Best Practices Guide

revision 3.0

McAfee® Network Security Platform
version 6.0

McAfee® Network Protection
Industry-leading network security solutions

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This product includes or may include: * Software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/). * Cryptographic software written by Eric A. Young and software written by Tim J. Hudson. * Some software programs that are licensed (or sublicensed) to the user under the GNU General Public License (GPL) or other similar Free Software licenses which, among other rights, permit the user to copy, modify and redistribute certain programs, or portions thereof, and have access to the source code. The GPL requires that for any software covered under the GPL, which is distributed to someone in an executable binary format, that the source code also be made available to those users. For any such software covered under the GPL, the source code is made available on this CD. If any Free Software licenses require that McAfee provide rights to use, copy or modify a software program that are broader than the rights granted in this agreement, then such rights shall take precedence over the rights and restrictions herein. * Software originally written by Henry Spencer, Copyright 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997 Henry Spencer. * Software originally written by Robert Nordier, Copyright (C) 1996-7 Robert Nordier. * Software written by Douglas W. Sauder. * Software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www.apache.org/). A copy of the license agreement for this software can be found at www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0.txt. * International Components for Unicode ("ICU") Copyright (C) 1995-2002 International Business Machines Corporation and others. * Software developed by CrystalClear Software, Inc., Copyright (C) 2000 CrystalClear Software, Inc. * FEAD(R) Optimizer(R) technology, Copyright Netopsystems AG, Berlin, Germany. * Outside In(R) Viewer Technology (C) 1992-2001 Stellent Chicago, Inc. and/or Outside In(R) HTML Export, (C) 2001 Stellent Chicago, Inc. * Software copyrighted by Thai Open Source Software Center Ltd. and Clark Cooper, (C) 1998, 1999, 2000. * Software copyrighted by Expat maintainers. * Software copyrighted by The Regents of the University of California, (C) 1996, 1989, 1998-2000. * Software copyrighted by Gunnar Ritter. * Software copyrighted by Sun Microsystems, Inc., 4150 Network Circle, Santa Clara, California 95054, U.S.A., (C) 2003. * Software copyrighted by Gisle Aas. (C) 1995-2003. * Software copyrighted by Michael A. Chase, (C) 1999-2000. * Software copyrighted by Neil Winton, (C) 1995-1996. * Software copyrighted by RSA Data Security, Inc., (C) 1990-1992. * Software copyrighted by Sean M. Burke, (C) 1999, 2000. * Software copyrighted by Martijn Koster, (C) 1995. * Software copyrighted by Brad Appleton, (C) 1996-1999. * Software copyrighted by Michael G. Schwern, (C) 2001. * Software copyrighted by Graham Barr, (C) 1998. * Software copyrighted by Larry Wall and Clark Cooper, (C) 1998-2000. * Software copyrighted by Frodo Looijaard, (C) 1997. * Software copyrighted by the Python Software Foundation, Copyright (C) 2001, 2002, 2003. A copy of the license agreement for this software can be found at www.python.org. * Software copyrighted by Beman Dawes, (C) 1994-1999, 2002. * Software written by Andrew Lumsdaine, Lie-Quan Lee, Jeremy G. Siek (C) 1997-2000 University of Notre Dame. * Software copyrighted by Simone Bordet & Marco Cravero, (C) 2002. * Software copyrighted by Stephen Purcell, (C) 2001. * Software developed by the Indiana University Extreme! Lab (http://www.extreme.indiana.edu/). * Software copyrighted by International Business Machines Corporation and others, (C) 1995-2003. * Software developed by the University of California, Berkeley and its contributors. * Software developed by Ralf S. Engelschall <rse@engelschall.com> for use in the mod_ssl project (http:// www.modssl.org/). * Software copyrighted by Kevlin Henney, (C) 2000-2002. * Software copyrighted by Peter Dimov and Multi Media Ltd. (C) 2001, 2002. * Software copyrighted by David Abrahams, (C) 2001, 2002. See http://www.boost.org/libs/bind/bind.html for documentation. * Software copyrighted by Steve Cleary, Beman Dawes, Howard Hinnant & John Maddock, (C) 2000. * Software copyrighted by Boost.org, (C) 1999-2002. * Software copyrighted by Nicolai M. Josuttis, (C) 1999. * Software copyrighted by Jeremy Siek, (C) 1999-2001. * Software copyrighted by Daryle Walker, (C) 2001. * Software copyrighted by Chuck Allison and Jeremy Siek, (C) 2001, 2002. * Software copyrighted by Samuel Krempp, (C) 2001. See http://www.boost.org for updates, documentation, and revision history. * Software copyrighted by Doug Gregor (gregod@cs.rpi.edu), (C) 2001, 2002. * Software copyrighted by Cadenza New Zealand Ltd., (C) 2000. * Software copyrighted by Jens Maurer, (C) 2000, 2001. * Software copyrighted by Jaakko Järvi (jaakko.jarvi@cs.utu.fi), (C) 1999, 2000. * Software copyrighted by Ronald Garcia, (C) 2002. * Software copyrighted by David Abrahams, Jeremy Siek, and Daryle Walker, (C) 1999-2001. * Software copyrighted by Stephen Cleary (shammah@voyager.net), (C) 2000. * Software copyrighted by Housemarque Oy <http://www.housemarque.com>, (C) 2001. * Software copyrighted by Paul Moore, (C) 1999. * Software copyrighted by Dr. John Maddock, (C) 1998-2002. * Software copyrighted by Greg Colvin and Beman Dawes, (C) 1998, 1999. * Software copyrighted by Peter Dimov, (C) 2001, 2002. * Software copyrighted by Jeremy Siek and John R. Bandela, (C) 2001. * Software copyrighted by Joerg Walter and Mathias Koch, (C) 2000-2002. * Software copyrighted by Carnegie Mellon University (C) 1989, 1991, 1992. * Software copyrighted by Cambridge Broadband Ltd., (C) 2001-2003. * Software copyrighted by Sparta, Inc., (C) 2003-2004. * Software copyrighted by Cisco, Inc and Information Network Center of Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, (C) 2004. * Software copyrighted by Simon Josefsson, (C) 2003. * Software copyrighted by Thomas Jacob, (C) 2003-2004. * Software copyrighted by Advanced Software Engineering Limited, (C) 2004. * Software copyrighted by Todd C. Miller, (C) 1998. * Software copyrighted by The Regents of the University of California, (C) 1990, 1993, with code derived from software contributed to Berkeley by Chris Torek.

Issued JUNE 2010 / Best Practices Guide
700-2379-00/ 3.0 - English

Contents
Preface ........................................................................................................... v
Introducing McAfee Network Security Platform............................................................................. v About this Guide............................................................................................................................ v Audience .......................................................................................................................................vi Conventions used in this book ......................................................................................................vi Related Documentation................................................................................................................vii Contacting Technical Support ..................................................................................................... viii

Chapter 1 Introduction.................................................................................. 1
Pre-installation checklist................................................................................................................ 1

Chapter 2 Recommended Manager specifications.................................... 2
Manager Server specifications ...................................................................................................... 2 Manager Client specifications ....................................................................................................... 2 Determining your Database Requirements ................................................................................... 3

Chapter 3 Cabling best practices ................................................................ 4 Chapter 4 Large Sensor deployments ........................................................ 5
Staging Sensors prior to deployment ............................................................................................ 6 Recommendations for large Sensor deployment .......................................................................... 6

Chapter 5 Troubleshooting issues with Sensor ........................................ 7 Chapter 6 Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings ........................... 8
Duplex mismatches ....................................................................................................................... 8 Troubleshooting a Duplex Mismatch with Cisco Devices.............................................................. 8 Cisco PIX® Firewall ...............................................................................................................9 Cisco CSS 11000...................................................................................................................9 Cisco Catalyst® 2900XL, 3500XL Series (Hybrid).................................................................9 Cisco Catalyst 4000, 5000, 6000 Series (Native) ..................................................................9 Cisco IOS® for Catalyst 4000, 6000 Series ...........................................................................9 Auto-negotiation issues ................................................................................................................. 9 Situations that may result in Auto-negotiation issues...........................................................10 Valid Auto-negotiation and Speed Configuration settings....................................................10 Explanation of CatOS show port command counters ..........................................................11 Gigabit auto-negotiation (no link to connected device) ........................................................12

Chapter 7 Effective Policy Tuning practices ............................................ 13
Analyzing high-volume attacks.................................................................................................... 13 Managing Attack filters ................................................................................................................ 13 Learning profiles in DoS attacks.................................................................................................. 14

Chapter 8 Response Management ............................................................ 15
Sensor Response Actions ........................................................................................................... 15

Chapter 9 Creating Rule sets ..................................................................... 16

iii

Best methods for rule set creation............................................................................................... 16

