Transformation Language Reference

Informatica PowerCenter®
(Version 7.1.1)

Informatica PowerCenter Transformation Language Reference Version 7.1.1 August 2004 Copyright (c) 1998–2004 Informatica Corporation. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. This software and documentation contain proprietary information of Informatica Corporation, they are provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use and disclosure and is also protected by copyright law. Reverse engineering of the software is prohibited. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without prior consent of Informatica Corporation. Use, duplication, or disclosure of the Software by the U.S. Government is subject to the restrictions set forth in the applicable software license agreement as provided in DFARS 227.7202-1(a) and 227.7702-3(a) (1995), DFARS 252.227-7013(c)(1)(ii) (OCT 1988), FAR 12.212(a) (1995), FAR 52.227-19, or FAR 52.227-14 (ALT III), as applicable. The information in this document is subject to change without notice. If you find any problems in the documentation, please report them to us in writing. Informatica Corporation does not warrant that this documentation is error free. Informatica, PowerMart, PowerCenter, PowerChannel, PowerCenter Connect, MX, and SuperGlue are trademarks or registered trademarks of Informatica Corporation in the United States and in jurisdictions throughout the world. All other company and product names may be trade names or trademarks of their respective owners. Portions of this software are copyrighted by DataDirect Technologies, 1999-2002. Informatica PowerCenter products contain ACE (TM) software copyrighted by Douglas C. Schmidt and his research group at Washington University and University of California, Irvine, Copyright (c) 1993-2002, all rights reserved. Portions of this software contain copyrighted material from The JBoss Group, LLC. Your right to use such materials is set forth in the GNU Lesser General Public License Agreement, which may be found at http://www.opensource.org/licenses/lgpl-license.php. The JBoss materials are provided free of charge by Informatica, “as-is”, without warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Portions of this software contain copyrighted material from Meta Integration Technology, Inc. Meta Integration® is a registered trademark of Meta Integration Technology, Inc. This product includes software developed by the Apache Software Foundation (http://www.apache.org/). The Apache Software is Copyright (c) 1999-2004 The Apache Software Foundation. All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: Informatica Corporation provides this documentation “as is” without warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of non-infringement, merchantability, or use for a particular purpose. The information provided in this documentation may include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Informatica could make improvements and/or changes in the products described in this documentation at any time without notice.

Table of Contents
List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi
New Features and Enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii PowerCenter 7.1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii PowerCenter 7.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xiv PowerCenter 7.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xviii About Informatica Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiv About this Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv Document Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv Other Informatica Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi Visiting Informatica Customer Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi Visiting the Informatica Webzine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi Visiting the Informatica Web Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi Visiting the Informatica Developer Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvi Obtaining Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii

Chapter 1: The Transformation Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Transformation Language Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Transformation Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Internationalization and the Transformation Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Expression Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Expression Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 General Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Adding Comments to Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Reserved Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Chapter 2: Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
DD_DELETE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 DD_INSERT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 DD_REJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
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Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 DD_UPDATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 FALSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 NULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Working with Null Values in Boolean Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Working with Null Values in Comparison Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Null Values in Aggregate Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Null Values in Filter Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Nulls with Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 TRUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Chapter 3: Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Operator Precedence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Arithmetic Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 String Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Nulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Comparison Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Logical Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Nulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Chapter 4: Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
System Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 $$$SessStartTime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 SESSSTARTTIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 SYSDATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 WORKFLOWSTARTTIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Transaction Control Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 TC_COMMIT_BEFORE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 TC_COMMIT_AFTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 TC_ROLLBACK_BEFORE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Local Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

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Chapter 5: Dates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Date/Time Datatype . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Julian Day, Modified Julian Day, and the Gregorian Calendar . . . . . . . . 34 Dates in the Year 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Dates in Relational Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Dates in Flat Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Default Date Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Date Format Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 TO_CHAR Format Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Understanding Date Arithmetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Chapter 6: Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Function Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Aggregate Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Aggregate Functions and Nulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Character Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Conversion Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Data Cleansing Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Date Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Numeric Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Scientific Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Special Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Test Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Variable Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 ABORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 ABS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 ADD_TO_DATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 ASCII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 AVG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 CEIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 CHR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 CHRCODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

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v

. . . . 125 MAX (Numbers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 MIN (Dates) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 INITCAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 LAST_DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 IS_NUMBER . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 FLOOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 MOD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 LOWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 ERROR . 126 MEDIAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 LOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 IIF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 DECODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 ISNULL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 FIRST . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 GET_DATE_PART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 LENGTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 LPAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 MIN (Numbers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 LOOKUP . . . . . . . . . . . 103 IS_DATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 IS_SPACES . 72 COS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 COSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 DATE_DIFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 MOVINGAVG . 123 MAX (Dates) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 DATE_COMPARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 CUME . . . . . . . . . . . 139 MOVINGSUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 LAST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 INSTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 COUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 LN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 LTRIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 EXP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 METAPHONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CONCAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 vi Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 VARIANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 SQRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 TO_INTEGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 RTRIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 ROUND (Numbers) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 SINH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 TANH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 SIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Aggregate Functions . . . . . . . . 166 SETMAXVARIABLE . . . . . . . . 182 STDDEV . . . . 175 SIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 TAN . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 TO_DECIMAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 SETMINVARIABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 POWER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 ROUND (Dates) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 UPPER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 SETCOUNTVARIABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 RPAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 TO_CHAR (Numbers) . . . . . . . . 183 SUBSTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 SET_DATE_PART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Table of Contents vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 TO_FLOAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 TRUNC (Numbers) . . . . 196 TO_DATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 SUM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 SETVARIABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 TRUNC (Dates) . . . . 191 TO_CHAR (Dates) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 REPLACECHR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 REPLACESTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 SOUNDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PERCENTILE . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Character Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Variable Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 Special Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 viii Table of Contents .Conversion Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Scientific Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Numeric Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Test Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Date Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Data Cleansing Functions . . . 228 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . ... . .. . . . . . . . 23 . . ..... ... . TO_CHAR Format Strings. . . Logical Operators in the Transformation Reference .. . . .. Datatype Expansion for $$$SessStartTime . . . Operators in the Transformation Language .. 3-3. . . . 5-3. . . . . . .. . .... . . 36 .. .. . . . . .. . . 40 .. . . . . . . . .. ... . . . . Arithmetic Operators in the Transformation Language . . TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings .. . 36 . . . .. .. .. . .. . . . . . . 25 . . 22 . .. . . . . . . 3-1. . . . ... . . . . .. . 39 . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. ... .. 26 .. . . ... . . 39 . . .. . . 5-4. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 43 130 180 List of Tables ix . . 5-2. .. . . . 18 . . SOUNDEX Encoding Guidelines for Consonants . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . Evaluating Null Values in Comparison Expressions . . . . .List of Tables Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table Table 1-1. . . 2-1. . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . 3-2... . . . . Date Format Strings in the Transformation Reference . . . .. . .. 4-1. . . .. METAPHONE Encoding Guidelines . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. ... . . . . . . .. . . . 5-6. . . . . . 5-5. . . . . . . . . . . RR Format String Conversions . . . .. Differences Between RR and YY Format Strings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1. . . . . . . Comparison Operators in the Transformation Language . . . 6 . . . . . . . . Date Functions that Use Date Format Strings . 6-2. . ... . . . . . . 5-1.. .. . . . . . . .. . . . 3-4. . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . Reference Qualifiers in Transformation Language . . 28 ... . . . .

x List of Tables .

Informatica’s software product that delivers an open. handle complex transformations on the data. PowerCenter combines the latest technology enhancements for reliably managing data repositories and delivering information resources in a timely. data migration. The PowerCenter Server can extract large volumes of data from multiple platforms. The PowerCenter metadata repository coordinates and drives a variety of core functions. usable.Preface Welcome to PowerCenter. scalable data integration solution addressing the complete life cycle for all data integration projects including data warehouses and data marts. loading. transforming. including extracting. xi . PowerCenter can simplify and accelerate the process of moving data warehouses from development to test to production. and support high-speed loads. data synchronization. and information hubs. and managing data. and efficient manner.

pmcmd. and MELCOM-kana. You can configure a maximum number of patterns and a minimum pattern frequency. a specified percentage of data. PowerCenter supports additional Japanese language code pages. session.New Features and Enhancements This section describes new features and enhancements to PowerCenter 7. You can save sessions that you create from the Profile Manager to the repository. pmcmd passes variables and values in the file to the PowerCenter Server.1. PowerCenter 7. and workflow prefixes. Row Uniqueness function.1. or for a specified number of rows starting with the first row. and workflows generated when you create a data profile. You may want to narrow the scope of patterns returned to view only the primary domains. You can create a data profile for a sample of source data instead of the entire source. or the rows that do not meet the business rule. When you create multiple partitions for a flat file source session.1.1 This section describes new features and enhancements to PowerCenter 7. session. You can configure the Data Profiling Wizard to filter the Domain Inference function results. JEF-kana. Flat file partitioning. sessions.0. Define mapping. You can determine unique rows for a source based on a selection of columns for the specified source. and 7. 7. Verbose data enhancements. You can specify the type of verbose data you want the PowerCenter Server to write to the Data Profiling warehouse. When you use a local parameter file. You can use parameter files that reside on a local machine with the Startworkflow command in the pmcmd program. the rows that meet the business rule. Profile mapping display in the Designer. xii Preface . The Designer displays profile mappings under a profile mappings node in the Navigator. such as JIPSEkana. and workflow prefixes for the mappings.1.1. You can view a profile from a random sample of data. Data Profiling ♦ Data sampling. The PowerCenter Server can write all rows.1. Domain Inference function tuning. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ PowerCenter Server ♦ ♦ ♦ Code page. you can configure the session to create multiple threads to read the flat file source. or you may want to widen the scope of patterns returned to view exception data. Session enhancement. You can define default mapping.

Security ♦ Oracle OS Authentication. and Sybase repositories. Teradata external loader. reswords. You can attach document types such as XML. Oracle. Reserved word support. JPEG. it searches for reswords. Enable enhanced security when you create a relational source or target connection in the repository. you can connect to IBM. target. You can use pmrep to perform the following functions: − − − Remove repositories from the Repository Server cache entry list. ♦ ♦ Repository ♦ Exchange metadata with other tools. GIF. When the PowerCenter Server initializes a session. or lookup table name or column name contains a database reserved word.txt in the PowerCenter Server installation directory. the PowerCenter Server places quotes around matching reserved words when it executes SQL against the database. Repository Server ♦ pmrep. Depending on the loader you use. you can pass attachments through the requests or responses in a service session. Use ODBC drivers to access other sources and targets. If any source. you can also override the error. Oracle. you can create and maintain a file. You can export or import multiple objects at a time. you can connect to IBM. You can now use Oracle OS Authentication to authenticate database users. such as Business Objects Designer. PowerCenter uses Oracle OS Authentication when the user name for an Oracle connection is PmNullUser. and repositories using native drivers. When you export metadata. and Sybase sources. On SuSE Linux.♦ SuSE Linux support. The Repository Server runs on SuSE Linux. the PowerCenter Client creates a file format recognized by the target tool. The document type you can attach is based on the mime content of the WSDL file. ♦ SuSE Linux support. You do not need to know a database user name and password. If the file exists. you can now override the control file. Update a connection attribute value when you update the connection. When you load to Teradata using an external loader. Oracle OS Authentication allows you to log on to an Oracle database if you have a logon to the operating system. You can exchange source and target metadata with other BI or data modeling tools. targets. and work table names by specifying different tables on the same or different Teradata database. DB2.txt. Preface xiii . or PDF. The PowerCenter Server runs on SuSE Linux. containing reserved words. log. When you import web service definitions with attachment groups. Web Services Provider ♦ Attachment support. On SuSE Linux. DB2.

PowerCenter 7. You can now select the columns or groups you want to include in an auto profile and enable verbose mode for the Distinct Value Count function. Purging data from the Data Profiling warehouse. This is a new book that describes the functionality of Real-time Web Services. The PowerCenter Server creates a connection to the Web Services Hub based on the number of sources. You can now create a data profile for VSAM sources. It also includes information from the version 7.♦ Pipeline partitioning. You can now pivot more than one multiple-occurring element in an XML view. targets. Licensing Informatica provides licenses for each CPU and each repository rather than for each installation. Support for verbose mode for source-level functions. Auto profiles now include the Aggregator function. XML ♦ Multi-level pivoting.1. You can now view PowerCenter Data Profiling reports in a separate browser window. connectivity.0 Web Services Hub Guide. You can now purge data from the Data Profiling warehouse. Data Profiling ♦ ♦ Data Profiling for VSAM sources. Source View in the Profile Manager. Aggregator function in auto profiles. and view verbose data for Distinct Value Count functions. resize columns in a report. and options. This book consolidates XML information previously documented in the Designer Guide. PowerCenter Data Profiling report enhancements. and partitions in the session. Creating auto profile enhancements. You can also pivot the view row. You can create multiple partitions in a session containing web service source and target definitions. Prepackaged domains. Workflow Administration Guide. Informatica provides a set of prepackaged domains that you can include in a Domain Validation function in a data profile. Informatica provides licenses for product. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Documentation ♦ ♦ Web Services Provider Guide. You can now view data profiles by source definition in the Profile Manager. You store xiv Preface .1 This section describes new features and enhancements to PowerCenter 7. XML User Guide. You can now create data profiles with source-level functions and write data to the Data Profiling warehouse in verbose mode. and Transformation Guide.

the license keys in a license key file. REP_VERSION_PROPS allows you to see the version history of all objects in a PowerCenter repository. upgrade. You can export metadata to and import metadata from other business intelligence tools. and the command line program. You can also use pmrep to create. You can increase repository performance by skipping information when you copy. Object import and export enhancements. You can now run 64-bit PowerCenter Servers on AIX and HP-UX (Itanium). the PowerCenter Server Setup. This improves processing performance for most sessions. truncate log files. Repository Server ♦ Updating repository statistics. You can choose to skip MX data. The PowerCenter Server now reads a block of rows at a time. ♦ ♦ Repository ♦ Exchange metadata with business intelligence tools. REP_SERVER_NET and REP_SERVER_NET_REF views allow you to see information about server grids. You can compare objects in an XML file to objects in the target repository when you import objects. This improves performance when PowerCenter accesses the repository. and delete a folder. PowerCenter Server processing enhancements. pmlic. or restore a repository. or enable a repository. PowerCenter now identifies and updates statistics for all repository tables and indexes when you copy. Partitioning enhancements. and restore repositories. modify. ♦ ♦ Preface xv . PowerCenter Server ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 64-bit support. and run multiple pmrep commands sequentially. and deploy group history. You can manage the license files using the Repository Server Administration Console. You can use pmrep to back up. delete a relational connection from a repository. pmrep. MX views have been added to help you analyze metadata stored in the repository. back up. such as Cognos Report Net and Business Objects. delete repository details. Increased repository performance. MX views.1 MX views in its schema. you can define up to 64 partitions at any partition point in a pipeline that supports multiple partitions. PowerCenter Metadata Reporter PowerCenter Metadata Reporter modified some report names and uses the PowerCenter 7. If you have the Partitioning option. You can now read and write CLOB/BLOB datatypes. workflow and session log history. disable. CLOB/BLOB datatype support.

the PowerCenter Server can ignore some ports when it compares values in lookup and input ports before it updates a row in the cache. The PowerCenter Server can perform parallel processing of both requestresponse and one-way services. ♦ xvi Preface . such as TIBCO or IBM MQSeries.Transformations ♦ Flat file lookup. Midstream XML transformations. the Designer invokes the Flat File Wizard. You can also extract data from messaging systems. When you create a Lookup transformation using a flat file as a lookup source. Web Services Provider ♦ Real-time Web Services. You can also use a lookup file parameter if you want to change the name or location of a lookup between session runs. The XML transformations enable you to extract XML data stored in relational tables. Enhanced printing. When you use a dynamic lookup cache. you can choose whether the PowerCenter Server outputs old or new values from the lookup/output ports when it updates a row. You can now perform lookups on flat files. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Usability ♦ ♦ Viewing active folders. The Web Services Hub now hosts Real-time Web Services in addition to Metadata Web Services and Batch Web Services. Union transformation. Version Control You can run object queries that return shortcut objects. or a collection of all older versions of objects. You can also run object queries based on the latest status of an object. such as data stored in a CLOB column. The Designer and the Workflow Manager highlight the active folder in the Navigator. Custom transformation API enhancements. The query can return local objects that are checked out. Also. You can install the Web Services Hub on a JBoss application server. You can use the Union transformation to merge multiple sources into a single pipeline. Real-time Web Services allows you to create services using the Workflow Manager and make them available to web service clients through the Web Services Hub. You might want to output old values from lookup/output ports when you use the Lookup transformation in a mapping that updates slowly changing dimension tables. Web Services Hub. You can now create an XML Parser transformation or an XML Generator transformation to parse or generate XML inside a pipeline. Use these functions to take advantage of the PowerCenter Server processing enhancements. The Custom transformation API includes new array-based functions that allow you to create procedure code that receives and outputs a block of rows at a time. The Union transformation is similar to using the UNION ALL SQL statement to combine the results from two or more SQL statements. The quality of printed workspace has improved. Dynamic lookup cache enhancements. the latest version of checked in objects.

The Workflow Monitor includes improved options for filtering tasks by start and end time. You can synchronize one or more XML definition when the underlying schema changes. You can open multiple instances of the Workflow Monitor on one machine. You can remove the Navigator and Output window. DTD files. or schema files. For more informations. Synchronizing XML definitions. the Designer creates separate entities for references and multiple-occurring elements. You can choose to generate XML views using hierarchy or entity relationships. The Workflow Monitor displays workflow runs in Task view chronologically with the most recent run at the top. add or delete columns from views. you no longer distinguish between online or offline mode. Workflow Monitor The Workflow Monitor includes the following performance and usability enhancements: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ When you connect to the PowerCenter Server. When you import XML definitions. XML workspace. You can use XML schemas that contain simple and complex datatypes. You can synchronize an XML definition with any repository definition or file used to create the XML definition. targets. such as TIBCO or IBM MQSeries. The XML transformations enable you to extract XML data stored in relational tables. XML files.Note: PowerCenter Connect for Web Services allows you to create sources. You can now create an XML Parser transformation or an XML Generator transformation to parse or generate XML inside a pipeline. Midstream XML transformations. see PowerCenter Connect for Web Services User and Administrator Guide. ♦ ♦ ♦ Preface xvii . such as data stored in a CLOB column. You can simultaneously monitor multiple PowerCenter Servers registered to the same repository. Additional options for XML definitions. You can create views. When you create views with entity relationships. You can edit XML views and relationships between views in the workspace. In a view with hierarchy relationships. including relational sources or targets. XML Support PowerCenter XML support now includes the following features: ♦ ♦ Enhanced datatype support. the Designer expands each element and reference under its parent element. You can also extract data from messaging systems. and transformations to call web services hosted by other providers. you can choose how you want the Designer to represent the metadata associated with the imported files. It displays folders alphabetically. and define relationships between views.

You can specify the size of the cache used to store the XML tree. For example. After you create a profiling warehouse. The connectivity information in the Installation and Configuration Guide is consolidated into two chapters. Data Integration Web Services You can use Data Integration Web Services to write applications to communicate with the PowerCenter Server. you can profile source data to evaluate source data and detect patterns and exceptions. The Installation and Configuration Guide now contains a chapter titled “Upgrading Repository Metadata. The PowerCenter Client provides a Profile Manager and a Profile Wizard to complete these tasks. This book now contains chapters titled “Connecting to Databases from Windows” and “Connecting to Databases from UNIX. You can create XML files of several gigabytes in a PowerCenter 7. you can create profiling mappings and run sessions. Circular references occur when an element is a direct or indirect child of itself. Load Manager and Metadata Exchange Web Services running on the Web Services Hub. Installation and Configuration Guide. and evaluate join criteria. Increased performance for large XML targets. PowerCenter now supports XML files.0 This section describes new features and enhancements to PowerCenter 7.0.1 XML session by using the following enhancements: − ♦ Spill to disk. Data Integration Web Services is a web-enabled version of the PowerCenter Server functionality available through Load Manager and Metadata Exchange. Then you can view reports based on the profile data in the profiling warehouse. You can also define the file names for XML output files in the mapping. Documentation ♦ ♦ Glossary. You can output XML data to multiple XML targets. suggest candidate keys. − − PowerCenter 7. Support for multiple XML output files. you can determine implicit data type.” This chapter describes changes to repository ♦ xviii Preface . It is comprised of two services for communication with the PowerCenter Server. Data Profiling If you have the Data Profiling option.♦ Support for circular references. User-defined commits. DTD files. the XML data spills to disk in order to free up memory. The Installation and Configuration Guide contains a glossary of new PowerCenter terms.” Upgrading metadata. If the size of the tree exceeds the cache size. detect data patterns. You can define commits to trigger flushes for XML target files. and XML schemas that use circular definitions.

Metaphone. Row error logging. External loading enhancements. When using external loaders on UNIX. It encodes both uppercase and lowercase letters in uppercase. server load. When using external loaders on Windows. session completion status. and distribute it to other users to install the PowerCenter Client. PowerCenter Servers balance the workload among all the servers in the grid. session errors.1. METAPHONE encodes characters of the English language alphabet (A-Z). In a server grid. You can specify the length of the string that you want to encode. You can choose to log row errors in a central location to help understand the cause and source of errors. including session load time. ♦ PowerCenter Server ♦ ♦ DB2 bulk loading. The Metaphone function encodes string values.objects impacted by the upgrade process. You can use PowerCenter Metadata Reporter to analyze operational metadata. You access the Informatica installation CD from the command line to create the control file and install the product. worklets. Metadata analysis.0 metadata. Consult the upgrade information in this chapter for each upgraded object to determine whether the upgrade applies to your current version of PowerCenter. The Soundex function encodes a string value into a four-character string. source and target tables. you can now choose to load from staged files. Functions ♦ Soundex. It uses the first character of the input string as the first character in the return value and encodes the remaining three unique consonants as numbers. PowerCenter Metadata Reporter includes the following features: ♦ Metadata browsing. The session configuration object has new properties that allow you to define error logging. Distributed processing. You can use PowerCenter Metadata Reporter to browse PowerCenter 7. you can now choose to load from a named pipe. and transformations. Preface xix ♦ ♦ . ♦ Installation ♦ Remote PowerCenter Client installation. you can group PowerCenter Servers registered to the same repository into a server grid. and warehouse growth. If you purchase the Server Grid option. such as workflows. You can create a control file containing installation information. The change in functionality for existing objects depends on the version of the existing objects. mappings. PowerCenter Metadata Reporter PowerCenter Metadata Reporter replaces Runtime Metadata Reporter and Informatica Metadata Reporter. SOUNDEX works for characters in the English alphabet (A-Z). You can enable bulk loading when you load to IBM DB2 8.

You can now use data driven load mode with Teradata external loaders. If you use LDAP. The Repository Agent logs security changes to a log file stored in the Repository Server installation directory. The deployment and object import commands require you to use a control file to define options and resolve conflicts. You can also use pmrep to run queries. the security module passes your login name to the external directory for authentication. upsert. Real time processing enhancements. This enables more efficient joins with minimal usage of memory and disk cache. You can export and import multiple objects and objects types. or update.♦ External loading using Teradata Warehouse Builder. ♦ ♦ ♦ Repository Server ♦ Object export and import enhancements. When you log in to the repository. Use Repository Manager privilege. You can use Teradata Warehouse Builder to load to Teradata. You can now export and import objects using the Repository Manager and pmrep. groups. It writes a column in the target file or named pipe to indicate the update strategy. You do not have to delete user names from the repository. You can track changes to repository users. maintain labels. such as maintaining deployment groups and labels. You can now enable or disable users from accessing the repository by changing the status. and change object status. Concurrent processing. You can use pmrep to perform change management tasks. such as copy object. You can now use a Microsoft SQL Server trusted connection to connect to the repository. and listing objects. You can perform the same tasks in the Designer and Workflow Manager if you have the Use Designer and Use Workflow Manager privileges. You can now use default repository user authentication or Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) to authenticate users. You can also export objects from a query result or objects history. The control file uses these values to determine how to load data to the target. You can apply the transformation logic to rows defined by transaction boundaries. such as the Aggregator transformation. The ♦ ♦ xx Preface . ♦ ♦ Security ♦ LDAP user authentication. pmrep commands. The repository maintains a status for each user. the repository maintains an association between your repository user name and your external login name. The Use Repository Manager privilege allows you to perform tasks in the Repository Manager. privileges. Audit trail. the PowerCenter Server flags rows for insert. You can now use real-time processing in sessions that also process active transformations. update. importing. Teradata Warehouse Builder can simultaneously read from multiple sources and load data into one or more tables. Mixed mode processing for Teradata external loaders. deploying. Additionally. The PowerCenter Server now reads data concurrently from sources within a target load order group. You can choose to insert. When you select data driven loading. and permissions through the Repository Server Administration Console. checking in. exporting. or delete data. You can export and import objects with or without their dependent objects. delete. Trusted connections.

distribute the template with the DLL or shared library you develop. and workflows in the Workflow Manager. Deployment. you can purge it from the repository. and you can compile the procedure with any C compiler. You can create templates that customize the appearance and available properties of a Custom transformation you develop. The Repository Manager and Workflow Manager allow you to compare two repository objects of the same type to identify differences between them. Custom transformations operate in conjunction with procedures you create outside of the Designer interface to extend PowerCenter functionality. If you want to permanently remove an object version.audit trail log contains information. You can compare Designer objects and Workflow Manager objects in the Repository Manager. This allows you to store multiple copies of a given object during the development cycle. adding or removing a user or group. You can check out and reserve an object you want to edit. Version control allows you to maintain multiple versions of an object. This gives you greater control over the specific objects copied from one repository to another. You can delete an object from view and continue to store it in the repository. copying a deployment group allows you to copy a select number of objects from multiple folders in the source repository to multiple folders in the target repository. You can recover or undelete deleted objects. the colors. Check out and check in versioned objects. You can create Custom transformations with multiple input and output groups. and check in the object when you are ready to create a new version of the object in the repository. worklets. such as changes to folder properties. Version control in PowerCenter includes the following features: ♦ Object versioning. and adding or removing privileges. The PowerCenter Client tools allow you to compare objects across open folders and repositories. The Custom transformation replaces the Advanced External Procedure transformation. Each version is a separate object with unique properties. You can also compare different versions of the same object. Compare objects. and use deployment groups to copy specific groups of objects from one repository to another. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Preface xxi . Delete or purge a version. You can compare tasks. track changes. Transformations ♦ Custom transformation. Individual objects in the repository are now versioned. sessions. You can use the Joiner transformation to join two data streams that originate from the same source. ♦ Joiner transformation. Unlike copying a folder. When you create a Custom transformation template. and the properties a mapping developer can modify. Version Control The PowerCenter Client and repository introduce features that allow you to create and manage multiple versions of objects in the repository. control development on the object. You can specify the icons used for transformation.

or you can share it with all users in the repository. You can copy objects within folders. XPath support. XML target enhancements. This allows you to see the changes made to an object over time. You can compare workflows and tasks from the Workflow Manager. This allows you to associate multiple objects in groups defined by the label. You can create a static deployment group that you manually add objects to. Labels. You can also configure the PowerCenter Server to not output empty elements to the XML target. use XPath to locate XML nodes. A label is an object that you can apply to versioned objects in the repository. You can use an XML schema to validate an XML file and to generate source and target definitions. You can create a query that specifies conditions to search for objects in the repository. and organize groups of objects for deployment or export and import. increase performance for large XML files. When you process an XML file or stream. to other folders. You can make a private query. you can set commits and periodically flush XML data to the target instead of writing all the output at the end of the session. improve query results. You can choose to append the data to the same target file or create a new target file after each flush. ♦ ♦ ♦ Usability ♦ Copying objects. You can format the XML target file so that you can easily view the XML file in a text editor. You can now copy objects from all the PowerCenter Client tools using the copy wizard to resolve conflicts. XML schemas also allow you to define some complex datatypes. You can save queries for later use. or create a dynamic deployment group that uses a query to populate the group. Track changes to an object. Comparing objects. Within the Designer. You can view a history that includes all versions of an object and compare any version of the object in the history to any other version. You can use labels to track versioned objects during development. and to different repositories. Queries. and parse or generate XML data from various sources. You can also compare all objects from within the Repository Manager.♦ Deployment groups. The XML wizard allows you to view the structure of XML schema. You can use XPath to locate XML nodes. declare multiple namespaces. format your XML file output for increased readability. You can create a deployment group that contains references to objects from multiple folders across the repository. you can also copy segments of mappings to a workspace in a new folder or repository. ♦ ♦ ♦ XML Support PowerCenter contains XML features that allow you to validate an XML file against an XML schema. XML schemas allow you to declare multiple namespaces so you can use prefixes for elements and attributes. Increased performance for large XML files. ♦ xxii Preface . XML support in PowerCenter includes the following features: ♦ XML schema.

You can save and optionally check in objects that change from invalid to valid status as a result of the validation. When you edit a port in a mapping. the Workflow Manager accesses the repository to retrieve the last-saved version of the object. The PowerCenter Client writes messages in the Output window that describe why it invalidates a mapping or workflow when you modify a dependent object. mappings. View dependencies. The Session Wizard is enhanced to provide a graphical depiction of a mapping when you configure partitioning. you can choose to propagate changed attributes throughout the mapping. You can view parent and child dependencies and global shortcuts across repositories. Enhanced partitioning interface. Validate multiple objects. mapplets. In the Workflow Manager. and worklets. The Designer propagates ports. or workflows. You can now revert to the last saved version of an object in the Workflow Manager. You can validate multiple objects in the repository without fetching them into the workspace.♦ Change propagation. targets. Before you edit or delete versioned objects. and conditions based on the direction that you propagate and the attributes you choose to propagate. workflows. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Preface xxiii . such as sources. expressions. Revert to saved. When you do this. Enhanced validation messages. Refresh session mappings. Viewing dependencies help you modify objects and composite objects without breaking dependencies. you can view dependencies to see the impact on other objects. you can refresh a session mapping. mappings. You can validate sessions.

Provides information to help you create and run workflows in the Workflow Manager. and permissions and privileges. Provides information on how to create and configure each type of transformation in the Designer. such as creating and maintaining repositories. including details on environment variables and database connections. Provides information to install PowerCenter Connect for JMS. Batch Web Services. The Web Services Hub hosts Real-time Web Services. Troubleshooting Guide. Includes information to help you create mappings. extract data from JMS messages. and load data into JMS messages. Provides information needed to use the Designer. PowerCenter Connect® for JMS® User and Administrator Guide. Also includes a description of the transformation datatypes used to process and transform source data. Installation and Configuration Guide. Provides syntax descriptions and examples for each transformation function provided with PowerCenter. Web Services Provider Guide. Lists error messages that you might encounter while using PowerCenter. build mappings. Includes information on running sessions with XML data. Provides information about how to profile PowerCenter sources to evaluate source data and detect patterns and exceptions. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ xxiv Preface . Transformation Guide. Provides information needed to install and configure the PowerCenter tools. folders. mapplets.About Informatica Documentation The complete set of documentation for PowerCenter includes the following books: ♦ ♦ Data Profiling Guide. Also includes details on using the midstream XML transformations to parse or generate XML data within a pipeline. Transformation Language Reference. Each error message includes one or more possible causes and actions that you can take to correct the condition. Provides information you need to create XML definitions from XML. and relational or other XML definitions. Includes details on functionality available in the Repository Manager and Administration Console. as well as monitor workflows in the Workflow Monitor. Getting Started. Also contains information on administering the PowerCenter Server and performance tuning. This guide also provides information about how to use the web services that the Web Services Hub hosts. users. and transformations. Workflow Administration Guide. XSD. Designer Guide. and Metadata Web Services. Provides basic tutorials for getting started. groups. Provides information you need to install and configure the Web Services Hub. or DTD files. XML User Guide. Provides information needed to administer the repository using the Repository Manager or the pmrep command line program. Repository Guide.

Emphasized subjects. relational database concepts. The following paragraph provides suggested uses.About this Book The Transformation Language Reference is written for the developers who are responsible for building mappings to load a data warehouse. The following paragraph notes situations where you can overwrite or corrupt data. The Transformation Language Reference assumes you have knowledge of SQL. unless you follow the specified procedure. This is the variable name for a value you enter as part of an operating system command. italicized text boldfaced text italicized monospaced text Note: Tip: Warning: monospaced text bold monospaced text Preface xxv . This is a code example. The material in this book is available for online use. The following paragraph provides additional facts. Document Conventions This guide uses the following formatting conventions: If you see… It means… The word or set of words are especially emphasized. This is an operating system command you enter from a prompt to run a task. and the interface requirements for your supporting applications. This is generic text that should be replaced with user-supplied values.

the Informatica Webzine.com. as well as literature and partner information. The Informatica Webzine is a password-protected site that you can access through the Customer Portal. access to the Informatica customer support case management system (ATLAS). The services area of the site includes important information on technical support. Visiting the Informatica Developer Network The Informatica Developer Network is a web-based forum for third-party software developers. please email webzine@informatica. upcoming events. Informatica Webzine.com. To register for an account. detailed descriptions of specific features. and implementation services. user group information.com xxvi Preface . Visiting the Informatica Webzine The Informatica Documentation team delivers an online journal.informatica. newsletters. and locating your closest sales office.Other Informatica Resources In addition to the product manuals. The site contains information about Informatica. You will also find product information.informatica. The site contains product information.informatica. and tips and tricks to help you develop data warehouses. you can access the Informatica Customer Portal site at http:// my. The Customer Portal has an online registration form for login accounts to its webzine and web support. Informatica provides these other resources: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Informatica Customer Portal Informatica Webzine Informatica web site Informatica Developer Network Informatica Technical Support Visiting Informatica Customer Portal As an Informatica customer. You can access the Informatica Developer Network at the following URL: http://devnet. This journal provides solutions to common tasks. training and education.com. go to http://my.com. its background. Visiting the Informatica Web Site You can access Informatica’s corporate web site at http://www. the Informatica Knowledgebase. If you have any questions.informatica. and access to the Informatica user community.

and support customer-oriented addon solutions based on Informatica’s interoperability interfaces.m. . (local time) Germany Phone: +49 1805 702 702 Hours: 9 a.m. (local time) France Phone: +33 1 41 38 92 26 Hours: 9 a.5:30 p.5:30 p.m.m. . . CA 94063 Phone: 866. .m.m. (local time) Netherlands Phone: +31 306 082 089 Hours: 9 a.m. .6 p.5:30 p. White Waltham Maidenhead.m.5:30 p. (GMT) email: support_eu@informatica.213.m. (local time) Preface xxvii . . Berkshire SL6 3TN Phone: 44 870 606 1525 Fax: +44 1628 511 411 Hours: 9 a.9489 Hours: 6 a. (PST/PDT) email: support@informatica.com Africa / Asia / Australia / Europe Informatica Software Ltd. (local time) Singapore Phone: +65 322 8589 Hours: 9 a.com Belgium Phone: +32 15 281 702 Hours: 9 a.m.m.m.5 p. market.The site contains information on how to create. 6 Waltham Park Waltham Road. Redwood City.385.m. .5:30 p. You can request a user name and password at http://my. You can call or email your nearest Technical Support Center listed below or you can use our WebSupport Service.m.informatica.6332 or 650.5 p. .563. (local time) Switzerland Phone: +41 800 81 80 70 Hours: 8 a. North America / South America Informatica Corporation 2100 Seaport Blvd. WebSupport requires a user name and password.com.m.m.5800 Fax: 650. Obtaining Technical Support There are many ways to access Informatica technical support.

xxviii Preface .

