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2008
Volume 4, Number 2, Issue 16
MAR • APR

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40 ON THE COVER
Photos: Ichiro Nagata

40 ONE IS NONE — TWO IS ONE BOB PILGRIM


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46 BORSTAR MICHAEL BAUM


22
Border Patrol’s Elite Search And Rescue Team.

51 VIRGINIA TECH SHOOTINGS FRANK BORELLI


Why Do Students Sit Still?

56 IT’S ABOUT CONTROL JEREMY D. CLOUGH


How To Understand And Zap The Average DV Perp.

60 TERRORIST ATTACKS — EXPLOSIVES HOWARD LINETT


It’s Only A Matter Of Time.

64 PSYCHOLOGICAL TRAUMA ROBERT D. BOYDEN, PH.D.


Take Care Of Your Officers.

68 PROBATION & PAROLE 101 BEN CHRISTIE


Community Supervision.
4 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:31 PM Page 5

56

COLUMNS 64
16 LEAA JAMES J. FOTIS
18 CORRECTIONS BRIAN DAWE
48
20 HIGH TECH BOB DAVIS
24 OFFICER SURVIVAL SAMMY REESE
26 EVOC ANTHONY RICCI
28 PRIVATE SECURITY ED PALUMBO
30 RESERVES PERRY W. HORNBARGER

32 STREET LEVEL JOHN MORRISON


34 REALITY CHECK II
36 CARRY OPTIONS MARK HANTEN
CLINT SMITH

RESOURCES
31 RECRUITMENT
38 HARD TOOLS PAUL MARKEL
76 SPOTLIGHT

DEPARTMENTS 28 80 CLASSIFIEDS
80 AD INDEX
8 RETURN FIRE
22 ON THE JOB 60
82 INSIDER RUMINATIONS
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AMERICAN COP
PUBLISHER
THOMAS von ROSEN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ROY HUNTINGTON
EDITOR DAVE DOUGLAS
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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
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CCW/DUTY CARRY EDITOR MARK HANTEN
TECHNOLOGY EDITOR BOB DAVIS
VEHICLE/EVOC EDITOR ANTHONY RICCI
OFFICER SAFETY EDITOR SAMMY REESE
PROFFESIONAL SECURITY EDITOR ED PALUMBO
SUPERVISORY SKILLS EDITOR JOHN MORRISON
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“ If we’re going to
attempt to conceal
our identities off duty,
it would be nice to
receive the magazine


in a discreet way.
Officer Survival Column
Sammy, great article on officer safety scribers. Sorry about that but my
and concealing our identities. However bosses have told me it’s a cost issue.
you better add one more to your list — Apparently, putting the magazine in a
receiving a magazine in the mail with the blank sleeve would force us into
name American COP in bold print with line of sight. Hey guys, great magazine. I another postal rate and cost a bundle.
all our information stamped on the front look forward to getting it every other They tell me they are working on a
cover. If we’re going to attempt to con- month. It can be a big aid to training. solution but I’m not holding my breath.
ceal our identities off duty, it would be However, I agree we should all try to As for the take-home car situation,
nice to receive the magazine in a discreet keep our identities hidden when not on Sammy’s former agency provided take-
way. Remember, not all of us drive big the job. Just something to think about. home rides to their patrol cops. His
shiny patrol cars home and park them in Dan Morton,THP solution to the problem was parking
the front yard. And, most of us with take the car in front of his neighbor ’s
home cars have sense enough to park Dan, you are absolutely right about house. Funny thing, Sammy’s house
them in the garage or out of the direct how the magazine is mailed to sub- never got egged or TPed but for some

ENFORCEMEN
LLAW T

SUP
PLIES

8 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


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reason it happened often to his
neighbor — go figure. Dave
99++ #PING*GCF
Policy Changes
Dave, some recent changes to police
policies in California restrict foot
chases. Police administrators cite risk
to the officer and the perpetrator, too
often underscoring their possible result
of a police shooting.
Administrators are restricting how
and when officers can sprint after a sus-
pect. They outline alternatives like heli-
copters and radios to coordinate a
perimeter for a grid search. Speaking as
someone who has worked high-crime
areas as a street cop, this policy is as
ridiculous as it is transparent.
This policy is a symptom of race pol-
itics undermining law and order. Fear of
lawsuits and negative press has Sheriffs
and Chiefs on the run — instead of the
criminal. They fear for their jobs over I^emd
controversy spun by the media over the 7YjkWb
use of force on minorities. I_p[
Here is a reality check: per capita,
minorities commit a disproportionate
number of violent crimes. It stands to ?j _i j^[
reason minorities would therefore be the D;M b_]^j
subject of most chases and use of force. X[_d] ki[Z Xo
Patrol cops have a front-row seat to jeZWo½i bWm [d\ehY[c[dj0
watch a criminal justice system intimi-
dated by race hustlers, rogue civil ?djheZkY_d] j^[
rights attorneys and the liberal media.
Hamstrung and stewing in frustration JWYj_YWb B_]^j Xo <_hij#B_]^j KI7$
cops witness our country imploding
under the influence of a leaderless gov-
ernment too timid to hold the line and
back the warriors among us.
Doug Traubel,
Detective in Idaho

Doug, makes you want to just grab


the admin weenies by the collar and
shake their sorry butts. They’ve been
away from the streets too long and forget
there really are bad guys out there. Not
the disadvantaged — but bad guys.
We should not drop foot pursuits <ehmWhZ#\WY_d] ^[WZbWcf$
because we might — heaven forbid —
catch a bad guy. And, if we’re forced to H[j[dj_ed Yb_f CEBB; h[WZo  Åd][h beef$
shoot him in the process, not only
should he not have run, but he 7BB Yedjhebi kdZ[h ed[ j^kcX$
shouldn’t have placed the officer in a DWjkhWbbo Wb_]di m_j^ f_ijebi  h_Æ[i$
position where deadly force was neces-
sary. I’m a big believer in the idea of CeZ[b efj_edi _dYbkZ[0 IjheX[" Ckbj_#Yebeh"
personal responsibility. If you run from '(& bkc[di" B; h[Z#m^_j[#Xbk[ iW\[jo ÆWi^"
a cop or do something threatening his ?d\hWh[Z WdZ ceh[$
life, you are responsible for your own
death or injury. I don’t have a bit of I[[ m^o j^[ K$I$ 8ehZ[h FWjheb WdZ
sympathy. I just feel bad for the sus- fhe\[ii_edWbi [l[hom^[h[ Y^eei[ <_hij#
pect’s family, the officer and the B_]^j KI7 Wj mmm$Åhij#b_]^j#kiW$Yec
officer’s family — not the dirtbag.
The very last group admin should
worry about is the press. They need us
more than we need them. If the commu-
nity has a gripe about a shooting, that’s
one thing. If the press wants to make
WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM
.--#*+*#**+&
MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:32 PM Page 12
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hay over a shoot, admin needs to
remember when that reporter or news
director goes home at night he could
give a crap about the poor disadvan-
taged, gang-banging, beer-swilling,
dope-smoking miscreant — but he does
care about his advertisers — it’s all
money driven. Tears and blood sell.
We can’t run a law enforcement
agency like it was a department store.
Sometimes, as a matter of fact some-
what often, we’re going to have dis-
satisfied customers. Build a bridge
and get over it. That’s the nature of
police work. If the situation was war-
ranted and the shooting is clean, I
think of it as just being Darwin’s little
helpers. Dave
Reserves Column
I’ve seen many journals of other
professions and I must have missed
where another party not hired to do that
job thought it was fun. So, they thought
they’d get a smattering of the training
and go do it for free.
I don’t care how well meaning or
sincere the volunteer is, if they are
doing someone else’s job for nothing
and they do not have or cannot get the Premium Night Sights & Optics
skills and training needed to do that job,
then they have no business playing at it. Meprolight® offers eighty models of premium night sights for pistols,
And since your ad stated the magazine rifles and shotguns, including some with dual color combinations.
was “for cops, by cops” then either you They are impervious to solvents, useable in virtually any light and carry
are making a big mistake in your adver-
tising or just full of bunk — which is it? a 12-year illumination warranty. Eight new models are available for 2007.
I’d like to play at being a doctor and Meprolight Reflex sights are battle-tough, and illuminate without battery
maybe a few other professions too, but
they don’t allow it. My agency was power. Three reticles are available, adjustments are positive .5 MOA clicks,
forced to stop it by union pressure. and a 30mm lens is quick to target. Meprolight is the right sight in any light.
They took away tons of OT first from
us by allowing those “players” to do Exclusively imported by For free catalog contact Kimber, Dept 971,
the “dress like a cop” thing and make a One Lawton Street, Yonkers, NY 10705,
joke out of the job. Of course the call (800) 880-2418 or
visit www.kimberamerica.com
“dress-ups” had to call the real police
when they ran across a problem, as
Copyright 2007 Kimber Mfg., Inc. All rights reserved. Kimber names, logos and other
they had no idea what to do. trademarks may not be used without permission. Names of other companies, products
It takes a rookie a few hundred and services may be the property of their respective owners.

hours of academy and OJT to get to


where they too have a clue how to
handle the job. Hope you get my drift
and take that column out of COP mag-
azine — unless you want to put in the
other column about civilians playing
brain surgeon. Get the point?
Steven S.Baum,
Niagara Falls P.D. 25 years

Steven, ain’t gonna happen. The


column stays. You are HUA if you think
today’s reserves and auxiliary officers
lack training. Even 30 years ago when I
started out as a reserve with our local
sheriff ’s department, the training was
the same as it was for the regulars —
just extended over a longer time frame.
But, it was the same training conducted
by the same trainers at the same training
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facility. I know because when I was hired are added to the mix. After receiving the ,JNCFS
as a regular, I went through it again.
As for taking away OT — never saw
it here. There was plenty to go around.
surplus rifles, several of our officers
bought their own; Bushmaster and Rock
River in semi-auto mode only as we
"DDFTTPSJFT
!VAILABLEFROMDEALERSOR
The reserves took the crap jobs like really don’t see the need for full auto,
directing traffic at ballgames, and besides the surplus guns are available if DIRECTFROM+IMBER
parades or transporting stinking puking needed. I did as well.
drunks to jail for us. I’ll give them every We were allowed to qualify and carry
single minute of that they want — I the “personal rifles” on duty. Since the
hated directing traffic. (“Is this road original purchase, I’ve purchase some
closed?” “No lady, it’s our annual flare toys; 3-9 power illuminated Mil-dot
burn off day. If we don’t get rid of them scope, EOTech 512 red dot sight, Rail
before the end of the fiscal year we don’t fore grips and even a cheap laser along
get as much in next year’s budget.”) with a tactical light. But the most valu-
What about volunteer fire depart- able “accessory” I purchased was a pro-
ments? Are you going to tell a gressive reloader to produce cheap “Duty
“reserve/volunteer” firefighter to put Equivalent” ammunition for practice.
that hose down and leave when your The practice is well worth it as my
house is burning? Dave recent qualifications can attest. I’ve
qualified with iron sights, the EOTech ,JNCFS¥3JNmSF5BSHFU 5.

Corrections Column and I’m making plans to qualify with DPOWFSTJPOLJUT NWZ4:IVL
Brian, as a Calif. CO I enjoy your the scope. Our department isn’t large 5IKPÅ\UW[\!JZIVL[IVL
columns but I want to clarify something enough to have a dedicated SWAT QV[\ITT_Q\PW]\\WWT[QVWVMUQV]\M
in the Jan/Feb issue. As you know most team, but calls on bigger department’s
POST positions at prisons are not SWAT guys if necessary.
armed and in Calif. if you work a non- As Clint Smith points out, that
armed position you only qualify once a resource is usually and hour or two
year, which means most COs in Calif. away — unacceptable in an active
only go to the range during our annual shooter situation.
one week block training. The armed I find I agree with Clink Smith
positions qualify quarterly. totally. I have the “toys” to use should
By the way you might find this inter- the tactical situation dictate, but I keep
esting, at CDC & R we still carry S&W it in “iron sight mode.” <PM,JN1SP™ 5BD.BH™Q[\PM
mod 64 .38 cal weapons and earlier this Thanks for the great articles! ]T\QUI\M[\IQVTM[[[\MMT!)+8
year, admin took away our shotguns for Ptl. L. Apple,
transportation runs — go figure. I look West Carrollton PD UIOIbQVM*W\PN]TT[QbMIVLKWUXIK\
forward to your next column. ^MZ[QWV[IZMI^IQTIJTM
Mark Muckenthaler Just finished reading Mr. Smith’s
“I’m Sorry You're Not An Operator”,
Officer Muckenthaler, thanks so article in the Jan/Feb 08 issue. For one
much for writing and setting me of the first times I can think of, I totally
straight on the qualification specifics of agree with him.
CDC. I was under the impression all I’ve watched departments here slide
COs in the CDC had to qualify quar- down the same slope, not only with
terly. I’d also like to thank you for sub- rifles but shotguns as well. Every thing-
scribing to American COP. a-my-bob you could think of had to be <PM,JNCFS$VTUPN4IPQ
At COP, we recognize corrections as had or hung on the guns, the “new
an important part of the law enforce- lions” believed it made them work WNNMZ[ÅVM!OZQX[VQOP\[QOP\[
ment community and provide a forum better, and oh so cool (Chicks love XMZNWZUIVKMXIZ\[IVLZMÅVQ[PQVO_Q\P
to discuss corrections issues. Many cool), us old timers (aka dinosaurs) just \PMPQOP\MKP3QU8ZW11‘XZWKM[[
civilians don’t understand the pivotal plodded along trying to help.
roll we play, in fact many LE profes- Hell, when I started — so many years
sionals also lack that understanding. ago — it was the model-27 3.5" or Colt-
If you get a chance, check out 357 6" on the hip backed up by the Win-
www.COIntel.net. I think you’ll find a chester 30-30 in the trunk and double
lot of useful information on our pro- barrel 12 from Stevens. Sorry rambling.
fession. Be safe, and watch your back OUTSTANDING MR.SMITH.
in there. Brian D. James Sgt/ret
;dgXdbeaZiZ^c[dgbVi^dcdc@^bWZg[^gZVgbh
Reality Check II Column AMERICAN COP TM welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve VcYVXXZhhdg^ZheaZVhZhZcY'id/
I found myself in complete agree- the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due @^bWZg9Zei,-%!
ment with Clint Smith. My department to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your DcZAVlidcHigZZi!Ndc`Zgh!CN&%,%*!
received some “surplus” M-16s from letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to American COP, you agree XVaa-%%--%"')&-dgk^h^i
to provide Publishers Development Corp. such copyright as is lll#`^bWZgVbZg^XV#Xdb
some program of the Federal Govern-
required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your
ment several years ago and equipped letter in any format. Send your letters to Return Fire, American
*OGPSNBUJPOBOETQFDJmDBUJPOTBSFGPSSFGFSFODFPOMZBOETVCKFDUUPDIBOHFXJUIPVUOPUJDF'JSFBSNTBGFUZJTFWFSZ
HVOPXOFSTSFTQPOTJCJMJUZ6TFBOETUPSFBMMmSFBSNTTBGFMZ5FBDIFWFSZPOFJOZPVSIPNF FTQFDJBMMZDIJMESFO 
them with “Tactical Lights” (the COP, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; www.ameri-
QSPQFSmSFBSNTBGFUZ,JNCFSmSFBSNTTIPVMEPOMZCFQVSDIBTFEBOEVTFEJODPNQMFUFDPNQMJBODFXJUIBMMOBUJPO
BM TUBUFBOEMPDBMMBXT"MMTVHHFTUJPOTGPSVTFJOUIJTBEPS BOZ,JNCFSMJUFSBUVSFNVTUCFUBLFOXJUIJOUIFDPOUFYU
cheapest they could find.) cancopmagazine.com;
PGUIFTFMBXT,JNCFSmSFBSNTBSFTIJQQFEXJUIB$BMJGPSOJBBQQSPWFEDBCMFMPDLBTBTBGFUZNFBTVSF"EEJUJPO

*
BMMZ QJTUPMTBSFTIJQQFEJOBMPDLBCMFIJHIJNQBDUDBTF6TFPGUIFDBCMFMPDLBUBMMUJNFTJTFODPVSBHFEXIFOB
I agree basic iron sight marksmanship e-mail: ed@americancopmagazine.com.
mSFBSNJTJOTUPSBHF,JNCFSPXOFSTNBZSFRVFTUBGSFFDBCMFMPDLCZNBJM*ODMVEFGPSQPTUBHFBOEIBOEMJOH
$PQZSJHIU ,JNCFS.GH *OD
needs to be mastered before any “toys”
WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 15
MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:32 PM Page 16

LEAA JAMES J. FOTIS

THE LAW ENFORCEMENT ALLIANCE OF AMERICA.