Chapter 10 Port clustering on Asymmetric networks ............................. 17 Chapter 11 Access Control Lists (ACLs).................................................. 18 Chapter 12 SSL best practices .................................................................. 19
SSL only traffic - throughput........................................................................................................ 19 SSL only traffic - throughput........................................................................................................ 19 SSL traffic mixed with HTTP 1.1 traffic........................................................................................ 20 Supported SSL functionalities ..................................................................................................... 21 Supported Web servers .......................................................................................................22 Supported cipher suites .......................................................................................................22 SSLv3/TLS cipher suites......................................................................................................22 Unsupported SSL functionalities ................................................................................................. 22

Chapter 13 Sensor HTTP Response Processing deployment................ 23
Tests for enabling HTTP Response Traffic ................................................................................. 23 HTTP Response processing results for I series Sensors.....................................................24 HTTP Response processing results for M-series Sensors ..................................................24

Chapter 14 Database maintenance ........................................................... 26
Backup of data and configurations .............................................................................................. 26

Chapter 15 Alerts and Disk space maintenance ...................................... 28
Archiving alerts............................................................................................................................ 28 Scripts for disk space maintenance............................................................................................. 28 Dbtuning.bat .........................................................................................................................28 Purge.bat..............................................................................................................................29 Using File Maintenance Scheduler.............................................................................................. 29

Chapter 16 Manager Disaster Recovery (MDR) best practices .............. 30 Chapter 17 Performance issues ................................................................ 31
Sniffer trace ................................................................................................................................. 31 Data link errors ............................................................................................................................ 31 Half-duplex setting ...............................................................................................................31 Full-duplex setting ................................................................................................................31

Chapter 18 Vulnerability Assessment....................................................... 32 Chapter 19 I-series Sensor capacity by model number .......................... 33 Chapter 20 M-series Sensor capacity by model number ........................ 35 Chapter 21 Comparison Between I-1200/I-1400 and M-1250/M-1450 FE ports ............................................................................................................. 37 Index ............................................................................................................. 40

iv

network Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) and Network Threat Behavior Analysis (NTBA) for mission-critical enterprise. while providing unmatched protection against spyware and known. and explains how this document is organized. About this Guide This guide provides the recommended practices for using Network Security Platform most effectively. Best practices are provided for the following topics/issues in Network Security Platform: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Hardware and software recommendations for Network Security Platform Cabling best practices Considerations for large McAfee® Network Security Sensor [formerly McAfee® IntruShield® Sensor] deployments Troubleshooting tips for the McAfee Network Security Sensor (Sensor) Sensor Deployment issues . and NTBA Appliance are installed and managed through a single Manager. zero-day. and scalable Network Access Control (NAC). NAC Sensor. It also provides information such as. McAfee® Network Threat Behavior Analysis Appliance provides the capability of monitoring network traffic by analyzing NetFlow information flowing through the network in real time. and service provider networks. the supporting documents for this guide and how to contact McAfee Technical Support.speed & duplex settings Policy Tuning best practices Best Practices for creating Rule sets Port clustering on asymmetric networks Tips for Access Control Lists (ACLs) SSL best practices HTTP Response processing deployment for the Sensor Database Maintenance Alerts & Disk space Maintenance issues Manager Disaster Recovery (MDR) pairs Performance issues and Vulnerability Assessment v . thus complementing the NAC and IPS capabilities in a scenario in which McAfee Network Security Sensor.Preface This preface provides a brief introduction to the product. carrier. and encrypted attacks. discusses the information in this document. Introducing McAfee Network Security Platform McAfee® Network Security Platform [formerly McAfee® IntruShield®] delivers the most comprehensive. accurate.

and commands on the User Interface (UI) are shown in Arial Narrow bold font. 1. set Sensor ip <A. tabs. Names of keys on the keyboard are denoted using UPPER CASE. Procedures are presented as a series of numbered steps. and maintaining McAfee® Network Security Manager [formerly McAfee® IntruShield® Security Manager]. click Backup.D> Caution: vi . but is not necessarily familiar with daily IPS-related tasks.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. Text such as syntax. Conventions used in this book This document uses the following typographical conventions: Convention Example Terms that identify fields. selections.C.B. or the commands necessary to perform particular tasks. such as loss of data is denoted using this notation. Type: setup and then press ENTER. key words.0 Preface Audience This guide is intended for use by network technicians and maintenance personnel responsible for installing. Press ENTER. Select My Company > Admin Domain > Summary. and values that you must type exactly are denoted using Courier New font. options. Menu or action group selections are indicated using a right angle bracket. configuring. Information that you must read before beginning a procedure or that alerts you to negative consequences of certain actions. Variable information that you must Type: Sensor-IP-address and then press type based on your specific ENTER. On the Configuration tab. Parameters that you must supply are shown enclosed in angle brackets. the relationship between tasks. situation or environment is shown in italics. buttons. The Service field on the Properties tab specifies the name of the requested service.

Refer to Quick Tour for more information on these guides. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Quick Tour Installation Guide Upgrade Guide Getting Started Guide IPS Deployment Guide Manager Configuration Basics Guide I-1200 Sensor Product Guide I-1400 Sensor Product Guide I-2700 Sensor Product Guide I-3000 Sensor Product Guide I-4000 Sensor Product Guide I-4010 Sensor Product Guide M-1250/M-1450 Sensor Product Guide M-1250/M-1450 Quick Start Guide M-2750 Sensor Product Guide M-2750 Quick Start Guide M-3050/M-4050 Sensor Product Guide M-3050/M-4050 Quick Start Guide M-6050 Sensor Product Guide M-6050 Quick Start Guide M-8000 Sensor Product Guide M-8000 Quick Start Guide Gigabit Optical Fail-Open Bypass Kit Guide Gigabit Copper Fail-Open Bypass Kit Guide 10 Gigabit Fail-Open Bypass Kit Guide M-8000/M-6050/M-4050/M-3050 Slide Rail Assembly Procedure M-2750 Slide Rail Assembly Procedure M-series DC Power Supply Installation Procedure Administrative Domain Configuration Guide Manager Server Configuration Guide CLI Guide vii .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. but non-critical. accidents from contact with electricity. Notes that provide related. or other serious consequences is denoted using this notation. Warning: Note: Related Documentation The following documents and on-line help are companions to this guide.0 Preface Convention Example Information that you must read to prevent injury. information are denoted using this notation.

You will be provided with a user name and password for the online case submission. In addition. customers can also resolve technical issues with the online case submit.html page. software downloads. PST Monday-Friday. Extended 24x7 Technical Support is available for customers with Gold or Platinum service contracts. viii .M. Registered customers can obtain up-to-date documentation. Note: McAfee requires that you provide your GRANT ID and the serial number of your system when opening a ticket with Technical Support. to 5:00 P. technical bulletins.com/us/about/contact/index.mcafee. and quick tips on McAfee's 24x7 comprehensive KnowledgeBase.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6.M. contact McAfee for assistance: Online Contact McAfee Technical Support http://mysupport. Phone Technical Support is available 7:00 A. Global phone contact numbers can be found at McAfee Contact Information http://www.mcafee.0 Preface • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Device Configuration Guide IPS Configuration Guide NAC Configuration Guide Integration Guide System Status Monitoring Guide Reports Guide Custom Attack Definitions Guide Central Manager Administrator's Guide Troubleshooting Guide Special Topics Guide—In-line Sensor Deployment Special Topics Guide—Sensor High Availability Special Topics Guide—Virtualization Special Topics Guide—Denial-of-Service NTBA Appliance Administrator's Guide NTBA Monitoring Guide NTBA Appliance T-200 Quick Start Guide NTBA Appliance T-500 Quick Start Guide Contacting Technical Support If you have any questions. and signature updates.com.

We recommend that you follow some of the best techniques and tips to use McAfee Network Security Platform most effectively. built for the accurate detection and prevention of intrusions and network misuse. 1 . see Planning for installation.CHAPTER 1 Introduction McAfee® Network Security Platform [formerly McAfee® IntruShield®] is a combination of network appliances and software. Following chapters outline the best practices for Network Security Platform. Troubleshooting Guide. This can save considerable time during the installation and tuning process of the system. Pre-installation checklist There are some important tasks that you should consider before McAfee® Network Security Manager [formerly McAfee® IntruShield® Security Manager] software installation. For more information.

Manager Server specifications The following is the recommended minimum hardware configuration for a Manager Server with embedded MySQL database: Hardware Recommended Size/Speed Physical memory Processor Hard Disk 4 GB RAM 2 x 3. we also recommend that the client hosts used to manage the Network Security Platform solution meet the requirements in the following table: Hardware Recommended Size/Speed Physical memory Processor 512 MB or more 1. we recommend larger configurations than the hardware specifications in the release notes. 2 . The larger your deployment. Performance may be slow if you connect to the Manager using a browser on the server machine itself. the more high-end your Manager Server should be. to manage 40 or more McAfee® Network Security Sensors (Sensors). Because Java applets take advantage of the processor on the host from which they are being viewed. The Manager contains Java applets. Many McAfee® Network Security Platform issues result from an under-powered Manager Server. For example. which provides a Web-based user interface for centralized and remote Sensor management.5 GHz or faster CPU Note: You will experience better performance in your configuration and dataforensic tasks by connecting to the Manager from a browser on the client machine.CHAPTER 2 Recommended Manager specifications McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) software runs on a dedicated Windows server.2 Pentium processors 80 GB hard disk space (or greater) Manager Client specifications The Manager client is a Java Web application.