It includes the following topics: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Overview.Chapter 1 The Transformation Language This chapter provides a general overview of the transformation language. 10 For information about supported datatypes and data conversions. 2 Expression Syntax. 9 Reserved Words. see “Datatype Reference” in the Designer Guide. 5 Adding Comments to Expressions. 1 .

You can also create local variables in transformations. Return values. Create workflow variables for use within a workflow to write expressions referencing values that change from workflow to workflow. ♦ ♦ ♦ 2 Chapter 1: The Transformation Language . The Designer allows you to write expressions in the following transformations: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Aggregator Expression Filter Rank Router Update Strategy Link condition Decision task Assignment task The Workflow Manager allows you to write expressions in the following tasks and conditions: ♦ ♦ ♦ Transformation Language Components The transformation language includes the following components to help you create simple or complex transformation expressions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Functions. For more information. Use built-in variables to write expressions that reference value that vary. Operators. see “Mapping Parameters and Variables” in the Designer Guide. see “Working with Workflows” in the Workflow Administration Guide. Use transformation operators to create transformation expressions to perform mathematical computations. such as TRUE. Over 60 SQL-like functions allow you to change data in a mapping. You can write expressions in both the Designer and the Workflow Manager. and External Procedure transformations. Constants. Create mapping parameters for use within a mapping or mapplet to reference values that remain constant throughout a session. Local and system variables. Create mapping variables in mapplets or mappings to write expressions referencing values that change from session to session. Mapping parameters and variables. such as the system date. such as a state sales tax rate. Workflow variables. or compare data. The transformation language includes SQL-like functions so you can write expressions that modify data or test whether data matches conditions. Use built-in constants to reference values that remain constant. For details. You can also write expressions that include the return values from Lookup. Stored Procedure. combine data.Overview PowerCenter provides a transformation language to help you write expressions to transform source data.

You can create an expression as simple as a port. see “Transformations” in the Designer Guide. such as ORDERS. Internationalization and the Transformation Language Transformation language functions can handle character data in either ASCII or Unicode data movement mode. you might use the AVG function to calculate the average salary of all your employees. For example. the PowerCenter Server writes results to the target tables based on the update strategies you define. For example. such as 10. such as IIF and DECODE MIN and MAX also return values based on the sort order associated with the PowerCenter Server code page.For details on creating expressions and local variables in the Designer. or a numeric literal. Use Unicode mode to handle multibyte character data. For example. or the SUM function to calculate the total sales for a specific branch. When you validate an invalid expression in the expression editor. “>>>>”. Transformation Expressions With the transformation language. You can also write complex expressions that include functions nested within functions. the LENGTH function returns the number of characters in a Overview 3 . a dialog box displays the expression with an error indicator. not byte-oriented. you can create a transformation expression that takes the data from a port and changes it. For a detailed discussion of how transformation expressions are evaluated. if the expression a = b + c contains an error at c. during a workflow. This indicator appears to the left of and points to the part of the expression containing the error. Then. The return values of the following functions and transformations depend on the code page of the PowerCenter Server and the data movement mode: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ INITCAP LOWER UPPER MIN (Date) MIN (Number) MAX (Date) MAX (Number) Any function that uses conditional statements to compare strings. the error message displays: a = b + >>>> c Transformation language functions that evaluate character data are character-oriented. or combine different ports using the transformation language operators. see “Transformations” in the Designer Guide.

not the number of bytes.string. The LOWER function returns a string in lowercase based on the code page of the PowerCenter Server. 4 Chapter 1: The Transformation Language .

SQL supports the keywords AS and FROM for nonaggregate functions and ALL and DISTINCT for aggregate functions. For example. or combine different columns using the transformation language operators. variable) String literals. or a numeric literal (such as 10). while SQL does not. a pre-defined workflow variable (such as $Start.Expression Syntax Although the transformation language is based on standard SQL. You can create an expression that is as simple as a port (such as ORDERS). the transformation language supports an optional filter condition for aggregate functions.Status). but the transformation language does not. it is not exactly like SQL. You can also write complex expressions that include functions nested within functions. On the other hand. Expression Components Expressions can consist of any combination of the following components: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Ports (input. numeric literals Constants Functions Local and system variables Mapping parameters and mapping variables Pre-defined workflow variables User-defined workflow variables Operators Return values Expression Syntax 5 . input/output.

CURRVAL :SP Required when you write an expression that includes the return value from an unconnected Stored Procedure transformation..5 LOOKUP function.sequence_generator_transformation.external_procedure_transformation(argument1. :SD Optional (PowerMart 3. ... For example: 'Alice Davis' String literals are case-sensitive and can contain any character except a single quotation mark. The datatypes for the local ports must exactly match the datatype of the Lookup ports used in the lookup condition.ITEM_NAME. The general syntax is: :SP. :TD. argument2.PRICE..5 expressions only). [. The order must match the order of the ports in the transformation. The general syntax is: :SEQ. :TD Required when you reference a target table in a PowerMart 3.99) String and Numeric Literals You can include numeric or string literals.source_table.) :LKP Required when you create an expression that includes the return value from an unconnected Lookup transformation. The general syntax is: :EXT. use the reference qualifiers in Table 1-1: Table 1-1. PROC_RESULT]) The arguments must match the arguments in the unconnected Stored Procedure transformation.SALES.SALES.) The arguments are the local ports used in the lookup condition. .stored_procedure_transformation( argument1. the following string is not allowed: 'Joan's car' To return a string containing a single quote. 10. argument2. The general syntax is: :LKP.SALES.column_name :SEQ Required when you create an expression that includes a port in a Sequence Generator transformation.ITEM_ID. For example. The general syntax is: LOOKUP(:TD. Qualifies a source table port in an expression. 15. Reference Qualifiers in Transformation Language Reference Qualifier :EXT Description Required when you write an expression that includes a return value from an External Procedure transformation.lookup_transformation(argument1. Be sure to enclose string literals within single quotation marks. The general syntax is: :SD.Ports and Return Values When you write an expression that includes a port or return value from an unconnected transformation. use the CHR function: 'Joan' || CHR(39) || 's car' 6 Chapter 1: The Transformation Language . :TD. argument2.

For example: . see “Working with Workflows” in the Workflow Administration Guide. Except for literals. For example. as the start position. Use the ports tab in the Expression Editor to enter a port name into an expression. and operators see corresponding chapters in this guide. not a string. or the results of another expression. For example. literal string or number. ‘1’. If you need to create both single-level and nested functions. variable. For example. The PowerCenter Server treats a dash (-) as a minus operator. Do not use quotation marks for literal numbers. and period (.Do not use single quotation marks with numeric literals. The colon (:). local and system variables. the Designer propagates the name change to expressions in the transformation. Just type the number you want to include. 10) is not valid because the SUBSTR function requires an integer value.) have special meaning and should be used only to specify syntax. the transformation language is not case-sensitive. Separate each argument in a function with a comma. ♦ You can pass a value from a port. create separate Aggregator transformations. Except for literals. Lookup transformation. General Rules These general rules apply when writing all expressions: ♦ You cannot include both single-level and nested aggregate functions in an Aggregator transformation.05 or $$Sales_Tax Note: For details on constants. the expression SUBSTR(TEXT_VAL. comma (. mapping parameters and variables. The PowerCenter Server treats any string value enclosed in single quotation marks as a character string. If you rename a port in a connected transformation. Stored Procedure transformation. Expression Syntax 7 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ .). For details on workflow variables. ♦ You cannot use strings in numeric expressions. ♦ You cannot mix datatypes when using comparison operators. enclose literal strings within single quotation marks. the expression 123. External Procedure transformation.4 = ‘123. the Designer and PowerCenter Server ignore spaces. If you pass a literal value to a function.4’ is not valid because it compares a decimal value with a string. functions. You cannot add an integer and a string. the expression 1 + ‘1’ is not valid because you can only perform addition on numeric datatypes. ♦ You cannot use strings as numeric parameters.

which allow only one nested aggregate function). ♦ ♦ For more information on entering expressions. see “Transformations” in the Designer Guide and “Working with Workflows” in the Workflow Administration Guide. do not use quotation marks to designate mapping parameters or variables or workflow variables.♦ When you pass a mapping parameter or variable or a workflow variable to a function within an expression. The PowerCenter Server evaluates the expression starting with the innermost function. You can nest multiple functions within an expression (except aggregate functions. 8 Chapter 1: The Transformation Language . Do not use quotation marks to designate ports.

you can add them by clicking Comment in the Expression Editor. as in: // These are comments The PowerCenter Server ignores all text on a line preceded by these two comment specifiers.This expression concatenates first and last names for customers: FIRST_NAME -.First names from the CUST table || // Concat symbol LAST_NAME // Last names from the CUST table // Joe Smith Aug 18 1998 The PowerCenter Server ignores the comments and evaluates the expression as follows: FIRST_NAME || LAST_NAME You cannot continue a comment to a new line: -. the Designer and Workflow Manager do not validate the expression. Adding Comments to Expressions 9 . if you want to concatenate two strings.Adding Comments to Expressions The transformation language provides two comment specifiers to let you insert comments in expressions: ♦ Two dashes. you can enter the following expression with comments in the middle of the expression: -. For example.First names from the CUST table || // Concat symbol LAST_NAME // Last names from the CUST table Joe Smith Aug 18 1998 In this case.This expression concatenates first and last names for customers: FIRST_NAME -. as in: -. If you do not want to embed comments.These are comments ♦ Two slashes. since the last line is not a valid expression.

These include: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ :EXT :LKP :SD :SEQ :SP :TD AND DD_DELETE DD_INSERT DD_REJECT DD_UPDATE FALSE NOT NULL OR PROC_RESULT SESSSTARTTIME SPOUTPUT SYSDATE TRUE WORKFLOWSTARTTIME ABORTED DISABLED FAILED NOTSTARTED STARTED STOPPED SUCCEEDED The following words are reserved for workflow expressions only: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Note: You cannot use a reserved word to name a port or local variable. operators. are reserved for specific functions. 10 Chapter 1: The Transformation Language .Reserved Words Some keywords in the transformation language. You can only use reserved words within transformation and workflow expressions. Reserved words have predefined meanings in expressions. and system variables. such as constants.

Chapter 2 Constants This chapter describes how to use the built-in constants of the transformation language: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ DD_DELETE. 13 DD_REJECT. 16 NULL. 19 11 . 17 TRUE. 15 FALSE. 12 DD_INSERT. 14 DD_UPDATE.

DD_DELETE Flags records for deletion in an update strategy expression. 12 Chapter 2: Constants . When you run a workflow. and all other items for insertion: IIF( ITEM_ID = 1001. DD_INSERT ) This update strategy expression uses numeric literals to produce the same result: IIF( ITEM_ID = 1001. 2. DD_DELETE. select the data-driven update strategy to delete records from a target based on this flag. It is easier to troubleshoot complex numeric expressions if you use DD_DELETE. Informatica recommends using DD_DELETE instead of the integer literal 2. Note: Use the DD_DELETE constant in the Update Strategy transformation only. Example The following expression marks items with an ID number of 1001 for deletion. DD_DELETE is equivalent to the integer literal 2. 0 ) Note: The expression using constants is easier to read than the expression using numeric literals.

DD_INSERT is equivalent to the integer literal 0. Examples The following examples modify a mapping that calculates monthly sales per salesperson. Note: Use the DD_INSERT constant in the Update Strategy transformation only. The following update strategy expression uses SESSSTARTTIME to find only those orders that shipped in the last two days and flag them for insertion. DD_INSERT ) DD_INSERT 13 . and rejects everything else: IIF( EMPLOYEE. 0 ) > 2.DD_INSERT Flags records for insertion in an update strategy expression. Because DATE_DIFF returns a Double value. DD_REJECT ) This update strategy expression uses numeric literals to produce the same result: IIF( EMPLOYEE. It is easier to troubleshoot complex numeric expressions if you use DD_INSERT. When you run a workflow. 'DD' ). DD_INSERT. ORDERS. Informatica recommends using DD_INSERT instead of the integer literal 0. the expression uses TRUNC to truncate the difference. 3 ) Tip: The expression using constants is easier to read than the expression using numeric literals.NAME = 'Alex'. returning the difference between the two dates.DATE_SHIPPED. it flags them for insertion: IIF( TRUNC( DATE_DIFF( SESSSTARTTIME. If the result is greater than 2. the expression subtracts DATE_SHIPPED from the system date. Using DATE_DIFF. 0. so you can examine the sales of just one salesperson. It then compares the result to the integer literal 2. the expression flags the records for rejection.NAME = 'Alex'. The following update strategy expression flags an employee’s sales for insertion.DD_REJECT. If the result is 2 or less. select the data-driven update strategy to write records to a target based on this flag.

Examples The following examples modify a mapping that calculates the sales for the current month. DD_INSERT ) 14 Chapter 2: Constants . so it includes only positive values. DD_REJECT. DD_INSERT. The following data-driven example uses DD_REJECT and IS_SPACES to avoid writing spaces to a character column in a target table. the PowerCenter Server skips the record and writes it to the session reject file. This expression flags records that consist entirely of spaces for reject and flags all others for insert: IIF( IS_SPACES( CUST_NAMES ).SALES > 0. Note: Use the DD_REJECT constant in the Update Strategy transformation only. DD_REJECT is equivalent to the integer literal 3. 0. It is easier to troubleshoot complex numeric expressions if you use DD_REJECT. Use DD_REJECT to filter or validate data. When you run a workflow. Informatica recommends using DD_REJECT instead of the integer literal 3.SALES > 0. If you flag a record as reject. 3 ) Notice that the expression using constants is easier to read than the expression using numeric literals.DD_REJECT Flags records for rejection in an update strategy expression. This update strategy expression flags records less than zero for reject and all others for insert: IIF( ORDERS. select the data-driven update strategy to reject records from a target based on this flag. DD_REJECT ) This expression uses numeric literals to produce the same result: IIF( ORDERS.

the expression uses TRUNC to truncate the difference. The following update strategy expression uses SYSDATE to find only those orders that have shipped in the last two days and flag them for insertion. select the data-driven update strategy to write records to a target based on this flag. ORDERS. If the result is 2 or less. DD_REJECT. the expression flags the records for rejection. Using DATE_DIFF. 'DD' ). When you run a workflow. DD_UPDATE is equivalent to the integer literal 1. DD_UPDATE. the expression subtracts DATE_SHIPPED from the system date. Because DATE_DIFF returns a Double value. it flags them for rejection: IIF( TRUNC( DATE_DIFF( SYSDATE.NAME = 'Alex'. If the result is greater than 2. This expression flags records for Alex as updates and flags all others for rejection: IIF( EMPLOYEE. DD_UPDATE ) DD_UPDATE 15 . 1. It then compares the result to the integer literal 2.DATE_SHIPPED. otherwise. The mapping loads sales for one employee. flagging Alex’s sales for update (1) and flagging all other sales records for rejection (3): IIF( EMPLOYEE. It is easier to troubleshoot complex numeric expressions if you use DD_UPDATE. Examples The following examples modify a mapping that calculates sales for the current month. it flags the records for update. Informatica recommends using DD_UPDATE instead of the integer literal 1.DD_UPDATE Flags records for update in an update strategy expression. returning the difference between the two dates. 0 ) > 2. 3 ) Notice that the expression using constants is easier to read than the expression using numeric literals. DD_REJECT ) This expression uses numeric literals to produce the same result.NAME = 'Alex'. Note: Use the DD_UPDATE constant in the Update Strategy transformation only.

'.FALSE Clarifies a conditional expression. Var2 > 30. 'Variables were out of desired ranges. FALSE is equivalent to the integer 0. 'Variable 2 was more than 30. Var1 < 23.'Variable 1 was 22!'. This is useful if you want to perform multiple searches based on a single search value: DECODE( FALSE.'. Example The following example uses FALSE in a DECODE expression to return values based on the results of a comparison. Var2 = 49.') 16 Chapter 2: Constants . Var1 = 22. 'Variable 1 was less than 23.'Variable 2 was 49!'.

!=. However. Therefore. For example. <>. the PowerCenter Server produces the following results: ♦ ♦ NULL AND TRUE = NULL NULL AND FALSE = FALSE Working with Null Values in Comparison Expressions By default. Working with Null Values in Boolean Expressions Expressions that combine a null value with a Boolean expression produces results that are ANSI compliant. >=. the PowerCenter Server parameter is TreatNullInComparisonOperatorsAs. or it might ignore null values. you can also configure the PowerCenter Server to treat null values as high or low in comparison operations. when you use a null value in an expression containing a comparison operator. NULL is not equivalent to a blank or empty string (for character columns) or zero (for numerical columns). ^=. any column that has the NOT NULL or PRIMARY KEY constraint will not accept nulls. if the PowerCenter Server tries to write a null value to a column with one of these constraints. the PowerCenter Server produces a null value. For details on how each function handles null values. >. For more information. Functions can handle nulls differently. When you configure the PowerCenter Server on UNIX.NULL Indicates that a value is either unknown or undefined. it might return zero or NULL. This PowerCenter Server configuration property affects the behavior of the following comparison operators in expressions: =. Be sure to consider nulls when you create transformations. suppose you have the following expressions: NULL > 1 NULL = NULL NULL 17 . Configure how the PowerCenter Server handles null values in comparison expressions on the Configuration tab of the PowerCenter Server setup using the Treat Null In Comparison Operators As property. <= For example. the database will reject the row and the PowerCenter Server will write it to the reject file. If you pass a null value to a function. <. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” and “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. see “Functions” on page 49. Although you can write expressions that return nulls.

see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. 18 Chapter 2: Constants . Null Values in Filter Conditions If a filter condition evaluates to NULL. the function does not select the record. MOVINGAVG. use the ISNULL function. you can choose how you want it to handle null values in aggregate functions. Evaluating Null Values in Comparison Expressions Expression NULL > 1 NULL = NULL Treat Null in Comparison Operators As NULL NULL NULL HIGH TRUE TRUE LOW FALSE TRUE Null Values in Aggregate Functions By default. which returns zero). For example. the following expression evaluates to NULL: 8 * 10 . For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. the aggregate function returns NULL (except COUNT. when you configure the PowerCenter Server.Table 2-1 describes how the PowerCenter Server evaluates the expressions: Table 2-1. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. Nulls with Operators Any expression that uses operators (except the string operator ||) and contains a null value always evaluates to NULL.NULL To test for nulls. as well as CUME. If the filter condition evaluates to NULL for all records in the selected port. You use filter conditions with aggregate functions. However. You can have the PowerCenter Server treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULLs. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as nulls in aggregate functions. the function returns NULL. and MOVINGSUM.

') TRUE 19 . 'Variable 1 was less than 23. This is useful if you want to perform multiple searches based on a single search value: DECODE( TRUE. 'Variables were out of desired ranges. Var1 < 23.'. Var2 > 30. 'Variable 2 was more than 30.'.'Variable 2 was 49!'.TRUE Returns a value based on the result of a comparison.'Variable 1 was 22!'. Example The following example uses TRUE in a DECODE expression to return values based on the results of a comparison. TRUE is equivalent to the integer 1. Var2 = 49. Var1 = 22.

20 Chapter 2: Constants .

24 Comparison Operators. 23 String Operators.Chapter 3 Operators This chapter describes how to use operators to perform arithmetic or comparisons within functions. 26 21 . 22 Arithmetic Operators. 25 Logical Operators. It includes the following topics: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Operator Precedence.

!=. modulus. For example. If you write an expression that includes multiple operators. <>. not equal to. Concatenate. the equation 8 + 5 . used when specifying conditions. less than or equal to. not equal to. Table 3-1. Operators in the Transformation Language Operator () +. 4. division. Less than. The transformation language also supports the use of operators within nested expressions. *. Unary plus and minus. >= =. used when specifying conditions. subtraction. 3. the PowerCenter Server evaluates the expression in the following order: 1. the PowerCenter Server evaluates operations inside parentheses before operations outside parentheses. <=. depending on how you nest the operations. The logical OR operator. >. ^= NOT AND OR Meaning Parentheses.2) * 8 Return Value -3 32 22 Chapter 3: Operators . The PowerCenter Server evaluates operators in the order they appear in the following table. || <. /. Operations in the innermost parentheses are evaluated first. When expressions contain parentheses.2 * 8 returns different values: Equation 8+5-2*8 8 + (5 . Equal to. The logical AND operator. Arithmetic operators String operators Comparison operators Logical operators Table 3-1 lists the precedence for all transformation language operators. greater than. greater than or equal to. not equal to.Operator Precedence The transformation language supports the use of multiple operators and the use of operators within nested expressions. It evaluates operators in an expression with equal precedence to all operators from left to right. % +. The logical NOT operator. 2. Addition. Multiplication.

13 % 2 = 1 because 13 divided by 2 equals 6 with a remainder of 1. Arithmetic Operators in the Transformation Language Operator +. Unary minus indicates a negative value. the function returns NULL. division. use the string operator ||. % +. When you use arithmetic operators in an expression. The expression 1. the expression 1 + ‘1’ is not valid because it adds an integer to a string. use the date functions. modulus. The addition operator (+) does not concatenate strings. all of the operands in the expression must be numeric. To concatenate strings. Addition. Table 3-2 lists the arithmetic operators in order of precedence in the transformation language: Table 3-2. Meaning Unary plus and minus. /. To perform arithmetic on date values. For example. A modulus is the remainder after dividing two integers. For further information on built-in date functions.Arithmetic Operators Use arithmetic operators to perform mathematical calculations on numeric data. If you perform arithmetic on a null value. Arithmetic Operators 23 . see “Understanding Date Arithmetic” on page 47.23 + 4 / 2 is valid because all of the operands are numeric. Multiplication. Unary plus indicates a positive value. *. Note: The transformation language provides built-in date functions that let you perform arithmetic on date/time values. For example. subtraction.

however. However. Example The following example shows an expression that concatenates employee first names and employee last names from two columns. produces the same results in less time. This expression removes the spaces from the end of the first name and the beginning of the last name.String Operators Use the || string operator to concatenate two strings. Nulls The || operator ignores null values. then concatenates the last name: LTRIM( RTRIM( EMP_FIRST ) || ' ' || LTRIM( EMP_LAST )) EMP_FIRST ‘ ‘ Alfred’ Bernice’ EMP_LAST ‘ Rice ‘ RETURN VALUE Alfred Rice Bernice Kersins Proud Curt NULL ‘ Kersins’ ‘ Proud’ NULL ‘ Curt’ NULL NULL NULL Note: You can also use the CONCAT function to concatenate two string values. concatenates a space to the end of each first name. The || operator converts operands of any datatype (except Binary) to String datatypes before concatenation: Input Value 'alpha' || 'betical' 'alpha' || 2 'alpha' || NULL Return Value alphabetical alpha2 alpha The || operator includes leading and trailing spaces. if both values are NULL. You can use the LTRIM and RTRIM functions to trim leading and trailing spaces before concatenating two strings. the || operator returns NULL. The || operator. 24 Chapter 3: Operators .

For example. For information on how to compare dates. If you compare a value to a null value. the expression 123.4 > ‘123’ is not valid because the expression compares a decimal with a string. Greater than or equal to. Comparison Operators in the Transformation Language Operator = > < >= <= <> != ^= Meaning Equal to. The expressions 123. Less than or equal to. Less than.4 > 123 and ‘a’ != ‘b’ are valid because the operands are the same datatype. the PowerCenter Server returns NULL. manipulate data. and return a TRUE (1) or FALSE (0) value. see “Dates” on page 33. When you use comparison operators in an expression. Not equal to. Not equal to. the result is NULL. the operands must be the same datatype. Not equal to. You can use the greater than (>) and less than (<) operators to compare numeric values or return a range of rows based on the sort order for a primary key in a particular port. If a filter condition evaluates to NULL. Greater than. Table 3-3 lists the comparison operators in the transformation language: Table 3-3. Comparison Operators 25 .Comparison Operators Use comparison operators to compare character or numeric strings.

For example. Joins two conditions and returns TRUE if both conditions evaluate to TRUE. FALSE for zero. For example. and NULL for NULL. Nulls Expressions that combine a null value with a Boolean expression produce results that are ANSI compliant. if an expression evaluates to TRUE. Table 3-4 lists the logical operators in the transformation language: Table 3-4. Logical Operators in the Transformation Reference Operator NOT AND OR Meaning Negates result of an expression. Expressions that return a numeric value evaluate to TRUE for non-zero values. Returns FALSE if both conditions are not true. the PowerCenter Server produces the following results: ♦ ♦ NULL AND TRUE = NULL NULL AND FALSE = FALSE 26 Chapter 3: Operators . NOT returns TRUE. Returns FALSE if one condition is not true. If an expression evaluates to FALSE. the operator NOT returns FALSE. Connects two conditions and returns TRUE if any condition evaluates to TRUE.Logical Operators Use logical operators to manipulate numeric data.

32 27 . 31 Local Variables. 28 Transaction Control Variables.Chapter 4 Variables This chapter describes how to use these variables: ♦ ♦ ♦ System Variables.

System Variables
The transformation language provides the following system variables:
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

$$$SessStartTime SESSSTARTTIME SYSDATE WORKFLOWSTARTTIME

$$$SessStartTime
$$$SessStartTime returns the initial system date value on the machine hosting the PowerCenter Server when the server initializes a session. $$$SessStartTime returns the session start time as a string value. The format of the string depends on the database you are using. Table 4-1 lists the $$$SessStartTime date and time format according to different database types:
Table 4-1. Datatype Expansion for $$$SessStartTime Database Type Oracle Sybase Microsoft SQL Server Informix ODBC IBM DB2 Date/time format MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS YYYY-MM-DD-HH24:MI:SS

You can use $$$SessStartTime in a mapping or mapplet filter condition, user-defined join, or SQL override of a source qualifier. You can also use $$$SessStartTime in session-level overrides for mapping attributes. For details on using $$$SessStartTime in a mapping, see “Source Qualifier Transformation” in the Transformation Guide.
Note: Changing any database environment variable such as NLS_LANG_FORMAT for

Oracle or DBDATE for Informix does not affect the format string for datetime values the PowerCenter Server uses in the SQL override for $$$SessStartTime.

Example
The following expression uses $$$SessStartTime in the source filter condition of a source qualifier to perform an incremental extraction. The expression specifies a range of dates of all days in the week prior to when the PowerCenter Server initializes the session. The expression uses the function DATEDIFF to find the difference in the number of days between the value

28

Chapter 4: Variables

ORDER_DATE and $$$SessStartTime. If the difference between the two dates is less than or equal to seven days, the PowerCenter Server extracts that row from the source:
DATEDIFF(DAY, ORDER_DATE, ‘$$$SessStartTime’) <= 7

SESSSTARTTIME
SESSSTARTTIME returns the current date and time value on the machine hosting the PowerCenter Server when the server initializes the session. You can use SESSSTARTTIME with any function that accepts transformation date/time datatypes. SESSSTARTTIME is stored as a transformation date/time datatype value. You can use SESSSTARTTIME in a mapping or a mapplet. You can reference SESSSTARTTIME only within the expression language.

Example
The following expression uses SESSSTARTTIME to display the number of days an order has been open. Using the SQL function DATE_DIFF, the PowerCenter Server subtracts DATE_ENTERED from SESSSTARTTIME and returns the result as a number of days:
DATE_DIFF(SESSSTARTTIME, DATE_ENTERED, ‘DD’)

SYSDATE
SYSDATE returns the current date and time on the machine hosting the PowerCenter Server for each row passing through the transformation. SYSDATE is stored as a transformation date/time datatype value. To capture a static system date, use the SESSSTARTTIME variable instead of SYSDATE.

Example
The following expression uses SYSDATE to find only those orders that have shipped in the last two days and flag them for insertion. Using DATE_DIFF, the PowerCenter Server subtracts DATE_SHIPPED from the system date, returning the difference between the two dates. Because DATE_DIFF returns a double value, the expression truncates the difference. It then compares the result to the integer literal 2. If the result is greater than 2, the expression flags the rows for rejection. If the result is 2 or less, it flags them for insertion.
IIF( TRUNC( DATE_DIFF( SYSDATE, DATE_SHIPPED, 'DD' ), 0 ) > 2, DD_REJECT, DD_INSERT

WORKFLOWSTARTTIME
WORKFLOWSTARTTIME returns the current date and time value on the machine hosting the PowerCenter Server when the server initializes the workflow. You can use WORKFLOWSTARTTIME with any function that accepts transformation date/time

System Variables

29

datatypes. WORKFLOWSTARTTIME is stored as a transformation date/time datatype value. You can use WORKFLOWSTARTTIME in workflow tasks such as Assignment tasks, Decision tasks, and links. You can reference WORKFLOWSTARTTIME only within the expression language.

Example
The following expression uses WORKFLOWSTARTTIME to display the number of minutes between the workflow start time and the start time of a task in the workflow. Using the SQL function DATE_DIFF, the PowerCenter Server subtracts the task start time from WORKFLOWSTARTTIME and returns the result as a number of days:
DATE_DIFF(WORKFLOWSTARTTIME, $s_EmployeeData.StartTime, ‘MI’)

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Chapter 4: Variables

Transaction Control Variables
Transaction control variables define conditions to commit or rollback transactions during the processing of database rows. You use these variables in transaction control expressions that you build in the Expression Editor. Transaction control expressions use the IIF function to test each row against a condition. Depending on the return value of the condition, the PowerCenter Server commits, rolls back, or makes no transaction changes for the row. For details about transaction control, see “Transaction Control Transformation” in the Transformation Guide. The following example uses transaction control variables to determine where to process a row:
IIF (NEWTRAN=1, TC_COMMIT_BEFORE, TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION)

If NEWTRAN=1, the TC_COMMIT_BEFORE variable causes a commit to occur before the current row processes. Otherwise, the TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION variable forces the row to process in the current transaction. You can use the following variables in the Expression Editor when you create a transaction control expression.
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION TC_COMMIT_BEFORE TC_COMMIT_AFTER TC_ROLLBACK_BEFORE

TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION
The PowerCenter Server does not perform any transaction change for the current row. This is the default transaction control variable value.

TC_COMMIT_BEFORE
The PowerCenter Server commits the transaction, begins a new transaction, and writes the current row to the target. The current row is in the new transaction.

TC_COMMIT_AFTER
The PowerCenter Server writes the current row to the target, commits the transaction, and begins a new transaction. The current row is in the committed transaction.

TC_ROLLBACK_BEFORE
The PowerCenter Server rolls back the current transaction, begins a new transaction, and writes the current row to the target. The current row is in the new transaction.

Transaction Control Variables

31

Local Variables
If you use local variables in a mapping, you can use them in any transformation expression in the mapping. For example, if you use a complex tax calculation throughout a mapping, you might want to write the expression once and designate it as a variable. You thereby increase performance since the PowerCenter Server performs the calculation only once. Local variables are especially useful when used with stored procedure expressions to capture multiple return values. For details on local variables, see “Transformations” in the Designer Guide.

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Chapter 4: Variables

34 Date Format Strings. 39 TO_CHAR Format Strings. 47 33 . 40 TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings. 43 Understanding Date Arithmetic.Chapter 5 Dates This chapter describes how to use dates in transformations. It includes the following topics: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Overview.

