MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 

 

 
TOWARDS A MODEL OF   SUSTAINABLE URBAN AGRICULTURE: 
A CASE STUDY OF ASHAIMAN, GHANA 
  1 June 2009 
   

 

 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
 

 
   

REPORT BY ‐   ASHAIMAN GROUP:  
 

SARAH ADAMS  SHANILA ATHULATHMUDALI  ERIKA BREYER  CATHERINE BURGESS  ABIGAIL BURRIDGE  BASMA GABER  SHAILEAN HARDY  DANIEL ODEKINA  JENNY PERRY  ELISE ROTSZTAIN  RIEKO SUZUKI  TRAVIS WOODWARD 
 

 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009       
 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS  
i  ii  iii    1  1  1  1  3  3  4  5  6  6  7  11  14  17  21 
22  22 

 

Ashaiman Group 

                                   
   

ABBREVIATIONS   PREFACE  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  PURPOSE OF STUDY  BACKGROUND: THE STUDY AREAS 
      Ashaiman‐Tema  GIDA   Roman Down 

DEFINITION OF SUA AND CRITERIA  ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK  RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 
            Limitations  Waste  Water  Gender  Linking Farmers Together   Opening a Dialogue 

FINDINGS, DIAGNOSIS AND STRATEGIES 

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS  CONCLUSIONS: INSTITUTIONALISING SUSTAINABLE URBAN AGRICULTURE   REFERENCES  APPENDIX 1: SUSTAINABLE URBAN AGRICULTURE THEMES AND CRITERIA  APPENDIX 2: SEMI‐STRUCTURED QUESTIONNAIRES (FARMERS EXAMPLE)  APPENDIX 3: FOCUS GROUP METHODOLOGY  APPENDIX 4: SCHEDULE OF RESEARCH METHODOLOGY  APPENDIX 5: DATA COMPILATION AND ANALYSIS  APPENDIX 6: IRRIGATION WATER SOURCES  APPENDIX 7: WATER STRATEGIES 

 
25 

 
 

 
27 

29  32 
35 

   
 

37 
39  40 

 
   

 
 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009       
 

 

 

Ashaiman Group 

LIST OF FIGURES   
2  4  7  8  8    11  12  13  13    23    24    Figure 1:   Map of Study Areas  Figure 2:   Food Security & Urban Agriculture    Figure 3:   Farmers using chemical fertilisers  Figure 4:   Example of community composting facility  Figure 5:   Zoom Lion, the private company who has an agreement with the     AshMA to collect waste   Figure 6:   GIDA site irrigation system  Figure 7:   GIDA Ashaiman Dam Water Flows  Figure 8:   Encroaching residential developments built adjacent to the reservoir  Figure 9:   RD Farmer Emmanuel demonstrating the pumping system that the     farmers use to extract water  Figure 10:   Strategies for SUA in Ashaiman ‐ A Framework for Strategic Collective    Action  Figure 11:   Ashaiman Stakeholder Analysis with Influence of SUA Strategies at the    National and Local Levels 

  LIST OF TABLES 
  9  10  15  16  18  19  20  20  21  22  Table 1:   Table 2:   Table 3:   Table 4:   Table 5:   Table 6:   Table 7:   Table 8:   Table 9:   Table 10:   Proposed Waste Strategies  Monitoring and Impact Assessment for Waste Proposed Water Strategies  Monitoring and Impact Assessment for Water  Proposed Gender Strategies  Monitoring and Impact Assessment for Gender  Proposed Cooperative Strategies  Monitoring and Impact Assessment for Cooperatives  Proposed Strategy to Open Dialogue  Monitoring and Impact Assessment for Opening Dialogue 

 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
 

Ashaiman Group 

 
ABBREVIATIONS  
  AMA    AshMA   AWGUPA  EPA    GAMA    GIDA    IWMI    JICA    MoFA    NDPC    RD    RUAF    SUA    TCPD    TDC    ToR    UA    WMD                                                                                                                  Accra Metropolitan Assembly  Ashaiman Municipal Assembly  Accra Working Group on Urban and Peri‐Urban Agriculture  Environmental Protection Agency    Greater Accra Metropolitan Area      Ghana Irrigation Development Authority  International Water Management Institute  Japan International Cooperation Agency  Ministry of Food and Agriculture  National Development Planning Commission  Roman Down  Resource Centres on Urban Agriculture and Food Security  Sustainable Urban Agriculture  Town and Country Planning Department  Tema Development Corporation  Terms of Reference  Urban Agriculture  Waste Management Department 

i | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
 

Ashaiman Group 

 
 

PREFACE 

  The Ashaiman Group would like to thank the many lecturers, experts, and organisations who supported  us  before,  during  and  after  our  expedition  to  Ghana.    We  would  especially  like  to  thank  IWMI  for  hosting  us,  Mrs  Memuna  Mattah,  our  excellent  facilitator  and  translator,  Mr  Nii  Ofoe  Hansen,  the  Scheme  Manager  at  the  Irrigation  Development  Site,  Mr  Sam  Nukpor,  Director  of  the  Ashaiman  Municipal Directorate of Food and Agriculture, and all of the farmers who extended their hospitality to  us  and  generously  offered  so  much  of  their  time  for  our  research.  We  would  also  like  to  express  our  appreciation to the Ashaiman Municipal Assembly and the Ashaiman Stool for so graciously receiving  us and to Joyce Decutt from MoFA for keeping us informed about the positive developments that are  taking place as a result of our presence in Ashaiman. The group feels privileged to have helped catalyse  change that will assist the farmers at Roman Down.  The spirit of the farmers and those that support  them was inspiring.    We would also like to thank the DPU staff for their on‐going support, especially Adriana Allen, Hannah  Griffiths and Alex Frediani. 