McAfee recommends archiving and deleting old alert data regularly. one year) will require additional storage capacity to accommodate both old and new data. Things to consider while determining your database size requirements are: • Aggregate alert and packet log volume from all Sensors—Many Sensors amount to higher alert volume and require additional storage capacity.0 Recommended Manager specifications Determining your Database Requirements The amount of space required for your database is governed by many factors. while a packet log is approximately 450 bytes. Note: For more information on capacity planning. As a best practice. Note that an alert is roughly 200 bytes on average.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. Maintaining your data for a long period of time (for example. and attempting to keep your active database size to about 40 GB. mostly unique to the deployment scenario. These factors determine the amount of data you want to retain in the database and the time for which the data has to be retained. • Lifetime of alert and packet log data: You need to consider the time before you archive or delete an alert. Manager Server Configuration Guide. 3 . see Capacity Planning.

most administrators cable the console and management ports. or those with congestion problems. and only physically introduce the Sensor into the scanning process once the proper scanning policies are in place. only after the McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) has been fully configured. and so on. in the most security-conscious environments. the monitoring ports have been configured. In other words. the latest signature set has been downloaded.CHAPTER 3 Cabling best practices It is a common practice to physically cable the monitoring ports. 4 . a private network is often used to connect the Sensor management ports to the McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager). Also. use those connections to configure the solution. This is another best practice in terms of cabling the Sensors.

one Sensor at-a-time. As the volume of alerting increases. The same is true for policy updates. If the communication with the Manager is lost. see Upgrading Sensor software via a TFTP server. You can instead use the TFTP method for updating the Sensor image. For releases prior to 3. with versions prior to 3. Depending on the policies deployed on your system. before deployment. which helps you to load concurrent images on the Sensor via the Sensor’s CLI.Take note of the volume of alerting in your Sensors. Start-up load on the Manager .1. each Sensor must pass its alert data to the Manager when connectivity is re-established. Concurrent processes . compare a worldwide deployment where Sensors are named “4010-1” through “4010-25” as opposed to “UK-London-sens1. Sensor Software Updates . 5 . and try not to attempt other tasks during that time period. Alert Traffic . this process has been reduced to a matter of minutes. This includes having many users logged into the system simultaneously. You must decide the point at which a signature set update process becomes time consuming. not hours.Be aware of the time periods in which your scheduled processes (such as database backup or report generation) occur. It can also lead to confusion if you have not provided unique.Signature Set downloads are applied to Sensors serially. • Signature Set downloads . at a much faster rate. not • • • • • concurrently. For example. (where the number of Sensors deployed range from 36 to 70) there are some important tasks which should be considered. McAfee recommends that you have a good understanding on the best techniques required to accomplish these tasks in your deployment scenario. You can schedule this process though you can’t reboot the Sensor automatically.” “India-Bangalore-sens1. the process would take approximately 3 minutes per Sensor. recognizable names for your Sensors and any VIDS you create. Note that the resource names appear both in the Resource Tree of the Manager as well as in Alert data and Reports. prior to the deployment. So.But but any update from the Manager Server causes the process to take place sequentially. the Manager Resource Tree can become very crowded. there is potential to starve Manager resources since the resulting alerts are passed to the Manager. CLI Guide. it is required to account for the startup load on the Manager. it will take approximately 2.Depending on the number of VIDS and Admin Domains defined in your deployment.” and so on. Note that from version 3. A reboot can take up to 5 minutes. as this can lead to process locking.1. For example. establishing connections with all Sensors can be time consuming as Sensors continue to collect alerts.CHAPTER 4 Large Sensor deployments When you consider large McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) deployments.All Sensor software updates do require a reboot. At this point we would recommend that you utilize a second McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) to minimize the time. which makes it difficult to locate the resource you require at any point of time. Your VIDS names should also be clear and easy for everyone maintaining the network to recognize at a glance.5 hours to complete a signature set update. more data is passed into the Manager. For more information on the process of using TFTP to update your Sensor software.1. in a deployment with 50 Sensors. Usability .When the Manager starts.

McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. and then box the configured Sensor and send it to its final destination. see Updating the configuration of a Sensor. and become more aggressive in the number of Sensors you deploy in the next phase. make sure that the Sensor is working as expected. For more information on updating the Sensor with latest software updates. But policies like the McAfee Network Security Platform provided All-Inclusive policy can overwhelm you with data. Note: Very large Sensor deployments mean that the number of Sensors deployed is more than 71.0 Large Sensor deployments Staging Sensors prior to deployment With large or very large deployments. Or you might use the TFTP feature to load the Sensor image at one location. Here they test the Sensor functionality. you will have to consider staging your Sensors before you release them to their final destination. Recommendations for large Sensor deployment Most McAfee® Network Security Platform customers begin their deployment in their lab environment. Installation Guide. and/or if you are planning to release Sensors to various geographical regions or remote locations. and create an initial policy. For more information. • 6 . For example. before shipping the Sensor to another. Stagger your Sensor deployment in phases. if every Sensor in a large deployment is running it without any customization. McAfee provides a few recommendations for this process: • Spend time creating effective policies before actual deployment. Availability of more information makes the tuning process easier. see Upgrading Sensor software via a TFTP server. they deploy the Sensor in a live environment. you can tune your policies more effectively. familiarize themselves with the Manager. Device Configuration Guide. use the McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) in a lab environment to push Sensor software to the Sensor. Once they are comfortable with the product. As each new batch of Sensors provides you with more data points. Large Sensor deployments have Sensors numbering between 36 and 70.

• • Caution 1: Note that the Sensor will need to reboot to move out of L2 mode only if the Sensor entered L2 mode because of internal errors. disabling the ports will send traffic through the internal tap. while the device is examined elsewhere. before you remove it from the network. Traffic then continues to flow directly through the Sensor. Caution 4: A very brief link disruption might occur while the links are renegotiated to place the Sensor back in in-line mode. to disconnect the cables and let traffic flow unimpeded. if they are. 7 . Connect a fail-open kit. Caution 3: Depending on the network equipment. This enables you to set a threshold on the Sensor that pushes the Sensor into L2 bypass mode if the Sensor experiences a specified number of errors within a specified time frame. this disruption should range from a couple of seconds to more than a minute with certain vendors’ devices. Sensors with FE ports contain an internal tap. Caution 2: A Sensor reboot breaks the link connecting the devices on either side of the Sensor and requires the re-negotiation of the network link between the two devices surrounding the Sensor. without passing to the detection engine. For FE monitoring ports. to any GE monitoring port pairs on the Sensor. If a kit is attached to the Sensor. issue the following command: layer2 mode assert This pushes the Sensor into Layer2 Passthru (L2) mode. Check to see whether your services are still affected. causing traffic to flow through the Sensor while bypassing the detection engine. disabling the Sensor ports forces traffic to flow through the bypass switch. to troubleshoot a Sensor issue: • All Sensors have a Layer2 Passthru feature.CHAPTER 5 Troubleshooting issues with Sensor When McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) experiences problems in the in-line mode. (The layer2 mode deassert command pushes the Sensor back to detection mode.) Configure Layer2 Passthru Mode on each Sensor. providing fail-open functionality. (It does not need a reboot if the layer2 mode assert command was used to put the Sensor into L2 mode). the problem could instead be a network issue or a configuration issue. there is no need for the external kit. If you feel your Sensor is causing network disruption. McAfee recommends that you first try the following techniques. then you have eliminated certain Sensor hardware issues. effectively pulling the Sensor out of the path. which consists of a bypass switch and a controller. one instinct is to physically pull it out of the path.

half-duplex. Symptoms include poor port performance and frame check sequence (FCS) errors that increment on the switch port. Contact Cisco's TAC for assistance. creating the mismatch. Duplex mismatches A duplex mismatch (for example. if a Web server is talking to a database server through an Ethernet switch with a duplex mismatch. For example. intermittent connectivity. Use the following commands to verify fixed interface settings on some Cisco devices that connect to Sensor: 8 . manually configure the switchport to 100 Mbps. This common issue results from disabling auto-negotiation on one link partner and having the other link partner default to a half-duplex configuration. while large ones fail due to a timeout. Following sections provide you the best practices related to these issues. If your intent is not to use auto-negotiation. Troubleshooting a Duplex Mismatch with Cisco Devices When troubleshooting connectivity issues with Cisco switches or routers. you may be running into this issue. Speed determination issues may result in no connectivity between the Sensor and its network device partners on either side. one end of the link in full-duplex and the other in halfduplex) may result in performance issues. Sometimes there are duplex inconsistencies between McAfee® Network Security Platform and the switch port. small database queries may succeed. verify that the Sensor and the switch/routers are using a valid configuration. To troubleshoot this issue. The show intfport <port> command on the Sensor CLI will help reveal errors. Manually setting the speed and duplex to full-duplex on only one link partner generally results in a mismatch. you must manually set both link partners' speed and duplex settings to full-duplex. and loss of communication. If this action resolves the connectivity problems.CHAPTER 6 Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings The most common McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) deployment problems relate to configuration of the monitoring port speed and duplex settings. This is the reason why speed and duplex cannot be hard-coded on only one link partner. It can also create subtle problems in applications.