D. and 9999 A. These transformation datatypes include a Date/Time datatype. see “Variables” on page 27. TO_CHAR. For details on built-in variables. the PowerCenter Server truncates the millisecond portion of the date. Converts a date to a string. Dates expressed in a different calendar system are not supported. The transformation language provides the following other functions to manipulate dates: ♦ ♦ ♦ IS_DATE. ‘MM’. Date functions accept date/time values only. Date format strings. 1 ) Note: PowerCenter supports dates between 1753 A. To pass a string to a date function. first use TO_DATE to convert it to a date/time value. TO_DATE and IS_DATE format strings. Use to specify the format of a string you want to convert to a date or test. You can use date variables to capture the current date or session start time on the machine hosting the PowerCenter Server. Julian Day. truncate. or perform arithmetic on a date. Milliseconds PowerCenter supports date/time values up to the second.Overview The transformation language provides a set of date functions and built-in date variables to help you perform transformations on dates. TO_DATE. Use to specify the format of the return string. Use with date functions to specify the parts of a date. TO_CHAR format strings. Tests whether a string represents a date. and the Gregorian Calendar PowerCenter supports dates in the Gregorian calendar system only. PowerCenter stores dates internally in binary format. or compare dates. Converts a string to a date. Modified Julian Day. ‘MM/DD/RR’). With the date functions you can round. the following expression converts a string port to date/time values and then adds one month to each date: ADD_TO_DATE( TO_DATE( STRING_PORT. If you pass a value to a date function or Date/Time port.D. The transformation language also provides the following sets of format strings: ♦ ♦ ♦ Date/Time Datatype PowerCenter provides a set of generic datatypes to help you transform data from different sources. For example. 34 Chapter 5: Dates . extract one part of a date.

you can use the J format string in a TO_CHAR expression to convert date values to MJD values expressed as strings.D. RR Format String The transformation language provides the RR format string to convert strings with two-digit years to dates. 'J') SHIP_DATE_MJD_STR 2451544 2415021 RETURN_VALUE Dec 31 1999 00:00:00 Jan 1 1900 00:00:00 Because the J format string does not include the time portion of a date. PowerCenter supports dates between 1753 A. nor with Modified Julian Day. and 9999 A. the following TO_DATE expression converts strings in the SHIP_DATE_MJD_STRING port to date values in the default date format: TO_DATE (SHIP_DATE_MJD_STR. which represents some fraction of 24 hours. This term should not be confused with Julian Day. Overview 35 . you can convert a string in the format MM/DD/RR to a date. By definition. For example. the return values have the time set to 00:00:00. You can also use the J format string in TO_CHAR expressions. MJD includes a time component expressed as a decimal. Using TO_DATE and the RR format string. For example. For example: TO_CHAR(SHIP_DATE. The RR format string converts data differently depending on the current year. 'J') SHIP_DATE Dec 31 1999 23:59:59 Jan 1 1900 01:02:03 RETURN_VALUE 2451544 2415021 Note: The PowerCenter Server ignores the time portion of the date in a TO_CHAR expression.Note: Dates in the Julian calendar are called Julian dates. Dates in the Year 2000 All transformation language date functions support the year 2000.D. The MJD for a given date is the number of days to that date since Jan 1 4713 BC 00:00:00 (midnight). PowerCenter provides the ability to manipulate Modified Julian Day (MJD) formats using the J format string. and are not supported in PowerCenter. The J format string does not convert this time component.

If the current year is between 0 and 49 (such as 2003) and the source string year is between 0 and 49. ♦ Table 5-1 summarizes how the RR format string converts to dates: Table 5-1. ‘MM/DD/RR’) 04/12/1998 00:00:00 11/09/2001 00:00:00 TO_DATE(String. the PowerCenter Server returns the next century plus the two-digit year from the source string. Table 5-2 illustrates the different results each format string returns: Table 5-2. If the source string year is between 50 and 99. In TO_DATE expressions. If the source string year is between 50 and 99. the PowerCenter Server returns the current century plus the two-digit year from the source string. Both the RR and YY format strings specify two-digit years. ‘MM/DD/RR’ ) ORDER_DATE ‘04/12/98’ ‘11/09/01’ RETURN_VALUE 04/12/1998 00:00:00 11/09/2001 00:00:00 Difference Between the YY and RR Format Strings PowerCenter also provides a YY format string. The YY and RR format strings produce identical results when used with all date functions except TO_DATE. the PowerCenter Server returns the previous century plus the two-digit year from the source string. RR and YY produce different results. the PowerCenter Server returns the current century plus the specified two-digit year. If the current year is between 50 and 99 (such as 1998) and the source string year is between 0 and 49. RR Format String Conversions Current year 0-49 0-49 50-99 50-99 Source year 0-49 50-99 0-49 50-99 RR Format String Returns Current century Previous century Next century Current century Example The following expression produces the same return values for any current year between 1950 and 2049: TO_DATE( ORDER_DATE. ‘MM/DD/YY’) 04/12/1998 00:00:00 11/09/1901 00:00:00 36 Chapter 5: Dates .♦ Current Year Between 0 and 49. Current Year Between 50 and 99. Differences Between RR and YY Format Strings String 04/12/98 11/09/01 Current Year 1998 1998 TO_DATE(String.

the PowerCenter Server converts the string to a date value. the PowerCenter Server skips the row. Overview 37 ♦ ♦ . You can pass date/time data to any of the date functions. If you omit the format string. ‘MM/DD/YY’) 04/12/2098 00:00:00 11/09/2001 00:00:00 For dates in the year 2000 and beyond. the PowerCenter Server only uses the default date format when you: ♦ Convert a date to a string by connecting a date/time port to a string port. Default Date Format The PowerCenter Server uses a default date format to store and manipulate strings that represent dates. The PowerCenter Server expects the string values to be in the default date format. Note: The transformation language date functions accept date values only. and even between applications. while the time might include the hours. Convert a string to a date by connecting a string port to a date/time port. the PowerCenter Server returns the string in the default date format. If an input value does not match this format. Informatica recommends using the RR format string for dates in the twenty-first century. or it is an invalid date. Dates in Flat Files The transformation language provides the TO_DATE function to convert strings to date/ time values.Table 5-2. If the string is in the default date format. day. If you specify a format string. you must first use the TO_DATE function to convert it to a transformation Date/Time datatype. and seconds. the transformation language can read any date with a date datatype. The PowerCenter Server converts the date to a string in the default date format. MM/DD/ YYYY HH24:MI:SS. ‘MM/DD/RR’) 04/12/1998 00:00:00 11/09/2001 00:00:00 TO_DATE(String. the PowerCenter Server returns a string in the specified format. You can also use IS_DATE to check if a string is a valid date before converting it with TO_DATE. If you want to pass a string to a date function. [format_string]) to convert dates to strings. Although date formats vary from database to database. The date includes the month. dates stored in relational databases contain a date and time value. and year. the YY format string produces less meaningful results than the RR format string. MM/DD/ YYYY HH24:MI:SS. Dates in Relational Databases In general. minutes. Differences Between RR and YY Format Strings String 04/12/98 11/09/01 Current Year 2003 2003 TO_DATE(String. Because PowerCenter stores dates in binary format. MM/DD/ YYYY HH24:MI:SS. Use TO_CHAR(date.

If you specify a format string. the PowerCenter Server expects the string in the default date format. 1:00:00AM = 1. 11:00:00PM = 23) Minutes Seconds The default date format of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS consists of: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 38 Chapter 5: Dates . If you omit the format string. [format_string]) to convert strings to dates. September = 09) Day (of the month) Year (expressed in four digits. such as 1998) Hour (in 24-hour form. 12:00:00AM = 0. 12:00:00PM = 12. Month (January = 01. the PowerCenter Server expects a string in the specified format.♦ Use TO_DATE(date. For example. MM/DD/ YYYY HH24:MI:SS.

MON. For example. Hour of day (0-23). if you pass 12-APR-1997 to a date function. You can use any of these formats to specify the entire hour portion of a date. if you pass 12-APR1997 to a date function. This function returns an integer value based on the default date format. DD. you can use Y. Specify the part of the date you want to return. J Description Days (01-31). you can use any of these format strings specify 12. SSSS Y. MON. Date Functions that Use Date Format Strings Function ADD_TO_DATE DATE_DIFF GET_DATE_PART ROUND SET_DATE_PART TRUNC Description Specify the part of the date you want to change. YYYY. You can use any of these format strings to specify the entire day portion of a date. Seconds (0-59). RR Note: The format string is not case-sensitive. you can use HH. It must always be enclosed within single quotation marks. if you pass 12-APR-1997 to a date function. Specify the part of the date you want to round. HH12. YY. For example. DY. where zero is 12 AM (midnight). DAY.) Month (01-12). YYY. HH24 MI MM. Specify the part of the date to use to calculate the difference between two dates. HH. Date Format Strings in the Transformation Reference Format String D. You can use any of these format strings to specify the entire month portion of a date. Specify the part of the date you want to truncate. DDD. Specify the part of the date you want to change. MONTH SS. Table 5-4 uses date functions with date format strings to evaluate input dates: Table 5-4. Year portion of date (1753 to 9999). or MONTH to specify APR. Table 5-3 summarizes the format strings you can use to specify a part of a date: Table 5-3.Date Format Strings You can evaluate input dates using a combination of format strings and date functions. Date format strings are not internationalized and must be entered in predefined formats as listed in the following table. For example. you can use MM. Date Format Strings 39 . or HH24 to specify the hour portion of the date. or YYYY to specify 1997. if you pass the date 12-APR-1997 2:01:32 PM. YY. HH12. YYY. For example. You can use any of these format strings to specify the entire year portion of a date. Minutes (0-59.

where 00 is 12AM (midnight). Converts the calendar date to a string equivalent to its Modified Julian Day value. including leap years). MI MM MONTH MON Q RR SS 40 Chapter 5: Dates . The function removes the leading digits. You can use any of these format strings to specify AM and PM hours. if you use 'RR' and pass the year 1997. where Sunday equals 1.M.TO_CHAR Format Strings The TO_CHAR function converts a Date/Time datatype to a string with the format you specify. TO_CHAR Format Strings Format String AM.’ However. where January to March equals 1. Day of month (01-31). You might use TO_CHAR to convert dates to string. and P. ‘YY. Table 5-5 summarizes the format strings for dates in the function TO_CHAR: Table 5-5. Quarter of year (1-4). Jan). Day of week (1-7). PM. Hour of day (01-12). calculated from Jan 1. When used with TO_CHAR. Day of year (001-366. January). AM and PM return the same values as do A. Abbreviated three-character name for a month (for example. ‘J’ ) converts Dec 31 1999 23:59:59 to the string 2451544.M. Wed).M. TO_CHAR returns 97. ‘RR’ calculates the closest appropriate century and supplies the first two digits of the year. Name of day. For example. changing the format for reporting purposes. D DD DDD DAY DY HH.. 4713 00:00:00 BC. Hour of day (00-23). including up to nine characters (for example. It ignores the time component of the date.M. the expression TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE. HH12 HH24 J Description Meridian indicator. ‘RR’ produces the same results as. You can convert the entire date or a part of the date to a string. and is interchangeable with. Seconds (00-59). TO_CHAR is generally used when the target is a flat file or a database that does not support a Date/Time datatype. Last two digits of a year. Modified Julian Day. Minutes (00-59). Wednesday). when used with TO_DATE. For example. including up to nine characters (for example. A. Month (01-12). Name of month. Abbreviated three-character name for a day (for example. P.

Use double quotation marks to separate ambiguous format strings. For example. week 2 starts on Jan 8 and ends on Jan 14. For example.. SSSSS. Entire year portion of date. if you use 'YYY' and pass the year 1997. where week 01 starts on Jan 1 and ends on Jan 7. and so on. for example D””DDD. For example. RR. 'MM/DD/YYYY "Sales Were Up"' ) and pass the date Apr 1 1997. if you use 'YYYY' and pass the year 1997. The function removes the leading digits.Table 5-5. When you use SSSSS in a TO_CHAR expression. Note: The PowerCenter Server ignores the time portion of the date in a TO_CHAR expression. the expression TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE. For example. Week of month (1-5). Text that displays in the output. and YY format strings. TO_CHAR Format Strings Format String SSSSS Description Seconds since midnight (00000 . Last digit of a year. ‘MM/DD/YYYY SSSSS’) converts 12/31/1999 01:02:03 to 12/31/1999 03783. TO_CHAR Format Strings 41 . where week 1 starts on the first day of the month and ends on the seventh. Punctuation that displays in the output. You might use these symbols to separate date parts. Last three digits of a year. It must always be enclosed within single quotation marks. TO_CHAR returns 97. the function returns the string '04/01/1997 Sales Were Up'. TO_CHAR returns 997. The function removes the leading digits. TO_CHAR returns 7. For example. if you create an output port with the expression: TO_CHAR( DATES. Week of year (01-53). For example. week 2 starts on the eighth day and ends on the fourteenth day. Examples The following examples illustrate the J.YYYY' ). you might create the following expression to separate date parts with a period: TO_CHAR( DATES. 'MM. Feb 1 designates the first week of February.86399). See the individual functions for more examples.: "text" ““ Note: The format string is not case-sensitive. For example. You can enter multibyte characters that are valid in the repository code page. The function removes the leading digits. For example. TO_CHAR returns 1997. The empty quotation marks do not appear in the output. if you use ‘Y’ and pass the year 1997. the PowerCenter Server only evaluates the time portion of a date. Y YY YYY YYYY W WW -/.DD. Last two digits of a year. if you use 'YY' and pass the year 1997.

'J') SHIP_DATE RETURN_VALUE Dec 31 1999 23:59:59 2451544 Jan 1 1900 01:02:03 2415021 SSSSS Format String You can also use the format string SSSSS in a TO_CHAR expression. 'SSSSS') SHIP_DATE 12/31/1999 01:02:03 09/15/1996 23:59:59 RETURN_VALUE 3783 86399 RR Format String The following expression converts dates to strings in the format MM/DD/YY: TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE.J Format String You can use the J format string in a TO_CHAR expression to convert date values to MJD values expressed as strings. the YY format string produces the same results as the RR format string. ‘MM/DD/YY’) SHIP_DATE 12/31/1999 01:02:03 09/15/1996 23:59:59 05/17/2003 12:13:14 RETURN_VALUE 12/31/99 09/15/96 05/17/03 42 Chapter 5: Dates . the following expression converts the dates in the SHIP_DATE port to strings representing the total seconds since midnight: TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE. For example. The following expression converts dates to strings in the format MM/DD/YY: TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE. For example: TO_CHAR(SHIP_DATE. ‘MM/DD/RR’) SHIP_DATE 12/31/1999 01:02:03 09/15/1996 23:59:59 05/17/2003 12:13:14 RETURN_VALUE 12/31/99 09/15/96 05/17/03 YY Format String In TO_CHAR expressions.

TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings Format String AM. Hour of day (0-23). the function returns FALSE (0). PM.m. If the string matches the format string and is a valid date. Hour of day (1-12). including leap years). If a string does not match the specified format string or is not a valid date. IS_DATE format strings are not internationalized and must be entered in predefined formats as listed in the following table. Day of month (1-31). Minutes (0-59).m. You can use any of these format strings to specify AM and PM hours.. Table 5-6 summarizes the format strings for the functions TO_DATE and IS_DATE: Table 5-6. Abbreviated three-character name for a day (for example. DD DDD DAY DY HH. including up to nine characters (for example. a. if any parts do not match. If you omit the format string. use the format strings listed in the TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings table to specify the date format. The DAY format string is not case-sensitive. the function returns TRUE (1). The source string format and the format string must match exactly including any date separators. TO_DATE format strings are not internationalized and must be entered in predefined formats as listed in the TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings table. If the strings you want to test are not in the default date format. Note: TO_DATE and IS_DATE use the same set of format strings. When you create a TO_DATE expression. the PowerCenter Server does not convert the string and skips the row. Wed). TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings 43 . Wednesday). AM and PM return the same values as do a. HH12 HH24 MI Description Meridian indicator. The DY format string is not case-sensitive. IS_DATE tells you if a value is a valid date. Name of day. TO_DATE is generally used to convert strings from flat files to date/time values.TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings The TO_DATE function converts a string with the format you specify to a date/time value. use a format string for each part of the date in the source string. where zero is 12AM (midnight). and p. the source string must be in the default date format MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. Day of year (001-366.m. A valid date is any string representing a valid date in the default date format of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS.m. p.

the PowerCenter Server might return inaccurate values or skip the row. Name of month. If you do not include a 44 Chapter 5: Dates . the PowerCenter Server returns the next century plus the two-digit year from the source string. Case does not matter. representing May 12. ‘MM/DD/YYYY SSSSS’) converts 12/31/1999 3783 to 12/31/1999 01:02:03. Use with TO_DATE to convert two-digit years to four-digit years. 1998. Case does not matter. Seconds since midnight. the PowerCenter Server only evaluates the time portion of a date. August). the PowerCenter Server returns the previous century plus the two-digit year from the source string. If the year value of the source string is between 50 and 99. The current year on the machine running the PowerCenter Server with the last two digits of the year replaced with the string value.Table 5-6.Current Year Between 50 and 99. you must include the format string YYYYMMDD. TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings Format String RR Description Four-digit year (for example. . . the PowerCenter Server returns the current century plus the specified two-digit year. Use when source strings include two-digit years. The current year on the machine running the PowerCenter Server with the last digit of the year replaced with the string value. 2020. Four digits of a year. Use the RR or YY format string instead. to TO_DATE. the expression TO_DATE(‘2451544’. It ignores the time component of the source string. Month (1-12). ‘J’ ) converts 2451544 to Dec 31 1999 00:00:00. For example. For example.Current Year Between 0 and 49. The current year on the machine running the PowerCenter Server with the last three digits of the year replaced with the string value. the expression TO_DATE( DATE_STR. For example. When you use SSSSS in a TO_DATE expression. 2034). if you pass the string ‘20200512’. If the current year is between 50 and 99 (such as 1998) and the year value of the source string is between 0 and 49. including up to nine characters (for example. If it does not. Aug). If the current year is between 0 and 49 (such as 2003) and the source string year is between 0 and 49. SS SSSSS J MM MONTH MON Y YY YYY YYYY Requirements The PowerCenter Server expects the format of the TO_DATE string to meet the following conditions: ♦ The format of the TO_DATE string must exactly match the format string including any date separators. Modified Julian Day. assigning all dates the time of 00:00:00. the PowerCenter Server returns the current century plus the two-digit year from the source string. Abbreviated three-character name for a month (for example. Seconds (0-59). Convert strings in MJD format to date values. Do not use this format string if you are passing two-digit years. If the source string year is between 50 and 99.

the PowerCenter Server expects the string in the default date format MM/ DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. the PowerCenter Server uses the format string MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. The current year is 1998: TO_DATE and IS_DATE Format Strings 45 . Likewise. See the individual functions for more examples. 'J') SHIP_DATE_MJD_STR 2451544 2415021 RETURN_VALUE Dec 31 1999 00:00:00 Jan 1 1900 00:00:00 Because the J format string does not include the time portion of a date. if you pass the string 2020120 to TO_DATE and include the format string YYYYMMDD. Example The following examples illustrate the J. Tip: By default. The current year is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_STR. RR Format String The following expression converts a string into a four-digit year format. the PowerCenter Server returns an error and skips the row because the string does not match the format string. the PowerCenter Server returns an error and skips the row. the return values have the time set to 00:00:00. ♦ The format string must always be enclosed within single quotation marks. The format string is not case-sensitive. J Format String The following expression converts strings in the SHIP_DATE_MJD_STRING port to date values in the default date format: TO_DATE (SHIP_DATE_MJD_STR. ‘MM/DD/RR’) DATE_STR 04/01/98 08/17/05 RETURN VALUE 04/01/1998 00:00:00 08/17/2005 00:00:00 YY Format String The following expression converts a string into a four-digit year format. and SSSSS format strings.format string. RR. if you pass a string that does not match the format string. For example.

'MM/DD/YYYY SSSSS') DATE_STR 12/31/1999 3783 09/15/1996 86399 RETURN_VALUE 12/31/1999 01:02:03 09/15/1996 23:59:59 46 Chapter 5: Dates . SSSSS Format String The following expression converts strings that include the seconds since midnight to date values: TO_DATE( DATE_STR. ‘MM/DD/YY’) DATE_STR 04/01/98 08/17/05 RETURN VALUE 04/01/1998 00:00:00 08/17/1905 00:00:00 Note: For the second row.TO_DATE( DATE_STR. while YY returns the year 1905. RR returns the year 2005.

DATE_DIFF. SET_DATE_PART. Subtract two dates. 31. 1753 00:00:00 AD and Dec. You can only use the date functions on Date/Time values. You cannot use numeric arithmetic operators (such as + or -) to add or subtract dates.Understanding Date Arithmetic The transformation language provides built-in date functions so you can perform arithmetic on date/time values as follows: ♦ ♦ ♦ ADD_TO_DATE. The transformation language recognizes leap years and accepts dates between Jan. Change one part of a date. 9999 23:59:59 AD. Note: The transformation language uses the transformation Date/Time datatype to specify date values. Understanding Date Arithmetic 47 . Add or subtract a specific portion of a date. 1.

48 Chapter 5: Dates .

see “Function Quick Reference” on page 215. Each function description includes: ♦ ♦ ♦ Syntax Return value Example For a quick reference to these functions. 49 .Chapter 6 Functions This chapter describes all the functions in the transformation languages. in alphabetical order.

Function Categories The transformation language provides the following types of functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Aggregate Character Conversion Data Cleansing Date Numerical Scientific Special Test Variable Aggregate Functions Aggregate functions return summary values for non-null values in selected ports. Use operators to perform arithmetic within the function. Apply filters to calculate values for specific rows in the selected ports. With aggregate functions you can: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Calculate a single value for all rows in a group. AVG COUNT FIRST LAST MAX (Date) MAX (Number) MEDIAN MIN (Date) MIN (Number) PERCENTILE STDDEV The transformation language includes the following aggregate functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 50 Chapter 6: Functions . Return a single value for each group in an Aggregator transformation. Calculate two or more aggregate values derived from the same source columns in a single pass.

The PowerCenter Server groups by ID.♦ ♦ SUM VARIANCE If you configure the PowerCenter Server to run in Unicode mode. You can use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. The PowerCenter Server will evaluate the innermost aggregate function expression. Then it SUMS the four averages to get the result. You can nest only one aggregate function within another aggregate function. You can set up an Aggregator transformation that groups by ID and nests two aggregate functions as follows: SUM( AVG( earnings ) ) where your dataset contains the following values: ID 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 EARNINGS 32 45 100 650 800 65 74 76 763 916 20 45 99 100 347 25 112 250 347 560 The return value is 1085. MIN and MAX return values according to the sort order of the code page you specify in the session properties. and use the result to evaluate the outer aggregate function expression. evaluates the AVG expression. Function Categories 51 . and returns four values.

1. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. the PowerCenter Server rounds a decimal value to an integer (for example. By default. FALSE. including a numeric port: MEDIAN( PRICE. You can enter any valid transformation expression. The filter condition must evaluate to TRUE. or NULL. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. You can apply a filter condition to all aggregate functions. the function selects all rows in the port.Aggregate Functions and Nulls When you configure the PowerCenter Server. you can use the TRUNC function to truncate the value to an integer: MEDIAN( PRICE. You can have the PowerCenter Server treat null values in aggregate functions as NULL or zero. If the filter condition evaluates to NULL or FALSE. QUANTITY > 0 ) In all cases. the PowerCenter Server does not select the row. If you pass an entire port of null values. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. Character Functions The transformation language includes the following character functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ASCII CHR CHRCODE CONCAT INITCAP INSTR 52 Chapter 6: Functions . You can optionally configure the PowerCenter Server so that if you pass an entire port of null values to an aggregate function. For example. you can enter the following as the complete syntax for the MEDIAN function. TRUNC( QUANTITY ) > 0 ) If you omit the filter condition. 1. SALARY > 50000 ) You can also use other numeric values as the filter condition.5 to 2. For example. 0.35 to 0) for the filter condition. as well as to CUME. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULL in aggregate functions. If the value rounds to zero. the function returns NULL. Filter Conditions A filter limits the rows returned in a search.000: MEDIAN( SALARY. the following expression calculates the median salary for all employees who make more than $50. the function returns zero. MOVINGAVG.2 to 1. the filter condition returns FALSE. If you do not want to round up a value. and MOVINGSUM.

Replace characters in a string. INSTR IS_DATE Function Categories 53 The transformation language includes the following data cleansing functions: ♦ ♦ . UPPER. Convert the datatype of an input value. LOWER. Trim string values. and INITCAP use the code page of the PowerCenter Server to evaluate character data.♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ LENGTH LOWER LPAD LTRIM METAPHONE REPLACECHR REPLACESTR RPAD RTRIM SOUNDEX SUBSTR UPPER The character functions MAX. Conversion Functions The transformation language includes the following conversion functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ TO_CHAR(Date) TO_CHAR(Number) TO_DATE TO_DECIMAL TO_FLOAT TO_INTEGER Data Cleansing Functions The transformation language includes a group of functions to help you eliminate data errors. Encode strings. MIN. With data cleansing functions you can: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Test input value.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ IS_NUMBER IS_SPACES ISNULL LTRIM METAPHONE REPLACECHR REPLACESTR RTRIM SOUNDEX SUBSTR TO_CHAR TO_DATE TO_DECIMAL TO_FLOAT TO_INTEGER Date Functions The transformation language includes a group of date functions to help you round. if you want to pass a string to a date function. see “Dates” on page 33. For a complete list of date format strings. you must first use the TO_DATE function to convert it to a transformation Date/Time datatype. or perform arithmetic on a date. or compare dates. truncate. The transformation language includes the following date functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ADD_TO_DATE DATE_COMPARE DATE_DIFF GET_DATE_PART LAST_DAY MAX MIN ROUND SET_DATE_PART TRUNC Several of the date functions include a format argument. extract one part of a date. Date format strings are not internationalized. You must specify one of the transformation language format strings for this argument. 54 Chapter 6: Functions . However. You can pass any value with a date datatype to any of the date functions.

Therefore.The Date/Time transformation datatype does not support milliseconds. the PowerCenter Server truncates the millisecond portion of the date. Numeric Functions The transformation language includes the following numeric functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ABS CEIL CUME EXP FLOOR LN LOG MOD MOVINGAVG MOVINGSUM POWER ROUND SIGN SQRT TRUNC Scientific Functions The transformation language includes the following scientific functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ COS COSH SIN SINH TAN TANH Special Functions The transformation language includes the following special functions: ♦ ♦ ABORT DECODE Function Categories 55 . if you pass a date with milliseconds.

the PowerCenter Server evaluates the start and current value of a variable at the beginning of the session based on the final value of the variable from the last session run. the PowerCenter Server uses multiple threads to 56 Chapter 6: Functions . it uses the saved value as the start value of the variable for the next time you use this session. When using mapping variables in sessions with multiple partitions. the PowerCenter Server performs the aggregate function across all partitions to determine one final value to save to the repository. Then at the end of the session. When you run a workflow. you use special functions in Expression. Filter. and Update Strategy transformations. you use SetMinVariable to set a variable to the minimum evaluated value. You can nest other functions within special functions. At the end of the session. The PowerCenter Server calculates the minimum current value for the variable for each partition. You can use the following variable functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ SetCountVariable SetMaxVariable SetMinVariable SetVariable You can use different variable functions with a variable based on the aggregation type of the variable. When you create multiple partitions in a pipeline.♦ ♦ ♦ ERROR IIF LOOKUP Generally. use variable functions to determine the final value of the variable for each partition. Unless overridden. You can also nest a special function in an aggregate function. Test Functions The transformation language includes the following test functions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ISNULL IS_DATE IS_NUMBER IS_SPACES Variable Functions The transformation language includes a group of variable functions to help you update the current value of a mapping variable throughout the session. For example. You should use SetVariable function only once for each mapping variable in a pipeline. it finds the minimum current value across all partitions and saves that value into the repository.

For more information on mapping variables. For more information on mapping variables in sessions with multiple partitions. see “Mapping Parameters and Variables” in the Designer Guide. see “Pipeline Partitioning” in the Workflow Administration Guide. If you use this function more than once for the same variable. Function Categories 57 . the current value of a mapping variable may have indeterministic results.process that pipeline.

assign ABORT as the default value. For more information on the Abort command. Return Value NULL. Syntax ABORT( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. and issues a specified error message to the session log file. Generally. The default value overrides the ERROR function in an expression. String. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Note: The PowerCenter Server handles the ABORT function and the Abort command you issue from the Workflow Manager differently. You can use the ABORT function for both input and output port default values. you use ABORT within an IIF or DECODE function to set rules for aborting a session. If you use ABORT in an expression for an unconnected port. The string can be any length.ABORT Availability: Designer Stops the session.or target-based commit interval and the buffer block size defined for the session. The message you want to display in the session log file when the session stops. You might use ABORT for input ports to keep null values from passing into a transformation. see “Working with Workflows” and “Working with Sessions” in the Workflow Administration Guide. 58 Chapter 6: Functions . If you want to ensure the session stops when an error occurs. You can use ABORT to validate data. When the PowerCenter Server encounters an ABORT function. The PowerCenter Server writes to the target up to the aborted row and then rolls back all uncommitted data to the last commit point. including ERROR function calls within an expression. the PowerCenter Server does not run the ABORT function. It processes any rows read before the session aborts and loads them based on the source. You can also use ABORT to handle any kind of transformation error. You can perform recovery on the session after rollback. it stops transforming data at that row.

ABS Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the absolute value of a numeric value. If you pass a Double. NULL if you pass a null value to the function. it returns a Double. Return Value Positive numeric value.95 59. Likewise.COST ) PRICE 250 52 169. ABS returns the same datatype as the numeric value passed as an argument. You can enter any valid transformation expression. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. Syntax ABS( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Note: If the return value is Decimal with precision greater than 15. regardless of which number is larger: ABS( PRICE .95 NULL 30 330 200 RETURN VALUE 100 4 100 NULL 40 100 100 ABS 59 . Passes the values for which you want to return the absolute values. it returns an Integer. if you pass an Integer.95 70 430 100 COST 150 48 69. Numeric datatype. Example The following expression returns the difference between two numbers as a positive value.

You can use any of the hour format strings: HH. the expression ADD_TO_DATE( SHIP_DATE. the expression ADD_TO_DATE( SHIP_DATE.ADD_TO_DATE Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Adds a specified amount to one part of a date/time value. For example. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 60 Chapter 6: Functions . For example. Enter a positive or negative integer in the amount argument. the expression ADD_TO_DATE( SHIP_DATE. 'DD'. the expression ADD_TO_DATE( SHIP_DATE. DY. 10 ) adds 10 years to all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. or YYYY. You can use any of the year format strings: Y. DD. 'HH'. You use the MI format string to set the minute. the expression ADD_TO_DATE( SHIP_DATE. 59 ) adds 59 seconds to each date in the SHIP_DATE port. MON. MONTH. -10 ) subtracts 10 months from each date in the SHIP_DATE port. Month. Day. Seconds. 'MI'. Enter a positive or negative integer in the amount argument. 10 ) adds 10 days to each date in the SHIP_DATE port. HH24. DDD. For example. 'SS'. YYY. the expression ADD_TO_DATE ( SHIP_DATE. Enter a positive or negative integer in the amount argument. HH12. YY. and DAY. 'YY'. and returns a date in the same format as the date you pass to the function. Enter a positive or negative integer in the amount argument. 'MONTH'. 25 ) adds 25 minutes to each date in the SHIP_DATE port. For example. You can use any of the day format strings: D. Enter a positive or negative integer in the amount argument. Enter a positive or negative integer in the amount argument. You can use ADD_TO_DATE to change the following parts of a date: ♦ Year. You can use any of the month format strings: MM. Hour. For example. 14 ) adds 14 hours to each date in the SHIP_DATE port. You use the SS format string to set the second. ADD_TO_DATE accepts positive and negative integer values. For example. Minute.

1 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. An integer value specifying the amount of years. Enclose the format string within single quotation marks.Syntax ADD_TO_DATE( date. amount Return Value Date in the same format as the date you pass to this function. Example The following expressions all add one month to each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port. amount ) Argument date format Meaning Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to an integer. the PowerCenter Server returns Feb 28 1998. If you pass a value that creates a day that does not exist in a particular month. 1 ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 12 1998 12:00:30AM Jan 31 1998 6:24:45PM Jan 29 2000 5:32:12AM Oct 9 1998 2:30:12PM NULL RETURN VALUE Feb 12 1998 12:00:30AM Feb 28 1998 6:24:45PM Feb 29 2000 5:32:12AM Nov 9 1998 2:30:12PM NULL (Leap Year) ADD_TO_DATE 61 . format. Date/Time datatype. 'mm'. NULL if a null value is passed as an argument to the function. ADD_TO_DATE recognizes leap years and adds one month to Jan 29 2000: ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. 1 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MON'. Required. if you add one month to Jan 31 1998. A format string specifying the portion of the date value you want to change. the PowerCenter Server returns the last day of the month. and so on by which you want to change the date value. days. Required. Also note. months. For example. 'MONTH'. hours. for example. Note that the format string is not case-sensitive. 'MM'. Passes the values you want to change.

-15 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. For example. 'HH'. the PowerCenter Server returns Feb 28 1998. 'DDD'. You can nest TO_DATE to convert strings to dates. 'D'. 'HH24'.The following expressions subtract 10 days from each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. -15 ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 1 1997 12:00:30AM Jan 31 1997 6:24:45PM Oct 9 1997 2:30:12PM Mar 3 1996 5:12:20AM Mar 1 1996 5:32:12AM NULL RETURN VALUE Dec 31 1996 9:00:30AM Jan 31 1997 3:24:45AM Oct 8 1997 11:30:12PM Mar 2 1996 2:12:20PM Feb 29 1996 2:32:12PM NULL (Leap Year) Working with Dates Use the following tips when working with ADD_TO_DATE: ♦ ♦ You can add or subtract any part of the date by specifying a format string and making the amount argument a positive or negative integer. if you add one month to Jan 31 1998. -15 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DAY'. ADD_TO_DATE changes only one portion of the date. If you modify a date so that it changes from standard to daylight savings time. -10 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. ♦ ♦ ♦ 62 Chapter 6: Functions . -10 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. -10 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. -10 ) ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DY'. the PowerCenter Server returns the last day of the month. 'DD'. you need to change the hour portion of the date. -10 ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 1 1997 12:00:30AM Jan 31 1997 6:24:45PM Mar 9 1996 5:32:12AM Oct 9 1997 2:30:12PM Mar 3 1996 5:12:20AM NULL RETURN VALUE Dec 22 1996 12:00AM Jan 21 1997 6:24:45PM Feb 29 1996 5:32:12AM Sep 30 1997 2:30:12PM Feb 22 1996 5:12:20AM NULL (Leap Year) The following expressions subtract 15 hours from each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ADD_TO_DATE( DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH12'. You can nest TRUNC and ROUND to help you manipulate dates. which you specify. If you pass a value that creates a day that does not exist in a particular month.

the ASCII function returns the numeric Unicode value of the first character of the string passed to the function. ASCII 63 . Character string. Unicode values fall in the range 0 to 65. Informatica recommends using the CHRCODE function instead of the ASCII function to create new expressions. Normally. but it evaluates only the first character in the string. The ASCII or Unicode value of the first character in the string. You can enter any valid transformation expression. You can pass a string of any size to ASCII.ASCII Availability: Designer Workflow Manager When you configure the PowerCenter Server to run in ASCII mode. Syntax ASCII ( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. Passes the value you want to return as an ASCII value. If you use ASCII in your existing expressions. ASCII converts it to a character string and returns the ASCII or Unicode value of the first character in the string. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. before you pass any string value to ASCII. you parse out the specific character you want to convert to an ASCII or Unicode value. When you configure the PowerCenter Server to run in Unicode mode. the ASCII function returns the numeric ASCII value of the first character of the string passed to the function. you might use RTRIM or another string-manipulation function to do this. however. For example.535. If you pass a numeric value. they will still work correctly. This function is identical in behavior to the CHRCODE function. Return Value Integer.

