ARCHDIOCESE OF INDIANAPOLIS

7/19/2009

Environmental Stewardship Agenda
Today the great gift of God’s Creation is exposed to serious dangers and lifestyles which can degrade it. Environmental pollution is making particularly unsustainable the lives of the poor of the world … we must pledge ourselves to take care of creation and to share its resources in solidarity. —Pope Benedict XVI August 27, 2006

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis recognizes the growing importance of making careful and efficient use of the Earth‟s resources, and further recognizes that the daily operations of its facilities, grounds, and transport needs has a direct impact on the environment. This Environmental Stewardship Agenda has been developed as a first critical step toward implementing a strategic environmental program to reduce the Archdiocese‟ environmental impact through the more conscious and efficient use of resources. The benefits of implementing an Environmental Stewardship Agenda are clear, and include: cost savings through the more efficient use of resources and reduction of costly waste, fulfilling a moral obligation to care for creation and the poor, improved employee and public health, a reduction of risk, and helping to foster further educational, spiritual and economic growth within the Archdiocese. The unique challenges and opportunities associated with the Archdiocese of Indianapolis as an organization were evaluated as part of the development of targeted stewardship recommendations. Likewise, the Archdiocese‟ key environmental impacts were examined - including all utility use at the Catholic Center and Xavier building for the past two years. While not an exhaustive environmental audit, this preliminary evaluation serves as an indicator of the full impact the Archdiocese has on the environment in the course of its daily operations. During FY 07 – 09, for example, the Archdiocese spent an average of $17,448 per month on employee mileage reimbursement. This represents an average of 32,965 miles driven, 1,303 gallons of gasoline burned, and 15.6 tons of CO2 emitted each month – a tremendous impact on the environment, those vulnerable populations most affected by air pollution and climate change, and the Archdiocese‟ financial budget. Section 4 broadly outlines an Action Agenda for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis to greatly reduce its own environmental impact while encouraging its parishes, schools, employees and parishioners to do the same. The section is divided into seven main areas: (1) Energy, (2) Water, (3) Waste, (4) Land Use, (5) Transportation and Travel, (6) Purchasing, and (7) Communication and Outreach. Comprehensive environmental stewardship recommendations are made within each section. Many of the recommendations outlined in the Action Agenda can save the Archdiocese of Indianapolis money in the long term. By initially focusing on those projects that will produce a significant cost-savings and then strategically reinvesting to support other projects, the Archdiocese‟ environmental stewardship program can be designed as largely self-supporting. The Archdiocese can additionally make use of a broad range of funding options to support its environmental stewardship goals. Funding options are detailed in section 5 and include a variety of creative internal financing mechanisms, grants, rebates, and private donations. It is recommended that a formal implementation structure - led by an Environmental Project Manager and supported by the input and oversight of a staff Environmental Committee - be put in place to ensure that the Archdiocese‟ environmental stewardship efforts are successful and sustained. Designed to begin with early action and lay a foundation for continued success, a 12-month implementation timeline is proposed in section 6. Recommended first-year steps include: a kick-off meeting to engage staff; sharing „best practices, with parishes and schools; establishing a formal implementation structure to drive the effort; implementing visible, low-cost “jumpstart projects”; engaging in ongoing communication with employees, parishes, schools and parishioners; working to formalize environmental policy and goals; and implementing first large environmental projects. First projects have been recommended based on their costsavings potential and the Archdiocese‟ own priorities and needs. They include: (1) energy audits and retrofits; (2) a campaign to reduce the amount and impacts of employee driving; (3) strengthening and supporting a “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” ethic, and (4) supporting the completion of several planned IS projects which will significantly reduce the organization‟s environmental impact.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................................................................................. 1 1. INTRODUCTION.................................................................................... 4 1.1 Stewardship ........................................................................................ 4 1.2 Benefits .............................................................................................. 5 1.3 Values and Vision ............................................................................... 5 1.4 How to Use this Document ................................................................. 6 2. OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES ....................................................... 7 2.1 Overview of Archdiocese ...................................................................... 7 2.2 Opportunities ....................................................................................... 8 2.3 Challenges ......................................................................................... 10 3. KEY IMPACTS ..................................................................................... 11 3.1 Select Expenses and Impacts .............................................................. 12 3.2 Utilities ............................................................................................... 15 4. ACTION AGENDA ................................................................................ 21 4.1. Energy .............................................................................................. 22 4.2. Water ................................................................................................ 31 4.3. Waste ............................................................................................... 35 4.4. Land Use .......................................................................................... 41 4.5. Transportation and Travel ................................................................ 46 4.6. Purchasing........................................................................................ 54 4.7. Communication and Outreach .......................................................... 61 5. FUNDING OPTIONS ............................................................................. 65 5.1 Guaranteed Energy Savings Financing................................................. 65 5.2 Internal Energy-Efficiency Financing Options...................................... 65 5.3 Clean Energy Revolving Loan Fund ..................................................... 66 5.4 Grants and Donations ......................................................................... 67 5.5 Rebates and Tax Incentives ................................................................ 67 6. NEXT STEPS ........................................................................................ 68 6.1 Recommended Implementation Strategy............................................. 68 6.2 Next Steps .......................................................................................... 70
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WORKS CITED .......................................................................................... 74 APPENDIX A: BEST PRACTICES FOR PARISHES AND SCHOOLS ...................... 78 APPENDIX B: STAFF PRIORITIES.................................................................. 80 APPENDIX C: INFORMATIONAL STAFF INTERVIEWS ..................................... 82 APPENDIX D: INVENTORY OF ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES......................... 83 APPENDIX E: SELECT EXPENSES AND IMPACTS – FY 2007 - 2008 ................ 87 APPENDIX F: COST SAVINGS POTENTIAL .................................................... 90 APPENDIX G: POTENTIAL GOVERNMENT GRANT OPPORTUNITIES ................ 91 APPENDIX H: PRIVATE ENVIRONMENTAL GRANT-MAKING ENTITIES ............ 92 APPENDIX I: REBATES AND TAX INCENTIVES .............................................. 94

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Archdiocese of Indianapolis
ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AGENDA

1. INTRODUCTION
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis, a Roman Catholic Archdiocese encompassing nearly 13,800 square miles in central and southern Indiana, recognizes the growing importance of making careful and efficient use of the Earth‟s resources. This Environmental Stewardship Agenda has been developed in accordance with the Archdiocese mission statement, and is tailored to meet the following organizational goals:  Improved stewardship of the Earth‟s resources used by the Archdiocese, resulting in the reduced impact of its daily operations on the environment.    Improved stewardship of the Archdiocese‟s financial resources through the more efficient use of material resources and the use of other environmental strategies aimed at reducing costly waste. Increased employee education on “Care for Creation” to assist them in reducing their environmental impact at work, home, and in the community. Strategic communication with the 150 parishes and 73 schools of the Archdiocese on “Care for Creation” in order to work toward (1) an increase in general awareness about “Care for Creation”, (2) the sharing of the Archdiocese‟s efforts and successes within its own operations, and (3) the provision of key information and resources aimed at encouraging similar efforts within their own institutions. A RCHDIOCESE
OF I NDIANAPOLIS

M ISSION *:

… W E COMMIT OURSELVES TO GENEROSITY AND TO THE RESPONSIBLE USE OF OUR SPIRITUAL AND MATERIAL RESOURCES .

V ALUES *:

S TEWARDSHIP ;

COMPASSION AND HUMAN LIFE AND ALL CREATION

RESPECT

FOR

(ARCHDIOCESE ONLINE ) *E XCERPTS OF ORIGINAL T EXT

1.1 Stewardship
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis continually strives to improve its stewardship of the financial and material resources entrusted to its care. Everything about the daily operations of the offices, buildings, grounds, and transportation of the Archdiocese – and the habituated practices of those who use them - have an impact on the environment and the budget. This Environmental Stewardship Agenda represents a critical first step toward planning and implementing a strategic environmental program focused on the more efficient use of resources – and adopting more sustainable practices that “meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”
(Bruntland Commission sustainability definition – United Nations).
Catholic Climate Covenant

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1.2 Benefits
It is increasingly common for organizations to take a systematic approach toward reducing their environmental impact. There is increased public demand for

D ID YOU KNOW ? R EPLACING ONE

organizations to “go green” as the emergence of serious
BULB BULB FIVE AND OVER

INCANDESCENT WITH AN ENERGY - EFFICIENT CFL WILL SAVE THE BURNING OF HUNDRED POUNDS OF COAL BETWEEN $30.00 AND $50.00 THE LIFETIME OF THE BULB .

environmental problems increases the public health, species extinction, and social justice costs of inaction. At the same time, organizations are finding that they can align the broader issue of leaving a healthy planet for our descendents with their own legitimate business concerns and bottom line. (Green

( US EPA )

Purchasing).
The benefits of undertaking the strategic planning and implementation of an Environmental Stewardship Agenda are clear:         Cost savings associated with using resources

more efficiently and reducing costly waste.
Employee health and productivity Risk reduction associated with climate change

and other environmental problems.
Public Health and Quality of Life Educational Opportunity Local Economic Development Opportunity Moral obligation – “Care for Creation” Social Justice – Caring for one another locally

“…THE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT HAS IMPLICATIONS FOR EVERY ONE OF US WHO LIVE ON THIS PLANET . A LMOST ALWAYS THE NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES HAVE A GREATER IMPACT ON THOSE MOST VULNERABLE – THE POOR , THE ELDERLY , THE ILL . W E ARE LIVING AT A TIME WHEN THE CHOICES WE MAKE HAVE BOTH LOCAL AND GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS .” ( ENVIRONMENTAL GUIDE 1)

and globally
In many cases, organizations find that the operational and economic benefits of adopting environmentallyfriendly measures actually qualify them as the most cost-effective solution while additionally meeting other goals (Climate Action Plan).

1.3 Values and Vision
Archdiocese administrative leadership was asked to discuss, value, and prioritize the organizational benefits to implementing a strategic environmental stewardship agenda. While individual responses varied (Appendix B), clear overarching organizational values were identified:

The Archdiocese of Indianapolis will use the Environmental Stewardship planning and implementation process as an opportunity to ensure it continues to meet its member (parishes, schools, employees, parishioners) needs and interests. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis will ensure the wise and efficient use of the financial, material, and natural resources entrusted to it, with a priority given to implementing cost-saving environmental measures. The financial need to use resources more efficiently will act as a catalyst for taking those positive environmental steps that are squarely in line with other deeply-held values, including: fulfilling a moral obligation to care for creation, creating an educational opportunity for schools and parishes, being an example by “walking the talk”, taking action on environmental social justice issues, and protecting employee and public health.

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1.4 How to Use this Document
This document is intended to be used as a tool to assist the Archdiocese of Indianapolis in beginning the process of “greening” its own operations while also encouraging and supporting parishes, schools, employees, and parishioners in making more sustainable choices. It is designed to be as comprehensive and practical as possible, and is organized into discrete sections that can be read together or utilized independently as needed. These sections include: 

Introduction - rationale and vision for
adopting a systematic environmental stewardship approach.

“N OT

EVERYTHING CAN BE DONE AT ONCE ,

Opportunities and Challenges –
overview of the Archdiocese‟s organization-specific opportunities and challenges as identified through interviews with key staff.

BUT MUCH CAN BE ACCOMPLISHED WHEN A STRUCTURE IS PUT IN PLACE TO LEAD A FORMAL EFFORT ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP ARE OF MADE THEIR IN

WHEN OF

EMPLOYEES THE IMPACT

CONSCIOUS ACTIONS ,

ACTIVELY

ENGAGED

Key Impacts – Preliminary baseline
data on the Archdiocese‟s use of resources within its core administrative facilities.

IDENTIFYING AND IMPLEMENTING SOLUTIONS , AND CELEBRATED FOR THEIR SUCCESSES .”

Action Agenda – Comprehensive outline of recommendations to
improve the Archdiocese‟s use of resources in seven areas: Energy, Water, Waste, Land Use, Transportation and Travel, Purchasing, and Communication and Outreach.

Financial Resources – Overview of financial resources and tools available to support project
implementation, including creative internal financing mechanisms, grants, rebates, and private donations.

 

Next Steps – Recommendations for the adoption of an internal structure and process for
successfully undertaking the implementation of the Archdiocese Environmental Stewardship Agenda.

Appendix A – Best Practices for Parishes and Schools – Environmental stewardship information
targeted to Archdiocese parishes and schools as a first step toward greening their own operations. It should be noted that greening an organization is about progress and not perfection. Not everything can be done at once, but much can be accomplished when a structure is put in place to lead a formal environmental stewardship effort - when employees are made conscious of the impact of their actions, actively engaged in identifying and and implementing for their solutions, successes. celebrated

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2. OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
Greening a large organization is a complex task. Like every organization, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has unique characteristics that must be taken into account if its environmental stewardship efforts are to be successful. The purpose of this section is to provide an overview of the Archdiocese and of Indianapolis the as an organization, describe unique one township in Spencer County (Archdiocese

B Y THE N UMBERS - 2009
C OLLEGES : 2 H IGH SCHOOLS : 11 K-8 S CHOOLS : 60 T OTAL S CHOOLS : 73 P ARISHES : 139 M ISSIONS : 12 T OTAL CHURCHES : 151 T OTAL P ARISHIONERS : 226,620 T OTAL CLERGY : 290
E MPLOYEES IN C ATHOLIC C ENTER :110 E MPLOYEES IN XAVIER BUILDING : 3 H OME -BASED EMPLOYEES IN INDY : 78 C HARITIES , AGENCIES , CYO: 374 P ARISHES / SCHOOLS : 5,238

2009 Yearbook).
Operating as a notfor-profit organization, Archdiocese Indianapolis headquartered the of is in

opportunities and challenges it is afforded. Information was derived from staff interviews (Appendix C), and has been used to develop the environmental stewardship recommendations outlined in Sections 4 and 6.

the Catholic Center (1400 N. Meridian Street) Xavier (1435 Street), N. and the Illinois in It Building both

2.1 Overview of Archdiocese
Led by Archbishop Daniel M Buechlien, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis was erected over 175 years ago in 1834 as the Diocese of Vincennes. It was renamed the Diocese of Indianapolis in 1898 and was raised to the status of an Archdiocese in 1944 (Roman Catholic). The Archdiocese of Indianapolis is a diverse Roman Catholic Archdiocese encompassing nearly 13,800 square central Indiana. 73 and Roman Catholics, the Archdiocese includes Deaneries and over 38 counties plus 11 With schools, serving miles in south and

T OTAL EMPLOYEES : 5,803

FY 07-08 B UDGET : $73.2 M ILLION
(A RCHDIOCESE 2009 Y EARBOOK , J OHN H ANSBERRY , J ULIE S HEWMAKER )

Indianapolis.

directly manages 7 buildings, including Indianapolis‟ St.

Peter and Paul Cathedral, and directly owns 12 vehicles while insuring 167 additional vehicles the archdiocese (John Wahl, personal communication May 29, 2009). within There are 5,803 on the

employees

Archdiocese payroll, of which 113 have offices Catholic in Center the or

Xavier Building (John

Hansberry, personal communication May 18, 2009). The
budgeted of in and the FY expenses Archdiocese 07-08, parishes

151 parishes, over 225,000

totaled $73.2 Million excluding

schools (Julie Shewmaker, personal communication May 26, 2009).
MAP OF ARCHDIOCESE OF INDIANAPOLIS (ARCHDIOCESE ONLINE)

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2.2 Opportunities
The Archdiocese has numerous opportunities in the form of existing resources and unique organizational qualities which can be leveraged to support its environmental stewardship goals. Some of these opportunities are examined below and have been incorporated in the development of recommendations later in this document. Opportunity: “Care for Creation” Movement. There is a strong existing “Care for Creation” movement among diverse interdenominational congregations which holds that “we are called to see the earth as „good‟ and to love it as God loves all of life” (Environmental

The Catholic Coalition on Climate Change. Launched
in 2006 by the USCCB and other Catholic partners, the CCCC encourages the Catholic Community to become involved in practical environmental stewardship solutions as it addresses the human and moral dimensions of climate change.

The Catholic Climate Covenant. A program of the
CCCC, the Catholic Climate Covenant was launched on April 22nd of this year and encourages Catholics to take the St. Francis Pledge to Care for Creation and

the Poor – a commitment to reduce your carbon
footprint through prayer, learning, assessment, action and advocacy.

Guide).

In

Indianapolis

this

movement has been growing steadily over the past several years. On January 31st of this year, more than 160 people attended the Third Green Congregation Workshop and nearly 21 percent of attendees were Roman Catholic (Green

Regional Action
Faith in Action. Catholic congregations in Michigan
and Northern Indiana are partnering to create and present educational resources on addressing climate change and other environmental issues.

Congregations). This broad network of engaged
congregations and individuals can serve as a rich resource of information and shared experience. Opportunity: Catholic Environmental Action. Since the early 1990s there has been strong and growing action from Roman Catholics in the area of environmental stewardship and social justice at the national, regional, and local levels. These efforts provide valuable outreach and education tools that can be leveraged to support Archdiocese environmental efforts.

Local Action
Christ the King Parish. Led by parishioner Patti
Cortellini, this Indianapolis congregation is a designated “Creation Care Congregation” through the Interfaith Alliance Indianapolis Care for Creation Committee (Creation Care Congregations).

Archdiocese Earth Stewardship Committee.

Five

Catholic churches on the north side of Indianapolis have formed the Archdiocese Earth Stewardship Committee, or “Green Deanery of Indianapolis,” and are meeting regularly to share resources (Creation

National Action
USCCB Climate Change Justice and Health Initiative
educates and advocates on the connections between Catholic faith, social justice, and the environment. It places a special emphasis on addressing the moral dimensions of climate change and its impacts on the poor.

Care Congregations). Low Carbon Diet. During this past season of Lent,
weekly workshops were offered by “Green Deanery” parishes to assist parishioners in reducing their carbon footprint (Program

Examines

Carbon

Footprints).

CATHOLIC RESOURCES
Catholic Earthcare Australia: www.catholicearthcareoz.net USCCB Climate Change Justice and Health Initiative: www.usccb.org/sdwp/ejp/climate Catholic Climate Covenant. www.catholicclimatecovenant.org Catholic Coalition on Climate Change. www.catholicsandclimatechange.org/ NCEA: Ensuring a Healthy Environment:
www.ncea.org/departments/nabccce/EnvironmentalConcerns.asp

INTERDENOMINATIONAL RESOURCES
Green Congregations: www.webofcreation.org Interfaith Alliance Indianapolis Care for Creation Committee: www.interfaithindy.org/care Indianapolis Green Congregations Website:
www.ikecoalition.org/Green_Sanctuary/Green_Sanctuary.htm

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Opportunity:

Large

potential

impact.

As

an

together to effect positive change. These models can be utilized and built upon. Opportunity: Staff with extensive environmental and energy expertise. The Archdiocese has an environmental manager on staff with certifications to safely handle issues with lead, asbestos, mold, and pesticide. Management services additionally extensive and structure staff has energy facilities This existing internal represents that can an be asset and knowledge

organization with a large scope of influence, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has the potential to make as enormous as reductions of its in the absolute schools, environmental impact of its own daily operations well those parishes, parishioners and employees through example, education, support, budgeting guidelines, and direct management. Opportunity: demonstration High value. public The visibility actions of and the

Archdiocese of Indianapolis are highly visible to both Catholics and non-Catholics. It has a unique opportunity to set an example by demonstrating to individuals and other organizations how a large, diverse enterprise can successfully reduce its environmental footprint.

maintenance expertise.

institutional utilized. Opportunity:

Broad

funding

options. The Archdiocese has the ability to consider broad funding and financing options to support its environmental These stewardship include efforts. options

leveraging grants, soliciting private donations, creative
www.catholicclimatecovenant.org

and financing

considering mechanisms

such as establishing a revolving loan fund or bonding initiative. The Archdiocese has a development staff of 20 individuals to support fundraising efforts. Opportunity: Record of successful environmental projects. Archdiocese staff has implemented many successful environmental stewardship projects and practices to date. A full list of existing and planned Archdiocese environmental stewardship projects can be found in Appendix D. These efforts can be communicated with staff and parishioners to demonstrate real environmental impact and cost reductions, celebrate successes, and build support for implementation of the Archdiocese Environmental Stewardship Agenda.

Opportunity: Orientation to public wellbeing. Staff and parishioners are generally oriented to “doing the right thing.” A well developed communications strategy aimed at increasing awareness of the environmental, financial, and social justice impacts of daily behaviors – while providing guidance and support to change those behaviors – is likely to be highly successful. Opportunity: Successful staff program models. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has existing staff programs – including the Wellness Program and Information Systems training programs – which serve as examples of staff successfully working

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2.3 Challenges
Like all organizations, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has particular qualities which may pose challenges to implementing a new set of policies. We examine these potential challenges in order to take them fully into account as we develop robust environmental stewardship recommendations. Challenge: Decentralized authority structure. The Archdiocese‟s decentralized authority structure can make implementing organizational change more challenging than it might otherwise be under a traditional centralized power structure. Under Catholic Canon Law, parishes and schools are autonomous over their own property, operational policies and purchasing decisions. The role of the Archdiocese is to support, educate and provide recommendations to parishes, but not direct policy (Coridan). This can sometimes make operations proactive sharing. less than efficient and across the organization, and elevates the importance of communication information

opportunity to take a close look at how efficiently the organization is using resources such as electricity and paper, and identify opportunities for cost-savings. Challenge: Communications with parishes and schools. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has 151 parishes, 73 schools, 290 clergy and a total of 5,803 employees spread over nearly 13,800 square miles. By all accounts, communications among all parts of the Archdiocese body can be difficult. Specifically, a standardized electronic communications system uniting parishes, schools, and all employees within the Archdiocese has not yet been implemented. This can sometimes hinder effective coordination and make operations less than efficient. Challenge: Internal communications.

Communications among staff within the Catholic Center can also be challenging. In some areas, there is a lack of written policies which outline efficient organizational procedures and clearly communicate expectations to staff. An internal structure to proactively improve policy buy-in and compliance among staff - and allow for more effective communication among staff from various departments - could be strengthened and would improve organizational efficiency. Challenge: Heavy staff workloads. As a non-profit organization, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has responded to budget pressures by reducing staff over the years. As a result many staff members have heavy workloads and may not be able to undertake additional responsibilities effectively. Challenge: Habits are hard to change. True of any

D ID YOU KNOW ?
AN
IDLING VEHICLE GETS 0 MPG AND CONTRIBUTES TO AIR POLLUTION . I N MOST CARS ANY MORE THAN 10 SECONDS OF IDLING USES MORE GASOLINE THAN RESTARTING THE ENGINE .

R EDUCE

IDLING BY AVOIDING DRIVE - THROUGH WINDOWS AND TURNING OFF THE CAR WHEN STOPPED FOR MORE THAN 10 SECONDS .

(WWW .INDYCICAP .ORG )

Challenge: Budget constraints. As a non-profit organization, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis routinely operates under budget constraints and is currently addressing a significant associated hand, it is budget with an deficit. This can make funding any up-front capital expenditures On the other implementing challenging. environmental stewardship

organization, changing employee habits can be a major challenge. People generally like doing things “the way they have always been done” and can be suspicious of new procedures or products. For this reason, it is important to include employees in the process of greening the organization and to make internal education and communication a central piece of the effort.

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3. KEY IMPACTS
As a large organization with the management of numerous capital projects and a great number of existing facilities and acres of land under its care, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis utilizes a great deal of resources in the course of its daily operations. As such, it has an equally large impact on the local and global environment. The Indiana electricity that is used to light staff offices and power computers, for example, is largely generated by burning coal – contributing to local air and water pollution and emitting pollutants which contribute to global climate change. Likewise, the Archdiocese‟ use of paper, janitorial supplies, and other needed products has profound environmental impacts associated with their production, transport, use, and final disposal – including contributing to air and water pollution and global climate change. The purpose of this section is to describe the Archdiocese‟ use of key resources within its core facilities. While not an exhaustive environmental audit, this preliminary evaluation describes in broad strokes the resource use of the Archdiocese‟ core administrative operations within the Catholic Center and Xavier Buildings and serves as an indicator of the full impact the Archdiocese has on the environment in the course of its daily operations. This analysis has been used to inform and focus the recommended environmental stewardship actions presented in section 4. The data presented within this section was graciously provided by Archdiocese staff (Julie Shewmaker, personal
www.archindy.com

communications March 23, May 18; John Hansberry, May 18; John Wahl May 27; Abbey Kirchner June 1, June 11). While this document
does not attempt to quantify the environmental impacts associated with the Archdiocese‟ 5 additional Indianapolis facilities, its 151 parishes and 73 schools, or the households and vehicles of its employees and parishioners, these are all areas within the Archdiocese‟ scope of influence in which environmental stewardship can be improved through either direct management, indirect support, or outreach and education tools.