UNDER
SEIGE n many ways, 2007 was a very bad year for law enforce-

I ment. Based on data available when this was written from


Craig Floyd of NLEOMF, it appears 2007 was one of the
most deadly years for cops — nearing 170 fallen at time of
writing. That represents an increase of nearly 40 percent over
this time last year.
Reflected as well is a
“dramatic spike” in
fatal shootings; again,
up over 40 percent so
far in 2007.
Almost as alarming
is the fact 40 of the cop
killers over the last
decade have been under
18 years old. Floyd
identifies them as “a
cold-blooded criminal
element with no regard
for human life.”

Confirmation
his characterization seems to be

T confirmed by the five-year FBI


study, Violent Encounters: A
study of Felonious Assaults on
It’s NOT
Crime
Our Nation’s Law Enforcement Officers.
Bad guys had no hesitation whatsoever
about pulling the trigger and the
“Offenders typically displayed no moral
or ethical restraints in using firearms.”
So, more cops were killed and cop
killers and criminals seem to be
quicker to choose to attack and try to
Controls LEAA makes clear, Gun
kill us; there appears to be insuffi-
cient deterrence.
In response, politicians (mostly with
a “D” after their names) have chosen to
blame guns and groups like the NRA;
A control is NOT Crime con-
trol; never has been, never
will be! Space limitations
prevent me from detailing just how
wrong these hug-a-thug politicians
one politician actually said it was time are for blaming guns, honest gun
to “tell the NRA to take a hike.” They owners or the NRA for causing
are willing to play politics as usual and cop killers. For example, the NRA
propose more meaningless gun-control trains more law enforcement
laws, rather than deal with the real Continued on page 73
issues, and propose real solutions.
James J. Fotis is a retired officer from New York and the Executive Director of the Law Enforcement Alliance of America (LEAA). LEAA works to promote officer safety issues, defend law enforcement in the media and promote
the belief that gun control is not crime control. You can find out more or become a member of the hard-hitting, conservative, unabashedly pro-cop, pro-gun, pro-self defense LEAA by visiting their Web site at www.leaa.org

16 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:32 PM Page 17

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MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:33 PM Page 18

CORRECTIONS BRIAN DAWE

BEHIND THE FENCE.

is 14 per 100,000
Suicide rate of prisoners in state custody
y is 47 per 100,000
Suicide rate of prisoners in county custod

County jails assault


rate — 2.7 per 100 on staff
inmates
State facilities assaul ong county
t on
rate — 1.4 per 100 staff AIDS/HIV am3 times higher
inmates wastate counterparts
Federal facilities assa than their s
rate — 0.9 per 100ult on staff
inmates

ates
15.6 percent of county inmmbers
were identified as ga ng me Average Daily Po
s were past 10 years increapulation for the
13.4 percent of state inmate
mb ers
sed
systems by 30.45 pein the state
identified as gang me rcent
ates were Average Daily Popu
11.7 percent of federal inmmbers la
past 10 years increation for the
identified as gang me county systems by sed in the
51.07 percent
was asked recently if I’d be
K
I willing to testify as an expert wit-
ness on corrections at contract arbi-
tration in Suffolk County, New
York. I’ve done this many times in the
past, but still felt a few hours to refresh
my brothers and
sisters working in a
state prisons and
almost triple the assault
I
d
K
my memory by going over some new county system. The rate in federal facilities. County jails
statistics would be needed. first thing that jumped out was the dis- have an assault on staff rate of 2.7 per O
When I began to prepare my presen- parity between the number of assaults 100 inmates. In state facilities it’s 1.4 C
tation I was stunned at the differences on staff compared to state and federal per 100 and 0.9 in the federal system. a
between the inmates I encountered as a prisons. Assaults on staff in our nation’s When I looked at the Average Daily K
state correctional officer and those of county jails were nearly double that of Population (ADP) for the past 10 years
I found although the number of r
inmates in state custody had increased –

ALARMING INDICATIONS by 30.45 percent from 1995 to 2006,


the increase in our county jails was a
whopping 51.07 percent. Assault rates
K

ther indicators, such as suicide rates, were alarming. Inmates commit began to make more sense.

O suicide in state custody at a rate of 14 per 100,000; in the county sys-


tems that number was an astronomical 47 per 100,000 — over three
times higher. Another major concern involved mental health issues —
56 percent of state inmates were found to have some form of mental disorder
while 64 percent of county inmates suffered from these maladies. Among state
Only Jail?
inmates, 15 percent were deemed to have psychotic disorders, while 24 percent ’d gained a newfound respect for
of county inmates suffered — one out of every four inmates. Also I found
AIDS/HIV among county inmates was three times higher than their state coun-
terparts; 1.8 percent of the population compared to 0.5 percent. I attempted to
look at the effect terrorism and tighter immigration enforcement is having on
the system but statistically it’s just too early to tell, although we do know an
I my brothers and sisters in the
county system. There is a public
misconception when you discuss
county, state and federal inmates. The
public, much of the media and our
overdue crackdown on illegal immigration is having a substantial impact on politicians often look upon a county jail
daily population levels. and say, “It’s only a jail, the real bad
Corrections realize 1/3 of all violent incidents in our nation’s prisons and guys are in the state prison or federal
jails are gang related. No longer surprised, I found 15.6 percent of county pen.” How wrong they are.
inmates were identified as gang members compared to 13.4 percent of state Continued on page 75
and 11.7 percent of federal inmates.

18 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:33 PM Page 19

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;dg XdbeaZiZ ^c[dgbVi^dc dc @^bWZg
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MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:33 PM Page 20

HIGH TECH BOB DAVIS

CUTTING EDGE WIDGETS — AND OTHER NEW STUFF.

HIGH TECH HIDE & SEEK

f there’s anything I’ve learned in 30 years of policing always room for Jell-O so there’s got to be room for one or

I it’s you need a big tool box if you want to be efficient.


Along with the regular stuff — guns, knives, handcuffs
and batons — you have to throw in a few gadgets now
and then. Gadgets are like Jell-O; we all know, there’s
two good toys in the toolbox.
This gadget is a sophisticated global positioning system or
GPS device made by DeWALT called MOBILELOCK. That’s
right, the big tool company that uses a lot yellow in marketing
their products. They came up with a gem hiding in plain sight
with very little yellow on it. If you ask me, it’s pretty savvy

Smart Widgets
he DS500
because very few bad guys will ever associate a high-tech
recovery device with a company known for power tools.

T MOBILE-
LOCK comes
with four sen-
sors packed into its
tiny 3.5"x 4.5"x1"
casing holding a
rechargeable bat-
tery lasting about 4
weeks before
recharging. The
model 505 comes
with an additional
housing for 4 “D”
size batteries and
extends the run life
Assisted GPS
f you don’t have easy access to
up to three months.
Built-in sensors
detect tampering,
door contact
opening, vibration
I the Internet, you can always pro-
gram the device over a touchtone
phone, so you always have
access. In addition to the four basic
sensors, each unit uses state-of-the-
and temperature art “Assisted GPS.” Assisted GPS
changes. All can be uses both satellite and known cellular
programmed indi- towers to “assist” in locating the unit
vidually with even if the crooks attempt to hide the
DeWALT’s very cool Web-base interface. You can customize settings, such as stolen goods out of sight. When a
alarm times, vibration sensitivity, and alerts. You can even give each sensor a thief disturbs a piece of protected
nickname instead of using its electronic serial number. equipment or property, or attempts to

20 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:21 AM Page 21

$NCEM 5JGGR
QH VJG (COKN[
remove the unit from the asset, the
alarm activates and a silent signal is
sent over the cellular network. In
turn, notifications are sent to three
pre-programmed telephone numbers
or e-mail addresses alerting the owner
in matter of moments. The downside;
if you work in an area with little or
no cellular coverage, you’re out of
luck. But if the crooks move the
goods to a covered area, you’re back
in business. Just “ping” the MOBILE-
LOCK from their Web site and you’ll
get a real time location tied into
Microsoft’s global mapping system in
a matter of moments.
Now there are some costs involved
with this technology. Since the device
uses cellular networks to notify

Using the High Tech


GPS MOBILELOCK,
reminds me of playing
hide-n-seek as a kid.
Well, I’m not a kid 8bWYa I^[[f eh
playing hide-n-seek M^_j[ Ad_]^j5 Kdb_a[
Wdo ÆWi^b_]^j X[\eh["
anymore; nowadays I j^[
have some cool new JWYj_YWb B_]^j [dWXb[i oek je iW\[bo
f[h\ehc Wdo jWia" m_j^ Xej^ ^WdZi$
tools to use. Ready or
not here I come.
owners, there’s a monthly service
charge, which includes several
“locates.” You can also pre-purchase
blocks of 50 “locates” for $25.
These devices are targeted at the
construction industry. They’re
designed to attack the burgeoning
problem of construction site larceny.
And, even though the device is pas-
sive, its unique technology allows it to
become a pro-active tool for law I[[ m^o j^[ K$I$ 8ehZ[h FWjheb WdZ
enforcement. Besides the obvious fhe\[ii_edWbi [l[hom^[h[ Y^eei[ <_hij#
applications the potential for other
law enforcement uses — whether sur- B_]^j KI7 Wj mmm$Åhij#b_]^j#kiW$Yec
reptitious surveillance of a suspect’s
car, an electronic geographic fence or I[Ykh[" jme#^WdZ[Z m[Wfed ]h_f$
setting up bait cars in high crime
areas, or simple motion detection in IW\[h m[Wfed ^WdZb_d]$
restricted areas — is tremendous. DWjkhWbbo Wb_]di m_j^ f_ijebi  h_Æ[i$
Using the High Tech GPS MOBILE-
LOCK, reminds me of playing hide-n- CeZ[bi _dYbkZ[0 '(&#bkc[d ekjfkj m_j^
seek as a kid. Well, I’m not a kid h[Z Åbj[h1 '(&#bkc[d ekjfkj c_b#if[Y m_j^
playing hide-n-seek anymore; nowa- CEBB; h[j[dj_ed Yb_f WdZ '(&#bkc[d ekjfkj
m_j^ ijheX[$
days I have some cool new tools to
use. Ready or not
here I come. *
More Info: www.dewalt.com/mobilelock

WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM
.--#*+*#**+&
MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:21 AM Page 22

ON THEJOB COMMANDER GILMORE

A CAREFULLY SELECTED COLLECTION OF SLAPSHOTS AND SNOT-FLINGIN’ FUNNY STUFF FROM FELLOW COPS.

Not Quite Up To
Date On Technology
obert Lyn White had a plan — but not a clue — he worked. He thought he was getting

R when he burglarized the Southside Laundry in


Elko, Nevada. The well-known
52-year old local resident knew the
place was monitored by six sur-
away clean — pardon the pun, okay?
Robert truly couldn’t figure it out when
officers showed up at his door soon after
the burglary was discovered. How could
veillance video cameras, so they have known? He took the cam-
after he bagged up the eras. But, he hadn’t taken the video
rest of his loot, he went recorder or the tape which captured
from one camera to the his every twitch and chuckle — close-
next carefully discon- up and personal. Nevada
necting and removing State Prison may offer a
them. He figured since course like, “Under-
he was stealing the cam- standing Basic Tech-
eras, it didn’t matter if nology 101.”
he stared right into Just imagine being
them while he the officer who
was loosening patiently explained to
bolts and nuts, him, “Remember
doing a little those fat cords you
laughing and unscrewed from
mugging for the backs of the
the cameras as cameras? See, the
pictures kinda
squeeze down
real skinny, and
they flow like
water through
those tubes back
to this metal box-
thingie, and….”

Jerry Meloche

ANOTHER TECHNO DUMMY found 46-year old Kurt Husfeldt standing


there with the stolen unit in his hands,
t first it looked like the city of scratchin’ some techno-cop with Suf- trying to figure out how that funny-

A Babylon, New York was SOL


— Seriously Outta Luck —
and missing 14 expensive new
GPS devices. They were intended to be
used by operators of the town’s snow-
folk County came up with one of those
“why didn’t we think of this first?”
ideas. They turned the GPS receiver on
and hit “search.”
Bingo! One of the errant GPS devices
lookin’ “cell phone” worked.
Husfeldt, his 13-year old son, and a
20-year old accomplice were charged
in the theft. They thought they had
stolen a buncha fancy new cell phones
plows, street sweepers and dump was fired up and operating, making a and were trying to get one to make a
trucks. The public works garage had neat little blip on the screen. Officers call. It did — but not the kinda call they
been burglarized and there were no easily homed in on a residence in nearby expected. It called Momma and said,
apparent clues. After a little head Lindenhurst. When the cops arrived, they “Come get me!”

AND IT WORKS GREAT ON UNWANTED GUESTS


ome guys have mother-in-law problems. Aaron de “She yelped,” de Bruyn admitted, “Because getting

S Bruyn said he had a grandmother-in-law problem.


It seems he couldn’t get her to shut up and couldn’t
get her to leave the house, which, one presumes,
would have also taken care of problem number one. He
found another approach, but it wasn’t very socially sensi-
stunned hurts.” Well, duh… He called police and reported
he had a relative in his house who wouldn’t leave. Consid-
ering she had just been shocked maybe, at that point, she
wasn’t able to leave. Maybe she was still taking a little
twitch-an’-shiver break on the floor.
tive: He zapped her with his stungun. Ol’ Rosemary was checked out and declared to be
Yup. His wife’s granny, 79-year old Rosemary Garlock, okay. Aaron was checked in at Washington’s Skamania
was sittin’ on the sofa when Aaron poked her with 50,000 County Jail and charged with fourth-
volts. He didn’t seem to think that was overdoing it. degree domestic violence. *
Got something to share? Send it to me at OnTheJobStuff@Yahoo.com and if I use it, I’ll fish around in my desk and find some kinda cheap gizmo to send you.
22 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:21 AM Page 23
MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:21 AM Page 24

OFFICERSURVIVAL SAMMY REESE

GETTING HOME IN THE SAME CONDITION YOU WENT TO WORK IN.

The Back Up Gun


he argument over backup weapons and

T where to carry them is almost as bad as


Weaver Vs. Isosceles — I don’t care which
stance you use to defend yourself as long as
you win and the bad guy doesn’t. No one will
care or ask what stance you used.
The argument over backup weapons gets cops’
hackles up. Some won’t go anywhere — on or off
duty — without two or more guns. Some will cry
and moan about having to worry about
retaining two guns, it costs too much money
and it’s too heavy. I’ll ask a simple question,
how much is your life worth? I bet to your
family there’s no way to put a price on it.
Recently, a rural deputy told me he
has a second gun but doesn’t have a way
to carry it. He patted his duty gun and
said, “I guess I’ll have to live and die with
this one.” Let’s just say we found a way for
him to carry the second gun.

It’s Worth
Your Life
oming from the school of one

C is none and two is one, you


know which side of the
backup gun argument I am
going to take. Without debating too
heavily how and what to carry, I’ll Carry Options
stand on top of my soap box
and yell, please carry a second here to carry is always tough. Today we
gun somewhere on your
person — where you can
access it with either hand. And
then, practice with it. When or
if you need it, things have
W carry more gear than Batman, but the new
generation of guns are so light — the
ammo weighs more than the gun. Just
remember these super light guns are not fun to shoot
— unless you’re into pain. But if you really need it,
D
gotten really bad and there you’ll never notice.
will be no time for fam-fire or Ankle rigs, pocket holsters and special pouches on
warm ups. Plan and what-if vests have made packing a second gun much easier.
the worst possible situation Quality stuff costs money and I already covered the
you might find yourself in and how much your life is worth part. Take a few days off
practice saving your life. from buying Moca-frapa-lattes and use the money to
What to carry is a personal buy a quality holster. If you stay away from the fufu
choice and may also be dic- coffee house for a while — 5 bucks a day for a month
tated by department policy. I is around $150. That’s good enough for a quality hol-
know of cops carrying what ster and some practice ammo. Another six months and
most would consider a duty you’ve got the gun too.
gun for backup and others car- Law enforcement today has more challenges than
rying a two-shot derringer. when editor Douglas hit the streets — you put gas in
The ability to pull out some your car, he had a grain bucket — but technology has
type of bullet launcher is the made doing the job easier and tougher. Just ask any
far better option opposed to a pocket cop trying to do a traffic stop while all the occupants of the car are videotaping or
full of lint. Clint Smith says you can recording him on camera phones. What hasn’t changed is you only have the tools
never have too big a gun or too much you have on you when the bell rings. I hope you never need the backup
ammo when it hits the fan. gun you have diligently carried every day. Don’t die wishing you had one. *
24 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:21 AM Page 25

The Stinger DS LED From Streamlight.