Example The following expression returns the ASCII or Unicode value for the first character of each value in the ITEMS port: ASCII( ITEMS ) ITEMS Flashlight Compass Safety Knife Depth/Pressure Gauge Regulator System RETURN VALUE 70 67 83 68 82 64 Chapter 6: Functions .

AVG
Availability: Designer

Returns the average of all values in a group of rows. Optionally, you can apply a filter to limit the rows you read to calculate the average. AVG is one of several aggregate functions. You can nest only one other aggregate function within AVG, and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. For more information, see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50.

Syntax
AVG( numeric_value [, filter_condition ] ) Argument numeric_value filter_condition Meaning Required. Numeric datatype. Passes the values for which you want to calculate an average. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Optional. Limits the rows in the search. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE, FALSE, or NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

Return Value
Numeric value. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL, or if no rows are selected. For example, the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows.
Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15, you can enable high

precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits.

Nulls
If a value is NULL, AVG ignores the row. However, if all values passed from the port are NULL, AVG returns NULL.
Note: By default, the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. If

you pass an entire port or group of null values, the function returns NULL. However, when you configure the PowerCenter Server, you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server, see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide.

AVG

65

Group By
AVG groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation, returning one result for each group. If there is not a group by port, AVG treats all rows as one group, returning one value.

Example
The following expression returns the average wholesale cost of flashlights:
AVG( WHOLESALE_COST, ITEM_NAME=’Flashlight’ ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Navigation Compass Regulator System Flashlight Depth/Pressure Gauge Flashlight RETURN VALUE: 31.66 WHOLESALE_COST 35.00 8.05 150.00 29.00 88.00 31.00

Tip
You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to AVG before the function calculates the average. For example:
AVG( QTY * PRICE - DISCOUNT )

66

Chapter 6: Functions

CEIL
Availability: Designer Workflow Manager

Returns the smallest integer greater than or equal to the numeric value passed to this function. For example, if you pass 3.14 to CEIL, the function returns 4. If you pass 3.98 to CEIL, the function returns 4. Likewise, if you pass -3.17 to CEIL, the function returns -3.

Syntax
CEIL( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Numeric datatype. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

Return Value
Integer if you pass a numeric value with declared precision between 0 and 28. Double value if you pass a numeric value with declared precision greater than 28. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.

Example
The following expression returns the price rounded to the next integer:
CEIL( PRICE ) PRICE 39.79 125.12 74.24 NULL -100.99 RETURN VALUE 40 126 75 NULL -100

Tip
You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to CEIL before CEIL returns the next integer value. For example, if you wanted to multiply a numeric value by 10 before you calculated the smallest integer less than the modified value, you might write the function as follows:
CEIL( PRICE * 10 )

CEIL

67

CHR
Availability: Designer Workflow Manager

When you configure the PowerCenter Server to move data in ASCII mode, CHR returns the ASCII character corresponding to the numeric value you pass to this function. ASCII values fall in the range 0 to 255. You can pass any integer to CHR, but only ASCII codes 32 to 126 are printable characters. When you configure the PowerCenter Server to move data in Unicode mode, CHR returns the Unicode character corresponding to the numeric value you pass to this function. Unicode values fall in the range 0 to 65,535.

Syntax
CHR( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Numeric datatype. The value you want to return as an ASCII or Unicode character. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

Return Value
ASCII or Unicode character. A string containing one character. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.

Example
The following expression returns the ASCII or Unicode character for each numeric value in the ITEM_ID port:
CHR( ITEM_ID ) ITEM_ID 65 122 NULL 88 100 71 RETURN VALUE A z NULL X d G

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Chapter 6: Functions

Use the CHR function to concatenate a single quote onto a string. The single quote is the only character that you cannot use inside a string literal. For example:
'Joan' || CHR(39) || 's car'

returns
Joan's car

CHR

69

Normally. Informatica recommends using the CHRCODE function instead of the ASCII function to create new expressions. before you pass any string value to CHRCODE. For example. CHRCODE returns the numeric Unicode value of the first character of the string passed to the function. it will still work correctly. If you pass a numeric value. you might use RTRIM or another string-manipulation function to do this. When you configure the PowerCenter Server to run in Unicode mode. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. This function is identical in behavior to the ASCII function. you parse out the specific character you want to convert to an ASCII or Unicode value. Return Value ASCII or Unicode character. Character string.535. ASCII values fall in the range 0 to 255. If you currently use ASCII in expressions. CHRCODE converts it to a character string and returns the ASCII or Unicode value of the first character in the string. Passes the values you want to return as ASCII or Unicode values. You can enter any valid transformation expression. A string containing one character. Syntax CHRCODE ( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. 70 Chapter 6: Functions . However. Unicode values fall in the range 0 to 65.CHRCODE Availability: Designer Workflow Manager When you configure the PowerCenter Server to run in ASCII mode. CHRCODE returns the numeric ASCII value of the first character of the string passed to the function.

Example The following expression returns the ASCII or Unicode value for the first character of each value in the ITEMS port: CHRCODE( ITEMS ) ITEMS Flashlight Compass Safety Knife Depth/Pressure Gauge Regulator System RETURN VALUE 70 67 83 68 82 CHRCODE 71 .

Syntax CONCAT( first_string. CONCAT converts all data to text before concatenating the strings. Required. Using the || string operator instead of CONCAT improves PowerCenter Server performance when you run sessions. CONCAT returns NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Any datatype (except Binary). you can use the || string operator to concatenate strings. Example The following expression concatenates the names in the FIRST_NAME and LAST_NAME ports: CONCAT( FIRST_NAME. Return Value String. Nulls If one of the strings is NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. The first part of the string you want to concatenate. CONCAT ignores it and returns the other string.CONCAT Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Concatenates two strings. second_string ) Argument first_string second_string Meaning Required. LAST_NAME ) FIRST_NAME John NULL Bobbi Jason Dan LAST_NAME Baer Campbell Apperley Wood Covington RETURN VALUE JohnBaer Campbell BobbiApperley JasonWood DanCovington 72 Chapter 6: Functions . NULL if both string values are NULL. Alternatively. If both strings are NULL. The second part of the string you want to concatenate. Any datatype (except Binary).

For example. the following expression first concatenates a space on the end of the first name and then concatenates the last name: CONCAT( CONCAT( FIRST_NAME. The single quote is the only character you cannot use inside a string literal.FIRST_NAME Greg NULL 100 LAST_NAME NULL NULL 200 RETURN VALUE Greg NULL 100200 CONCAT does not add spaces to separate strings. If you want to add a space between two strings. CONCAT( CHR(39). For example: CONCAT( 'Joan'. 's car' )) returns Joan's car CONCAT 73 . you can write an expression with two nested CONCAT functions. ' ' ). LAST_NAME ) FIRST_NAME John NULL Bobbi Jason Dan Greg NULL LAST_NAME Baer Campbell Apperley Wood Covington NULL NULL RETURN VALUE John Baer Campbell (includes leading space) Bobbi Apperley Jason Wood Dan Covington Greg NULL Use the CHR and CONCAT functions to concatenate a single quote onto a string.

Example The following expression returns the cosine for all values in the Degrees port: COS( DEGREES * 3.14159265359 / 180 ) DEGREES 0 90 70 30 5 18 89 NULL RETURN VALUE 1. For example. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Numeric data expressed in radians (degrees multiplied by pi divided by 180).0 0.14159265359 / 180 ) 74 Chapter 6: Functions .996194698091745 0.951056516295147 0.COS Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the cosine of a numeric value (expressed in radians).342020143325593 0. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Passes the values for which you want to calculate a cosine. Syntax COS( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. you can convert the values in the port to radians before calculating the cosine. Numeric datatype.0174524064371813 NULL Tip You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to COS before the function calculates the cosine. Return Value Double value.866025403784421 0.0 0. as follows: COS( ARCS * 3.

45 0 0. Numeric data expressed in radians (degrees multiplied by pi divided by 180).381231106176 1.345 NULL RETURN VALUE 1. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.54308063481524 9.897 3. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Numeric datatype. For example: COSH( MEASURES. Passes the values for which you want to calculate the hyperbolic cosine.66 5.COSH Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the hyperbolic cosine of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Syntax COSH( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required.0 2.0 1. Return Value Double value.06010513656773 NULL Tip You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to COSH before the function calculates the hyperbolic cosine. Example The following expression returns the hyperbolic cosine for the values in the Angles port: COSH( ANGLES ) ANGLES 1.ARCS / 360 ) COSH 75 .0874465864177 19.4435376920294 116.

this function ignores columns with null values. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. Nulls If all values are NULL. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. the function returns NULL. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. You can apply a condition to filter rows before counting them. Alternative. this function counts all rows. filter_condition] ) Argument value * filter_condition Meaning Required. regardless if a column in a row contains a null value. You can enter any valid transformation expression. For more information. Return Value Integer. Limits the rows in the search. Passes the values you want to count. However. filter_condition] ) or COUNT( * [. FALSE. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. Optionally. you can include the asterisk (*) argument to count all input values in a transformation. COUNT is one of several aggregate functions. Any datatype (except Binary). If you apply the asterisk argument. You can enter any valid transformation expression. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. If you apply the value argument. Optional. the function returns 0. You can nest only one other aggregate function within COUNT.COUNT Availability: Designer Returns the number of rows that have non-null values in a group. or NULL. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. Syntax COUNT( value [. Note: By default. Use to count all rows in a transformation. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. Zero if all values passed to this function are NULL (unless you include the asterisk argument). see “Installing and Configuring the 76 Chapter 6: Functions .

The function counts all rows in a transformation.PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. excluding null values: COUNT( ITEM_NAME. IN_STOCK < 5 ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight NULL Compass Regulator System Safety Knife Halogen Flashlight RETURN VALUE: 1 IN_STOCK 10 2 NULL 5 8 1 In this example. the function counted the Halogen flashlight but not the NULL item. QTY < 5 ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight NULL Compass Regulator System Safety Knife Halogen Flashlight RETURN VALUE: 2 QTY 10 2 NULL 5 8 1 COUNT 77 . including null values. If there is no group by port COUNT treats all rows as one group. returning one result for each group. Group By COUNT groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation. as illustrated in the following example: COUNT( *. returning one value. Example The following expression counts the items with less than 5 quantity in stock.

the function counts all rows that pass into the transformation. but do not use a filter.In this example. the function counts the NULL item and the Halogen Flashlight. For example: COUNT( * ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight NULL Compass Regulator System Safety Knife Halogen Flashlight RETURN VALUE: 6 QTY 10 2 NULL 5 8 1 78 Chapter 6: Functions . If you include the asterisk argument.

filter_condition Return Value Numeric value. CUME returns the running total for the previous row. You can enter any valid transformation expression. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. Passes the values for which you want to calculate a running total. Optional. A running total means CUME returns a total each time it adds a value. You can add a condition to filter rows out of the row set before calculating the running total. or if no rows are selected (for example. CUME 79 . Limits the rows in the search. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. if all values in the selected port are NULL. CUME returns NULL. Use CUME and similar functions (such as MOVINGAVG and MOVINGSUM) to simplify reporting by calculating running values. Syntax CUME( numeric_value [. Nulls If a value is NULL.CUME Availability: Designer Returns a running total. You can create a nested expression to calculate a running total based on the results of the function as long as the result is a numeric value. You can enter any valid transformation expression. or NULL. However. Numeric datatype. FALSE. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). filter_condition] ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL.

you can add values before calculating a running total: CUME( CA_SALES + OR_SALES ) CA_SALES 40000 80000 40000 60000 NULL 50000 OR_SALES 10000 50000 2000 NULL NULL 3000 RETURN VALUE 50000 180000 222000 222000 222000 275000 80 Chapter 6: Functions .Example The following sample rowset might result from using the CUME function: CUME( PERSONAL_SALES ) PERSONAL_SALES 40000 80000 40000 60000 NULL 50000 RETURN VALUE 40000 120000 160000 220000 220000 270000 Likewise.

NULL if one of the date values is NULL. 1 if the second date is earlier. 0 if the two dates are equal. Syntax DATE_COMPARE( date1.DATE_COMPARE Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns an integer indicating which of two dates is earlier. DATE_SHIPPED ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 Feb 1 1997 Dec 22 1997 Feb 29 1996 NULL Jan 13 1997 DATE_SHIPPED Jan 13 1997 Feb 1 1997 Dec 15 1997 Apr 12 1996 Jan 6 1997 NULL RETURN VALUE -1 0 1 -1 NULL NULL (Leap year) DATE_COMPARE 81 . Date/Time datatype. You can enter any valid transformation expression as long as it evaluates to a date. Date/Time datatype. Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression as long as it evaluates to a date. The second date you want to compare. date2 ) Argument date1 date2 Meaning Required. Example The following expression compares each date in the DATE_PROMISED and DATE_SHIPPED ports. Return Value -1 if the first date is earlier. and returns an integer indicating which date is earlier: DATE_COMPARE( DATE_PROMISED. Note that DATE_COMPARE returns an integer value rather than a date value. The first date you want to compare.

Required. If date1 is earlier than date2. You can specify years. 'Mm' or 'mM'. 82 Chapter 6: Functions . or seconds. You can enter any valid transformation expression. The format string is not case-sensitive. minutes. hours.DATE_DIFF Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the length of time between two dates. NULL if one (or both) of the date values is NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. the format string 'mm' is the same as 'MM'. months. Format string specifying the date or time measurement. minutes. If date1 is later than date2. days. The PowerCenter Server subtracts the second date from the first date and returns the difference. the return value is a positive number. Date/Time datatype. or seconds. format ) Argument date1 date2 format Meaning Required. date2. Zero if the dates are the same. Syntax DATE_DIFF( date1. such as 'mm'. the return value is a negative number. hours. Enclose the format strings within single quotation marks. Return Value Double value. You can request the format to be years. You can specify only one part of the date. Passes the values for the first date you want to compare. For example. months. Passes the values for the second date you want to compare. days. Date/Time datatype. Required.

'DDD' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. DATE_SHIPPED. DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH24' ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Mar 10 1996 6:10:45PM NULL Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM Jun 3 1997 1:13:46PM DATE_SHIPPED Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Feb 29 1996 2:15:14AM Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM NULL Aug 23 1996 4:20:16PM RETURN VALUE -2100. DATE_SHIPPED.0 255. 'D' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.Example The following expressions return the number of hours between the DATE_PROMISED and DATE_SHIPPED ports: DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.925277777016 (Leap year) NULL NULL 6812. 'HH12' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.663553240709 (Leap year) NULL NULL 283. DATE_SHIPPED.5 87.0 2100. 'HH' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. DATE_SHIPPED. DATE_SHIPPED. 'DY' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.870486111147 DATE_DIFF 83 .5 10. 'DAY' ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Mar 10 1996 6:10:45PM NULL Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM Jun 3 1997 1:13:46PM DATE_SHIPPED Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Feb 29 1996 2:15:14AM Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM NULL Aug 23 1996 4:20:16PM RETURN VALUE -87. DATE_SHIPPED.89166666567 The following expressions return the number of days between the DATE_PROMISED and the DATE_SHIPPED ports: DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. 'DD' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. DATE_SHIPPED.

'MONTH' ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Mar 10 1996 6:10:45PM NULL Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM Jun 3 1997 1:13:46PM DATE_SHIPPED Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Feb 29 1996 2:15:14AM Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM NULL Aug 23 1996 4:20:16PM RETURN VALUE -2. DATE_SHIPPED. 'YY' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. DATE_SHIPPED.35340409697164 The following expressions return the number of years between the DATE_PROMISED and DATE_SHIPPED ports: DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.91935483870839 2. DATE_SHIPPED.0288334464133489 (Leap year) NULL NULL 0. 'MM' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.91935483870839 0.346001356960187 NULL NULL 9. DATE_SHIPPED. 'YYYY' ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Mar 10 1996 6:10:45PM NULL Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM Jun 3 1997 1:13:46PM DATE_SHIPPED Mar 29 1997 12:00:00PM Jan 1 1997 12:00:00AM Feb 29 1996 2:15:14AM Dec 10 1997 5:55:10PM NULL Aug 23 1996 4:20:16PM RETURN VALUE -0. DATE_SHIPPED.779450341414304 84 Chapter 6: Functions . DATE_SHIPPED.243279569892366 0. 'YYY' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.The following expressions return the number of months between the DATE_PROMISED and DATE_SHIPPED ports: DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. 'MON' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED.243279569892366 0. 'Y' ) DATE_DIFF( DATE_PROMISED. DATE_SHIPPED.

If you enter 'Halogen'. you may not search for a portion of a value. Passes the values for which you want to search. first_result [. Any datatype (except Binary). The value you want to return if the search does not find a matching value. Optional. Syntax DECODE( value. Default value if the search does not find a matching value. the return value depends on the code page and data movement mode of the PowerCenter Server.. it returns a result value. You can build an unlimited number of searches within a DECODE function. first_search. DECODE 85 .DECODE Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Searches a port for a value you specify. If the function finds the value. you can either trim trailing blanks with the RTRIM function or include the blanks in your search string. not just 'Halogen'. You can enter any valid transformation expression. The search value must match the value argument exactly. Any value with the same datatype as the value argument. For example. Passes the values you want to search. If your data contains multibyte characters and your DECODE expression compares string data. Required. result default Return Value First_result if the search finds a matching value. second_result]. if you want to search for the string 'Halogen Flashlight' in a particular port.. You can enter any valid transformation expression. second_search. Also note that the search value is case-sensitive. Even if multiple conditions are met. If you use DECODE to search for a value in a string port. Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression.default] ) Argument value search Meaning Required. NULL if you omit the default argument and the search does not find a matching value.[. you must enter 'Halogen Flashlight. The value you want to return if the search finds a matching value. Any datatype (except Binary). Any datatype (except Binary). You can enter any valid transformation expression. the search does not find a matching value. which you define. the PowerCenter Server returns the first matching result.

141592654’.414213562’. When you run a session in high precision mode. and 3. For example. 'NONE' ) ITEM_ID 10 14 17 20 25 NULL 40 RETURN VALUE Flashlight Regulator NONE Knife NONE NONE Tank 86 Chapter 6: Functions . and the other results are Decimal. ‘Archimedes’.141592654. ‘3. 14. you have the following expression: DECODE ( CONST_NAME ‘Five’.414213562. 'Regulator'. 'Tank'. 1.DECODE and Datatypes When you use DECODE. For example. ‘Archimedes’. if at least one result is Double. the following expression is invalid: DECODE ( CONST_NAME ‘Five’. ‘1. This expression always writes the result as a Decimal. 3.141592654. 10.141592654 ) The return values in this expression are 5. 1.414213562. You cannot create a DECODE function with both string and numeric return values. 40. The Decimal datatype has greater precision than Integer. Example You might use DECODE in an expression that searches for a particular ITEM_ID and returns the ITEM_NAME: DECODE( ITEM_ID. 5. The first result is an Integer. 3. 'Flashlight'.141592654 ) When you validate the expression above. 'Knife'. 20. the datatype of the return value is always the same as the datatype of the result with the greatest precision. ‘Pythagoras’. 5. ‘Pythagoras’. ‘Pi’. 3. the Designer writes the following error message: Function cannot resolve operands of ambiguously mismatching datatypes. the datatype of the return value is Double. ‘Pi’.

Var1 < 23. 'Variables Var1 21 22 23 24 25 Var2 47 49 49 27 50 'Variable 1 'Variable 2 'Variable 1 'Variable 2 were out of was 22!'. Var2 > 30.') RETURN VALUE Variable 1 was less than 23. was less than 23. Variable 1 was 22! Variable 2 was 49! Variables were out of desired ranges. Var2 = 49.Note that DECODE returns the default value of NONE for items 17 and 25 because the search values did not match the ITEM_ID. DECODE returns NONE for the NULL ITEM_ID.'. The following expression tests multiple columns and conditions. was more than 30. Variable 2 was more than 30.'. was 49!'. evaluated in a top to bottom order for TRUE or FALSE: DECODE( TRUE. Var1 = 22. desired ranges. Also. DECODE 87 .

the PowerCenter Server skips the row and logs both the error message from the expression and the error message from the default value. Generally. and it does not log an error in the session log. You might use ERROR for input ports to keep null values from passing into a transformation. and you assign the default value. You can use the ERROR function for both input and output port default values.ERROR Availability: Designer Causes the PowerCenter Server to skip a row and issue an error message. It does not skip the row. you use the ERROR function in an expression. to the output port. assign ERROR as the default value. the default value overrides the ERROR function in an expression. Each time the PowerCenter Server encounters the ERROR function in the expression. When you use the ERROR function in an expression and in the output port default value. For example. you use ERROR within an IIF or DECODE function to set rules for skipping rows. The string can be any length. For details about using default values. 88 Chapter 6: Functions . Return Value String value. Syntax ERROR( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. see “Transformations” in the Designer Guide. The PowerCenter Server does not write these skipped rows to the session reject file. String value. it overrides the error with the value ‘1234’ and passes ‘1234’ to the next transformation. The error message displays in the session log file. which you define. including ERROR function calls within an expression. ‘1234’. If you use an output default value other than ERROR. Use ERROR for output ports to handle any kind of transformation error. You can use ERROR in Expression transformations to validate data. If you want to ensure the PowerCenter Server skips rows that produce an error. The message you want to display when the PowerCenter Server skips a row based on the expression containing the ERROR function.

Example The following example shows how to reference a mapping that calculates the average salary for employees in all departments of your company.'. Negative salary found. but skip negative values. The following expression nests the ERROR function in an IIF expression so that if the PowerCenter Server finds a negative salary in the Salary port. Negative salary found. Row skipped. ERROR ('Error. it skips the row and displays an error: IIF( SALARY < 0. Row skipped.' NULL 150000 1005 ERROR 89 . EMP_SALARY ) SALARY 10000 -15000 NULL 150000 1005 RETURN VALUE 10000 'Error.

Numeric datatype. For example. EXP is the reciprocal of the LN function. Syntax EXP( exponent ) Argument exponent Meaning Required. Example The following expression uses the values stored in the Numbers port as the exponent value: EXP( NUMBERS ) NUMBERS 10 -2 8. Return Value Double value. which returns the natural logarithm of a numeric value. NULL if a value passed as an argument to the function is NULL. EXP(2) returns 7. You might use this function to analyze scientific and technical data. where e=2.754427176 NULL 90 Chapter 6: Functions . (The exponent in the equation e^value).71828183. You can enter any valid transformation expression.55 NULL RETURN VALUE 22026.4657948067 0.EXP Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns e raised to the specified power (exponent). The value to which you want to raise e.38905609893065.135335283236613 5166. rather than business data.

Any datatype (except Binary). Syntax FIRST( value [. FALSE. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. FIRST 91 . FIRST ignores the row. Nulls If a value is NULL. For more information. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. Passes the values for which you want to return the first value. or NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. or if no rows are selected (for example. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. filter_condition ] ) Argument value filter_condition Meaning Required. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. Optional. Note: By default. You can enter any valid transformation expression. FIRST is one of several aggregate functions. you can apply a filter to limit the rows the PowerCenter Server reads. You can nest only one other aggregate function within FIRST. Return Value First value in a group. Optionally. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. However. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. However. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL.FIRST Availability: Designer Returns the first value found within a port or group. if all values passed from the port are NULL. FIRST returns NULL. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. the function returns NULL. Limits the rows in the search.

ITEM_PRICE > 10 ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Navigation Compass Regulator System Flashlight Depth/Pressure Gauge Flashlight RETURN VALUE: Flashlight ITEM_PRICE 35.00 29. returning one value.00 88.00 88.00 31.00: FIRST( ITEM_NAME.00 29.00 8. returning one result for each group.05 150. ITEM_PRICE > 40 ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Navigation Compass Regulator System Flashlight Depth/Pressure Gauge Flashlight RETURN VALUE: Regulator System ITEM_PRICE 35. FIRST treats all rows as one group.00 The following expression returns the first value in the ITEM_NAME port with a price greater than $40.00 31.00 8.Group By FIRST groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation.00 92 Chapter 6: Functions . If there is no group by port. Example The following expression returns the first value in the ITEM_NAME port with a price greater than $10.05 150.00: FIRST( ITEM_NAME.

Example The following expression returns the largest integer less than or equal to the values in the PRICE port: FLOOR( PRICE ) PRICE 39. the function returns 3. the function returns 3.14 to FLOOR. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. if you pass 3. you might write the function as follows: FLOOR( UNIT_PRICE * 10 ) FLOOR 93 .98 to FLOOR. Syntax FLOOR( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression as long as it evaluates to numeric data. if you want to multiply a numeric value by 10 before you calculate the largest integer less than the modified value. Likewise. For example. For example.24 NULL -100. Double if you pass a numeric value with declared precision greater than 28.FLOOR Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the largest integer less than or equal to the numeric value you pass to this function.17 to FLOOR. the function returns -4. if you pass -3.12 74.99 RETURN VALUE 39 125 74 NULL -101 Tip You can perform arithmetic on the values you pass to FLOOR. Return Value Integer if you pass a numeric value with declared precision between 0 and 28. If you pass 3. Numeric datatype.79 125.

Date/Time datatype. if you create an expression that returns the month portion of the date. Return Value Integer representing the specified part of the date. and pass a date such as Apr 1 1997 00:00:00. 'YY'. Enclose format strings within single quotation marks. Required. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. For example. A format string specifying the portion of the date value you want to change.GET_DATE_PART Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the specified part of a date as an integer value. format ) Argument date format Meaning Required. or 'YYYY' all return 1997. 'HH' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. GET_DATE_PART returns 4. 'mm'. Syntax GET_DATE_PART( date. 'HH12' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. Therefore. 'YYY'. The format string is not case-sensitive. the format strings 'Y'. for example. Example The following expressions return the hour for each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port. Note that 12:00:00AM returns 0 because the default date format is based on the 24 hour interval: GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. if you pass the date Apr 1 1997 to GET_DATE_PART. Each format string returns the entire part of the date based on the default format of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. 'HH24' ) DATE_SHIPPED Mar 13 1997 12:00:00AM Sep 2 1997 2:00:01AM Aug 22 1997 12:00:00PM June 3 1997 11:30:44PM NULL RETURN VALUE 0 2 12 23 NULL 94 Chapter 6: Functions . You can enter any valid transformation expression.

'DDD' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DY' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'YYY' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MON' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'YY' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'YYYY' ) DATE_SHIPPED RETURN VALUE Mar 13 1997 12:00:00AM 1997 June 3 1997 11:30:44PM 1997 NULL NULL GET_DATE_PART 95 . 'D' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MM' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'Y' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DD' ) GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED.The following expressions return the day for each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DAY' ) DATE_SHIPPED Mar 13 1997 12:00:00AM June 3 1997 11:30:44PM Aug 22 1997 12:00:00PM NULL RETURN VALUE 13 3 22 NULL The following expressions return the month for each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MONTH' ) DATE_SHIPPED Mar 13 1997 12:00:00AM June 3 1997 11:30:44PM NULL RETURN VALUE 3 6 NULL The following expression return the year for each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: GET_DATE_PART( DATE_SHIPPED.

Required. value2 Unlike conditional functions in some systems. You can enter any valid transformation expression.value2] ) Argument condition value1 Meaning Required. based on the results of a condition. value1 [.IIF Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns one of two values you specify. including another IIF expression. You can enter any valid transformation expression. The value you want to return if the condition is FALSE. Any datatype (except Binary). EMP_NAME ) SALES 150 50 120 NULL EMP_NAME John Smith Pierre Bleu Sally Green Greg Jones RETURN VALUE John Smith '' (empty string) Sally Green '' (empty string) 96 Chapter 6: Functions . the following expression does not include a FALSE condition and value1 is a string datatype so the PowerCenter Server returns an empty string for each row that evaluates to FALSE: IIF( SALES > 100. including another IIF expression. the FALSE (value2) condition in the IIF function is not required. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to TRUE or FALSE. The value you want to return if the condition is TRUE. the function returns the following when the condition is FALSE: ♦ ♦ ♦ 0 if value1 is a Numeric datatype. If you omit value2. Syntax IIF( condition. The return value is always the datatype specified by this argument. For example. Any datatype (except Binary). NULL if value1 is a Date/Time datatype. The condition you want to evaluate. Empty string if value1 is a String datatype. Optional.

3333 ) The TRUE result (1) is an integer and the FALSE result (. you have the following expression: IIF( SALES < 100. --then test to see if sales is between 1 and 49: IIF( SALES < 50. . Special Uses of IIF You can use nested IIF statements to test multiple conditions. IIF( SALES < 50. When you run a session in high precision mode and at least one result is Double. IIF( SALES < 200. SALARY1. BONUS))). the following expression includes the FALSE condition NULL so the PowerCenter Server returns NULL for each row that evaluates to FALSE: IIF( SALES > 100. SALARY3. the datatype of the return value is the same as the datatype of the result with the greatest precision. For example. The following example tests for various conditions and returns 0 if sales is zero or negative: IIF( SALES > 0. IIF( SALES < 100. 0 ) You can make this logic more readable by adding comments: IIF( SALES > 0. the return value depends on the code page and data movement mode of the PowerCenter Server. SALARY2. value2 if the condition is FALSE. The Decimal datatype has greater precision than Integer. --then return SALARY1 IIF 97 . For example.Return Value value1 if the condition is TRUE. EMP_NAME. 1. NULL ) SALES 150 50 120 NULL EMP_NAME John Smith Pierre Bleu Sally Green Greg Jones RETURN VALUE John Smith NULL Sally Green NULL If your data contains multibyte characters and your condition argument compares string data. the datatype of the return value is Double.3333) is a decimal. IIF and Datatypes When you use IIF. so the datatype of the return value is always a Decimal.

return 0) You can use IIF in update strategies. DECODE may improve readability. SALARY3. --else test to see if sales is between 100 and 199: IIF( SALES < 200. see “Filter Transformation” in the Transformation Guide. SALARY2. SALES > 199. DD_INSERT) Alternative to IIF You can use DECODE instead of IIF in many cases. SALES > 0 and SALES < 50. SALARY1. SALES > 49 AND SALES < 100. For example: IIF( ISNULL( ITEM_NAME ). --else for sales over 199. 98 Chapter 6: Functions . --then return SALARY3. BONUS) You can often use a Filter transformation instead of IIF to maximize session performance. For more information. DD_REJECT. SALES > 99 AND SALES < 200. --then return SALARY2.SALARY1. --else for sales less than or equal to zero. The following shows how you can use DECODE instead of IIF using the first example from the previous section: DECODE( TRUE. return BONUS) ) ). --else test to see if sales is between 50 and 99: IIF( SALES < 100.

or vertical tab) and characters that are not alphanumeric. if you pass the string ‘…THOMAS’. If your data contains multibyte characters.INITCAP Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Capitalizes the first letter in each word of a string and converts all other letters to lowercase. carriage return. For example. the return value depends on the code page and data movement mode of the PowerCenter Server. formfeed. tab. Words are delimited by white space (a blank space. Syntax INITCAP( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. INITCAP( FIRST_NAME ) FIRST_NAME ramona 18-albert NULL ?!SAM THOMAS PierRe RETURN VALUE Ramona 18-Albert NULL ?!Sam Thomas Pierre INITCAP 99 . You can enter any valid transformation expression. the function returns Thomas. newline. Return Value String. Any datatype (except Binary). Example The following expression capitalizes all names in the FIRST_NAME port. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.

INSTR locates the start position by counting from the end of the string. Any value. If you pass a decimal.INSTR Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the position of a character set in a string. The search_value must match a part of the string exactly. If the start position is a negative number. For example. The position in the string where you want to start the search. The results of the expression must be a character string. INSTR locates the start position by counting from the beginning of the string. for example 'abc'. You can enter any valid transformation expression. If the search value appears more than once in the string. the mapping fails when you run a workflow. enclose the characters you want to search for in single quotation marks. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. if not. Passes the value you want to evaluate. Zero if the search is unsuccessful. For example. the function uses the default value of 1. If you omit this argument. Required. if you write INSTR('Alfred Pope'. INSTR converts the value to a string before evaluating it. If you pass a negative integer or zero. If the start position is a positive number. search_value start occurrence Return Value Integer if the search is successful. meaning that INSTR searches for the first occurrence of the search value. 'Alfred Smith') the function returns zero. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Optional. counting from left to right. search_value [. you would enter 2 to search for the second occurrence from the start position. Optional. A positive integer greater than zero. meaning that INSTR starts the search at the first character in the string. the function uses the default value of 1. the PowerCenter Server rounds it to the nearest integer value. The default value is 1. The search value is case-sensitive. Integer represents the position of the first character in the search_value.start [. you can specify which occurrence you want to search for. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Syntax INSTR( string. counting from left to right. If you omit this argument. The set of characters you want to search for. The string must be a character string. 100 Chapter 6: Functions . If you want to search for a character string. INSTR searches from the first character in the string.occurrence]] ) Argument string Meaning Required. If the start position is zero. Must be an integer value.

