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A S I S E E
S O U T H E A S T A S I A - -
L E A D E R S H I P L E S S O N S A N D R E M E M 5 R A N C E S F R O M V I E T N A M
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V i e t n a s O c t o b e r




Khang, seventh Commandant of the Vietnamese Marine Corps, and all the men who
serve in the organization can be proud of their unit's accomplishments which span
If years of hostilities and combat.
It was shortly after the 1954 Geneva Accords that the Republic of Vietnam
recognized the need for a Marine Corps, and on October 1, 1954, the NVMC was
activated as a component of the Vietnamese Navy, and was assigned the mission of
conducting amphibious operations on the coast, rivers and canals.
During this early phase, the Vietnamese Marine Corps consisted of 1,137
Vietnamese. and one U. S. Marine Corps advisor, who constituted the personnel
strength for a landing baualion, river patrol company, river group, ranger group
and field support group.
About 11 years after its birth, the Marine Corps was officially separated from
the Vietnamese Navy. and on January 3, l%j. it became an autonomous service under
the control of the Joint General Staff of the Vietnamese Armed Forces.
Like any youngster, the Corps grew through the years until today it is a force of
nearly 9,000 officers and men who have been organized into a Division Headquarters.
a Training Command, six Infantry Bsualions (with four rifle companies per
battalion), two Brigade Headquarters, two Artillery Battalions, a Medical Battalion, a
Headquarters Battalion and a Service Battalion.
As we Marines are all aware, the higher up the ladder you advance, the more
responsibility you receive. This is true with the mission of the VNMC, which has
been expanded to: (1) Conduct amphibious operations throughout the coastal areas
and off shore islands of the Republic of Vietnam; (2) Conduct riverborne operations
along the coastal lowlands and in the Delta Region; and (3) Conduct such independent
and/or joint combined ground operations in conjunction with Republic of Vietnam
Army and Free World Forces as may be directed.
Parterned after our own Corps, the Vietnamese Marines have proven their
capabilities by executing major troop movements on land, sea and air. They are part
of the Republic of Vietnam General Reserve, and have been employed from the DMZ
to the Mekong Delta-operating in all four Corps Tactical Zones.
During one engagement in northern I Corps, during 1965, the 2nd Battalion,
VNNIC, exhibited a fighting spirit which was recorded by the enemy, when the
capture of his documents revealed the notation. "The second Battalion . . fought like
Crazy Water Buffaloes.' The 2nd BsUalion, incidentally, is the most decorated unit in
the Vietnamese Marine Corps, and their decorations include a United Stgtes
Presidential Unit Citation.
If you happen to be traveling through some village or hamlet and see a poster
proclaiming. "Serve with the Best," don't be alarmed that one of our recruiting
sergeants has set up a shop here in Vietnam. "Serve with the Best-Be a Vietnamese
Marine." is a recruiting pitch used by 13 recruiting teams traveling throughout the
four Corps Tactical Zones.
The VNMC is an all-volunteer unit. and the men who join the "Corps" must
virtually sweat blood in order to graduate from the intensive Vietnamese Training
Center at Thu Quc, near Saigon. The center is modeled after our own Marine Corps
Recruit Depot, and most of Thu Duc's Drill Instructors are graduates of our DI School
in San Diego.
There's no greater tribute an enemy can pay to the opposite force than to give
the organization a distinctive nickname. In World War I, we earned the title "Devil
Dogs." Here, in Vietnam, our counterparts have earned the title Trau Dien "Crazy
Water Buffaloes.'
I for one, am extremely proud to see the Devil Dogs and Cnrzy Water Buffaloes
fighting a common enemy.
FROM CG 111 MAF. - A Primary Goal - Oct ober 10.1%9
In my first column in the Sea Tiger, I states that Free World Forces were
fighting one war in Vietnam, but this war involved struggles on many fronts-not all
on the battlefield. A primary goal of the Government of the Republic of Vietnam is to
organize its strength for its hture as a free nation. As in all nations, the real
strength of the Republic of Vietnam lies in its people. It is ten of utmost importance
that attention and concern be given to the political unit that contains the vast
majority of the Vietnamese people-the village.
It is also in the village that American fighting men come into close contact with
the people. If we are to assist the Vietnamese in their struggle for political, civic and
economic progress, it is fbndamental to our effort that we understand-and
respect-the vilhge political structure.
The rural village is the lowest formal level of government in this country. It is
referred to as the basic administrative unit in the Republic of Vietnam. The
Republic's conslitution refers to only three levels of local government-city, province
and village.
In Augw 1%9, there were about 2300 villages throughout the Republic of
Vietnam, and they are responsible for governing more than 13,000 hamlets. Thus,
the majority of the Vietnamese people are served by village government.
The "mayor". or executive of a village is the village chief. This is an appointive
office, and is often filled by a respected village elder. Since 1%6, the village
administrative fbnctions have been performed by an administrative committee
composed of a chairman (the village chief), vice chairman, and staff members. Each
staff member is in charge of certain functions such as ahhistration, agriculture,
security and military affixin. The members of this committee are appointed by either
the village chief or the province chief. In essence, this administrative committee is
the village chiefs staff.
The village chiefs committee is complemented by the village council which is
an elective body of six to twelve nonsalaried councilors and to which the village chief
and his administrative committee are responsive. In fact. this council, which usually
meets once a month. is the decision making arm of the village government; whereas
the village chief and his committee are the implementing arm. The council may be
dissolved by the province chief if there is evidence of more than half of the council
members being pro-communist-a measure designed to keep Viet Cong influence out
of the local community. A councilor may be dismissed for the same reason, without
eliminating the council.
In recent weeks, the central government has turned over to most of the
villages, checkbooks for the spending of millions of piasters on project, and thereby
encourage popular participation in local self government. "Town meetings", long a
41
successful method of conducting public business in New England communities, have
brought together for the first time people with common interests in community
development.
Wi t h responsibilities increasing daily, village officials have long needed some
type of formal training. This need is being met. Hundreds of local officials i n I Corps
have completed or are now attending trainiag i n leadership and administration at the
National Training Center st Vung Tau. Others have been or are being W e d in
province schools. The result has been increasingly capable village adminisvation
responsive to the people.
The struggle to bring political and economic stability and progress to the people
of Vietnam is no less important than the military effort in the field. The enemy is
aware that he cannot win if he loses the struggle i n the villages. He has placed
increasing emphasis upon the destruction of the legitimate village political structure
by assassination and subversion. The enemy knows that a strong and prosperous
village, loyal to the national government, can effectively thwart his design to
subjugate this nation. We, as members of the Free World llrIilitaty Assistance Forces,
must do our utmost to assist the Government of the Republic of Vietnam in the
winning of this struggle at the village level.
I am providing further details to all commands of 11 MAF on the organization
and functioning of the Republic of Vietnam. I ask you to read and understand this
material, especially what has been outlined here.
We are winning. We need only persevere.
M o d e r n i z a t i o n O c l o b e r