errors and re-transmissions can cause unpredictable behavior in the network. 5000. Generally these errors are not fatal—traffic still makes it through— but locating and fixing them is a time-waster.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. This can cause performance issues. and note the counter information.0 Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings Cisco PIX® Firewall • interface ethernet0 100full Cisco CSS 11000 • • interface ethernet-3 phy 100Mbits-FD Cisco Catalyst® 2900XL. 9 . Instead. 3500XL Series (Hybrid) • • • interface FastEthernet0/2 duplex full speed 100 Cisco Catalyst 4000. for example. 6000 Series (Native) • • set port speed 1/1 100 set port duplex 1/1 full Cisco IOS® for Catalyst 4000. autonegotiation issues mainly result in a loss of performance. and loss of communication. When auto-negotiation leaves one end of the link in. full-duplex mode and the other in half-duplex (also known as a duplex mismatch). Auto-negotiation issues Auto-negotiation issues typically do not result in link establishment issues. view the output of the show port mod/port command. intermittent connectivity. 6000 Series • • Router(config)# interface fastethernet slot/port Router(config-if)# speed 100 • Router(config-if)# duplex full When troubleshooting Network Security Platform performance issues with Cisco switches.

• • Problems may arise when vendor switches/routers do not conform exactly to the IEEE specification 802. Neither side establishes link. Vendor-specific advanced features that are not described in IEEE 802. 100 Mbps Full-duplex 100 Mbps Full-duplex 10 Mbps Half-duplex AUTO 100 Mbps Full-duplex 100 Mbps Full-duplex 100 Mbps Full-duplex 100 Mbps Half-duplex 1000 Mbps Full-duplex AUTO 100 Mbps Full-duplex 100 Mbps Half-duplex 10 Mbps Half-duplex 1000 Mbps Half-duplex No Link No Link 10 . Valid Auto-negotiation and Speed Configuration settings The table below summarizes all possible settings of speed and duplex for Sensor and switch ports. hardware incapability.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. and no operational issues should exist. Generally.3u auto-negotiation specifications and all additional features are disabled.3u for 10/100 Mbps auto-negotiation (such as auto-polarity or cabling integrity) can also lead to hardware incompatibility and other issues. auto-negotiation should properly negotiate speed and duplex. or software defects.3u. due to speed mismatch Duplex Mismatch 1 Correct Manual Configuration2 Link is established. Network Security Platform Configuration 10/100 port Speed/Duplex Configuration of Switch Speed/Duplex Resulting Sensor Speed/Duplex Resulting Catalyst Speed/Duplex Comments 100 Mbps Full-duplex 1000 Mbps Full-duplex No Link No Link Neither side establishes link.0 Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings Situations that may result in Auto-negotiation issues Auto-negotiation issues with the Network Security Platform Sensor may result from nonconforming implementation. due to speed mismatch. but switch does not see Fast Link Pulse (FLP) and defaults to 10 Mbps halfduplex. if the switch used with the Sensor adheres to IEEE 802.

FCS FCS error count is the number of frames that were transmitted or received with a bad checksum (CRC value) in the Ethernet frame. or port).McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. This is also an indication of transmit buffer being full. Xmit-Err Rcv-Err This is an indication that the receive buffer is full. duplex mismatch. Single collisions are the number of times the transmitting port had one collision before successfully transmitting the frame to the media. cable. UnderSize These are frames that are smaller than This is an indication of a bad frame 64 bytes (including FCS) and have a generated by the connected device. good FCS value. These are the result of collisions at half-duplex. cable. Increasing speed and moving the link partner to full-duplex should minimize this occurrence. In some switches. Single Collisions Multiple Collisions This is an indication of a half-duplex configuration. Multiple collisions are the number of times the transmitting port had more than one collision before successfully transmitting the frame to the media. or port). or a connected device generating frames that do not end with on an octet and have a bad FCS. These are the result of collisions at half-duplex. or a connected device generating frames with bad FCS. These frames are dropped and not propagated onto other ports. The counter should only increment in situations in which the switch is unable to forward out the port at a desired rate. This is an indication of excessive input rates of traffic. Situations such as excessive collisions and 10 Mb ports cause the transmit buffer to become full. This is an indication of a half-duplex configuration. This is an indication that the internal transmit buffer is full. bad hardware (NIC. This is an indication of excessive output rates of traffic. the Out-Lost counter has a direct correlation to the Rcv-Err. 11 . This counter should be zero unless there is excessive traffic through the switch. duplex mismatch.0 Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings Explanation of CatOS show port command counters Counter Description Possible Causes Alignment Errors Alignment errors are a count of the number of frames received that do not end with an even number of octets and have a bad CRC. bad hardware (NIC. This is also an indication of the receive buffer being full.

duplex mismatch. dot1q. configuration issue. If either device does not support Gigabit auto-negotiation. IEEE 802. The Gigabit auto-negotiation negotiates flow control. Runts This is an indication of the result of collisions. The reason for this occurrence is that the time to propagate the signal from one end of the network to another is longer than the time to put the entire packet on the network. Gigabit auto-negotiation (no link to connected device) Gigabit Ethernet has an auto-negotiation procedure that is more extensive than that which is used for 10/100 Mbps Ethernet (per Gigabit auto-negotiation specification IEEE 802.0 Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings Counter Description Possible Causes Late Collisions A late collision occurs when two This is an indication of faulty hardware devices transmit at the same time and (NIC. Its detection is exactly the same as it is for a normal collision. cable. Excessive collisions are the number of This is an indication of over-utilization frames that are dropped after 16 of the switch port at half-duplex or attempts to send the packet resulted in duplex mismatch. The two devices that cause the late collision never see that the other is sending until after it puts the entire packet on the network. 12 . and remote fault information. duplex mode. it just happens later than it does for a normal collision. They are only detected during transmissions of packets longer than 64 bytes. cable. or switch port) or a duplex neither side of the connection detects mismatch. Late collisions are detected by the transmitter after the first time slot of the 64-byte transmit time occurs. disabling Gigabit autonegotiation forces the link up. 16 collisions. or an ISL value.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. Giants These are frames that are greater than This is an indication of faulty 1518 bytes and have a bad FCS hardware.1Q (dot1q). or switch port). a collision. You must either enable or disable link negotiation on both ends of the link. or an Inter-Switch Link Protocol (ISL) configuration issue. These are frames smaller than 64 bytes with a bad FCS value This is an indication of faulty hardware (NIC.3z1998). Both ends of the link must be set to the same value or the link will not connect. Excessive Collisions Carrier Sense Carrier sense occurs every time an Ethernet controller wants to send data and the counter is incremented when there is an error in the process.

McAfee recommends. For more information. and 13 . Rather than disable the alert altogether.1. Typically. the next decision is whether to disable the corresponding attack altogether OR apply a particular attack filter to that attack that will disable alerting for a particular IP address or range of IP addresses. or more generic detection methods that aid in detecting unknown exploits for the vulnerability. an SMS server may be generating the alert Netbios: Copy Executable file attempt during the legitimate transfer of login scripts. see Consolidated View. AOL IM is allowed traffic on the network.0 Effective Policy Tuning practices CHAPTER 7 Effective Policy Tuning practices As of McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) software version 2. the following best practices can make tuning more efficient and effective. to use this or another McAfee Network Security Platform-provide policy as a starting point. you encounter the term “attack”. have the McAfee® Network Security Platform 'Default Inline IPS' policy loaded on all interfaces. These tailored policies can be either cloned versions of Network Security Platform pre-configured policies or custom-built policies that employ custom rule sets. thresholds. For instance. Managing Attack filters When a particular alert is declared as false positive. The “Default Inline IPS’ policy can be changed at the Root Admin level. Analyzing high-volume attacks Take attacks that are generating the most alerts (use Consolidated View in Threat Analyzer) and investigate their legitimacy. where each method is used to detect an attempt to exploit a particular vulnerability in a system. it will be evident that your network or security policy will affect the overall level of alerts. These signatures and checks may contain very specific means for identifying a specific known exploit of the vulnerability.” Network Security Platform defines an attack as being comprised of one or more signatures. System Status Monitoring Guide. all McAfee® Network Security Sensors (Sensors) on initial deployment. Though each network environment has unique characteristics. but to tune these into segment-tailored custom policies. If. Many of the top alerts seen on the initial deployment of a Sensor will be common false positives seen in many environments. anomaly profiles. In almost all cases. Note: As you interact with Network Security Platform policies.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. for instance. it is a best practice to implement the latter. or correlation rules. where appropriate. at the beginning of the tuning process. then there might not be a need to alert on AOL IM setup flows. not “signature. An appropriately tuned policy will reduce false positives.