ii | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

Ashaiman Group 

  It is estimated that over 50% of the world’s population now lives in cities (Deelstra and Girardet 2000,  Mougeot  2006).    A  growing  urban  population  requires  a  growing  volume  of  food,  and  whilst  it  is  assumed that this food will be transported into the city either from rural areas or from overseas, this  raises significant sustainability issues.  Food grown within a city provides opportunities for the city to  feed itself.  The City of Accra in Ghana has been growing at an average of 4% per year since the 1970s  (Ghana Ministry of Local Government 1992). Today, 24% of households in Accra are considered ‘food  insecure’,  meaning  that  these  households  lack  basic  calories  and  spend  a  high  proportion  of  their  income on food.  Forty per cent are considered vulnerable, in that they have enough food for now, but  still spend a high proportion of income of food, making them vulnerable to seasonal and price changes,  or other global food supply issues (Maxwell et al 2000, 80).     Growing food in cities, or Urban Agriculture (UA), has wide benefits for the economy, society and the  environment.  For  example,  UA  enables  lower  income  groups  to  grow  food  for  subsistence,  provides  employment and income opportunities, reducing poverty and increasing city productivity.     The  group  was  tasked  with  investigating  UA  in the  Municipality of  Ashaiman,  to  establish  whether  it  was  sustainable,  and  if  not,  to  propose  interventions  that  would  take  Ashaiman  on  the  path  to  Sustainable Urban Agriculture (SUA).      During the team’s five month investigation into SUA in Ashaiman, Ghana, the team discovered:     How the problem of managing an increasing volume of waste created by an increasing urban  population is polluting and threatening existing UA   How water is essential for the survival of UA, but that its use as a means to dispose of waste  can threaten the safety of food in the city, and ultimately food security    How important women are, in terms of providing nutrition to the family, in taking a progressive  role in farming, in scaling up networks of farmers and in the trading of food   How cooperation between farming groups is necessary to ensure a future for UA   How UA can open a dialogue between key decision makers   How UA can be catalyzed into SUA through using a framework for strategic collective action    As a result, the Team has made strategic recommendations to address waste management, to improve  water quality, to promote the role of women in urban farming, to enable collaboration between  farming associations and to formalize the opening of dialogue and strategic collective action for SUA in  Ashaiman.

 

iii | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

PURPOSE OF STUDY 
  The  purpose  of  this  study  is  to  examine  UA  in  Greater  Accra,  focusing  on  the  Ghana  Irrigation  Development Authority (GIDA) and Roman Down (RD) farming sites in Ashaiman, in the Greater Accra  Metropolitan Area (GAMA). The team’s objectives, addressing the Terms of Reference (ToR) are to:    1. Understand the current system of urban agriculture in Tema and wider Accra;  2. Assess the sustainability of current agricultural practices;  3. Assess existing strategies (if any) that promote sustainable urban agriculture;  4. Diagnose possible implementation policies to promote sustainable urban agriculture;  5. Determine how the team’s diagnosis would lead to sustainable urban agriculture in Ashaiman.    

BACKGROUND: THE STUDY AREAS 
  The location of the chosen study areas presents a unique research opportunity.  The sites are located  in the only planned region in the GAMA: Ashaiman‐Tema and are also associated with the government  agency  GIDA.  The fact  that these  sites have been  planned and  are  connected  to  a  government body  allows for laboratory‐like conditions in which to examine UA in Accra compared to other sites.     Ashaiman‐Tema    The Tema port area was built 25 km east of Accra in 1962 as an export processing zone, which relieved  some  of  the  population  pressure  from  the  ever‐expanding  city.  The  land  to  develop  the  town  was  compulsory  purchased  by  the  Tema  Development  Corporation  (TDC)  from  its  traditional  customary  owners.  In contrast to the haphazardly developed Accra, Tema was designed with a Master Plan and a  portion of its land was specifically designated for UA. In the 1980s the district received many migrants  who  were  unemployed  and  impoverished  as  a  result  of  the  country’s  Structural  Adjustment  Programmes. Many turned to farming when they could not find other work (Boakye 2008, Grant and  Yankson 2003). In 2008 a township with a large informal settlement in Tema, Ashaiman, was made an  autonomous  district  and  given  its  own  municipal  government,  the  AshMA,  in  keeping  with  Ghana’s  decentralisation policies (Ghana Districts 2008, Larbi 1996).    GIDA     In  the  early  1960s  GIDA  purchased  79  hectares  of  the  land  next  to  a  reservoir  designated  for  agriculture from the TDC. In 1968 construction of a dam was completed and land was parceled out to  farmers who could access the dam water (see Figure 1). Unlike many other urban agriculture sites,    1 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

these farmers currently have land security and pay six month renewable leases to GIDA (Boakye 2008).  Food grown on the site includes traditional crops such as maize and okra, as well as fish farms and rice  paddies.    

 
2 | P a g e    

 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Roman Down    The  other  site,  RD,  is  just  outside  of  the  GIDA  Scheme  and  is  cultivated  by  farmers  who  have  an  informal agreement with GIDA to use the land (see Figure 1). Most of the farmers inherited their plots  from  their  fathers  who  started  farming  around  the  same  time  the  GIDA  dam  was  built.  There  are  approximately 60 farmers on the site, half of whom belong to the Roman Down Cooperative Farmers  Society.  There  are  nearly  20  female  farmers  who  farm  with  their  husbands,  in  contrast  to  the  independent GIDA female farmers.   

DEFINITION OF SUA AND CRITERIA 
  To address the ToR, the team formulated a definition for sustainable urban agriculture (SUA):    “SUA  is  a  resilient  process  of  the  production  of crops  for  subsistence  or  commercial  consumption  in  urban  and  peri‐urban  areas  where  it  is:  equitable;  protects  and  enhances  the  environment,  health,  personal  and  social  well‐being,  which  is  embedded  in  national  and  local  governance;  supports  local  jobs and income opportunities and incorporates traditional knowledge systems”.    From this definition eight themes were established:    

    For each theme, criteria were specified to assess the sustainability of UA as it is currently practiced at  GIDA and RD sites (see Appendix 1). Reviewing these criteria enabled the team to identify existing  avenues of support for UA and analyze areas that require intervention. They have helped the team  delve further to formulate interventions that promote sustainable urban agriculture.   

3 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK 
  To refine the concept of SUA further, the case study sites and interventions were analysed through the  lens of ‘food security’. WHO explains: “food security exists when all people at all times have access to  sufficient,  safe,  nutritious  food  to  maintain  a  healthy  and  active  life”  (World  Health  Organization,  2009).  This  includes  having  physical,  economic  and  social  access  to  food  that  meets peoples’  dietary  needs as well as their food preferences.      Illustrated in Figure 2, food security is built on three pillars: food availability, food access, and food use.  There  are  four  main  issues  that  contribute  to  food  security:  sustainable  economic  development  and  trade, environment, health and agriculture.   