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MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:21 AM Page 26

EVOC ANTHONY RICCI

SURVIVING IN YOUR MOBILE OFFICE.

FATIGUE ON THE JOB


DWT — DRIVING WHILE TIRED ver have one of those days when nothing goes right? Perhaps during an

E incident you were less than understanding, more hot tempered or even acted
a bit too aggressively. From the time you got in your car (banging your
head) to when you were writing reports and lost your only pen under the
seat. Next time you reflect on your actions, ask yourself how much sleep you’re
getting and what your shifts were like for the past couple weeks. Were you
coming off of days and got stuck on the nightshift rotation or maybe just opted for
the overtime to help with your kid’s education costs. Whatever the case, if you’re
overtired, sooner or later it will affect your personality, motor skills, thought
process and how you handle yourself on the job.
Some of us think our patrol car is a mobile bed and a place to catch up on
those missed Zzzzzzs. That’ll get you in trouble really quick. Many shifts go
without incident and sometimes you can get away with screwing off. But what
happens that one time your job calls on you to make the notorious life saving —
correct — split second decision? It could require verbal commands, drawing a
firearm or simply avoiding a potential accident while driving to the scene. Being

Are You DWT? fatigued on the job is never a good thing especially when 80 to 90 percent of
your time is spent behind the wheel of a moving automobile.

r. Bryan Vila, performed exten-

D sive research on how fatigue


affects law enforcement and
authored Tired Cops — the
Importance of Managing Police Fatigue.
Vila’s research shows fatigue can impair
and aggressive behaviors,
you should really analyze
your schedule and make
time to sleep, eat right,
exercise, and be with the
officers just as if they had consumed too family. Stepping back and
much alcohol. Judgment and common getting adequate rest will
sense become substandard. Seventeen enable you to perform
hours of sustained wakefulness decreases better and be much more
physical and mental performance to a level effective. You’ll feel more
equivalent of a blood alcohol level at .05 productive and enjoy a
percent, while 24 hours of sustained wake- sense of self-accomplish-
fulness is equivalent to .10 percent, which ment instead feeling like
meets or exceeds the legal standard of dri- This officer was on his way home at end-of-shift. High the hamster on a treadmill
ving while intoxicated in all 50 states. speed and fatigue were both major factors in this going through the motions.
single-vehicle accident. Fortunately, the cop survived.
There are many reasons for officers to If you start to feel over
be fatigued on the job. Some are evident fatigued while driving on
and can be self-rectified such as: poor
diet, sleep loss, sleep deprivation,
insomnia, any disruption in your body’s
Adequate Rest patrol immediately stop
driving. Pull off the road
at a safe place and take a
natural cycle, sedating medications, orrectly diagnosing and short nap, consuming caffeine and
drinking even small amounts of alcohol,
driving alone for long periods of time
especially on rural routes, and working
more than 60 hours a week.
Sometimes reasons seemingly easy to
C accepting fatigue is the first
step to helping yourself deal
sugar will only work for the short
term and never rely on “drowsy dri-
with a very serious problem. ving devices.” The only real fix is
However, many of us think being
tired is part of the job and shrug it
being correctly prepared for your
shift, which means getting the correct
fix are harder to identify than you’d think. off. When fatigued, we face many of amount of sleep (8 hours) each night,
For example: is your sleep loss caused by the same symptoms as a DUI. If working out regularly and trying to eat
choosing to work as many OT shifts as you’re experiencing slower reaction a well balanced diet.
you can or could it be possible you have time, bad judgment, poor vision, More info on this topic as well as
an unknown sleep apnea problem? Sleep problems with information pro- Dr. Bryan Vila’s book Tired Cops —
apnea can go unnoticed for years, unless cessing and short-term memory, the Importance of Managing Police
someone tells you your breathing abnor- decreased performance, vigilance Fatigue can be found at
mally in your sleep you wouldn’t recog-
nize it yourself.
and motivation, increased moodiness www.sleepfoundation.org. *
Anthony Ricci is the owner and president of Advanced Driving and Security (ADSI). He’s been teaching cops to drive for over 10 years. www.1adsi.com.
26 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:22 AM Page 27

Now your finger is all you need to get to your handgun


or your valuables. The GunVault Bio uses fingerprint
recognition biometrics and a spring-loaded door to give you
instant access to your safe’s contents when you need
it—and strong, tamperproof security
when you don’t. Mounts
securely to walls,
floors, drawers or
inside your vehicle—
it’s the ultimate insult
to criminals everywhere.

www.gunvault.com • 800-242-1055
MACOP08sec1 1/23/08 1:22 AM Page 28

PRIVATESECURITY ED PALUMBO

ISSUES AND TRENDS ON THE PRIVATE SIDE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT.

The Dogs
A
Of War s the world turns or disintegrates, depending on whether you have an eco-
friendly, holistic global warming approach to life on this planet, or —
heaven forbid — view life from a rational, empirical, evidence-based per-
spective, the words we use to describe the various disciplines of our pro-
fession mutate as well. And the seeds of confusion are thus sewn.
An illustration: Several years ago members of a privately funded, paramili-
tary force, inserted into a “foreign” country, for whatever reason — suppression,
protection services — were called mercenaries. In some quarters they still are,
but the meaning of the word, strongly influenced as applied, or misapplied, by
the media, becomes muddled when attempts are made to simultaneously
describe both private security endeavors in
support of nation-building and mercenary
force operations, sometimes in the same
Sequoia Blankenship
region. It gets more confusing when the
same companies offer both “services.” (I
recommend John Irvin’s 1981
Definition re these men
Dogs of War for cinematic
clarity, at least, regarding the
meaning of “mercenary.”)

A and women
thoughtful
professionals,
surrendering a signifi-
cant chunk of their lives, EXPONENTIAL
not to mention exposure
to enormous personal
risk as they volunteer
to assist our govern-
ment to stabilize
EXPANSION
hose who employ the
broken institutions over-
seas? Or, “person(s) who
takes part in an armed conflict who is not a national of
a Party to the conflict and is motivated to take part in
the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain
T modern “merc” shy away
from the term merce-
nary: The post 9-11
world has seen a remarkable
expansion of specialized forms of
and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a Party to private security contractor, the so-
the conflict, material compensation substantially in called private military company,
excess of that promised or paid to combatants of similar or PMC. Blackwater, Dyncorp,
ranks and functions in the armed forces of that Party” ArmorGroup, Control Risks have
(the definition of mercenary according to Wikipedia!)? expanded the role of private-sector
The recent travails of Blackwater and the attendant protective security to fill gaps left
media frenzy further blur the distinction between what is in Iraq, Bosnia, Afghanistan and
and is not a mercenary. Or is there a distinction? What’s elsewhere. This has led to some
the difference between the operations of a private security interesting and controversial
team helping to train a police force in Afghanistan and a exploits having implications for
private security team in Baghdad assigned to protect US the security profession.
diplomats? Both are, usually, armed. Both are populated It has also led to less contro-
by former military types, and/or current or former law versial — as judged by the media
enforcement officers. Both are in country as a direct and many American politicians,
result of a critical inability on the part of local govern- who need little reason to fault US
ment to protect its own borders, institutions, and people. government, US corpora-
tions, and certainly
28 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
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anyone who bears arms for a living —


but spectacularly horrifying deaths —
of PMC employees, Blackwater, for
example — whereas only alleged
deaths at the hands of Blackwater rate
non-stop media scrutiny and Congres-
sional condemnation. Was there a
Senate hearing when four American
Blackwater team members were
slaughtered and burned in Fallujah? If
so, I blinked and missed it entirely.

Consultant
Vs
Mercenary
The rise of the private security com-
pany in emerging nations, war zones and
high-risk areas has created a new breed of
private soldiers, armed mercenaries,
security guards, and companies who have
the license to resort to full-scale violence
if attacked. But are they the same people?
Are all those disciplines fairly and accu-
rately lumped together? When does a pri-
vate security contractor providing protec-
tive or intelligence services in emerging
markets to an MNC (sorry, multi-national
corporation) cease being a consultant and
become a mercenary? Is it a matter of
intent? Does the identity or nationality of
the MNC matter?
In the eyes of many “they” constitute
freelance and mostly unregulated war-
riors who operate with, at best, murky
legal restraint. (Wise elders in the US
Congress recently passed legislation
placing any such PMC, of US origin,
under the laws of the United States). The
commercial provision of an armed force
has become a standard way of doing
business, as well as the potential for cre-
ating a supplemental tool of foreign
policy. This isn’t a new idea; you only
have to know the history of American
business, and note the private security
arms of economic icons such as Ford, or,
on behalf of US agri-businesses in Cen-
tral America in the late twenties, the US
Marine Corps, to realize our government
has influenced public policy with such
means, internally and externally, for well
over a hundred years.
Is there a need to find a proper place
for “PMC” organizations? Does con-
gressional oversight help? Has it ever?
What’s the impact, if any, on the secu-
rity profession?
In the next installment we’ll break
this out further and interview several
real people whose mercenary actions
are the sum and substance of the
debate and the center of
the controversy. *
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RESERVES PERRY W. HORNBARGER

DEDICATION AND PROFESSIONALISM THAT GOES BEYOND PAY.

LOADED MAGAZINES FOR ISSUED SIDEARM

WHAT’S EXTRA CUFFS AND FLEXCUFFS PAIR OF SOCKS


BACK-UP FLASHLIGHT W/TRAFFIC CON
FLASH LIGHT BULB
E
“D” CELL BATTERIES

IN THE HANDCUFF KEY (JUST IN CASE)


MOLESKIN FOR BLISTERS HANDKERCHIEF
GLOVES AND EAR WARMERS

BAG?
SMALL BOTTLE OF PAIN RELIEVER
EXTRA PENS AND PENCILS
T
INFECTIOUS DISEASE KI LATEX GLOVES
TRAFFIC VEST AND WHISTLE
POCKET CPR MASK
f you’re like most Reserve/Auxiliary Offi-

I cers nationwide, your department doesn’t


issue a personal police car. If they do —
I’m jealous. We’re fortunate to have four
cars issued to our unit — minimally equipped
A COUPLE OF BLACK PLASTIC TRASH BAGS
PORTABLE BREATHALYZER TEST MOUTHPIECES
TOWELS PERMANENT MARKER
SMALL DISPOSABLE
— that can be checked out by our members.
As a result of having cars with only bare bones
equipment officers must carry their personal
issued equipment with them. Many, if not all,
HAND SANITIZER LEG RESTRAINTS
utilize a “ditty bag” of some sort. You know CHARGED RADIO BATTERY NYLON CORD (25’ – 50’)
the stuff I’m talking about, the equipment the
department issues and expects you to have and EMERGENCY BLANKETS (THE THIN ALUMINUM
use in the event you need it. ONES)
BIO-HAZARD SAFETY EVIDENCE TUBE FOR SYRINGES
Trial And Error ASSORTED VEHICLE FUSES

any of us have learned through trial and error and things I use frequently — stays up front within reach and

M some inconveniences what items we should always


have to make our job a little easier. I wish in my
early years, someone had taken the time to put pen
to this and give to the new guys. I asked my training
officer of years ago to put together a list of recommended
ready for quick use.
It may seem like a lot of crap to carry but many of you
know how invaluable some of these items can be when
you’re on the street and need them — right now. Through
personal experience you may have learned to carry some
items to help those new members. Many of the items I different items; if so, I’d love to hear what works for you.
carry in my bags come from that list. Due to the number of The weather in certain areas of the country may dictate
issued and optional items I choose to carry, I’m actually other items such as cold or hot weather gear or supplies,
up to two bags now, but one of them stays in the trunk but I’m sure we agree there are some basic items for any
with the bulky or seldom needed items. The other one — kit no matter what part of the country you are in.

Area Specific Be Prepared


little forethought, on what

S
ome officers carry bottled water and emergency food rations. If you work
in a desolate or even a rural area, that’s probably not a bad idea. I’m fortu-
nate to work in an area where 24-hour convenience stores are everywhere.
But during bad weather or when preparing for extended operations, such
as sitting on an extended crime scene, I’ll usually stop by one of them and pick up
A you’re likely to run across on
your beat and planning will
make life on the streets a little
more tolerable for you and your co-
workers. You may be a “hero” to your
some snacks and drinks, more for personal comfort than a matter of survival. partner when his flashlight batteries
As far as the bag itself, a number of decent manufacturers make suitable die or when a sudden headache
bags. The one I use has a removable pocket flap on top so you can remove it to develops in the middle of the shift.
sew on a patch or have it embroidered. I had our unit patch and a black After all, as Reserve/Auxiliary Offi-
nametape with my last name on it sewn on. This makes it a little easier to iden- cers, isn’t that our job —
tify. If you’re interested, drop me an e-mail. to “be there”? *
Perry W. Hornbarger is the Unit Commander of the Chesterfield, Va. Auxiliary Police Unit. He can be reached via e-mail at hornbargerp@yahoo.com.
30 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
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We are seeking highly qualified police


officers for our lateral police officer school
commencing in May of 2008.
Benefits:
$41,000-$44,000 starting salary depending on experience,
State Police enhanced retirement, health and dental insurance,
take home car, education pay, shift differential pay, remote duty
location pay, specialty team pay, openings throughout the state.
Qualifications:
Must have 3 years law enforcement experieince and 2 years with
current agency, 30 college credit hours, pass written exam,
physical fitness test, polygraph, psychological and medical exams,
background check, pass oral interview and Chiefs selection.
If you are interested in what it takes to be a New Mexico State Police
Officer, contact your nearest State Police Office or call

1-800-521-9911 or visit our website @


nmsp.com
MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:34 PM Page 32

STREET LEVEL JOHN MORRISON

STRAIGHT TALK ON SUPERVISION & LEADERSHIP ON THE FRONT LINES — THE STREETS.

Partners:
More Than Two Cops in a Black-and-White Hooptie
his time it only resulted Later, they confessed they had no

T in a 9mm round
smashing into some
cheap drywall, rather
than into a cop’s head. It
could have been — and often
has been — far worse, termi-
nally worse. Without their
reason, no justification for
assuming so.
Their agency, like many others,
focuses patrol officers’ training
first on individual skills, then on
large-group skills like crowd and
riot control tactics, and then,
permission I won’t reveal rarely, on small-group skills
more detail, but essentially it used more often by tactical
came down to the fact part-
ners who’d worked together
four nights a week for over

teams — four and


six-officer tech-
niques for hard entries,
two years had never seriously stairway and hallway
discussed — much less trained clearing, etc. Even then one of the
for — handling multiple lethal few techniques taught is doorway
threats emerging from different entries — first and second officer
angles, like, from the front through the door. Another excep-
door of a residence and from tion is training in high-risk
deep within an adjacent open vehicle stops. Those two cover
garage. They both focused perhaps five percent of the situa-
on the same threat, and tions patrol partners routinely
assumed the other threat engage in, leaving a vast chasm to
“belonged” to their partner. be filled with dead cops.