we recommend that you create an attack filter for the SMS server and apply it to the attack. It is also a best practice to document all your tuning activities.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. before tuning DoS attacks. it may issue false alarms or fail to detect actual attacks during a time period when it is adapting to the new network traffic conditions. The learning process takes two days. The Report section can be used to assist the documentation process.0 Effective Policy Tuning practices cancel the possibility of finding a real attack of this nature. The IPS Sensor configuration report will deliver reports that list attack filters that have been applied and attacks that have been otherwise customized. If the Sensor does not re-learn the new environment. ACKS. you move the Sensor from a lab or staging environment to a production environment) or a configuration change (that is. IPS Configuration Guide. After a profile has been learned. Implementing this mode successfully is critically dependent on detailed knowledge of the segments that the particular Sensors are monitoring. IPS Configuration Guide. DoS SYN flood alerts reported outbound on a firewall interface to the Internet). Note: For more information on attack filters. the particulars of the profile (number of SYNS. see Managing Attack Filters and Attack Responses. an e-Commerce site that is getting more and more customers. This is Learning Mode operation. since the Sensor can automatically adapt to it. Every attack filter created is globally stored. It is a best practice to have the Sensor re-learn the profile when there is a network change (that is. Learning profiles in DoS attacks It is a best practice to let the Sensors learn the profiles of the particular segments they are monitoring. you change the CIDR block of a subinterface) that causes a significant sudden traffic change on an interface. see Managing DoS Learning Mode profiles on a Sensor. This involves setting thresholds manually for the type of segment characteristics that are learned in Learning Mode. and so on) can be viewed per Sensor. DoS detection can also be implemented using the Threshold Mode. For more information on Sensor learning modes. There is no need to re-learn a profile when network traffic increases or decreases naturally over time (for example. thus its Web traffic increases in parallel). so that the filter can be applied to any Exploit or Reconnaissance attack. During this period it is not unusual to see DoS alerts associated with normal traffic flows (for example. 14 .

causing the attack to be blocked without your knowledge. IPS Configuration Guide. IPS Configuration Guide. it is important not to set the policies and responses so fine that they disrupt the flow of traffic and slow down the system. but disable alerting. preventing DoS attacks and attacks against the firewall is crucial. Other suspicious traffic intended for the internal network. Critical attacks like buffer overflows and DoS attacks require responses in real time. a better understanding of the potential attack purpose can be determined.CHAPTER 8 Response Management When McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) detects an activity which violates a configured security policy. see Sensor Actions. 15 . These include: • • Dropping Alert Packets: Only works in in-line mode. if you are monitoring outside of a firewall in in-line mode. Proper configuration of responses is crucial to maintaining effective protection. and logs based on specific attacks or attack parameters (such as severity) is recommended for effective network security. Thus. such as scans and low-impact well-known exploits. In this case. If the Sensor is monitoring the network outside of the firewall in in-line mode. see IPS Quarantine settings in the IPS Sensor. since McAfee® Network Security Platform can be customized to protect any zone in a network. Note 1: For more information on other Sensor actions. lest you enable blocking for an attack. Will drop a detected attack packet and all subsequent packets in the same flow. are best logged and analyzed as the impact is not immediate. Remember that response actions are decoupled from alerting. Pay particular attention to this with the Recommended For Blocking (RFB) category of attacks. Note 2: For more information on IPS Quarantine. IPS Quarantine: Sensor will quarantine/remediate a host as per the configurations in McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) and the Sensor monitoring ports. a preset response from the Sensor is integral to the protection or prevention process. while scans and probes can be logged and researched to determine compromise potential and the source of the attack. alerts. Developing a system of actions. Sensor Response Actions There are multiple Sensor actions that are available for configuration per attack. IPS Quarantine can be enabled per attack in the Policy Editors. For example. knowing what needs to be protected can help to determine the response type.

An include rule (which should always start a rule set) is a set of parameters that encompass a broad range of well-known attacks for detection.CHAPTER 9 Creating Rule sets A rule set is configured based on attack category. After this. severities. start with an include rule for all Exploit category attacks. Sendmail as the application. For example. 16 . see Managing Rule Sets. Proper creation of rule sets is essential for eliminating false positives and ensuring maximum protection on your network. combination that needs to be detected. • General-to-specific rule creation. The first method is general-to-specific. Windows 2000. and so forth in the same manner. applications. applications and protocols. operating system. Unix as the OS. The second method is collaboration: Create multiple include rules within one rule set for each category. Follow this with multiple exclusion rules that strip away protocols. et cetera. et cetera. operating systems. Collaborative rule creation. and benign trigger probability options. et cetera. application. For example. Each rule in a set is either an include rule or an exclude rule. thus focusing the rule set on the environment where it will be enforced. create the first rule in the set with the Exploit category. • Note: For more information on rule set creation. Next. severity. These best practices can assist while creating rules sets in the McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager). that are rarely or never seen in a zone of your network. protocol. create another include rule for Exploit. protocols. Best methods for rule set creation There are two best practice methods employed for creating rule sets. Start with an include rule that covers a broad range of operating systems. An exclude rule removes elements from the include rule in order to focus the policy's rule set. Each include rule added. create one or more exclude rules to strip away specific operating systems. and SMTP as the protocol. Each criterion must be matched in order for an alert to be triggered. broadens the scope of the detection. IPS Configuration Guide. WindMail.

Thus keeping state of asymmetric transmissions is essential for successfully monitoring the traffic. It is a best practice to implement a port clustering configuration when dealing with asymmetrically routed networks. and a complete transmission may be received on one segment. Interface groups normalize the impact of traffic flows split across multiple interfaces. Note: For more information on port clustering. All of the ports that make up the interface are configured as one logical entity. Asymmetric networks are common in load balancing and active/passive configurations. see Port clustering (interface groups). an interface group appears in the System Configuration tool's Resource Tree as a single interface node (icon) under the Sensor where the ports are located. but depart on another. thus maintaining state to avoid information loss. referred to as Interface Groups in the Manager interface. enables multiple ports on a single McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) to be grouped together for effective traffic monitoring. Getting Started Guide.CHAPTER 10 Port clustering on Asymmetric networks Port clustering. keeping the configuration consistent. Once configured. 17 .

with the exception of FTP. TFTP. which negotiate the data channel separately from the control channel. There is a limit on the number of ACL rules that can be supported by a McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor). you can explicitly deny these protocol instances by denying the fixed control port. see Access Control Lists. or negotiate ports that do not follow a standard. IRC. and RPC services. are not supported. Protocols such as H. such as instant messaging and peer-to-peer communication. KaZaA. However. you can configure ACLs to explicitly deny these protocol instances by denying the fixed control port. Network Security Platform detects use of and attacks in such programs as Yahoo Messenger.323 and Netmeeting. IPS Configuration Guide. you can configure explicit permit and deny rules for RPC as a whole. 18 .CHAPTER 11 Access Control Lists (ACLs) Note the following points while working with Access Control Lists or ACLs: • You cannot set explicit ACL permit rules for protocols that negotiate ports dynamically. For RPC services. such as statd and mountd. The following table specifies the rule limit for ACLs: Sensor ACL rule limit • • • • I-4010 I-4000 I-3000 I-2700 I-1400 I-1200 1000 1000 1000 400 100 50 Sensor ACL rule limit M-8000 M-6050 M-4050 M-3050 M-2750 M-1450 M-1250 1000 1000 1000 1000 400 100 50 Note: For more information. An alternative option for denying protocols that use dynamic ports is to configure IDS policies to drop the attacks that are detected in such transmissions. and so on. Protocols or services. are not supported. that use dynamic ports. However. but not its constituents.

1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 10K response each 1024-bit RSA 128-bit ARC4 I-2700 I-3000 I-4000 I-4010 Max. SSL Connections / Sec.0 SSL best practices CHAPTER 12 SSL best practices Note that there is a performance impact when using the SSL decryption feature.throughput • • • • Session resumption for 4 out of 5 TCP connections 5 HTTP 1.throughput • • • • Session resumption for 4 out of 5 TCP connections 5 HTTP 1.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. Throughput 325 85 Mbps 600 155 Mbps 800 200 Mbps 1200 310 Mbps SSL only traffic . SSL Connections / Sec. SSL only traffic .1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 5K response each 1024-bit RSA 128-bit ARC4 I-2700 I-3000 I-4000 I-4010 Max. Throughput 300 150 Mbps 400 200 Mbps 800 400 Mbps 800 400 Mbps 19 . Refer the following sections for the SSL throughput measurements and test methodologies.