 
 

In order to accommodate urban population growth, it is important for a city to be able to feed itself. In  Accra,  UA  is  already  feeding  the  city.  According  to  the  International  Water  Management  Institute  (IWMI),  90%  of  Accra’s  fresh  vegetables  are  grown  within  the  city.  If  vegetables  were  not  produced  within  the  city  it  would  cost  Ghana  US$14  million  annually  to  import  vegetables  from  neighbouring  countries (Drechsel et al 2006). From the research and fieldwork, however, the team concluded that

 

4 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

current UA practices in Accra are not sustainable. This was an entry point for the team to take it one  step  further  and  examine  how  to  promote  a  form  of  SUA  that  is  embedded  in  local  and  national  institutional frameworks. 
 

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 
  Prior  to  the  fieldwork  component  of  the  research,  an  extensive  literature  review  was  undertaken  to  understand the field of UA, the contextual factors shaping its practice in Accra, and the particularities  of the Ashaiman municipality in which the study sites are located. This was supplemented by seminars  from experts in these subjects.     The fieldwork on which this paper is based was carried out over a two‐week period in May 2009. At  both  sites,  a  number  of  methods  were  used  to  gain  insight  about  farming  practices,  challenges  the  farmers face, and their perceptions of the proposed interventions.  As a means of direct observation,  transect walks were led by the farmers from which a perception map (Figure 1) was compiled. Informal  conversations were had at this time with farmers, including representatives of their cooperatives, and  officials from MoFA and GIDA. Group interviews using semi‐structured questionnaires were held with  farmers  (see  Appendix  2  for  questionnaires).  Daily  activity  focus  group  discussions  were  held  with  farmers as well, separated by gender to differentiate between male and female roles. Finally, seasonal  analysis  focus  group  discussions  were  held  with  male  farmers  to  understand  farming  practices  year‐ round, instead of a snapshot of the rainy season when the fieldwork was conducted (see Appendix 3  for  focus  group  methodology).  A  total  of  approximately  100  farmers  were  interviewed,  of  which  approximately 35 were female and 65 were male.     Semi‐structured  interviews  were  also  conducted  with  local  stakeholders  specific  to  the  study  areas  including residents of the Ashaiman community, female traders at the Ashaiman Market, residents of  the  encroachment,  members  of  the  AshMA,  the  traditional  landowners,  and  the  Ashaiman  Stool.  Further seminars and question and answer sessions were attended over the course of the fieldwork to  obtain a more holistic picture of UA in Accra from different stakeholders. These included the IWMI, the  Ashaiman  Municipal  Assembly,  the  Accra  Waste  Management  Department  (WMD)  and  the  Environment  Protection  Agency  (EPA),  among  others.  Appendix  4  sets  out  a  complete  schedule  of  research  methods  and  institution  interviews,  and  Appendix  5  a  description  of  data  compilation  and  analysis.

 

5 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Limitations    In order to ensure transparency of the process and the findings, the Team noted their limitations in the  execution  of  the  research.    These  limitations  included  the  short  period  of  time  available  for  the  research and the field trip, which also reduced the timeframe within which other actors and academics  could  be  engaged,  and  a  lack  of  data  specific  to  Ashaiman  and  Tema  for  analysis.    There  is  also  the  added  constraint  of  a  language  barrier.    Although  the  respondents  were  enthusiastic  about  the  research, there are inevitably elements of understanding lost in translation between the researchers,  interpreters and respondents, particularly as the interpreters and respondents were occasionally from  different regions with different dialects.    It  also  must  be  noted  that  the team  are  not  experts  in  agriculture,  irrigation,  waste  management  or  wastewater treatment technology, but found that expectations upon arriving in Ghana were that the  team  consisted  of  such  experts,  and  so  this  may  have  influenced  expectations  of  outcomes  of  the  research.    There  are  also  a  number  of  biases  present  in  the  research.    The  Team,  although  from  9  different  countries  with  very  different  backgrounds,  are  all  interested  in  environment  and  sustainable  development, and so interpret the information through this critical lens.  The Team also brings its own  assumptions  on  environmental  problems  and  UA  and  how  this  relates  to  sustainability.    The  respondents:  farmers,  officials,  NGOs  and  academics,  also  frequently  had  an  agenda  that  they  were  pursuing to improve access to land or the quality of water, for example, and so these kinds of issues  were inevitably highlighted over others in the research.   

FINDINGS, DIAGNOSIS AND STRATEGIES 
  The following section diagnoses the findings from the study and recommends strategies for improving  the prospects for SUA on the GIDA and RD sites. Each intervention is summarised in a table that sets  out the strategy, who should be involved, the timeframe for the intervention, why the intervention is  being  proposed,  and  how  the  intervention  could  be  implemented.    A  secondary  table  relates  each  intervention  to  the  criteria  for  achieving  SUA  and  proposes  indicators  and  a  monitoring  regime.  The  interventions  are  proposed  in  three  phases:  immediate  to  short  term,  medium  term  and  long  term.   Immediate to short term interventions are designed to immediately minimise risk or provide benefit,  medium  term  are  intermediary  interventions  to  adapt  to  risk  or  provide  a  step  change  to  improvement, and long term interventions are those to be initiated immediately, but with a long life  span, and focus on mitigating the problem, eliminating it at source or providing institutional changes.   

6 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 Waste    Insufficient  collection  of  solid  waste  in  Ashaiman  has  resulted  in  the  dumping  and  accumulation  of  waste  in  the  waterways  upon  which  local  farmers  depend  to  irrigate  their  crops.    The  quality  of  the  water used to irrigate crops on both sites has been diminished, and the safety of the crops being grown  on the RD site has been affected. However, according to the WMD, 60% of waste generated in GAMA  is organic, so the current waste problem in Ashaiman could be turned into an opportunity to provide  farmers with an abundant supply of organic fertilisers through the use of compost.    However,  there  are  obstacles  preventing  the  adoption  of  such  organic  fertilisers.  Currently,  farmers  use  predominantly  chemical  fertilisers  (Figure  3),  and  the  seasonal  analysis  focus  groups  revealed that, although farmers are  aware  that  organic  fertilisers  such  as  compost  are  better  for  the  soil,  they  still  perceive  chemical  fertilisers  as  providing  faster  crop  growth  and  more  abundant  yields  in  the  short  term.    In  addition,  MoFA  provides  fertiliser  subsidies  in  the  form  of  monthly  coupons,  whereby  one  coupon  reduces  the  price  of  one  unit  of  chemical  fertiliser  by  50%.  Therefore,  the  decision  to  switch  to  organic  inputs  is  difficult  for  farmers  who  are  trying  to  cut  costs,  as  subsidised  chemical fertilisers are less costly than compost, which must also be stored and transported.     At the same time, farmers noted increasing salinity of the soil and worries over lower soil fertility. A  2008  UN  report  on  organic  agriculture  and  food  security  (UNEP  2008)  showed  that  while  organic  conversion  in  tropical  Africa  is  associated  with  an  initial,  short‐term  yield  reduction,  yields  actually  increase  in  the  long  term.  The  use  of  chemicals  is  unsustainable  in  the  long  term,  as  petro‐chemical  inputs deplete soil nutrients over time. (Ananthakrishnan 1978). Moreover, the subsidies provided by  MoFA are apparently temporary, and even at their current levels, they are not sufficient to cover all of  the  farmers’  fertiliser  needs.  Therefore,  high  quality,  locally  available  compost  could  become  an  attractive  alternative  to  chemical  inputs  if  farmers  were  also  aware  of  the  long‐term  benefits  of  switching.