'a' ) COMPANY Blue Fin Aqua Center Maco Shark Shop Scuba Gear Frank’s Dive Shop VIP Diving Club RETURN VALUE 13 2 5 3 0 The following expression returns the position of the second occurrence of the letter ‘a’. starting at the beginning of each company name. and returns 0: INSTR( COMPANY. and returns the position for the ‘a’ in ‘Aqua’: INSTR( COMPANY. 'a'. and returns 0: INSTR( COMPANY. it skips the ‘A’ in ‘Blue Fin Aqua Center’. 1. it skips the ‘A’ in 'Blue Fin Aqua Center’. starting from the last character in the company name. 'a'. 2 ) COMPANY Blue Fin Aqua Center Maco Shark Shop Scuba Gear Frank’s Dive Shop VIP Diving Club RETURN VALUE 0 2 5 0 0 INSTR 101 . -1. Because the search_value argument is case-sensitive. Because the search_value argument is case-sensitive. Because the search_value argument is casesensitive. it skips the ‘A’ in ‘Blue Fin Aqua Center’. 2 ) COMPANY Blue Fin Aqua Center Maco Shark Shop Scuba Gear Frank’s Dive Shop VIP Diving Club RETURN VALUE 0 8 9 0 0 The following expression returns the position of the second occurrence of the letter ‘a’ in each company name. starting at the beginning of each company name.Example The following expression returns the position of the first occurrence of the letter ‘a’.

The following expression returns the position of the first character in the string ‘Blue Fin Aqua Center’ (starting from the last character in the company name): INSTR( COMPANY. The expression finds the last (rightmost) space in the string and then returns all characters to the left of it: SUBSTR( CUST_NAME. The following expression evaluates a string. starting from the end of the string.-1. 1 ) COMPANY Blue Fin Aqua Center Maco Shark Shop Scuba Gear Frank’s Dive Shop VIP Diving Club RETURN VALUE 1 0 0 0 0 Using Nested INSTR You can nest the INSTR function within other functions to accomplish more complex tasks.1. 'Blue Fin Aqua Center'. 1. INSTR(CUST_ID. '#')-1 ) || SUBSTR( CUST_ID.' ' .INSTR( CUST_NAME.1 )) CUST_NAME PATRICIA JONES MARY ELLEN SHAH RETURN VALUE PATRICIA MARY ELLEN The following expression strips out the character '#' from a string: SUBSTR( CUST_ID. INSTR(CUST_ID. '#')+1 ) CUST_ID ID#33 #A3577 SS #712403399 RETURN VALUE ID33 A3577 SS 712403399 102 Chapter 6: Functions . -1.

You can enter any valid transformation expression.ISNULL Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns whether a value is NULL. Return Value TRUE (1) if the value is NULL. see “LENGTH” on page 115. Example The following example checks for null values in the items table: ISNULL( ITEM_NAME ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight NULL Regulator system ‘’ RETURN VALUE 0 (FALSE) 1 (TRUE) 0 (FALSE) 0 (FALSE) Empty string is not NULL ISNULL 103 . Passes the rows you want to evaluate. Note: To test for empty strings. For more information. Syntax ISNULL( value ) Argument value Meaning Required. FALSE (0) if the value is not NULL. ISNULL evaluates an empty string as FALSE. use LENGTH. Any datatype (except Binary).

‘RR’) as IS_DATE(02/29/2000 00:00:00). The output port for an IS_DATE expression must be String or Numeric datatype. In most cases. 104 Chapter 6: Functions . Informatica recommends using the RR format string with IS_DATE. If you omit the format string. you must use the format string 'MON DD YYYY HH12:MI:SSAM'. the function returns TRUE (1). the string value must be in the default date of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. Syntax IS_DATE( value [. so there is no February 29th. Must be a string datatype. For example. Note: IS_DATE uses the same format strings as TO_DATE. If the strings match the format string. not the YY format string. For example. NULL if a value in the expression is NULL or if the format string is NULL. Return Value TRUE (1) if the row is a valid date. Enter a valid TO_DATE format string. the two format strings return the same values. You can enter any valid transformation expression.format] ) Argument value format Meaning Required. If the strings you want to test are not in the default date format. if you pass the string 'Mar 15 1997 12:43:10AM'.IS_DATE Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns whether a string value is a valid date. In the first case. You might use IS_DATE to test or filter data in a flat file before writing it to a target. A valid date is any string in the default date format of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. but there are some unique cases where YY returns incorrect results. the PowerCenter Server computes the expression IS_DATE(‘02/29/00’. which returns false. Passes the rows you want to evaluate. IS_DATE evaluates strings and returns an integer value. the function returns FALSE (0). Optional. ‘YY’) is internally computed as IS_DATE(02/29/1900 00:00:00). If the strings passed to IS_DATE do not match the format string specified. use the TO_DATE format strings to specify the date format. FALSE (0) if the row is not a valid date. The format string must match the parts of the string argument exactly. However. year 1900 is not a leap year. which returns TRUE. the expression IS_DATE(‘02/29/00’.

Warning: The format of the IS_DATE string must exactly match the format string including any date separators. Example The following expression checks the INVOICE_DATE port for valid dates: IS_DATE( INVOICE_DATE ) This expression returns data similar to the following: INVOICE_DATE NULL ‘180’ ‘04/01/98’ ‘04/01/1998 00:12:15’ ‘02/31/1998 12:13:55’ ‘John Smith’ RETURN VALUE NULL 0 (FALSE) 0 (FALSE) 1 (TRUE) 0 (FALSE) 0 (FALSE) (February does not have 31 days ) The following IS_DATE expression specifies a format string of ‘YYYY/MM/DD’: IS_DATE( INVOICE_DATE. This expression checks the values in the INVOICE_DATE port. the PowerCenter Server returns ERROR and skips the row. and converts each valid date to a date value. the PowerCenter Server might return inaccurate values or skip the record. ‘YYYY/MM/DD’ ) If the string value does not match this format. If it does not. IS_DATE 105 . If the value is not a valid date. IS_DATE returns FALSE: INVOICE_DATE NULL ‘180’ ‘04/01/98’ ‘1998/01/12’ ‘1998/11/21 00:00:13’ ‘1998/02/31’ ‘John Smith’ RETURN VALUE NULL 0 (FALSE) 0 (FALSE) 1 (TRUE) 0 (FALSE) 0 (FALSE) 0 (FALSE) (February does not have 31 days) The following example shows how you can use IS_DATE to test data before using TO_DATE to convert the strings to dates.

TO_DATE( INVOICE_DATE ). ERROR(‘Not a valid date’ ) ) INVOICE_DATE NULL ‘180’ ‘04/01/98’ ‘1998/01/12’ ‘1998/11/21 00:00:13’ ‘1998/02/31’ ‘John Smith’ RETURN VALUE NULL ‘Not a valid date’ ‘Not a valid date’ 1998/01/12 ‘Not a valid date’ ‘Not a valid date’ ‘Not a valid date’ 106 Chapter 6: Functions . ‘YYYY/MM/DD’ ).Note that this example returns a Date/Time value. Therefore. the output port for the expression needs to be Date/Time: IIF( IS_DATE ( INVOICE_DATE.

6804’ The output port for an IS_NUMBER expression must be a String or Numeric datatype.IS_NUMBER Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns whether a string is a valid number. FALSE (0) if the row is not a valid number.45D-32’ (Windows only) ‘.45e+32’ ‘+3. Passes the rows you want to evaluate. A valid number consists of the following parts: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Optional space before the number Optional sign (+/-) One or more digits with an optional decimal point Optional scientific notation. You can enter any valid transformation expression.45E-32’ ‘+3. You might use IS_NUMBER to test or filter data in a flat file before writing it to a target. Return Value TRUE (1) if the row is a valid number. Syntax IS_NUMBER( value ) Argument value Meaning Required.45d+32’ (Windows only) ‘+3. IS_NUMBER 107 . such as the letter ‘e’ or ‘E’ (and the letter ‘d’ or ‘D’ on Windows) followed by an optional sign (+/-). followed by one or more digits Optional white space following the number The following numbers are all valid: ‘ 100 ‘ ’ +100’ ‘-100’ ‘-3. Must be a string datatype.

and converts each valid number to a double-precision floating point value.00 0.00 0.45E-3’ ‘ ‘’ ‘+123abc’ ‘ 123ABC’ ’ RETURN VALUE 123 -3450 0.00345 0.NULL if a value in the expression is NULL.00: IIF( IS_NUMBER ( ITEM_PRICE ).00 0. the following expression checks the values in the ITEM_PRICE port.45e+3’ ‘-3.Windows only) 0 (False . such as TO_FLOAT. the PowerCenter Server returns 0.00’ ‘-3.00 0.UNIX only) 0 (False) 0 (False) 0 (False) 0 (False) 1 (True) 1 (True) 0 (False) 0 (False) NULL Incomplete number Consists entirely of whitespace Empty string Leading whitespace Trailing whitespace ‘123 ‘ABC’ ‘-ABC’ NULL You can use IS_NUMBER to test data before using one of the numeric conversion functions.45D-3’ ‘-3.00 ) ITEM_PRICE ‘123.45d-3’ ‘3.45e+3’ ‘3. 0. If the value is not a valid number.45E-’ ‘ ‘’ ‘+123abc’ ‘ 123’ ‘ ’ RETURN VALUE 1 (True) 1 (True) 1 (True .00’ ‘-3. TO_FLOAT( ITEM_PRICE ).00 0. Example The following expression checks the ITEM_PRICE port for valid numbers: IS_NUMBER( ITEM_PRICE ) ITEM_PRICE ‘123. For example.00 NULL Consists entirely of whitespace Empty string ‘ABC’ ‘-ABC’ NULL 108 Chapter 6: Functions .

Passes the rows you want to evaluate. a newline. see “LENGTH” on page 115. For more information. a carriage return. A space is a blank space. IS_SPACES evaluates an empty string as FALSE because there are no spaces. a formfeed. NULL if a value in the expression is NULL. To test for an empty string.) Tip You can use IS_SPACES to avoid writing spaces to a character column in a target table. or a vertical tab. Must be a string datatype. Example The following expression checks the ITEM_NAME port for rows that consist entirely of spaces: IS_SPACES( ITEM_NAME ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight RETURN VALUE 0 (False) 1 (True) Regulator system NULL ‘’ 0 (False) NULL 0 (FALSE) (Empty string does not contain spaces.IS_SPACES Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns whether a string value consists entirely of spaces. if you have a transformation that writes customer names to a fixed length CHAR(5) IS_SPACES 109 . use LENGTH. For example. Return Value TRUE (1) if the row consists entirely of spaces. FALSE (0) if the row contains data. Syntax IS_SPACES( value ) Argument value Meaning Required. a tab. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

you might want to write ‘00000’ instead of spaces. To do this. CUST_NAMES ) 110 Chapter 6: Functions . '00000'. you create an expression similar to the following: IIF( IS_SPACES( CUST_NAMES ).column in a target table.

the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. Limits the rows in the search. LAST 111 . the function returns NULL. filter_condition ] ) Argument value filter_condition Meaning Required. FALSE. For more information. Return Value Last row in a port. Note: By default. or NULL. LAST is one of several aggregate functions. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. Syntax LAST( value [. You can enter any valid transformation expression. You can nest only one other aggregate function within LAST. or if no rows are selected (for example. Optionally. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. you can apply a filter to limit the rows the PowerCenter Server reads. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Passes the values for which you want to return the last row. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. However. Any datatype (except Binary). Optional. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only.LAST Availability: Designer Returns the last row in the selected port. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server.

05 150.00 29.00 Vest RETURN VALUE: Vest 31.00 8.00 Depth/Pressure Gauge 88. ITEM_PRICE > 10 ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Navigation Compass Regulator System Flashlight ITEM_PRICE 35.00 112 Chapter 6: Functions .00: LAST( ITEM_NAME.Example The following expression returns the last row in the ITEMS_NAME port with a price greater than $10.

LAST_DAY ignores the row. The last day of the month for that date value you pass to this function. Example The following expression returns the last day of the month for each date in the ORDER_DATE port: LAST_DAY( ORDER_DATE ) ORDER_DATE Apr 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 6 1998 12:00:00AM Feb 2 1996 12:00:00AM NULL Jul 31 1998 12:00:00AM RETURN VALUE Apr 30 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 31 1998 12:00:00AM Feb 29 1996 12:00:00AM NULL Jul 31 1998 12:00:00AM (Leap year) LAST_DAY 113 . returning one result for each group. Null If a value is NULL. Syntax LAST_DAY( date ) Argument date Meaning Required. Return Value Date. If there is no group by port. However. NULL if a value in the selected port is NULL. LAST_DAY returns NULL. LAST_DAY treats all rows as one group. returning one value. if all values passed from the port are NULL. Date/Time datatype. Passes the dates for which you want to return the last day of the month. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a date.LAST_DAY Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the date of the last day of the month for each date in a port. Group By LAST_DAY groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation.

The following example returns the last day of the month for each order date in the same format as the string: LAST_DAY( TO_DATE( ORDER_DATE.You can nest TO_DATE to convert string values to a date. 'DD-MON-YY' )) ORDER_DATE '18-NOV-98' '28-APR-98' NULL '18-FEB-96' RETURN VALUE Nov 30 1998 00:00:00 Apr 30 1998 00:00:00 NULL Feb 29 1996 00:00:00 (Leap year) 114 Chapter 6: Functions . If you pass a string that does not have a time value. the date returned will include the time 00:00:00. TO_DATE always includes time information.

Syntax LENGTH( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. String datatype. Example The following expression returns the length of each customer name: LENGTH( CUSTOMER_NAME ) CUSTOMER_NAME Bernice Davis NULL John Baer Greg Brown RETURN VALUE 13 NULL 9 10 Tips You can use LENGTH to test for empty string conditions. use ISNULL. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. To test for spaces. The strings you want to evaluate. ‘EMPTY STRING’ ) To test for a null field. Return Value Integer representing the length of the string. LENGTH 115 . You can enter any valid transformation expression. use IS_SPACES. use an expression such as: IIF( LENGTH( CUSTOMER_NAME ) = 0. see “IS_SPACES” on page 109. If you want to find fields in which customer name is empty. For details. For details. including trailing blanks. see “ISNULL” on page 103.LENGTH Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the number of characters in a string.

828313737302 -0. (The PowerCenter Server does not write row. For example. (The PowerCenter Server does not write row. You can enter any valid transformation expression. greater than zero. Numeric datatype. Return Value Double value. Syntax LN( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required.LN Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the natural logarithm of a numeric value. Example The following expression returns the natural logarithm for all values in the NUMBERS port: LN( NUMBERS ) NUMBERS 10 125 0.04082199452026 NULL Error. This function is the reciprocal of the function EXP. You usually use this function to analyze scientific data rather than business data. Passes the values for which you want to calculate the natural logarithm.) Note: The PowerCenter Server displays an error and does not write the row when you pass a negative number or zero.098612. LN(3)returns 1.302585092994 4. 116 Chapter 6: Functions . The numeric_value must be a positive number greater than zero.96 NULL -90 0 RETURN VALUE 2.) Error. It must be a positive number. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.

The base of the logarithm.956244644696599 NULL NULL Error. Any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a positive number other than 0 or 1.) Error. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. (PowerCenter Server does not write the row.) Error.09 NULL 35. or if you pass a negative value for the exponent. Example The following expression returns the logarithm for all values in the NUMBERS port: LOG( BASE. LOG 117 . (PowerCenter Server does not write the row. Syntax LOG( base. zero.LOG Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the logarithm of a numeric value. Required. (PowerCenter Server does not write the row. The exponent of the logarithm. Must be a positive numeric value greater than 0. exponent ) Argument base Meaning Required.) Note that the PowerCenter Server displays an error and does not write the row if you pass a negative number. exponent Return Value Double value. Any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a positive number greater than 0. or 1 as a base value. Most often.78 -9 0 10 EXPONENT 1 10 18 NULL 18 5 -2 RETURN VALUE 0 -0. Must be a positive numeric value other than 0 or 1. you use this function to analyze scientific data rather than business data. EXPONENT ) BASE 15 .

must match search1 datatype. search1 value1 118 Chapter 6: Functions .. The values you want to search for in the lookup source column specified in search1. Must be an output port in the same lookup table as result. If you use the LOOKUP function in a mapping.LOOKUP Availability: Designer Searches for a value in a lookup source column. rather than creating Lookup transformations. When you create a session based on a mapping that uses the LOOKUP function. you must specify the database connections for $Source Connection Value and $Target Connection Value in the session properties. Specifies the values you want to match to value. You can enter any valid transformation expression. For more information. Always preface this argument with the reference qualifier :TD. Specifies the return value if the search matches the value. You can define multiple searches for one lookup table within a LOOKUP function. Any datatype (except Binary). search1. However. you need to enable the lookup caching option for 3. Syntax LOOKUP( result. value2]. Note: This function is not supported in mapplets. value1 [. Datatype that matches the value1. This option exists expressly for PowerMart 3.5 compatibility in the session properties.5 users who want to continue using the LOOKUP function.. each search must find a matching value to return the lookup value. search2. The LOOKUP function compares data in a lookup source to a value you specify. it returns the value from a specified column in the same row in the lookup table. Using the Lookup Transformation or the LOOKUP Function Informatica recommends using the Lookup transformation rather than the LOOKUP function to look up values in PowerCenter mappings. Required. Always preface this argument with the reference qualifier :TD. When the PowerCenter Server finds the search value in the lookup table. Must be an output port in the same lookup table as search. see “Lookup Transformation” in the Transformation Guide. ) Argument result Meaning Required. Any datatype (except Binary). Required.

it returns the result from the same row as the search1 argument. 15. and returns the item name if both searches find a match: LOOKUP( :TD.SALES.ORDERS.QTY.ORDERS. :TD.PRICE. ' ')) Use the :TD reference qualifier in the result and search arguments of a LOOKUP function: LOOKUP(:TD.PRICE. 10.ITEM. Error if the search finds more than one matching value. Example The following expression searches the lookup source :TD. ORDERS. This means that both the value and the length for each row must match. RTRIM( ORDERS. If the PowerCenter Server finds matching values.Return Value Result if all searches find matching values.ITEM_NAME.QTY) LOOKUP 119 .SALES.99 15.ORDERS.99 Tips When you compare char and varchar values.SALES.SALES for a specific item ID and price.99 15. :TD. you need to use the RTRIM function to trim the trailing spaces from the lookup source so that the values match the lookup search: LOOKUP(:TD.ORDERS.ITEM_ID.PRICE.ORDERS.00 15. NULL if the search does not find any matching values. :TD.99 ) ITEM_NAME Regulator Flashlight Halogen Flashlight NULL RETURN VALUE: Flashlight ITEM_ID 5 10 15 20 PRICE 100. :TD.PRICE.ITEM. the LOOKUP function returns a result only if the two rows match exactly. ORDERS.ITEM. If your lookup source is a padded char value of a specified length and your lookup search is a varchar value. :TD.

LOWER Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts uppercase string characters to lowercase. the return value depends on the code page and data movement mode of the PowerCenter Server. Any string value. Example The following expression returns all first names to lowercase: LOWER( FIRST_NAME ) FIRST_NAME antonia NULL THOMAS PierRe BERNICE RETURN VALUE antonia NULL thomas pierre bernice 120 Chapter 6: Functions . NULL if a value in the selected port is NULL. Return Value Lowercase character string. The argument passes the string values that you want to return as lowercase. Syntax LOWER( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a string. If your data contains multibyte characters.

however.second_string] ) Argument first_string length Meaning Required. or if length is a negative number. be sure to enclose the characters you want to add to the beginning of the string within single quotation marks. second_string Return Value String of the specified length. '0') PART_NUM 702 1 0553 484834 RETURN VALUE 000702 000001 000553 484834 LPAD 121 . If you omit the second_string. You can enter a specific string literal. This argument specifies the length you want each string to be. The strings you want to change. Can be a character string. You can enter any valid transformation expression. This argument is case-sensitive. for example 'abc'. The characters you want to append to the left-side of the first_string values. RPAD returns NULL. Can be any string value. When length is a negative number. Required. length [. LPAD( PART_NUM.LPAD Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Adds a set of blanks or characters to the beginning of a string to set the string to a specified length. Example The following expression standardizes numbers to six digits by padding them with leading zeros. the function pads the beginning of the first string with blanks. Optional. Syntax LPAD( first_string. 6. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Must be a positive integer literal.

Flashlight *. If the first string is longer than the length. 16.. LPAD truncates the string from right to left. '.*Safety Knife The following expression shows how LPAD handles negative values for the length argument for each row in the ITEM_NAME port: LPAD( ITEM_NAME. For example. LPAD(‘alphabetical’. '*..*' ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Compass Regulator System Safety Knife RETURN VALUE *. LPAD uses a portion of the second string: LPAD( ITEM_NAME.') ITEM_NAME Flashlight Compass Regulator System RETURN VALUE NULL NULL NULL 122 Chapter 6: Functions .. -5. If the second string is longer than the total characters needed to return the specified length. 5.**Compass Regulator System *.LPAD counts the length from left to right..**.. ‘x’) returns the string ‘alpha’.**.

Passes the strings you want to modify. Then it returns the string. character-by-character. however.LTRIM Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Removes blanks or characters from the beginning of a string. trim_set Return Value String. If the character in the string matches any character in the trim_set. For example. You can enter any valid transformation expression. If you omit the second string. Most often. Syntax LTRIM( string [. If the trim_set is NULL. you must enclose the characters you want to remove from the beginning of the string within single quotation marks. You can use operators to perform comparisons or concatenate strings before removing characters from the beginning of a string. if you want to remove the 'A' character from the string 'Alfredo'. LTRIM continues comparing and removing characters until it fails to find a matching character in the trim_set. LTRIM removes only single-byte spaces. You can also enter a character string. the function removes any blanks from the beginning of the string. The string values with the specified characters in the trim_set argument removed. for example. you would enter 'A'. starting with the left side of the string. 'abc'. trim_set] ) Arguments string Meaning Required. Any string value. If you do not specify a trim_set parameter in your expression: ♦ ♦ In UNICODE mode. If you use LTRIM to remove characters from a string. not 'a'. Passes the characters you want to remove from the beginning of the first string. LTRIM 123 . Any string value.and double-byte spaces from the beginning of a string. In ASCII mode. Optional. LTRIM removes both single. You can enter any valid transformation expression. LTRIM removes it. Also note that LTRIM is case-sensitive. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. LTRIM compares the trim_set to each character in the string argument. you use LTRIM with IIF or DECODE in an Expression or Update Strategy transformation to avoid spaces in a target table. with any matching characters removed. the function returns NULL.

LTRIM removes it. you might create an expression similar to the following: LTRIM( LTRIM( NAMES ).Example The following expression removes the characters ‘S’ and ‘. MacDonald and the ‘S’ from both Sawyer and Steadman. 'S. so LTRIM returns the string in the LAST_NAME port and moves to the next row. but not the period from H. If the first character in the string matches the first character in the trim_set. When the first character in the string does not match the corresponding character in the trim_set. character-by-character. For example.’ from S. H does not match either character in the trim_set argument. This is because LTRIM searches. You can also remove multiple sets of characters by nesting LTRIM. if you want to remove leading blanks and the character 'T' from a column of names. Bender teadman LTRIM removes ‘S. Bender. Tips You can use RTRIM and LTRIM with || or CONCAT to remove leading and trailing blanks after you concatenate two strings. If it matches the second character in the trim_set. LTRIM returns the string and evaluates the next row. Bender. for the set of characters you specify in the trim_set argument. MacDonald Sawyer H. and so on. In the example of H.') LAST_NAME Nelson Osborne NULL S.’ from the strings in the LAST_NAME port: LTRIM( LAST_NAME. Then LTRIM looks at the second character in the string. Bender Steadman RETURN VALUE Nelson Osborne NULL MacDonald awyer H. 'T' ) 124 Chapter 6: Functions . LTRIM removes it.

You can nest only one other aggregate function within MAX. or if no rows are selected (for example. For more information. Return Value Date. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. Date/Time datatype. FALSE. You can enter any valid transformation expression.MAX (Dates) Availability: Designer Returns the latest date found within a port or group. You can apply a filter to limit the rows in the search. ITEM_NAME='Flashlight' ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Regulator System Flashlight Diving Hood Halogen Flashlight Flashlight Flashlight ORDER_DATE Apr 20 1998 May 15 1998 Sep 21 1998 Aug 18 1998 Feb 1 1998 Oct 10 1998 NULL MAX (Dates) 125 . or NULL. Example You can return the maximum date for a port or group. The following expression returns the maximum order date for flashlights: MAX( ORDERDATE. Optional. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. Passes the date for which you want to return a maximum date. filter_condition] ) Argument date filter_condition Meaning Required. MAX is one of several aggregate functions. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. Syntax MAX( date [. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Limits the rows in the search. You can also use MAX to return the largest numeric value in a port or group.

126 Chapter 6: Functions . You can also use MAX to return the latest date in a port or group. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. Note: By default. or if no rows are selected (for example. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. FALSE. If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. filter_condition] ) Argument numeric_value filter_condition Meaning Required. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). You can nest only one other aggregate function within MAX. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. Nulls If a value is NULL. Passes the numeric values for which you want to return a maximum numeric value. or NULL. MAX returns NULL. the function returns NULL. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. You can apply a filter to limit the rows in the search. Syntax MAX( numeric_value [. Optional.MAX (Numbers) Availability: Designer Returns the maximum numeric value found within a port or group. However. if all values passed from the port are NULL. Numeric datatype. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. You can enter any valid transformation expression. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. For more information. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Return Value Numeric value. MAX ignores it. However. Limits the rows in the search. MAX is one of several aggregate functions.

ITEM_NAME='Flashlight' ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Regulator System Flashlight Diving Hood Halogen Flashlight Flashlight Flashlight RETURN VALUE: 85. MAX treats all rows as one group.00 85.00 360. returning one value.00 PRICE 10.00 NULL MAX (Numbers) 127 .Group By MAX groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation. returning one result for each group.00 79.00 55. Example The first expression returns the maximum price for flashlights: MAX( PRICE. If there is no group by port.00 162.

You can enter any valid transformation expression. Nulls If a value is NULL. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. If there is an even number of values in the port. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. However. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. MEDIAN ignores the row. Numeric datatype. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. you can apply a filter to limit the rows you read to calculate the median. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. the function returns NULL. or if no rows are selected (for example. Return Value Numeric value. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. MEDIAN is one of several aggregate functions. Syntax MEDIAN( numeric_value [. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. or NULL. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). see “Installing and Configuring the 128 Chapter 6: Functions . Optionally. You can nest only one other aggregate function within MEDIAN. FALSE. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. the median is the average of the middle two values when all values are placed ordinally on a number line. if all values passed from the port are NULL. Optional. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. MEDIAN returns NULL. the median is the middle number. However. Note: By default. For more information. filter_condition ] ) Argument numeric_value filter_condition Meaning Required. Limits the rows in the search. You can enter any valid transformation expression. If there is an odd number of values in the port. Passes the values for which you want to calculate a median.MEDIAN Availability: Designer Returns the median of all values in a selected port. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only.

PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide.

Group By
MEDIAN groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation, returning one result for each group. If there is no group by port, MEDIAN treats all rows as one group, returning one value.

Example
To calculate the median salary for all departments, you create an Aggregator transformation grouped by departments with a port specifying the following expression:
MEDIAN( SALARY )

The following expression returns the median value for orders of stabilizing vests:
MEDIAN( SALES, ITEM = ‘Stabilizing Vest’ ) ITEM Flashlight Stabilizing Vest Stabilizing Vest Safety Knife Medium Titanium Knife Tank Stabilizing Vest Chisel Point Knife Stabilizing Vest Stabilizing Vest SALES 85 504 36 5 150 NULL 441 60 NULL 1044

Wrist Band Thermometer 110 RETURN VALUE: 472.5

MEDIAN

129

METAPHONE
Availability: Designer Workflow Manager

Encodes string values. You can specify the length of the string that you want to encode. METAPHONE encodes characters of the English language alphabet (A-Z). It encodes both uppercase and lowercase letters in uppercase. METAPHONE encodes characters according to the following list of rules:
♦ ♦

Skips vowels (A, E, I, O, and U) unless one of them is the first character of the input string. METAPHONE(‘CAR’) returns ‘KR’ and METAPHONE(‘AAR’) returns ‘AR’. Table 6-1 lists the METAPHONE encoding guidelines:
Table 6-1. METAPHONE Encoding Guidelines Input B C Returns n/a B X S n/a K J T F F n/a J K H H n/a J K L M N J n/a K L M N Condition - when it follows M - in all other cases - when followed by IA or H - when followed by I, E, or Y - when it follows S, and is followed by I, E, or Y - in all other cases - when followed by GE, GY, or GI - in all other cases - in all cases - when followed by H and the first character in the input string is not B, D, or H - when followed by H and the first character in the input string is B, D, or H - when followed by I, E or Y and does not repeat - in all other cases - when it does not follow C, G, P, S, or T and is followed by A, E, I, or U - in all other cases - in all cases - when it follows C - in all other cases - in all cases - in all cases - in all cases Example - METAPHONE (‘Lamb’) returns LM. - METAPHONE (‘Box’) returns BKS. - METAPHONE (‘Facial’) returns FXL. - METAPHONE (‘Fence’) returns FNS. - METAPHONE (‘Scene’) returns SN. - METAPHONE (‘Cool’) returns KL. - METAPHONE (‘Dodge’) returns TJ. - METAPHONE (‘David’) returns TFT. - METAPHONE (‘FOX’) returns FKS. - METAPHONE (‘Tough’) returns TF. - METAPHONE (‘Hugh’) returns HF. - METAPHONE (‘Magic’) returns MJK. - METAPHONE(‘GUN’) returns KN. - METAPHONE (‘DHAT’) returns THT. - METAPHONE (‘Chain’) returns XN. - METAPHONE (‘Jen’) returns JN. - METAPHONE (‘Ckim’) returns KM. - METAPHONE (’Kim’) returns KM. - METAPHONE (‘Laura’) returns LR. - METAPHONE (‘Maggi’) returns MK. - METAPHONE (‘Nancy’) returns NNS.

D F G

130

Chapter 6: Functions

Table 6-1. METAPHONE Encoding Guidelines Input P Q R S T Returns F P K R X S X 0* n/a T V W F W n/a X Y Z KS Y n/a S Condition - when followed by H - in all other cases - in all cases - in all cases - when followed by H, IO, IA, or CHW - in all other cases - when followed by IA or IO - when followed by H - when followed by CH - in all other cases - in all cases - when followed by A, E, I, O, or U - in all other cases - in all cases - when followed by A, E, I, O, or U - in all other cases - in all cases Example - METAPHONE (‘Phone’) returns FN. - METAPHONE (‘Pip’) returns PP. - METAPHONE (‘Queen’) returns KN. - METAPHONE (‘Ray’) returns R. - METAPHONE (‘Cash’) returns KX. - METAPHONE (‘Sing’) returns SNK. - METAPHONE (‘Patio’) returns PX. - METAPHONE (‘Thor’) returns 0R. - METAPHONE (‘Glitch’) returns KLTX. - METAPHINE (‘Tim’) returns TM. - METAPHONE (‘Vin’) returns FN. - METAPHONE (‘Wang’) returns WNK. - METAPHONE (‘When’) returns HN. - METAPHONE (‘Six’) returns SKS. - METAPHONE (‘Yang’) returns YNK. - METAPHONE (‘Bobby’) returns BB. - METAPHONE (‘Zack’) returns SK.

*The integer 0.

Skips the initial character and encodes the remaining string if the first two characters of the input string have one of the following values:
− − − −

KN. For example, METAPHONE(‘KNOT’) returns ‘NT’. GN. For example, METAPHONE(‘GNOB’) returns ‘NB’. PN. For example, METAPHONE(‘PNRX’) returns ‘NRKS’. AE. For example, METAPHONE(‘AERL’) returns ‘ERL’.

If a character other than “C” occurs more than once in the input string, encodes the first occurrence only. For example, METAPHONE(‘BBOX’) returns ‘BKS’ and METAPHONE(‘CCOX’) returns ‘KKKS’.

METAPHONE

131

Syntax
METAPHONE( string [,length] ) Argument string Meaning Required. Must be a character string. Passes the value you want to encode. The first character must be a character in the English language alphabet (A-Z). You can enter any valid transformation expression. Skips any non-alphabetic character in string. Optional. Must be an integer greater than zero. Specifies the number of characters in string that you want to encode. You can enter any valid transformation expression. When length is zero or a value greater than the length of string, encodes the entire input string. Default is zero.

length

Return Value
String. NULL if one of the following conditions is true:
♦ ♦ ♦

All values passed to the function are NULL. No character in string is a letter of the English alphabet. string is empty.

Examples
The following expression encodes the first two characters in EMPLOYEE_NAME port to a string:
METAPHONE( EMPLOYEE_NAME, 2 ) Employee_Name John *@#$ P$%%oc&&KMNL Return Value JH NULL PK

The following expression encodes the first four characters in EMPLOYEE_NAME port to a string:
METAPHONE( EMPLOYEE_NAME, 4 ) Employee_Name John 1ABC *@#$ P$%%oc&&KMNL Return Value JHN ABK NULL PKKM

132

Chapter 6: Functions

MIN (Dates)
Availability: Designer

Returns the oldest date found in a port or group. You can apply a filter to limit the rows in the search. You can nest only one other aggregate function within MIN, and the nested function must return a date datatype. MIN is one of several aggregate functions. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. For more information, see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. You can also use MIN to return the minimum numeric value in a port or group.

Syntax
MIN( date [, filter_condition] ) Argument date filter_condition Meaning Required. Date/Time datatype. Passes the values for which you want to return minimum value. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Optional. Limits the rows in the search. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE, FALSE, or NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

Return Value
Date if the value argument is a date. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL, or if no rows are selected (for example, the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows).

Nulls
If a single value is NULL, MIN ignores it. However, if all values passed from the port are NULL, MIN returns NULL.

Group By
MIN groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation, returning one result for each group. If there is no group by port, MIN treats all rows as one group, returning one value.

MIN (Dates)

133

ITEM_NAME='Flashlight' ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Regulator System Flashlight Diving Hood Halogen Flashlight Flashlight Flashlight RETURN VALUE: Feb 1 1998 ORDER_DATE Apr 20 1998 May 15 1998 Sep 21 1998 Aug 18 1998 Feb 1 1998 Oct 10 1998 NULL 134 Chapter 6: Functions .Example The following expression returns the oldest order date for flashlights: MIN( ORDER_DATE.