w e a p o n s
























T h i s b r o u g h t t h e o f c r a f t W r n e d o v e r t o

















m o d e r n i z a t i o n ,

U . O c t o b e r 2 4 .




























i t




























P s y o p s — T r u t h O c t o b e r



















































Our deeds provide the spark that gives life and meaning to the entire PsyOp effort.
We deal vith the people in their villages with a variety of programs and
contacts, such as Combined Action Program and civic action projects. But the most
important resource is the individual American. When we show friendship, courtesy
and understanding, we reinforce the meaning of our actions, and make clear that our
aims and methods are different from those of the enemy. We protect and build to help
the people realize a brighter future.
If we fail to show the proper respect to village chiefs, even though the act we
are performing is a helpful one, we cause resentment in people. The enemy uses
such acts in his propaganda efforts to destroy the faith the people have in us and
their confidence in their own future.
I am confident that we will continue to defeat the enemy in combat. I am also
confident that we will continue , with empathy, our acts of kindness and
understanding. Such a combination cannot fail.
FROM CG 111 MAF - Marine Carps Birthdry - November 7.1969
On this 194th anniversary of our Corps, I think it is fitting to use my column to
bring you the words of a former Commandant of the Marine Corps . . . an officer who,
by every deed and every thought, exemplified a model of leadership for us all to
follow. On this Marine Carps Birthday. let us re-read the words of Major General John
A. Lejeune, 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps.
"On November 10. 1773, a Corps of Marines was created by a resolution of the
Continental Congress. Since that date many thousands men have borne the name
Marine. In memory of them it is fitting that we who are Marines should
commemorate the birthday of our Corps by calling to mind the glories of its long and
illustrious history.
"The record of our Corps is one which will bear comparison with that of the
most famous military organizations in the world's history. During 90 of the 146 years
of its existence the Marine Corps has been in action against the Nation's foes. From
the W e of Trenton to the Argonne, Marines have won foremost honors in war and
in the long era of tranquility at home generation after generation of Marines have
grown gray in war in both hemispheres, and in every corner of the seven seas that
our country and its citizens might en joy peace and security.
"This high name of distinction and soldierly repute we who are Marines today
have received from those who have preceded us in the Corps. With it we also receive
from them the eternal spirit which has animated our Corps from generation to
generation and has been the distinguishing mark of the Marines in every age. So
long as that spirit continues to flourish Marines will be found equal to every
emergency in the hture as they have been in the past."
These words were written in 1921 but they are just as applicable and timely
today. They sum up the esprit and dedication of our Corps.
Happy Birthday, Marines.
S e a b e e s . N o v e m b e r
