 

7 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

In  this  context,  a  community‐based  composting  scheme  (Figure  4)  could  provide  a  viable  organic  alternative to chemical fertilisers if the subsidies provided by MoFA could be reallocated to compost  production  and  the  construction  of  a  local  community  composting  facility.  Since  the  production process would be coordinated within and by the community, the cost of the compost and transport to  the farmers’ site would be lower than more centralised schemes.  In addition, the AshMA mentioned in  an  interview  with  the  research  team  that  they  were  currently  in  negotiations  with  a  private  Italian  waste management company to provide waste  collection,  separation  and  recycling  in  Ashaiman.  This  would  indicate  that  there  are  economic incentives in setting up a scheme for  waste  collection  and  separation,  and  the  point  of  contention  may  be  whether  a  private  company  or  the  community  retains  the  profits  of such an arrangement. Since managing waste  at  the  community  level  involves  many  stakeholders  as  well  as  changes  in  attitude  toward  waste,  a  multi‐tiered  approach  to  introduce the composting scheme and improve  overall  waste  management  in  Ashaiman  is  proposed in Tables 1‐2.  

 

 

8 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

9 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

10 | P a g e    

 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Water    A significant finding was the actual locations of the two farm sites and their water sources (see Figure  1).  On the GIDA site, the farmers on the left bank have free access to water as part of their lease.  This  water is flows onto their farms via reinforced irrigation channels and sluices, assisted by gravitational  forces.  This  reinforced  irrigation  system  was  funded  and  implemented  by  the  Japan  International  Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 2001 in conjunction with an aid project that also rehabilitated some of  the dam and built a research and training centre called the Irrigation Development Centre (Figure 6).   

 
 

However, the farmers on the right bank have to pump their water from the GIDA drain, which collects  the water after it has flowed across the left bank (Figure 7).  It is likely that this water is contaminated  by the artificial fertilisers and pesticides used by farmers on the left bank. The right bank farmers pay  lower rent to compensate for the expense of maintenance and fuel for the pumps. 

11 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 
 

An issue of great concern to GIDA is the development of middle‐income residential properties that are  encroaching near the reservoir (Figure 8).  The residents of these properties are suspected of dumping  waste  directly  into  the  water.    This  area  is  on  the  flood  plain  and  when  flooding  occurs,  the  water  deposits the waste from this community into the dam, polluting the water and causing the dam to silt  up.  It  was  not  possible to  confirm  how  these houses  were  granted permission  to  the  land;  residents  claimed it was through the Ashaiman stool, other sources claimed it was through the AshMA or GIDA,  whilst  the  Ashaiman  stool,  AshMA  and  GIDA  themselves  all  claimed  the  developments  were  illegal,  demonstrating the  complexity of land issues in GAMA.  12 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

    The  source  of  water  for  irrigation  for  RD  is  the  Ashaiman  city  drain,  from  which  the  farmers  pump  water  in  the  dry  season.  This  water  source  would  have  been  clean  50  years  ago  but  is  now  contaminated  with  waste  from  the  growing  township  (see  Appendix  6).  The  GIDA  scheme,  originally  intended to include RD, was unable to be extended because it was not possible to take water from the  dam across the river that is now the city drain.  
 

 
 

The RD farmers use furrow irrigation, which reduces the risk of crop contamination as the water does  not splash onto the vegetables. In the rainy season, when wastewater irrigation is not necessary, crops  grown include peppers and tomatoes, which are eaten raw. In the dry season, these types of crops are   13 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

discouraged and crops that are cooked, such as maize and okra are grown.  Although the farmers on  RD  do  not  pay  for  the  land,  they  estimate  that  the  cost  of  using  pumps  to  extract  water  is  more  expensive than even the left bank farmers’ leases (Figure 9). 
 

Farmers from both sites stated that they have access to an adequate supply of water all year, but that  it is the quality of the water that is of concern as a result of pollution from the Ashaiman Township and  the  encroaching  developments  near  the  dam.    This  pollution  is  exacerbated  by  the  damming  of  the  river  by  right bank  farmers  to  flood their  fields with  water.    This  causes  polluted  water  to back‐flow  into the GIDA drain, polluting this site.    To  address  this,  short  term  strategies  to  train  famers  on  selecting  crops  less  vulnerable  to  contamination  are  recommended.  There  is  a  risk  that  this  could  negatively  affect  the  income  opportunities of the farmers, but RD farmers stated that very few grow vulnerable crops and that some  training  has  already  taken  place  on  this  issue.  GIDA  and  IWMI  supported  technical  interventions  to  adapt  the  existing  infrastructure  to  reduce  the  pollution  of  the  water  sources  feeding  the  two  farm  sites, and also to supply more water to the right bank farmers on the GIDA site.  As such, a settlement  pond,  decanter  digester  and  anaerobic  filter  system  (Bodard  1996),  and  spillways  have  been  recommended  (see  Appendix  7  for  more  information).    Such  technical  interventions  require  capital  investment, and land would need to be set aside for such purposes. See Tables 3‐4.    Gender    The  farmer’s  cooperatives  (at  RD  and  GIDA)  have  both  male  and  female  members.  At  RD  there  are  approximately  60  farmers,  30  of  whom  (22  men  and  8  women)  are  current  members  of  the  cooperative, and on the GIDA site the cooperative is comprised of 93 farmers, 76 men and 17 women.  On the GIDA site, 14 of the 17 women farm independently on their own plots. In contrast to this, the  RD  women  farmers  have  no  formal  rights  to  the  land  they  use,  and  so  depend  upon  male  family  members to set aside a portion for use. Both male and female farmers on both sites noted that GIDA  was unique in its provision of land directly to women. This reflects the findings by Danso et al (2004),  which  depict  that  customary  law  has  historically  made  no  provision  for  women  to  acquire  access  to  land  independently  from  men.  The  majority  of  women  on  the  GIDA  site  are  widowed  or  unmarried  which, the team hypothesised, was a key factor in their ability to seek land tenure in a culture that has  not  traditionally  accepted  women’s  association  with  land.  In  addition,  there  is  a  women’s  representative in the GIDA farmer’s cooperative, although all cooperative leadership positions on both  sites are held exclusively by men. This led the team to conclude that, while women receive a number of  training  and  extension  services  through  the  cooperatives,  they  are  not  necessarily  able  to  influence  how the cooperatives are run.