Jerry Meloche

BEYOND TACTICS A TRIAD OF


nd it’s not just formalized “tactics” or “techniques” that are critical in two- PROBLEMS
A officer operation: Very basic, second-nature behaviors are extremely important.
In one case, two officers responded to a vaguely-described disturbance in a res-
idential area and found nothing noteworthy. They stood in an empty driveway hree factors frequently work
and had a brief discussion — about what, we’ll never know. Between partners, it could
have been about their families, favorite fishing spots, or lunch plans.
They stood side by side, both looking — not scanning, just looking — in the one
direction: the quiet, empty street to their front. They were both shot from behind, their
assailant had cover, concealment, and accesses — gates, doors and windows.
T against partner-training con-
sistency: First, in order to
manage staffing, agencies
tend to split partners up for assign-
ment to in-service training, using
Had they been trained to do so, or just thought about it and discussed it, they might relief personnel to fill in vacancies.
have stood facing each other, offset by at least a body-width to their sides, so they could Often this is done to assure the pres-
talk easily, even fulfill that all-too-human need for occasional eye contact, and still have ence of at least one officer on the beat
almost unbroken 360-degree visual assessment of their surroundings. with area-specific knowledge. This
All too often, for all the wrong reasons, partners who otherwise interact practice addresses one potential
smoothly; who have great loyalty and respect for each other; who can almost read problem and creates a virtually cer-
each other’s minds, seriously neglect that one aspect of “partnership” that will keep tain problem.
them alive: assuring their base-line, everyday tactical approaches to a wide variety Second, agencies commonly
of situations are consistent and compatible. schedule officers for annual in-ser-
John Morrison served in combat as a Marine sergeant, and retired as a senior lieutenant from the San Diego Police Department, having served there as Director of Training, Commanding Officer of SWAT and division
executive officer. He has taught, written and lectured widely on training, tactics and leadership. Contact him at StreetLevelOne@yahoo.com.
32 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
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vice training by hire date, seniority or


even alphabetically. Often the cur-
riculum, or details within the same
basic curriculum, changes from
quarter to quarter or month to month.
Attend in different quarters, and part-
ners may receive very different or
even conflicting training.
Finally, even in cases where part-
ners are taught from the same material
and the same lesson plan — but by
different instructors — the injection
of individual style and relative
emphasis may result in significant dis-
parity in understanding by the stu-
dents. As Director of Training in San
Diego, I observed this “branding”
phenomenon many times, and fought
constantly to assure instructors had
the opportunity to stamp their person-
alities on the style of instruction, but
not on the substance of it. When it
comes to tactics performed by part-
ners, difference equals DEATH.
The Phantom Factor
Overshadowing all of these other
considerations is something I call “The
Phantom Factor.” Put a pair of partners
through the same training together on
the same day and you may still wind up
with inconsistent application. This
depends on how each officer receives,
prioritizes, internalizes and interprets
the instruction offered.
They may come away from
training thinking they’ve got the same
“lock” on what they learned, but be
half-past-dead wrong. Only if they
talk about it in detail, discussing sce-
narios and simulations, will differ-
ences be revealed. That’s something a
supervisor can’t count on, because as
soon as the troops are back on the
beat, they’ll have a myriad of other
concerns to converse about, and —
why should they even question
whether they both “got” the same
messages from that training?
The Triad Solution
That’s where the sergeant comes
in. Every police partnership is really a
triad, consisting of Officers A & B,
and their sergeant; behind them,
overseeing them, putting the “super”
and “vision” together in “supervi-
sion.” No one else can make the on-
scene observations you can; spot the
errata and missteps in application
which — count on it — will be there.
The degree to which you do this will
determine whether you spend your
“free time” with bull ses-
sions — or burials. *
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REALITY CHECK I I CLINT SMITH

COUNSEL, WISDOM, GUIDANCE AND TEACHING.

DRAWING?
f you need the gun just draw it. This sounds simple
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
I enough — except for the trouble we get into while
just drawing it or just putting it away. Yeah I know;
simple — yes — except, I can think of a whole
bunch of times cops have shot themselves — some
fatally — while “just drawing” or “just putting it away.” M
ost cops get some semblance of range training in
presentation of the handgun from the holster. This is
helpful, as contemporary retention holsters require
practice for even the lowest skill level to be
achieved. This is the point at which you can actually get the
damn thing out and put it away. In your world when you need it

THE RANGE you often really need it and when you are about to have a
handful of “turd” it needs to go back in smoothly and securely.

ot often enough we train at the range, well actually

N qualify to meet the mandated basic standards


designed by someone who often thinks the range is a
place where the buffalo still roam. I digress, sorry …
the training, in theory, brings our skill level up and addresses
tactical issues, applications and knowledge gleaned from cur-
rent events and incidents. Our training allows us to address
the issue of drawing the handgun with the strong hand and of
course the opposite hand in case of injury to include dis-
arming all the retention strap lever stuff and of course the
wily re-holster and so on.
The staff explains the subtle points of the draw, like not
covering our hands with the muzzle during the draw stroke
and even more often during the re-holster so as to not
acquire the new nickname of “stumpy.” They should also
include drawing the handgun from the supine and or prone
position. All of us have been in a physical fight and almost
all fights wind up on the ground. So, if it turns from a
physical fist fight into a gunfight we’ll of course be tuned
up because the staff has had us work on that grounded
drawing technique — during qualification. Or is it
training? Get the point?

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THE CAR
uch of your time is spent in a patrol car. While in

M the car, you may have to draw the handgun to


defend yourself or to prepare to defend yourself as
you exit the vehicle.
Here’s a non-shooting tip: Make sure you select a transmis-
sion mode that doesn’t allow it to run over you while or soon
after you get out of it. Park would be good. I have seen cops
chase their cars down the road. It’s pretty funny, especially if
you’re not their supervisor. But, if you creamed the whole
front end of your cruiser and your engine is in the trunk now,
you probably won’t have to worry about the car rolling away.

THE SEAT BELT


T
he seat belt won’t automatically retract if there’s
been the least bit of violent action with the
vehicle sometimes even including slamming on
the brakes or an impact. So you’ll have to move
The Draw
he draw stroke is tied to the belt and door manipu-
the belt out of the way. A good way is to slide your oppo-
site hand between the belt and the front of your body, run
your extended fingers down to the release latch and while
pushing down grasp the belt with your fingers. While
holding it, move it across to the door handle.
T lation, as an example: as the opposite hand goes to
the belt the strong hand goes to the handgun and
unsnaps retention straps. The opposite hand moves
the belt to the door while the strong hand draws the pistol
and takes it to a place along side the steering wheel at
three o’clock. As the
opposite hand moves to
THE DOOR
note of caution here as with all the stuff on
the door and releases the
belt, the handgun is
moved to twelve o’clock

A the cars these days; you may have to pull the


lock button. Your auto door locks are, at
times, less than reliable when your battery is
sitting on the center console due to a collision.
The door can be pushed opened with the support
on the steering wheel and
on around to nine o’clock.
The door should now be
open and the muzzle of
the handgun moves for-
hand. You probably shouldn’t shove it or jab it with the ward and out of the car.
foot. It may rebound and whack the snot out of you. This technique does not
Key points regarding the open door are: Don’t put allow the muzzle to cross
your foot in the V made by the door and the car body the legs or crotch and
nor should you rest your hands or forearms in the V more importantly the
made by the door strut and windshield strut. The door could muzzle isn’t snagged in the openings of the steering
be struck by passing cars and or the suspect vehicle if driven wheel, fouling the drawing stroke. Probably more impor-
back into your cruiser — we don’t want our stuff crushed in tant, especially if the handgun is brought back into the car
between the door and car body. The door is concealment but under duress, is to recover the handgun back to the hol-
may provide some degree of cover, mostly determined by ster in a reverse sequence, of nine, twelve,
what type of rounds may be inbound from the threat. The
door may stop .38 Special — it won’t stop .30-06 rounds.
three and re-holster. *
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CARRY OPTIONS MARK HANTEN

FROM HOLSTERS TO HAVERSACKS.

Hidden Beauty
TUCKER GUNLEATHER
’ve never been a big fan of inside the waistband holsters. Like a good

I friend says, “I’ve got a hard enough time keeping myself inside my
waistband!” Be that as it may, I have always wanted to like them; for
concealment they’re a great option. Even a fairly short tee shirt can con-
ceal the butt of a handgun flat against your hip or the small of your back.
I’ll admit to occasionally sticking my gun inside my waistband without a
holster, but I don’t recommend it. There not much there to keep the gun
from falling out of (or into) your pants.

Have It Your Way


ecently, I was on the Web searching for holster info and I read a

R review, which went on and on about how comfortable the


Tucker “Cover Up IWB” holster is. After a little checking I
found Tucker Gunleather makes some great gear, but I need to see for
myself, so I called Tucker’s shop and talked it over with manager
Rob Longenecker. I got an idea of what I wanted and ordered it
through their online process. There was no question about the
options available and what the costs would be. If I had a question
about options, I just called Rob and he explained the pros and
cons. Even on the simple Cover Up, there are options for
roughout or smoothout, the leather, clip styles, belt widths, left
versus right and gun model. The holster is made to your specs.

Form, Function And Stealth


he Cover Up gets its name from the clip, which attaches
with your off hand exposes the grip for an easy full hand grip
on your gun. It’s really quite genius.
I got Tucker’s Cover Up for Springfield Armory’s new
EMP 9mm 1911 and have been carrying it every day. It’s

T the holster to the waistband/belt on your pants. It’s


attached low on the holster so you can tuck your shirt
down between the gun and your waistband, “covering up”
the gun entirely. It works great and a quick tug of the shirt
absolutely outstanding — thin enough I can stick it inside the
waistband of any pants and it’s secure. The height and cant of
the holster are adjustable and it has a very useful sweat shield
protruding up on the inside of the holster putting a piece of
leather between you and your gun keeping it from poking you
let alone preventing sweat from ruining your finish. It can
also help reholstering. The Cover Up has rapidly become my
most worn “off duty” holster and I already have plans for
more Cover Ups for my additional carry guns.

The Pretty Sister


n addition to the Cover Up, I got one of the most

I amazing holster rigs I’ve ever seen from Tucker. It’s the
HF1 Belt Holster in Black Cherry color with a full swirl
cut stamp and a silver and gold star concho. Not only is it
a work of art, it’s one on the most functional and well made
belt holsters I’ve ever seen. Although I may not have too
many opportunities to wear it on duty, I am already ordering
a plain black version to wear with my uniform when I’m not
wearing my duty belt. And you can bet I’ll be
wearing this baby to the occasional BBQ. *
For More Info: www.tuckergunleather.com
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y
MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:34 PM Page 38

HARDTOOLS PAUL MARKEL

ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR THE JOB.

Aimpoint’s
Micro T-1
The
Mystical
RED DOT any of us have likely learned to view the world
through cynical glasses. “You don’t trust anyone,”

M my lovely wife has told me. I take it as a compli-


ment. When it comes to new, ghee-whiz gadgets
or technologies a lot of cops have the knee-jerk — it won’t
work — reaction and when the subject of red dot or electronic
big one is, “You can’t do any-
thing with a dot scope you can’t do with iron sights.”
I have been using red dot electronic optics from various
optics comes up, I’ve heard a loud refrain of skepticism. manufacturers for several years now. As with any product,
“When I need it, the batteries will be dead” or “I won’t each company has their own twist on the idea. The basic con-
bet my life on something that uses batteries” are two of the cept behind the red dot optic is to give the shooter a highly
most popular arguments against red dot sights. The other visible aiming/reference point for rapid target acquisition.

Straight from the


The LaRue Tactical factory, the T1
High Mount, here mounts to any
on a Vang Comp Mil-STD 1913 Rail.
Remington 870,
allows for a high
cheek weld and
for co-witnessing
with iron sights
on a flat-top AR.

Small, Tough
And Reliable
he T1 was designed to incor-

T porate positive features of


larger optics in a more com-
pact package. It only weighs
only 4 oz and like their popular
CompM2 it operates on a single 3V
Lithium battery.
Thanks to the use of 21st Century
38 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
MACOP08sec1 1/22/08 10:34 PM Page 39

technology, the T1 has a run time


of an amazing 50,000 hours.
You install the battery, find the
dot intensity you like and
leave it there. After four to
five years you’ll need to install
a fresh battery.
The T1 has 13 settings for
dot intensity; six for use with
night vision and seven for low,
normal and bright light. Zeroing
is accomplished with windage and
elevation knobs. They even had the
foresight to build in an adjustment
tool so you don’t need a penny or
dime to turn the knobs.
The T1comes standard with a MIL-
STD 1913 low mount. LaRue Tactical
makes a quick-detach high mount that
works very well allowing for co-wit-
nessing the T1 with the iron sights on
the flat-top M4/AR.
Real World Durability
Aimpoint’s durability is legend
among military personnel. A friend
related an incident during a rapid
insertion. He was thrown from his
vehicle and ended up on his back with
his CompM2 equipped M4 underneath
him. He hit so hard he initially feared
the carbine’s barrel might have been
bent. You can’t call time out
in the middle of a mis-
sion; he got up, checked
his gear, and drove on
completing the team’s
assignment. Not only
did the Aimpoint still
work fine, it didn’t even
lose its zero.
Freddie Blish of Aim-
point demonstrates the
T1 by zeroing it,
removing it from the gun
and tossing it across the
room. Gasps are heard
from the audience as the
sight bounces on the
concrete floor. He’ll
mount it back on the rifle
and show you the unit works and zero

h hasn’t been lost. That’s tough.


If the worst happened and your bat-
tery did die or the optic quit, you

e could still make accurate shots on


target by simply sighting through the
tube. You can also flip up you iron
sights. And, as for relying on some-
thing manmade to save your life; don’t
forget the rifle, subgun, or shotgun
your sight is mounted to was
made by the hands of men. * VISIT US ON THE WEB!!
For More Info: www.aimpoint.com,
www.americancopmagazine.com
www.laruetactical.com
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Bob Pilgrim
Photos:
Photos: Ichiro
Ichiro Nagata
Nagata

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2
ONE IS
NONE
—TWO
IS ONE
XD .45 ACP Compact
utgunned And Outperformed. The FBI

O
released its most recent and edifying study
entitled, Violent Encounters: A Study of Felo-
nious Assaults Against our Nation’s Law
Enforcement Officers. The researchers
selected 40 incidents from over 800 encoun-
ters, interviewed 50 police officer victims
and almost 50 felons who committed felo-
nious assaults against cops. Among many
interesting revelations almost half the felons carried some kind
of backup weapon, practiced with their firearms more often
and enjoyed higher hit ratios than the cops they assaulted. This
very sobering study hopefully will motivate police officers to
train more with their duty weapon and carry backups.
Tactical Redundancy
One of the mantras of our beloved Navy Seals is, “One is
none and two is one.” They practice tactical redundancy when
it comes to personnel firepower and frequently “clicks” are
quickly followed by a resounding “bang” when they subcon-
sciously transition to their secondary. For today’s professional,
there are a plethora of chopped and channeled revolvers and
pistols — usually condensed versions of their full-sized sib-
lings and Springfield Armory has added one more.

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XD .45 ACP Compact


MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:36 PM Page 43
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:36 PM Page 44

To compliment its outrageously suc-


cessful, 14–round, XD .45 ACP, SA
created the XD big bore compact with
an appreciably reduced profile, but
without a serious reduction in ammo
capacity or barrel length. To completely
avoid the consequences of sub–sizing
and diminishment of fire sustainability,
SA, in addition to the very concealable
10–round magazine also includes a full
sized 13-round tube with convenient
pinky rest. With this additional 14
round response capability ala its full
sized siblings, SA calls the Compact,
“Two Guns in One.”
Bargain Priced Quality
Springfield Armory is an aggres-
sive company courting customers
with products providing more for
their money and the XD kit with
padded lockable case, holster, ammu-
nition pouch, loading device, security
lock, Allen wrench and nylon bristle
bore brush are included as standard.
Open box, add ammo, point in safe
direction and make bang — lots of
them. On top of all the goodies and
the factory’s excellent customer sup-
port you can also opt for four or five
inch barrel lengths.
I t’s Grip Length, Stupid
You see Virginia, when it comes to
concealed carry, it’s the gun’s grip size
and not barrel length that “prints”
against the garment. The overall height
of the XDC with 10-round mag is .65"
shorter than the full-sized Tactical
model and the overall size of its
ergonomic grip is one of the smallest
on the market.
While not as small as some backup
pieces in .45 ACP and certainly no
lightweight, the XDC could serve the
larger framed officer in a support role
and would nicely compliment the five-
inch Tactical. It would also make an
ideal stand alone, heavy hitting, and
concealable sidearm for the detective or
federal agent. Except for its lighter
weight, smaller grip dimensions and
fewer rounds with the standard maga-
zine, the XDC is a smaller version of
its slightly older and larger brethren.
Redundant Safeties
Safety at SA is of primary concern
and the XD series features redundant
safeties. Well known by now is the
pistol’s “Ultra Safety Assurance” sear
and striker system originally developed
by guess who – gun genius John
Browning. The trigger releases the
striker, but ignition won’t occur unless
the prominent grip safety is depressed
by a properly established firing grip.
Four other safety components join in to
make this one of the safest point and

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shoot handguns on the market. Loaded external dimensions would consequently of a four-inch XDC I recorded average
chamber and striker status indicators increase making the gun less accommo- velocities of 2051 fps.
visually and tactilely reveal the condi- dating for smaller stature officers. How- The XDC is good to go right out of
tion of the gun without conducting a ever, Croation and SA engineers focused the box, but I wanted to add at least one
press check. Similar to the Glock, the instead on excavating the frame’s inte- custom item to the mix. I affixed a set of
XD borrowed its trigger safety lever. rior and while internal dimensions have stick on Tac-Grips. These super adhesive
The fully compressed striker is also been increased, the only external change grips are so positive they have found
blocked by an internal component not has been flattening its backstrap a skosh, homes on almost all my handguns. They
permitting its release unless the trigger so its grip is universally adaptable to positively enhance control, particularly
is depressed and a disconnector prevents almost all adult sized shooters. for those not possessing good grip
the gun from firing when out of battery. Other parts, such as its guide rod, strength. As with many New Millennium
The grip safety deactivates the discon- some slide components and slide rails handguns, the XD’s exhibit frame rails to
nector and must be gripped firmly to are also larger and more substantial than accommodate white lights and or lasers.
prevent shooter-induced stoppages. the smaller caliber XDs including the
.45 GAP. The excellent hammer forged Combat Competent.
Superior Ergonomics barrel is fully supported and will handle When compared to the military
Perhaps the XD’s most attractive the most advanced 11 mm loads, such style two stage trigger of a five-inch
attribute is its amazing ergonomics. The as Le Mas’s 85-grain/2000+ fps armor barreled Tactical XD .45 ACP I’d eval-
XD is a completely new gun and has defeating and soft tissue destroying uated previously, the XDC’s 6.5 pound
been designed from the beginning to round. This law enforcement/military lever displayed quite a bit of creep.
accommodate larger cartridges such as only round is capable of turning many The trigger seemed to have three
the 10 mm and 9x23 mm. In most cases, handguns into short-range rifles and out Continued on page 66