Indianapolis Environmental Organizations:
The Indianapolis Zoo – My Carbon Pledge SustainIndy US Green Building Council – Indiana Chapter Green Piece Indy Indiana Living Green Magazine INdiana Sustainability Alliance (INSA) Hoosier Environmental Council (HEC) Earth Day Indiana Indiana Wildlife Federation The Nature Conservancy, Indiana Chapter Marion County Soil and Water Conservation District Central Indiana Land Trust Improving Kids’ Environment Health by Design Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) Keep Indianapolis Beautiful

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3.1 Select Expenses and Impacts

FIGURE 1: ARCHDIOCESE SELECT EXPENSES FY 2007 - 2008

Figure 1 describes select expenses made by the Archdiocese during FY 2007 – 2008. While this data is not a perfect indicator of the amount, efficiency and environmental impact of the Archdiocese‟ resource use, it is data that is readily accessible to staff, and serves two main purposes. First, it serves as a good indirect indicator of the resource use and environmental impacts of Archdiocese operations. Second, it suggests areas of high environmental impact that can be targeted for cost-savings. Appendix E details the expenses described in Figure 1 and broadly outlines their associated environmental impacts. Major expenses can be broken into three categories: (1) travel and conferences; (2) postage, paper and printing, and (3) utilities. This suggests that the Archdiocese‟ major environmental impacts with the highest cost savings potential are those associated with travel, paper, and utility consumption. Appendix F examines the cost savings potential of environmental stewardship actions targeted to particular areas by estimating a “reasonably expected” savings range based on the experience of others. This analysis indicates that employee mileage, postage and utilities are areas with high cost-savings potential. Each of these areas is more closely examined later in this section.

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Mileage expenses: mileage

reimbursement Archdiocese reimbursement

expenses were examined for all months of available data for Fiscal (Figure Years 2). 2007 During – 2009 23 the

months from July 2007 to May 2009, the Archdiocese spent an average of $17,448 per month on mileage reimbursement, with a range of $4,057 in July 2007 to $36,331 in June 2008. This data was during used that to time Figure 2. Mileage reimbursement expenses 7/07 – 5/09 month. Carbon emissions from this driving

approximate the miles driven by reimbursed employees IRS and the CO2 emissions associated from that driving by utilizing mileage reimbursement guidelines (www.irs.gov), the average fuel economy of the US car and truck fleet (25.3 mpg, Fuel Economy

averaged 15.6 tons per month, and a total of 359.6 tons of carbon pollution were emitted during that 23 month period. In addition to emitting significant amounts of pollutants which contribute to global climate change, the burning of gasoline also emits the components of local air pollution which affect public health including carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and unburned hydrocarbons (EPA). Travel expenses: Archdiocese travel expenses were examined for all months of available data for Fiscal Years 2007 – 2009 (Figure 3). During the 23 months from July 2007 to May 2009, the Archdiocese month on spent an average of $33,194 per travel expenses, with a range of $5,727 in September 2007 to $335,089 in July 2008.

Basics), and the amount of CO2 produced per
gallon of gasoline consumed (24 lbs CO2/gal,

Fuel Economy Basics).
During this time, it is approximated that

Archdiocese employees drove an average of 32,965 reimbursed miles per month, consuming an average of 1,303 gallons of gasoline per

Figure 3. Travel expenses 7/07 – 5/09

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While it is not possible to quantitatively estimate impacts from travel expense data with any sort of accuracy, it is clear that business travel is a significant source of environmental impacts for the Archdiocese. Environmental impacts include the air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from car and air travel, the water and energy use of hotels, and the waste produced by conferences and meetings (Environmentally
D ID YOU KNOW ? T HE AVERAGE JET
EMITS ONE POUND OF CARBON DIOXIDE FOR EVERY PASSENGER MILE TRAVELED . US

BUSINESS TRAVELERS TRAVEL OVER 240 B ILLION MILES ANNUALLY . E NVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE B USINESS T RAVEL

Responsible

send out approximately 1.3 tons of paper per month in outgoing mail. While the assumptions behind these calculations are not realistic in real life (clearly, the archdiocese is not only exclusively standard mailing weight

Business Travel).
Postage: postage available Archdiocese expenses data for were Fiscal

IMPACT FACT:
BY ONE ESTIMATE , THE A RCHDIOCESE OF INDIANAPOLIS MAILS OUT APPROXIMATELY 1.3 TONS OF PAPER EACH MONTH . ________ P RODUCING 1.3 TONS OF PAPER REQUIRES :  3.9 TONS OF WOOD  14,474 K W H OF ELECTRICITY A ND P RODUCES :  24,798 GALLONS OF WASTEWATER  2961 POUNDS OF SOLID WASTE  3797 POUNDS OF GREENHOUSE G ASES – THE EQUIVALENT OF NEARLY 8 MONTHS OF CAR EXHAUST ( EDF PAPER C ALCULATOR )

examined for all months of Years 2007 – 2009 (Figure 4). During the 23 months from 2009, spent $12,591 postage. This data a was very used to July the an per 2007 to May of on Archdiocese average month

letters), it does give us a basis to approximate the organization‟s use in this area. The environmental impact of producing this amount of paper is high. Producing 1.3 tons of copy paper requires 3.9 tons of wood and 14,474 kWh of electricity, while producing resource

provide

rough

approximation of the tons of paper the Archdiocese places in outgoing mail each month. Assuming that all outgoing mail is of average letter weight and mailed at the standard rate, the Archdiocese

24,798 gallons of wastewater, 2961 pounds of solid waste, and 3797 pounds of greenhouse gases - the equivalent of nearly 8 months of car exhaust (Environmental Defense Paper Calculator). Additional environmental impacts result from the production of stamps, the transportation of paper and stamps, and the transportation of mail to its final recipients.

Figure 4. Postage expenses 7/07 – 5/09

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3.2 Utilities
This section examines the Archdiocese‟ use of water, electricity, natural gas, and steam in its core administrative facilities – the Catholic Center and adjacent Xavier Building. The use of each of these utilities represents a significant expense to the Archdiocese in addition to impacting the local and global environment. The implementation of environmental stewardship measures can assist the Archdiocese in making more efficient use of these resources, resulting in cost savings and a smaller environmental footprint.
www.archindy.org

C ORE FACILITY FACTS :
C ATHOLIC C ENTER 1400 N. M ERIDIAN S T, I NDIANAPOLIS B UILT IN 1927
95,111 S QUARE F EET 85% 110 100% 1984 70 HRS O FFICES / 15% M EETING HALL E MPLOYEES B UILDING
STEAM , WITH OFFICE SPACE CONDITIONED ;

preliminary Action Agenda does not stretch to calculating the carbon footprint, water footprint, or ENERGY STAR energy efficiency rating score (www.energystar.gov) of these facilities, it is recommended that these additional analyses be utilized in the future as needed.

CITY AC

2

HEAT PUMPS AND

HVAC

SYSTEM AGE WEEKLY USAGE

D ID YOU KNOW ?
TO
ACCOUNT FOR CLIMATE DIFFERENCES AROUND THE WORD , THE ENERGY USED IN BUILDINGS IS TYPICALLY MEASURED AGAINST

A PPROXIMATE

X AVIER BUILDING 1435 N. I LLINOIS ST , I NDIANAPOLIS B UILT IN 1964
21,630 S QUARE F EET 70% 3 78 100% O FFICES / 30% W AREHOUSE E MPLOYEES E MPLOYEES B UILDING
GAS AND WITH OFFICE SPACE WORK FROM HOME

H EATING DEGREE DAYS (HDD), A QUANTITATIVE INDEX DERIVED TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS .
HDD

FROM LOCAL

CONDITIONED ; NATURAL

AC
SYSTEMS AGE RANGE WEEKLY USAGE

INDICES REFLECT THE DEMAND FOR ENERGY REQUIRED TO HEAT A BUILDING WITHIN A PARTICULAR LOCATION .

1980 – 2003, HVAC 40 HRS A PPROXIMATE

A

The information presented here is derived from all available FY 2007 – 2009 utility bills. First, the usage and cost of each utility in both facilities is presented. Then, the energy use baseline of each facility is presented for FY 2007 – 2008 to serve as a yardstick against which future improvements can be measured. While the scope of this

BUILDING LOCATED IN FLORIDA WILL HAVE A LOWER HDD INDEX IN J ANUARY THAN THE SAME BUILDING IN INDIANA , BECAUSE HIGHER F LORIDA TEMPERATURES MEAN IT WILL TAKE LESS ENERGY TO HEAT THAT BUILDING TO THE SAME TEMPERATURE .

T HIS

DOCUMENT USES FAHRENHEIT - BASED HEATING DEGREE DAYS FOR A BASE TEMPERATURE OF 65F, RECORDED AT THE INDIANAPOLIS A IRPORT WEATHER STATION .

HDD SOURCE:

WWW . DEGREEDAYS . NET

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15

Water Use and Cost:
Within its core administrative facilities the

the utility bills was also much more erratic and spiked during the summer months. This is likely attributed to the frequent estimation (and then correction) of water use on the utility bills as well as lawn care needs or other unknown seasonal water needs which spike during the summer.

Archdiocese of Indianapolis has used an average of 12,330 CU FT of water per month over the past 2 years at an average monthly cost of $477.44. Less water was used at the Xavier Building (675 CU FT/mo at an average cost of $40.41/mo ), which is smaller at 21,630 sq ft, houses permanent offices for only 3 employees, and has no lawn. Much more water was used in the Catholic Center during this time (11,655 CU FT/mo at an average cost of $437.03/mo). At 95,111 sq ft, the Catholic Center is a much larger building which houses offices for 110 full time employees. In addition to being used in greater quantities, water use in the Catholic Center as recorded on

Figure 5. Catholic Center and Xavier Building Water Cost, FY 2007 – 2009.

Figure 6. Catholic Center and Xavier Building Water Use, FY 2007 – 2009.

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Electricity Use and Cost:
Over the past 2 years, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has used an average of 120,097 kWh of electricity per month within its core administrative facilities at an average monthly cost of $7,194. Less electricity was used at the smaller Xavier Building (13,175 kWh/mo at an average cost of $1,135/mo) than the Catholic Center during this at same an time period cost of (106,921kWh/mo $6,058/mo). As described on page 14, Heating Degree Days (HDD) are a quantitative index used to reflect the demand for energy required to heat a building. Electricity use in the gas-heated Xavier Center is higher during the summer months reflecting a greater use of air conditioning. Electric usage in the Catholic Center spikes both in the hot summer average

months and in the coldest winter months. This reflects greater use of the building‟s two energyefficient heat pumps, which are used to help cool and heat the building as needed by moving heat. Note that the electric use of the Catholic Center is less in winter, as its heat pumps supplement steam, its main heat supply.

Figure 7. Catholic Center and Xavier Building Electric Cost, FY 07 -09

Figure 8. Catholic Center and Xavier Building Electricity Use, FY 2007 – 2009.

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Steam Use and Cost:
In Indianapolis, steam is generated from the burning of municipal solid waste at the Covanta Energy-from-Waste Facility where over 2,000 tons of solid waste is processed daily, generating 4,500 pounds of steam per ton (Covanta). While some controversy surrounds the air pollution issues that can be associated with Energy-fromwaste facilities, today many environmentalists promote it as a viable renewable energy source. As noted in the box on page 14, The Catholic Center is heated in part by steam, while the Xavier Building does not receive steam service. In the past two years, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has used an average of 3,101 therms of steam in the Catholic Center each month at an average monthly cost of $5,184. These averages include

the summer months when no steam is used for heating along with winter months when steam costs have spiked to nearly $14,000. Therms used generally follow HDD as expected, while dipping slightly during the holiday season when the building is unoccupied.

Figure 9. Catholic Center Steam Cost, FY 07 -09

Figure 10. Catholic Center Steam Use, FY 2007 – 2009.

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Natural Gas Use and Cost:
The Xavier Building is heated by natural gas, while the Catholic Center does not have natural gas service at this time. In the past two years, the Archdiocese of

difference in how the building was used such as thermostats being set higher or warehouse doors left open. The problem was corrected in subsequent months.

Indianapolis has used an average of 543 therms of natural gas in the Xavier Building each month at an average monthly cost of $570. Therms used generally follow HDD as expected, with one exception. There was a spike in natural gas use in December 2007 that is not explained by colder temperatures. This indicates that additional natural gas was used due either to an equipment problem, or a
Figure 11. Xavier Building Natural Gas Cost, FY 07 -09

Figure 12. Xavier Building Natural Gas Use, FY 2007 – 2009.

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Energy Use Baseline:
In order to calculate baseline data for the total energy use of each facility, data from FY 2007 – 2008 was utilized, as complete data from the current fiscal year was not available. We find that the energy footprints of these two adjacent facilities is quite different. During FY 07 -08, the Catholic Center utilized a total of 3,510,409 kBtus of energy, derived from 99% steam and 1% electricity. That is to say, it took 36.9 kBtu to operate (heat, light, and operate electrical equipment) each square foot of the Catholic Center during FY 07- 08 at a cost of $1.32 per square foot (Figure 13). The Xavier Building used a total of 120,113 kBtu of energy during that same time, derived from 55% natural gas and 45% electricity. It took 55.5 kBtu to operate each square foot of the Xavier Building during FY 07 – 08 at a cost of $0.93 per square foot (Figure 14). While nearly 30% more energy (by kBtu) was used in the Catholic Center than the Xavier building during the baseline year, per square foot the Catholic Center is a more efficient building. It used only 36.9 kBtu per square foot while the Xavier Building used 55.5 kBtu per square foot. However, the energy used by the Catholic Center was more
Figure 14. Xavier Building Energy Use Baseline, FY 07 -08 Figure 13. Xavier Building Energy Use Baseline, FY 07 -08

expensive, costing $1.32 per square foot to the Xavier Building‟s cost of $0.93.

before switching the energy source of any facility. A total of $145,000 was spent on energy utilities to operate these two facilities for the baseline year. Seeking additional efficiencies in energy use can benefit the environment while freeing up limited funds for purposes that are more directly related to the Archdiocese‟ mission.

While natural gas may be a more cost-effective source of energy, it may not necessarily be preferable to steam. Performing a detailed analysis is beyond the scope of this document, but environmental impact should be considered

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4. ACTION AGENDA
This Action Agenda broadly outlines the steps the Archdiocese of Indianapolis can take to reduce its environmental impact and encourage its parishes, schools, employees and parishioners to do the same. This section is divided into seven main areas: Energy, Water, Waste, Land Use, Transportation and Travel, Purchasing, and Communication and Outreach. Comprehensive environmental stewardship recommendations are made in each area. There is wide variation in the types of recommendations offered - some require behavioral changes, while others require equipment upgrades or other measures. Some will have immediate results, while some will take longer. Recommendations cannot be implemented all at once. Section 6, “Next Steps” recommends an implementation strategy and first actions for the Archdiocese to make steady progress toward its environmental goals. Recommendations which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are marked with a green target symbol:

www.catholicclimatecovenant.org

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4.1. Energy
Most of the world‟s energy is produced from non-renewable resources such as natural gas, oil, and coal which contribute to air, soil and water pollution as well as global climate change. The United States represents 5% of the world‟s population yet consumes 25% of the world‟s energy – and energy use is expected to grow 1.8% annually through 2020 (Green Action Guide). In Indiana, over 95% of electricity is produced by coal, making our state a major contributor of

IMPACT FACT:
Last year the Archdiocese of Indianapolis spent on average nearly $400 a day for energy use in the Catholic Center and Xavier Building. Taking steps to use less energy will benefit the environment and free up limited funds that could be used to more directly support the Archdiocese‟ mission.

greenhouse gas pollution and its effects - which are disproportionately felt by the world‟s vulnerable and poor (Catholic Climate Covenant). Using less electricity from cleaner sources is vital to protecting people and ecosystems worldwide, and ensuring that our stewardship leaves a healthy planet for future generations.
Solar oven, www.wholeworldbotanicals.com

There are many steps the Archdiocese of Indianapolis can take to reduce its energy consumption and support cleaner sources of energy. Actively pursuing energy conservation measures not only benefits the local and global environment, but also typically results in significant cost savings for an organization. After all, consuming less means paying less, and energy can be expensive. There are also many costeffective options to directly support clean energy sources and explore renewable energy generation (Putting Energy into

DID YOU KNOW? :
E NERGY
EFFICIENCY UPGRADES GENERALLY SAVE MONEY THAT CAN BE USED TO PAY FOR THE COST OF

THE PROJECT . C OST SAVINGS CONTINUES TO ACCRUE ONCE PROJECT COSTS ARE RECOVERED .

EPA E NERGY STAR

Stewardship).
This section outlines the many steps the Archdiocese can take to use energy more efficiently, support clean energy generation, and empower others to do the sets at same. of once. Recommendations actions. 6, Not are all presented as “Stewardship Steps”, or related Section a recommendations can be implemented “Next Steps” outlines recommended

implementation strategy, while steps which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with this green target symbol:

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Stewardship Step

No 1

Conserve Energy
[b] Passive Cooling
An important way to lower energy bills is to use passive forms of heating and cooling. Encourage employees to shut blinds when the sun shines in office windows in the summer and keep blinds open to capture the sun‟s heat in winter. Installing awnings and window tinting also helps reduce cooling costs, as well as planting shade trees on the south and west sides of facilities.

____________________________________________
The most cost-effective way for an organization to use less energy is to raise employee awareness about the importance of energy conservation, and work to improve behavioral practices, habits, and operational procedures:

[c] Temperature controls
Set thermostats for 68 degrees in winter and 75 degrees or higher in summer. When the building is unoccupied at night and on the weekends, turn off the air conditioning and turn down the heat to 55 degrees in the wintertime. If employees control temperatures in their offices, stress the importance of respecting these temperature guidelines, and

[a] Communicate energy conservation
o Post signs reminding employees and guests to turn off the lights when they leave the room. Post signs next to light fixtures in bathrooms, offices, and other spaces that are occasionally unoccupied. o Post signs reminding employees and guests to keep exterior doors closed when the HVAC is running. o Ask employees to implement “power conservation” modes on their computer, and to turn off all monitors, printers and copiers at the end of the day. Equipment continues to draw power even when turned off, and should be unplugged at night. Follow up with reminders and employee recognition. o Remind employees to turn off desk lamps, fans, stereos, and other electric items they may have in their offices when not in use. o Remind employees to unplug all chargers when the device is fully charged and when not in use. Charges draw current even when not plugged into a device. o Limit the use of employee space heaters, hot plates, mini-refrigerators and other equipment in offices that draw a lot of energy. Encourage employees to work with Maintenance staff on temperature issues and use common equipment and appliances in the kitchen or break room.

encourage them to open windows in the summer instead of using air conditioning. Controlling temperatures with programmable thermostats is recommended (see Stewardship Step # 2 in this section).

[d] Ensure regular maintenance practices
Regularly maintain all equipment and appliances to ensure they are working as efficiently as possible -HVAC system. Ensure that the HVAC system is maintained according to the manufacturer‟s recommendations, including changing the filters monthly. Consider purchasing washable filters which can be washed and reused. -Appliances. Don‟t forget to clean and maintain appliances. Maintain an air-gap of at least 3 inches between the back of appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, and water coolers and the wall. Clean condenser coils (or the back of the appliance) regularly.

D ID YOU KNOW ?: A MERICAN BUSINESSES LOSE UP TO $4 B ILLION EVERY YEAR IN WASTED ENERGY
COSTS THROUGH THE INEFFICIENT USE OF OFFICE EQUIPMENT . W ASTED ENERGY ALSO CONTRIBUTES UNNECESSARILY TO LOCAL AIR POLLUTION AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE .

G REEN A CTION G UIDE
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-Air registers. Keep air registers and make sure they aren‟t covered by furniture or other obstructions. Close heating vents in unused rooms.
Stewardship Step

[b] Lighting
o Review overhead lighting technology – Between 25 and 50% of energy use in commercial facilities is used for lighting, and energy-efficient lighting upgrades typically pay for themselves. Review overhead lighting in all facilities to determine if more efficient lighting is available. While making specific lighting recommendations is beyond the scope of this document, in general:

No 2

Make Easy Efficiency Upgrades

____________________________________________
After improving conservation habits, the most costeffective way for an organization to use less energy is for in-house staff to make relatively simple energy-efficiency upgrades. These upgrades are relatively low-cost to implement and have a quick pay-back period. It is recommended that Archdiocese staff systematically review which recommended efficiency upgrades have not yet been taken within each of its 7 directly-managed facilities. Much has been done in the past to improve energy efficiency, especially in the Catholic Center. It is recommended that updates be reviewed as well to determine if cost-effective new technologies may now be available which would further decrease energy use.

 If overhead lights in older facilities are not fluorescent, work with a consultant to determine conversion options.  If linear fluorescents are used, switch to T-8 lamps and electronic ballasts, which use 30% less energy than older T12 tubes with magnetic ballasts. o CFL Bulbs – Compact florescent bulbs use 75% less energy than incandescent bulbs and last ten times over its lifetime and pay for itself in six months. Ensure that all employee desk lamps, standing lamps and other light sources use an energyefficient alternative to incandescent bulbs, and encourage employees and parishioners to switch to CFL bulbs in their own homes. o Review other lighting needs –  Install energy-efficient exit lighting in all Archdiocese-managed facilities.  Replace spotlights with halogen bulbs or reflectorized compact fluorescent bulbs o Switch from mercury vapor lamps to metal halide or high-pressure sodium lamps. o Remove unneeded bulbs – Remove bulbs where less light is needed, such as in hallways and near windows where there is good daylighting. Avoid “overlighting.”

[a] Building Shell
A facility‟s building shell consists of its full exterior – outer walls, ceilings, doors, windows, floors and insulation. The building shell controls the flow of air out of and into the facility, keeps out moisture and modulates heat loss and gain. Regularly inspect each facility‟s shell and seal any gaps by caulking around windows and doors, weather stripping, and installing door sweeps. These low-cost solutions are very easy and go a long way to improving a building‟s energy efficiency. Larger opportunities for energy savings in the building shell include considering insulation, roofing and window upgrades.

AN

ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM STARTED IN

1974

BY THE

MUNICIPAL UTILITY IN ADDITIONAL

O SAGE, I OWA, ( POP. 3,500)

KEEPS AN

$1

MILLION A YEAR IN THE LOCAL ECONOMY .

THIS

PROGRAM , WHICH RELIED ON SIMPLE TOOLS LIKE CAULK GUNS , DUCT TAPE , INSULATION , LIGHT BULBS , AND EDUCATION , HAS CREATED AN ANNUAL COMMUNITY ECONOMIC STIMULUS EQUAL TO

$1000

PER HOUSEHOLD .

(E NVIRONMENTAL G UIDE

FOR

CONGREGATIONS )

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o Install switch plate occupancy sensors – Install occupancy sensors in bathrooms, hallways and other areas which are not used frequently. Occupancy sensors are inexpensive and pay for themselves quickly. o Consider installing additional lighting controls such as bi-level switching, dimmers, and daylight sensors to avoid over-lighting any area.

[c] Programmable Thermostats
Install programmable thermostats to automatically reduce temperatures during times when building is unoccupied. Programmable thermostats are relatively inexpensive, have a quick payback period, and can help save up to 20% of energy costs. Ensure that thermostats are properly programmed - and reprogrammed when the hours of building use change.
Putting Energy into Stewardship

[d] Appliances and equipment
When appliances and equipment need to be replaced, purchase an Energy Star model. It may be cost-effective to replace older, inefficient appliances and equipment with more efficient models. Evaluate this option whenever equipment is more than ten years old.
Stewardship Step

No 3

Implement an eco-friendly IT strategy

[e] Water Heater
Heating water is a major energy use. Turn down water heaters to 120 degrees (if dishwashers are in use that don‟t have a heat-boosting coil, water will need to be at 140 degrees to sterilize dishes), insulate water heaters and wrap hot water pipes for increased insulation. When building is unoccupied for several days or more, turn the water heater down to the lowest setting. Where facility hot water needs are limited, consider if a “tankless” water heater might be appropriate.