SSL Connections / Sec. SSL Throughput HTTP 1.1 Throughput Total Throughput 100 25 Mbps 475 Mbps 500 Mbps 200 50 Mbps 350 Mbps 400 Mbps I-3000 Max.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6.1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 5K response each 1024-bit RSA 128-bit ARC4 I. SSL Connections / Sec.1 Throughput Total Throughput 400 100 Mbps 1550 Mbps 1650 Mbps 800 200 Mbps 780 Mbps 980 Mbps I-4010 Max.0 SSL best practices M-2750 M-3050 M-4050 M-6050 M-8000 Max.1 traffic • • • • Session resumption for 4 out of 5 TCP connections 5 HTTP 1. SSL Connections / Sec.1 Throughput Total Throughput 200 50 Mbps 860 Mbps 910 Mbps 400 105 Mbps 475 Mbps 580 Mbps I-4000 Max. SSL Throughput HTTP 1. Throughput 550 250 Mbps 1300 600 Mbps 2700 1200 Mbps 4500 2 Gbps 8500 3. SSL Connections / Sec. SSL Throughput HTTP 1. SSL Throughput HTTP 1.8 Gbps SSL traffic mixed with HTTP 1.1 Throughput Total Throughput 400 100 Mbps 1740 Mbps 1840 Mbps 800 200 Mbps 860 Mbps 1060 Mbps 20 . SSL Connections / Sec.2700 Max.

7 Gbps M-6050 Max. SSL Connections / Sec.4 Gbps M-8000 Max.1 Throughput Total Throughput 1750 800 Mbps 8 Gbps 8. SSL Connections / Sec. SSL Throughput HTTP 1. SSL Throughput HTTP 1.8 Gbps Supported SSL functionalities Following SSL functionalities are supported.1 Throughput Total Throughput 110 50 Mbps 500 Mbps 550 Mbps M-3050 Max.1 Throughput Total Throughput 220 100 Mbps 1. SSL Connections / Sec. 21 .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. SSL Throughput HTTP 1.35 Gbps M-4050 Max.2 Gbps 1.5 Gbps 2. SSL Connections / Sec.1 Throughput Total Throughput 880 440 Mbps 4 Gbps 4.0 SSL best practices M-2750 Max. SSL Connections / Sec.1 Throughput Total Throughput 440 200 Mbps 2. SSL Throughput HTTP 1. SSL Throughput HTTP 1.

0 SSL best practices Supported Web servers SSL decryption is supported for the following web servers: • • Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) Apache Supported cipher suites The following SSL cipher suites (as named in their respective RFCs) are supported: SSLv2 cipher suites • SSL_CK_RC4_128_WITH_MD5 • SSL_CK_RC4_128_EXPORT40_WITH_MD5 • SSL_CK_DES_64_CBC_WITH_MD5 • SSL_CK_DES_192_EDE3_CBC_WITH_MD5 SSLv3/TLS cipher suites • • • • • • • • • SSL/TLS_NULL_WITH_NULL_NULL SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_NULL_MD5 SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_NULL_SHA SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_MD5 SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_RC4_128_SHA SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_DES_CBC_SHA SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA SSL/TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA SSLv3/TLS cipher suites Unsupported SSL functionalities The following SSL functionalities are not supported: • • iPlanet Web servers Diffie-Hellman ciphers (McAfee recommends that you disable acceptance of DiffieHellman requests on the SSL Web server to ensure that Network Security Platform is able to decrypt the traffic) Compression in the SSL records (a negotiable option in SSLv3 and TLS) PCT (Microsoft's extension to SSLv2) • • 22 .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6.

Some examples of HTTP response processing deployment: • • You want to protect a bunch of clients on your internal network . which do not usually transmit hostile content due to the security measures taken. Typical real-world deployments do not have equal amounts of HTTP request traffic and response traffic in both directions through the Sensor. and do not wish to serve attacks embedded in HTTP response traffic . changes in aggregate Sensor performance will depend on the proportion of HTTP traffic to other traffic on the link being monitored. The test sends equal HTTP request and response loads in both directions through the Sensor. customers can consider selectively enabling HTTP response processing to better optimize their network. • The test involves only HTTP traffic. You want to protect both internal clients as well as the Web content you are serving to external clients. You are serving Web content to external clients. In these deployments. we recommend that you enable HTTP response processing on the minimum number of ports and in only the required directions to achieve your protection goals. the Sensor can absorb larger bursts without significant impact. the combined HTTP request and response traffic processed by Sensors in real deployments is typically less than that shown in the tests. When not running at maximum load. • • • 23 .enable HTTP response processing for outbound traffic only. but typically running at significantly lower throughput. The test results reflect performance at sustained load.CHAPTER 13 Sensor HTTP Response Processing deployment HTTP response processing is disabled by default. Changing the HTTP response processing setting does not change the Sensor performance for any other protocol. there is significant amount of request traffic in one direction and response traffic in the opposite direction. The things to note about the test are given below. In these environments.enable HTTP response processing for inbound traffic only. Real-world networks are typically loaded. To minimize the potential performance impact on the McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor). occasionally peaking at maximum capacity. Usually. The test environment was created to illustrate the likely worst-case performance impact. Therefore.enable HTTP response processing in both directions. Since HTTP requests are typically <= 1/10th of the response size. • Tests for enabling HTTP Response Traffic The test results provided in the next two sections illustrate potential impact of enabling response processing traffic. expected to occur in deployments protecting large Web server farms. You can enable it for each traffic direction on an interface pair. The test sends HTTP request continuously at maximum load. HTTP response processing typically provides little value because all HTTP response traffic is sourced from trusted servers.

For Sensor performance numbers under the following conditions: • • HTTP response processing enabled/disabled and 5 HTTP 1. dependent on the traffic being inspected and some environments could see a reduction in performance as significant as the test results indicate. of course.0 Sensor HTTP Response Processing deployment The net result of all of these factors is that in typical networks. size of a response page sent to the client by the sites or applications that are typically accessed.5 HTTP 1.1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 10K response each . the impact of enabling HTTP response processing is not noticed.78 Gbps 1 Gbps 550 Mbps 195 Mbps 97 Mbps 1 Gbps 1 Gbps 680 Mbps 430 Mbps 160 Mbps 75 Mbps HTTP Response processing results for M-series Sensors Refer the following table for M-series Sensor performance numbers with HTTP response processing: 24 .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. HTTP Response processing results for I series Sensors Refer the following table for I-series Sensor performance numbers with HTTP response processing: I-4010 I-4000 I-3000 I-2700 I-1400 I-1200 .HTTP Response Scanning Disabled .HTTP Response Scanning Enabled for outbound direction . The exact impact is. The factors to take into account include: • • • proportion of HTTP traffic to other protocols relative amount of HTTP requests and responses in each direction and.5 HTTP 1.1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 10K response each 2 Gbps 1.1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 10K response each sent in one direction.

4 Gbps 2.5 Gbps 600 Mbps 200 Mbps 100 Mbps 5.1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 10K response each 10 Gbps 5 Gbps 3 Gbps 1.8 Gbps 2 Gbps 1 Gbps 500 Mbps 200 Mbps 100 Mbps 25 .HTTP Response Scanning Enabled for outbound direction .0 Sensor HTTP Response Processing deployment M-8000 M-6050 M-4050 M-3050 M-2750 M-1450 M-1250 .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6.5 HTTP 1.HTTP Response Scanning Disabled .1 get page requests per TCP connection with a 10K response each .5 HTTP 1.

If you have any specific questions. if you are using an agent that queries the database. database tuning). contact Technical Support. Further information on the impact of online database tuning of the Manager database will be sent to the third-party vendors that are directly accessing this database. • Online database tuning operation causes the creation of temporary alert and packet log tables. Implement a schedule for backups using the Backup scheduler. Saving the 'All Tables' settings monthly is strongly recommended. simply retry the query. see Manager Server Configuration Guide. There is a remote chance that during the transition to the temporary tables. Back up all information. following best practices are recommended: • • • Back up Manager data either within the Manager server (McAfee Network Security Platform\Backups folder) or preferably on external media. archives. Tune your database at regular intervals using the online tuning tools. (Be sure to schedule this at a time when other processes will not be running concurrently. Do not run scheduled actions concurrently. and audits. Also note that there is no change in database SQL query behavior if online database tuning is disabled. Warning: A database left untuned can. your agent may attempt to interact with these tables during tuning. file maintenance. Your configuration tables are saved by default once a week on Saturday. Perform regular file maintenance to prevent disk space issues. When scheduling certain Manager actions (backups. Make a regular practice of defragmenting the disk of the Manager server. • • • • Backup of data and configurations For the back up of McAfee® Network Security Platform data and configurations. If a SQL query error occurs.CHAPTER 14 Database maintenance McAfee recommends the following best practices for database backup and tuning: • Perform regular manual backups of your database using the Backup feature in the McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) software. alerts.) As the 'All Tables' and 'Audit and Alert Tables' options can be rather large in size (depending upon the amount of alert data in the database) these types of backups should be saved off the Manager server. lead to data corruption. set a time for each that is unique and is a minimum of an hour after/before other scheduled actions. as disk fragmentation can lead to database inefficiency. Note: For more information on tuning your database. Protect backups from tampering by creating a digital fingerprint of the file using a hash function such as MD5 or SHA-1. including configurations. Backing up config tables weekly is recommended. over time. • • • 26 . the SQL query will result in an error. Database backups are cumulative and the size of a backup file can become quite large.