You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. MIN ignores it. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. MIN is one of several aggregate functions. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. Nulls If a single value is NULL. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). or NULL. MIN returns NULL. You can apply a filter to limit the rows in the search. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. if all values passed from the port are NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Optional. Numeric datatypes. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only.MIN (Numbers) Availability: Designer Returns the minimum numeric value found in a port or group. MIN (Numbers) 135 . the function returns NULL. Syntax MIN( numeric_value [. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. However. Passes the values for which you want to return minimum value. Note: If the return value is a decimal with precision greater than 15. For more information. FALSE. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLS in aggregate functions. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. or if no rows are selected (for example. You can enter any valid transformation expression. filter_condition] ) Argument numeric_value filter_condition Meaning Required. You can nest only one other aggregate function within MIN. You can also use MIN to return the oldest date in a port or group. and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. However. Return Value Numeric value. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. Limits the rows in the search. Note: By default. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide.

00 55.00 NULL 136 Chapter 6: Functions . returning one value. ITEM_NAME='Flashlight' ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Regulator System Flashlight Diving Hood Halogen Flashlight Flashlight Flashlight RETURN VALUE: 10. Example The following expression returns the minimum price for flashlights: MIN ( PRICE. returning one result for each group.00 PRICE 10.00 360. If there is no group by port. MIN treats all rows as one group.00 162.00 85.00 79.Group By MIN groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation.

divisor ) Argument numeric_value divisor Meaning Required.00 NULL 20. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Syntax MOD( numeric_value.5) returns 3.00 12. For example. The numeric value you want to divide by. Example The following expression returns the modulus of the values in the PRICE port divided by the values in the QTY port: MOD( PRICE. MOD(8. The divisor cannot be zero. PowerCenter Server does not write row. Required.00 9. Numeric datatype. The remainder of the numeric value divided by the divisor. Return Value Numeric value of the datatype you pass to the function.00 25. The values you want to divide. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.00 15. QTY ) PRICE 10.MOD Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the remainder of a division calculation. MOD 137 .00 QTY 2 5 2 3 3 NULL 0 RETURN VALUE 0 2 1 0 NULL NULL Error.

00 25.00 15. QTY )) PRICE 10. 0) produced a NULL rather than an error because the IIF function replaces NULL with the zero in the QTY port. NULL. the function returns NULL: MOD( PRICE.The last row (25.00 9.00 NULL 20. To avoid dividing by zero. 0) produced an error because you cannot divide by zero. which returns the modulus of Price divided by Quantity only if the quantity is not zero.00 QTY 2 5 2 3 3 NULL 0 RETURN VALUE 0 2 1 0 NULL NULL NULL The last row (25.00 12. IIF( QTY = 0. you can create an expression similar to the following. 138 Chapter 6: Functions . If the quantity is zero.

the function returns NULL. five rows at a time. However. For example. The values for which you want to calculate a moving average. if you want to calculate a moving average for a column of data. Note: If the return value is a decimal with precision greater than 15. filter_condition Return Value Numeric value. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. Defines the row set for which you want to calculate the moving average. You can enter any valid transformation expression. MOVINGAVG 139 . rowset [. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). you can apply a condition to filter rows before calculating the moving average. or NULL.MOVINGAVG Availability: Designer Returns the average (row-by-row) of a specified set of rows. you might write an expression such as: MOVINGAVG(SALES. if all values are NULL. Nulls MOVINGAVG ignores null values when calculating the moving average. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. Syntax MOVINGAVG( numeric_value. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. 5). Optional. Limits the rows in the search. Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Must be a positive integer literal greater than zero. Numeric datatype. Optionally. filter_condition] ) Argument numeric_value rowset Meaning Required. or if no rows are selected (for example. FALSE.

and thereafter. returns the average for the last five rows read: MOVINGAVG( SALES. 140 Chapter 6: Functions . and 243 based on rows 3 through 7.8 243 The function returns the average for a set of five rows: 358 based on rows 1 through 5. 5 ) ROW_NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 SALES 600 504 36 100 550 39 490 RETURN VALUE NULL NULL NULL NULL 358 245.Example The following expression returns the average order for a Stabilizing Vest.8 based on rows 2 through 6. based on the first five rows in the Sales port. 245.

The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. five rows at a time. or if the function does not select any rows (for example. or NULL. Syntax MOVINGSUM( numeric_value. FALSE. filter_condition Return Value Numeric value. if all values are NULL. you might write an expression such as: MOVINGSUM( SALES. You can enter any valid transformation expression. filter_condition] ) Argument numeric_value rowset Meaning Required. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). Note: If the return value is a Decimal with precision greater than 15. the function returns NULL. you can apply a condition to filter rows before calculating the moving sum. You can enter any valid transformation expression. if you want to calculate a moving sum for a column of data. However. The values for which you want to calculate a moving sum. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. For example. Required. Numeric datatype. Defines the rowset for which you want to calculate the moving sum. Must be a positive integer literal greater than zero.MOVINGSUM Availability: Designer Returns the sum (row-by-row) of a specified set of rows. Nulls MOVINGSUM ignores null values when calculating the moving sum. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. 5 ) Optional. Limits the rows in the search. MOVINGSUM 141 . Optionally. rowset [.

1229 based on rows 2 through 6. and 1215 based on rows 3 through 7.Example The following expression returns the sum of orders for a Stabilizing Vest. 142 Chapter 6: Functions . based on the first five rows in the Sales port. and thereafter. 5 ) ROW_NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 SALES 600 504 36 100 550 39 490 RETURN VALUE NULL NULL NULL NULL 1790 1229 1215 The function returns the sum for a set of five rows: 1790 based on rows 1 through 5. returns the average for the last five rows read: MOVINGSUM( SALES.

the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). PERCENTILE ignores the row. the PowerCenter Server displays an error and does not write the row. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. If you pass a number outside the 0 to 100 range. and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. You can enter any valid transformation expression. PERCENTILE returns NULL. when PERCENTILE 143 . filter_condition Return Value Numeric value. Numeric datatype. percentile [. FALSE. Nulls If a value is NULL. Passes the percentile you want to calculate. or NULL. Passes the values for which you want to calculate a percentile. Limits the rows in the search. you can apply a filter to limit the rows you read to calculate the percentile. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. See the following equation for more details. However.PERCENTILE Availability: Designer Calculates the value that falls at a given percentile in a group of numbers. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. For more information. Optional. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. PERCENTILE is one of several aggregate functions. You can enter any valid transformation expression. or if no rows are selected (for example. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. Required. However. inclusive. Note: By default. Syntax PERCENTILE( numeric_value. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. Integer between 0 and 100. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. You can nest only one other aggregate function within PERCENTILE. Optionally. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. if all values in a group are NULL. the function returns NULL. filter_condition ] ) Argument numeric_value percentile Meaning Required.

returning one value. PERCENTILE returns the value of the ith element in the list. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. Otherwise PERCENTILE returns the value of n: n = [ i th element × ( i – i ) ] + [ i th element × ( i – i ) ] 144 Chapter 6: Functions . returning one result for each group. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions.you configure the PowerCenter Server. If there is no group by port. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. Example The PowerCenter Server calculates a percentile using the following logic: ( x + 1 ) × percentile i = ------------------------------------------------100 where: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ x is the number of elements in the group of values for which you are calculating a percentile. PERCENTILE returns the value of the first element in the list. Group By PERCENTILE groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation. PERCENTILE treats all rows as one group. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. If i is an integer value. If i < 1.

0 85000.The following expression returns the salary that falls at the 75th percentile of salaries greater than $50.0 99000.000: PERCENTILE( SALARY.0 86000.0 NULL 55000.0 9000. SALARY > 50000 ) SALARY 125000.0 100000. 75.0 48000.0 RETURN VALUE: 106250.0 PERCENTILE 145 .0 27900.

Numeric value.0 -3.0 6. Return Value Double value. exponent ) Argument base exponent Meaning Required.5 NULL 10.265625 982. This argument is the exponent value.5 3.00137174211248285 729.0 3. Required.5 RETURN VALUE 100 1838.00137174211248285 0. If the base value is negative. Syntax POWER( base.0 -3.5 2.POWER Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns a value raised to the exponent you pass to the function. You can enter any valid transformation expression. In this case.0 -6.0 146 Chapter 6: Functions .594307804838 NULL NULL 0. the exponent must be an integer.0 3. If the base value is negative.0 5. the exponent must be an integer.0 729. This argument is the base value. EXPONENT ) NUMBERS 10. the function rounds any decimal values to the nearest integer before returning a value. NULL if you pass a null value to the function.0 EXPONENT 2. Example The following expression returns the values in the Numbers port raised to the values in the Exponent port: POWER( NUMBERS.0 -3.0 NULL -6. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Numeric value.0 6.0 5.

5.0 raised to 5.0 raised to 6 returns the same results as -3. otherwise the PowerCenter Server rounds the exponent to the nearest integer value. the exponent must be an integer. POWER 147 . If the base is negative.Note that -3.

REPLACECHR returns InputString. an empty string. Required. Required. NULL if InputString is NULL. You can also enter a text literal enclosed within single quotation marks. Determines whether the arguments in this function are casesensitive. InputString. Required. 148 Chapter 6: Functions . You can enter any valid transformation expression. REPLACECHR searches the input string for the characters you specify and replaces all occurrences of all characters with the new character you specify.REPLACECHR Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Replaces characters in a string with a single character or no character. InputString if OldCharSet is NULL or empty. Must be an integer. If NewChar contains more than one character. You can enter one or more characters. OldCharSet. 'abc'. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Syntax REPLACECHR( CaseFlag. the function is case-sensitive. Must be a character string. The characters you want to replace. When CaseFlag is a non-zero number. If NewChar is NULL or empty. If you pass a numeric value. Empty string if REPLACECHR removes all characters in InputString. If OldCharSet is NULL or empty. the function is not case-sensitive. You can enter any valid transformation expression. When CaseFlag is a null value or a zero. for example. NewChar ) Argument CaseFlag Meaning Required. REPLACECHR uses the first character to replace OldCharSet. the function converts it to a character string. If you pass a numeric value. You can enter one character. You can enter any valid transformation expression. or NULL. REPLACECHR returns NULL. the function converts it to a character string. Must be a character string. Passes the string you want to search. If InputString is NULL. InputString OldCharSet NewChar Return Value String. Must be a character string. REPLACECHR removes all occurrences of all characters in OldCharSet in InputString.

‘]["’. WEBLOG.1 GET /companyinfo/index.html HTTP/1.html HTTP/1. NULL ) WEBLOG "GET /news/index.1" GET /companyinfo/index.1 NULL The following expression changes part of the value of the customer code for each row in the CUSTOMER_CODE port: REPLACECHR ( 1.1" NULL RETURN VALUE 29/Oct/2001:14:13:50 -0700 31/Oct/2000:19:45:46 -0700 GET /news/ index. ‘A’.html HTTP/1.1" "GET /companyinfo/index. WEBLOG. ‘"’.html HTTP/1.html HTTP/1.html HTTP/1. CUSTOMER_CODE.Example The following expression removes the double quotes from web log data for each row in the WEBLOG port: REPLACECHR( 0. ‘M’ ) CUSTOMER_CODE ABA abA BBC ACC NULL RETURN VALUE MBM abM BBC MCC NULL The following expression changes part of the value of the customer code for each row in the CUSTOMER_CODE port: REPLACECHR ( 0.1 NULL RETURN VALUE GET /news/index.1 01/Nov/2000:10:51:31 -0700 GET /news/ index.html HTTP/1.1" [01/Nov/2000:10:51:31 -0700] "GET / news/index. NULL ) WEBLOG [29/Oct/2001:14:13:50 -0700] [31/Oct/2000:19:45:46 -0700] "GET / news/index.1 NULL The following expression removes multiple characters for each row in the WEBLOG port: REPLACECHR ( 1.html HTTP/1.html HTTP/1.html HTTP/1. CUSTOMER_CODE.1 GET /companyinfo/index. ‘M’ ) CUSTOMER_CODE ABA abA BBC ACC RETURN VALUE MBM MbM BBC MCC REPLACECHR 149 . ‘A’.

The single quote is the only character that cannot be used inside a string literal. NULL ) INPUT 'Tom Smith' 'Laura Jones' Tom's NULL RETURN VALUE Tom Smith Laura Jones Toms NULL For more information. see “CHR” on page 68. including the single quote. CHR(39). INPUT. CUSTOMER_CODE. ‘A’. The following expression removes multiple characters. ‘14’. NULL ) CUSTOMER_CODE ABA BBC ACC AAA aaa NULL aaa NULL RETURN VALUE B BBC CC [empty string] The following expression removes multiple numbers for each row in the INPUT port: REPLACECHR ( 1. NULL ) INPUT 12345 4141 111115 NULL RETURN VALUE 235 NULL 5 NULL When you want to use a single quote (‘) in either OldCharSet or NewChar. you must use the CHR function.The following expression changes part of the value of the customer code for each row in the CUSTOMER_CODE port: REPLACECHR ( 1. for each row in the INPUT port: REPLACECHR (1. 150 Chapter 6: Functions . INPUT.

the function converts it to a character string. When CaseFlag is a non-zero number. REPLACESTR returns NULL. If InputString is NULL. REPLACESTR ignores the OldString argument. You can enter any valid transformation expression. REPLACESTR returns InputString. When REPLACESTR replaces a string. Determines whether the arguments in this function are casesensitive. Empty string if REPLACESTR removes all characters in InputString. Must be a character string. You can enter one or more characters per OldString argument. Required. Must be a character string. For more information. the first OldString argument has precedence over the second OldString argument. Passes the strings you want to search. When REPLACESTR contains multiple OldString arguments.] NewString ) Argument CaseFlag Meaning Required. [OldString2. You can enter one character. OldStringN. it places the cursor after the replaced characters in InputString before searching for the next match. and the second OldString argument has precedence over the third OldString argument. or no character. . When all OldString arguments are NULL or empty. When CaseFlag is a null value or a zero. the function converts it to a character string. That is. multiple characters. 'abc'. Syntax REPLACESTR ( CaseFlag. etc. the function is not case-sensitive. an empty string. Must be an integer. InputString OldString NewString Return Value String. You can enter any valid transformation expression.REPLACESTR Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Replaces characters in a string with a single character. If you pass a numeric value. Required.. REPLACESTR removes all occurrences of OldString in InputString. multiple characters. Required. and one or more OldString arguments is NULL or empty.. REPLACESTR 151 . InputString. Must be a character string. OldString1. If NewString is NULL or empty. You can enter any valid transformation expression. You can also enter a text literal enclosed within single quotation marks. If you pass a numeric value. You can enter any valid transformation expression. You must enter at least one OldString argument. The function replaces the characters in the OldString arguments in the order they appear in the function. see the examples. for example. or NULL. The string you want to replace. the function is case-sensitive. REPLACESTR searches the input string for all strings you specify and replaces them with the new string you specify. if you enter multiple OldString arguments.

’. NULL ) WEBLOG "GET /news/index. ‘"’. The following expression changes the title for certain values for each row in the TITLE port: REPLACESTR ( 0. Ms. ‘s. Mr. ‘ HTTP/1.html HTTP/1. Ms. ‘ab’. ‘rs.’. ‘rs. RETURN VALUE Ms.html GET NULL NULL RETURN VALUE /news/index. InputString if all OldString arguments are NULL or empty.1" GET /companyinfo/index. WEBLOG. The following expression shows how the REPLACESTR function replaces multiple OldString arguments for each row in the INPUT port: REPLACESTR ( 1. ‘iss’. ‘iss’. ‘*’ ) INPUT abc abbc abbbbc bc RETURN VALUE *c ** *bb* * 152 Chapter 6: Functions . TITLE.html /companyinfo/index. ‘s. ‘bc’. Example The following expression removes the double quotes and two different text strings from web log data for each row in the WEBLOG port: REPLACESTR( 1.html [empty string] The following expression changes the title for certain values for each row in the TITLE port: REPLACESTR ( 1. RETURN VALUE Ms.’ ) TITLE Mrs.’ ) TITLE Mrs.1" "GET /companyinfo/index.1’.html /companyinfo/index. MRS. Miss Mr. ‘GET ’.html HTTP/1. TITLE.NULL if InputString is NULL. MRS. INPUT. MRS.

‘b’ ) INPUT ab bc abc abbc abbcc RETURN VALUE b b bc bb bbc When you want to use a single quote (‘) in either OldString or NewString. INPUT. ‘s’ )). CONCAT(‘it’. INPUT. For example: CONCAT( ‘Joan’. ‘bc’.The following expression shows how the REPLACESTR function replaces multiple OldString arguments for each row in the INPUT port: REPLACESTR ( 1. ‘ab’. CONCAT( CHR(39). CONCAT(CHR(39). for each row in the INPUT port: REPLACESTR ( 1. see “CHR” on page 68 and “CONCAT” on page 72. ‘its’ ) INPUT it's mit's mits mits' RETURN VALUE its mits mits mits' For more information. Use both the CHR and CONCAT functions to concatenate a single quote onto a string. ‘s car’ )) returns Joan's car The following expression changes a string that includes the single quote. The single quote is the only character that cannot be used inside a string literal. you must use the CHR function. REPLACESTR 153 .

Minute. and ROUND(05/22/1998 10:15:30. For example.ROUND (Dates) Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Rounds one part of a date. For example. Hour. This functions can round the following parts of a date: ♦ Year. If the minute portion of the time is between 0 and 29. Month. 'YY') returns 01/01/1998 00:00:00. the expression ROUND(04/01/1998 11:29:35. the expression ROUND(06/30/1998 2:30:55. If the minute portion is 30 or greater. Rounds the day portion of the date based on the time. You can also use ROUND to round numbers. Day. and ROUND(4/16/1998 8:24:19. it rounds to the first day of the next month with the time set to 00:00:00. the function rounds the date to the next day with the time set to 00:00:00 (12AM). If time has 0 to 29 seconds. Rounds the hour portion of the date based on the minutes in the hour. and ROUND(04/01/1998 13:39:00. 'HH') returns 04/01/1998 14:00:00. the function returns January 1 of the next year with the time set to 00:00:00. the expression ROUND(06/13/1998 2:30:45. If the time is between 00:00:00 (12AM) and 11:59:59AM. Rounds the minute portion of the date based on the seconds. 'HH') returns 04/01/1998 11:00:00. If the day of the month is between 16 and the last day of the month. it rounds the date to the first day of the input month with the time set to 00:00:00. the function rounds to the next hour and sets the minutes and seconds to zero. the expression ROUND(4/15/1998 12:15:00. 'YY') returns 1/1/1998 00:00:00. the function returns the current minutes and sets the seconds to zero. 'MI') returns 05/22/1998 10:15:00. the function returns the current hour with the minutes and seconds set to zero. 'DD') returns 06/14/1998 00:00:00. and ROUND(06/13/1998 22:30:45. the function returns January 1 of the input year. the expression ROUND(05/22/1998 10:15:29. For example. and sets the time to 00:00:00. 'MI') returns 05/22/1998 10:16:00. Rounds the month portion of a date based on the day of the month. 'MM') returns 4/1/1998 00:00:00. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 154 Chapter 6: Functions . If the month is between July and December. the function returns the current date with the time set to 00:00:00 (12AM). If the time is 12:00:00 (12PM) or later. the function rounds to the next minute and sets the seconds to zero. 'DD') returns 06/13/1998 00:00:00. Rounds the year portion of a date based on the month. For example. and ROUND(07/1/1998 3:10:15. 'MM') returns 5/1/1998 00:00:00. For example. If the day of the month is between 1 and 15. If the month is between January and June. If the time has 30 to 59 seconds.

Date/Time datatype. 'YY' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. Enter a valid format string. You can nest TO_DATE to convert strings to dates before rounding. the function rounds the date to the nearest day. 'MON' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. NULL if you pass a null value to the function. You can round only one portion of the date. If you omit the format string. This is the portion of the date that you want to round. 'YYYY' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1999 12:00:00AM NULL The following expressions round the month portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED.format] ) Argument date format Meaning Required.Syntax ROUND( date [. 'MONTH' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM May 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1999 12:00:00AM NULL ROUND (Dates) 155 . Example The following expressions round the year portion of dates in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MM' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. ROUND returns a date in the same format as the source date. Return Value Date with the specified part rounded. 'YYY' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. You can link the results of this function to any port with a Date/Time datatype. 'Y' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. Optional.

'DD' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DY' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DAY' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:59PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 15 1998 12:00:00AM Apr 20 1998 12:00:00AM Dec 21 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1999 12:00:00AM NULL The following expressions round the hour portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED.The following expressions round the day portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'D' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH24' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:31AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:59PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 15 1998 2:00:00AM Apr 19 1998 2:00:00PM Dec 20 1998 3:00:00PM Jan 1 1999 12:00:00AM NULL The following expression rounds the minute portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH12' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DDD' ) ROUND( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MI' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:59PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 15 1998 2:11:00AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:00PM Dec 20 1998 3:30:00PM Jan 1 1999 12:00:00AM NULL 156 Chapter 6: Functions .

ROUND returns NULL.44. ROUND(12.0 and ROUND(15. precision] ) Argument numeric_value precision Meaning Required. -1) returns 10 and ROUND(15.0 because the function rounds 0. Numeric datatype. For example. ROUND(12. the function rounds to the nearest integer before evaluating the expression. For example. If you enter a negative precision. Optional. Syntax ROUND( numeric_value [.99. the function rounds to this number of decimal places. returning an integer. ROUND(12.4. If one of the arguments is NULL. You can use operators to perform arithmetic before you round the values. ROUND (Numbers) 157 . If you omit the precision argument. 0.ROUND (Numbers) Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Rounds numbers to a specified number of digits or decimal places. -1) returns 20. You can also use ROUND to round dates.99. the function rounds to the nearest integer. Return Value Numeric value. truncating the decimal portion of the number. the function rounds this number of digits to the left of the decimal point.8) returns 13. ROUND(12. For example. 1) returns 13. Positive or negative integer. 1) returns 15.99) returns 13. If you enter a positive precision. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits.8 to 1 and then evaluates the expression. You can enter any valid transformation expression. For example.99. If you enter decimal precision. Note: If the return value is a decimal with precision greater than 15.99.

8 ) PRICE 12.99 56.994 15.8678 56.99 56.34 NULL RETURN VALUE 13.3 NULL If you omit the precision argument. 3 ) PRICE 12.99 -18. ROUND( PRICE. -2 ) PRICE 13242.95 NULL RETURN VALUE 13200.Example The following expression returns the values in the Price port rounded to three decimal places.99 -15.0 NULL If you pass a decimal value in the precision argument. 0.99 -108.0 56.0 -100.99 1435.9949 -18. the PowerCenter Server rounds it to the nearest integer before evaluating the expression: ROUND( PRICE. the function rounds to the nearest integer: ROUND( PRICE ) PRICE 12.0 -16.956 NULL You can round digits to the left of the decimal point by passing a negative integer in the precision argument: ROUND( PRICE.95 NULL RETURN VALUE 13.9936 15.0 NULL 158 Chapter 6: Functions .868 56.0 57.9561 NULL RETURN VALUE 12.0 -19.0 1400.995 -18.

For example. The PowerCenter Server evaluates the following expression as TRUE: ROUND(7/3 * 3) = 7 ROUND (Numbers) 159 . When the PowerCenter Server runs in low precision mode.999999999999999 because it truncates the result of the first division operation. use ROUND to round the truncated result of the left hand side of the expression to the expected result. the PowerCenter Server evaluates the left hand side of the expression as 6. The PowerCenter Server evaluates the entire expression as FALSE. it truncates the result of calculations if the precision of the value exceeds 15 digits. To achieve the expected result.Tip You can also use ROUND to explicitly set the precision of calculated values and achieve expected results. suppose you want to process the following expression in low precision mode: 7/3 * 3 = 7 In this case. This may not be the result you expect.

This argument is casesensitive. Must be a positive integer literal. ‘x’) would return the string ‘alpha’.. if the first string is longer than the length.. length [. 16. '. RPAD truncates the string from right to left. or if length is a negative number.. appending the string '. The strings you want to change.') ITEM_NAME Flashlight Compass Regulator System Safety Knife RETURN VALUE Flashlight. You can enter any valid transformation expression.second_string] ) Argument first_string length second_string Meaning Required. RPAD uses a partial part of the second_string when necessary. 'abc'... Regulator System Safety Knife.. When length is a negative number. 160 Chapter 6: Functions . RPAD returns NULL. Compass. Example The following expression returns the item name with a length of 16 characters. for example. Return Value String of the specified length. RPAD counts the length from left to right. Any string value.. Required. So.. Syntax RPAD( first_string.. Passes the string you want to append to the right-side of the first_string values.. Specifies the length you want each string to be. 5.... NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Optional. RPAD(‘alphabetical’.. If you omit the second string.. Any string value..' to the end of each item name: RPAD( ITEM_NAME. Enclose the characters you want to add to the end of the string within single quotation marks. For example.RPAD Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts a string to a specified length by adding blanks or characters to the end of the string. the function pads the end of the first string with blanks.

The following expression returns the item name with a length of 16 characters.. -5..*' ) ITEM_NAME Flashlight Compass Regulator System Safety Knife RETURN VALUE Flashlight*.') ITEM_NAME Flashlight Compass Regulator System RETURN VALUE NULL NULL NULL RPAD 161 . 16... appending the string ‘*.**. '.** Regulator System Safety Knife*. Compass*.**.*’ to the end of each item name: RPAD( ITEM_NAME. '*...* The following expression shows how RPAD handles negative values for the length argument for each row in the ITEM_NAME port: RPAD( ITEM_NAME.

the function removes blanks from the end of the first string. Also note that RTRIM is case-sensitive. Optional. however.and double-byte spaces from the end of a string. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. you must enclose the characters you want to remove from the end of the string within single quotation marks. 162 Chapter 6: Functions . character-by-character. The string values with the specified characters in the trim_set argument removed. You can use operators to perform comparisons or concatenate strings before removing blanks from the end of a string. 'abc'. Passes the values you want to trim. RTRIM continues comparing and removing characters until it fails to find a matching character in the trim_set. Any string value. Any string value. for example. If you use RTRIM to remove characters from a string. with any matching characters removed. starting with the right side of the string. It returns the string. Passes the characters you want to remove from the end of the string. RTRIM compares the trim_set to each character in the string argument. If the character in the string matches any character in the trim_set. RTRIM removes both single. You can enter any valid transformation expression. If you omit the second string. Syntax RTRIM( string [. If you do not specify a trim_set parameter in your expression: ♦ ♦ In UNICODE mode. RTRIM removes it. RTRIM removes only single-byte spaces.RTRIM Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Removes blanks or characters from the end of a string. You can also enter a text literal. trim_set] ) Argument string Meaning Required. In ASCII mode. trim_set Return Value String.

If the last character in the string matches the first character in the trim_set. RTRIM removes it. When the character in the string fails to match the trim_set. you might create an expression similar to the following: RTRIM( RTRIM( NAMES ). RTRIM removes it. the last character in the string does not match. If. for the set of characters you specify in the trim_set argument. You can also remove multiple sets of characters by nesting RTRIM. This is because RTRIM searches. 're') LAST_NAME Nelson Page Osborne NULL Sawyer H. In the last example. RTRIM compares the second character in the trim_set. 't' ) RTRIM 163 . RTRIM returns the string and evaluates the next row. For example.Example The following expression removes the characters ‘re’ from the strings in the LAST_NAME port: RTRIM( LAST_NAME. however. character-by-character. Tips You can use RTRIM and LTRIM with || or CONCAT to remove leading and trailing blanks after you concatenate two strings. the last character in Nelson does not match any character in the trim_set argument. If the second from last character in the string matches the second character in the trim_set. and so on. Bender Steadman RETURN VALUE Nelson Pag Osborn NULL Sawy H. Bend Steadman RTRIM removes ‘e’ from Page even though ‘r’ is the first character in the trim_set. so RTRIM returns the string 'Nelson' and evaluates the next row. if you want to remove trailing blanks and the character ‘t’ from the end of each string in a column of names.

Use SETCOUNTVARIABLE with mapping variables with a Count aggregation type.SETCOUNTVARIABLE Availability: Designer Counts the rows evaluated by the function and increments the current value of a mapping variable based on the count. Returns the new current value. The session is configured for a test load. Use SETCOUNTVARIABLE in the following transformations: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Expression Filter Router Update Strategy The PowerCenter Server does not save the final value of a mapping variable to the repository when any of the following are true: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ The session fails to complete. see “Mapping Parameters and Variables” in the Designer Guide. At the end of a successful session. Unless overridden. The session runs in debug mode and is configured to discard session output. Name of the mapping variable you want to set. Increases the current value by one for each row marked for insertion. The session is a debug session. When used with a session that contains multiple partitions. the PowerCenter Server generates different current values for each partition. Syntax SETCOUNTVARIABLE( $$Variable ) Argument $$Variable Meaning Required. At the end of the session. Decreases the current value by one for each row marked for deletion. it determines the total count for all partitions and saves the total to the repository. Keeps the current value the same for each row marked for update or reject. 164 Chapter 6: Functions . it uses the saved value as the initial value of the variable for the next time you use this session. Use mapping variables with a count aggregation type. the PowerCenter Server saves the last current value to the repository. For details on mapping variables.

Darkroom Co. Example You have a mapping that updates a slowly changing dimension table containing distributor information.com CUR_DIST 23 24 25 25 24 25 At the end of the session. decreases the count for each deleted row. The initial value of $$CurrentDistributors from the previous session run is 23.. The PowerCenter Server saves the same value for $$CurrentDistributors to the repository for sessions with multiple partitions as for sessions with a single partition. and keeps the count the same for all updated or rejected rows.. The following expression counts the number of current distributors with the mapping variable $$CurrentDistributors and returns the current value to the CUR_DIST port.Return Value The current value of the variable. Supply.) DIST_ID (update) (insert) (insert) (update) (delete) (insert) 000015 000024 000025 000003 000024 000026 DISTRIBUTOR MSD Inc. Howard’s Supply JNR Ltd. It increases the count by one for each inserted row. Darkroom Co. the PowerCenter Server saves ‘25’ to the repository as the current value for $$CurrentDistributors. The next time the session runs. the PowerCenter Server evaluates the initial value to $$CurrentDistributors to ‘25’. SETCOUNTVARIABLE 165 . SETCOUNTVARIABLE ($$CurrentDistributors) (row marked for.

You can change the seconds by entering a positive integer between 0 and 59 in the value argument. and November) in the value argument. 10 ) changes the day to 10 for all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. 'DD'. 2001 ) changes the year to 2001 for all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. For example. 59 ) changes the second to 59 for all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. Change the hour by entering a positive integer between 0 and 24 (where 0=12AM. and DAY) to set the day. June. DY. Change the month by entering a positive integer between 1 and 12 (January=1 and December=12) in the value argument. YY. 'YY'. DDD. 14 ) changes the hour to 14:00:00 (or 2:00:00PM) for all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. You can use any of the hour format strings (HH. For example. 'MI'. the expression SET_DATE_PART( SHIP_DATE. For example. You can use any of the year format strings: Y. For example. HH24) to set the hour. For example. 10 ) changes the month to October for all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. or YYYY to set the year. Change the minutes by entering a positive integer between 0 and 59 in the value argument. 12=12PM. MON. and 24 =12AM) in the value argument. April. For example. DD. You use the SS format string to set the second. With SET_DATE_PART you can change the following parts of a date: ♦ Year. Day. 'HH'. 'SS'. You use the MI format string to set the minute. MONTH to set the month. Minute. You can use any of the month format strings: MM. the expression SET_DATE_PART( SHIP_DATE. Seconds. September. HH12. 25 ) changes the minute to 25 for all dates in the SHIP_DATE port. 'MONTH'. the expression SET_DATE_PART( SHIP_DATE. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 166 Chapter 6: Functions . the expression SET_DATE_PART( SHIP_DATE. the expression SET_DATE_PART( SHIP_DATE. Hour. You can use any of the month format strings (D. Change the year by entering a positive integer in the value argument. the expression SET_DATE_PART( SHIP_DATE. YYY. Change the day by entering a positive integer between 1 and 31 (except for the months that have less than 31 days: February. Month.SET_DATE_PART Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Sets one part of a date/time value to a value you specify.

16 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. 'HH'. The date you want to modify. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Return Value Date in the same format as the source date with the specified part changed. Required. 'HH24'. Date/Time datatype. the session fails. The format string is not case-sensitive. Example The following expressions change the hour to 4PM for each date in the DATE_PROMISED port: SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED.Syntax SET_DATE_PART( date. 16 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. The integer must be a valid value for the part of the date you want to change. If you enter an improper value (for example. A positive integer value assigned to the specified portion of the date. format. Required. value ) Argument date format value Meaning Required. A format string specifying the portion of the date to be changed. 16 ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:15:56AM Feb 13 1997 2:30:01AM Mar 31 1997 5:10:15PM Dec 12 1997 8:07:33AM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 1 1997 4:15:56PM Feb 13 1997 4:30:01PM Mar 31 1997 4:10:15PM Dec 12 1997 4:07:33PM NULL SET_DATE_PART 167 . February 30). 'HH12'. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.

'DD'. 'MONTH'.MM'. 2000 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. For example. you can nest multiple SET_DATE_PART functions within the date argument. 6 ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:15:56AM Feb 13 1997 2:30:01AM Mar 31 1997 5:10:15PM Dec 12 1997 8:07:33AM NULL RETURN VALUE Jun 1 1997 12:15:56AM Jun 13 1997 2:30:01AM Error. 'YYYY'. 2000 ) DATE_PROMISED Jan 1 1997 12:15:56AM Feb 13 1997 2:30:01AM Mar 31 1997 5:10:15PM Dec 12 1997 8:07:33AM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 1 2000 12:15:56AM Feb 13 2000 2:30:01AM Mar 31 2000 5:10:15PM Dec 12 2000 4:07:33PM NULL Tip If you want to change multiple parts of a date at one time. Jun 12 1997 8:07:33AM NULL The following expressions change the year to 2000 for the dates in the DATE_PROMISED port: SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. 1) 168 Chapter 6: Functions .The following expressions change the month to June for the dates in the DATE_PROMISED port. 6 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. such as changing March 31 to June 31: SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. 'MON'. 6 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. 'YYYY'. 2000 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. 7). 'Y'. 1998). you might write the following expression to change all of the dates in the DATE_ENTERED port to July 1 1998: SET_DATE_PART( SET_DATE_PART( SET_DATE_PART( DATE_ENTERED. 2000 ) SET_DATE_PART( DATE_PROMISED. 'YY'. The PowerCenter Server displays an error when you try to create a date that does not exist. 'MM'. 'YYY'. PowerCenter Server doesn't write row.