____________________________________________
Information Technology (IT) is a major source of energy use in an office environment. The steps outlined below can significantly reduce energy use related to IT, as well as to help reduce the Archdiocese‟ environmental footprint in other areas: o Implement a standardized email system to better facilitate efficient, paper-free communications. o Purchase energy efficient computers and power supplies o Extend the life of equipment as much as possible. Reuse or donate equipment that has reached the end of its useful life, and recycle IT hardware if it cannot be donated or used elsewhere. o Put all computers on power-saving modes manually or through software which can make the changes remotely:   o o Sleep after 15 minutes of inactivity Switch off screensavers

[f] Vending Machines
Install energy-efficient vending machines, and/or institute a policy to unplug machines at night and on the weekends.

[g] Air ducts and steam pipes
Insulate air ducts and steam pipes to reduce heat loss.

Instruct employees to turn off inactive equipment at night and on the weekend. Instruct employees to use centrally-located printers and copiers and print double-sided by default. Reduce number of extraneous and inefficient copiers.

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o o

Utilize software and training to better enable employees to edit document electronically. Utilize software and training to enable and encourage staff to participate in web-meetings or teleconferences whenever possible to reduce travel.

Stewardship Step

No 4

Take Efficiency Further

____________________________________________
It is recommended that the Archdiocese have a professional audit conducted each of its directlymanaged facilities in order to systematically identify all opportunities to reduce energy use as well as make specific recommendations on energy-efficiency upgrades based on financial analyses and specialized knowledge of available technologies and equipment. If audits are to be performed, it is advisable that staff wait until audit recommendations are provided before implementing their own energy efficiency upgrades. To date, an energy audits has not been conducted in any Archdiocese-owned facility (John

o

Virtualize workstations and enable remote access to applications through workstation virtualization to reduce commutes and eliminate the need for computers to be left on in the office.

o

Make the network operations center as energyefficient as possible, enable remote access to the center to save energy, and reuse waste heat from the network operations center if possible.

o

Reduce equipment and virtualize applications storage and servers in the data center whenever possible.

o

Implement hierarchical storage to the extent feasible.

Wahl, personal communication). An energy audit can
be conducted by an independent third-party energy auditor or by a full-service ESCO company. Each option is described below:

The Archdiocese of Indianapolis‟ Information Services division has either already implemented or has plans in place to implement many of these items (See Appendix D). It is recommended that implementation of these projects be prioritized for completion in the next year in order to significantly reduce IT-related energy use.

[a] Third Party energy audit
Third-party energy auditors provide an independent, expert evaluation of a facility‟s energy use, energy savings potential and project costs. They can provide additional services to assist staff - such as preparing project specifications or financial analyses – but typically do not perform building retrofit projects. This ensures that their evaluation is an independent, expert evaluation rather than an effort to sell additional services.

[b] Full-service ESCO
Energy Service Companies, or ESCOs, also perform energy audits to determine a facility‟s energy efficient retrofit options. However, the ESCO‟s scope of service typically also includes installing and managing the recommended energy projects, selling equipment and providing ongoing equipment maintenance, and arranging for product financing – or some combination of these services. The ESCO‟s main interest, therefore, typically lies not with the energy audit but in installing and managing the recommended facility retrofits. This can be positive insofar as the ESCO has a vested interest in the longterm results of the retrofits (ESCOs usually specialize in offering long-term Guaranteed Energy Savings Contracts), but has the drawback of tying energy

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audit recommendations to future product or service sales. Based upon Archdiocese staff‟s technical expertise, preferences, and financing needs an independent third-party energy audit is the recommended method of facility evaluation.
Stewardship Step

[a] IPL Green Power Option
Indianapolis Power and Light offers customers the option to purchase a percentage (up to 100%) of their electricity from renewable sources of energy. The additional cost to purchase green power from IPL represents renewable energy purchased from Midwestern wind farms and Indiana landfill gas generation plants. The cost is currently an additional $0.0065 per kWh. Over the past 2 years the Archdiocese has used an average of 4650 kWh per month. To purchase 100% renewable power for the Catholic Center through IPL‟s program, it would cost approximately an additional $30 per month.

No 5

Purchase Green Energy

____________________________________________
“Green” energy is electricity supplied from renewable sources such as solar, wind, biomass, hydroelectric and geothermal power. Unlike fossil-fuel based energy sources, green power contributes no or low global warming pollutants. Choosing to purchase green energy is an important way to reduce an organization‟s contribution to air and climate change pollution – especially in Indiana, where over 95% of our electricity is generated by burning coal. Purchasing green power helps create the demand for investment in renewable energy generation. As more companies invest in renewable power, prices come down, making it a more accessible option for everyone. Utilities are the single greatest source of air pollution in the United States, so helping to create demand for cleaner, renewable energy options is an important step. Several options are available to the Archdiocese of Indianapolis to purchase green power:

[b] Renewable Energy Certificates
Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), also called Green Tags, can also be purchased directly from brokers who sell RECs on the open market.

DID YOU KNOW?:
THE CITY OF CHICAGO HAS BEGUN PERFORMING
ENERGY AUDITS AND RETROFITS ON OVER

[c] Produce on-site Renewable Energy
Consider opportunities to produce renewable energy on-site at each facility. While it may meet only a portion of a building‟s energy needs, auxiliary solar or wind energy production can help defray electricity costs while serving as an educational opportunity and public demonstration values. of the Archdiocese‟ on-site Full environmental biomass, and Opportunities for

15

MILLION SQUARE FEET OF PUBLIC FACILITIES.

WHEN COMPLETE, IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE
CITY WILL SAVE

30,000 TONS OF CO2 $6 MILLION IN

EMISSIONS,

84 TONS OF NITROUS OXIDES, 128

TONS OF SULFUR DIOXIDE, AND ENERGY COSTS EVERY YEAR.

renewable energy production include solar, wind, geothermal technologies. information on renewable energy generation options can be found at the US Department of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy website: http://www.eere.energy.gov/

US Mayor‟s Climate Action Handbook

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Stewardship Step

No 6
After calculating

Purchase Carbon Offsets
its carbon footprint, the

Indiana Chapter of The Nature Conservancy to support reforestation projects within Indiana, working with the City of Indianapolis or other

____________________________________________
Archdiocese of Indianapolis can measure how many tons of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases it emits each year, and then “offset” a percentage or all of that carbon footprint by making voluntary financial contributions to a carbon offset program. Programs which provide carbon offsets work to balance out the impact of an organization‟s carbon emissions equivalent on the by ensuring amount of that an carbon on your isn‟t

organizations to support local tree-planting projects, or locate Indiana carbon offset projects (including reforestation, projects) afforestation, The Delta or agricultural Carbon other soil sequestration practices, sustainably managed forest through Program regional (http://deltacarbon.org) organizations.

dioxide is reduced somewhere else planet from work based the to CO2 purchase. removed which Carbon dioxide

atmosphere remove from and the

(other than reforestation projects, sequester

atmosphere) but rather new CO2 emissions are prevented elsewhere. Carbon including: production, offset providers offer energy efficiency

different ways of reducing carbon, renewable energy

projects, forestry and land use which acts to sequester carbon, destruction of HFCs and other industrial GHG pollutants, and methane capture.
Stewardship Step

No 7

Build Green

[a] Purchase global carbon offsets
A wide variety of global carbon-offset projects are available and can be accessed through one of several reputable Carbon Offset providers, Offset including: Program carbonfund.org, TerraPass.com, and The Nature Conservancy Voluntary Carbon (http://www.nature.org/initiatives/climatechange/ac tivities/art23932.html).

____________________________________________
Consider making a commitment to build green whenever constructing or remodeling an Archdiocese facility to ensure that future buildings will be efficient and environmentally friendly. Taking energy conservation and efficiency into account at the planning and design phase of a major project is a good investment. The additional cost of building green is estimated to be $4 per square foot, yet net savings over twenty years ranges between $48.87 and $67.31 per square foot. Full information on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Standards and other forms of green building

[b] Offset carbon locally
Because climate change is a global issue, carbon offset projects can occur across the globe. However, it is desirable to support local projects whenever possible. Some options include working with The

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can be found at the US Green Building Council‟s website: http://www.usgbc.org/. Over the years, Archdiocese staff has done an excellent job of incorporating energy efficiency upgrades into major remodeling projects whenever possible. For example, an energy-efficient reflective roof was installed on the Catholic Center. Recognize and communicate this and other environmental successes.
Stewardship Step

employees regarding energy use. Establish an energy-use baseline for each facility, formulate quantitative reductions goals, track and report progress, recognize individual efforts, and celebrate successes. Consider joining EPA‟s Energy Star for Congregations program to utilize tools, tips, benchmark facility energy use against comparable facilities, and receive recognition.

No 8

Increase Awareness

____________________________________________
Raise awareness among employees and parishioners about the ways they can reduce energy use and costs in their own facilities and homes.

[a] Support energy conservation throughout the Archdiocese
Use outreach and education the tools to of educate energy parishes, schools, employees, parishioners and the community about importance conservation, energy efficiency and the use of green power. Communicate the stewardship steps they can take at work and in their own facilities and homes to reduce energy use. Provide targeted information on rebate options and funding opportunities to support energy conservation efforts within the Archdiocese.

[b] Notify vendors
Notify vendors that energy conservation, energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources are important to the Archdiocese. Ask them to report how they are supporting energy conservation, and formalize any new Archdiocese environmental policies in their contract language.
Stewardship Step

No 9
Policy

Formalize Practices

____________________________________________
[a] Create and implement an Energy Conservation
Formalize energy conservation practices in an Archdiocese Energy Conservation Policy which clearly communicates procedures and expectations to

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ADDITIONAL E NERGY R ESOURCES:
ENERGY S TAR FOR CONGREGATIONS :
HTTP :// WWW . ENERGYSTAR . GOV /INDEX . CFM ? C = SMALL _ BUSINESS . SB_ CONGREGATIONS

EPA P UTTING ENERGY INTO S TEWARDSHIP :
HTTP :// WWW . ENERGYSTAR .GOV / IA / BUSINESS / SMALL _ BUSINESS / CONGREGATIONS _ GUIDEBOOK /C ONG_G UIDE . PDF

EPA CLEAN ENERGY W EBSITE : HTTP :// WWW . EPA. GOV / CLEANENERGY / EPA INFORMATION ON CFL B ULBS : HTTP :// WWW .ENERGYSTAR . GOV/ INDEX . CFM ?C =CFLS . PR_ CFLS DOE ENERGY EFFICIENCY P RACTICES FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS :
HTTP :// WWW 1. EERE .ENERGY . GOV / BUILDINGS / COMMERCIAL /

DOE G REEN POWER NETWORK : US G REEN BUILDING N ETWORK :

http://apps3.eere.energy.gov/greenpower/ http://www.usgbc.org/

INDIANAPOLIS POWER AND LIGHT G REEN POWER O PTIONS :

http://www.iplpower.com/ipl/index?page=IPLGeneral&Menu=06050300&DocID=020501 6c986701096a4e9803007c1f
C ITIZEN ‟ S G AS ENERGY SAVER ‟ S PROGRAM : HTTP :// WWW . CITIZENSGAS . COM/ FORHOMES/ ENERGYSAVERS . HTML E COBUSINESS C ARBON C ATALOGUE : HTTP ://WWW. CARBONCATALOG . ORG / T HE C HICAGO CLIMATE EXCHANGE : HTTP :// WWW . CHICAGOCLIMATEX .COM /

Sources of Information:
(Green Action Guide, Carbon Offsets, US Mayor‟s Climate Action Handbook, New Energy for Cities, Putting Energy into Stewardship, Clean Climate Preferable Air Green IT, Environmental EnergyStar for Guide for Congregations, Central Indiana Partnership, Plan, Congregations, EPA Clean Energy Website, Action Environmentally Benchmarking Purchasing,

Toward Energy Efficiency). See “Works Cited” for complete citations.

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4.2.

Water
Conservation). Growing world populations are putting stress on
available water supplies, and equitable access to clean drinking water is a major moral issue across the world. In the United States public demand for water has more than tripled since 1950. At least 36 states anticipate water shortages within the next four years, and it remains an essential resource we can‟t afford to waste here in Indiana (WaterSense).

Clean water is an essential resource, yet only 1% of water on Earth is available for use by people ( Water

DID YOU KNOW?
AN
AVERAGE OF 2,906 GALLONS OF WATER IS USED DAILY IN THE A RCHDIOCESE ‟ C ATHOLIC C ENTER .

www.froedtert.com

Taking steps to

protect the quality of our drinking water supplies is critical to the health of this and future generations. Likewise, working to actively conserve water yields many benefits, including:   

T HIS

AMOUNT OF WATER WEIGHS OVER

24

TONS !

Cost savings – Water conservation efforts can reduce water and sewer costs by up to 30 percent. Cost savings in maintenance, energy, and chemical expenses are also possible. Energy savings – When less water is used, less energy is utilized for water treatment, pumping, and heating. An environmental benefit – Increased water levels in local streams and wetlands preserves habitat for native plant and animal species and also allows wetlands to continue their natural function of filtering pollutants. Reduced air and climate pollution result from water-related energy savings.

 

Public health benefits – Lower water levels lead to higher concentrations of pollutants, and can negatively impact human health. Less wastewater – Producing less wastewater reduces the energy needed for water treatment. When there is too much wastewater in Indianapolis‟ combined sewer system, raw sewage overflows into Indianapolis streams. Many overflow areas are located in central Indianapolis neighborhoods. (Water Conservation, WaterSense, Household Water Efficiency, Putting Energy

into Stewardship).

DID YOU KNOW? :
L ETTING
A FAUCET RUN FOR FIVE MINUTES USES AS MUCH ENERGY AS LEAVING ON A BULB FOR 14 HOURS .

This section outlines the many steps the Archdiocese can take to use water more efficiently, protect water quality,
60- WATT
LIGHT

and empower others to do the same. Recommendations are presented as

EPA W ATER S ENSE

“Stewardship Steps”, or sets of related actions. Not all recommendations can be implemented at once. Section 6, “Next Steps” outlines a recommended implementation strategy, while steps that can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with this green target symbol:

Page

31

Stewardship Step

No 1

Focus on Efficiency

Stewardship Step

____________________________________________
[a] Regularly check for and repair all leaks
A slow leak can waste over 100 gallons of water in a week, and toilet leaks can waste hundreds of gallons a day. Check for leaks by periodically shutting down all water-using facilities overnight and reading the water meter. If the meter advances, you have a leak somewhere in your facility. Fix leaks promptly and fix small leaks by replacing toilet flappers and faucet washers as needed.

No 2
___________________________________________
[a] Use green cleaning products
One of the easiest ways to keep chemicals out of our local rivers and streams is to use phosphate-free dishwashing detergent and environmentally-friendly janitorial products. The Catholic Center janitorial service uses green products. It is recommended that this requirement be included in contract language.

[b] Dispose of chemicals properly
Dispose of all unwanted chemicals properly and never put them down the drain. In Indianapolis, unwanted chemicals can be disposed of at Indianapolis ToxDrop locations (327-4TOX). Archdiocese maintenance services disposes of chemicals properly. Ensure that all present and new staff is trained in and follows procedures.

[b] Install water-efficient fixtures
Replace all faucet aerators and any showerheads with water-efficient models. Install hand nozzles on any outdoor hoses. These retrofits are inexpensive, can be done easily, and typically pay for themselves within a year.

[c] Make toilets water-efficient
Adjust flush valves or install water replacement devices in existing toilets. For a low-cost solution, place plastic bottles filled with water in the tank to displace water.

[c] Wash cars responsibly
When archdiocese vehicles are washed, use a commercial car wash that recycles water. Encourage employees to do the same with their personal vehicles – especially those that are used for Archdiocese business. Formalize this expectation in a Green Fleet policy (See section 5.3, Transportation and Travel).

[d] Upgrade toilets and faucets
Replace any existing automatic toilet flush systems that operate regardless of use with photosensor/use-based automatic flush systems. Install automatic hand/motion sensors on faucets to reduce unnecessary water use. Consider installing waterefficient toilets and urinals.

[d] Use Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
Adopt an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach to minimize the use of chemicals in buildings and grounds. IPM controls weeds and pest with natural measures, minimizing the use of chemicals wherever possible.

[e] Purchase water-efficient products
When appliances wear out, replace them with a water-efficient model. The EPA WaterSense label makes it easy to identify water-efficient products. (See section 4.6 for more information on green purchasing policies)

[e] Use water-friendly land use techniques
Protect water quality by using water-friendly land use techniques such as eliminating the use of irrigation and chemicals outdoors, planting trees to reduce stormwater runoff, and installing raingardens or bioswales to help remove pollutants from water, and using rainbarrels. (See section 4.4, Land Use, for more detailed information about water-friendly land management).

DID YOU KNOW? :
T HE AVERAGE A MERICAN USES MORE THAN 100 GALLONS OF WATER A DAY – ENOUGH TO FILL OVER 1,600 DRINKING GLASSES .

(W ATER S ENSE )

A BOUT 1.1 BILLION PEOPLE WORLDWIDE LACK ACCESS TO SAFE , CLEAN DRINKING WATER ( WWW .FRIENDSOFWATER .COM) U SING A BROOM TO CLEAN A SIDEWALK OR DRIVEWAY INSTEAD OF A HOSE WILL GENERALLY SAVE OVER 150 GALLONS OF WATER . (WWW .BEWATERWISE .COM )

Page

32

Stewardship Step

No 3
[a] Use rainbarrels

Recycle Rainwater

not treated for drinking, is quite suitable to be “recycled” for other purposes such as irrigation.

[c] Consider installing a green roof
A green roof is specially designed to have growing vegetation on it. It helps to improve water quality by slowing and filtering stowmwater, works to further insulate the building, and helps counteract the urban heat island effect whereby urban areas tend to be hotter than surrounding vegetated areas. This increased temperature exacerbates urban air pollution problems.

____________________________________________

Install rainbarrels to collect rainwater and use to water plants, trees, gardens and landscaping. Rainbarrels reduce non-point source pollution in streams by keeping rainwater on-site, and reduce the use of treated water for landscaping. There are many commercially available options for rainwater storage and reuse.
Stewardship Step

[d] Reduce pavement
Eliminate or minimize paved surfaces where possible in order to reduce the amount of polluted stormwater runoff. Pave walkways with permeable material such as gravel, woodchips, or permeable pavers. Use permeable pavement for parking lots.

No 4

Focus on Hot Water Efficiency

[e] Prevent erosion
Place hay bales or silt fences around construction areas to keep bare soil from being washed into area streams and storm sewers during a rainstorm.
Stewardship Step

____________________________________________
[a] Lower water temperature
Set water heaters to the lowest temperature needed (110 – 120 F) to save energy.

[b] Insulate water heaters
Install insulation blankets on water heaters made before 2002. Insulate the first three feet of the hot water pipe out of the heater in all units. Consider insulating all hot water pipes, which saves energy and allows hot water to reach the tap more quickly.

No 6
[a] Water Audit

Get a Water Audit

____________________________________________

[c] Consider a “tankless” water heater
Consider purchasing a “tankless” water heater to reduce energy use. When purchasing a new water heater, choose the most efficient model possible.
Stewardship Step

Have a professional conduct a comprehensive water audit of existing facilities in order to detect all leaks and make recommendations customized to each facility‟s specific needs. Implement all recommendations.
Stewardship Step

No 5

New Construction

Opportunities

No 7

____________________________________________
[a] Choose water efficient equipment
Take advantage of renovations and construction projects to choose water-efficient fixtures, toilets and appliances. Choose WaterSense-labeled products where possible.

Increase Awareness

____________________________________________
[a] Post signs for employees and guests
Post signs in the kitchen, bathrooms, and other areas where water is used to remind employees to conserve water. Once employees are made more aware of their water use, consumption usually decreases.

[b] Consider greywater systems
Greywater and rainwater collection systems are more complex than simply installing rainbarrels, and should be considered for new construction projects. Greywater is any used water that has not been mixed with food or used in toilet facilities. This water, while

[b] Create a water conservation policy
Formalize the Archdiocese‟ water conservation efforts in a written policy with quantitative targets.

Page

33

Regularly report progress to employees, solicit feedback, and celebrate successes.

[c] Notify vendors
Notify vendors, especially groundskeepers and janitorial companies, that water conservation and protecting water quality is important to the Archdiocese. Ask them to report how they are supporting water conservation, and formalize any new Archdiocese environmental policies in their contract language. (See section 4.6, purchasing)

DID YOU KNOW ? :

RAIN GARDENS ARE GARDENS DESIGNED TO
CATCH STORMWATER THAT RUNS OFF OF DRIVEWAYS , DOWNSPOUTS , PARKING LOTS OR ROADS, AND TYPICALLY USE NATIVE PLANTS WITH DEEP ROOTS .

RAIN GARDENS
POLLUTION

ARE PRETTY WITH A

[d] Support water conservation throughout the Archdiocese
Use outreach and education tools to educate parishes, schools, employees, parishioners and the community about the importance of water conservation and protecting water quality. Communicate the stewardship steps they can take at work and in their own facilities and homes. (See section 4.7, Communication and outreach)

PURPOSE . THEY WORK TO SLOW AND FILTER RAINWATER BEFORE IT ENTERS LOCAL WATERWAYS, HELPING TO REDUCE NON - POINT SOURCE WATER

( N ON - POINT SOURCE POLLUTION )

Sources of Information:
(Environmental Guide for Congregations, Household Water Efficiency, Lawn Watering Tips, Non-Point Source Pollution, Putting Energy Into Stewardship, Sustainable Event Planning Guide, Water Conservation, Water Conservation - GreenBiz.com, Water Conservation Tips, EPA WaterSense).
See “Works Cited” for complete citations.

ADDITIONAL W ATER R ESOURCES:
EPA WATERS ENSE P ROGRAM : HTTP :// WWW. EPA .GOV/ OWM / WATER- EFFICIENCY EPA WATER E FFICIENCY TIPS FOR BUSINESS : HTTP :// WWW . EPA .GOV / OWM/ WATER EFFICIENCY / PUBS/ BUSINESS .HTM

INDIANAPOLIS W ATER : HTTP:// WWW .INDIANAPOLISWATER . COM INDIANAPOLIS CLEAN STREAM TEAM B USINESS R ESOURCES :
HTTP :// WWW . INDYGOV .ORG/ E GOV /C ITY /DPW/E NVIRONMENT /CLEAN S TREAM /HELP /B USINESSES / HOME. HTM

A MERICAN W ATERWORKS A SSOCIATION : HTTP:// WWW . AWWA. ORG/ AWWA WATERWISER WEBSITE : HTTP :// WWW .WATERWISER .ORG/ O UR WATER , O UR WORLD (INTEGRATED PEST M ANAGEMENT RESOURCE):
HTTP :// WWW .OURWATEROURWORLD .ORG/

UNESCO W ATER FOOTPRINT CALCULATOR : HTTP:// WWW . WATERFOOTPRINT .ORG T HE US WATER M ONITOR WEBSITE : HTTP:// WATERMONITOR. GOV

Page

34

4.3.

Waste

The average American produces 4.5 pounds of trash every day, up from the 2.6 pounds we each produced in 1960. With more Americans producing more waste, there has been a nearly 300% increase in U.S. garbage over the past 50 years – 230 million annual tons by

C ATHOLIC C ENTER WASTE :
Trash is collected two times per week from a large 2-yard container. Trash is then incinerated or sent to a local landfill. Recycling is collected two times per month in 45 gallon tubs. (John Wahl)
Congregations)

2003. Our waste doesn‟t vanish when we are finished with it. Over half ends up in a landfill, and the rest is incinerated, composted or recycled. Incineration and landfilling contribute to air and water pollution – most directly affecting those who live closest to these facilities (Environmental Guide for Congregations). Every organization can take steps to significantly reduce the waste it produces. The best way to reduce solid

waste is to avoid creating it in the first place. This means purchasing more thoughtfully, reducing waste, repairing and reusing products instead of throwing them away, and recycling where possible (Green Action
Guide).

Taking a proactive approach to waste prevention has many benefits. Significant cost savings can result from choosing durable and reusable products, repairing equipment rather than discarding it, using less of items such as office paper, and being conscious not to purchase more of an item than is needed (Environmentally

Preferable

Purchasing).