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Michael Baum

B RSTAR Border
Patrol’s
Elite Search
And Rescue
Team
lite is a word too often assigned these days

E
devaluing its true meaning. Seems everyone has an
elite team — SWAT, Bomb Squad, Parking Con-
trollers, Crossing Guards, Ballerinas — you get my
point. But in this case, when I say elite, it’s meant in
the truest Funk and Wagnalls definition of the word.
BORSTAR recruits its members from over eight
thousand agents of the Border Patrol. All candidates have a
minimum of two years on the job and a fair percentage are
former military.
No Posers
The entrance physical for BORSTAR is something I
haven’t seen since my days as a Pararescue wannabe. Forty
pushups, 60 situps, seven pull-ups, and a mile and a half run
in under 12 minutes are a candidates’ welcome. Passing that,
it’s time for a little swim. The remaining five weeks of the
course build the candidates’ ability to perform SAR missions
in what Air Force PJs like to call “austere and non-permis-
sive environments.” The failure rate for the training is damn
high due to the physical nature of the mission; roughly 70
percent fail the course.
In Tucson, a team of 52 agents patrols the border until
the heads-up comes in for a SAR mission. Then it’s time to
call in the appropriate assets — usually Blackhawk heli-
copters — pick up the agents, tracking dogs and go find
some aliens in distress.
Lost In The Wilderness
The good news is while not welcome, these aliens are
usually pretty peaceful when BORSTAR catches up with

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R
them. For the most part, they’ve been
hiking through the wilderness of
southern Arizona for more than a few
days and are exhausted. According to
BORSTAR’s commander, Ron
Bellavia, the “coyotes” who bring
them across usually promise a quick
jump, hop and a skip into Tucson
rather than the truth of several days in
the scorching desert with little water.
While talking to Ron, he recalls one of
the team’s best missions in which a
group of 60 plus aliens called 9-1-1
after their coyote got them lost.
Because the phone was GPS enabled,
BORSTAR agents were onsite within
30 minutes to shepherd the seriously
ill aliens. Seven comatose aliens lived
to see another day, while sadly; one
was too far-gone for help. Considering
the odds, that’s pretty good work.
But aliens aren’t the only folks who
pay the bills for BORSTAR; a little
while back, a military dependent from
Davis-Mothan AFB fell while
spelunking. Local agencies showed up
first but lacked the equipment to pull him
out from the tight spaces. BORSTAR
was called in to assist and along with
Pararescuemen stationed at Mothan they
finished the job. The cooperation is the

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result of all agencies involved having a


good working relationship.
Not Just A Pretty Face
My SAR unit’s fulltime Sergeant, a
soft spoken and hard working cop, got
BORSTAR to cut loose a few agents
to come teach a basic tracking class
this past fall. BORSTAR loves to
come play with other agencies. They
claim it’s because they learn some-
thing from us. Right, I think it’s a
chance to go play somewhere new.
These guys were not only technically
astounding but excellent instructors
who obviously cared deeply about
their subject matter.
Starting with a brief classroom session
to describe the basics of tracking, the
agents took us out in the field where real
learning takes place. We started small by
examining just a few prints in the dirt and
seeing what we could learn. Patience is
the name of this game along with trying
to get inside the target’s head. Where are
they going? What can the tracks tell us
about the individuals involved? The list
of questions goes on and on. As always,
the goal of a good tracker is not to catch
someone but to put other assets in front of
the path of the pursued.
Trackers, especially BORSTAR,
must always keep in mind the possi-

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the impression I’d been an Army


Ranger. Well, I’d never been a Ranger
but the boots I wore were an expen-
sive Danner model favored by
Rangers stationed at Fort Lewis,
Washington — close enough.
Service Oriented
My impression of the agents con-
ducting the class was they codified what
every spec-ops group tries to do but
many fail to accomplish. They were so
good that they were humble, polite,
patient and approachable, revealing
steadfast confidence their abilities and
who they are. This courtesy also extends
to their boss, Ron Bellavia. After training
by his agents, I sent an e-mail to say
thanks. I didn’t hear back for months.
Suddenly, I got a very nice response
apologizing for the delay as he was out
of the country — way out. A few months
later while meeting with him in Tucson,
the real story came out — he’d been in
Iraq for the past four months as an
bility of an ambush and having your Hagee and his partners were able to adviser on border security. His 12 years
nose in the dirt is a good way to get correctly identify my height, weight, in law enforcement and the skills learned
caught. While rare, some cocaine race, injuries and my military back- and applied from BORSTAR gave him
smugglers walk the product into the ground. I know some of you are the unique opportunity to serve overseas
country and, to them the money rolling your eyes at this but listen up: and pass those skills on to our military.
involved is worth fighting for. my boot size gave the range of my He was rewarded with mortar and sniper
height, the depth of the impression attacks at every location he visited.
Who Are Those Guys? made by my boots gave my approxi- BORSTAR provides a unique SAR
So, how good are these guys at mate weight, the shape of my foot capability to the law enforcement com-
tracking? Everybody is different and identified my race, the slight blurring munity. They’ve worked events ranging
some agents have more of a medical of my left boot print indicated I was from the Olympic Games to Hurricane
focus or another specialty BORSTAR dragging that leg, my curious heels Katrina and provided some great
desires. But, by observing my tracks together and toes out stride gave away training for other agencies. If you get
without anybody on my team telling the fact I was taught to march by the the chance, go train with
the agents who set the tracks, Agent American military, and my boots gave them. It’s a great experience.
*
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Frank Borelli
PART 2

Virginia Tech
Shootings
Why Do Students Sit Still?

Any willingness to
commit an act of
violence or physical
aggression even in
the name of justice,
n part one of this series I discussed the mainstream
no matter how
I media and some of the mistakes they make in
reporting on such tragedies as the one that occurred
at Virginia Tech. Often they make those mistakes
because they are reporting from a base of knowl-
edge that’s either incomplete, incorrect or both. At the end of legally justified, is
completely
part one I asked the question, “Why wasn’t there any
counter-attack? With violence actively being performed
against five classrooms full of teachers and students, how

unacceptable within
come no one attempted to attack back?”
Counter Attack

an educational
Now, I know there are those who scoff at the idea of
counter-attacking empty handed against an armed assailant.
By the same token, as a member of the law enforcement
community, I know I’ve been trained on how to defend
myself — empty handed — against knife attacks, blunt
trauma attacks and even attacks committed with a firearm if
the shooter is within reach. It can be done. Beyond the phys-
institution.
ical skills required it takes quite a bit of courage. That some

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people lack that courage shouldn’t be a activists speaking out against violence. became parents in the seventies and
surprise to the police community or Bear in mind, those activists — the entered (at least some of them) into the
even our society as a whole. It is, after peace preaching pacifists — weren’t professional work force. Throughout
all, what we’ve been teaching for only speaking out against the war in the seventies, eighties and nineties our
decades. Think about it … . Vietnam but they were preaching the country saw an evolution of educa-
In World War II our entire country cause of peace at any cost. The Peace tional and legal policy banning vio-
got behind the war effort and very few Movement espoused communication, lence for any reason at all — even self-
people complained. If they did, they compromise and capitulation. In other defense.
weren’t given much of a public voice. words, they believed in not fighting for 1970 through 1982 just happen to be
The Korean War was a little different. what you believe in. the years I attended elementary, junior
After all, no one had actually attacked high school and high school. I clearly
America that time. Vietnam was even Peaceniks remember the fights I got into in ele-
more different and our country saw Those “hippies” from the sixties mentary school. I remember how they

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were dealt with. If I started it, I was in fight my family fully expected me to punitive retaliation from the school
deep trouble. But the person I hit or fight back hard and fast enough to win. administration — how odd.
pushed who then defended himself got As I progressed through junior high
in no trouble at all. Of course, the school and into high school though that Board Of Imbeciles
school would prefer for him to tell a attitude changed — not at home — but In 2003 – 2004 I had the privilege of
teacher, but if he defended himself, in the schools. My own children are serving on the local county Board of
that’s okay. At home, if I started the now either in or through their school Advisors to the Board of Education. In
fight I was in big trouble. If I was years and it strikes me as odd we have that school year the Sheriff had secured
defending myself though, I was only in a “zero tolerance” policy toward vio- a grant from the Department of Home-
trouble if I lost the fight. lence. This policy punishes the student land Security that would have enabled
There’s a very important distinction who defends himself against an attack. him to — at no cost to the schools —
made there: if I couldn’t walk away In doing so the schools are teaching our put deputies in the schools as School
from the fight or talk my way out of the children never to fight back for fear of Resource Officers. The School Board

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We’ve spent
decades
teaching our
children never
to fight.
fought that effort so successfully that and educated in just such an environ- — let the plane get on the ground and
ultimately only one deputy was added ment for at least twelve years and most negotiations can begin. We all saw
to the SRO program. The School probably closer to fifteen. After more how well that worked out. On one
Board’s attitude really surprised me, but than a decade of being taught violence plane, heroic citizens fought back and
served as an example of the outlook for any reason is completely unaccept- saved an unknown number of lives.
existing today within our educational able why would we ever expect them to Those heroes realized they couldn’t
systems: violence — any show of force fight back? This outlook in our educa- just sit and wait. They felt morally
— any willingness to commit an act of tional institutions isn’t a unique occur- compelled to act. Reality was it was
violence or physical aggression even in rence in our society; nor is this the only their only hope to live. That was six
the name of justice, no matter how place pacifism has bitten us in the butt. years ago.
legally justified, is completely unaccept- On September 11, 2001 passengers
able within an educational institution. on three airplanes did exactly what Evolution Or Extinction
The students at Virginia Tech who they were conditioned to do for In 1999 our country watched as the
were attacked by Cho had been raised decades: don’t resist — be compliant Columbine attack occurred. The police

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r
er

response was criticized and we school systems. I am not encouraging women signing up to work in profes-
evolved. The attacks of nine-eleven violence in the schools, but I do believe sions requiring performance in conflict
caused us to evolve again. Across our we need to change our zero tolerance situations? From ocean to ocean our
country states are passing laws com- policy. We can’t spend more than a country is experiencing a shortage of
monly referred to as “castle doctrine” decade teaching our kids they’ll be police officers and military recruits.
which doesn’t require retreat on the punished for fighting no matter the cir- Well, duh. We’ve spent decades
part of a victim. Our legislatures are cumstances and then expect them to teaching our children never to fight.
legally empowering us to once again suddenly learn how to stand their Why would they then pursue a career
fight back against an unlawful attack. If ground in any conflict after they grad- that will require them to do so? We
the bad guy gets hurt or killed — doom uate. It just doesn’t work that way. must start teaching them there are some
on them. They shouldn’t have tried to Having now graduated two genera- things worth fighting for. If we don’t,
commit that crime. tions of children raised in such an edu- where will we be when another two
I submit to you that this outlook cational systems, why are we surprised generations have passed?
must flow down through and into our there’s a national shortage of men and Think about it. *
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IT’S ABOUT HO W T O
r st a n d
Unde e
P th
and ZA
Av er a g e
D V P e rp

CONTROL nyone who’s done any time in law enforce- is one of several calculated options used to control the victim.

A
ment knows domestic violence (DV) calls Keep this in mind when you arrive on a scene:
are some of the most dangerous and frus- although the tendency is to only ask questions about
trating responses. Put in financial the beating, look for the bigger picture. For example:
terms, they’re a high-risk does the victim have a car, phone or a job? Is there
investment on, potentially, family in the area? Are they allowed to control
a limited return. Unfor- their own finances? Does their partner
tunately, they’re also frequently pre- closely monitor their activities? At trial,
cursors to murder, which means as this shows the jury how pervasive the
tough as they are to deal with, the abuse really is. If your victim is
way you handle them can have unwilling to cooperate it also goes a
repercussions that don’t go away. long way towards explaining why.
For example, one DV case I tried
What Is I t? involved a scrawny little punk who
Domestic violence isn’t pri- liked to choke his live-in. She lived
marily about violence. It’s about in his trailer with his family, worked
control. Violence is one of the with him, had her paycheck taken by
ways the abuser (usually, but not him, and had no car, no phone and
always, male) keeps the victim none of her family nearby. She liter-
under his sway. While the knee-jerk ally had no other support system, which
reaction to a 200-pound man beating explained why she had endured a series
up his 110-pound wife in front of the of attacks before finally reported him.
kids is to think he just lost control, that’s Another example comes from a parental
rarely the case: anger is a tool, and violence abuse case, which I won in spite of the victim

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Jeremy D. Clough

T Whether or not the perp will talk to you, his body may tell you
everything you need to know. Make sure to inspect—and if
necessary, photograph — the hands for things like reddened
knuckles and other offensive wounds.

claiming it never happened. but also described her bad health and until there’s a violent
The defendant’s 75-year-old how she needed the defendant to care episode. It’s followed by a
mother was partially blind, for her. It wasn’t hard for the jury to honeymoon period during
had suffered a series of figure out why she was changing her which everything’s okay.
strokes and heart attacks story. As an aside, Our Hero’s cell- That leads to another period
and couldn’t care for phone started playing “Bad to the of increasing tension and
herself. She was Bone,” during sentencing, which the cycle repeats. Because
pushed into the court- impressed the judge about as much of inherent delays in the
room in a wheelchair, as you’d expect — he’s still in jail. court system, it’s hard to
where she not only get a case to trial before the
denied the abuse she’d Abuse Cycle victim is back in the hon-
described to the The most frustrating part of DV eymoon period with their
responding officers, cases is the victim who recants or abuser — “He’s the hand-
refuses to testify. DV follows a cir- some man over there.” —
cular pattern in which tensions build bursting into tears.
Even if they’re not
happy again, they’re
probably still together.
The phrase “rule of thumb,” suppos- The average victim
edly comes from an English law that leaves her abuser seven
limited a man to beating his wife times before staying
with a stick no larger than his thumb. gone or getting killed.
Obviously, that no longer applies:
domestic violence in any form is
So they’re either happy
illegal, immoral, and cowardly. and together or scared

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When the cops roll


up, Dipstick takes
a swing — felony
obstruction. Kicks
out the back glass
— felony interfer-
ence with govern-
ment property.

and together; either way, from the nesses, it was a swearing match and the
second you respond, expect your then- Domestic violence isn’t primarily about jury simply didn’t believe the victim.
violence, it’s about control. The victim’s
cooperative victim — if she takes the access to things like transportation,
There was an uninvolved, unrelated
witness stand at all — will lie about the finances, and communication can be witness on the scene, but the officers
story she’s telling you. If the victim and valuable keys to your case. never IDd him.
abuser are unmarried, we can use her The Moral: If someone else saw the
written statement from the scene at trial assault, ID them and get a written
(you do get written statements, right?). statement and contact info,
If they’re married, in many including social security
states, she can invoke her number and date of birth. If
spousal privilege not to tes- they didn’t see anything, do
tify and the US Supreme it anyway. If they make up
Court decision in Crawford something later, you can
v. Washington will keep her always produce their
statements out. If that’s the prior statement to
only evidence you col- show they’re lying.
lected, it may very well Also, they may be
kill your case. needed at trial just to
say they were there
Expect The Worst and didn’t see it.
The best way to over- This is the best-
come this — expect it known response to
from the beginning. the ever-popular
Treat it like a murder defense argument —
where your victim’s not any witness the State
around anymore. Do it doesn’t call would
with three things: other have exonerated
witnesses, other evidence, the defendant.
and other crimes. Although it may
Even when the victim testi- seem counterintuitive
fies truthfully, the jury still has to call an idunnonuthin’ wit-
to believe them and there’s no ness, sometimes you use them
guarantee. Take the 6'5" biker just to take that weapon from the
who testified he acted in self- defense arsenal.
defense after his foot-shorter You also need to look for other poten-
wife attacked him. Ludicrous? Nope, tial witnesses as well: talk to neighbors,
acquitted. Without third-party wit- even if they’re nowhere around when