 

14 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

15 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

16 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Additional barriers to entry into farming as a profession were related to women being able to reconcile  their  roles  as  mothers  and  wives  with  laborious  farm  tasks.  Through  constructing  daily  activity  timelines  with  both  men  and  women  in  focus  groups,  the  team  found  that  the  burden  of  work  for  women on both sites is higher than that of men. For example, women typically start work earlier in the  morning to prepare breakfast and get the children ready for school, while men head straight for the  farm. Women also have to return home from the fields earlier in the day to tend to household chores,  cook the evening meal, conduct petty trading from their homes and attend to the children after school.  Even with these barriers, all of the women farmers on both sites noted the importance of farming as a  family tradition. The GIDA site women farmers are mostly migrants from rural areas and find the GIDA  scheme  a  way  for  them  to  continue  the  farming  they  had  practiced  before  moving  to  the  city.  Even  though most farming in greater Accra is for cash cropping (Obuobie et al 2004), the women farmers  that  were  interviewed  on  both  sites  highlighted  that  farming  provides  a  way  for  them  to  feed  their  families, even in times of economic hardship.     The  GIDA  representative  noted  that even  with  a  heavier  workload, the women  farmers  on the GIDA  site were the best performers in terms of production and loan repayment and tended to take on less  debt in general. Therefore, farming can be a significant way to promote food security at the household  level by complementing women’s current roles as farmers and household food providers. To promote  gender equity as an integral part of a system of SUA, the strategies and processes for monitoring and  evaluation in Tables 5‐6 are proposed.  
 

Linking Farmers Together     The farmers’ cooperatives in Ashaiman act as organised support networks, where issues are discussed  and  problems  shared.  Farmers  on  both  sites  receive  training  on  farming  methods,  which  is  well  received, but an interest was expressed in broadening training to marketing.  Even though the farmers  have  formed  cooperatives,  they  are  locked  into  their  relationship  with  the  female  traders,  who  sell  their  produce  at  the  local  market.  Since  the  farmers  only  earn  income  at  harvest  time,  they  supplement  their  purchase  of  agricultural  inputs  by  borrowing  from  the  traders,  who  have  a  steady  cash flow. They are therefore beholden to the traders and often must accept reduced prices for their  crops. The farmers’ cooperatives on both of the sites have agreements that they will not sell below a  certain  price,  but  the  traders  are  more  organised  with  a  monopoly  on  the  markets.  They  take  advantage of the fact that farmers need to sell before their crops spoil and that the traders have many  other  customers.  The  aforementioned  women’s  savings  group  could  help  to  address  the  power  struggle  that  farmers  currently  face  in  terms  of  borrowing  small  loans  from  market  women,  whilst  harnessing the female farmers’ strength, that of managing money.  
 

 

17 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 
18 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

The farmers from the study sites in Ashaiman do not currently take part in forms of collective action (in  terms  of  mobilizing  their  resources)  beyond  their  cooperatives.  Linking  farmer’s  cooperatives  would  provide farmers with a platform on which to share knowledge, resources and ideas, and capitalize on  their  collective  power  as  providers  of  food  for  Ashaiman,  the  city  of  Accra  and  its  surrounding  communities.  Following  the  Team’s  visit  to  the  RD  site,  the  secretary  of  the  RD  farmers  association  provided the team with a list of farmers wanting to join the co operative. The list showed an additional  11 female farmers and 8 male farmers wanting to join, and these applications appeared to be because  the farmers saw the Team’s visit as a sign that there was momentum for change.     As a starting point, it is proposed that a list of all cooperatives be obtained from the registrar, whilst  MoFA extension officers act as facilitators and organisers of regular round table meetings. The medium  term proposal is to extend the ‘cooperative network’ beyond those farmers in the cooperatives, linking  ‘communities’ of farmers regardless of their current membership status. This strategy is built upon the  values  of  social  inclusion  and  decentralization  in  order  to  establish  a  grassroots  organisation  or  network  of  farmers.  Empowerment  (of  the  farmers)  would  be  the  central  goal,  and  communication  would be key to fostering an environment in which resources can be collectively mobilized in order to  influence a degree of authority and power. See Tables 7‐8. 
 

 
 

19 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

   

 

20 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Opening a Dialogue    The  team  discovered  that  there  had  been  no  dialogue  between  key  land  and  UA  stakeholders  in  Ashaiman. The team met the Ashaiman stool accompanied by a representative from GIDA and MoFA,  which was the first time that these organisations had met. The linking of these actors together enabled  the history and claims to the site and possible solutions to be shared in a productive and open way. At  this meeting, the future of the RD farmers was called into question, with the stool claiming the land.  The  stool  stated  that  they  were  willing  to  consider  supporting  the  farmers  on  the  site  if  an  arrangement could be set up that mutually benefited the community, such as donating a portion of the  produce. The representative from GIDA, Hansen, made clear that he would act as an advocate for the  farmers, and would liaise between the farmers and the chieftaincy to create an open dialogue. Since  returning home from Accra, the team has been notified that MoFA, the Council of Elders in Ashaiman,  and some executives of the RD farmers, have met and discussed the situation, which has led to the quit  order  to  be  withdrawn.  This  indicates  that  such  a  dialogue  could  continue  into  the  future  to  secure  land for UA in Ashaiman. 
 

Based  on  the  experiences  of  the  other  teams,  it  is  apparent that  not  all  chieftaincies  are  as  open  to  dialogue and setting aside land for UA as the Ashaiman stool. Land scarcity is still a critical issue for the  future  of  UA  and  the  team  recommends  that  wherever  possible,  multi‐stakeholder  dialogue  takes  place to discuss land use planning before opinions are formed and decisions are made. See Tables 9‐10.   