Significant

energy

savings results from recycling products, and from using fewer goods in the first place. The environmental benefits of waste reduction are also significant. They include producing less air and water pollution, consuming fewer natural resources, helping to preserve biodiversity, and producing less global warming pollution. Global warming pollution is affected by waste prevention both directly – through the methane generated from the organic waste in landfills – and indirectly - from the embodied

D ID YOU KNOW ?:
The earth‟s natural resources are being used up faster than they can be replaced, and the US is a major contributor to the problem. Americans account for only 5% of the world‟s population, yet consume 33% of the world‟s natural resources.

energy needed to produce and transport each product consumed (The Climate Action Plan). Finally, waste reduction has public health benefits as toxins associated with air and water pollution are reduced. This section outlines the steps which the Archdiocese can take to reduce the amount of waste it produces, reuse materials, recycle those resources headed for final disposal, and empower others to do the same.

(Green Action Guide)

Recommendations are presented as “Stewardship Steps”, or sets of related actions. While not all recommendations can be implemented at once, Section 6 outlines a recommended implementation strategy. Those steps which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with the green target symbol:

Page

35

Stewardship Step

No 1
[a] Implement an Purchasing Program

Prevent Waste
Environmentally Preferable

Stewardship Step

____________________________________________

No 2
___________________________________________
[a] Reduce Paper Use
If the United States cut office paper use by just 10% it would prevent the emission of 1.6 million tons of greenhouse gases -- the equivalent of taking 280,000 cars off the road. There are many simple steps the Archdiocese can take to reduce paper use by 10% and more.

Waste prevention starts with conscientious purchasing practices. After all, everything that ends up in the Archdiocese‟ trash is likely something that the Archdiocese bought in the first place. Buy reusable and durable products instead of disposable ones to reduce waste, lower costs, and support other environmental goals. (See section 4.6 Purchasing).

 Educate employees about how they can reduce

[b] Foster a waste prevention ethic
Challenge employees to consume less, share resources such as newspapers and magazines instead of buying multiple copies, and purchase only what is necessary to complete a project or achieve a particular goal. Set up an “extra supply” closet so that extra office supplies and equipment can easily be shared among departments. (See section 4.6 for more information on green purchasing policies).

paper waste:
o Print and copy only what is needed. Proof read
documents on screen, and preview documents before printing. Use the print preview function to spot errors before you print. If only a few pages of the document are needed, print only those pages instead of the whole report. Consider sharing documents with co-workers when possible. Print only the number of copies needed for a meeting, and don‟t make extras. (IS is

Did you know?:
You can save up to 20% on your paper use by changing 3 default settings on your documents: o Change default margins from 1 inch to 0.9 inch. This is hardly noticeable and makes the document about 10% shorter. o Use a compact font such as Times New Roman and reduce the default size to 11.5 points. This decreases the document length by about 5%

currently implementing an initiative to better enable electronic proofreading. See Appendix D).
o Use central printers and make double-sided copies. All employees have access to centrallylocated copiers on each floor which print and copy double-sided in a secure environment, and also scan documents that can be securely emailed. These copiers should be always be used by employees in order to minimize paper, energy, and printing costs. Training is available to all employees on how to use copiers. Consider removing inefficient printers.

o Post or route internal memos announcements instead of printing them
o Use

and

o Change

the default line spacing from to 0.95, making the

single-spaced

document about 5% shorter. These changes are subtle and can be used for all drafts and many final documents. (E NVIRONMENTAL
GUIDE FOR CONGREGATIONS )

electronic communications whenever possible. (IS is currently working on several initiatives to improve capabilities for electronic communications. See Appendix D).

o Offer reports and publications on CD. o Print forms only on demand so they don‟t become outdated before use. o Set default margin and font to fit more words on a page. Change your default margins from

Page

36

1.25" to 1" and use a space-efficient font like Times New Roman. This, alone, can reduce the amount of paper you use by up to 8%. o Create an electronic filing system and store information on computer disks to minimize printing needs or create a central filing system to avoid duplication. o Send and receive faxes electronically o Use laptops, overheads or chalkboards for presentations instead of handouts.

o

Reduce the use of plastic bottles by using
pitchers of water with glassware for meetings and offering bulk water dispensers.

[b] Reduce mail waste
Last year the Archdiocese spent $167,000 on postage. By one estimate, this represents 1.3 tons of paper in outgoing mail. In addition to using electronic communications whenever possible, the o

Encourage employees to bring their own mug
or cup for drinks and to bring their lunch in reusable containers. Stock the kitchen with dishwashing supplies and provide space for employee dishware to support their efforts.

Archdiocese can reduce its postage and paper use by asking employees to take the following steps:
o

Print addresses directly on envelopes instead
of using labels

o

Provide mugs and glassware for guests. Set up
a washing system for guest glassware whereby staff volunteer sign up to “do the dishes” 1 day a month. Keep an updated sign over the sink indicating the money saved on Styrofoam cups since the program began.

o

Don‟t do double mailings to try to qualify for
bulk mailing rates.

o

Regularly

check

that

o

mailing lists are up-todate to avoid duplication
or sending unwanted materials.

Consider eliminating the use of Styrofoam cups and other disposable kitchen products
such as plates, bowls, and silverware. If elimination of all disposables is not possible, consider using biodegradable plates, bowls and cutlery and composting them.

o

Mail

items

in

the

smallest

possible

[d] Reduce maintenance waste
The waste associated with maintenance and janitorial services can be significant. Work to encourage staff and vendors to take the following steps: o

envelope or box. This will
also reduce postage costs.

Replace adsorbent use with reusable mops or
vacuums.

o

When mailing large documents, make sure they are printed double-sided with narrow margins. This will save on paper and postage
costs.

o

Use

washable

cleaning

cloths

instead

of

disposable cloths or paper cleaning products.

[c] Reduce Waste in the break room
Purchasing products that are later thrown away not only adds to the local landfill, but is like throwing away money. Purchase durable products for the break room, and encourage employees and guests to do the same.

o

Replace paper towels with air driers. If this is
not immediately possible, ensure that recycledcontent paper towels are purchased.

o

Use reusable air filters rather than disposable
for all air circulation systems.

Page

37

Stewardship Step

No 3

Repair, Reuse and Donate

o

repairs when feasible. Purchase reusable goods such as rechargeable
batteries, reusable furnace filters, and ceramic dishware. (See section 4.6 Purchasing).

____________________________________________
[a] Repair and refurbish
In addition to focusing on waste prevention and waste reduction, an important way to save money and keep valuable resources out of the waste stream is to take good care of materials and rely on preventative maintenance to extend the life of equipment. Items that are broken or worn out can be sent for repair or to be refurbished. This can make products like new, keeps them out of the landfill, and is much less expensive than buying a new item.

[c] Donate
Items that the Archdiocese can no longer use but that are in good condition can be donated to individuals, charities, or secondhand stores so that others have the opportunity to reuse them. Encourage employees to think before they throw things away, and take the following steps: o

Donate unused books, magazines and journals to local organizations, literacy
programs, hospitals, or schools

[b] Reuse
The next best way to keep unwanted items out of the trash is to find a way to reuse them. This is easy once the habit is formed, and saves money on buying new products. Ask employees to take the following steps: o Reuse Paper and Packaging. o Reuse single-sided paper for internal memos or scratch pads. o Reuse shredded paper or newspaper as packaging material. o Reuse file folders by applying new labels or for other projects. o Reuse boxes and packaging material. o Reuse manila envelopes for internal mail. o Keep bottles for reuse in the office. o

Donate old technology to a non-profit organization which can refurbish them for
others.

o

Donate old furniture, vehicles, and any usable goods.
Stewardship Step

No 4
[a] Evaluate and

Recycle

____________________________________________
strengthen office recycling

programs
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis currently has a recycling program in the Catholic Center for office paper, newspaper, aluminum cans, and plastics. Recyclables are collected in a central location on each floor of the Catholic Center, collected by Maintenance Services staff, and picked up every two weeks by Trinity Recycling. The program has been in place for at least the past 4 years (John Wahl,

o o
o o

Refill ink cartridges Reuse paper clips, rubber bands, and other office supplies Reuse working components of old electronics
such as keyboard, mouse, wires and cables.

Keep parts of discarded equipment for future

personal communication May 27, 2009).
At this time, the Archdiocese‟ recycling program should be evaluated and strengthened where possible. The following steps are recommended: o Document the environmental benefits of the program currently in place and share with employees, parishes and schools to celebrate success. o Build upon successes of current program by soliciting employee feedback on how the program might be improved and participation rate increased. Engage employees in implementing their suggestions.

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38

o Make recycling more convenient by providing
employee desk-side recycling bins, recycling bins in break rooms, and additional recycling bins on each floor. As a rule, a recycling bin should be offered next to each large trashcan as an alternative. If this is not possible, signage should be posted indicating where the nearest recycling bin can be located. o Review what materials are recycled. And consider expanding the formal recycling program to include additional plastics, cardboard, toner cartridges, batteries, electronics, and other waste.

o

Shop around for recycling rates and services
in order to ensure the Archdiocese is still getting the best services at the best rate. Look for vendors that will purchase certain materials if dropped off, and negotiate with vendors who are usually willing to be flexible. More recycling leads to less trash. Reevaluate your recycling and trash service needs annually.

Stewardship Step

No 5

Compost

____________________________________________
[a] Compost yard and food waste
25% of all municipal waste is organic matter such as yard waste and food. When landfilled, the anaerobic decomposition of this waste produces methane, a powerful green house gas. While methane at Indianapolis‟ landfill is captured and burned for energy, its capture is not 100%. Setting up a simple composting program can keep organic materials out of the landfill and produce a rich organic fertilizer for the lawn and landscaping. It also makes a great project to share with children at schools and parishes. Children like to contribute their own food scraps, watch how it decomposes over time, and then use it in a garden to grow food and plants that attract wildlife … and produce more waste for the compost pile.
Stewardship Step

o

Consider Abitibi. Explore placing an Abitibi
Paper Retriever recycling bin in the parking lot. It takes up very little space, will generate a small revenue stream, and encourages the community to become involved in the Archdiocese recycling efforts. Be willing to ask them to negotiate on terms.

o

Talk up your recycling program to employees.
Make sure bins are labeled and employees know what can be recycled where. Engage employees in measuring the program‟s success and keep it fun and rewarding.

[b] Recycle e-waste and other toxic materials
Electronics contain potentially harmful substances and should be kept out of the landfill where they can contaminate water supplies. Batteries, compact floursecent bulbs (CFLs) and other flourescent bulbs should also be disposed of properly to prevent mercury and other toxic substances from seeping into groundwater. Information Services currently recycles electronics through the City of Indianapolis ToxDrop program. It is recommended that all employees, agencies, parishes and schools be advised that CFLs, batteries, electronics and other toxic materials should be recycled through ToxDrop or a similar program.

No 6

Conduct a Waste Assessment

____________________________________________
[a] Waste Assessment
Have a staff member or professional conduct a comprehensive waste audit, in order to identify the types and amounts of items are thrown away at a particular facility. An audit can be performed by examining purchasing records, doing a facility walkthrough or examining and sorting waste. An audit will help target waste reduction goals and strategies as well as establish a baseline against which future progress can be measured.

[c] Recycle construction and demolition materials
When demolition and capital projects occur, every effort should be made to reuse, donate or recycle demolition and construction materials.

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39

Stewardship Step

No 7

Increase Awareness

and formalize any new Archdiocese environmental policies in their contract language. (See section 4.6, Purchasing)

____________________________________________
[a] Post signs for employees and guests
Post signs in the mail room, break room, near recycling bins and trash cans, and other areas with targeted messages reminding employees to reduce, reuse and recycle. (See section 4.7, Communication and Outreach)

[d] Support waste prevention, reduction and recycling throughout the Archdiocese
Use outreach and education tools to educate parishes, schools, employees, parishioners and the community about the importance of “reduce, reuse, recycle”. Communicate the stewardship steps they can take at work and in their own facilities and homes. (See section 4.7, Communication and Outreach).

[b]

Create

a

waste

reduction

policy

with

quantitative targets. Track and report progress to employees.
Formalize the Archdiocese‟ waste reduction efforts in a written policy with quantitative targets. Regularly report progress to employees and celebrate successes. Solicit feedback from employees on how waste reduction efforts can be strengthened. (See section 6, Next Steps)

Sources of Information:
(Green Action Guide, Sustainable Event Planning

Guide, WasteWise, The Climate Action Plan, US Mayor‟s Climate Action Handbook, Environmentally Preferable Purchasing, Green Business Initiative, SustainIndy, Portland Online, Earth 911.com, Environmental Guide for Congregations, Green IT for Dummies, Reduce Waste). See “Works Cited” for complete citations.

[c] Notify vendors
Notify vendors that waste prevention, reduction and recycling is important to the Archdiocese. Ask them report how they are supporting waste prevention,

WASTE RESOURCES:
INDIANAPOLIS RECYCLE AND R EUSE G UIDE : HTTP:// WWW. KIBI .ORG/ RECYCLE/ RECYCLE _ REUSE_ GUIDE . HTM INDIANAPOLIS RECYCLING PROGRAMS : HTTP :// WWW .SUSTAININDY .ORG / SOLID- WASTE - AND- RECYCLING . CFM INDIANAPOLIS TOX D ROP: HTTP :// WWW .SUSTAININDY .ORG / TOXDROP .CFM INDIANA R ECYCLING COALITION : HTTP :// WWW . INDIANARECYCLING .ORG / EPA WASTEWISE P ROGRAM : HTTP :// EPA .GOV/ WASTEWISE EPA R EDUCE , REUSE , RECYCLING P ROGRAM FOR B USINESS : HTTP :// WWW . EPA. GOV / EPAWASTE/ WYCD / OFFICE . HTM EPA S OURCE R EDUCTION P UBLICATIONS : HTTP :// WWW . EPA .GOV/ MSW/ SOURCPUB .HTM N ATIONAL R ECYCLING C OALITION : HTTP :// WWW .NRC- RECYCLE. ORG/ C OMMUNITY B ACKYARD COMPOSTING G UIDE:
HTTP :// WWW .BAE .NCSU . EDU/ TOPIC / VERMICOMPOSTING / PUBS / COMPOSTING .PDF

E ARTH 911 M ATERIAL R EUSE G UIDE : HTTP :// BUSINESS .EARTH 911. COM/ GREEN -GUIDES/ MATERIAL -REUSE/

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40

4.4.

Land Use
The loss and degradation of natural habitats worldwide are a significant threat to biodiversity (World Resources Institute). The way in which land is preserved, developed and managed as a resource also has significant environmental impacts related to energy use, waste generation, water and air quality and local wildlife (US Mayors Climate Action Handbook). Importantly, our connection with land also has a profound impact on the human spirit and quality of life. Green spaces – sometimes just a tree or small urban courtyard – are needed places to relax, recharge, and reconnect (Environmental Guide for Congregations). The Archdiocese of Indianapolis manages not only facilities, but

also a great deal of land – the lawns, gardens, and landscaping surrounding its buildings as well as numerous cemeteries across the state. Taking steps to reduce the environmental impact of traditional land management is an important way to care for the environment in addition to yielding other benefits, including:  Cost savings – Green land use practices can save money by reusing and reducing waste, reducing energy, fuel, and water use, and reducing or eliminating expensive pesticides and fertilizers.  Energy and fuel savings – Trees shade and help insulate buildings. Strategically planted, they can significantly reduce the energy needed to cool a building.  Environmental benefits – Eco-friendly land use has numerous direct and indirect environmental benefits including supporting local biodiversity; reducing waste, energy and fuel use and their associate climate change emissions; and protecting local air and water quality.  Public health benefits – Green land use practices reduce the amount of chemicals and toxins in the environment and help protect public health (GreenScapes, WasteWise, US Mayors,

Environmental Guide, Reduce.org, )
This section outlines the numerous steps the

F OR

YOU SHALL GO OUT IN JOY ,

Archdiocese empower Steps”, or

can others sets of

take to

to do

adopt the

more same. Not all

AND BE LED BACK IN PEACE; THE MOUNTAINS AND THE HILLS BEFORE YOU SHALL BURST INTO SONG , AND ALL THE TREES OF THE FIELD SHALL CLAP THEIR HANDS .

environmentally-friendly land use practices and Recommendations are presented as “Stewardship related actions. recommendations can be implemented at once. Section 6, “Next Steps” outlines a recommended implementation strategy, while steps which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with this green target symbol:

I NSTEAD OF THE THORN

SHALL COME UP THE CYPRESS ;

INSTEAD OF THE BRIER SHALL COME UP THE MYRTLE ; AND IT SHALL BE TO THE L ORD FOR A MEMORIAL , FOR AN EVERLASTING SIGN THAT SHALL NOT BE CUT OFF .

(I SAIAH 55:12-13)

Page

41

Stewardship Step

No 1

Manage Land for Water Conservation and Quality

o o o o

____________________________________________
[a] Adopt water-efficient irrigation practices
The Archdiocese does not irrigate its lawn at the Catholic spikes Center during the (John summer Wahl, months, personal however, communication). Water use at the Catholic Center indicating that some other seasonal water use may be taking place. Nonetheless, it is recommended that the Archdiocese review its irrigation policy with its vendor and formalize the policy in contract language. The following recommendations regarding waterefficient irrigation practices are offered: o Don‟t irrigate if possible, and never water your lawn or irrigate during times of drought. o Irrigate using collected rainwater if possible and use downspouts to distribute rainwater over the lawn and gardens to increase natural irrigation o Irrigate in the early morning or during the coolest part of the day. Don't water on windy days. o Set sprinkler systems to water the lawn or garden only – not the sidewalk or street.

Install moisture sensors on sprinkler systems. Use soaker hoses or trickle irrigation systems if possible. Regularly check for and repair all leaks in the irrigation system Aerate lawn regularly to improve water penetration

[b] Adopt water-friendly mowing practices
The Archdiocese has already adopted water-friendly mowing practice by mowing the grass at 3 ½ inches and leaving clippings (John Wahl, personal communication). It is recommended that the positive environmental impact of this practice be shared with employees, and that the policy be formalized in contract language with the vendor. The following recommendation regarding waterfriendly mowing practices is offered: o Mow at 3 inches with a mulching mower and leave clippings in place. Lawn clipping provide nutrients for the lawn, reduce the chance of soil erosion, and keep organic waste out of the landfill where it produces methane gas, a potent greenhouse gas.

[c] Use mulch
Mulch around trees, shrubs, and in landscaping beds to conserve water by allowing water to absorb better and reduce evaporation. Mulch also protects water quality by covering bare soil. Dirt which is not covered by plants can more easily erode during a rainstorm, polluting local water. Consider using leaves, grass clippings or other vegetative material for mulch, which will eventually self-compost and act as an organic fertilizer.

[d] Apply compost
Compost is a great fertilizer and retains moisture in the soil – helping to conserve water. Additionally, finding another use for your organic waste through composting helps reduce waste and greenhouse gas emissions and is a healthy alternative to commercial fertilizers – further helping to preserve water quality. Compost can be applied in landscaping beds and to top-dress lawns. Collect all yard waste except grass clippings to be composted and reused. Limbs and wood waste can be chipped and used for mulch.

[e] Create water-efficient landscaping
Use native plant species in your landscaping, which are appropriate for the climate and require less water. Consider xeriscaping - landscaping with

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42

native plants which requires very little or no water to maintain.

[f] Landscape to reduce storm water runoff and attract wildlife
Landscape to encourage water to run into the ground rather than neighboring streets, sidewalks and storm sewers. This reduces non-point source pollution, helps protect local water quality, and keeps water out of Indianapolis‟ combined sewer system which overflows raw sewage into local streams during heavy rains. o Plant and properly maintain trees. Plant trees around parking lots and buildings. Trees reduce stormwater runoff and support water quality. They can also reduce energy use by shading buildings when planted in strategic sites, improve local air quality, and help to remove global warming pollutants from the atmosphere. Maintain trees with regular, correct pruning. Never “top” trees (cut the tips off of main branches), which shortens tree life. o Install a rain garden. Rain gardens are landscaped areas that are designed to infiltrate rainwater. These gardens collect rainwater runoff, filter it and then slowly release it into the ground - helping reduce soil erosion and local water pollution. Rain gardens are typically landscaped with deep-rooted native plants and can attract local wildlife. They make excellent learning resources at schools. Making a rain garden is not difficult, and there are many readily available resources to assist. o Plant a prairie. Larger land areas can be seeded with native prairie plants or grasses. These deep-rooted plants help water infiltrate on-site, protecting water quality, and also require very

Butler University Prairie – www.butler.edu

little mowing, maintenance or watering – further helping to conserve water and protect air quality from lawn mower emissions. Prairies, which can also be planted in relatively small urban areas, attract local wild life, are pleasant greenspaces, and can serve as excellent education tools when planted on school grounds. o Create riparian buffers. Plant dense strips of native trees, shrubs and groundcovers next to streams, lakes and ditches. In order to protect water quality, lawn should not reach to the edge of a body of water. Instead, a riparian buffer should be created to stabilize the soil and to slow and filter run-off.

[g] Sweep sidewalks
Clean outdoor sidewalks and walkways with a broom rather than hose.

[h] Protect driplines
In facilities without gutters, spread gravel or plant grass under the dripline to prevent soil erosion and better allow for water infiltration.

[i] Eliminate or reduce fertilizer and pesticide use
Protect local water quality by eliminating or reducing the use of fertilizers and pesticides. Utilize an Integrated Pest Management system to minimize chemical use, and use native plants and apply compost to further reduce the need for fertilizer and pesticide use. Whenever possible use organic, biobased, or slow release fertilizers and biopesticides instead of conventional pesticides. Spot treat whenever possible and purchase only the amount of fertilizers and pesticides you need and can use for a specific treatment. Dispose of all unused fertilizers and pesticides properly.
Indianapolis Cultural Trail – www.indyculturaltrail.org

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43

Stewardship Step

No 2

Manage Land for Waste Reduction

o

____________________________________________
[a] Reduce maintenance needs
Adopting land use practices that reduce the need for landscaping and lawn maintenance also reduces waste. The following recommendations are offered to reduce grounds maintenance needs: o Select slow-growing native species that require little maintenance. o Minimize site and soil disruptions whenever possible. o Cluster buildings and structures to maximize open space and minimize the need for formal landscaping beds. o Keep as much natural area as possible – minimize lawn areas.

o

lumber for outdoor benches, signs and decks. Consider using rubberized asphalt, which incorporates recycled tires, for walking and running paths. Use landscaping edging made with recycled plastic.

[b] Use durable, recycled products
Purchase items that will last longer for outside use. Whenever possible, use recycled materials. o Use durable plastic lumber made from recycled bottles and bags rather than pressure treated

Recycled plastic picnic table – www.britichrecycledplastic.co.uk

o

When using concrete, specify high-performance concrete which is much more durable and can contain fly ash from trash incinerators and other recycled materials.

[c] Reuse and Recycle unneeded items
Whenever possible, reuse unneeded items to keep them out of the waste stream: o Return wooden pallets whenever possible. The wood from non-returnable products can be reused for other purposed or chipped for mulch o When replacing an outdoor structure, take it apart to reuse or recycle all possible materials such as metal, wood, shingles, concrete, or pavement. o When reconfiguring landscaping or removing trees and shrubs from facility grounds, healthy plants can be given to employees or an organization that can use them. o When moving soil, reuse it on the grounds. Creating berms or mounds adds visual interest to landscaping and can serve as a windbreak. o Recycle bedding trays, plant containers, and all other recyclables.

[e] Reclaim land
o Whenever possible, reclaim wasteland and turn it into a valuable natural area such as prairie, wetland or forest which support air and water quality goals while attracting local wildlife and providing a valuable greenspace for employees and the community to enjoy.

Low maintenance landscaping

www.louisvilleky.gov

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44

Stewardship Step

No 3

Adopt Energy Reduction Practices

Stewardship Step

No 4

Connect with Nature

____________________________________________ ____________________________________________
[a] Reduce facility energy needs
Strategically plant trees and other vegetation outside and around buildings to maximize shade and insulation, reducing indoor heating and cooling needs. Protect trees and other vegetation during construction. Replace any trees that are damaged or removed.

[a] Garden for wildlife
Whenever possible, make land use choices that attract and support local wildlife and biodiversity. Planting native species, preserving open space and natural areas, and creating rain gardens and prairie plantings all help maintain local biodiversity. They also directly work to improve air and water quality, improving the environment for all of us.