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you roll up. People who like to hit girls usually like to
There’s a keep them from calling for help, too — we
see a lot of broken phones and wires
pretty good pulled out of walls. Either seize ‘em for
chance they evidence or photograph ‘em.
heard some-
thing. You also
want to know if
it’s happened
before. Learn if
anyone watched it
happen or saw the
bruises later.
Even though they may
not be willing to talk and
you spend a lot of time trying
to find them it’s worth the effort;
you’re not responsible for the results, likely to go to trial,
but you are responsible for giving it but if it has to be
your best shot. And don’t forget to inter- tried, it can force a
view the perp, huh? He may not talk, reluctant witness to tes-
but you’ll never know if you don’t try. tify. If you compile a
damning enough case,
Value Added either the victim, defendant or
Any time you take a case beyond the both may feel compelled to take the
realm of mere testimony, you’re on stand and explain it. That’s the best part
much more solid footing. Since most of the trial — bring popcorn. ment property. Does he
DV cases start with a 9-1-1 call, get a have a crack pipe, roaches in
copy of the tape and dispatch logs. If Best Laid Plans the ashtray, a gun involved? It’s the
the call is made during the assault, it’s a Still, you can lose cases where the “Would you like to supersize that?”
chilling window into what actually hap- victim recants or refuses to testify. The approach to law enforcement.
pened — such as the case we had with problem usually isn’t that the jury The DA may not follow up with all
a recanting victim. You could hear the thinks he’s innocent; they’re just not of these charges and the jury probably
victim and her children screaming in going to step up to the plate for a won’t convict on all of them. But if
terror on the 9-1-1 tape as the defen- victim who won’t do it for herself. I your guy is a real bad actor, the more
dant tried to get at them by repeatedly tried a guy for beating his wife. Neigh- opportunities you present, the more
ramming their house with his SUV. It’s bors ignored the fight until he started likely they are to convict on something.
powerful evidence. hacking down his front door with an And really, one charge is all it takes,
Make sure you have photos of any- axe — then they called 9-1-1. The wife especially if it’s a felony.
thing relevant, starting with injuries and test-i-lied in his defense and the jury So if he did it — charge it. I’m not
weapons. In the case of bruises, take gave our hero a pass on the DV, but saying to overcharge where you don’t
photos at the scene and then go back a convicted him for fighting the have a good-faith basis: make sure it’s
few days later, when they’ve started to responding officers and kicking the a legit charge and when in doubt ask
darken. Seize any weapon used. This is back glass out of the patrol car. End your DA. DV suspects don’t give their
obvious, but it’s amazing how many result, he went away and justice was victims any mercy — and you
times weapons are left at the scene. still served. shouldn’t expect their lawyers to give
Broken cell phones and holes in walls you an inch — so hit them as hard as
are other common findings: if it’s part Supersize Your Case you ethically can.
of a structure, photograph it. If it’s You get a call on a suspect slapping
smaller, seize it. his wife around in the yard and he’s Doing What’s Right
Documentary evidence can also drunk. You’ve got your DV charge Sometimes it’s hard to care about
be a windfall. Find out if there’s and a maybe a public drunk. A cases the victims don’t care about and
any legal history between the two: neighbor tells him to stop and it’s even harder to get a jury to care.
for example, prior reported DV Dipstick tells him to mind his But working in criminal justice isn’t
incidents (even with no own or take a beatdown. about doing what other people want —
arrest made); prior or Now you’ve got assault it’s about doing what’s right. There’s
pending divorce on the neighbor as truth to the phrase “the first time
actions; or previous, well as terroristic they’re a victim, the second time
current, or dis- threats. Then, if they’re a volunteer.” It doesn’t mean
missed protective the neighbor’s kid they don’t deserve justice and even if
orders. Has the is watching — in they didn’t, our job isn’t to only protect
victim ever gone Georgia — hit- the deserving. Take the bad actors out
to a battered ting someone in of circulation and make them answer
woman’s shelter? front of a child for what they’ve done. Speak up for
The mountain of is cruelty in the those who will not — or cannot —
paperwork can third. When the speak for themselves and treat each DV
make the differ- cops roll up, Dip- call like a murder case —
ence in otherwise
less than winnable
stick takes a swing
— felony obstruc-
before it becomes one. *
cases. tion. Kicks out the Special thanks to Linda Beaver,
More evidence makes back glass — felony Family Violence Intervention Program
your case stronger and less interference with govern- Facilitator and Chris Coulter, Ph.D.

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IT’S ONLY A MATTER OF TIME

TerRoriSt AtTacks —

“Their ‘Second
Wave’ was as
successful as the
initial attack.”

D
ropped off downtown their parkas each wore a packed vest shaling of ambulances began just out-
they made their way to containing kilos of explosive wrapped side the bomb blast radius. Border
the heart of the club dis- with epoxied together nails and steel Police fought to move TV cameramen
trict. The pair was nuts filled with rat poison. out of the triage area. BOOM! We
familiar with the area and The terrorists assumed predeter- watched the hood of a car fly through
the movements of the mined positions creating a “Kill the air in a burst of fiery flames. A
thousand teens partying in the many Zone” between them and waited until broadcasting TV camera caught the
nearby pubs and discos. They them- the crush of kids in the pedestrian image live from the scene as the
selves had spent Saturday nights par- mall was at its height. BOOM! Two explosion’s concussion hit the cam-
tying in the same clubs. explosions so simultaneous it sounded eraman and spun him around. A car
The pair of teen terrorists in their like one. bomb detonated on a side street, 20
baggy pants and oversized designer Ten minutes later the ambulances yards back from where the terrorist
parkas, fit right in. Except that under and TV crews arrived. Triage and mar- planners correctly predicted the ambu-

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E HOWARD LINETT

— ExploSives

“The terrorists
assumed predetermined
positions creating
a ‘Kill Zone’ between
them and waited”
lances would be loading victims. Their bombing tactics, I include all manner As if that was not enough, terrorists
“Second Wave” was as successful as of successful tactics not just those the have attempted to incorporate chem-
the initial attack. terrorists employ today. ical and biological agents in their
The terrorists’ explosive devices bombs. Hepatitis “B” and HIV/Aids
A New Reality kill and maim not only with blast, fire carrying human bomb delivery sys-
I describe terrorist bombing tactics and concussion, but also with tems have been employed — so far
from a historical perspective. America shrapnel. Their bombs are deliberately unsuccessfully. Nut shrapnel plugged
has relatively little experience with anti-personnel incorporating a matrix with anti-coagulant rat poison was a
terrorism bombings. We haven’t taken of epoxied-together nuts, ball bearings problem. Don’t worry about
the counter-measures thwarting the and “sheets” of nails forming a bio/chem; it’s the conventional, the
types of bombings especially typical shrapnel shell around the explosive. blast, fire, concussion and shrapnel
in the earlier stages of a terror cam- The “Kill Zone” is extensive. Anyone that will kill you.
paign. For that reason, in reviewing within 150 yards is in mortal danger. The terrorists’ many methods of

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“Detonations
are timed for
when the
location is
the busiest.”

“Now-a-days
each exploding
garment is
equipped with
a detonator
for each
hand and
each foot.”
bomb detonation include hi-tech and an electric circuit and detonates the duffel bags are use to conceal larger
wireless. Can you say cellular phone? bomb; that’s why the Israeli Mantra is explosive devices. These “carryalls”
When advising law enforcement I “two bullets to the head.” get bombs onto or into anywhere the
urge departments to purchase the best terrorist is capable of penetrating secu-
cell phone jammer available and Exploding Objects rity (virtually nonexistent in the US).
blackout the area of terror attack or So bombs can be transported and Today bombs are also carried and or
potential attack. Act as if you’re being “planted,” they’re hidden, camouflaged worn and detonated by human delivery
watched by a terrorist who simply inside objects. In the early stages of a systems — the homicide bomber. Alter-
needs to press the speed-dial on her terror campaign expect explosive natively a homicide bomber may wear
telephone to detonate either the con- devices to be concealed in common an exploding vest or belt.
cealed explosive garment worn by the items. Bombs will be placed on super-
terrorist you’ve just taken-out or the market shelves hidden inside food Basic Bombing Tactics
secondary bomb 10 yards away from packages. Each will kill a few shoppers Terrorists bomb locations where
you — or both. and maim an equal number. A child’s their intelligence reports innocents can
Never forget the explosive gar- electronic game forgotten in the school- be found in large numbers. Detona-
ments worn by bombers also incorpo- yard will explode when turned on. Sev- tions are timed for when the location
rate multiple, low-tech detonation trig- eral schoolchildren will lose limbs and is the busiest. The terrorists want to
gers. The sergeant from a Border be blinded. A cell phone, handbag or a get the bomb inside the targeted loca-
Police anti-terror unit advises, “Now- briefcase accidentally left on or under tion because the force of the blast is
a-days each exploding garment is the table in a packed coffee shop will greatly magnified if contained,
equipped with a detonator for each explode when moved. All the shop’s whether inside a bus, restaurant or
hand and each foot.” patrons will be permanently disabled mall. They also use explosives to
Explosive garments are constructed and disfigured if not killed outright. destroy buildings and structures.
so that a bullet passing through closes Book bags, suitcases, backpacks and Terrorists select targets for a combi-

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s
ng
“Hijack a tanker-
truck loaded with
gasoline and you
have an enormous
explosive device.”
nation of reasons. The target may have along the roadside would arouse suspi- maneuverable, go anywhere bomb
symbolic significance — like City Hall. cion, they’ll burry the explosive device delivery system.
The target’s destruction will cause sec- in the path of the targeted vehicle. If the driver of the vehicle bomb is
ondary problems, for instance a major Lacking a better alternative and having intending to become a martyr the only
bridge. Or the resulting death will be time on their side, terrorists will dig a safe target is the target physically out of
horrific and devastating — the street in tunnel to the location where they want reach. His vehicle bomb is literally a
front of a church, as worshipers leave to plant their bomb. The attacks carried Martyr Guided Missile. Pushing in
on Easter Sunday morning. out by these tunneling terrorists may between two passenger packed buses
Where security is absent or lax ter- use a thousand or more kilos of explo- and detonating is an especially popular
rorists will carry the explosive devices sive, with devastating effect. and horrifically deadly terrorist tactic.
onto the train, bus or subway or into the
mall, office building or school and Vehicle Bombs I t’s Only A Matter Of Time
leave it to explode shortly thereafter. Rather than as a placed charge, I So far, with few exceptions, the US
Where security exists a homicide classify a vehicle used as a bomb has been spared this nightmare. But just
bomber will carry or wear the bomb delivery system as a vehicle bomb. look at the destruction and chaos caused
and attempt to get past security. If she They are employed to attack both sta- by McVey in Oklahoma City. Think if
can’t, then whoever is near the target’s tionary and moving targets. The that became a yearly, monthly, weekly
entrance becomes the alternate target. vehicle’s carrying capacity determines or daily event. American cops will be
the power of the explosion. Hijack a the on the front lines responding to these
Roadside Bombs tanker-truck loaded with gasoline and incidents or hopefully stopping them
Terrorists employ placed charges to you have an enormous explosive before the terror is unleashed on inno-
take out passing vehicles. Bombs are device. Load Mom’s SUV with a dozen cents. We’re behind the learning curve
camouflaged as everything from rocks full back-deck barbecue size propane in this area and we better start
to abandoned cars. When anything tanks and you have less obtrusive, more catching up most riki-tik. *
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Psychological
Trauma from
Critical
Incidents
TAKE CARE
OF YOUR
OFFICERS
oo often, when we relate stress to the police the psychological trauma their officers experience simply

T
profession, we only address the obvious stres- as part of their job description.
sors such as shift work, long hours, and frus-
tration with the criminal justice system or PTSD
often times our own department. What line Post-traumatic stress disorder can be as debilitating as any
supervisors sometimes fail to recognize is the wound or injury experienced in the line of duty and much
incremental stress caused by exposure to crit- more difficult for recovery. The aggregate impact of everyday
ical incidents such as serious or fatal car experiences in the life of a cop can be devastating if not
wrecks, graphic trauma of pedestrian versus train, children addressed as it occurs and disallowed to become “baggage.”
involved injuries and death, shootings, stabbings, and sense- Loss of attention, poor job performance, physical illness,
less, unexplained suicides. malingering, and personal problems can be manifestations of
The machismo, “Rock of Gibraltar,” psyche of the Amer- incremental psychological trauma caused by what once was
ican cop isn’t made of Kevlar or SprectraShield, nor is it considered benign events that is just part of the job description.
impervious to the negative impact of critical incidents and The persona of a cop is that of a fearless crime fighter
often requires external protections afforded only by their who protects the public from the social ills and is delivered
direct leadership. from the most dangerous situations unscathed — nothing is
A major responsibility of street supervisors is to mini- further from the truth. Friederich Nietzsche stated, “Who-
mize the exposure of dangers to the officers through their ever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he
experience and skills; and this task is often consummated does not become a monster” — part of that responsibility is
effectively on a daily basis. However, it’s equally impor- with the street supervisor. It’s often said a good police
tant the same supervisor make every attempt to mitigate officer is a reflection of good leadership, however the con-

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cers prior to critical incident exposure.


I worked in a small police department
Robert D. Boyden, Ph.D. situated on the outskirts of Philadel-
phia, Pennsylvania, and although the
department was small, we experienced
many of the violent crimes of the city
and numerous critical incidents. Nei-
ther the Chief nor shift supervisors
were trained or emotionally equipped
to provide stress intervention — it was
never even offered or considered.
In the later years of my career, the
County began a Critical Incident
Stress Management (CISM) team
available on a formal basis; however,
most were unaware of its existence or
availability. In order for stress inter-
vention and mitigation to work, it
must be available on a 24-hour basis
and become part of the culture of
policing — more importantly, it can’t
be viewed as a “weakness” in the
character of those utilizing the assis-
tance. This is one of the benefits of
an informal assistance system prac-
ticed by the shift supervisor, it
becomes standard operating proce-
dure after critical incidents and all
members take part.
The stigma of defusing stress
through outside assistance can have a
chilling affect on using the service and
must not be tolerated. A study com-
pleted with the Vermont State Police on
utilization of peer support services
revealed the rank and file did not use
these programs was because of the fear
it would be viewed as a weakness in the
troopers and held against them in pro-
motions. Unfortunately, there are
numerous cops who won’t seek assis-
tance due to preconceived perception
and the practice of stigma. Peer coun-
seling under informal conditions has a
much better chance for success
allowing the officers to feel comfort-
able talking to other cops they work
directly with and have already devel-
oped a trust.

verse is also true, that a bad or poor to the supervisor without prejudice or Informal Action
performing officer is also a by- fear of stigma. Counseling and debriefing con-
product of poor leadership. No, all street level supervisors don’t ducted after critical incidents on an
need to become counselors and thera- informal environment using empathy,
Band-Aid Approach pist. God knows their jobs are tough shared emotions, and unconditional
Agencies seem to deal with officer enough, however they do need to add regard for those exposed to the incident
stress by sending them to additional empathy, a shoulder to lean on and an can be more effective than counseling
training or counseling. It’s often done ear to listen as part of their responsi- by an anonymous professional who
as a service offered after an employee bility to their people. Venting by cops possesses more credentials than Freud.
has been exposed to episodic stress. after a critical incident should be It’s the reasons Alcoholics Anonymous
Reactive stress counseling is just that, encouraged and informal debriefings is so successful. That isn’t to say pro-
reactive and often times is like placing conducted by the supervisor made to be fessional counseling is of no value in
a band-aid on a severed limb. The policy, even something as informal as a stress related conditions concerning law
closest and most available resource for locker room bull session involving the enforcement issues, however what we
a police officer after exposure to a crit- entire squad (preferably after the tour are attempting to achieve is minimizing
ical incident is the line supervisor and for obvious reasons). the negative effects of stress after indi-
it’s incumbent for that supervisor to vidual critical incidents and providing a
provide immediate attention to alle- Prepare Your Cops “vent” so the psychological trauma
viate the stress created by the incident. Pre-incident stress preparation can does not build up. Stress-reduction
It’s equally important the affected also be engaged as part of an everyday practices should be part of police
officer feel comfortable enough to talk practice to help prepare and buffer offi- training, culture and conducted on a