 
 

 

21 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS 
  Whilst the Team feels that the strategies proposed in this study are feasible, other large scale  strategies were proposed by stakeholders and members of the team that could provide contribute  towards promoting UA and achieving SUA.  However, these strategies require significant investment,  and as such, are considered to be outside the scope of this study, but could offer opportunities for  additional research by other organisations.  These large‐scale strategies include:   Increasing the dam capacity, rehabilitating the right bank and dredging the dam of silt deposits   The development of an anaerobic digestion system to manage waste   Enhancing  infrastructure  within  Ashaiman  so  wastewater  from  households  can  be  disposed  of  appropriately    A more immediate and achievable opportunity for the institutionalisation of UA in Ashaiman is in the  development of their by‐laws.  As a newly formed Municipal Assembly (formed in February 2008), the  AshMA has the responsibility of forming new local by‐laws, that incorporate national priorities but that  are appropriate to the local level.  There are a range of opportunities relating to the by‐laws.  These  are:   Formation of by‐laws in an inclusive and participatory manner   By‐laws that secure UA as a priority for Ashaiman, such as securing land for UA   By‐laws that do not impede the practise UA    

CONCLUSIONS: INSTITUTIONALISING SUSTAINABLE URBAN AGRICULTURE  
  In proposing strategies, it was important to consider how addressing the waste, water, land tenure and  gender equity issues at the Ashaiman sites would fit into a larger framework for promoting SUA at the 
 

22 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

city and national level. Using Levy’s (2007) framework for strategic collective action, which is illustrated  in Figure 10, the team sought to ensure that (1) stakeholders had the opportunity to come together to  understand their common problems and opportunities and determine a collective intent for action, (2)  both  farmers  and  the  surrounding  communities  would  be  part  of  organisations  that  would  build  collective capacity to address waste, water and land issues at the grassroots level, (3) the farmers and  communities would be linked to institutions who could advocate for their interests to the AshMA and  central government, and create linkages for dialogue on key issues affecting farmers and surrounding  communities,  and  (4)  the  surrounding  communities,  the  local  government  and  the  wider  city  population could see their role in managing local water and waste issues and come to support UA as  contributing to the health of the city. The final key element is to point to the GIDA site as a laboratory  for testing innovative strategies. Having a site which could demonstrate the success of new agricultural  techniques, cooperative structures and savings strategies could serve to set positive new precedents  for action on a city‐wide level through learning exchanges and inviting city officials to publicly share in  successes.  See  Levy  (2007)  and  Boonyabancha  (2005)  for  case  studies  that  illustrate  the  power  of  learning exchanges and precedent setting in urban interventions. 
 

 

23 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

It  is  also  important  that  local  action  is  complemented  and  supplemented  by  national  policies  that  respect the rights of farmers and convey their importance in terms of feeding the city. The team wishes  to emphasise that UA needs to be officially recognised and granted its place in the national policies of  Ghana.  Urban  agriculture  feeding  the  city  could  be  a  driver  for  social  change  and  environmental  protection. It is a source of affordable food for the urban population and therefore plays a crucial role  in terms of food security and urban livelihoods. The team recommends that AshMA, as the local level  of  government  in  Ashaiman,  opinion  leaders  and  any  other  stakeholders  pool  resources  for  the  institutionalization and mainstreaming of  UA, as set out in Figure 11. The team particularly advocate  the  inclusion  of  UA  in  the  development  initiatives  proposed  by  the  National  Development  and  Commission of Ghana. 
 

 

24 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

REFERENCES 
  Ananthakrishnan, S. (1978). “Agriculture and development strategy: a case for organic fertilisers”. In  Harle, Vliho (ed.) The Political Economy of Food. Westmead: Saxon House.    Boakye, Samuel (2008). “Sustaining urban farming: Explaining why farmers make investment in the  absence of secure tenure with new evidence from Ghana”, DSA Conference, September 2008.    Boonyabancha, Somsook (2005). “Baan Mankong: going to scale with ‘slum’ and squatter upgrading in  Thailand”, Environment & Urbanization, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 21‐46.    Bodard, P. (1996) A Agua e saneamento no Nordeste do Brasil: Estudos de Casol. GRET Urbano Brasil.  PSEou, France, pp. 21‐22.    Danso G., Cofie, O., Annang, L., Obuobie, E., and B. Keraita (2004). “Gender and Urban Agriculture: The  case of Accra, Ghana”. Paper presented at the RUAF/IWMI/ Urban Harvest Woman Feeding Cities  Workshop on Gender Mainstreaming in Urban Food Production and Food Security. 20‐23 September,  2004. Accra, Ghana.     Deelstra, T. And Girardet, H. (2000). “Urban agriculture and sustainable cities”, in: Bakker, N.;  Dubbeling, M.; Guendel, S.; Sabel‐Koschella, U.; Zeeuw, H. (eds). Growing Cities, Growing Food: Urban  Agriculture on the Policy Agenda. Feldafing (Germany): DSE, pp.43‐65.    Drechsel, Pay, Sophie Graefe, Moise Sonou, and Olufunke O. Cofie (2006). “Informal Irrigation in Urban  West Africa: An Overview”, IWMI Research Report 102.    Ghana Districts (2008). “Ashaiman municipal”, [Online] Available at:  http://www.ghanadistricts.com/districts/?news&r=1&_=171, (Accessed 24 May 2009).    Ghana Ministry of Local Government (1992). “Strategic plan for the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area”,  Volume 1, Context report, Accra: Department of Town and Country Planning.    Grant, R. and P. Yankson (2003). “City Profile: Accra”, Cities, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 65–74. 
 

Larbi, W. Odami (1996). “Spatial planning and urban fragmentation in Accra”, Third World Planning  Review, Vol. 18, pp. 193‐214.   

25 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Levy, C. (2007). “Defining Collective Strategic Action led by Civil Society Organisations: The case of  CLIFF, India”. 8th N‐AERUS Conference, London: DPU‐UCL.    Maxwell, Daniel, Carol Levin, Margaret Armar‐Klemesu, Marie Ruel, Saul Morris and Clement Ahiadeke  (2000). Urban Livelihoods and Food and Nutrition Security in Greater Accra, Ghana. Washington DC:  IFPRI, [Online] Available at:   http://www.who.int/nutrition/publications/WHO_multicountry_%20study_Ghana.pdf, (Accessed 29  May 2009).    Mougeot, L. (2006). Growing Better Cities: Urban Agriculture for Sustainable Development. Ontario,  Canada: International Development Research Centre.    Obuobie, E., P. Drechsel and G. Danso (2004). “Gender in open‐space irrigated urban vegetable farming  in Accra”, Urban Agriculture Magazine, No. 12, pp. 13‐15.    United Nations Environment Program (2008). “Organic Agriculture and Food Security in Africa”, United  Nations Conference on Trade and Development, New York: United Nations, pp. 1‐47.     World Health Organization (2009). “Trade, foreign policy, diplomacy, and health: Food security”,  [Online] Available at: http://www.who.int/trade/glossary/story028/en/, (Accessed 24 May 2009). 
 