[b] Reduce emissions
o Use hand or electric tools and equipment whenever possible to reduce emissions. Consider using electric lawn mowers, or reel lawn mowers for small areas. Perform regular equipment maintenance to reduce emissions and increase efficiency. Use solar powered or high-efficiency lighting for illuminating walkways, parking lots and outdoor signs

[b] Encourage employees to connect with nature
Being in natural spaces helps people to relax, recharge, and reconnect. Providing simple greenspaces such as a small courtyard with a bench, flowers and a bird feeder can improve employee health and well being. Creating pleasant natural spaces in a hectic urban environment or helping to create a raingardens, prairie plantings or native plant landscaping that attract wildlife can be an enjoyable project that helps coworkers connect with nature and each other. Encourage employees to bring green plants into the office. It helps improve indoor air quality and provides a daily connection with nature.

o o

[c] Minimize use of fuel and petroleum products
Use biobased fuels and lubricants for equipment whenever possible.

Sources of Information:
(World Resources Institute, RMI, Water

[c] Review cemetery land use practices
Flanner and Buchanan performs the day-to-day maintenance of Archdiocese cemeteries. Their land use policies are unknown (John Wahl, personal communication). The Archdiocese has a large amount of cemetery land, and the practices used in their management have a great impact on the environment. It is recommended that the Archdiocese become familiar with Flanner and Buchanan‟s standard land use practices and work with them to develop and implement environmentally-friendly land use policies.

Conservation, GreenScapes,

Lawn US

Watering Mayor‟s

Tips, Climate

Protection Handbook, Environmental Guide for Congregations, Reduce Waste). See
“Works Cited” for complete citations.

L AND U SE RESOURCES:
M ARION C OUNTY S OIL I NDIANA L OW -WATER
AND

WATER C ONSERVATION D ISTRICT : HTTP:// MARIONSWCD . ORG

LANDSCAPING FACTSHEET : HTTP :// WWW . INDYZOO . COM / PDF /X ERISCAPING . PDF

S USTAINABLE URBAN L ANDSCAPE I NFORMATION S ERIES (U

OF

M E XTENSION ): HTTP://WWW . SUSTLAND . UMN. EDU

I NTEGRATED P EST M ANAGEMENT R ESOURCES (M ICHIGAN STATE U NIVERSITY ): HTTP://WWW . IPM. MSU. EDU EPA GREEN S CAPES W EBSITE: EPA C OMPOSTING W EBSITE: I NTERNATIONAL
SOCIETY OF HTTP :// WWW . EPA . GOV / EPAWASTE / CONSERVE / RRR / GREENSCAPES / PUBS . HTM HTTP :// WWW . EPA . GOV / WASTE / CONSERVE /RRR /COMPOSTING / INDEX . HTM

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45

A RBORICULTURE : HTTP://WWW . ISA- ARBOR .COM

4.5.

Transportation and Travel

Transportation and business travel are major contributors to air pollution and global climate change. 20% of US greenhouse gas emissions come from cars – 350 million tons in 2003 (Environmental

Guide for Congregations). The Archdiocese of Indianapolis, alone,
contributes an average of 15.6 tons of CO2 per month from reimbursed miles driven, and spent over $500,000 last year on business travel. This represents a major environmental impact from car and airplane emissions, hotel water and energy use, and waste produced at business meetings and conferences (Environmentally Responsible Business Travel). Numerous tools are available to reduce the Archdiocese‟ transportation-related impact on the local and global environment. Proactively working to reduce workrelated travel and employee commutes while encouraging more efficient and environmentally-friendly forms of travel not only reduces global warming pollution and protects local air quality, but can also result in significant cost savings. If just 5% of the $530,863 spent on Archdiocese travel last year, for example, is saved through efficiencies and alternatives the resulting cost savings is over $26,000. Taking steps to reduce car and business travel also benefits public cities health in and the local economy. Many Indiana, including

DID YOU KNOW?
T HE
TRANSPORTATION SECTOR IS ONE OF THE LARGEST SOURCES OF U.S. CARBON EMISSIONS , AN IMPORTANT GLOBAL WARMING POLLUTANT . POOR INDIVIDUALS AND NATIONS , THOSE LEAST ABLE TO RESPOND , ARE THE ONES MOST AFFECTED BY GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE .

(US M AYOR ‟ S CLIMATE P ROTECTION H ANDBOOK ) CATHOLICCLIMATECOVENANT . ORG )

Indianapolis, are designated “non-attainment” cities by the EPA for compliance with the Clean Air Act. This designation puts restrictions on local economic development and poor local air quality contributes to juvenile asthma and other health problems (Green Action Guide, Environmental Guide for Congregations, US

Mayor‟s Climate Protection Handbook, Central Indiana Clean Air Partnership).
This section outlines the many steps the Archdiocese can take to reduce travel, transition to more environmentally-friendly forms of travel, and empower others to do the same. Recommendations are presented as “Stewardship Steps”, or sets of related actions. Not all recommendations can be implemented at once. Section 6, “Next Steps” outlines a recommended implementation strategy, while steps which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with this green target symbol:

DID YOU KNOW ? :
F UEL
EFFICIENCY IS REDUCED 1% FOR EVERY 3 PSI THAT TIRES ARE UNDER - INFLATED . I T IS ESTIMATED THAT 1.2 BILLION GALLONS OF FUEL WERE WASTED IN 2005 AS A RESULT OF DRIVING ON UNDERINFLATED TIRES .

US D EPARTMENT

OF

E NERGY

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46

Stewardship Step

No 1

Reduce Miles Traveled

____________________________________________
Last year the Archdiocese of Indianapolis spent $209,000 to reimburse employee mileage and nearly $11,000 on fuel costs for the 12 vehicles it owns. Working to reduce the total miles driven for Archdiocese business will save significant costs and reduce harmful air and global warming emissions.

surrounding neighborhood. Consider keeping a couple of bicycles on-site that can be borrowed by employees for meetings, and make the workplace bike-friendly by providing bike racks or other storage, and a shower facility if possible.

[a] Challenge employees to drive less
Launch a “drive less” campaign aimed at: (1) educating employees about the environmental and cost impacts of their car travel on behalf of the Archdiocese, (2) providing information and tools to reduce driving, and (3) challenging employees to reduce the miles they drive by 10% or more, whether they are driving Archdiocese-owned vehicles or their own cars on Archdiocese business. Institute a system to track miles traveled, report progress on reduced driving, and celebrate achievements. Many tools are available to reduce the miles traveled for Archdiocese business. Share the following

o

mileage reduction tips with employees:
o Walk or bike. Encourage employees to walk or bike to close destinations instead of driving. Provide maps to common walking/biking destinations and emphasize that walking or biking cuts fuel costs, is good for the environment, improves health, and enables employees to connect with the

o

D ID YOU KNOW ?
A CCORDING
TO THE

Use public transport. Encourage employees to use IndyGo instead of driving whenever possible. Ensure that bus fare is included as a reimbursable expense, and share this information with employees. Provide employees with clear instructions on how to use the IndyGo system, and route maps for common destinations. Have a “bus day”, hosting field trips with groups of employees traveling to common destinations so that employees become more familiar and comfortable with the bus system. Share Rides Encourage employees to share rides to common destinations whenever possible. Set up a common calendar or other system whereby employees can post their travel needs and find ways to share transportation. Plan trips Encourage employees to plan their trips so they can link several meeting or errands together rather than making a separate trip for each travel need. Encourage employees to think before driving: Do I really need to make this trip? Can I walk, bike, ride the bus, or share a ride instead? Can I combine it with another trip later?

A MERICAN A UTOMOBILE 54.0
CENTS PER

o

A SSOCIATION ,

IT COSTS AN AVERAGE OF

MILE TO OPERATE A CAR

-

INCLUDING GASOLINE ,

MAINTENANCE, INSURANCE , AND DEPRECIATION

(C ENTRAL I NDIANA C OMMUTER S ERVICES ).

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47

Stewardship Step

No 2

Reduce emissions

____________________________________________
In addition to reducing the total number of miles driven, fuel use and air pollution can also be reduced by taking simple steps to “drive smart.” Small changes in driving habits add up and can improve fuel efficiency by one third. The following guidelines can help significantly reduce the Archdiocese‟ contribution to air pollution, in addition to saving on fuel costs for Archdiocese-owned vehicles. Share

On the highway drive the speed limit, use cruise control, and use air conditioning to reduce air resistance and improve gas mileage. (When driving under 40 mph it is better to roll the windows down to cool off). Drive in overdrive when possible to reduce engine speed, conserve fuel and reduce emissions.

[b] Don‟t idle
Idling gets you nowhere. An idling vehicle gets 0 mph, wastes costly fuel and contributes to greenhouse gas emissions, local air pollution, and public health issues such as asthma. o Limit warm-up Cars warm up faster when they are moving. Limit how long you idle your car to warm up – even on cold mornings - to 30 to 45 seconds. It is not necessary for vehicle performance, and burns costly fuel. o Avoid drive-thru windows and heavy traffic Vehicles idle unnecessarily in drive-thru windows and heavy traffic. Choose to park your car and go inside – lines are often shorter, getting you on your way more quickly. If possible, avoid rush hour traffic. Leaving a bit earlier or later, or taking a less-traveled route can save gasoline and time. Turn off car when waiting or stuck in traffic Idling your engine for more than 30 seconds burns more gasoline than it takes to restart the engine. Turn off the engine whenever you are stopped for longer than half a minute. Adopting a “no idling” policy Consider adopting a formal “no idling” policy for Archdioceseowned vehicles and cars driven for Archdiocese business. “No idling” policies can lead to significant cost-savings for Archdiocese-owned vehicles and contribute to improved local air quality. Establish “no idling” zones Consider establishing posted “no idling” zones near drop-off and loading areas of Archdiocese facilities. No idling zones help to educate others, reduce localized air pollution – especially important in areas with children – and show the Archdiocese‟ commitment to protecting the environment.

the following emissions reduction tips with employees:
[a] Increase fuel efficiency when driving
Adhering to the following “eco-driving” guidelines will save on fuel use and air pollution. o Unload extra weight Carrying extra weight in your car lowers fuel efficiency unnecessarily. Remove unneeded or forgotten items, and reduce drag by removing ski racks and roof-top carriers when they are not being used. o Use correct tire pressure Invest in a tire pressure gauge and make it a habit to check your tire pressure every time you fuel up. Underinflated tires work harder and reduce fuel efficiency. Gas mileage can improve by about 3% just by keeping tires properly inflated. o Perform regular maintenance Perform regular, preventative maintenance on your vehicle. Regular maintenance, tuneups, and oil changes improve gas mileage and can reduce emissions by more than half. Use the recommended motor oil and replace air filters regularly. Regular maintenance also reduces waste by extending the life of your vehicle. o Drive conservatively Aggressive driving practices such as exceeding the speed limit, “reving” the engine, and accelerating quickly can significantly reduce fuel efficiency. Accelerate slowly and smoothly, and obey the speed limit. Driving at 75 mph uses 30 percent more fuel than driving 55 mpg. Practice eco-driving on the highway

o

o

o

o

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48

[c] Prevent other emissions
Vehicle-related air pollution can occur even when the car is turned off. Gasoline fumes react with pollutants, creating ground-level ozone and smog.

Stewardship Step

No 3

Green the Commute

Help lessen pollution from gasoline fumes by following these tips:
o Don‟t top off the tank “Topping off” the gas tank allows gasoline fumes to escape and contribute to air pollution. o Tighten your gas cap Gasoline evaporates easily and contributes to air pollution. As much as 30 gallons of gasoline per year can evaporate when a gas cap is not fully tightened. o Fuel up when its cool During the summer months, think ahead and plan to fuel up during cooler parts of the day early in the morning or in the evening. This helps prevent gasoline fumes from heating up and creating smog. o Maintain air conditioning system professionally Air conditioning refrigerants are potent global warming pollutants. Repair air conditioning leaks immediately, and have your air conditioning system professionally maintained by a service that recovers and recycles the refrigerant rather than releasing it into the atmosphere.

____________________________________________
Nearly 25% of all car trips that Americans take are to and from work, making a significant contribution to air pollution and global climate change. With nearly 6,000 employees across Indiana, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has a significant environmental impact related to the employee commute – and a significant opportunity to reduce that impact.

[a] Encourage and enable employees to green their commute:
o Utilize tools from Central Indiana Commuter Services (CICS) The Archdiocese of Indianapolis is a participating employer in Central Indiana Commuter Services (CICS) (www.centralincommuter.net). Proactively educate employees about the numerous tools available to them through CICS to green their commute - including carpool/vanpool services, and emergency rides home for registered commuters using any alternative form of transportation. Recognize and celebrate those employees who use alternative forms of transportation to get to work. o Carpool/Vanpool Encourage employees to carpool or vanpool to work. Central Indiana Commuter Services (CICS) offers carpool and vanpool services to central Indiana commuters, and will provide an “emergency ride home” (a free taxi ride home in case of emergency) to registered Archdiocese employee commuters if needed. Consider creating an Archdiocese-sponsored carpool program depending upon future employee interest and need. Consider creating one or more “green transit” parking spaces in a prime location reserved for carpools and hybrid vehicles. Recognize employees who carpool or vanpool to work. Walk or bike Encourage employees to walk or bike to work, and remind them that bike racks are available on IndyGo buses. Make the workplace bike-friendly by providing bike racks or other bike storage, and a shower facility if possible. Encourage employees to participate in Indianapolis‟ annual bike-to-work day (www.pedalandpark.org/bike2work.htm), and, consider sponsoring an Archdiocese bike-to-

o

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49

work day. Encourage employees to become registered bikers with CICS in order to qualify for an emergency ride home if needed. Recognize employees who walk or bike to work. o Public transport Encourage employees to take public transit to work. The Catholic Center is located on a bus line and taking an IndyGo bus is a convenient and affordable way to get to work. Provide employees with information on IndyGo routes and commuting services and encourage them to become registered commuters with CICS in order to qualify for an emergency ride home if needed. For facilities that are not on a transit line, consider providing shuttle transportation from transit sites in the morning and afternoon. Offer commuter incentives The IRS allows employers to offer tax-free commuter benefits designed to act as financial incentives to encourage the use of public transit and vanpools. These benefits are under Qualified Transportation Fringe Benefits provisions, and can be provided as employer-paid (a direct commute subsidy, on which the employee pays no taxes), employee-paid (employee pays no taxes on transit or vanpool commute expenses), or as a tax-free shared expense. Consider offering a “parking space cash-out option” for employees working at facilities where parking is paid. This benefit would allow employees to give up their paid parking space in exchange for taxfree commuter benefits of the same value. Offer flextime/telecommuting The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has a compressed 4-day work week for employees at the Catholic Center and Xavier Building. This policy, alone, cuts the environmental impact of the employee commute by 20%. Consider adopting a formal telecommuting and flextime policy aimed at reducing commute-related environmental impacts even further. When feasible, allowing employees to work from home, and/or schedule their hours to avoid rush hour traffic reduces both the number of commute miles, and emissions produced when waiting in heavy traffic.

o

Provide commute-planning support

Offer employees support in planning their commute by providing maps and transit route and schedule information and other services to facilitate the use of commute alternatives and mitigate the impacts of road construction. Consider offering employees access to real-time commuter services such traffic congestion, accident and weather information to aid in daily route planning.

o

o

Stewardship Step

No 4

Purchase ecofriendly cars

____________________________________________
[a] Make green purchasing decisions
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis currently owns 12 cars and insures over 167 cars throughout the Archdiocese. When cars need to be replaced, take their future fuel and environmental costs into account by considering their total life-cycle cost. Purchase the smallest, most fuel-efficient car for the purpose of the vehicle. Encourage parishes, schools,

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50

Stewardship Step

employees and parishioners to do the same by providing targeted information on environmental and cost impacts, along with up-to-date tools for selecting the right green vehicle for its intended purpose. Information on efficient car models, technology, and alternative fuels change quickly. Before making a purchasing decision, research up-to-date alternatives through the US EPA‟s comprehensive Green Vehicle Guide (www.epa.gov/greenvehicles). Alternatives include fuel-efficient gas-powered vehicles, clean diesel vehicles, hybrid and electric cars, and cars that run on alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG), ethanol, propane, pseries fuel, and biodiesel (which can be produced from used cooking oil). New technologies such as plug-in hybrid vehicles and fuel cell vehicles are likely to be commercially available in the next few years.

No 5

Reduce Business Travel

____________________________________________
[a] Use electronic communication
Reduce business travel by using teleconferencing, internet communications such as skype, or web conferencing whenever possible. While this will not completely replace the need for face-to-face meetings, these forms of electronic communication can be highly effective when meeting attendees have met previously and are in groups smaller than 10. You can share access to computer screens, see reactions through web cams and easily add new

D ID YOU KNOW ?
T HE
BY NUMBER OF MILES DRIVEN EACH DAY HAS INCREASED PERCENT SINCE

[b] Retire older, inefficient or underused cars
Consider retiring older, inefficient, or under-used vehicles and replacing them with less-polluting models. This may be the time to invest – car prices are currently quite competitive and the federal government has recently launched a new Car Allowance Rebate System (or “Cash for Clunkers” program) granting a $3,500 - $4,500 credit on new, efficient vehicles when an older, inefficient model is traded in. It is recommended that the Archdiocese investigate if it has vehicles that could be eligible under the program. More information can be found at: www.cars.gov.

70

1980. I NCREASED

TRAFFIC

CONGESTION COSTS

6.8

BILLION WASTED GALLONS OF FUEL

EACH YEAR NATIONWIDE .

(www.indycicap.org)

people to meetings. These forms of electronic communications can also be used to facilitate telecommuting. It is recommended that Information Services evaluate and choose electronic communications systems options. One electronic communications systems are identified, information should be shared with employees and a training system implemented. Include call-in information on all meeting requests.

[b] Formalize the travel-approval process
Human Resources is currently in the process of formulating and implementing a formal policy and process for approving business travel. This will have an important impact in reducing business travel that may not be necessary, and in seeking alternatives such as inviting a speaker to the Archdiocese rather than sending multiple employees to hear the same speaker. It is recommended that this process incorporate a formal mechanism to determine if electronic communication is a viable alternative, and then work with Information Services to provide and train employees in the use of the chosen technology.

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Stewardship Step

Stewardship Step

No 6

Green Business Travel

No 7

Formalize Practices

____________________________________________
[a] Use environmentally-friendly services
When business travel is necessary choose airlines, hotels and conference centers that have adopted environmentally responsible practices whenever possible.

____________________________________________
[a] Create and implement a Green Fleet Policy
Formalize green transportation practices in an Archdiocese Green Fleet Policy which clearly communicates procedures and expectations to employees regarding mileage and emissions reductions, commute alternative incentives, and green vehicle purchasing. Establish a travel-related emissions baseline, formulate quantitative reductions goals, track and report progress, recognize individual efforts, and celebrate successes.

[b] Choose green rental cars
When renting a car for business travel, choose the smallest, most fuel efficient model available. Some rental car companies offer hybrid vehicles and other eco-friendly options.

[c] Let companies know your preferences
Businesses are responsive to their guests. Let companies you use for business travel know your preferences, compliments, and comments about their environmental performance.

[b] Incorporate environmental considerations into business travel policy Business travel policies and
procedures are currently being developed by the Archdiocese Human Resources office. It is recommended that environmental considerations related to business travel be incorporated into the final policy and clearly communicated to employees

Stewardship Step

No 8
Stewardship Step

Offset Carbon

____________________________________________
[a] Offset Carbon
After travel has been reduced as much as possible, there will still be carbon emissions associated with Archdiocese travel. Consider purchasing carbon offsets to “neutralize” these emissions, making the Archdiocese travel clean and green.
(See Section 4.1 for more information on Carbon Offsets)

No 7

Sources of Information:
(Green Action Guide, Greening Fleets, US

[d] Plan green meetings
When hosting an event, look for opportunities to use electronic forms of communication whenever possible, use double-sided printing for handouts and promotional materials, provide recycling, minimize disposables and promote the use of public transportation.

Mayor‟s Manual, for

Climate

Protection

Handbook, Green Earth

New Energy for Cities, The EcoDriver‟s Commuter Choice, Green IT, Business Initiative, Environmental Guide Congregations, 911.com for Business, Central Indiana Clean Air Partnership, Reduce Waste). See “Works Cited” for complete citations.

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TRANSPORTATION RESOURCES:
EPA G REEN V EHICLE G UIDE:
HTTP :// WWW . EPA . GOV / GREENVEHICLE / TO

E NVIRONMENTAL D EFENSE F UND G UIDE

GREENER C ORPORATE F LEETS:

HTTP :// WWW . EDF . ORG / DOCUMENTS /8697_G REEN F LEET _ EDF . PDF

DOE A LTERNATIVE F UELS E CO DRIVING USA:

AND

A DVANCED V EHICLES DATA C ENTER :

HTTP :// WWW . AFDC . ENERGY . GOV /AFDC /INDEX . HTML

HTTP :// WWW . ECODRIVINGUSA . COM /#/ BE -AN - ECODRIVER / YOUR

G REEN BIZ: GREENING

C OMPANIES B USINESS TRAVEL :

HTTP :// WWW . GREENBIZ . COM /RESOURCES /RESOURCE / GREENING - YOUR - COMPANYS - BUSINESS -TRAVEL

P EDESTRIAN I NFORMATION C ENTER : B ICYCLE I NFORMATION C ENTER :

HTTP :// WWW . WALKINGINFO . ORG /

HTTP :// WWW . BICYCLINGINFO . ORG /

LOCAL RESOURCES :
C ENTRAL I NDIANA C OMMUTER S ERVICES : I NDY GO :
HTTP :// WWW . INDYGO . NET / HTTP :// WWW .327 RIDE . NET /

C ENTRAL I NDIANA C LEAN AIR PARTNERSHIP : E MPLOYEE C OMMUTING I NFORMATION : B USINESS F LEET I NFORMATION : I NDIANA B IOFUELS P UMP L OCATOR M AP: I NDIANA B ICYCLE C OALITION :
HTTP :// WWW . INDYCICAP . ORG / EMPLOYEE - COMMUTING . CFM

HTTP :// WWW . INDYCICAP . ORG /3- FLEET -INITIATIVES . CFM HTTP ://WWW . IN . GOV /OED /2367. HTM

HTTP :// BICYCLEINDIANA . ORG / HTTP :// WWW . INDYCULTURALTRAIL . ORG /

I NDIANAPOLIS C ULTURAL T RAIL : I NDY GREENWAYS:

HTTP :// WWW . INDYGREENWAYS . ORG / HTTP :// WWW . INDIANATRAILS . ORG /

I NDIANA T RAILS. ORG:

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4.6.

Purchasing

The environmental impacts of every organization relate directly to the products it purchases and uses. Purchasing decisions are central to the impact an organization has on every other aspect of environmental stewardship - energy use, water quality, waste generation, land use, transportation, and even communication and outreach (Green

purchasing).

Green

or

Environmentally

Preferable Purchasing (EPP) is the purchase of products and services that have “a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products that serve the same purpose.” (US EPA). Environmentally Preferable Purchasing seeks to balance

environmental considerations with a product‟s price and performance. It emphasizes products that are reusable, less toxic, energy efficient and and takes manufactured into account with the recycled material,

environmental impact of the product‟s whole life cycle - production, transport, use, maintenance, and final disposal (NYC WasteLess). In addition to reducing local and a global green

DID YOU KNOW ? :
F UMES
FROM CLEANING CHEMICALS , PAINT , FURNITURE AND CARPETS CAN LEAD TO POOR INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ARE LINKED TO HEALTH PROBLEMS , INCLUDING ASTHMA , HYPERSENSITIVITY PNEUMONITIS , AND LEGIONNAIRE ‟ S DISEASE .

environmental

impacts,

implementing

purchasing program can also result in considerable cost savings over the life of a product – especially if it is an item that saves energy or can be used in place of a large quantity of disposable products.

A LTERNATIVE

PRODUCT OPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE MARKETPLACE , INCLUDING LOW -VOC PAINTS AND NATURAL - FIBER CARPETS .

E NVIRONMENTAL G UIDE FOR C ONGREGATIONS

The purchasing decisions of a large organization like the Archdiocese can have a significant market influence – helping to support the market for recycled-content goods (encouraging more recycling) and driving down the price of “green” products which ultimately makes them more accessible to smaller organizations (Green purchasing). This section outlines the steps the Archdiocese of Indianapolis can take to reduce its environmental footprint by incorporating environmental factors into its purchasing decisions and empower others to do the same. Recommendations are presented as “Stewardship Steps”, or sets of related actions. Not all recommendations can be implemented at once. Section 6, “Next Steps” outlines a recommended implementation strategy, while steps which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with this green target symbol:

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54

Stewardship Step

No 1
[a] Buy less

Purchase to Reduce Waste

____________________________________________

Office paper has a high impact on the environment and should have 30% post-consumer content or more, and preferably processed without the use of chlorine or bleach. Recycled-content papers have become competitively priced in the past years.