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W h e n a M a r i n e e n t e r s b o o t c a m p , p h y s i c a l c o n d i t i o n i n g b e g i n s . h e
c o m e s t o a L i n e o u t f i t V i e t n a m , h e u n d e r s t a n d s w h y . B u t n o t a l l m a y s e r v e i n t h e s e
u n i t s . s e r v e o n s t a f f s , a n d i n s u p p o r t a n d s e r v i c e o r g a n i z a t i o n s .
W e . t h e n , a r e t h e o n e s w h o m u s t r e m i n d o u r s e l v e s t h a t p h y s i c a l i s a
p e r s o n a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y . T h e r e n o l o n g e r i s a d r i l l i n s t r u c t o r t o e n c o u r a g e u s . E a c h i s
h i s o w n p h y s i c a l f i t n e s s i n s t r u c t o r .
S o m e o n e o n c e s a i d : ' H e a l t h i s a g i f t , b u t y o u h a v e t o w o r k t o k e e p i t . " N e g l e c t
y o u r p h y s i c a l w e l l - b e i n g a n d t h e " g i f t ' g o e s - a n d , w i t h i t . y o u r s e l f - c o n f i d e n c e .
B u t t h e s e l f - d i s c i p l i n e d m a n g u a r d s h i s g i f t o f h e a l t h . H e r e l i e v e s m e n t a l
t e n s i o n w i t h p h y s i c a l e x e r t i o n . Y o u w i l l f i n d h i m o n h a n d b a l l a n d t e n n i s c o u r t s . Y o u
s e e h i m j o g g i n g a r o u n d a r e a r a r e a c o m p o u n d . H e ' s p l a y i n g b a s k e t h a l l o r p r e s s i n g a
s e t o f b a r b e l l s . A n d w h e n h e r e t u r n s t o w o r k , h i s m i n d i s c l e a r . P r o f e s s i o n a l
p r o b l e m s b e c o m e a c h a l l e n g e r a t h e r t h a n a h e a d a c h e . T h e a d m i n i s t r a t o r w h o c o i n e d
t h e p h r a s e " a b u c k e t o f w o r m s " p r o b a b l y g o t h i s e x e r c i s e i n t h e c l u b . T h e m a n w h o i s
p h y s i c a l l y t o u g h i s m e n t a l l y t o u g h . H e d o e s n ' t t h i n k i n t e r m s o f " w o r m s . "
I o n c e r e a d a b o u t a b u s i n e s s m a n w h o f e l t h i s m i n d w a s c o m i n g a p a r t u n d e r t h e
t e n s i o n o f c o m p e t i t i o n . H e w e n t t o a c l o s e f r i e n d , a d o c t o r , t o s e e k r a t h e r p a t h e t i c
m e d i c a l a d v i c e . H e a s k e d h i s f r i e n d t o p r e s c r i b e a m e t h o d o f d e a t h w h i c h w o u l d n o t
a p p e a r a s s u i c i d e . T h e p a t i e n t d i d n o t w a n t t o e m b a r r a s s h i s f a m i l y w h e n h e e s c a p e d
t h e p r e s s u r e s o f l i f e . S h a k e n a t f i r s t , t h e d o c t o r c o m p o s e d h i m s e l f a n d a n d p r e s c r i b e d
r u n n i n g . H e t o l d h i s s i c k f r i e n d t h a t , a t h i s a g e . h i s h e a r t c o u l d n ' t w i t h s t a n d t h e
p h y s i c a l s t r a i n . W i t h i n t w o m o n t h s , t h e b u s i n e s s m a n d i s p r o v e d t h e d o c t o r ' s
p r o g n o s i s . H e h a d e x e r c i s e d h i m s e l f b a c k i n t o t h e w o r l d .
6 7


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. t h e i r
n e m e s i s . T h e p e o p l e o f t h e R e p u b l i c o f V i e t n a m h a v e r e s i s t e d c o m m u n i s m w i t h t h e

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