 

26 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   
 APPENDIX 1: SUSTAINABLE URBAN AGRICULTURE THEMES AND CRITERIA 

Ashaiman Group 

 
Theme  Resilience    Criteria  Sufficient crops are produced to feed local people and eliminate dependency on  overseas imports.  A diversity of crops and crop species are produced to safe‐guard food supply against  disease.  Households are able to produce their own food for consumption, reducing their  vulnerability to market/price/ income shocks  Locally available, safe, organic inputs are used, reducing dependency on external  supplies  Equitable access and transfer of knowledge, opportunities, training, resources and  equipment for sustainable urban agriculture.  Equal access to sufficient and affordable food to enable the people of Tema to be  healthy.  Equal income generating opportunities are available for men and women.  The use of organic, safe, good quality fertilizers to increase and sustain the  productivity of the land.  The use of a natural predatory system and natural agricultural systems to manage  pests   The existence of local composting schemes that are accessible, affordable and  appropriate for the needs of local farmers.  The use of a low input agricultural system that does not use / minimises the use of  fossil fuels at any stage, from production to consumption.  The use of wastewater for irrigation where it is used in a safe manner and the  complementary use of rainwater harvesting for irrigation and vegetable washing to  reduce water extraction and food contamination.  Farming practices and food practices use water that is safe or made safe in irrigation  practices to prevent contamination that is detrimental to health.  Farmers are aware of the occupational and consumer health risks associated with their  profession and who act on this awareness to reduce and eliminate the risks.  The organic fertilisers used in farming practices are mature and uncontaminated by  chemicals.  Sufficient quantity and diversity of foods are available to support adequate nutrition at  the household and city levels.  The practice of urban agriculture that has benefits to the entire local community,  beyond those directly involved in its application.  The practice of urban agriculture that provides wider personal benefits beyond  employment and food such as self‐development, access to groups and networks and  other support structures  

Equity 

Environment   

Health and  Safety 

Personal and  Social   Well‐being 

27 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Theme  Governance 

Subsistence  and Income  Opportunities 

Criteria  Local authorities have the capacity to sustainably manage land, water and waste.  The land used for urban agriculture is secure either through land tenure or secure land  agreements.  Political, financial and institutional support by the state, both nationally and locally,  and local decision makers for urban agriculture.  Local decision makers recognise, support and incorporate urban agriculture into their  plans, policies and programmes.  Grassroots organisations are recognised and can influence policy and interventions.  There are income opportunities from agriculture in an urban environment.  There are peripheral income opportunities that serve to support sustainable farming  practices, such as composting facilities.  Export of food crops is not at the expense of local food supply and income  opportunities.  Vulnerable groups are able to access opportunities to engage in urban agriculture.  Farmers have easy access to education and training on safe farming techniques.  Farming practices incorporate both effective traditional farming systems and new  farming practices that are sustainable. 

 
   

Knowledge  systems 

28 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   
 APPENDIX 2: SEMI‐STRUCTURED QUESTIONNAIRES (FARMERS EXAMPLE) 

Ashaiman Group 

 

29 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

30 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

31 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

APPENDIX 3: FOCUS GROUP METHODOLOGY 
  In addition to semi‐structured interviews, the research team conducted 6 focus groups among women  and men farmers. Two separate activities were undertaken in the focus groups: a daily activity timeline  and  a  seasonal  analysis  of  food,  water,  inputs  and  income  availability.    In  total,  4  groups  of  farmers  completed  the  daily  activity  timeline  (1  male  and  1  female  group  per  site),  and  2  groups  of  farmers  completed the seasonal analysis activity (1 male group from each site).    The daily activity timeline consisted of asking farmers to map out a typical Monday of farm work in the  rainy  season.  The  research  team  provided  a  basic  layout  of  day  and  evening  hours  as  well  as  some  typical working and household activity cards that might apply. Additional blank cards were provided so  that  participants  could  add  activities  if  desired.  The  participants  were  then  asked,  starting  from  the  morning, to place the activity cards in the time slots on the page.    

  GIDA site female farmers daily activity timeline focus group    The daily activity data from the male and female groups was then compared to assess differences in  gender roles and workload across the groups.

 
32 | P a g e    

 

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
    Example of Finished Women’s Daily Activity Timeline:    Morning         

Ashaiman Group 

 

 

Evening 

 

 

 

  The  seasonal  analysis  activity  consisted  of  asking  farmers  to  rate  the  availability  of  food,  water,  and  income  as  well  as  the  need  to  use  fertilizers  and  pesticides  across  each  month  of  the  year.  Further  information  on  the  number  of  workers  needed  for  farming  tasks  by  season  was  collected,  distinguishing between those tasks that could be assisted by family members and those that required  hired labour. The research team provided a basic monthly calendar template with picture cards for the  different  resources  (food,  water,  income)  and  inputs  (chemical  fertilizers,  compost,  pesticides),  and  farmers indicated the status of that resource or input by placing cards on each month. Harvest months  might  show  many  income  cards,  for  example,  while  other  months  had  fewer  or  no  income  cards  to  show lower income times of the year. 

   
 

33 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

GIDA site male farmers seasonal analysis focus group    This seasonal analysis allowed the research team to discuss the main challenges faced across different  seasons in terms of resource availability, labour and inputs with the farmers. Since we visited the site  in the rainy season, this activity was essential to extending our understanding of farming practices and  framing our strategies to address the complete annual farming cycle.    Example of Finished Seasonal Analysis Activity: 

 
34 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

APPENDIX 4: SCHEDULE OF RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 

 
35 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 

 

36 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

APPENDIX 5: DATA COMPILATION AND ANALYSIS 
  In order for the team to gain insight on farming practices and challenges farmers face, and to test the  feasibility  of  proposed  interventions,  a  number  of  research  questions  were  developed.  They  were  based on the extensive literature review conducted prior to the fieldwork. Different versions of each  question were written to target the particular stakeholder to be interviewed.    When  all  the  questions  were  drafted,  they  were  compiled  into  one  master  database  and  assigned  codes based on topics. There were over 350 combinations of questions and stakeholders in total.     The following is a snapshot of the question database: 
 
Information Gap Interview Group Hypothesis Working  Arrangements,  Women Traders Gender Gender Roles Working  Arrangements,  Men Farmers Gender Gender Roles Women's Groups UN Habitat Gender General RWH RWH RWH Composting Composting Composting Question Label GR1 Question Text How many hours per week do you work?