This option is enabled by default to occur every Saturday night.0 Database maintenance • • • Test restoration of backups periodically to ensure that a backup was successful and valid. Manager Server Configuration Guide.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. This is set within the Backup Scheduler action. The 'Config Tables' option backs up only tabled information relating to configured tasks. Tip 2: For more information on database backup. This creates an XML file (no attempt to read this file should be made) that can be imported to any Sensor of the same type in the future. Save actual configurations of Sensors (not just the config tables) using the Export option under the Sensor_Name tab. Save actual Sensor configurations weekly. non-production Manager. see Database backup and Recovery. The best way to do this is to perform a “test” restore of the backup on a secondary. see Backing up data and settings. Manager Server Configuration Guide. 27 . Tip 1: For more information on backup methods.

bat The dbtuning.bat and dbtuning. Scripts for disk space maintenance If you have a large amount of data and wish to do your tuning offline. To do this you must stop the Manager and run the scripts. use the online tools. In order to develop best practices for database maintenance it is important to understand the lifecycle of an alert. Note: For more information on Disk Space Maintenance. using the Alert and Packet Log Archival feature. and that you discard alert and packet log information from your database every 90 days to manage your database size.bat (force the tuning of the database) scripts. Manager Server Configuration Guide. it is a best practice to use the purge. Getting Started Guide. Archiving alerts Archive your alerts and packet logs regularly.bat (forces the deletion of old alerts) and dbtuning. To tune while the Manager is running. For more information.CHAPTER 15 Alerts and Disk space maintenance Disk space maintenance is an important task that must be completed to ensure efficient running of the McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager). A best practice suggestion is to wait for 97 days of data and then on a recurring 7-day period run the purge. Note that there is currently a 4 GB size limitation for a single archive file. Scripts have to be run off-line (that is. McAfee recommends that you archive your alert data monthly. see Database maintenance and tuning. see The lifecycle of an alert. Manager service stopped) to release the lock from the database.bat—this will delete alerts already marked for deletion (from the Alert Viewer) as well as alerts older than 90 days. Dbtuning.bat utility does the following: • • • • • Defragments tables where rows/columns are split or have been deleted Re-sorts indexes Updates index statistics Computes query optimizer statistics Checks and repairs tables 28 . but ensure that you do not have another process running concurrently during the tuning.

see Setting a schedule for file maintenance. If automatic File Maintenance is used to delete alert and packet log data it is recommended that a large value -such as 90. as in 90 days—is entered in the “Scheduled Deletion” column for the Alert & Packet Log Data option.bat utility enables on-demand deletion of alerts and packet log data from your database. 29 . Note: For more information on setting the scheduler for file maintenance. Manager creates a group of administration files that must be maintained regularly. all alerts and packet logs older than 90 days are deleted at the weekly maintenance scheduler time. which may affect long-term and overall database performance.bat also offers to automatically start dbtuning. Purge.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. Manager Server Configuration Guide. or if they have been marked for deletion via the Threat Analyzer tool. By setting the value to 90 days. This can be accomplished using the Maintenance scheduler. Using File Maintenance Scheduler Databases can be substantially overloaded. with all Alert and Packet logs. Alerts and packet logs can be deleted that are older than a specified number of days. DoS files (profiles) and Data Mining files (for Trend Reporting) among others.0 Alerts and Disk space maintenance Purge. This allows for long-term analysis of alerts and logs without overloading your database with millions of alerts. These include Diagnostic files. any incident reports that have been generated. Apart from the database data. Maintenance of this data can be accomplished automatically using the File Maintenance scheduler.bat immediately after the purge is completed.bat The purge. and audit and fault logs. It is a best practice to schedule the deletion of the oldest of these files on an on-going basis.

This is by design because. we recommend you wait the 15 minutes and allow the new MDR pair to synchronize automatically. it takes approximately 5 to 10 minutes for the newly formed pair to finish MDRrelated tasks and become stable. you can press the Retrieve Configuration button on the Manage MDR page of the secondary McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) soon after MDR creation.CHAPTER 16 Manager Disaster Recovery (MDR) best practices A newly created MDR pair does not synchronize for the first 15 minutes after creation. 30 . depending on the quantity of McAfee® Network Security Sensors (Sensors). see MDR communication. If you have only one or two Sensors. to force the Managers to synchronize. If you return to the user interface of the primary Manager. Note: For more information on MDR. In most cases. the details on the Manage MDR page validate the information seen on the secondary. Manager Server Configuration Guide. however.

resulting in a collision. In half-duplex environments. link up/down situations. Generally. duplex mismatches. and alignment errors. some data link errors such as FCS. The result of a duplex mismatch is extremely slow performance. FCS. or runt counters are incrementing. Sniffer trace analysis reveals every packet on the wire and pinpoints the exact problem. and loss of connection. Data link errors Many performance issues may be related to data link errors. Half-duplex setting When operating with a duplex setting of half-duplex. and that it is useful to monitor (“span”) ports rather than spanning VLANs when troubleshooting switch connectivity issues. Sniffer trace A Sniffer details packet transfer. or vice versa. the collision counter is not active. Other possible causes of data link errors at full-duplex are bad cables. runts. and runt counters should be minimal. If the ratio of errors to input packets is greater than two or three percent. and data link errors. If the link is operating at full-duplex. or software or hardware issues. a faulty switch port. see also Configuration of Speed and Duplex settings (on page 8). which are caused when the frame is not completely copied to the wire. Note that it may be important to obtain several Sniffer traces from different ports on different switches. and collisions are normal. Excessive errors usually indicate a problem. CRC. alignment. 31 . resulting in fragmented frames. If the FCS. performance degradation may be noticeable. alignment errors. check for a duplex mismatch. alignment. a one percent ratio of errors to total traffic is acceptable for half-duplex connections. FCS. intermittent connectivity. Full-duplex setting When operating at full-duplex. Duplex mismatch is a situation in which the switch is operating at full-duplex and the connected device is operating at half-duplex.CHAPTER 17 Performance issues Most performance issues are related to switch port configuration. Collisions can cause runts. cyclic redundancy checks (CRC). For more information. and thus a Sniffer trace analysis can help pinpoint switch and McAfee® Network Security Platform performance or connectivity issues when the issues persist after you have exhausted the other suggestions in this document. it is possible for both the switch and the connected device to sense the wire and transmit at exactly the same time.

To avoid confusion. • • • Note: For more information on vulnerability assessment using Network Security PlatformMcAfee Vulnerability Manager integration. This will help ensure the assessment is accurate. Integration Guide. For information on ACLs. and render VA integration ineffective. see Integration with McAfee Vulnerability Manager. see Configuring ACL rules. 32 . If the scan traffic between the Vulnerability Manager server and the hosts being scanned passes through a Sensor monitoring port. reports can become obsolete quickly. if Network Security Platform uses an initial scanner report to analyze one alert and an updated scanner report to analyze the next. Replace old reports with new reports on a routine basis (weekly or monthly). To prevent this: Create ACLs to exclude all traffic from the Vulnerability Manager server from attack inspection. Given the frequency with which new attacks appear.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. it may correctly draw different conclusions for each. This prevents the Vulnerability Manager server being denied network access. Replacing an old report with a new one might result in similar alerts having different relevance values. consider acknowledging (or purging) all existing alerts each time you replace reports. For example. This will help increase the probability that a relevancy status of "Unknown" really means that the attack is not relevant. See the NAC Configuration Guide for information. Where possible. IPS Configuration Guide. scan all hosts you expect McAfee Network Security Platform to protect.0 Vulnerability Assessment CHAPTER 17 Vulnerability Assessment McAfee® Network Security Platform recommends the following while performing Vulnerability Assessment: • • Always use the latest signatures available for your vulnerability assessment (VA) software. then add the Vulnerability Manager server to the NAC Exclusions list. the Sensor may consider it as attack traffic and take the corresponding response action such as quarantining the Vulnerability Manager server. If you have configured Network Access Control (NAC) or IPS Quarantine.

000 50.000 100 300 254 100.000 5.000 5.000 NA NA 100 Mbps 40.000.000 254 100.000.500 300 250.000 750.000 10.000.000 500.000 16.000 50.000 128.000 64 2 Gbps 1.000 25.000 1.000 1.000 64 200 Mbps 80.CHAPTER 19 I-series Sensor capacity by model number The following table lists McAfee® Network Security Sensor (Sensor) limitations by category and by Sensor model.000 5.000 NA NA 1.000 1. Concurrent SSL Flows Number of SSL keys that can be stored on the Sensor Virtual Interfaces (VIDS) per Sensor VLAN / CIDR Blocks per Sensor VLAN / CIDR Blocks per Interface Customized attacks Attack filters Default number of supported UDP Flows Supported UDP Flows DoS Profiles SYN rate (64-byte packets per second) ACL Rules (refer to note below) 2 Gbps 1.000 128.000 64 1 Gbps 500.000 128.000 6.000 6.000 3.000 30. 33 .000 60.000 3.000 1. IPS Configuration guide. Maximum Type I-4010 I-4000 I-3000 I-2700 I-1400 I-1200 Aggregate Performance Concurrent connections Connections established per sec.000 64 600 Mbps 250.000 2.000 64.000 254 100.000 1.000 750.250 25.000 254 100.000 25.000 1.000 25. see Viewing ACL descriptions using Effective ACL rules.000 100 83.000 187.000 50 For more information on computing ACL.000 120 64.000 375.000 32.000.000 1.000 100.000 400 32 64 64 40.000 3.000 100.000 5.000 100 16 32 32 20.000 100.000 1.000 100.

