I neelJ$ 10 ttl e groU! (J' or ouches an 1/1. lng on 1'ne gr(JUi d, t su frJU1U:J'ng area may be e- ret. el . ne {!jrDous.

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It is not possible to determine if a downed power line is energized. Never touch or attempt to move a downed power line or a person who is in contact with a power line.

Keep children and pets away from areas where power lines may have fallen. Don’t drive over downed power lines. If a downed line is near water, keep a safe distance from the line and the water, even if it is a small puddle. If a power line falls over your car, stay in the car. If you must leave the car because of immediate danger, jump free of the car, making sure that no part of your body is touching the car when you come in contact with the ground. Be careful not to stand under tree limbs or power lines. Tree limbs can become weakened during a storm but not fall until several hours or even days after the storm. The same can be true for power lines or poles that sustain damage.

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Beware of outdoor hazards. Watch out for loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to the proper authority. See pp. 4 for contact numbers. Walk and drive cautiously. Debris filled streets are very dangerous. Snake and poisonous insects may be a hazard. Washouts can weaken road and bridge structures which could collapse under vehicle weight. Do not use water until authorities have declared the area to be a “safe water area”. Use the emergency supply in the tub or boil water. Report broke sewer or water mains to the Department of Public Works. Observe curfew.

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Be patient. It takes a team effort to clean up after a storm. Responsibility for the cleanup falls to numerous local, state and federal agencies.
DEBRIS CLEAN-UP
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Separate piles of debris by trunks and limbs and drag as close to the road as possible.

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Be sure the debris does not obstruct the roadway, does not clog ditches and is not under a power line.

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P.O. Box 217

Walker, LA

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P. 225.665.4356

F. 225.664.0140

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