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cops kill
cops kill
cops themselves
kill themselves at
themselves at a
at a rate
a rate six
rate six times
six times greater
times greater than
greater than
than
the
the general
the general population
general population and
population and have
and have
have a a three
a three times
three times greater
times greater
greater
chance
chance of
chance of having
of having a
having a substance
a substance abuse
substance abuse problem.
abuse problem.
problem.
daily basis. It won’t minimize or reduce cies have closer ties to the community The Police Suicide Foundation, cops
the initial impact of a critical incident, therefore when a critical incident such kill themselves at a rate six times
it’ll just provide the officers a way to as a suicide or fatal car accident occurs greater than the general population and
cope with episodic stress, recognize the cops are more likely to be familiar with have a three time greater chance of
stressors and make available a mutual the victim and the officers are less having a substance abuse problem. So
aid system within the department. desensitized to trauma because of the as a supervisor, ask yourself this prac-
Formal employee assistance pro- fewer number of events. tical question — Would you rather have
grams (EAP) are valuable tools for a healthy, psychologically fit officer
cops dealing with the emotional rigors Formal Action patrolling with you or a drunken time
of policing. But the stress often over- Let’s not minimize the importance bomb carrying a loaded gun with sui-
looked and disregarded as harmless is of formal critical incident stress man- cidal thoughts?
the incremental stress accumulated and agement teams and formally trained
the eventual psychological trauma cre- counselors. Their purpose is to create Do Your Job
ated by exposure. This type of aggre- awareness in line supervisors to Supervisors check their officer’s
gate stress can be mitigated through the stressful conditions created by critical weapons and brief them prior to shift
informal debriefing and defusing by incidents. They afford an informal assignments. Patrol vehicles are kept in
shift supervisors following the incident. means of dealing with episodic or top condition for safety and we make
Nothing more than a discussion of feel- incremental stress within squads. Rec- sure our officers are provided with bal-
ings and emotions over a cup of coffee ognizing each incident involving death listic vests. Why not try to minimize
and a friendly reminder we must not or serious injuries creates accumulative the greatest threat — stress. You owe it
forget, before becoming cops, we were stress and through informal discussions to your subordinates, and you owe it to
human beings, with feelings, empa- and debriefings this can play a signifi- yourself. Early intervention through
thetic sensitivities and emotions. cant role in mitigating it. informal chats, and debriefings can go
Often, smaller agencies feel invin- For those cynics who feel stress is along way to diminish the negative
cible against this type of stressful con- just part of the job and officers should impact of stress — make it
dition. On the contrary, smaller agen- just “shake it off,” realize, according to part of your routine. *
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PROBATION
& Community
Supervision
PAROLE 101
isclaimers are an inconvenient neces-
Ben Christie

D sity these days especially considering


the current gene pool. So here goes:
I’m not an expert, authority, college pro-
fessor, celebrity nor a 30-year Lifer, but I
am experienced and I’m here to “Represent.” I’m a
Field PO with over 12 years in two different states.
God bless the police reserves, auxiliary
officers and private security folks, but I’m a
member of that “third half” of law enforce-
ment and corrections. I’m the little old lady
in tennis shoes with a Glock-19, ASP, spray

Points To Ponder
You’re a street cop; Joe Schmuklipz is an upper-
level dope dealer you just can’t seem to catch in the
act. He’s driving a Beemer quarter ta eight (BMW
745), talking on his cell phone at 2AM at a known
drug corner with known dope dealers. Joey always has
a nice big smile for you — especially as he’s counting
that huge wad-o-twenties. What can a PO do for you?
Sequoia Blankenship
Good ol’ Joe has a curfew (Strike 1), he doesn’t have
a driver’s license or the POs permission to drive (Strike 2),
Joe’s not allowed to have a cell phone (Strike 3) and he
isn’t allowed to associate with known dope dealers outside of
a treatment setting (oops). He has specific instructions to stay
away from that particular drug corner. Joe is looking poorly.
As a result of your one phone call, Joe can be arrested, returned
to jail or prison. He’ll get his approved residence searched along with
the car and any car or place you and the PO can link him to (Lease/Mort-
gage holder, registered owner, etc). You’ll also probably get overtime for
that’ll melt
appearing in court or the parole hearing. Any dope, guns, etc found by the PO your face off,
search and arrest team will be turned over to the police for prosecution on new cuffs, restraining
criminal charges and Joe won’t be allowed bail. What’s not to like? belt, level III vest
and a dictionary. Oh
More Points To Ponder yeah, and a bad attitude
You’re a Fed (nothing personal). John Skuzwilly is state parolee — a from the workload.
shadowy figure and you’d like more background info. He’s also kinda getting Back in my college
in the way of your super high-tech whiz-bang surveillance of John’s family daze, I was told there were
owned barber shop — AKA “Pancakes and Syrup House.” In fact, he’s down three main parts to the Crim-
right giving you seizures endangering that CI you didn’t tell me about. I inal Justice System — cops, corrections and probation &
understand — you’re a Fed and can’t help yourself. How can your friendly parole — lets just call it Community Supervision. What
neighborhood PO help out? about after the arrest and prison? What do those 80,000
First off, you can look over his entire file and get copies of anything plus PO folks do and how can they help cops or COs or the
you need. Next, based upon your confidential information, a PO search general public with almost 5,000,000 offenders?
and arrest team hits John’s house and car only — not the barber shop. I t’s All In The Name
John Maxes out back in prison for having “syrup” at his house — a couple
POs basically fill a role protecting the community by
of grand in cash is confiscated and turned over to the local DA. Bye-bye supervising those under sentence of the court. Simply put,
Johnny — see you when you get back out. probation and parole practice community supervision.

68 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


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Supervision is a deal, a contract for


conditional freedom on the street. The

Thermal Imaging . . .
convicted individual promises to obey
the conditions of his supervision and
the court agrees not to lock him up or

like you’ve NEVER


keep him locked up for his entire sen-
tence. Sometimes, there’s a period of

1
supervision following incarceration or

seen it before.
a probation tail following a parole max
date. Regardless, it’s all supervision
and the conditions of supervision are
all pretty much the same everywhere.
We engineered the smallest high resolution thermal
Conditions surveillance system available. Our ergonomic
Generally, conditions of supervi-
sion include reporting as directed, MTM hand-held thermal imager delivers
don’t change residences without per-
mission, don’t leave the supervision exceptional detection, recognition
area without permission, no illegal and identification of
drugs or alcohol, no firearms or other
weapons and no illegal behavior. Spe- targets out up to
cial or other conditions can include 500 meters.
just about any good thing like stay
away from victims and drug dealers,
curfews, support dependants, pay
restitution, attend drug/alcohol pro-
grams, submit to urine tests, no drug
paraphernalia — just about any condi-
tion the supervision authority or a cre-
ative PO thinks the offender should
have as a condition for freedom.
Important Points
s Co-aligned, Integral
The offender/client/scumbag is
already guilty of a past crime and Laser Pointer
until their max date are under sen- s 320 x 240 Resolution
tence of the court. The PO controls s 2X Digital Zoom
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will make the determination of guilt
and punishment, but the PO is the
gatekeeper. They coordinate and do
the administrative grunt work. He’s
your point-of-contact.
There’s a start date and an end date
for the convicted individual. It can be
just days or the rest of the individual’s
natural life, depending upon the sen- Toll Free: 877-744-4802
tence. Once the bad guy reaches his
max date with no new criminal acts or
pending court cases, he’s off supervi-
sion. The PO no longer has supervi-
sory authority over the individual. It’s
over — until next time.
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WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 71
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TRAIN FOR LIFE


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with a substantial amount of
Dewey, DPMS, Falcon Ind., H.S. Precision, Manson Precision,
Otis, Smith Enterprises, Surefire, Trijicon,
Wilson Combat, Yankee Hill, and more.
stored kinetic energy. *
FREE catalog to all MIL/LE Personnel and Agencies. Discount pricing available. Everything we sell is 100% GUARANTEED - Period. More info: www.springfield-armory.com,
www.tac-grip.com, www.lemasltd.com
800-741-0015 brownells.com Source Code: BKQ
72 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
231.23384 AmCop MarApr08.indd 1 1/4/08 3:38:02 PM
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:39 PM Page 73

LEAA
Continued from page 16

trainers than any other group, they pro-


vide a $25,000 dollar death benefit for
LEO Members killed in the line of
duty — the list goes on and on.
Opportunistic Politicians
Opportunistic politicians use fallen
officers to drive their liberal agenda,
while real issues get ignored. For
instance our borders are still far too
wide open and that is part of the
increased violence problem.
A recent newspaper headline
screamed, Lawmen under siege along
Mexico border. The article said, “Alien
and drug smugglers along the US-
Mexico border have spawned a rise in
violence against ... law-enforcement.”
A border patrol veteran said, “They
have no hesitancy to attack the agents
on the line ....” Assaults against
Border Patrol agents have more than
doubled over the past two years.
With all this as a backdrop, the
Democrats’ “expert” on crime,
United States Senator Joe Biden —
who US News & World Report
called, “the Democrat’s chief anti-
crime specialist on Capitol Hill” (my
sides still hurt from laughing over
that one) — gives his take on the
crime problem. First, admitting that
Congress has failed to “protect
American families and American
communities from crime.” He says:
“We need to recommit ourselves to
the balanced, comprehensive
approach to fighting crime....”
Double And Triple Talk
What do these politicians mean
when they use words like: “balanced”
and “comprehensive?” Biden explains,
prevention and treatment programs. He
also supports tough, but “fair” criminal
laws. (We can’t have any laws crimi-
nals, especially cop killers, might not
think are fair.) If that isn’t enough,
Biden declares Congress needs to
make sure our prisons provide
offenders with the skills and resources
to Reenter Our Communities!
When these folks come seeking your
vote this fall, remember where they
place their emphasis — not more
prisons, not tougher laws with longer
prison time for offenders, not the Death
Penalty, not securing our borders,
nothing new, real, or meaningful.
America doesn’t need more “poli-
tics as usual.” The memory of
America’s fallen officers (and those
many thousands more attacked every
year, but survive) demand we go past
political rhetoric and really get tough
with criminals and secure
our borders. *
WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 73
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:39 PM Page 74

Quit wasting your time or even jeopardizing your life searching by “trial PROBATION & PAROLE 101
and error method” for a magazine to feed today’s semi-auto pistols. Continued from page 69
MEC-GAR exclusively manufactures magazines recognized for “stalking horses” to get around prob-
guaranteed fit, finish and totally reliable functionality by the majority of able cause and normal procedures to
firearm manufacturers since 1965! convict bad guys.
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even if he makes bail.
We have the power to search without a
warrant as long as reasonable suspicion
exists. The offender has already con-
sented to such searches and not to fight
extradition among other fun things — or
he goes to or stays incarcerated.
A cop needs “beyond a reasonable
doubt” through criminal law in a court
— a PO deals with administrative law
so the burden of proof is far reduced.
Look at it this way, a cop has to pull and
dead lift 90 to 95 lbs to prove guilt —
all the PO has to do is bench press 51
lbs — with a couple of spotters. Who
are the spotters? None other than con-
senting felons who have given up some
legal rights to get probation or parole
and the administrative procedures, laws
and case law lowering the burden of
proof. Remember, the accused is
already guilty of the crime placing him
under supervision.
Sadly, I get a lot more phone calls
from angry, pay back seeking ex-girl
friends — God bless them — than I do
cops or feds or COs. But every time, it’s
worth the call. Don’t get me wrong; I
get tipped by cops, feds and COs from
time to time and I have no doubt
they’ve helped save my life. Also, a bad
guy can have two or more POs at dif-
ferent levels — County, State and Fed-
eral or different locations. Hopefully the
POs know about each other and share
info among themselves.
Yeah right — hopefully. *
74 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:39 PM Page 75

CORRECTIONS
Continued from page 18

According to Christopher Mumola,


Policy Analyst for the US Bureau of
Justice Statistics, “Almost every state
prisoner has been through a period of
jail confinement.” The public, media
and elected officials need to be made
cognizant of this fact and the above
figures. Our county jails are the first
stop for many inmates who’ll find
themselves incarcerated for a majority
of their lives. In the state and federal
system many of the inmates have been
in the system before.
First 100 Hours
The inmate’s survival learning
curve behind the walls is much further
along than their county counterparts,
who in many instances are getting
their first taste of confinement. That
adds to an already very dangerous sit-
uation for the staff and the inmates. In
prison an inmate often has between 24

In prison an
inmate often has
between 24 and 72
hours to establish
themselves as
either predator or
prey, (we don’t like
it either, but that’s
the way it is.)
and 72 hours to establish themselves
16” Contour Barrel
as either predator or prey, (we don’t
RFLR-AP4 . . . . . . .$1254.00
7.62 NATO
like it either, but that’s the way it is.)
EOTech Not Included What they do, who they chose to asso-
ciate with, and how they interact with
other inmates and staff in those first
100 hours or so can make a major dif-
ference in how their incarceration
16” Contour Barrel turns out and in turn effects the safety
RFA2-AP4A . . . . . . . .$899.00
5.56 x 45mm
of the environment.
I’ve always had the greatest respect
for anyone willing to put on that badge,
put their lives on the line in the name of
public safety and work behind the walls.
Whether it’s juvenile, local, county,
state or federal it’s dangerous and diffi-
cult. But my hat goes off to the men and
women working in our country systems.
11” Chrome-Lined Barrel
RFA3-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .POR
LAW ENFORCEMENT &
MILITARY PERSONNEL
They do an amazing job. The next time
w/4-Rail Free Float Tube &
Mangonel Rear Flip-up Sight
RECEIVE A you drive by a county lock-up, don’t
5.56 x 45mm 10% DISCOUNT think for a minute they’re less violent,
Aimpoint and mount not included. ON DPMS PARTS
& ACCESSORIES! with less dangerous inmates — they
aren’t. The men and women who work
behind those walls deserve
DPMS Firearms, LLC • 3312 12th Street SE, Dept. ACOP • St. Cloud, MN 56304
(p) 1-320-258-4448, Ext. 2267 • (f) 1-320-258-4449 • (e) dpms@dpmsinc.com
of the highest praise. *
WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 75
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:39 PM Page 76

CHEST RIG
5.11 Tactical

PADDLE Designed by Kyle Lamb, the Chest Rig serves as a plat-


HOLSTER form for magazines, radios and other pouches. The inside
DeSantis Holster & features a quick-access compartment for maps or docu-
Gunleather mentation and it’s made of reinforced nylon mesh. The REMINGTON
Chest Rig adjusts to fit all body sizes and is available in HANDGUARDS
black and flat dark earth. To see the rig, and the rest of
the 5.11 Tactical Nylon line, go to www.511tactical.com. The Mako Group
DeSantis announces its
new Kydex sheet
paddle holster, style The Remington 870 Handguards with Rails provide a rigid,
D94 DS Paddle Holster. ultra-light Picatinny system for mounting virtually any
This model is made accessory. The lower rail enables foregrip, flashlight or
entirely of KYDEX sheet laser mounting. Two side rails for mounting flashlight or
and is an exceptionally laser sights are available as well. The Handguards are
light and compact holster. made from reinforced plastic composite to MIL-STD 1913.
Minimal friction between The Handguards install with no gunsmithing and include a
gun and holster results in a lifetime warranty. For more information, go to
smooth draw. The paddle is www.makosecurity.com.
adjustable for forward to rear-
ward cant and dual tension device
and precise molding give this holster a perfect fit. The
D94 is currently available for the Glock 17, 19, 22 and
G3 LED
23 in both right and left hand. Others will soon follow;
SureFire
MSRP is $40.00. Go to www.desantisholsters.com to
check them out.
The G3 LED is a longer-running LED version of SureFire’s
popular G3 Nitrolon. It features a virtually indestructible
light emitting diode — no filament to burn out or break —
AR15/M16 ARMORER’S WRENCH that produces four times the light of typical two “D” cell
Guntec USA flashlight. Designed with the needs of law enforcement in
mind, the G3 LED produces tactical-level lighting (enough
to temporarily overwhelm an aggressor’s night-adapted
This wrench com- vision) for nearly six hours and useful light levels
bines many of the for over nine hours on a single set of lithium batteries. To
functions necessary find out more, visit www.surefire.com.
for anyone building or
repairing an AR-15. At one end, it attaches either multi-point or peg style barrel nuts on barrels up to 1" in diameter, and
a torque wrench can fitted into the 1/2" square slot opening. Also works well with installing free-floating handguards. The
other end fits CAR/M-4 stock locking nuts, and a large flat head screwdriver blade is also included for use on full-
size A2 buttstock screws. The two other slots on the wrench fit A1 and A2 birdcage flash hiders and receiver exten-
sions. Call Guntec at (480) 518-5359 or visit them on the Web at www.tacticalaccessories.com.

40MM BARRICADE
ALS Technologies
MOBILE
A family of
COMPUTER
40mm car- Xplore Technologies
tridges
designed to
fire a non- The iX104C3 Tablet PC features a
pyrotechnic fingerprint reader, user acces-
55-gram, sible hard drive and PC card bay
two-part to help protect data security. The
spin-stabi- iX104C3 is RoHS compliant, Blue-
lized projec- tooth compatible, and includes GPS
tile filled with OC or CS (powder or liquid). This round permits wireless options. All Xplore products
the non-pyrotechnic introduction of chemical into areas without feature magnesium alloy housings,
the potential fire hazards of other types of munitions. The pro- shock mounted hard drives,
jectile is designed to be fired through dry wall, hollow-core enhanced XGA displays, Intel proces-
doors, solid-core doors or glass. This round is not to be fired at sors and onboard ports for expansion.
individuals. Check them out at www.alstechnologies.com. For more details visit www.xploretech.com.