The number of customized attacks can increase due to: • • • Modifications done to attacks on a policy by users Recommended for blocking (RFB) attacks User created asymmetric policies Example: How numerous customized attacks are created in asymmetric policies. a. • The All-inclusive with Audit rule set has 2204 exploit attacks.0 I-series Sensor capacity by model number Note for customized attacks The signature set push from McAfee® Network Security Manager (Manager) to a Sensor will fail if the number of customized attacks on the Sensor exceeds the customized attack limit. c.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. The total number of customized attacks for this policy is 2204 – 116 = 2038 customized attacks. Set the Inbound rule set to "File Server rule set". Create a new policy. 34 . b. Set the Outbound rule set to "All-inclusive with Audit rule set". You will see that: • The File Server rule set has 166 exploit attacks.

000 3.000 150.144 400.000 66.000 100.000 40.536 10.500 60.500 35 .000 20.000.000 10.000 131.000 1.000 100 Mbps 40.000 1.768 5.000 3.000 100.000 4. SSL Flow count maximum 10 Gbps 5 Gbps 3 Gbps 1.000 3.CHAPTER 20 M-series Sensor capacity by model number Maximum Type M-8000 M-6050 M-4050 M-3050 M-2750 M-1450 M-1250 N-450 Aggregate Performance Concurrent connections Connections established per sec.500.000 75.000 400.000 128.000 2.000 100 32 16 100 3.000 187.000 375.000 VIDS Attack filters per 262.5 Gbps 750.000 100.114 100.000 Attack filters per 128.072 25.000 18.000.000 200 Mbps 80.000.000 100.000 1.000 4.000 25.000 262.000 100.000 20.000 2.000 NA NA NA Number of SSL 64 keys that can be stored in Sensor Virtual Interfaces (VIDS) per Sensor VLAN / CIDR Blocks per Sensor VLAN / CIDR Blocks per Interface Customized attacks 1.000 200.000 65.000 120.000 262.000 60.000 36.000 NA NA NA 25.500.000 64 64 64 64 NA NA NA 1.000 300 64 32 300 254 254 254 254 254 64 32 254 100.000 1.000 32.000 262.000 30.000 187.000 100.144 50.000 3.000 100.144 Sensor Default number of supported UDP Flows Supported UDP Flows 400.000 600 Mbps 250.000 100.000 750.000 2 Gbps 250.

000 5.000 1.000 400 100 50 400 Note: SSL decryption is not supported on M-1450.000 1.000 1.500.McAfee® Network Security Platform 6.000 100 200.000.000 5.000 2.000 2. The number of supported SSL flows on a Sensor directly impacts the number of TCP flows that can be processed simultaneously.000 5.000 NA NA 5.000 300 600.000 1.0 M-series Sensor capacity by model number Maximum Type M-8000 M-6050 M-4050 M-3050 M-2750 M-1450 M-1250 N-450 DoS Profiles SYN rate (64byte packets per second) ACL Rules (refer to note below) 5.000.000 1.000 120 250. 36 .500. M-1250 and N-450 Sensors.

Does not require external passive Failopen Kit open Kit Supported with ports configured in fail. fail-open (bypass) with no dongles Ports fail-open (bypass). No traffic is disrupted. Ports remain enabled fail-close.Supported with ports configured in failclose (no dongles) close (no dongles) Ports fail-close and traffic is disrupted. and no traffic is disrupted. Sensor Power off . put into bypass. Full/Half Not supported Ports fail-close with dongles connected.inline fail-open Ports fail-open. No negotiation with peer devices.) Ports are enabled and in the down state till the Sensor starts rebooting. Full/Half only for 10/100 Supported and can be configured from the the Manager Ports fail-close and traffic is disrupted.inline failopen (CLI reboot or reboot due to error and watchdog on) Warm reboot .inline failopen Port Speed/Duplex Auto negotiation Sensor Power off . Ports are not admin disabled and traffic is disrupted 10/100. No negotiation with peer devices. and no traffic is disrupted 10/100/1000. Warm reboot . Dongles not required Dongles not required for both ports to fail-close SPAN Inline fail-close Inline fail-open (Default) Inline fail-open (Active Fail-open Kit) Link Failure . Dongles required Dongles required on both A and B ports to fail-close External tap is supported. traffic disruption till the Sensor is up Ports fail-close and traffic is disrupted. traffic disruption till the Sensor is up 37 . no traffic disrupted (must not have dongles connected. put into bypass. no support for internal tap.inline failclose (CLI reboot or reboot due to error and watchdog on) Ports are admin disabled and put in bypass before the Sensor reboots. Traffic is disrupted till then.CHAPTER 18 Comparison Between I-1200/I-1400 and M-1250/M-1450 FE ports Operating Condition/Mode I-1200/I-1400 M-1250/M-1450 TAP Internal and external tap are supported.inline failclose Link Failure . Ports are admin disabled.inline fail-close Does not require external passive Fail. Ports remain enabled fail-close.

not active Green .inline fail-open Front panel LED for Not present Normal/Bypass operations . No support to control fail-open/bypass Has support to control failoperation open/bypass operation I-1200 . I-1400 . normal operation.1A/1B and 2A/2B 1A/1B through 4A/4B Auto MDIX support The Manager port configuration panel .disabled and down (applicable for inline fail-open only) 38 . normal operation. Always on (green). normal operation.1A/1B.inline failopen Port link LED interpretation . OFF indicates down and traffic is disrupted Port link LED interpretation .TAP Link Events Port density Green indicates up and inline.link status color coding No support(Supported in I1200 and not Supported by default (not configurable in I1400). OFF indicates down and not necessarily bypass OFF indicates down and traffic is disrupted Options to either restore defaults or to retain the current port configuration are available Green indicates up and inline.up Red .0 Comparison Between I-1200/I-1400 and M-1250/M-1450 FE ports Operating Condition/Mode I-1200/I-1400 M-1250/M-1450 Resetconfig Restores to default configuration (inline fail-open) and reboots Normal is green and indicates up.inline fail-close Front panel LED for Not present Normal/Bypass operations . Always on (green). OFF indicates down and traffic disrupted.not active Green . Always on (green). Front panel LED for Not present Normal/Bypass operations .disabled and down The color codes are: • • • • Yellow . OFF indicates bypass and no traffic is disrupted OFF indicates down.enabled but down Gray .enabled but down Gray .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. OFF indicates bypass.bypass and no traffic disrupted. traffic is disrupted. OFF indicates bypass.inline fail-open Port link LED interpretation during reboot/Sensor power down . Configurable through CLI through CLI) The color codes are: • • • • Yellow.inline fail-close OFF indicates .inline failclose Port link LED interpretation during reboot/Sensor power down .up Red .SPAN Front panel LED for Not present Normal/Bypass operations .

inline failclose The Manager port status at Link failure .Inline/Bypass status color coding Not present Four separate bypass buttons.SPAN Red Gray Red Red Red Red 39 .inline Yellow .bypass The Manager port status at Link failure .inline failopen The Manager port status at Link failure .0 Comparison Between I-1200/I-1400 and M-1250/M-1450 FE ports Operating Condition/Mode I-1200/I-1400 M-1250/M-1450 The Manager port config panel .McAfee® Network Security Platform 6. one button per port pair: • • Green .

........................................ 37 Response Management....... 19 B backup of data.............................. 17 sensor troubleshooting issues ...... 7 M Manager Disaster Recovery (MDR) best practices 34 ...... 35 H half-duplex setting ..................ix V vulnerability assessment best practices......... 9...................................................................................................................... 16 R rule set creation best practices ... 26 staging sensors...... 24............... 35 HTTP ............... 15................ 33 duplex mismatch ........... 23............................................................................... 7 interface groups .... 4 connectivity issues . 28 I in-line mode...................................................................... 10.................... 7 sniffer trace ...................................P performance issues................................................. 20 L large sensor deployment.... 8 conventions ............. 6 Layer2 Passthru ..................... vi D data link errors ................................................................................................................... 11............................ 35 speed and duplex settings .................................................................................... 8 SSL best practices .................................. 27.... 30........ 35 Index A auto-negotiation issues .............................................. 5......................................................... 30 S Sensor capacity by model number................. 13 policy tuning practices................... 25................ 32..................................................................................... 35 database management best practices ............................................................................................................................. 37 F File Maintenance Scheduler.. 6 C cabling best practices....... 8 T technical support..... 33 full-duplex setting .

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