GR3 GWG13 AT1 RPR1 RPR11 RPR10 CWS4 CCF1 CPE4

How much time do you spend each day traveling to the plot? When you have a programme or information for the women  farmers, how do you reach them? Since the change from Tema to Ashaiman, have there been any  changes in how the site is managed? Have you ever used collected rainwater as a source for watering  your crops? Are there any rainwater collection systems on any of the GIDA  sites? Do you ever collect rainwater to use for your household needs?  Do you know anyone who does? Do you have a bin to put your household waste into?  Do you know if there is any composting facility that available in  the site? Have you ever used composting fertiliser?

Ashaiman  GIDA Transition RWH Perceptions &  Women Farmers Practices RWH Perceptions &  IWMI/AWGUPA Practices RWH Perceptions &  Local Community Practices Waste/Sanitation  Local Community Situation Composting  Men Farmers Facilities Composting  Women Farmers Perceptions

  The question database constantly evolved and was added to during the fieldtrip as more was learned  and the research needs changed.    Whenever a stakeholder interview or question and answer session was conducted, the database was  used as a starting point to extract the relevant questions.    In order to compile the data to facilitate analysis, the answers from each interview were entered into  one  answer  database.  The  database  can  be  filtered  by  any  criteria,  including  topic,  stakeholder,  or  specific question so that results can easily be compared. This also alerted the team during the fieldtrip  if there were any discrepancies between stakeholder perceptions that warranted further investigation. 

 

37 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
    The following is a snapshot of the answer database:   
Respondent  Name (for  DEMO2:  interviews  GIDA/  with officials  Type of  DEMO1:  Non­ DEMO3:  DEMO5:  Interviewer only) Interview Gender GIDA Age Occupation GR4 GIDA Farmers  Focus  Female Cooperative Group Daily  Activities GIDA 30­55 Farmer

Ashaiman Group 

ID

GR5

GR8 farming is  primary, but  some  women take  crops to  market  sometimes

GR9 Okra, maize,  rice are  prmary;  some grow  vegetables  like  tomatoes,  peppers and  onions

JPWF1 Jenny

always  Weeding, but  enough food  children or hired  to feed your  labour can help  family; is a  sometimes hobby she  likes; is a  family  tradition  that's been  passed down  to us

JPMF1 Jenny

Farmers  Semi­ Male Cooperative ­  structured  Roman Down group  interview

Non­GIDA 65,  36,38,  37, 68,  60

farmer

father was a  cost of equipments  farming.  tomatoes,  farmer­  for farming,  Wives take  peppers  "farmer from  repairing pumps  crops from  (august­end  infancy"­ and pipes. Pumps  farm and sell  of year),  stable  are expensive and  them at the  okra, corn  seasons(dry  they have to change  market (may­ season,  it every 3­4 years.  august) rainy  Waste and plastics  season)­  disposed in gutters  access to  and transformed  market and  through the canal to  to sell the  farms is a major  crops. problem for farmers.

EMF1

Erika

Farmers  Focus  Cooperative ­  Group  Roman Down Seasonal  Analysis

Male

Non­GIDA 30­65

farmer

lack of support from  no other  the government and  source of  price flutuation due  income to offer and demand  for products in the  market each season

Maize and  okra

RMF1

Rieko

GIDA Farmers  Semi­ Male Cooperative structured  group  interview

GIDA

50

Farmer

farming the  land allocation,  Electrocity way to live it  financeinterms of,  is fun to see  water fee and  vegetables  buying inputs, such  growing as chemical fertiliser  and labour force 

Rice, Maize,  Tomatoes,  Okra

 

 
 

 

38 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

 APPENDIX 6: IRRIGATION WATER SOURCES 

 

39 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

APPENDIX 7: WATER STRATEGIES 
  Settlement Pond    A settlement pond improves the quality of water by temporarily increasing the space that the water  from a river flows into, causing the water to slow down.  Slowing down the rate of flow or velocity of  the water causes it to drop the waste it is carrying (suspended load) to the bottom of the pond.  The  water can then either be pumped directly out of the pond for irrigation or the water can re‐enter the  stream  or  river,  increasing  its  rate  of  flow  again  and  supplying  cleaner  water  downstream.  Further  information  is  available  from  the  UK  Drinking  Water  Inspectorate  at  http://www.dwi.gov.uk/  (last 
accessed 30/05/09)  

  A Decanter Digester and an Anaerobic Filter    
   

Spillway                          Arial view of a network of decanter digesters  and anaerobic filters (Bodard, 1996 pp. 21‐22) 

  The vessel on the left is the Decanter  Digester and the vessel on the right is  the Anaerobic Filter (Bodard, 1996 pp.  21‐22) 

40 | P a g e    

MSc Environment & Sustainable Development  DPU Field Work 2009 
   

Ashaiman Group 

Sanitation  waste  flows  from  individual  households  into  a  community  based  Decanter  Digester.    One  Decanter Digester can serve 30 homes, and takes up 3m across by 2m deep.  Once the sanitation waste  enters the Decanter Digester, organic material settles to the bottom of the vessel, which then acts as a  digester.  Water pressure then forces water to flow in a small pipe from the digester into the Anaerobic  Filter.    In  the  Anaerobic  Filter,  the  water  is  forces  through  a  network  of  small  stones,  which  further  purifies  the  water.    The water  is  forced  up  through  the  vessel,  where  it  can  then  enter  a  drain.  This  process purifies the waste water and makes it suitable for entering a drain system.    Source: Bodard, P. (1996) A Agua e saneamento no Nordeste do Brasi: Estudos de Casol. GRET Urbano  Brasil. PSEou, France, pp. 21‐22.    Spillway    A spillway is a structure that operates, via gravity, by releasing excess water from a dam to prevent  overtopping or flooding during times when high volumes of water enter the dam’s reservoir.  More  information is available at the British Dams Website:  http://www.britishdams.org/about_dams/overflow.htm (last accessed 30/05/09) 
 

   

 

   

 
 
 

41 | P a g e    

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.