At the end of a successful session. the PowerCenter Server generates different current values for each partition.SETMAXVARIABLE Availability: Designer Sets the current value of a mapping variable to the higher of two values: the current value of the variable or the value you specify. The session runs in debug mode and is configured to discard session output. see “Mapping Parameters and Variables” in the Designer Guide. it saves the highest current value across all partitions to the repository. When used with a session that contains multiple partitions. Use SETMAXVARIABLE with mapping variables with a Max aggregation type. SETMAXVARIABLE 169 . it uses the saved value as the initial value of the variable for the next session run. SETMAXVARIABLE returns the higher string based on the sort order selected for the session. Unless overridden. At the end of the session. The session is a debug session. SETMAXVARIABLE ignores all other row types and the current value remains unchanged. the PowerCenter Server saves the final current value to the repository. Returns the new current value. For details on mapping variables. When used with a string mapping variable. The session is configured for a test load. Use SETMAXVARIABLE in the following transformations: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Expression Filter Router Update Strategy The PowerCenter Server does not save the final value of a mapping variable to the repository when any of the following conditions are true: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ The session fails to complete. The SETMAXVARIABLE function executes only if a row is marked as insert.

the last evaluated value for $$MaxItems in each partition is as follows: Partition Partition 1 Partition 2 Final Current Value for $$MaxItems 35 23 170 Chapter 6: Functions . SETMAXVARIABLE ($$MAXITEMS. Example The following expression compares the number of items purchased in each transaction with a mapping variable $$MaxItems. Suppose the same session contains three partitions. ITEMS) TRANSACTION 0100002 0100003 0100004 0100005 0100006 0100007 ITEMS 12 5 18 35 5 14 MAX_ITEMS 22 22 22 35 35 35 At the end of the session. The next time the session runs. When value is NULL the PowerCenter Server returns the current value of $$Variable. Required. value ) Argument $$Variable value Meaning Required. it saves the largest value to the repository. The value you want the PowerCenter Server to compare against the current value of the variable. the PowerCenter Server saves ‘35’ to the repository as the maximum current value for $$MaxItems. For example. the PowerCenter Server evaluates the initial value to $$MaxItems to ‘35’. Use mapping variables with Max aggregation type. Return Value The higher of two values: the current value of the variable or the value you specified. The initial value of $$MaxItems from the previous session run is 22. Then. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a datatype compatible with the datatype of the variable. Name of the mapping variable you want to set. The return value is the new current value of the variable. It sets $$MaxItems to the higher of two values and returns the historically highest number of items purchased in a single transaction to the MAX_ITEMS port. The PowerCenter Server evaluates $$MaxItems for each partition.Syntax SETMAXVARIABLE( $$Variable.

Partition Partition 3 Final Current Value for $$MaxItems 22 Value for $$MaxItems saved to the repository: 35 SETMAXVARIABLE 171 .

the PowerCenter Server saves the final current value to the repository. The SETMINVARIABLE function executes only if a row is marked as insert. Returns the new current value.SETMINVARIABLE Availability: Designer Sets the current value of a mapping variable to the lower of two values: the current value of the variable or the value you specify. Unless overridden. The session is a debug session. Use SETMINVARIABLE with mapping variables with a Min aggregation type. Use SETMINVARIABLE in the following transformations: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Expression Filter Router Update Strategy The PowerCenter Server does not save the final value of a mapping variable to the repository when any of the following conditions are true: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ The session fails to complete. At the end of a successful session. 172 Chapter 6: Functions . it saves the lowest current value across all partitions to the repository. SETMINVARIABLE returns the lower string based on the sort order selected for the session. For details on mapping variables. When used with a session that contains multiple partitions. it uses the saved value as the initial value of the variable for the next session run. see “Mapping Parameters and Variables” in the Designer Guide. The session runs in debug mode and is configured to discard session output. The session is configured for a test load. the PowerCenter Server generates different current values for each partition. When used with a string mapping variable. SETMINVARIABLE ignores all other row types and the current value remains unchanged. At the end of the session.

Name of the mapping variable you want to set. Return Value The lower of two values: the current value of the variable or the value you specified. SETMINVARIABLE ($$MinPrice.00’ to the repository as the minimum current value for $$MinPrice. Use with mapping variables with Min aggregation type.25 24.00 MIN_PRICE 22. Required. The initial value of $$MinPrice from the previous session run is 22. The next time the session runs.50 22. the PowerCenter Server saves ‘22. value ) Argument $$Variable value Meaning Required.50 27.00 22.50 22. The value you want the PowerCenter Server to compare against the current value of the variable.00 24.00 26.50 22.00 22.00’.50.75 23. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a datatype compatible with the datatype of the variable.Syntax SETMINVARIABLE( $$Variable.25 22.00 22. The return value is the new current value of the variable. It sets $$MinPrice to the lower of two values and returns the historically lowest item price to the MIN_PRICE port.00 22. PRICE) DATE 05/01/2000 09:00:00 05/01/2000 10:00:00 05/01/2000 11:00:00 05/01/2000 12:00:00 05/01/2000 13:00:00 05/01/2000 14:00:00 05/01/2000 15:00:00 05/01/2000 16:00:00 05/01/2000 17:00:00 PRICE 23. the PowerCenter Server evaluates the initial value to $$MinPrice to ‘22. Example The following expression compares the price of an item with a mapping variable $$MinPrice. SETMINVARIABLE 173 .00 At the end of the session. When value is NULL the PowerCenter Server returns the current value of $$Variable.00 22.50 22.75 25.

50 Value for $$MinPrice saved to the repository: 22. the last evaluated value for $$MinPrice in each partition is as follows: Partition Partition 1 Partition 2 Partition 3 Final Current Value for $$MinPrice 22. Then.50 22.00 22.00 174 Chapter 6: Functions . For example. The PowerCenter Server evaluates $$MinPrice for each partition.Suppose the same session contains three partitions. it saves the smallest value to the repository.

Use with mapping variables with Max/Min aggregation type. The SETVARIABLE function executes only if a row is marked as insert or update. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a datatype compatible with the datatype of the variable. the PowerCenter Server uses multiple threads to process that pipeline. it saves a final current value to the repository. Syntax SETVARIABLE( $$Variable. it uses the saved value as the initial value of the variable for the next session run. When you create multiple partitions in a pipeline. SETVARIABLE 175 . SETVARIABLE ignores all other row types and the current value remains unchanged. If you use this function more than once for the same variable. the PowerCenter Server compares the final current value of the variable to the start value of the variable. The session is configured for a test load. For details on mapping variables. At the end of a successful session. the current value of a mapping variable may have indeterministic results. Unless overridden. Use SETVARIABLE in the following transformations: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Expression Filter Router Update Strategy The PowerCenter Server does not save the final value of a mapping variable to the repository when any of the following conditions are true: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ The session fails to complete. Returns the specified value. You should use SetVariable function only once for each mapping variable in a pipeline. The value you want to set the current value of the variable to. see “Mapping Parameters and Variables” in the Designer Guide.SETVARIABLE Availability: Designer Sets the current value of a mapping variable to a value you specify. The session runs in debug mode and is configured to discard session output. The session is a debug session. value ) Argument $$Variable value Meaning Required. Name of the mapping variable you want to set. Based on the aggregate type of the variable. Required.

43 323.01 97.23 699. The following expression sets the mapping variable $$Timestamp to the timestamp associated with the row and returns the timestamp to the SET_$$TIMESTAMP port: SETVARIABLE ($$Time. SYSDATE) TRANSACTION 0100002 0100003 0100004 0100005 0100006 TOTAL 534.Return Value Current value of the variable. The next time the session runs.01 97.95 SET_$$TIME 10/10/2000 01:34:33 10/10/2000 01:34:34 10/10/2000 01:34:35 10/10/2000 01:34:36 10/10/2000 01:34:37 At the end of the session. The next time the session runs.50 116. TIMESTAMP) TRANSACTION 0100002 0100003 0100004 0100005 0100006 TIMESTAMP 10/01/2000 12:01:01 10/01/2000 12:10:22 10/01/2000 12:16:45 10/01/2000 12:23:10 10/01/2000 12:40:31 TOTAL 534. the PowerCenter Server saves “10/10/2000 01:34:37” to the repository as the last evaluated current value for $$Time.23 699.50 116.43 323. the PowerCenter Server evaluates all references to $$Time to “10/10/2000 01:34:37”.95 SET_$$TIMESTAMP 10/01/2000 12:01:01 10/01/2000 12:10:22 10/01/2000 12:16:45 10/01/2000 12:23:10 10/01/2000 12:40:31 At the end of the session. Example The following expression sets a mapping variable $$Time to the system date at the time the PowerCenter Server evaluates the row and returns the system date to the SET_$$TIME port: SETVARIABLE ($$Time. the PowerCenter Server saves “10/01/2000 12:40:31” to the repository as the last evaluated current value for $$Timestamp. the PowerCenter Server evaluates the initial value of $$Timestamp to “10/01/2000 12:40:31”. 176 Chapter 6: Functions . When value is NULL the PowerCenter Server returns the current value of $$Variable.

SIGN Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns whether a numeric value is positive.99 0 NULL RETURN VALUE 1 -1 0 NULL SIGN 177 . Syntax SIGN( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Numeric value. Example The following expression tells you if the SALES port includes any negative values: SIGN( SALES ) SALES 100 -25. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Return Value -1 for negative values. 0 for 0. Passes the values you want to evaluate. negative. or 0. NULL if NULL. 1 for positive values.

309016994374967 0. Syntax SIN( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Passes the values for which you want to calculate the sine. Numeric data expressed in radians (degrees multiplied by pi divided by 180). You can also use operators to convert a numeric value to radians or perform arithmetic within the SIN calculation. You can enter any valid transformation expression.0871557427476639 0.14159265359 / 180 ) 178 Chapter 6: Functions . Example The following expression converts the values in the Degrees port to radians and then calculates the sine for each radian: SIN( DEGREES * 3.50000000000003 0.14159265359 / 180 ) DEGREES 0 90 70 30 5 18 89 NULL RETURN VALUE 0 1 0.939692620785936 0. For example: SIN( ARCS * 3. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.SIN Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the sine of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Numeric datatype. Return Value Double value.999847695156393 NULL You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to SIN before the function calculates the sine.

You can enter any valid transformation expression.897 3. Numeric data expressed in radians (degrees multiplied by pi divided by 180).66 5. Passes the values for which you want to calculate the hyperbolic sine.SINH Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the hyperbolic sine of the numeric value. Example The following expression returns the hyperbolic sine for the values in the Angles port: SINH( ANGLES ) ANGLES 1.45 0 0. Syntax SINH( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. For example: SINH( MEASURES.376934801486 0.35188478309993 NULL Tip You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to SINH before the function calculates the hyperbolic sine.ARCS / 180 ) SINH 179 .03225804884884 19.345 NULL RETURN VALUE 1. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Return Value Double value.4178051793031 116.0 2. Numeric datatype.0 0.1752011936438 9.

Skips numbers in string. V C. For example. SOUNDEX encodes the first occurrence and skips the remaining occurrences in the set. I. For example SOUNDEX(‘A123’) returns ‘A000’ and SOUNDEX(‘MAeiouhwC’) returns ‘M000’. SOUNDEX encodes characters according to the following list of rules: ♦ ♦ Uses the first character in string as the first character in the return value. T L M. For example. Encodes the first three unique consonants following the first character in string and ignores the rest. It uses the first character of the input string as the first character in the return value and encodes the remaining three unique consonants as numbers. Z D. SOUNDEX(‘J’) returns ‘J000’. If string encodes to less than four characters. K. and encodes it in uppercase. both SOUNDEX(‘Joh12n’) and SOUNDEX(‘1John’) return ‘J500’. Q. P. N R ♦ ♦ Skips the characters A. Table 6-2 lists SOUNDEX encoding guidelines for consonants: Table 6-2. S. J. SOUNDEX Encoding Guidelines for Consonants Code 1 2 3 4 5 6 Consonant B. SOUNDEX works for characters in the English alphabet (A-Z). For example. U.SOUNDEX Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Encodes a string value into a four-character string. F. SOUNDEX pads the resulting string with zeroes. If string contains a set of consecutive consonants that use the same code listed in Table 6-2 on page 180. E. H. O. ♦ ♦ ♦ 180 Chapter 6: Functions . X. both SOUNDEX(‘JohnRB’) and SOUNDEX(‘JohnRBCD’) return ‘J561’. both SOUNDEX(‘John’) and SOUNDEX(‘john’) return ‘J500’. For example. Assigns a single code to consonants that sound alike. G. SOUNDEX(‘AbbpdMN’) returns ‘A135’. and W unless one of them is the first character in string. For example.

Syntax SOUNDEX( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. NULL if one of the following conditions is true: ♦ ♦ ♦ If value passed to the function is NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. No character in string is a letter of the English alphabet.♦ Returns NULL if string is NULL. Return Value String. or if all the characters in string are not letters of the English alphabet. Passes the string value you want to encode. string is empty. Example The following expression encodes the values in the EMPLOYEE_NAME port: SOUNDEX( EMPLOYEE_NAME ) EMPLOYEE_NAME John William jane joh12n 1abc NULL Return Value J500 W450 J500 J500 A120 NULL SOUNDEX 181 . Must be a character string.

since the function SQRT only evaluates positive numeric values. Positive numeric value.54 RETURN VALUE 10 Error. PowerCenter Server does not write row. 182 Chapter 6: Functions . the PowerCenter Server displays a Transformation Evaluation Error and does not write the row. Return Value Double value. Example The following expression returns the square root for the values in the Numbers port: SQRT( NUMBERS ) NUMBERS 100 -100 NULL 60. NULL 7. You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to SQRT before the function calculates the square root. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Passes the values for which you want to calculate a square root. Syntax SQRT( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. You can enter any valid transformation expression. If you pass a negative value or character value.SQRT Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the square root of a non-negative numeric value.78074546557076 The value -100 results in an error during the session.

Optional. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide.STDDEV Availability: Designer Returns the standard deviation of the numeric values you pass to this function. Note: By default. or if no rows are selected (for example. However. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. For more information. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. However. STDDEV is used to analyze statistical data. STDDEV is one of several aggregate functions. You can nest only one other aggregate function within STDDEV. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). when you configure the PowerCenter Server. if all values are NULL. and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. This function passes the values for which you want to calculate a standard deviation or the results of a function. STDDEV 183 . STDDEV returns NULL. filter_condition Return Value Numeric value. or NULL. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. FALSE. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLS in aggregate functions. Limits the rows in the search. You can use operators to average values in different ports. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. You can enter any valid transformation expression. STDDEV ignores it. You can enter any valid transformation expression. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50.filter_condition] ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. the function returns NULL. Nulls If a single value is NULL. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. Numeric datatypes. Syntax STDDEV( numeric_value [.

0 2198.88 3001.0 RETURN VALUE: 3254.0 2198.00 in the TOTAL_SALES port: STDDEV( SALES. the return value is zero. The following expression calculates the standard deviation of all rows in the SALES port: STDDEV(SALES) SALES 2198. returning one value.0 RETURN VALUE: 0 The return value is zero because each row contains the same number (no standard deviation exists).90 and 153.000. If there is no group by port.0 153.0 NULL 8953.88 in the calculation because the filter_condition specifies sales greater than $2.0 1010. SALES > 2000.00 ) SALES 2198.0 2198.90 2256. STDDEV treats all rows as one group.Group By STDDEV groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation. If there is no standard deviation. returning one result for each group. 184 Chapter 6: Functions . Example The following expression calculates the standard deviation of all rows greater than $2000.60361129688 The function does not include the values 1010.

SUBSTR counts all characters. If you omit the length argument. the function converts it to a character string. If the start position is zero. starting at the beginning of the string. The position in the string where you want to start counting. Syntax SUBSTR( string. including blanks. If you pass a negative integer or zero.length] ) Argument string Meaning Required. The number of characters you want SUBSTR to return. If the start position is a negative number. If the start position is a positive number.SUBSTR Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns a portion of a string. You can enter any valid transformation expression. SUBSTR locates the start position by counting from the end of the string. If you pass a decimal. the function rounds it to the nearest integer value. SUBSTR returns all of the characters from the start position to the end of the string. start length Return Value String. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Must be an integer. You can enter any valid transformation expression. If you pass a numeric value. SUBSTR 185 . NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Optional. Empty string if you pass a negative or zero length value. Passes the strings you want to search. Must be an integer greater than zero. SUBSTR searches from the first character in the string. Must be a character string. SUBSTR locates the start position by counting from the beginning of the string. start [. Required. the function returns an empty string.

The expression still reads the source string from left to right when returning the result of the length argument: SUBSTR( PHONE. 8 ) PHONE 808-555-0269 809-555-3915 357-687-6708 NULL RETURN VALUE 555-0269 555-3915 687-6708 NULL You can also pass a negative start value to return the phone number for each row in the Phone port. 3 ) PHONE 809-555-0269 357-687-6708 NULL RETURN VALUE 809 357 NULL SUBSTR( PHONE. -8. 186 Chapter 6: Functions .Example The following expressions return the area code for each row in the Phone port: SUBSTR( PHONE. 0. 3 ) PHONE 809-555-3915 357-687-6708 NULL RETURN VALUE 809 357 NULL The following expressions return the phone number without the area code for each row in the Phone port: SUBSTR( PHONE. 1. 5. 3 ) PHONE 808-555-0269 809-555-3915 357-687-6708 NULL RETURN VALUE 555 555 687 NULL You can nest INSTR in the start or length argument to search for a specific string and return its position.

' ' . 1. starting from the end of the string. 8) returns ‘bcd’ and SUBSTR('abcd'. For example: SUBSTR('abcd'. The expression finds the last (right-most) space in the string and then returns all characters preceding it: SUBSTR( CUST_NAME.INSTR( CUST_NAME. '#')+1 ) When the length argument is longer than the string.-1. -2. SUBSTR 187 .1. INSTR(CUST_ID.The following expression evaluates a string. INSTR(CUST_ID. 8) returns ‘cd’.1 ) CUST_NAME PATRICIA JONES MARY ELLEN SHAH RETURN VALUE PATRICIA MARY ELLEN The following expression strips out the character '#' from a string: SUBSTR( CUST_ID. 2. '#')-1 ) || SUBSTR( CUST_ID. SUBSTR returns all the characters from the start position to the end of the string.1 ) .

The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. SUM ignores it. or if no rows are selected (for example. Passes the values you want to add. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Numeric datatype. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. the filter condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLS in aggregate functions. Limits the rows in the search. you can apply a filter to limit the rows you read to calculate the total. Nulls If a single value is NULL. You can nest only one other aggregate function within SUM. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. if all values passed from the port are NULL. You can use operators to add values in different ports. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. Optional. For more information. SUM is one of several aggregate functions. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. Syntax SUM( numeric_value [. the function returns NULL.SUM Availability: Designer Returns the sum of all values in the selected port. Optionally. or NULL. 188 Chapter 6: Functions . SUM returns NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Note: By default. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. filter_condition Return Value Numeric value. FALSE. However. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. filter_condition ] ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. However. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide.

For example: SUM( QTY * PRICE .0 4519. SALES > 2000 ) SALES 2500.0 Tip You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to SUM before the function calculates the total.Group By SUM groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation. returning one value.0 1900. returning one result for each group. SUM treats all rows as one group.0 NULL 3458. Example The following expression returns the sum of all values greater than 2000 in the Sales port: SUM( SALES.0 RETURN VALUE: 10477.0 1200. If there is no group by port.DISCOUNT ) SUM 189 .

74747741945531 1. Return Value Double value.324919696232929 57.577350269189672 0. Numeric data expressed in radians (degrees multiplied by pi divided by 180). NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Example The following expression returns the tangent for all values in the Degrees port: TAN( DEGREES * 3. Syntax TAN( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Numeric datatype.2899616310952 NULL 190 Chapter 6: Functions .TAN Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the tangent of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Passes the numeric values for which you want to calculate the tangent.19175359259435 0.14159 / 180 ) DEGREES 70 50 30 5 18 89 NULL RETURN VALUE 2.0874886635259298 0. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

For example: TANH( ARCS / 360 ) TANH 191 .345 NULL RETURN VALUE 0. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.998676551914886 0.TANH Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Returns the hyperbolic tangent of the numeric value passed to this function. Return Value Double value.999963084213409 0.45 0 0. Example The following expression returns the hyperbolic tangent for the values in the Angles port: TANH( ANGLES ) ANGLES 1. Syntax TANH( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required.66 5.993926947790665 0.331933853503641 NULL Tip You can perform arithmetic on the values passed to TANH before the function calculates the hyperbolic tangent. Numeric data expressed in radians (degrees multiplied by pi divided by 180).897 3.0 2. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Passes the numeric values for which you want to calculate the hyperbolic tangent. Numeric datatype.0 0.761594155955765 0.

You can convert the date into any format using the TO_CHAR format strings.TO_CHAR (Dates) Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts dates to character strings. The format string defines the format of the return value. If you omit the format string. Passes the date values you want to convert to character strings. Date/Time datatype. Enter a valid TO_CHAR format string. 'MON DD YYYY' ) DATE_PROMISED Apr 1 1998 12:00:10AM Feb 22 1998 01:31:10PM Oct 24 1998 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE 'Apr 01 1998' 'Feb 22 1998' 'Oct 24 1998' NULL 192 Chapter 6: Functions .format] ) Argument date format Meaning Required. Syntax TO_CHAR( date [. Optional. not the format for the values in the date argument. TO_CHAR also converts numeric values to strings. You can enter any valid transformation expression. the function returns a string based on the default date format of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. Return Value String. Example The following expression converts the dates in the DATE_PROMISED port to text in the format MON DD YYYY: TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED.

If you omit the format_string argument, TO_CHAR returns a string in the default date format:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED ) DATE_PROMISED Apr 1 1998 12:00:10AM Feb 22 1998 01:31:10PM Oct 24 1998 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE '04/01/1997 00:00:01' '02/22/1997 13:31:10' '10/24/1997 14:12:30' NULL

The following expressions return the day of the week for each date in a port:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'D' ) DATE_PROMISED 04-01-1997 12:00:10AM 02-22-1997 01:31:10PM 10-24-1997 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE '3' '7' '6' NULL TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'DAY' ) DATE_PROMISED 04-01-1997 12:00:10AM 02-22-1997 01:31:10PM 10-24-1997 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE 'Tuesday' 'Saturday' 'Friday' NULL

The following expression returns the day of the month for each date in a port:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'DD' ) DATE_PROMISED 04-01-1997 12:00:10AM 02-22-1997 01:31:10PM 10-24-1997 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE '01' '22' '24' NULL

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The following expression returns the day of the year for each date in a port:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'DDD' ) DATE_PROMISED 04-01-1997 12:00:10AM 02-22-1997 01:31:10PM 10-24-1997 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE '091' '053' '297' NULL

The following expressions return the hour of the day for each date in a port:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'HH' ) TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'HH12' ) DATE_PROMISED RETURN VALUE

04-01-1997 12:00:10AM '12' 02-22-1997 01:31:10PM '01' 10-24-1997 02:12:30PM '02' NULL NULL TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'HH24' ) DATE_PROMISED RETURN VALUE

04-01-1997 12:00:10AM '00' 02-22-1997 01:31:10PM '13' 10-24-1997 11:12:30PM '23' NULL NULL

The following expression converts date values to MJD values expressed as strings:
TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE, 'J') SHIP_DATE Dec 31 1999 03:59:59PM Jan 1 1900 01:02:03AM RETURN_VALUE 2451544 2415021

The following expression converts dates to strings in the format MM/DD/YY:
TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE, ‘MM/DD/RR’) SHIP_DATE 12/31/1999 01:02:03AM 09/15/1996 03:59:59PM 05/17/2003 12:13:14AM RETURN_VALUE 12/31/99 09/15/96 05/17/03

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You can also use the format string SSSSS in a TO_CHAR expression. For example, the following expression converts the dates in the SHIP_DATE port to strings representing the total seconds since midnight:
TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE, 'SSSSS') SHIP_DATE 12/31/1999 01:02:03AM 09/15/1996 03:59:59PM RETURN_VALUE 3783 86399

In TO_CHAR expressions, the YY format string produces the same results as the RR format string. The following expression converts dates to strings in the format MM/DD/YY:
TO_CHAR( SHIP_DATE, ‘MM/DD/YY’) SHIP_DATE 12/31/1999 01:02:03AM 09/15/1996 03:59:59PM 05/17/2003 12:13:14AM RETURN_VALUE 12/31/99 09/15/96 05/17/03

The following expression returns the week of the month for each date in a port:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'W' ) DATE_PROMISED 04-01-1997 12:00:10AM 02-22-1997 01:31:10AM 10-24-1997 02:12:30PM NULL RETURN VALUE 01' 04' 04' NULL

The following expression returns the week of the year for each date in a port:
TO_CHAR( DATE_PROMISED, 'WW' ) DATE_PROMISED 04-01-1997 12:00:10PM 02-22-1997 01:31:10AM 10-24-1997 02:12:30AM NULL RETURN VALUE '18' '08' '43' NULL

Tip
You can combine TO_CHAR and TO_DATE to convert a numeric value for a month into the text value for a month using a function such as:
TO_CHAR( TO_DATE( numeric_month, ‘MM’ ), ‘MONTH’ )

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195

TO_CHAR (Numbers)
Availability: Designer Workflow Manager

Converts numeric values to text strings. TO_CHAR also converts dates to strings. TO_CHAR converts numeric values to text strings as follows:

Converts double values to strings of up to 16 digits, with accuracy up to 15 digits. If you pass a number with more than 15 digits, TO_CHAR rounds the number to the sixteenth digit. Returns decimal notation for numbers in the ranges (-1e16,-1e-16] and [1e-16, 1e16). TO_CHAR returns scientific notation for numbers outside these ranges.

Figure 6-1 illustrates that when TO_CHAR converts numbers to strings, it returns scientific notation for all numbers that fall along the bold line. It returns all other numbers in decimal notation.
Figure 6-1. Ranges for TO_CHAR Notation
scientific notation scientific notation scientific notation

-∞

]
-1e16

(
-1e-16

)
0
1e-16

[
1e16

Note: The PowerCenter Server converts the values 1e-16 and -1e16 to scientific notation, but

returns the values 1e-16 and -1e-16 in decimal notation.

Syntax
TO_CHAR( numeric_value ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Numeric datatype. The numeric value you want to convert to a string. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

Return Value
String. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL.

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Example
The following expression converts the values in the SALES port to text:
TO_CHAR( SALES ) SALES 1010.99 -15.62567 10842764968208837340 1.234567890123456789e-10 1.23456789012345e17 0 33.15 NULL RETURN VALUE ‘1010.99’ ‘-15.62567’ ‘1.084276496820884e+019’

(rounded to 16th digit)

‘0.0000000001234567890123457’ (greater than 1e-16 but less than 1e16) ‘1.23456789012345e17’ ‘0’ ‘33.15’ NULL

(greater than 1e16)

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197

The output port must be date/time for TO_DATE expressions. Do not use the YYYY format string. You use the TO_DATE format strings to specify the exact format of the source strings. the PowerCenter Server might return inaccurate values or skip the record. You can map the results of this function to any target column with a date datatype. you must use the format string 'MON DD YYYY HH12:MI:SSAM'. TO_DATE always returns a date and time. For details on the TO_DATE format string. Warning: The format of the TO_DATE string must exactly match the format string including any date separators. If you are converting two-digit years with TO_DATE. format] ) Argument string format Meaning Required. For example. Return Value Date. see “Requirements” on page 44. the date returned always includes the time 00:00:00. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Optional. Enter a valid TO_DATE format string. Must be a string datatype. If you pass a string that does not have a time value. The format string must match the parts of the string argument exactly. 198 Chapter 6: Functions . Passes the values that you want to convert to dates. use either the RR or YY format string.TO_DATE Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts a character string to a date datatype in the same format as the character string. If it does not. the string value must be in the default date of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. NULL if you pass a null value to this function. Syntax TO_DATE( string [. If you omit the format string. if you pass the string 'Mar 15 1998 12:43:10AM'.

If you pass a string that does not have a time value. PowerCenter Server skips this row. TO_DATE 199 . TO_DATE always returns a date and time. the century will be 19.Example The following expression returns date values for the strings in the DATE_PROMISED port. If you run a session in the twentieth century. If you run a session in the twentieth century. the PowerCenter Server returns an error. 'MM/DD/YY' ) DATE_PROMISED '01/22/98' '05/03/98' '11/10/98' '10/19/98' NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 22 1998 00:00:00 May 3 1998 00:00:00 Nov 10 1998 00:00:00 Oct 19 1998 00:00:00 NULL The following expression returns date and time values for the strings in the DATE_PROMISED port. the date returned always includes the time 00:00:00. the century will be 19. The current year on the machine running the PowerCenter Server is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_PROMISED. 'MON DD YYYY HH12:MI:SSAM' ) DATE_PROMISED 'Jan 22 1998 02:14:56PM' 'Mar 15 1998 11:11:11AM' 'Jun 18 1998 10:10:10PM' 'October 19 1998 ' NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 22 1998 02:14:56PM Mar 15 1998 11:11:11AM Jun 18 1998 10:10:10PM Error. the return values have the time set to 00:00:00. If you pass a string that does not have a time value. 'J') SHIP_DATE_MJD_STR ‘2451544’ ‘2415021’ RETURN_VALUE Dec 31 1999 00:00:00 Jan 1 1900 00:00:00 Because the J format string does not include the time portion of a date. NULL The following expression converts strings in the SHIP_DATE_MJD_STRING port to date values in the default date format: TO_DATE (SHIP_DATE_MJD_STR. The current year on the machine running the PowerCenter Server is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_PROMISED.

The following expression converts a string into a four-digit year format. The current year is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_STR. RR returns the year 2005 and YY returns the year 1905. The current year is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_STR. ‘MM/DD/Y’) DATE_STR ‘04/01/8’ ‘08/17/5’ RETURN VALUE 04/01/1998 00:00:00 08/17/1995 00:00:00 The following expression converts a string into a four-digit year format. The current year is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_STR. ‘MM/DD/YYY’) DATE_STR RETURN VALUE ‘04/01/998’ 04/01/1998 00:00:00 ‘08/17/995’ 08/17/1995 00:00:00 The following expression converts strings that includes the seconds since midnight to date values: TO_DATE( DATE_STR. ‘MM/DD/RR’) DATE_STR ‘04/01/98’ ‘08/17/05’ RETURN VALUE 04/01/1998 00:00:00 08/17/2005 00:00:00 The following expression converts a string into a four-digit year format.The following expression converts a string into a four-digit year format. 'MM/DD/YYYY SSSSS') DATE_STR ‘12/31/1999 3783’ ‘09/15/1996 86399’ RETURN_VALUE 12/31/1999 01:02:03 09/15/1996 23:59:59 200 Chapter 6: Functions . ‘MM/DD/YY’) DATE_STR ‘04/01/98’ ‘08/17/05’ RETURN VALUE 04/01/1998 00:00:00 08/17/1905 00:00:00 Note: For the second row. The current year is 1998: TO_DATE( DATE_STR.

--test second format. convert to date IS_DATE( CLOSE_DATE. --if true. TO_DATE( CLOSE_DATE. --test first format IS_DATE( CLOSE_DATE. if true.‘MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS’ ).‘MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS’ ). --if none of the above ERROR( ‘NOT A VALID DATE’) ) You can combine TO_CHAR and TO_DATE to convert a numeric value for a month into the text value for a month using a function such as: TO_CHAR( TO_DATE( numeric_month. ‘MONTH’ ) TO_DATE 201 . convert to date IS_DATE( CLOSE_DATE. ‘MON DD YYYY’).‘MM/DD/YYYY’). convert to date TO_DATE( CLOSE_DATE. TO_DATE( CLOSE_DATE. --test third format. ‘MM’ ).‘MON DD YYYY’).If your target accepts different date formats. if true. For example: DECODE( TRUE. you can use TO_DATE and IS_DATE with the DECODE function to test for acceptable formats.‘MM/DD/YYYY’ ).

2' '118. Specifies the number of digits allowed after the decimal point.200 118. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. TO_DECIMAL ignores leading spaces. If you omit this argument. The datatype is decimal with precision of 10 and scale of 3: TO_DECIMAL( IN_TAX. Syntax TO_DECIMAL( value [. Passes the values you want to convert to decimals. Zero if the value in the selected port is an empty string or a non-numeric character. scale] ) Argument value scale Meaning Required.679 60. 3 ) IN_TAX '15. Must be a string or numeric datatype.348' NULL 'A12. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. inclusive.TO_DECIMAL Availability: Designer Converts a string or numeric value to a decimal value. Example This expression uses values from the port IN_TAX.348 NULL 0 202 Chapter 6: Functions . Optional. the function returns a value with the same scale as the input value. You can enter any valid transformation expression.6789' '60. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. Must be an integer literal between 0 and 28.3Grove' RETURN VALUE 15. Return Value Decimal of precision and scale between 0 and 28. inclusive.

Return Value Double value.3Grove' RETURN VALUE 15. Syntax TO_FLOAT( value ) Argument value Meaning Required. Example This expression uses values from the port IN_TAX: TO_FLOAT( IN_TAX ) IN_TAX '15.348 NULL 0 TO_FLOAT 203 .6789 60. TO_FLOAT ignores leading spaces. Passes the values you want to convert to double values. NULL if a value passed to this function is NULL. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Must be a string or numeric datatype.2 118. Zero if the value in the port is blank or a non-numeric character.2' '118.TO_FLOAT Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts a string or numeric value to a double-precision floating point number (the Double datatype).6789' '60.348' NULL 'A12.