Purchase only those goods that will be needed to accomplish a task, and eliminate the purchase of extra or unnecessary items even if they are on sale. For items that aren‟t used frequently, it is preferable to share, borrow, rent or lease the item for occasional use.

D ID YOU KNOW ?
A LL
RECYCLING SYMBOLS ARE NOT THE SAME .

I NDICATES

THAT PRODUCT IS MADE FROM

RECYCLED MATERIAL

[b] Choose reusable products
Purchase products that can be used again and again, and limit the use of disposable products. Buy rechargeable batteries instead of 1-use batteries, reusable mugs instead of Styrofoam cups, and mechanical pencils in the place of limited-use pencils or pens to save money and reduce waste.

I NDICATES T HAT

THAT PRODUCT IS RECYCLABLE .

IS , IT HAS NO RECYCLED CONTENT BUT CAN

BE RECYCLED AT AN APPROPRIATE FACILITY .

Stewardship Step

( WWW . TREECYCLE . COM )

[c] Choose durable products
Limit the total amount of purchases by buying only products that will last a long time and won‟t need to be replaced often. The cheapest item may not be the best value in the long term.

No 2

Purchase to Reduce Toxics

____________________________________________
[a] Purchase green cleaning products
The Archdiocese‟ janitorial service currently uses “green” products (John Wahl, personal communication). Work with the vendor to review product use and formalize the arrangement in contract language. Purchase green cleaning products to keep on hand for Archdiocese maintenance staff and for staff use in private offices and kitchen. Avoid all products that are labeled “danger” and look for products labeled “non-toxic” and “biodegradable”. Purchase a phosphate and chlorine-free dishwashing

[d] Limit packaging
Choose products that have less packaging and packaging that can be reused, recycled, or composted. To further reduce the “waste” packaging purchased, avoid items packaged for single servings, purchase liquids in concentrate, and buy high-use items in bulk when possible.

[e] Purchase used and refurbished items
Purchase used or refurbished furniture and other items whenever possible.

[f] Buy products with recycled content
Purchase products with a high percentage of postconsumer recycled content, and items that can be recycled when the Archdiocese finishes with them.

DID YOU KNOW ? :
“24
BILLION POUNDS OF TOXINS THAT ARE DEVELOPMENTALLY AND NEUROLOGICALLY DAMAGING TO CHILDREN ARE RELEASED INTO THE ENVIRONMENT EVERY YEAR – MORE THAN ONE IN EVERY 200 CHILDREN ARE AFFECTED .

T HE

ACTUAL IMPACT OF TOXIC CHEMICALS ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING IS BELIEVED TO BE MUCH GREATER .”

G REEN A CTION G UIDE P 51 – SOURCES : N ATIONAL A CADEMY OF S CIENCES , N ATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL T RUST, AND PHYSICIANS FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY .

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55

detergent or biocompatible.

one

that

is

biodegradable

or

Stewardship Step

[b] Choose natural or less toxic alternatives for pest control in conjunction with the use of an
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system to reduce the use of toxic chemicals in buildings and grounds. Detailed information from the EPA on IPM and associated products can be found at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ipm/

No 3

Purchase to Protect Natural Resources

____________________________________________
[a] Buy recycled content or tree-free paper
Purchase paper made from the highest-possible recycled content (30% post-consumer content, minimum) and consider tree-free paper made from sources such as bamboo, oat, wheat, rice, and recycled denim and currency.

[c] Purchase organic foods
For meetings and events, purchase organic foods that are locally grown. If possible, utilize produce grown organically in a parish or school community garden. This is especially meaningful if those receiving the food helped to plant the produce and cared for it by applying compost they created from repurposed food waste. School children typically find participating in this type of hands-on earth stewardship project very meaningful.

[b] Buy environmentally-sound plant products
Buy items made from environmentally responsible ingredients, such as organic produce and sustainably harvested wood

[d] Consider chemicals before each purchase
Many products contain chemicals that can lead to poor indoor air quality and affect employee health in other ways. Consider how toxic a product is in use and disposal before buying and look for less-toxic alternatives. Many kinds of plywood and particle board can emit formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. Other common products that can emit formaldehyde or Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are carpeting, adhesives, plastics and paint.

D ID YOU KNOW ?
M ORE
THAN HALF THE PAPER PRODUCED IN THE

U NITED

S TATES

COMES FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN FORESTS , THE

REGION CONTAINING THE GREATEST BIODIVERSITY IN THE CONTINENTAL

U.S.

( WWW . TREECYCLE. COM )

Stewardship Step

No 4

Purchase to conserve water

____________________________________________
[a] Choose water-efficient appliances
When replacing appliances, choose those that require the least amount of water to operate.

[b] Choose WaterSense products
Products that earn the WaterSense label meet EPA criteria for water efficiency and performance. A listing of WaterSense products can be found at: www.epa.gov/WaterSense/pp/index.htm.

[c] Choose products manufactured using recycled wastewater
Whenever possible, choose products made using recycled or “reclaimed” wastewater in their manufacturing process.

[c] Purchase native landscaping plants and other products which require less water to maintain.

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56

given need. Consider hybrid, electric and alternative

D ID YOU KNOW ?
N EW
ENERGY - EFFICIENT REFRIGERATORS , DISHWASHERS ,

fuel vehicles (See Section 4.5 for more information).

[b] Purchase electric or hand tools when possible
Avoid gas-powered tools such as lawnmowers and trimmers. Purchase electric or hand-powered whenever possible.
AND CLOTHES WASHERS USE ABOUT THAN MODELS MANUFACTURED KITCHEN OR BREAK ROOM .

30%

LESS ENERGY

10

YEARS AGO .

CONSIDER

REPLACING OLDER , INEFFICIENT APPLIANCES IN THE

[c] Purchase local products whenever possible
Each product purchased has “indirect” environmental costs from the fuel use associated with the transport of raw materials and final product. Try to choose products that are locally grown or manufactured. This not only helps the environment, but also helps

(R OCKY M OUNTAIN I NSTITUTE )

Stewardship Step

No 5
[a] Purchase Equipment

Purchase to conserve energy
Energy Star Appliances and

boost the local economy.
Stewardship Step

____________________________________________

No 7

Work with vendors

It costs more money to operate an appliance over its lifetime than to buy it. When replacing appliances and equipment, choose EPA-labeled Energy Star products when available and select the smallest, most energy-efficient model which will meet your needs. Choosing energy-efficient appliances and equipment not only benefits the environment, but also can mean a significant cost-savings over the life of the equipment.

____________________________________________
[a] Communicate Green Purchasing needs to vendors
Let current and potential vendors know that the Archdiocese is concerned with the life cycle environmental impacts of the products it buys and the companies that manufacture and sell them.

[b] Purchase energy-efficient light bulbs
Don‟t purchase incandescent light bulbs which waste 90% of their energy to produce heat. Instead, purchase spotlights, compact desk fluorescent lamps and bulbs other (CFLs) for appropriate

D ID YOU KNOW ?
M ANY
PRACTICAL RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE TO ASSIST IN

CHOOSING ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE PRODUCTS INCLUDING

E CO -L ABELS

AND

EPP G UIDEBOOKS .

fixtures. Appropriate energy-efficient bulbs should be purchased for the overhead lighting system. CFLs and other fluorescents contain small amounts of mercury and must be disposed of properly.

E CO - LABELS

ARE USED TO PROVIDE A CLEAR SYMBOL THAT

A PRODUCT IS DEEMED “ ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE ” AFTER HAVING BEEN EVALUATED ON MULTIPLE ENVIRONMENTAL CRITERIA . REGULATED IN THE

E CO- LABEL

CRITERIA ARE NOT

Stewardship Step

US,

SO CARE SHOULD BE TAKEN THAT

No 6

Purchase to conserve fuel

PRODUCT CERTIFICATION CRITERIA IS TRANSPARENT AND ROBUST .

____________________________________________
[a] Purchase Green Vehicles
When vehicles need to be replaced, purchase the smallest, most fuel efficient car available for the

S EVERAL

HIGHLY -REGARDED ECO - LABELS INCLUDE :

E NERGY STAR , W ASTE S ENSE, GREEN S EAL, F OREST C ERTIFICATION S YSTEMS (FSC), C ERTIFICATION S YSTEMS.
AND

S CIENTIFIC

(G REEN P URCHASING )

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57

Establish clear lines of communication and ask suppliers for information and suggestions. This can be done systematically through administering a vendor survey.

departments. The purchasing department should work closely with product end-users to select any new products and evaluate their effectiveness and value for future use. Centralizing the purchasing process will also significantly strengthen efforts to develop and implement a green purchasing policy which successfully meets the Archdiocese‟ environmental and cost-saving goals

[b] Incorporate environmental criteria in service contracts
Work with vendors to incorporate environmental criteria into existing service contracts wherever feasible. Clearly spell out environmental criteria and expectations in new contracts.

[b] Work with vendors to negotiate term-contracts
Based upon the potential buying power of the Archdiocese‟ 73 schools and 151 parishes, it is recommended that the Archdiocese approach vendors about negotiating low-cost term contracts for common green products. While this buying power is not guaranteed, it is worth opening discussions to explore possibilities.

[c] Integrate environmental aspects in purchasing documents
Modify any standard specifications or bidding documents to include environmental and life cycle costing criteria

[d] Request sample products
Environmental purchasing does not mean compromising on product quality or performance. Staff who will be utilizing the product may be wary of trying something new. Work with vendors to get sample products for staff to test and share feedback on before buying larger quantities.

[c] Work to establish a pilot Indianapolis Green Purchasing Consortium
Work with local Archdiocese parishes and schools, as well as green congregations of other denominations, to establish a pilot green purchasing consortium in order to negotiate lower prices for common green products. Begin by focusing on one or two products, solicit feedback, and communicate and build on

Stewardship Step

successes.

No 8

Leverage Buying Power

[d] Collaborate with the Catholic Purchasing Network
Over 60% of the products purchased throughout the Archdiocese are purchased through the Catholic Purchasing Network. It is recommended that the Archdiocese of Indianapolis approach and offer to work with the Catholic Purchasing Consortium on beginning the process of incorporating environmental criteria into some of its product lines and offering some environmentally-preferable product alternatives. This will not only offer a potential cost savings to the Archdiocese on green products, but also has the potential to make an incredible reduction in the environmental footprint associated with Catholic purchasing across the nation. Purchasing staff within the Archdiocese of Indianapolis is involved with the Catholic Purchasing Consortium‟s governing board and may be in a good position to help explore these opportunities.

____________________________________________
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis purchases a large quantity of goods to support its daily operations. Leveraging this buying power to the greatest extent possible can enable the Archdiocese to help drive down prices for green products, making them more accessible within the organization and to consumers in the larger community.

[a]

Centralize

Archdiocese

administrative

purchasing
In order to leverage the purchasing power of the Archdiocese‟ 113 employees within the Catholic Center and Xavier Building, it is recommended that purchasing procedures be centralized through the Archdiocese savings can purchasing be office. by Significant costpurchasing large achieved

quantities of green office products (and other commonly used products) such as recycled-content office paper which can then be distributed among

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58

Stewardship Step

No 9
Policy

Formalize Green Purchasing Practices

Sources of Information: (New Energy for Cities, US Mayors Climate Protection

____________________________________________
[a] Develop and implement a Green Purchasing
Formalize green purchasing practices in an Archdiocese Green Purchasing Policy which establishes and clearly communicates purchasing procedures and environmental purchasing criteria to employees. Engage staff in creating procedures to apply environmental and life cycle costing criteria to purchasing decisions. Establish baseline information on current purchasing practices, formulate quantitative green purchasing goals, track and report progress, and celebrate successes.

Handbook, Green Business, Earth 911 for Business, EPA EPP Website, NYC WasteLess Website, Green Action Guide, Green Purchasing, Environmentally Preferable Purchasing, Environmental Purchasing Policies 101, Premier, California Climate Action Network, Green IT, Group Purchasing). See “Works Cited” for complete citations
citations.

A

PRODUCT OR SERVICE ‟ S

L IFE C YCLE C OST

IS THE

OVERALL ESTIMATED COST FOR THE LIFE OF THE PRODUCT OR SERVICE , INCLUDING :

[b] Support Green Purchasing decisions
The Archdiocese‟ Purchasing Department currently provides information and services as needed to parishes, schools and within the Archdiocese‟ core operational offices. It is recommended that staff be trained in environmental purchasing procedures, and that the program be promoted with ongoing twoway communications. Appropriate green purchasing tools and information support should be provided to all staff within the Archdiocese, parishes and schools to support good green purchasing decisions which incorporate environmental impacts and life cycle product costing.

DIRECT AND INDIRECT INITIAL COSTS

+

ONGOING OR PERIODIC OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE COSTS

+ PRODUCT IN

DISPOSAL COSTS

ADDITION TO ITS LIFECYCLE COST , EACH PRODUCT

CONSUMED ALSO HAS “ EXTERNAL ” COSTS RELATED TO ENVIRONMENTAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS .

THESE

COSTS ARE DIFFUSE AND GENERALLY PAID IN THE FORM OF LOWER EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY , INCREASED HEALTH INSURANCE PREMIUMS , HIGHER TAXES TO SUPPORT ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUPS, ETC .

(G REEN P URCHASING )

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59

GREEN PURCHASING RESOURCES:
EPA G UIDE
TO

E NVIRONMENTALLY P REFERABLE P URCHASING :

HTTP :// WWW . EPA . GOV / EPP

EPA G REEN PURCHASING D ATABASE : E NERGY STAR P URCHASING
AND

WWW . EPA . GOV / EPP / DATABASE . HTM

P ROCUREMENT R ESOURCES:

HTTP :// WWW . ENERGYSTAR . GOV / INDEX . CFM ? C = BULK _ PURCHASING . BUS _ PURCHASING

US G ENERAL S ERVICES A DMINISTRATION GREEN PRODUCTS G UIDE : R ESPONSIBLE P URCHASING N ETWORK (RPN): E NVIRONMENTAL D EFENSE F UND : P APER
AND

WWW . PUB . FSS . GSA . GOV / ENVIRON /INDEX . HTML .

HTTP :// WWW . RESPONSIBLEPURCHASING . COM /

P ACKAGING I NFORMATION

AND

R ESOURCES

FOR

C ORPORATIONS :

HTTP :// WWW . EDF . ORG / PAGE . CFM ? TAG ID=1439

C ATHOLIC R ELIEF S ERVICES F AIR T RADE C OFFEE:

HTTP :// WWW . CRSFAIRTRADE . ORG / COFFEE _ PROJECT /INDEX . HTM

ECO-LOGOS:
G REENER CHOICES. ORG: E CO LABEL W EBSITE : G REEN S EAL:
HTTP :// WWW . GREENERCHOICES . ORG / ECO - LABELS

HTTP :// WWW . GREENSEAL . ORG / TO

MBDC: "C RADLE

C RADLE " C ERTIFICATION :

HTTP :// WWW . MBDC . COM /

B IODEGRADABLE P RODUCTS I NSTITUTE (BPI): S CIENTIFIC C ERTIFICATION S YSTEMS : E NVIRONMENTAL CHOICE:

HTTP :// WWW . BPIWORLD . ORG /

HTTP :// WWW . SCSCERTIFIED . COM /

WWW . ENVIRONMENTALCHOICE . COM

F OREST C ERTIFICATIONS R ESOURCE C ENTER :
HTTP :// WWW . METAFORE . ORG / INDEX . PHP ? P =F OREST _C ERTIFICATION _R ESOURCE _C ENTER & S=147

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60

4.7.

Communication and Outreach

Clearly communicating to employees the importance of working together to reduce the Archdiocese‟ environmental impact (while also reducing costs) is critical to the successful implementation of the Archdiocese‟ Environmental Stewardship Agenda. In fact, employee engagement and partnership is the central ingredient of a successful program (US Mayors Climate Action Handbook). In addition to engaging employees as partners in “greening” its core operations, the Archdiocese of Indianapolis has an important role to play in encouraging and empowering its parishes and schools to reduce their own environmental impacts. The Archdiocese can also set an example for the broader community while encouraging its employees, parishioners, and school children to be better environmental stewards at home (Climate Action Plan). The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has over 5,800 employees, more than 225,000 parishioners, and nearly 25,000 school children. It therefore has a profound

DID YOU KNOW?
P ROGRAMS
WHICH ACTIVELY ENGAGE TEACHERS AND STUDENTS AS PARTNERS IN ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP CAN BE EXTREMELY SUCCESSFUL .

opportunity to help bring about an enormous collective benefit to the environment by helping Indiana Catholics to tread more lightly on the earth at work, home, school, and church. This is an opportunity that can be realized with effective communication and outreach tools. This section outlines the many communication and outreach tools the Archdiocese can utilize to educate and engage its employees, parishioners, parishes and schools in environmental stewardship. Recommendations are

B EING

GOOD STEWARDS OF THE ENVIRONMENT CAN BE VERY INSPIRING TO STUDENTS , STAFF AND THE COMMUNITY - AND PROVIDES REAL - LIFE LEARNING MATERIALS FOR THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS .

presented as “Stewardship Steps”, or sets of related actions. Not all recommendations can be implemented at once. Section 6, “Next Steps” outlines a recommended implementation strategy, while steps which can be implemented immediately at little to no cost are indicated with this green target symbol:

“ WE NEED TO LEARN AND THEN TO TEACH RESPECT FOR THE MATERIAL WORLD THAT GOD HAS ENTRUSTED TO OUR CARE AS STEWARDS OF ALL CREATION . T HIS VALUE ACKNOWLEDGES THAT EACH OF US HAS A RIGHT - AND A DUTY TO CARE FOR OUR OWN PROPERTY AND POSSESSIONS , BUT ALSO FOR THE GREAT BOUNTY WE HAVE RECEIVED FROM GOD' S GOODNESS : THE LAND WE WORK , THE AIR WE BREATHE , THE WATER WE DRINK , AND THE FOOD WE EAT ( AND SHARE WITH OTHERS ).” A RCHBISHOP BUECHLEIN “C ATHOLIC S CHOOL VALUES ”

Q UOTED

A MERICA , 4/24/99 ( PAGE 8) AT : HTTP :// WWW . NCRLC . COM / BISHOP STATEMENTS - WEBPAGES /INDIANA . HTM

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61

Stewardship Step

No 1

Internal Communications

current staff approached

should be kept short, made fun, and step-by-step. Consider offerer 20-

minute training courses or regular brownbag lunches to disseminate information and introduce any new policies or procedures. Making the “right” environmental decision can sometime be confusing support staff by providing accurate, concise, and accessible information.

___________________________________________
Implementing steps to reduce an organization‟s environmental impact ultimately requires changes in people‟s awareness, practices, habits and behaviors. Changing habits is not easy - making effective, engaging and clear communication central to a successful program.

[d] Maintain ongoing communications
Ongoing two-way communication is essential to creating lasting change within an organization. A regular, internal email bulletin providing “Care for Creation” updates is an easy way to distribute information and report on progress. Regularly solicit feedback from employees on how the program might be strengthened, and engage them in implementing their ideas. Be sure to publically recognize individuals who step forward to contribute their ideas and efforts, and consider implementing formal incentives and awards programs. Staff may find changing long-standing habits a bit easier when acknowledged for their efforts.

[a] “Care for Creation” Educate staff about Care for
Creation, and the importance of working together to reduce Clearly the Archdiocese‟ the environmental importance of impact. using communicate

Communication and Outreach Stewardship Step with Parishes and No 2 Schools
____________________________________________
[a] Introduce “Care for Creation” Introduce the
“Care for Creation” movement to Archdiocese parishes and schools, and communicate its value in terms of caring for the earth and one another by using resources more efficiently. Share the steps the Archdiocese is taking to green its own operations, along with the positive financial and environmental impacts of these actions. Communicate the

resources more efficiently to their work and the Archdiocese‟ mission.

[b] Engage employees as partners
Actively engaging employees, recognizing their efforts, and motivating them to work together to change habits and implement new procedures is essential to insuring the Archdiocese‟ environmental goals are successfully met. Fully engage employees from across the organization in formulating and implementing newd environmental policies and procedures. Regularly report progress to employees and solicit their feedback on how the program might be improved. Engage them in implementing their suggestions.

D ID

YOU

K NOW ?

[c] Support employee efforts through appropriate tools, training, education and feedback
The successful implementation of environmental programs depends in large part on the actions of individual departments and persons. New staff orientation should incorporate training on environmental policies and expectations. Training for

T HE N ATIONAL C ATHOLIC S CHOOL EDUCATION B OARD PROVIDES INFORMATION ON ITS WEBSITE AIMED AT MAKING C ATHOLIC SCHOOLS HEALTHIER BY INSTITUTING “ GREEN C LEANING ” AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTALLY - FRIENDLY PRACTICES .
HTTP :// WWW . NCEA . ORG / DEPARTMENTS / NABCCCE / E NVIRONMENTAL C ONCERNS .ASP

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62

Archdiocese‟ intent to encourage and support the efforts of parishes and schools to green their own operations.

Stewardship Step

No 3

[b] Engage parishes and schools as partners
Engaging parishes and schools as partners and motivating them to begin the process of greening their own operations is key to successfully increasing the efficiency of resource use throughout the Archdiocese of Indianapolis. Consider creating a spot on the Archdiocese‟ webpage, a regular Criterion article or monthly enewsletter in which parishes and schools can and experiences resources another with across highlight their share and one the environmental efforts

Communication and outreach with parishioners

____________________________________________
The daily choices that every individual makes have an impact on the local and global environment – and on the people most affected by environmental contamination and climate change. Small impacts from daily choices add up. With over 225,000 parishioners – each of whom impacts the environment in their home, car and work – the environmental footprint under the Archdiocese‟ scope of influence is large, as is the opportunity to encourage and assist parishioners in reducing their environmental impact.

Archdiocese.

[a] Introduce “Care for Creation”
Introduce the concept of “Care for Creation” to parishioners through the Criterion, website and other means. Share what “Care for Creation” is all about, and communicate its value to the Archdiocese of Indianapolis. Share the steps the Archdiocese is taking to green its own operations, and the results of those successful actions in terms of money saved and environmental impacts averted.

[c] Provide tools to green facilities and use stewardship as an resource
Provide Archdiocese Schools and Parishes with clear and easy to follow “tool kits” to begin the process of greening their own facilities. Additionally provide tools to support the use of environmental stewardship as an educational resource and opportunity for spiritual growth. Provide parishes and schools with needed information and make technical support available as they begin implementation of their own environmental programs. Find and celebrate existing environmental efforts within the Archdiocese, such as Indianapolis‟ “Green Deanery”, and consider sponsoring friendly competitions among parishes, schools, parishioner homes, or departments within the Archdiocese to recognize and encourage environmental successes.

educational

[b] Provide education and tools.
Develop and distribute tips and “toolkits” for individuals to reduce their environmental impact at home, in the car, and at work. Provide a space on the Archdiocese website for individuals to share information and resources on their efforts to go green, and provide a regular Criterion column written by a parishioner on greening their lifestyle. Host “Low Carbon Diet” workshops for employees and parishioners and consider developing targeted “toolkits” through a “Green Team” approach, based on implementing change through community support and fellowship. Solicit suggestions from parishioners on what tools they would find helpful to support their greening efforts, and work with them to implement their ideas.

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63

Stewardship Step

No 4

Communication and outreach with the wider community

Stewardship Step

No 5
[a] Electronic

Use eco-friendly communications tools

____________________________________________
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis can play a role in informing and encouraging the wider Catholic, interdenominational, and secular communities to reduce their environmental impacts. Communications strategies can include: using the website, Criterion, electronic communications and other media to motivate and inform; sponsoring or participating in an environmental fair open to the public; the development and use of environmental stewardship educational materials; publicizing successful steps the Archdiocese has taken to reduce its environmental impact; and others.

____________________________________________
Communications.
Use electronic

communications such as email, e-newsletters, and interactive websites instead of paper whenever possible. Prioritize implementing a standardized, accessible email communication system with all schools and parishes. Begin forming a parishioner email list serve so that information can be sent via email and e-newsletter. Offer parishioners the option of an electronic subscription to the Criterion instead of a paper one.

[a] Recycled or tree-free paper. To really “Walk the
Talk” when paper is needed for “Care for Creation” communications, it should be printed on the most sustainable paper possible ( tree-free or high recycled content, processed chlorine-free) with an eco-friendly ink (such as soy-based ink). Be sure to offer a place where brochures or flyers can be collected and reused or recycled.

[a] Larger Catholic Community – Share successes,
resources, and “lessons learned” with Catholic Agencies and other Diocese just beginning the process of improved environmental stewardship. Seek “lessons learned” from others that may have similar experiences.

[b] Local interdenominational community – Share
information community. and resources “Green with the local
Sources of Information: (Green Action Guide, US Mayor‟s Climate Preferable Protection Handbook, Climate Action Plan, Green Purchasing, Environmentally Purchasing, Environmental Purchasing Policies) See “Works Cited” for complete citations.

interdenominational

Congregations”

Learn from the experience of others,

and seek ways to support common efforts such as working to build a Green Purchasing consortium to make green products more accessible.

[d] Local community – Share information with the
local community through the Archdiocese‟ website, and inform local media about the Archdiocese‟ environmental efforts and successes.

Communication and Outreach Resources:
ICLEI Environmental Outreach Guide:
http://www.icleiusa.org/action-center/engaging-your-community/outreach-and-communicationsguide/Outreach%20and%20Communications%20Guide.pdf

City Education Campaigns:
One Day Vancouver: http://www.onedayvancouver.ca Salt Lake City E2 Program: http://www.slcgreen.com/pages/e2citizen.htm Seattle Climate Partnership: http://www.seattle.gov/climate/partnership.htm

Green Congregations Resources:
Energy Star for Congregations: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=small_business.sb_congregations Environmental Guide for Congregations, their Buildings and Grounds: http://www.webofcreation.org/Environmental%20Guide.pdf Stewardship of Creation: a Thirty Day Discipline: http://www.webofcreation.org/Worship/devotions/CreationCare.pdf

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64

5. FUNDING OPTIONS
A great deal of the strategies outlined in this Environmental Stewardship Agenda will save the Archdiocese of Indianapolis money in the long run by using resources more efficiently and reducing costly waste. This is particularly true of fuel use reduction and energy-efficiency projects which typically have a quick rate of return and good return on investment. By initially focusing on those projects that produce a significant costsavings and strategically reinvesting savings to support other projects, the Archdiocese‟ environmental stewardship program can be designed as financially self-supporting. While some environmental initiatives can be implemented at little or no cost, others require significant upfront capital. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has the opportunity to make use of a broad range of funding options to support its environmental stewardship goals, including: financing strategies such as Guaranteed Energy Savings Contracts, internal financing options, pension fund investments, and bonding initiatives; grants; rebates; and private donations.

5.1

Guaranteed

Energy

Savings Financing
Guaranteed Energy Savings Contracts are provided managers by full-service detailed Energy Service of Companies (ESCOs) who provide property with assessments recommended energy efficiency upgrades and then perform the energy retrofits at no up-front cost. Energy savings is guaranteed, and the up-front financing of capital costs is repaid through the energy savings over time. Energy retrofit projects have a long history of generating significant energy cost savings – mainly through HVAC and lighting upgrades. Lighting retrofits alone achieve an average 47% savings over existing lighting costs (New

Energy for Cities).
Despite these results, financing Energy Efficiency projects through a formal Guaranteed Energy Savings Contract with an ESCO is not a recommended financing mechanism for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis. Indiana law restricts formal Guaranteed Energy Savings Contracting to public entities, and ESCOs typically charge a premium interest rate for guaranteeing energy savings.

5.2 Internal Energy-Efficiency Financing Options
It is recommended that the Archdiocese of Indianapolis use the Guaranteed Energy Savings model described above to finance its energy efficiency projects internally rather than contracting with an ESCO, bank or other organization for third-party financing. The Archdiocese is able to finance internally at rate of around 5% providing a viable financing mechanism, while keeping loan interest rates to a minimum. Strategic

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65

investment in energy efficiency upgrades can reduce a facility‟s energy costs by up to 30%, potentially providing a sizeable return on investment. (EnergyStar for Congregations). In addition to traditional internal it is

financing

mechanisms,

recommended that the Archdiocese explore financing energy efficiency upgrades – and other environmental stewardship yield projects expected to – significant cost-savings

through pension fund investments, bonding initiatives, and other creative financing mechanisms. One emerging by approach state and being local

explored

governments is to invest pension money into energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. The cost savings which results from these facility retrofit projects is then used to repay the capital costs of the program, plus interest to the pension fund. Once all repayments have been made, revenue continues to be received in the form of reduced energy costs. Investment in energy efficiency projects can provide yields that are greater and more stable than investing in the stock market ( New Energy for Cities). The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has a sizeable combined investment fund of $160 Million which includes the Lay Employee Pension Fund, Priest Pension Fund, and Catholic Community Foundation funds (Jeff Stumpf, personal

communication May 13, 2009). A small portion of these funds could be invested in facility energy efficiency
upgrades as a pilot project, with additional investment in energy-efficiency upgrades of Archdiocese buildings subsequently evaluated. Another funding option which can be explored is a targeted bonding initiative. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has a Moody‟s Credit rating and can issue tax-exempt bonds. Funds can also be made available for green building projects by the sale of underused facilities, saving money and making more efficient use of space in Archdiocese core facilities in the process. While it is beyond the scope of this document to give specific financial advice, it is recommended that this and the other internal financing mechanisms presented here be further evaluated for suitability as viable financing mechanisms for Archdiocese environmental stewardship projects.

5.3 Clean Energy Revolving Loan Fund
One option to provide dedicated funding for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and other projects with high cost-savings potential is to form an internal clean energy revolving loan fund. Through this fund, noand low-cost loans can be made for energy efficiency upgrades at Archdiocese facilities, and repaid to the loan fund through energy cost savings. In this way, Archdiocese facilities benefit from low-cost loans for facility upgrades and benefit from continued utility cost-savings after the loan is repaid. The loan fund, in turn, is replenished so that funding is available for future projects (New Energy for Cities). Loans can be made available to parishes and schools throughout the Archdiocese, further encouraging and enabling their

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environmental stewardship efforts. The original funding to establish the revolving loan fund can come from re-prioritized existing organizational funds, a special bonding initiative, investment fund monies, grant monies, private donations, or a combination of funding sources.

5.4 Grants and Donations
A wide variety of potential grant and donation funding options are available to support the Archdiocese‟ environmental stewardship initiatives. Funding opportunities include potential state and local grants made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), private foundation grants, and private donations. It is recommended that each of the opportunities presented here be explored as a potential funding source to support the implementation of the Archdiocese‟ Environmental Stewardship Action Agenda. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis has a large development staff available to successfully pursue these opportunities in partnership with staff or other entities that can provide technical information and project design. While no government grant opportunities are currently available, potential opportunities – including state funding for energy efficiency projects, and an Indianapolis Green Building Fund - are outlined in Appendix G. Appendix H lists private grant-making entities known to financially support environmental initiatives. It is recommended that development staff further research the funding opportunities available through these public and private grant-making entities, and pursue appropriate prospects. The Archdiocese can additionally solicit support private of its donations efforts corporations in from and environmental

stewardship appropriate

private foundations, as well as though special solicitations of its parishioners or other traditional fundraising mechanisms. It is recommended that grants and private feasible. donation funding be utilized to the greatest extent

5.5 Rebates and Tax Incentives
Numerous rebates and tax incentives are available for organizations and individuals to enable the implementation of energy efficiency upgrades and other environmentally-friendly improvements. Rebates are available from the Federal government, state government, local utilities and other organizations. While tax incentives are not available to the Archdiocese, it will be helpful to employees and parishioners. Available rebates and residential tax incentives are outlined in Appendix I.

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6. NEXT STEPS
The Action Agenda presented in Section 4 comprehensively outlines steps the Archdiocese of Indianapolis can take to reduce the environmental impact of its own operations, while encouraging similar actions among its parishes, schools, employees and parishioners. Not everything can be implemented at once. This section outlines a strategic approach to begin implementation of the Archdiocese‟ Environmental Stewardship Agenda, and ensure that that its implementation is successful and sustained. Included are recommendations on a strategic implementation strategy and structure, as well as specific recommendations on next steps over the next 12 months.

6.1 Recommended Implementation Strategy
The following strategy is recommended to begin implementation of the Archdiocese‟ Environmental Stewardship Agenda with quick action, and ensure that implementation efforts are successful and sustained:

Figure 15. Archdiocese Environmental Stewardship Agenda Implementation Strategy.
1. Jumpstart Projects. Take early action by implementing some first “jumpstart projects” that are inexpensive, easy, and visible. This will launch the Archdiocese‟ environmental efforts with concrete action, build momentum among staff, and create successes that can be built upon. Recommendations for first projects include:

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Reduce energy use in Archdiocese-managed facilities by taking easy steps such as caulking around windows and doors and weather-stripping. Ensure that all incandescent bulbs have been switched to CFL bulbs, and install low-cost occupancy sensors and programmable thermostats in appropriate locations throughout Archdiocese facilities. Reduce water use by installing inexpensive faucet aerators and checking regularly for leaks. Post stewardship signs reminding employees and guests to turn off lights when not in use, conserve water, and place recycling in the appropriate receptacles. Provide staff with desk-side recycling bins, and remind them of which items to recycle and where they are collected. If bins cannot be purchased, provide employees with an attractive Archdiocese office paper recycling sign which can be affixed to a suitable repurposed box. Consider life-cycle costs in purchasing decisions, and encourage employees to purchase reusable rather than disposable items. Stock kitchens and break rooms with dish towels and dish soap. Encourage employees to bring in reusable mugs, plates and silverware (and extras for guests that can be picked up cheaply from garage sales) rather than using styrofoam, paper or plastic. Send out a short monthly e-newsletter to regularly update staff on environmental efforts, share information, solicit feedback, recognize employees, and celebrate successes.

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2. Implementation Structure. It is recommended that the Archdiocese of Indianapolis put a formal structure in place to ensure the successful implementation of its environmental stewardship goals. It is recommended that this structure be formed both by a committee comprised of key staff – an Environmental Committee, or staff “Green Team” – and by an Environmental Project Manager charged with leading the effort and overseeing the details of each particular project - including formal policy development, project planning, implementation, ongoing project management and results tracking. This structure ensures that projects are successfully implemented in a timely and professional manner, while allowing for critical staff collaboration and communication. Including key staff input in the planning, implementation and feedback process is important for several reasons. First, it develops staff buy-in and allows for considerations from across the organization to be taken into account as specific projects are developed and implemented. Second, it puts a formal process in place for inter-departmental staff communication, oversight, and problem-solving. Finally, it utilizes key staff expertise as a critical implementation resource but does so in a way which is highly respectful of their time and principal responsibilities. The Environmental Stewardship Committee should include

representation from each major area of the organization. The Environmental Project Manager should have environmental expertise and sufficient available time to lead each project‟s successful implementation and management.

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3. Internal Planning. It is recommended that, with input and oversight from the Staff Environmental Committee, an Environmental Project Manager lead the internal planning effort to prioritize actions for implementation, formalize environmental policy, gather full baseline data on current practices, and set quantitative goals. 4. Project Implementation. Once first projects are agreed upon, implementation can begin at any time. It is recommended that an Environmental Project Manager lead the implementation effort in close collaboration with key staff, and with the oversight and feedback of the Environmental Stewardship Committee. 5. Results Tracking and Assessment. When implementation is underway, project results should be tracked regularly against baseline data to gauge if the project is on track or if its approach should be modified. It is recommended that progress be regularly reported to the Staff Environmental Stewardship Committee and employees, and additionally shared with Archdiocese parishes, schools, and parishioners. If a project is not on track to meeting its goals, the Environmental Coordinator and Staff Committee – with additional staff feedback as appropriate -should assess the program, evaluate why it may not be working as planned, and adjust their approach as needed. 6. Ongoing Strategic Communication and Engagement. In order for the Archdiocese to be successful in meeting its environmental goals, it is important that communication and engagement with employees, parishes, schools, and parishioners be ongoing, open, and a central element of its environmental program. To maintain momentum, it is important to regularly share successes, recognize employee‟s efforts, solicit feedback to strengthen programs, and share best practices and support.

6.2 Next Steps

www.archindy.org

It is recommended that the following steps be taken over the next 12 months to begin implementation of the Archdiocese‟ Environmental Action Agenda, and ensure that that its implementation is successful and sustained: 1. Hold a kick-off meeting to brief staff on the Archdiocese environmental agenda. Include information on projects that have already been implemented along with their estimated cost savings and environmental impact. Recognize employees who are taking initiative, and invite all employees to collaborate and build upon this success. 2. Share “best practices” information with Parishes and Schools to encourage efforts to green their own facilities. Communicate the goals of the Archdiocese environmental agenda with parishes, schools and parishioners through the Criterion, an e-newsletter, or other appropriate means. 3. Implement small “jumpstart projects” immediately and then periodically to introduce the Archdiocese‟ environmental initiatives, create visible successes, and build and maintain momentum among employees, parishioners, parishes and schools. Appropriate jumpstart projects - those that are low-cost, relatively easy to implement, and visible - are listed in the previous section. Recommendations marked with the green target symbol throughout Section 4 are also potential jumpstart projects. 4. Establish a formal implementation structure to ensure that the Archdiocese‟ environmental efforts are successful and sustained. It is recommended that the effort be led by an Environmental Project Manager

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working in collaboration with a staff Environmental Committee to provide input, oversight, and coordination across departments. 5. Work to formalize an environmental policy to adopt a vision statement and clear goals, institutionalize environmental practices, and clearly communicate expectations to employees. This can be a longer-term process which takes place parallel to project implementation. 6. Implement first large environmental projects. It is recommended that the Archdiocese work to implement its first 4 large environmental projects over the next 12 months. The following projects are recommended based upon their cost-savings potential - along with the Archdiocese‟ organizational values, preferences, and needs 6a. Energy Audits and Retrofits It is recommended that the Archdiocese of Indianapolis have independent third-party energy audits conducted of the seven facilities it directly manages, as well as a corresponding financial analysis of the proposed retrofit projects. While many energy-efficient updates have been made in Archdiocesemanaged facilities over time, no facility has been fully audited previously. Energy audits will provide an independent, expert evaluation of each facility‟s energy use, energy savings potential and project costs. Building retrofit projects can then be coordinated independently by in-house staff. It is recommended that the Archdiocese closely evaluate funding options (Section 5) and determine the best strategy to invest in energy efficiency projects across the Archdiocese. It is also recommended that an energy use policy be developed for staff to clearly communicate and formalize expectations regarding energy conservation measures that should be taken in the workplace. Each facility‟s energy use should be tracked and regularly reported to employees. The Catholic Center and Xavier Building should additionally be reviewed by an architectural firm to evaluate options for using space more efficiently in conjunction with a thorough “green” remodel of the Catholic Center. The Xavier Building has offices for only 3 employees not working primarily from home, and much of its space is used for warehousing. It is recommended that further environmental and financial evaluations be performed to determine the viability of moving Xavier Building functions to other Archdiocese facilities, and using funds from the biulding‟s sale to fund a major “green” remodel of the Catholic Center. This solution, if determined to be financially viable, will significantly reduce the environmental impact of Archdiocese operation. [Section 4.1, Steps 1, 4a, 9; Section 5] 6b. Drive Less, Drive Better Campaign Launch a “drive less, drive better” campaign aimed at: (1) educating employees about the environmental and cost impacts of their car travel while conducting business for the Archdiocese, (2) providing information and tools to reduce driving, (3) educating employees about driving practices that can increase gas mileage and reduce environmental impacts,

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and (4) challenging employees to reduce the miles they drive by 10% or more - whether they are driving Archdiocese-owned vehicles or their own cars on Archdiocese business. Working to reduce the total miles driven for Archdiocese business, and improving the way cars are driven will result in significant savings and reduce harmful air and global warming pollutants. It is recommended that a system be instituted to track miles traveled, report progress on reduced driving (in terms of miles reduced, environmental impacts averted, and costs saved), and celebrate employee efforts. It is additionally recommended that efforts already underway through the Human Resources Department to implement employee travel approval standards be prioritized for completion in 2009 and specifically incorporate environmental considerations [Section 4.5, Steps 1 and 2]. 6c. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Launch a “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” campaign aimed at (1) educating employees about the environmental benefits of waste prevention, reduction and recycling, (2) providing information and tools to assist employees in making purchasing and disposal choices that reduce costly waste and increase recycling rates, (3) focusing on reduction of paper waste and postage costs through double-sided printing, electronic communications and other means, (4) reviewing and strengthening recycling programs at all Archdiocese-managed facilities, and (3) challenging employees to reduce waste and increase recycling rates. It is recommended that a system be instituted to track the amount of waste generated and recycled, regularly report progress to employees, and celebrate employee efforts. [Section 4.3, Steps 1,2,3,4,6,7] 6d. Electronic Communications and additional IS Environmental Initiatives The Information Services Department has several projects underway in implementation and planning phases that can significantly reduce the organization‟s paper and energy use. Fully outlined in Appendix D, projects include better facilitating electronic communications among employees, workstation and server virtualization, setting computers to minimal power settings, increasing the thermal efficiency of the network operations center, and implementing Snag-it 9.1 and ServerCheck. It is recommended that these projects be prioritized for implementation within the next 12 months, and results tracked and communicated to employees. [Section 4.1, Step 3] 7. Proactively establish ongoing two-way communication and engagement with employees, parishioners, parishes and schools regarding environmental efforts within the Archdiocese. [Section 4.7] 8. Evaluate progress and plan for continued implementation of environmental projects.

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Figure 16. Archdiocese Environmental Stewardship Action Agenda Implementation Timeline. Page

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Government. July 18, 2008. <http://www.gogreencommunities.org/Library/PDF/26822ILGSampleClimateFriendlyProcurementPol icy4.pdf>

Carbon Offsets. The Nature Conservancy. July 2009. <
http://www.nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/indiana/misc/art25850.html>

Catholic Climate Covenant. June 2009. <http://catholicclimatecovenant.org/> Catholic Coalition on Climate Change, The. June 2009. <http://www.catholicsandclimatechange.org/> Central Indiana Clean Air Partnership (CICAP) Website. June 2009. <http://www.indycicap.org/> Climate Action Plan, The: A Plan to Save Energy and Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Burlington Electric
Department. 2000. <http://www.burlingtonelectric.com/SpecialTopics/Reportmain.htm>

Commuter Choice. The Association for Commuter Transportation. June 2009. <
http://www.commuterchoice.com/cc_brochure.pdf> Coridan, James. Do Parishes Have Rights? Association for the Rights of Catholics in the Church. August 1994, accessed June 2009. < http://arcc-catholic-rights.net/rights_of_parishes.htm>

Covanta Indianapolis recognized by EPA for Environmental Excellence. Covanta Energy Corporation Press
Release. March 14, 2008. < http://www.covantaholding.com/site/news-2008/covanta-indianapolisexcellence.html>

Creation Care Congregations in the Indianapolis Area. Interfaith Alliance Indianapolis. June 2009. <
http://www.interfaithindy.org/care/congregations/index.html>

EPA Clean Energy Website. June 2009. <http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/> Earth911.com for Business. June 2009. <http://business.earth911.com/> EcoDriver‟s Manual, The: A Guide to Increasing Your Mileage and Reducing your Carbon Footprint. The
Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers. June 2009. < http://www.ecodrivingusa.com/files/EcoDriving_Manual.pdf>

EnergyStar for Congregations Website. May 2009. < http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=small_business.sb_congregations>
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Environmental Defense Paper Calculator. Environmental Defense Fund. June 2009.
<http://www2.edf.org/papercalculator/index.cfm>

Environmental Guide for Congregations, Their Buildings and Grounds. Web of Creation Ecology Resources:
Transforming Faith and Society. January 2006. <http://www.webofcreation.org/Environmental%20Guide.pdf>

Environmentally Preferable Purchasing. The New York City Department of Transportation, prepared by
Science Applications International Corporation. April, 2001. <http://www.nyc.gov/html/nycwasteless/downloads/pdf/eppmanual.pdf>

Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Website, US EPA. United Stated Environmental Protection Agency.
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Environmental Purchasing Policies 101: An Overview of Current Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Policies. Scot Case, Center for a New American Dream. March 25, 2004.
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Environmentally Responsible Business Travel. GreenBiz.com. June 2009. < http://www.greenbiz.com/resources/resource/environmentally-responsible-business-travel> Fuel Economy Basics. Union of Concerned Scientists. June 2009.
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Green Action Guide: Steps to Sustainable Living for Individuals, Denver Edition. Tides Center/GreenTeam
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Green Business Initiative Website. Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce. June 2009.
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Green IT for Dummies: Hewlett Packard Limited Edition. John Wiley & Sons Ltd. 2009.
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Green Congregations Workshop Evaluation Form. Improving Kids Environment. February 2009.
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GreenScapes. US EPA GreenScapes Website. June 2009.
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APPENDIX A: BEST PRACTICES FOR PARISHES AND SCHOOLS
The Archdiocese of Indianapolis recognizes the importance of caring for God‟s creation by making careful and efficient use of the Earth‟s resources, and has begun a process aimed at reducing the environmental impact of its daily operations. Taking steps to use resources more efficiently and reduce costly waste not only helps the environment, but also saves money, improves human health and quality of life, can serve as an important educational and spiritual resource, and is an important part of caring for one another – especially the poor and vulnerable who suffer most from negative environmental impacts. The Archdiocese of Indianapolis supports the efforts of its Parishes and Schools to reduce the environmental impact of their own facilities and operations, while encouraging students and parishioners to do the same at work and home. The following are steps that can be taken to Care for Creation: Top 10 Recommended Environmental Stewardship

Steps for Parishes and Schools 1. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Reduce the amount of waste produced by switching to reusable products instead of disposable and buying products with minimal packaging. Use email instead of snail mail to reduce paper use/ Reuse items instead of throwing them away or donate them to someone who can. Begin a recycling program in your facility if it is not already offered. Recycle paper, plastic, newspaper, glass, aluminum cans, and other items. 2. Turn Off Lights and Office Equipment Save electricity by posting signs reminding people to turn off lights when a room is unoccupied. Have staff turn off computers and office equipment overnight, on the weekends, and whenever they are not needed. Post signs reminding volunteers and office visitors to do the same. Place computers in “power saving mode” so that they drop into “sleep” after 10 minutes of inactivity and don‟t use screen savers which aren‟t necessary and waste energy. 3. Use Less Energy for Heat and Air Conditioning Taking simple steps such as caulking around doors and windows, installing weather stripping, and adding insulation can lower heating costs significantly. Set temperatures moderately (68 in winter and 75 in summer), and install programmable thermostats to turn down the heat or turn the air conditioner off whenever a building is not occupied. When the HVAC system needs to be replaced, choose the most efficient unit possible and base purchasing decisions on the life cycle cost of the unit – how much it will cost to purchase, maintain and operate over its lifetime – rather than just the initial cost. High-efficiency HVAC units may have a higher initial cost, but are most often the better value by saving significantly on energy costs over time. 3. Update Lighting Make simple lighting updates to save energy and money. Replace all incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs. CFLs last 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs, use two-thirds less energy,

Today the great gift of God’s Creation is exposed to serious dangers and lifestyles which can degrade it. Environmental pollution is making particularly unsustainable the lives of the poor of the world … we must pledge ourselves to take care of creation and to share its resources in solidarity.
—Pope Benedict XVI August 27, 2006

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and will save $30 over the life of each bulb. CFLs do contain a small amount of mercury – be sure to dispose of them properly. If linear fluorescents are used for overhead lighting, switch to T-8 lamps and electronic ballasts, which use 30% less energy than older T12 tubes with magnetic ballasts. 4. Conserve Water Take simple steps to use less water by installing low-cost aerators on faucets and low-flow showerheads, placing filled plastic bottles in toilet tanks to displace water, and eliminating or limiting lawn watering. Using less hot water saves energy. Save even more energy by lowering the water heater to 120 degrees, wrapping it in an insulating blanket if it is less than five years old, and insulating hot water pipes. 4. Buy Durable, Non-toxic and Efficient Products Buy durable products that can be used again and again. This not only reduces the amount of trash going to the landfill, but will save money previously spent on large amounts of disposable or low-quality products. Use green janitorial products and other no- or low-toxic alternatives to improve indoor air quality. Purchase Energy Star appliances and office equipment. When buying a car, purchase the most fuel-efficient model that will still meet your needs in order to save fuel costs over the life of the vehicle and protect the environment. 4. Drive Less Driving less for school or parish business means fewer emissions and lower fuel costs. Encourage the use of mass transit, walking or biking to close destinations, and sharing rides whenever possible. To improve gas mileage, make sure that vehicles are maintained regularly and that tires are inflated to the recommended pressure. 4. Plant a Tree Trees absorb carbon dioxide, reduce air and water pollutants, provide shelter for birds and other wildlife, and can help reduce energy costs by shading buildings. Trees, plants, and natural areas also remind us of our connection to God‟s creation, help us relax, and are good for the human spirit. Planting trees and landscaping with low water requirements beautifies grounds while helping to reduce environmental impacts. 4. Track and Report Resource Use Use utility bills and receipts to track the monthly use of electricity, natural gas, steam, water, gasoline, and other resources that are regularly used for operations. Make this information available to staff, students and parishioners to increase awareness and encourage conservation. Consider setting conservation goals (reduce energy use 10% over same time last year, for example) and report progress. Helping to track and reduce resource use can be a great source of real-life lesson materials for students. 4. Encourage Others to Care for Creation Encourage employees, parishioners, and students to reduce their own environmental impact at home and places of work. Share information about energy conservation, recycling, and Care for Creation. Encourage public officials to establish policies and programs that are good for the environment.