Passes the value you want to convert to an integer.3Grove' ‘ 123. You can enter any valid transformation expression. or the constants TRUE or FALSE. Optional. Zero if the value passed to the function contains alphanumeric characters. TO_INTEGER rounds the value to the nearest integer when the flag is FALSE or zero. The flag must be an integer literal. Specifies whether to truncate or round the decimal portion. Return Value ♦ ♦ ♦ Integer.348' NULL 'A12. String or numeric datatype.TO_INTEGER Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts a string or numeric value to an integer. or if you omit this argument.2' '118. TO_INTEGER truncates the decimal portion when the flag is TRUE or a non-zero number. Syntax TO_INTEGER( value [. Example The following expressions use values from the port IN_TAX: TO_INTEGER( IN_TAX. TO_INTEGER syntax contains an optional argument that allows you to choose to round the number to the nearest integer or truncate the decimal portion. flag] ) Argument value flag Meaning Required.6789' '60.87’ RETURN VALUE 15 60 118 NULL 0 123 -15 -15 ‘-15. TO_INTEGER ignores leading spaces.23’ 204 Chapter 6: Functions . TRUE ) IN_TAX '15. NULL if the value passed to the function is NULL.6789’ ‘-15.

TO_INTEGER( IN_TAX.2' '118.6789' '60.87’ RETURN VALUE 16 60 118 NULL 0 124 -16 -15 ‘-15. FALSE) IN_TAX '15.3Grove' ‘ 123.348' NULL 'A12.6789’ ‘-15.23’ TO_INTEGER 205 .

206 Chapter 6: Functions . Minute. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a date. If you truncate the hour portion of a date. the function truncates the time portion of the date. 'HH') returns 4/1/1997 11:00:00. the function returns the date with the minutes and seconds set to zero.format] ) Argument date format Meaning Required. and TRUNC(12/13/1997 22:30:45. or minute. the function returns the first day of the month with the time set to 00:00:00. 'MI') returns 5/22/1997 10:15:00. Hour. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Syntax TRUNC( date [. The format string is not case-sensitive.TRUNC (Dates) Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Truncates dates to a specific year. For example. If you truncate the year portion of the date. The date values you want to truncate. 'YY') returns 1/1/1997 00:00:00. If you omit the format string. 'MM') returns 4/1/1997 00:00:00. If you truncate the month portion of a date. 'DD') returns 6/ 13/1997 00:00:00. the expression TRUNC(4/1/1997 11:29:35. Month. and TRUNC(12/1/1997 3:10:15. day. Day. and TRUNC(4/30/1997 3:15:46. month. 'HH') returns 4/1/ 1997 13:00:00. For example. hour. the expression TRUNC(6/30/1997 2:30:55. 'YY') returns 1/1/1997 00:00:00. 'MM') returns 4/1/1997 00:00:00. and TRUNC(5/22/1997 10:18:30. 'DD') returns 12/13/1997 00:00:00. the function returns the date with the time set to 00:00:00. the expression TRUNC(4/15/1997 12:15:00. You can truncate the following date parts: ♦ Year. You can also use TRUNC to truncate numbers. the expression TRUNC(5/22/1997 10:15:29. Date/Time datatype. Enter a valid format string. 'MI') returns 5/22/1997 10:18:00. setting it to 00:00:00. the function returns the date with the seconds set to zero. Optional. the expression TRUNC(6/13/1997 2:30:45. and TRUNC(4/1/1997 13:39:00. For example. If you truncate the minute portion of a date. For example. For example. the function returns Jan 1 of the input year with the time set to 00:00:00. If you truncate the day portion of a date.

NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. 'Y' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MONTH' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Jun 20 1998 3:50:04AM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM Apr 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jun 1 1998 12:00:00AM Dec 1 1998 12:00:00AM NULL TRUNC (Dates) 207 . Example The following expressions truncate the year portion of dates in the DATE_SHIPPED port: TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'YYY' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'YY' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED.Return Value Date. 'YYYY' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Jun 20 1998 3:50:04AM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM Jan 1 1998 12:00:00AM NULL The following expressions truncate the month portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MM' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MON' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED.

'HH24' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:31AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Jun 20 1998 3:50:04AM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:59PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 15 1998 2:00:00AM Apr 19 1998 1:00:00PM Jun 20 1998 3:00:00AM Dec 20 1998 3:00:00PM Dec 31 1998 11:00:00AM NULL The following expression truncates the minute portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'D' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DDD' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DY' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'MI' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Jun 20 1998 3:50:04AM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:59PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 15 1998 2:10:00AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:00PM Jun 20 1998 3:50:00AM Dec 20 1998 3:29:00PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:00PM NULL 208 Chapter 6: Functions .The following expressions truncate the day portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DD' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'DAY' ) DATE_SHIPPED Jan 15 1998 2:10:30AM Apr 19 1998 1:31:20PM Jun 20 1998 3:50:04AM Dec 20 1998 3:29:55PM Dec 31 1998 11:59:59PM NULL RETURN VALUE Jan 15 1998 12:00:00AM Apr 19 1998 12:00:00AM Jun 20 1998 12:00:00AM Dec 20 1998 12:00:00AM Dec 31 1998 12:00:00AM NULL The following expressions truncate the hour portion of each date in the DATE_SHIPPED port: TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH12' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED. 'HH' ) TRUNC( DATE_SHIPPED.

The integer specifies the number of digits to truncate. TRUNC changes the specified digits to the left of the decimal point to zeros. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to a Numeric datatype. Syntax TRUNC( numeric_value [. Note: If the return value is decimal with precision greater than 15. NULL if one of the arguments is NULL.TRUNC (Numbers) Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Truncates numbers to a specific digit. Can be a positive or negative integer. TRUNC truncates the decimal portion of numeric_value and returns an integer. precision If precision is a positive integer. Numeric datatype. If you omit the precision argument. TRUNC returns numeric_value with the number of decimal places specified by precision. You can enter any valid transformation expression that evaluates to an integer. the PowerCenter Server rounds numeric_value to the nearest integer before evaluating the expression. TRUNC (Numbers) 209 . Passes the values you want to truncate. If precision is a negative integer. precision] ) Argument numeric_value Meaning Required. Return Value Numeric value. If you pass a decimal precision value. You can also use TRUNC to truncate dates. you can enable high precision in the session properties to ensure decimal precision up to 28 digits. Optional.

0 NULL 210 Chapter 6: Functions .86 56.9563 15.95 15.8652 56.Example The following expressions truncate the values in the Price port: TRUNC( PRICE.0 -18.0 15.99 NULL RETURN VALUE 12.9995 -18.99 NULL RETURN VALUE 10.956 15.865 56.95 1235.99 -18.999 -18.0 -180.0 50.0 NULL TRUNC( PRICE ) PRICE 12.99 56.992 NULL TRUNC( PRICE. 3 ) PRICE 12.9928 NULL RETURN VALUE 12.0 1230.99 -187. -1 ) PRICE 12.0 56.

Syntax UPPER( string ) Argument string Meaning Required. Passes the values you want to change to uppercase text. Example The following expression changes all names in the FIRST_NAME port to uppercase: UPPER( FIRST_NAME ) FIRST_NAME Ramona NULL THOMAS PierRe Bernice RETURN VALUE RAMONA NULL THOMAS PIERRE BERNICE UPPER 211 .UPPER Availability: Designer Workflow Manager Converts lowercase string characters to uppercase. the return value depends on the code page and data movement mode of the PowerCenter Server. If your data contains multibyte characters. NULL if a value passed to the function is NULL. String datatype. Return Value Uppercase string. You can enter any valid transformation expression.

You can nest only one other aggregate function within VARIANCE. VARIANCE is one of several aggregate functions. Limits the rows in the search. Formula The function uses the following formula to calculate the variance: where: ♦ ♦ xi is one of the numeric values. or NULL. Passes the values for which you want to calculate a variance. FALSE. For more information. You can enter any valid transformation expression. Optional. The filter condition must be a numeric value or evaluate to TRUE. the variance is 0. If n is 1. n is the number of elements in the set of numeric values. Syntax VARIANCE( numeric_value [. You use aggregate functions in Aggregator transformations only. the filter_condition evaluates to FALSE or NULL for all rows). Numeric datatype.VARIANCE Availability: Designer Returns the variance of a value you pass to it. 212 Chapter 6: Functions . VARIANCE is used to analyze statistical data. and the nested function must return a Numeric datatype. NULL if all values passed to the function are NULL. or if no rows are selected (for example. see “Aggregate Functions” on page 50. Return Value Double value. You can enter any valid transformation expression. filter_condition ] ) Argument numeric_value filter_condition Meaning Required.

0 NULL 8953.0 2256. Example The following expression calculates the variance of all rows in the TOTAL_SALES port: VARIANCE( TOTAL_SALES ) TOTAL_SALES 2198. returning one result for each group.0 RETURN VALUE: 10592444. Note: By default. VARIANCE treats all rows as one group.0 3001. see “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on UNIX” or “Installing and Configuring the PowerCenter Server on Windows” in the Installation and Configuration Guide. the function returns NULL. For more information on configuring the PowerCenter Server. You can treat null values as zero in aggregate functions or as NULL. Group By VARIANCE groups values based on group by ports you define in the transformation.Nulls If a single value is NULL. returning one value. you can choose how you want to handle null values in aggregate functions. when you configure the PowerCenter Server. the PowerCenter Server treats null values as NULLs in aggregate functions. If you pass an entire port or group of null values. VARIANCE treats all rows as one group. However. If there is no group by port. returning one value. However. VARIANCE returns NULL. If there is not a group by port. if all values passed to the function are NULL. or if no rows are selected.6666667 VARIANCE 213 . VARIANCE ignores it.

214 Chapter 6: Functions .

219 Data Cleansing Functions. 227 Variable Functions. see “Functions” on page 49. 222 Numeric Functions. 223 Scientific Functions. 220 Date Functions. 216 Character Functions. 226 Test Functions. 215 . 225 Special Functions. 228 For details on each function. 217 Conversion Functions.Appendix A Function Quick Reference This appendix provides a quick reference for all the functions available in PowerCenter. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Aggregate Functions.

filter_condition ] ) PERCENTILE( numeric_value. Calculates the value that falls at a given percentile in a group of numbers. filter_condition ] ) STDDEV( numeric_value [. filter_condition ] ) MAX( value [.Aggregate Functions Function AVG COUNT Syntax AVG( numeric_value [. Available in the Designer. Available in the Designer. filter_condition ] ) Description Returns the average of all values in a group. or latest date. Returns the minimum value. filter_condition ] ) MEDIAN( numeric_value [. Returns the variance of all records in a group. filter_condition ] ) LAST( value [. Available in the Designer. FIRST LAST MAX MEDIAN MIN PERCENTILE STDDEV SUM VARIANCE 216 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . Available in the Designer. or earliest date. Available in the Designer. found in a group. Available in the Designer. Returns the number of records with non-null value. Returns the sum of all records in a group. Returns the standard deviation for a group. filter_condition ] ) VARIANCE( numeric_value [. filter_condition ] ) SUM( numeric_value [. filter_condition ] ) MIN( value [. filter_condition ] ) COUNT( value [. Available in the Designer. found in a group. Available in the Designer. Returns the median of all values in a selected port. Returns the maximum value. Available in the Designer. percentile [. Available in the Designer. filter_condition ] ) FIRST( value [. in a group. Returns the first record in a group. filter_condition ] ) or COUNT( * [. Available in the Designer. Returns the last record in a group.

Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. OldCharSet. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. second_string ) INITCAP( string ) INSTR INSTR( string. search_value [. In Unicode mode. length [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns the position of a character set in a string. counting from left to right. returns the numeric ASCII value of the first character of the string passed to the function. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Replaces characters in a string with a single character or no character. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. to set a string to a specified length. it will still work correctly. Adds a set of blanks or characters to the beginning of a string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Concatenates two strings.Character Functions Function ASCII Syntax ASCII ( string ) Description In ASCII mode. This function is identical in behavior to the ASCII function. returns the numeric ASCII value of the first character of the string passed to the function. If you use the ASCII function in existing expressions. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. start [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. including trailing blanks. In ASCII mode. In Unicode mode. Capitalizes the first letter in each word of a string and converts all other letters to lowercase. occurrence ] ] ) LENGTH LENGTH( string ) LOWER LPAD LOWER( string ) LPAD( first_string. returns the numeric Unicode value of the first character of the string passed to the function. CHR CHR( numeric_value ) CHRCODE CHRCODE ( string ) CONCAT INITCAP CONCAT( first_string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Converts uppercase string characters to lowercase. returns the numeric Unicode value of the first character of the string passed to the function. trim_set ] ) REPLACECHR REPLACECHR( InputString. This function is identical in behavior to the CHRCODE function. Removes blanks or characters from the beginning of a string. Informatica recommends using the CHRCODE function instead of the ASCII function to create new expressions. however. NewChar ) Character Functions 217 . Returns the number of characters in a string. second_string ] ) LTRIM LTRIM( string [. Returns the ASCII or Unicode character corresponding to the specified numeric value.

Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. [OldString2. Returns a portion of a string. trim_set ] ) SUBSTR( string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.Function REPLACESTR Syntax REPLACESTR ( InputString. RPAD RTRIM SUBSTR UPPER RTRIM( string [. length [. start [. second_string ] ) Description Replaces characters in a string with a single character.] NewString ) RPAD( first_string. Removes blanks or characters from the end of a string. Converts a string to a specified length by adding blanks or characters to the end of the string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. or no character. OldStringN. multiple characters. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. length ] ) UPPER( string ) 218 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . Converts lowercase string characters to uppercase.. OldString1. .. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.

TO_DECIMAL TO_FLOAT TO_DECIMAL( value [. Converts any value (except binary) to a double-precision floating point number (the Double datatype). Converts any value (except binary) to an integer by rounding the decimal portion of a value. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. scale ] ) TO_FLOAT( value ) TO_INTEGER TO_INTEGER( value ) Conversion Functions 219 .Conversion Functions Function TO_CHAR TO_DATE Syntax TO_CHAR( numeric_value ) TO_CHAR( date [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. format ] ) TO_DATE( string [. Converts any value (except binary) to a decimal. format ] ) Description Converts numeric values and dates to text strings. Available in the Designer. Converts a character string to a date datatype in the same format as the character string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.

Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. OldStringN. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. It encodes both uppercase and lowercase letters in uppercase. occurrence ] ] ) IS_DATE( value ) IS_NUMBER( value ) IS_SPACES( value ) ISNULL( value ) LTRIM( string [. format ] ) RTRIM SOUNDEX SUBSTR TO_CHAR TO_DATE TO_DECIMAL TO_DECIMAL( value [. Removes blanks or characters from the beginning of a string. Encodes characters of the English language alphabet (A-Z). . Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns whether a value consists entirely of spaces. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. start [..Data Cleansing Functions Function INSTR IS_DATE IS_NUMBER IS_SPACES ISNULL LTRIM METAPHONE Syntax INSTR( string. Converts numeric values and dates to text strings. multiple characters. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. scale ] ) 220 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . Encodes a string value into a four-character string. start [. Replaces characters in a string with a single character. counting from left to right. [OldString2. Available in the Designer. OldCharSet. OldString1. Converts a character string to a date datatype in the same format as the character string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Removes blanks or characters from the end of a string. NewChar ) REPLACESTR ( InputString. Replaces characters in a string with a single character or no character. trim_set ] ) METAPHONE( string [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.. Returns a portion of a string. Returns whether a value is NULL. format ] ) TO_DATE( string [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. length ] ) TO_CHAR( numeric_value ) TO_CHAR( date [. search_value [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. trim_set ] ) SOUNDEX( string ) SUBSTR( string.length] ) Description Returns the position of a character set in a string. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns whether a value is a valid date. Converts any value (except binary) to a decimal. Returns whether a string is a valid number. REPLACECHR REPLACESTR REPLACECHR( InputString. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.] NewString ) RTRIM( string [. or no character. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.

Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. TO_INTEGER TO_INTEGER( value ) Data Cleansing Functions 221 . Converts any value (except binary) to an integer by rounding the decimal portion of a value.Function TO_FLOAT Syntax TO_FLOAT( value ) Description Converts any value (except binary) to a double-precision floating point number (the Double datatype).

and returns a date in the same format as the specified date. month. Truncates dates to a specific year. Available in the Designer. Note: If you do not specify the year as YYYY. minutes. hour. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. format ] ) SET_DATE_PART( date. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. date2 ) DATE_DIFF( date1. format ) GET_DATE_PART GET_DATE_PART( date. amount ) Description Adds a specified amount to one part of a date/time value. Available in the Designer. measured in the specified increment (years.Date Functions Function ADD_TO_DATE Syntax ADD_TO_DATE( date. DATE_COMPARE DATE_DIFF DATE_COMPARE( date1. or minute. months. format ] ) 222 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . format. hours. Returns the length of time between two dates. the PowerCenter Server assumes the date is in the current century. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. based on the default date format of MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. filter_condition ) MIN( date. format. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. format ) LAST_DAY MAX MIN ROUND SET_DATE_PART TRUNC LAST_DAY( date ) MAX( date. Returns the date of the last day of the month for each date in a port. Returns the earliest date found in a group. Returns a value indicating the earlier of two dates. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. day. Rounds one part of a date. Returns the latest date found in a group. value ) TRUNC( date [. filter_condition ) ROUND( date [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns the specified part of a date as an integer value. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Sets one part of a date/time value to a specified value. date2. days. or seconds).

Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. filter_condition ] ) EXP( exponent ) FLOOR FLOOR( numeric_value ) LN LN( numeric_value ) LOG MOD LOG( base. divisor ) MOVINGAVG MOVINGSUM POWER MOVINGAVG( numeric_value. Returns the logarithm of a numeric value. Available in the Designer. Returns the largest integer less than or equal to the specified numeric value.71828183. filter_condition ] ) POWER( base. Rounds numbers to a specified digit. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns e raised to the specified power (exponent). Available in the Designer. exponent ) MOD( numeric_value. negative. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. precision ] ) SIGN( numeric_value ) Numeric Functions 223 . Returns the smallest integer greater than or equal to the specified numeric value. Returns a value raised to the specified exponent.Numeric Functions Function ABS Syntax ABS( numeric_value ) Description Returns the absolute value of a numeric value. Available in the Designer. Returns the average (record-by-record) of a specified set of records. where e=2. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. CEIL CEIL( numeric_value ) CUME EXP CUME( numeric_value [. Returns the natural logarithm of a numeric value. Notes whether a numeric value is positive. filter_condition ] ) MOVINGSUM( numeric_value. recordset [. recordset [. Returns the remainder of a division calculation. or 0. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. exponent ) ROUND SIGN ROUND( numeric_value [. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns the sum (record-by-record) of a specified set of records. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns a running total of all numeric values. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.

TRUNC TRUNC( numeric_value [.Function SQRT Syntax SQRT( numeric_value ) Description Returns the square root of a positive numeric value. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Truncates numbers to a specific digit. precision ]) 224 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference .

Returns the tangent of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Scientific Functions 225 . Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns the hyperbolic sin of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Returns the hyperbolic tangent of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Returns the hyperbolic cosine of a numeric value (expressed in radians). Returns the sin of a numeric value (expressed in radians).Scientific Functions Function COS COSH SIN SINH TAN TANH Syntax COS( numeric_value ) COSH( numeric_value ) SIN( numeric_value ) SINH( numeric_value ) TAN( numeric_value ) TANH( numeric_value ) Description Returns the cosine of a numeric value (expressed in radians).

search1. Searches for a value in a lookup source column. first_search. Available in the Designer. default ] ) ERROR( string ) Description Stops the session and issues a specified error message. Available in the Designer. second_search. search2. value1 [. Causes the PowerCenter Server to skip a record and issue the specified error message. Informatica recommends using the Lookup transformation. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. value2 [. value2 ] ) LOOKUP LOOKUP( result.Special Functions Function ABORT DECODE ERROR Syntax ABORT( string ) DECODE( value. based on the results of a condition. Searches a port for the specified value. value2]… ) 226 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. IIF IIF( condition. first_result [. Returns one of two values you specify. Available in the Designer. second_result ]…[.

Returns whether a string is a valid number. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Test Functions 227 . Returns whether a value consists entirely of spaces. Returns whether a value is NULL. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.Test Functions Function IS_DATE IS_NUMBER IS_SPACES ISNULL Syntax IS_DATE( value ) IS_NUMBER( value ) IS_SPACES( value ) ISNULL( value ) Description Returns whether a value is a valid date. Available in the Designer and the Workflow Manager.

value ) 228 Appendix A: Function Quick Reference . SETMAXVARIABLE SETMAXVARIABLE( $$Variable. Sets the current value of a mapping variable to the higher of two values: the current value of the variable or the value specified.Variable Functions Function SETCOUNTVARIABLE Syntax SETCOUNTVARIABLE( $$Variable ) Description Counts the rows evaluated by the function and increments the current value of a mapping based on the count. Available in the Designer. Available in the Designer. value ) SETMINVARIABLE SETMINVARIABLE( $$Variable. Available in the Designer. Available in the Designer. value ) SETVARIABLE SETVARIABLE( $$Variable. Sets the current value of a mapping variable to a value you specify. Returns the specified value. Sets the current value of a mapping variable to the lower of two values: the current value of the variable or the value specified. Returns the new current value. Returns the new current value.

52 PERCENTILE 143 STDDEV 183 SUM 188 VARIANCE 212 AND reserved word 10 arithmetic date/time values 47 arithmetic operators description 23 using strings in expressions 23 using to convert data 23 ASCII See also Installation and Configuration Guide See also Workflow Administration Guide CHR function 68 converting ASCII values 68 converting characters to ASCII values 63 converting to Unicode values 70 ASCII function description 63 average aggregate functions for determining 65 returning 139 AVG function description 65 C calendars date types supported 34 capitalization strings 99.Index A ABORT function description 58 ABS function description 59 absolute values obtaining 59 ADD_TO_DATE function description 60 aggregate functions AVG 65 COUNT 76 description 50 FIRST 91 LAST 111 list of 216 MAX (dates) 125 MAX (numbers) 126 MEDIAN 128 MIN (dates) 133 MIN (numbers) 135 null values 18. 120. 211 229 .

162 replacing multiple 151 replacing one 148 returning number 115 Unicode characters 63. 68. 120. 70 CHR function description 68 inserting single quotes 6. 69 CHRCODE function description 70 comments adding to expressions 9 comparison operators description 25 using strings in expressions 25 CONCAT function description 72 inserting single quotes using 73 concatenating strings 24. 180 removing from strings 123. 72 constants DD_INSERT 13 DD_REJECT 14 DD_UPDATE 15 definition 2 FALSE 16 NULL 17 TRUE 19 conversion functions description 53 summary 219 TO_CHAR (dates) 192 TO_CHAR (numbers) 196 TO_DATE 198 TO_DECIMAL 202 TO_FLOAT 203 TO_INTEGER 204 converting date strings 35 COS function description 74 COSH function description 75 cosine calculating 74 calculating hyperbolic cosine 75 COUNT function description 76 CUME function description 79 D data cleansing functions description 53 summary 220 datatypes Date/Time 34 date functions ADD_TO_DATE 60 DATE_COMPARE 81 DATE_DIFF 82 GET_DATE_PART 94 LAST_DAY 113 MAX (dates) 125 MIN (dates) 133 ROUND 154 230 Index . 211 counting 185 encoding 130.case converting to uppercase 211 CEIL function description 67 character functions ASCII 63 CHR 68 CHRCODE 70 CONCAT function 72 INITCAP 99 INSTR 100 LENGTH 115 list of 52 LOWER 120 LPAD 121 LTRIM 123 METAPHONE 130 REPLACECHR 148 REPLACESTR 151 RPAD 160 RTRIM 162 SOUNDEX 180 SUBSTR 185 summary 217 UPPER 211 character strings converting from dates 192 converting to dates 198 characters adding to strings 121. 160 ASCII characters 63. 68 capitalization 99.

180 ERROR function default value 88 description 88 EXP function description 90 exponent values calculating 90 returning 146 expressions See also Designer Guide adding comments 9 conditional 16 in transformations 2 overview 3 syntax 5 using operators 22 using SYSDATE 29 :EXT reference qualifier description 6 reserved word 10 F FALSE constant description 16 reserved word 10 filter conditions aggregate functions 52 null values 18 Filter transformation See also Transformation Guide using ISNULL function 103 FIRST function description 91 Index 231 .SET_DATE_PART 166 summary 222 TRUNC (Dates) 206 date/time values adding 60 DATE_COMPARE function description 81 DATE_DIFF function description 82 dates See also date functions converting to character strings 192 default format 37 flat files 37 format strings 39 functions 54 Julian 34 Modified Julian 34 overview 34 performing arithmetic 47 relational databases 37 rounding 154 truncating 206 year 2000 35 DD_DELETE constant description 12 reserved word 10 update strategy example 12 DD_INSERT constant description 13 reserved word 10 update strategy example 13 DD_REJECT constant description 14 reserved word 10 update strategy example 14 DD_UPDATE constant description 15 reserved word 10 update strategy example 15 decimal arithmetic See high precision decimal values converting 202 DECODE function description 85 internationalization 3 default date format defined 37 default value See also Designer Guide ERROR function 88 division calculation returning remainder 137 documentation conventions xxv description xxiv online xxv double precision values floating point numbers 203 E empty string testing for 115 encoding characters 130.

219 data cleansing 53. 44 TO_CHAR function 40 TO_DATE function 43 functions aggregate 50. 216 categories 50 character 52. 220 date 54. 217 conversion 53. 44 matching 44 Modified Julian day 40. 222 definition 2 internationalization 3 numeric 55. 226 test 56. 223 scientific 55. 227 variable 56 MOVINGAVG function 139 MOVINGSUM function 141 PERCENTILE function 143 ROUND function 157 STDDEV function 183 SUM function 188 TO_DECIMAL function 202 TRUNC function 209 hyperbolic cosine function 75 hyperbolic sine function 179 hyperbolic tangent function 191 I IIF function description 96 internationalization 3 Informatica documentation xxiv Webzine xxvi INITCAP function description 99 internationalization 3 INSTR function description 100 integers converting other values 204 internationalization functions affected 3 invalid expression 3 sort order 3 IS_DATE function description 104 format strings 43 IS_NUMBER function description 107 IS_SPACES function description 109 ISNULL function description 103 G GET_DATE_PART function description 94 Gregorian calendar in date functions 34 H high precision See also Workflow Administration Guide ABS function 59 AVG function 65 CUME function 79 MAX function 126 MEDIAN function 128 MIN function 135 232 Index J J format string using with IS_DATE 45 using with TO_CHAR 42 using with TO_DATE 45 .flat files dates 37 floating point number See double precision values FLOOR function description 93 format from character string to date 198 from date to character string 192 format strings dates 39 definition 34 IS_DATE function 43 Julian day 40. 225 special 55.

44 month returning last day 113 MOVINGAVG function description 139 MOVINGSUM function description 141 multiple searches example of TRUE constant 19 N negative values SIGN 177 nested expressions operators 22 NOT reserved word 10 NULL constant description 17 reserved word 10 M mapping parameters See also Designer Guide definition 2 Index 233 .Julian dates in date functions 34 Julian day format string 40. 44 L LAST function description 111 LAST_DAY function description 113 LENGTH function description 115 empty string test 115 literals single quotes in 69. 73 single quotes requirement 6 :LKP reference qualifier description 6 reserved word 10 LN function description 116 local variables definition 2 description 31 LOG function description 117 logarithm returning 116. 117 logical operators description 26 LOOKUP function description 118 Lookup transformation See also Designer Guide instead of LOOKUP function 118 LOWER function description 120 internationalization 3 LPAD function description 121 LTRIM function description 123 mapping variables See also Designer Guide definition 2 mappings See Designer Guide MAX (dates) function description 125 internationalization 3 MAX (numbers) function description 126 internationalization 3 MEDIAN function description 128 METAPHONE description 130 milliseconds truncating 34 MIN (dates) function description 133 internationalization 3 MIN (numbers) function description 135 internationalization 3 minimum value returning 133 MOD function description 137 Modified Julian day format string 40.

52 checking for 103 filter conditions 18 in comparison expressions 17 ISNULL 103 logical operators 26 operators 18 string operator 24 numbers rounding 157 truncating 209 numeric functions ABS 59 CEIL 67 CUME 79 description 55 EXP 90 FLOOR 93 LN 116 LOG 117 MOD 137 MOVINGAVG 139 MOVINGSUM 141 POWER 146 ROUND (numbers) 157 SIGN 177 SQRT 182 summary 223 TRUNC (numbers) 209 numeric values converting to text strings 196 returning absolute value 59 returning cosine 74 returning hyperbolic cosine of 75 returning hyperbolic sine 179 returning hyperbolic tangent 191 returning logarithms 116. 117 returning minimum 135 returning sine 178 returning square root 182 returning standard deviation 183 returning tangent 190 SIGN 177 operators arithmetic 23 comparison operators 25 definition 2 logical operators 26 null values 18 string operators 24 using strings in arithmetic 23 using strings in comparison 25 OR reserved word 10 P PERCENTILE function description 143 ports syntax 6 positive values SIGN 177 POWER function description 146 PowerCenter Server handling nulls in comparison expressions 17 PowerMart 3.5 functions LOOKUP 118 primary key constraint null values 17 PROC_RESULT variable reserved word 10 Q quotation marks inserting single using CHR function 6 R reference qualifiers description 6 relational databases dates 37 REPLACECHR function description 148 REPLACESTR function description 151 reserved words list 10 O operator precedence expressions 22 234 Index .null values aggregate functions 18.

47 SET_DATE_PART function description 166 SETCOUNTVARIABLE function description 164 SETMAXVARIABLE function description 169 SETMINVARIABLE function description 172 SETVARIABLE function description 175 SIGN function description 177 SIN function description 178 sine returning 178.return values definition 2 syntax 6 ROUND (dates) function description 154 ROUND (numbers) function description 157 rounding dates 154 numbers 157 rows avoiding spaces 109 counting 76 returning average 139 returning first row 91 returning last row 111 returning sum 141 running total 79 skipping 88 RPAD function description 160 RR format string description 35 difference between YY and RR 36 using with IS_DATE 45 using with TO_CHAR 42 using with TO_DATE 45 RTRIM function description 162 running total returning 79 S scientific functions COS function 74 COSH 75 description 55 SIN 178 SINH 179 summary 225 TAN 190 TANH 191 :SD reference qualifier description 6 reserved word 10 :SEQ reference qualifier description 6 reserved word 10 sessions stopping 58 $$$SessStartTime description 28 example using in date functions 28 SESSSTARTTIME variable description 29 reserved word 10 using in date functions 29. 179 single quotes in string literals CHR function 69 using CHR and CONCAT functions 73 SINH function description 179 skipping rows 88 sort order internationalization 3 SOUNDEX description 180 :SP reference qualifier description 6 reserved word 10 spaces avoiding in rows 109 removing with DD_REJECT 14 special functions ABORT 58 DECODE 85 description 55 ERROR 88 IIF 96 LOOKUP 118 summary 226 Index 235 .

120. 191 TANH function description 191 TC_COMMIT_AFTER variable description 31 TC_COMMIT_BEFORE variable description 31 TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION variable description 31 TC_ROLLBACK_BEFORE variable description 31 :TD reference qualifier description 6 reserved word 10 test functions description 56 IS_DATE 104 IS_NUMBER 107 IS_SPACES 109 ISNULL 103 summary 227 text strings converting numeric values 196 TO_CHAR (dates) function description 192 examples 41 format strings 40 TO_CHAR (numbers) function description 196 TO_DATE function description 198 examples 45 format strings 43 TO_DECIMAL function description 202 TO_FLOAT function description 203 236 Index . 72 converting character strings to dates 198 converting dates to characters 192 converting length 160 converting numeric values to text strings 196 number of characters 115 removing blanks 123 removing blanks and characters 162 removing characters 123 replacing multiple characters 151 replacing one character 148 returning portion 185 SUBSTR function description 185 sum returning 141. 211 character set 100 concatenating 24.SPOUTPUT reserved word 10 SQRT function description 182 square root returning 182 SSSSS format string using with IS_DATE 46 using with TO_CHAR 42 using with TO_DATE 46 standard deviation returning 183 STDDEV function description 183 stopping sessions 58 string conversion dates 35 string literals single quotes in 69. 73 single quotes requirement 6 string operators description 24 strings adding blanks 121 adding characters 121 capitalization 99. 188 SUM function description 188 syntax expression 5 general rules 7 ports 6 return values 6 SYSDATE variable description 29 example 29 reserved word 10 system variables description 28 T TAN function description 190 tangent returning 190.

TO_INTEGER function description 204 transaction control variables description 31 transformation expressions null constraints 17 overview 3 transformation language compared to SQL 5 operators 22 overview 2 reserved words 10 transformation language components overview 2 transformation language updates boolean expressions 17 comparison expressions 17 transformations See Designer Guide TRUE constant description 19 reserved word 10 TRUNC (dates) function description 206 TRUNC (numbers) function description 209 truncating date/time values 34 dates 206 numbers 209 V variable functions description 56 SETCOUNTVARIABLE 164 SETMAXVARIABLE 169 SETMINVARIABLE 172 SETVARIABLE 175 with multiple partitions 56 variables $$$SessStartTime 28 local variables 31 SESSSTARTTIME 29 SYSDATE 29 system variables 28 TC_COMMIT_AFTER 31 TC_COMMIT_BEFORE 31 TC_CONTINUE_TRANSACTION 31 TC_ROLLBACK_BEFORE 31 transaction control variables 31 WORKFLOWSTARTTIME 29 VARIANCE function description 212 W webzine xxvi workflow variables definition 2 WORKFLOWSTARTTIME variable description 29 reserved word 10 using in date functions 30 U Unicode See also Installation and Configuration Guide See also Workflow Administration Guide converting characters to Unicode values 63 converting to ASCII values 70 converting Unicode values 68 update strategy DD_DELETE example 12 DD_INSERT example 13 DD_REJECT example 14 DD_UPDATE example 15 UPPER function description 211 internationalization 3 Y year 2000 dates 35 YY format string difference between RR and YY 36 using with IS_DATE 45 using with TO_CHAR 42 using with TO_DATE 45 Index 237 .

238 Index .

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