CATHOLIC RESOURCES
Catholic Earthcare Australia: www.catholicearthcareoz.net USCCB Climate Change Justice and Health Initiative: www.usccb.org/sdwp/ejp/climate Catholic Climate Covenant. www.catholicclimatecovenant.org Catholic Coalition on Climate Change. www.catholicsandclimatechange.org/ NCEA: Ensuring a Healthy Environment:
www.ncea.org/departments/nabccce/EnvironmentalConcerns.asp

INTERDENOMINATIONAL RESOURCES
Green Congregations: www.webofcreation.org Interfaith Alliance Indianapolis Care for Creation Committee: www.interfaithindy.org/care Indianapolis Green Congregations Website:
www.ikecoalition.org/Green_Sanctuary/Green_Sanctuary.htm

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APPENDIX B: STAFF PRIORITIES
A meeting of Archdiocese administrative leadership staff* was held May 6, 2009 at which participants were asked to prioritize (and add or remove is necessary) seven organizational priorities:        Moral Obligation: “Care for Creation”; Educational Opportunity for Schools and Parishes; Budget Issues; “Walk the Talk”- Be an Example; Social Justice; Employee and Public Health; Meet Donor (Member) Interests/ Needs.

Attendees were also given the opportunity to discuss priorities during subsequent individual meetings held during May and June 2009. Individual staff priorities are listed below:

Staff Priorities – Responses of Archdiocese administrative leadership staff.
Top 2 priorities – Budget Issues and Moral Obligation. Addressing budget shortfall is short-term need, incorporating other values is long-term benefit. Good example: direct deposit instead of printing paychecks. Sometimes can have more efficient/cheaper result without sacrificing quality Everything comes under umbrella of “Meeting Member (Parish/Schools/Members) Needs and Interest”. Key questions are: are we doing the right things? Are we doing them as cost-effectively as possible? Are we meeting the needs of the people we serve? “Walk the Talk”: Lead by example, while still meeting all member needs Taking care of customer needs: other things under that umbrella: social justice, moral obligation, walk the talk, education. BUDGET of departments, and support and help the parishes. Be good stewards of dollars. Employee education is very important Have done many things thus far such as switching to LCDs. There are better ways to leverage technology such as having email company-wide. Concerned with building energy consumption, number of buildings and how space is used

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Staff Priorities - Values statements from individual staff interviews
We can potentially use Environmentally Preferable Products even if they cost a bit more because it is important. It is important to describe the environmental impacts in a way that is easily understood. “reduce/reuse/recycle” – believe in more efficient use of resources. Work toward becoming more efficient while still achieving goals – being conscious of how use resources and how environmental impact plays into that. Minimizing inputs and minimizing waste (Chemicals are different issue) – using resources more efficiently. VISIBILITY is key. There are little things happening, but need to be known/visible. We also need to save money The Archdiocese as an environment that respects the whole person - Mission as church, Care about people There is a value in being green, as it relates to hiring and retaining good people. Shows that we “practice what we preach” Key question: “Are we doing the right things in the right way?” I see this initiative as potentially saving jobs. It reduces inefficiencies and appeals to donors, who what to see the organization living its values We need to „walk the walk‟ by leading by example with win-win decisions making. Would like to see a heightened sense of understanding from ALL employees that it‟s the little things that matter. Ultimately, they are the ones flipping light switches, throwing recyclables into the correct bin. Culture shift/ education: adjusting their office temperature and deciding when an open window would provide an equivalent (or better – fresh air!) benefit to their working environment.

* Archdiocese administrative leadership staff attending May 6 meeting, and participating in subsequent individual meetings: Eric Atkins, Director of Management Services Ed Isakson, Director of Human Resources Stephen James, Director of Purchasing Tom O‟Drobinak, Director of Information Services Julie Shewmaker, Controller Jeff Stumpf, Chief Financial Officer John Wahl, Associate Director of Management Services

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APPENDIX C: INFORMATIONAL STAFF INTERVIEWS
Archdiocese staff interviewed:
Stephen James, Director of Purchasing Jeff Stumpf, Chief Financial Officer Julie Shewmaker, Controller Eric Atkins, Director of Management Services John Wahl, Associate Director of Management Services Ed Isakson, Director of Human Resources Tom O‟Drobinak, Director of Information Services May 18, 2009 June 11, 2009 May 18, 2009 May 7, 2009 May 13, 2009

Standard interview questions:
1. 2. Describe your professional role with the Archdiocese and the department you lead. How do you see your area fitting in with the Archdiocese‟ overall Environmental Stewardship Strategy? How can you be most effective in this role? 3. 4. Where would you like to see the Archdiocese Environmental Programs in 1 year? In 5? What inherent challenges are there for the Archdiocese to meet its environmental goals? For your department? 5. What inherent opportunities, assets, and resources exist within the Archdiocese to meet its environmental goals? Within your department? 6. Describe any existing environmental practices. What has made them successful? Is there anything that could be done to strengthen these practices? 7. Describe any environmental practices you‟ve tried to implement that haven‟t been successful. What were the stumbling blocks?

8.

What do you consider the key indicators for success in your area that we can begin collecting baseline data on?

9.

What would you most like to see come out of this process of Development of Environmental Stewardship Strategy?

10. What environmental projects would you like to see prioritized over the coming year? What makes this a priority?

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APPENDIX D: INVENTORY OF ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES
Archdiocese of Indianapolis - implemented environmental practices
Energy: Environmentally-friendly updates to Catholic Center and Xavier Building:

    

Number of light bulbs has been reduced by half All light bulbs have been change to “Green listed” types Windows have been updated to double pane and low-E glass Roof is Siplast type with added insulation All programs have been in place for the past 4 to 10 years.

(John Wahl, personal communication May 29, 2009)
Energy: 8 large and outdated Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) were replaced with one energy-efficient Liquid

Crystal Display (LCD) and a multi-port switch in the network operations center. (Tom O‟Drobinak,

personal communication June 11, 2009)
Energy: Information Services uses TightVNC and Remote Access (RAS) to make server changes from outer offices rather than opening the door to the network operations center which allows AC to escape.

Keeping the door closed to this room which must remain thermal-regulated saves energy. (Tom

O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009)
Energy: Information Services has implemented a centralized Uninterruptable power supply (UPS) system

which is much more energy efficient than the 20 or so stand-alone UPS units used previously. (Tom

O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009)
Energy: Information Services advises users that don‟t plan on using remote access to turn off their

computers over the weekend. (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009)
Water and Purchasing: Environmentally-friendly cleaning products are used in the Catholic Center and

Xavier Building, and is required by the contract with cleaning company (John Wahl, personal

communication May 29, 2009).
Waste: Recycling Program at Catholic Center includes office paper, newspaper, aluminum cans, and

plastic. It is collected throughout building at a central location on each floor. Program has been in place for the past 4 to 10 years. (John Wahl, personal communication May 29, 2009)
Waste: Information Services recycles all electronics like cell phones and computers at the closest city

ToxDrop locations where hey break down the entire computer and its components into individual materials such as plastics, metals, glass and precious metals to be recycled. Keeping electronics out of the landfill is important to reduce water pollution. (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11,

2009)
Land Use: Environmentally-friendly grounds maintenance practices are specified in contract. Turf grass

is not irrigated, grass clippings are mulched on-site, and grass is mowed at 3.5 inches (John Wahl,

personal communication May 29, 2009).
Purchasing: Eco-friendly products purchased:

  

Recycled ink cartridges (outside of HP contract). Cleaning supplies Trying to promote use of ionized water for cleaning, though no takers yet. Page

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Archdiocese of Indianapolis - implemented environmental practices

Energy efficient electric bulbs. Virco school furniture, which uses recycled plastic Try to support local vendors (Stephen James, personal communication May 3, 2009)

Purchasing: Have purchased and currently implementing “Intergen”, an environmentally safe and non-toxic fire suppression system for network operations center. (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June

11, 2009)
Communication and Outreach: Environmental Stewardship is referenced as an organizational value in

Archdiocese 2009 Yearbook: “The good steward cares for, protects, and preserves the environment. This directory is printed on recyclable paper.” (Archdiocese Aiii)
Communication and Outreach: Use of electronic communications which reduces paper use, postage

costs and travel (Various staff interviews, May - June 2009)      

Purchasing has website that is utilized for communications with parishes and schools Accounting submits electronic billing statements, pay stubs, and W2 forms Archdiocese Deposit and Loan Fund has electronic monthly statements Electronic delivery of Human Resources information Direct deposit of paychecks Electronic surveys used to solicit feedback from staff on IS training classes and HR Travel policy. Remote computer access available from home - “Go to My PC”

Financing Strategies: Archdiocese investment policy strictly prohibits investing in companies that are

repeatedly cited for polluting the environment. (Jeff Stumpf, personal communication May 13, 2009).

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Archdiocese environmental projects in planning or early implementation
Energy: Information Services is working to implement workstation virtualization so that office

computers don‟t have to be left home overnight to be accessed remotely. (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal

communication June 11, 2009).
Energy: Information services has begun setting Windows XP PC‟s and laptop‟s to minimal power

management settings, has begun to set hard disks to turn off after 10 minutes, and has begun to set LCD‟s to turn off after 5 minutes. This is being done manually. After July 1 of this year, IS will acquire a product called “Surveyor” from Verdiem which will enable these power management changes to be made remotely on networked computers. This will result in significant energy savings. (Tom

O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009)
Energy: Information Services is in acquisition and deployment of VMWare for server virtualization. This will allow for the use of fewer servers, which will save space and energy (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal

communication June 11, 2009)
Energy: Information services is in acquisition and deployment of workstation virtualization which allows login to occur directly at he server level, saving on PC hardware and energy. It will also allow employees to work remotely without leaving their computers on overnight. (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June

11, 2009)
Energy: As part of implementation of new fire suppression system, will increase thermal efficiency of

the network operations center by sealing holes, adding door sweeps, and plugging any existing gaps.

(Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009)
Energy: 7 energy efficiency projects are planned in Archdiocese parishes and schools for 2009:

1. St. Charles, Bloomington: New boiler and HVAC system for school 2008/2009 2. Holy Trinity, Indianapolis: Bockhold Hall roof replacement with added insulation Spring 2009 3. St. Denis, Jennings County: New church energy efficient windows Summer 2009 4. St. Thomas Aquinas, Indianapolis: New church boilers & air-conditioning Spring 2009; 5. St. Thomas Aquinas, Indianapolis: New energy efficient lighting for church-summer 2009 6. St. Philip Neri, Indianapolis: New school HVAC w/boilers and air-conditioning-Summer 2009 7. St. John, Indianapolis: New church boiler-Summer 2009

(Eric Atkins, personal communication April 21, 2009)

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Archdiocese environmental projects in planning or early implementation
Communication and Outreach: Information Services is working on several initiatives to improve staff‟s

ability to utilize electronic communications 1. Currently working on making email list of priests and principals accessible to secretary heads and agency directors in a public folder to better enable electronic communication. 2. Implementation of Exchange 2007 begins July 1 and will be implemented by the end of August 2009. It is expected to allow for standard email addresses to be made available through the Archdiocese email system. If this is not possible, there are other alternatives that could allow for a global email list such as email-forwarding systems. 3. Archdiocese has capability to eventually ask parishioners for email addresses and use this for widespread electronic communicaiton.

(Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009)
Waste: Information Services is in acquisition and deployment of Snag-it 9.1, including training classes.

This is a screen capture software solution that works in all applications, across dual-monitors and can scroll down capturing long web pages not currently visible. The goal is lessen the need to print out hard copies (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009) Energy: Information Services in acquisition and deployment of ServerCheck monitoring solution to monitor Network Operation Center equipment. This uses nearly 30 times less energy than monitoring software
running on a standard system. (Tom O‟Drobinak, personal communication June 11, 2009) Transportation and Travel: Beginning process of formalizing a centralized Travel Policy and Approval

Process for seminars/conferences/meals through Human Resources Office. (Ed Isakson, personal

communication May 18, 2009).

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APPENDIX E: SELECT EXPENSES AND IMPACTS – FY 2007 - 2008
Category
Travel

SubCategory
Mileage Fuel Travel

Cost (12 months)
$209,000 $10,863 $311,000

Percent of Category
39% 2% 59% 100% 32%

Percent of Total
9.9% 0.5% 14.8% 25.2% 6.2%

Major Environmental Impacts
Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels for car and air travel Water quality impacts from fuel and oil spills Air pollution, water use, and greenhouse gas emissions associated with utility use in hotel and conference facilities Air quality, water quality and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the chemicals and fossil fuels used to grow, store and transport food and beverages. Some choices have less environmental impact Air pollution, water use, and greenhouse gas emissions associated with utility and resources use for seminars, workshops, and in conference facilities

subtotal
Meals and Seminars Meals, Beverages and Entertainment

$530,863
$130,000

Seminars, Conferences and workshops

$271,000

68%

12.9%

subtotal

$401,000

100%

19.1%

Postage

Postage

$167,000

100%

7.9%

Air pollution, water pollution and use, biodiversity impacts and greenhouse gas emissions associated with

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Category

SubCategory

Cost (12 months)

Percent of Category

Percent of Total

Major Environmental Impacts
paper production

subtotal

$167,000

100%

7.9%

Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with transport of mail 0.8% Air pollution, water pollution and use, biodiversity impacts and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of paper, toner and other office supplies

Paper and Office Supplies

Paper (over 2.4 Million pages) Toner Office Supplies

$16,000

12%

$20,000 $102,000

14% 74% 100% 100% 6.6%

1.0% 4.8%

subtotal
Printing and Advertising Printing and Advertising

$138,000
$586,000

27.8%

subtotal
Solid Waste Expenses Shredding costs Trash service Recycling costs

$586,000
$840

Air pollution, water pollution and use, biodiversity impacts and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production and transport of paper and inks for printing and transport of printed product

100% 21%

27.8% 0.0% Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with handing and transport of solid waste Air pollution, water pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions associated with final disposal of waste

$1,200 $1,900

30% 48% 100% 58% 4% 31% 0.2%

0.1% 0.1%

subtotal
Utilities Electric Water Steam

$3,940
$99,500 $6,500 $54,000

4.7% 0.3% 2.6%

Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the burning of natural gas and fossil fuels for electricity. In Indiana, over 95% of electricity comes from the burning of coal. Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from the

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Category

SubCategory
Gas

Cost (12 months)
$12,500

Percent of Category
7%

Percent of Total
0.6%

Major Environmental Impacts
burning of solid waste for steam. While the relative environmental impacts are somewhat controversial, some environmentalists prefer the burning of solid waste as a renewable resource. Relative conservation associated with water use. Indiana’s clean drinking water resources are finite and need to be managed appropriately and conserved.

subtotal

$172,500

100%

8.2%

Cell Phones

Cell Phones

$105,000

100% 100%

5.0% 5.0%

subtotal

$105,000

Environmental impacts associated with the production, use and disposal of cell phones. The relative impact may be positive, however, if the use of cell phones allows for increased efficiencies and reduces unnecessary travel.

TOTAL

$2,104,303.00

100.0%

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APPENDIX F: COST SAVINGS POTENTIAL
Based upon preliminary Archdiocese budget information (Julie Shewmaker, personal communication March 23, 2009) and the prior experience of other organizations, the following table provides conservative estimates of the cost savings potential of select sustainability initiatives targeted to each Category. Category Cost (12 mo.) Mileage Fuel costs (Catholic Center and Indianapolis Catholic Charities) Utilities for Catholic Center and Xavier Building electric, steam and gas Utilities for Catholic Center and Xavier Building - water Postage Paper (over 2.4 Million pages) Toner $6,500 $167,000 $16,000 $20,000 5% 3% 5% 5% $325 $5,010 $800 $1,000 35% 15% 35% 10% $2,275 $25,050 $5,600 $2,000 $151,000 5% $7,550 35% $52,850 $10,863 5% $543 20% $2,173 $209,000 Lowrange % 5% Low-range $ $10,450 Highrange % 20% Highrange $ $41,800

Please note the following:     “Low range” estimates are conservative projections of what savings can reasonably be expected within a 12 month timeframe for each project. Not all projects can be implemented within the first 12 months. Rather, preliminary efforts must be prioritized based on cost-savings potential and other values. “High range” estimates represent possible results from the successful implementation of robust sustainability projects. These results typically take longer than 12 months to achieve. This preliminary analysis does not include all potential cost savings and revenue generation. For instance, there is significant additional cost-savings potential in the areas of travel, printing, workshops, shredding, and others not included here. These require a more in-depth analysis to accurately estimate.

Figures are based upon the prior experience of other organizations and are intended to estimate broad cost-savings potential only. Actual cost savings achieved will depend upon the timing, type, and quality of sustainability project implementation.

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APPENDIX G: POTENTIAL GOVERNMENT GRANT OPPORTUNITIES
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) began to infuse $787 billion of public funding into the economy in spring of this year. It is estimated that over $100 billion of this funding is targeted to support energy efficiency, renewable energy and green jobs growth. Funding is being distributed through direct grants, formula grants, loans and loan guarantees, tax incentives and discretionary allocations. Fund allocation began in early 2009 and will continue through early 2011. Select funding opportunities related to the ARRA and other sources are listed below. New ARRA funding opportunities are announced on an ongoing basis, so it is a good idea to keep on top of grant opportunities as they become available.

Federal Opportunities

Comments

No federal grant opportunities are currently open to non-profit entities. The following sites can be monitored for appropriate grant opportunities as they are announced:
DOE ARRA Website EPA ARRA Website EERE ARRA Website Federal Grants Website http://www.energy.gov/recovery/funding.htm http://www.epa.gov/recovery/ http://www1.eere.energy.gov/recovery/ http://www.grants.gov/

State Opportunities
Indiana Department of Energy Grants Programs http://www.in.gov/oed/2588.htm

Comments

FY 2009-2010 Programs not yet posted as of July 15, 2009. Last years‟ program included Energy Efficiency rebates, Alternative Power and Energy Programs, and a Geothermal Residential Rebate Program.

Indiana Department of Energy ARRA Funds

http://www.in.gov/oed/2583.htm Indiana has been allocated $68.6M in funding through the ARRA. Funding will be administered through the Indiana Department of Energy. Specific grant programs are still being developed and will be announced beginning in July 2009. The Department of Energy was contacted in May 2009 by Janet McCabe of the Indianapolis Green Congregations organization to express the interest and need for funds to be made available for energy efficiency projects in faith-based organizations.

Local Opportunities
SustainIndy Green Building Fund http://www.sustainindy.org/

Comments

The City of Indianapolis has designated $500,000 of ARRA funding for a Green Building Fund which will provide zero-interest loans and grants to support local green projects in the private and nonprofit sectors. Grants and loans will be awarded on a competitive basis with applicants applying directly to the city. More information regarding this fund will be available at www.sustainindy.org when funds are allocated by the Federal Government later this summer or fall.

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APPENDIX H: PRIVATE ENVIRONMENTAL GRANT-MAKING ENTITIES
Local Foundations
The McKinney Family Foundation The Clowes Fund Eli Lilly & Company Foundation Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust Arthur Jordan Foundation Central Indiana Community Foundation Efroymson Fund Melvin and Bren Simon Foundation Principal Financial Group Foundation Walmart / Sam‟s Club Foundation Key Foundation LACY Foundation Sycamore Foundation Sallie Mae Fund Indianapolis Foundation Indiana Pacers Foundation Belvedere Fund http://www.walmartstores.com/GlobalWMStoresWeb/navigate.do?catg=2 17 https://www.key.com/html/A-12.3.html http://www.sklla.org/ http://www.sycamorefoundation.org/ http://www.thesalliemaefund.org http://www.cicf.org/page26544.cfm http://www.nba.com/pacers/news/Foundation_Index.html http://www.belvederefund.org/ (note: not operational as of July 18) for complete application information. Contact: Catherine Lerza Tel: (202) 293-0062 http://www.principal.com/about/giving/index.htm http://www.efroymsonfund.org/ http://arthur-jordan-foundation.idilogic.aidpage.com/ http://www.cicf.org/ http://www.ninapulliamtrust.org http://www.clowesfund.org/ http://www.lilly.com/products/access/foundation.html

Website
No website. Mr. Robert McKinney and family.

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W.C. Griffith Foundation Trust Cinergy Foundation The Health Foundation of Greater Indianapolis Pfizer Foundation Matching Gifts Program Panta Rhea Foundation Daimler Chrysler Corporation Fund Reilly Foundation OneAmerica Foundation Noyes Foundation Sustainable Communities Grant Duke Energy Foundation Veolia Water http://www.duke-energy.com/community/foundation.asp http://www.indianapoliswater.com/ContentEngine.aspx?PageName=CO0 ServeCommunity IPL Community Grants http://www.iplpower.com/ipl/index?page=IPLGeneral&Menu=05010000 &DocID=0205016c163f01078f72b7310073e8 http://www.noyes.org/ http://www.ega.org/funders/funder.php?op=view&orgid=471 http://www2.daimlerchrysler.com/dccfund/ http://www.blindness.org/pdfs/PfizerMtchGiftForm.pdf http://www.museumsusa.org/vendors/info/1259131 http://www.thfgi.org/

Select National Foundations
Clinton Climate Initiative The Energy Foundation The Garfield Foundation The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation The Joyce Foundation http://www.joycefdn.org/ http://www.clintonfoundation.org/cf-pgm-cci-home.htm http://www.ef.org/home.cfm http://www.lisc.org/content/organizations/detail/1090 http://www.hewlett.org/

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APPENDIX I: REBATES AND TAX INCENTIVES
Rebate or Incentive
ARRA Tax Incentives

Comments
http://www.energy.gov/media/HR_1424.pdf Summary of tax incentive available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, including a 30% Investment Tax Credit for small-scale wind energy generation, and residential energy efficiency tax credits that will be of interest to employees and parishioners.

Residential Tax Credits for Energy Efficiency EnergyStar Rebates and Offers

http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=tax_credits.tx_index (Residential) http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=rebate.rebate_locator EnergyStar rebate locator, by zip code, including rebates for EnergyStar appliances, office equipment, heating and cooling equipment, lighting products, and more.

Indiana State Tax Credits for Energy Star Equipment Citizens Gas Commercial Efficiency Rebates Duke Energy - Small Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  Indianapolis Power and Light - PerfectCents Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

http://www.in.gov/oed/2379.htm http://www.citizensgas.com/forhomes/appliancerebates.html

http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=IN15F &re=1&ee=1

http://www.iplpower.com/ipl/index?page=IPLGeneral&Menu=01050400 &DocID=0205016c986701096a4e9803007c00

Vectren Energy Delivery Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates Irrigation Systems Discount

http://www.vectren.com/selectState.do;jsessionid=4TTZKpbNYDtDsMSd MdRQr3l3yTQDrQsGjLyDK4c5wPhvVlV1FT2J!481578055 http://www.indianapoliswater.com/115.html Indianapolis Water is partnering with Automatic Irrigation Supply Company (AIS), a Fishers-based irrigation supply company, to offer a discount on its irrigations systems products such as rain and moisture sensors.

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Published for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis by

The Newday Group, LLC
Anna L. Jetmore-Vargas, MEM 909 West 77th Street South Drive Indianapolis, Indiana 46260 USA This document is available through the Archdiocese of Indianapolis for non-commercial use. Please send corrections and comments to Anna Jetmore-Vargas (ajetmore@newdayindiana.com) Type: Tw Cen MT © 2009 The Newday Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

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