76 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:39 PM Page 77

For more information on seeing your product featured in “Spotlight,” contact Delano Amaguin (888) 732-6461.

SPOTLIGHT
SAFETY FURNITURE
Crown Gym Mats, Inc.

With safety in training in mind, Crown Gym


Mats, Inc. has created a unique product line of
commonly found household and office items WINGLUX LIGHTBAR
made of solid foam and covered in bacteria, fire
and mildew resistant PCN. During tactical
Rontan North America
training exercises, these products simulate
actual conditions, without the fear of injury or
damage. Larger items can be disassembled for The aerodynamic WingLux is the newest roof-mounted
storage, and heavy-duty hook and loop fas- lightbar from Rontan North America. The innovative
teners hold them together for use. Check out design of the WingLux enables full 360-degree visibility
the entire line at www.cgmlawenf.com. and modern styling. Thanks to the swept-back design, at
least three light heads are visible at any given time,
even from the sides. The lights are high-intensity LED
and 100 percent digital as well as modular allowing for
CG-LOCK quick and easy changes and upgrades. Log on to
Lap Belt Cinch, Inc. www.rontan.com to find out more.

It’s an add-on to your vehicle seatbelt that offers EVOLUTION BODY ARMOR
enhanced seatbelt comfort, control and stability. The Armor Express
CGLock offers racing-harness control for the driver, injury
reduction in forward and lateral impacts and rollovers,
greater stability for booster seats and improved suspect
ULTRABOXES transport. The “CG” stands for Center of Gravity. This is a Evolution body
tool that clamps onto the tongue portion of the seatbelt armor carrier fea-
UK International allowing you to tighten the belt more firmly, while still tures a lightweight
allowing full range of upper body motion. Words can’t microfiber outer
describe it, go to www.cg-lock.com to view installation and shell and anti-
For over 35 years, Underwater Kinetics has manufactured information videos. microbial lining to
safety approved flashlights and rugged, waterproof equip- wick away mois-
ment cases. In addition to the existing line of Dry Boxes, ture and prevent
UltraCases and LoadoutCases, UK has released a new line odor. Other fea-
of smaller waterproof, impact resistant UltraBoxes this tures include
year. UltraBoxes come in a variety of sizes and colors, per- shoulder epaulets,
fect for protecting sensitive products, such as handguns, double front plate
ammunition, 2 way radios, cell phones, monitoring pockets to hold
devices…it can even be used to protect your lunch from the 5”x8” and 7”x10”
environment! Made in USA. For more information about inserts, eight
UK ’s line of products, go to www.underwaterkinetics.com. adjustment points,
4” wide removable
elastic straps with
Velcro closures, interior suspension system for ballistic
ALUMINUM pads, tapered lower front corners and zippered bottom
closures. The carriers are available for men or women,
GRIPS and come in black, navy, tan, brown, white and light
Gun Grips & Hogue blue. To find out more, log on to
www.armorexpress.com.

GunGrips.net has a new


line of Aluminum Grips AR-10(T)
specifically for the ArmaLite, Inc.
Beretta 92FS. The grips
are machined by
Hogue from T6 alu-
minum, then bead
blasted and
anodized. They’re ArmaLite introduces the AR-10(T) in .338 Federal. The AR-10(T)
available in clear and features include 22” stainless barrel with 1:10” right-hand twist
black and can be customized with laser-etched artwork, and target crown, free float ArmaLite Target handguard, gas
including military logos, police badges, monograms or block with Picatinny rail, forged upper receiver with Picatinny rail and a
even an image you send in. Visit www.GunGrips.net to two-stage National Match trigger. The AR-10(T) is being revealed at SHOT Show 2008, to find out more about it,
find out how you can get a set for your Beretta. check out www.armalite.com.

WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 77
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:40 PM Page 78

WIN! THIS PACKAGE!

I ncluded is the LaserMax


c ombining white light and a laser into a
rugged hands-free tactical light
system. Use the white light to identify
the threats and the laser to control them.
This durable solid-state LED light has a
has the brightest laser allowed by Federal
law. LaserMax lasers pulsate for fast target
acquisition and are user-adjustable for
windage and elevation.
The LMS 1202 is constructed of hard coat
switch for easy on and off operation when
stealth is a must.

Length: 4.38"
Width: 2.79"
10,000 hour lifetime with no fragile filament anodized Mil-spec aluminum practically guar- Height: 2.02"
to break. It provides 50 percent longer bat- anteeing it’s a long and useful life in your Weight: 13.4 oz. with batteries
tery life than competitors. A low battery indi- squad car’s shotgun mount. This LMS-1202 Batteries: 2 CR 123 lithium batteries
cator ensures you won’t be left in the dark. It Combo includes a momentary activation Solid State LED White Light: 60 Lumen

*
78 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM
AMERICAN COP • • MARCH/APRIL
JULY/AUGUST 2006
2008
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:40 PM Page 79

MOSSBERG M ossberg is considered to be one of the most


innovative firearms manufacturers in US
History. Founded in 1919, O.F. Mossberg &

930SPX AUTO Sons is the oldest family-owned firearms manufac-


turer in the USA. They’re known to have pioneered
many product features, which are now the standards

LOADING
by which others are judged. They’re also the first
long-gun manufacturer to receive the demanding ISO
9001 Certification.
Mossberg’s new 930SPX is evidence of their long-

SHOTGUN term relationship with the LE community. They’ve


brought to the table an affordable autoloader that
meets the demands of cops. Ultra-reliability is para-
mount in our world and the 930SPX gives us just that.
The 930SPX gives us features before only avail-
able on custom tactical shotguns. The Picatinny
receiver mounted rail holds a standard issue LPA
rear ghost ring sight. And, in concert with the M16
style fiber-optic front sight makes for rapid target
acquisition and quick follow-ups. Remove the rear
sight and just about any red dot optic mounts easily
enhancing the user’s ability to reach out and touch a
bad guy with monotonous consistency.
The 930SPX comes standard with a 7+1 Choate
magazine extension providing the high capacity we
need if we start having a “really bad day.” But watch out,
you can deplete that extra ammo pretty quickly with the
gas operated action. The gun is very fast and with the
reliability it offers, it’s just what we need for our job.

Gauge: 12 Gauge
Chamber: 3"
Choke: Cylinder Bore
Barrel Length: 18.5"
Capasity: 7+1
Length of Pull: 14"
Overall Length: 39"
Weight: 7.5 Lbs.
Finish: Matte Black
Stock: Black Synthetic
Picatinny Rail Top Receiver Mount
Removeable LPA Ghost Ring Rear Sight
Photo: Dave Douglas M-16 Style LPA Front Sight
Choate Mag Extention

x LMS-1202 Ambidextrous Thumb Safety


LaserMax LMS-1202 Combo

TO ENTER CONTEST: Use a postcard (no envelopes, please) and


Laser Wavelength: 635nm follow the sample shown. Send to AMERICAN COP Dept. X3, P.O. COP MAR/APR 2008:
Box 501930, San Diego, CA 92150-1930. Entries must be received Name ___________________________________
Power Output: 5mW before March 1, 2008.
Laser Axis: 1" of bore
Laser Operating Temp: 10-120 degrees
Dot Size 7 yds: 5/16"
Limit 1 entry per household. This contest is open to individuals who
are residents of the United States and its territories only. Agents
and employees of Publisher’s Development Corporation and their
Sample
Address _____________ City, State, Zip____________
Email Address _______________________
If I win, please ship my prize through:
families are excluded from entering. Contest void where prohibited
Dot Size 25 yds: 3/4" or restricted by law. Winners must meet all local laws and regula-
Dealer ___________________________________
Warranty: 3 years tions. Taxes and compliance with firearms regulations will be the Address _____________ City, State, Zip____________
responsibility of the winners. Winners will be notified by CERTIFIED
MAIL on official letterhead. No purchase necessary to enter. Phone ( ) ____ - ________ Store hours __ am __ pm

WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 79
MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:40 PM Page 80

AMERICAN COP
Classified ads $2.00 per-word per insertion. ($1.50 per-word per insertion for 3 or more) including name, address and phone number (20 word minimum). Min-
imum charge $40.00. Bold words add $1.00 per word. Copy and rerun orders must be accompanied by PAYMENT IN ADVANCE. NO AGENCY OR CASH DISCOUNTS ON
LISTING OR DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. All ads must be received with advance payment BY NO LATER THAN THE 1st of each month. Ads received after closing
will appear in the following issue. Please type or print clearly. PLEASE NOTE*** NO PROOFS WILL BE FURNISHED. Include name, address, post office, city, state and
zip code as counted words. Abbreviations count as one word each. Mail to AMERICAN COP CLASSIFIEDS, 12345 World Trade Drive, San Diego, California 92128. NOTE:
WE NOW HAVE DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADS IN BOTH GUNS MAGAZINE AND AMERICAN HANDGUNNER. ASK FOR OUR NEW RATE CARD, Or call (858) 605-0235.

ACCESSORIES BADGES COLLECTORS

IDENTIFY YOURSELF EMBLEMS & INSIGNIA


THIS BADGE MAY SAVE YOUR LIFE
Police Quality MISC
Gold Plated Streamlight Weapon-Mount & Tactical Lights Your
100% LEGAL source for Streamlight Flashlights, including the TLR-
FOR PERMIT HOLDERS 1 and TLR-2 and tactical lights. Call or visit us online!
FREE www.streamlightdistributor.com - 1-800-999-1358
Badge Case Free M-4 Rifles (with trade)Trade in your old
& Shipping machine guns, one old AC556 = 2 M-4's (NIB), one
With Order old MP5 = 3 M-4's(NIB), one old M16A1 = 4 M-4
(NIB), one old Thompson = 6 M-4's (NIB).All
Order Toll Free machine guns wanted for trade, any condition,

$38
MSRP: $58.00 You Save $20.00
must be ATF registered before May 1986. Will
trade for other items such as tasers, body armour,
ect. For reference & info call or email Bob Bowman
Size Money Back for more info at 352-235-2095 or
PO Box 970057
2” x 3” Guarantee
Coconut Creek, FL 33097
tankride@prodigy.net
1-877-332-2343
www.maxarmory.com

INDEX The companies listed have featured


advertisements in this issue. Look to them
OF ADVERTISERS first when you are ready to make a purchase.

Action Target 71 Kahr Arms 73


Action Target Academy 72 Kimber 7,15,19,84
Al Mar Knives 21 LA Police Gear 2
ALS Technologies 27 Mec-Gar USA 74
ArmaLite 12 Meprolight 13
ASP 71,73,75 New Mexico State Police 31
Benchmade 11 OfficerStore.com 8
Blackhawk 23 Pearce Grip, Inc. 13
Brownells 72 Safariland 6
CCF Raceframes 39 Smith & Wesson 3
CopQuest 71 Springfield 83
Cylinder & Slide 72 Streamlight 25
DeSantis Holsters 39 Sturm, Ruger & Co. 17
DPMS 75 Sure Set Holster 21
Elite Sports Express 33 SureFire 9
First Light 11,21 TOPS KNIVES 74
Glock 14 Trijicon 10
GunVault/Cannon Safe 27 Wilson Combat 29
Hatch 33 Winchester Ammunition 7
Insight Technology 69 XS Sights 75

80 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


MACOP08sec2 1/22/08 10:40 PM Page 81

INSIDERRUMINATIONS

INSIDERRUMINATIONS
Continued from page 82

Toro Caca (cont...)


illegal alien bias? don’t want the unwashed masses to become cognizant of
I want to hear about what Homeland Security is doing the fact we’re still at risk; we might actually force our
about preventing another attack or the invasion of lawmakers into doing something about it or, worse yet, we
America from Mexico. I want to hear about the schools might get angry at the misunderstood and much maligned
constructed by our military in Iraq, the level of success Fanatical Islamic Terrorists.
we’re having standing up their police force and reduc- I don’t give a rat’s ass about Hilary showing too much
tion of violence. cleavage, if Mitt had pre-marital sex or whom Rudy was
boinking while still married to wife #1, #2 or #3. Lindsay,
“You Can’t Handle The Truth” Britney, K-Fed, Hilary’s boobs, Rudy’s dalliances and
And, why doesn’t the mainstream media ever show Mitt’s lack thereof is Toro Caca and simply a diversion
real photos and video of the September 11, 2001 attack from what is truly important. The really scary thing is there
on the World Trade Center? Perhaps the public (us) can’t are people out there who are entranced by this crap and a
be trusted to process information containing images of lot of them can vote. If that’s not Toro Caca, I’m at a loss to
people plummeting to their deaths. Lord knows they understand what is.

A COMPLETELY SUBJECTIVE LOOK AT THINGS I LIKE Al Mar Knives


Al Mar created “Specialty Cutlery” in 1979
with the introduction of unique designs, produced
at quality levels rivaling custom, hand-made
blades. They use the finest steels, scale materials
and heat treatment available. And, their knives
are hand assembled, finished and sharpened by
craftsmen dedicated to creating the very best
knives you can buy.
Their Back Up Model 1 (Lower) and Model 2
(Upper), designed by ABS Mastersmith Kirk
Rexroat, are smaller lighter fixed blades designed
for all-day carry. They offer you exactly what
their name tells you — backup for whatever your
day may bring. Blades on both are AUS-8 stain-
less steel at 57-59 Rockwell hardness rating and
scales are black Micarta. Each includes a leather
sheath.

For More Info: www. almarknives.com

DeSantis Nemisis
During the summer I always carry my J frame with me
— usually in my pocket. Most of the holsters I tried
stuck to the gun like glue when drawn. The last thing I
want some snotbag to wonder is, “Why is my meal-
ticket/victim pointing a black bag at me?” I want him to
wonder, “What is that explos….” Finding a pocket holster
capable of breaking-up the outline of the gun and staying in
my pocket during the draw was, at the very least, frustrating.
The Nemesis from DeSantis solved my dilemma. The
ambidextrous design is lightweight and “sticky” as pine tar on the
outside. You actually have to work to get the empty holster out of
your pocket. Once in place the holster and gun are kept solidly in
the same position until you need it.
The inside of the holster is the Ying to the sticky outside
Yang. It’s silky smooth for a no hassle draw. That’s the way it’s
suppose to be and for about $20 you can’t go
wrong with this one. *
For more info: www.desantisholster.com

WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM 81
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INSIDER
RUMINATIONS
DAVE DOUGLAS

A NOSEY GOVERNMENT
his may not be news to you but I just heard about Allowing another level of examination is allowing the

T it. The Los Angeles Police Commission has pro-


posed scrutinizing the financial records of cops
involved in gang and drug investigations. After a
two-year grace period cops will have to disclose
finances, debts, stocks and real estate holdings.
Now I’ve never been a big supporter of labor unions
but this is precisely the
camel’s nose to get that much further under the tent. Pretty
soon we’re going to have the whole camel sitting right
there in our lap watching reruns of the “A Team” with us.
A quote, arguable attributed to Benjamin Franklin
states, “Those who would give up Essential Liberty to
purchase temporary safety deserve neither Liberty nor
Safety.” If cops as a group
reason we need them. And in give up rights protecting us
this case LAPD’s officer’s from undue search just so we
association is vehemently can have the “honor and priv-
opposed to the plan. ilege” of working gangs and
The scrutiny is one of the dope we’ll soon be without
points in a federal consent rights altogether.
decree attempting to reform
LAPD after the Rampart If Not Us — Who?
scandal of the 90s. While many If we band together and tell
federal agencies make this a them no more of this invasion
requirement for their agents, I of privacy will be tolerated
can’t think of any municipal whom else will they get to be
departments or SOs with the gang and dope cops? I don’t
requirement, neither can know, maybe the Sierra Club,
LAPD’s officer association. ACLU, Green Peace or
As far as I’m concerned, MoveOn.org can help out. Or
it’s none of their business maybe the moron assistant to
and we need to support the the assistant to the assistant
idea cops have rights too. One of them is the 4th US Attorney who came up with the consent decree lan-
Amendment and protection from a nosey government. guage might want to strap on a ballistic vest, thigh rig and
We’re randomly piss tested for drugs and tested when rubber gloves to do the job.
we’re involved in a shooting or vehicle accident. We I know this is starting to sound too much like a rant
take polygraph exams and are held to a higher standard from the Toro Caca section. I’ll take a deep cleansing
of conduct. That’s enough. breath and force myself to remember it’s LA.
INSIDERRUMINATIONS

Toro Caca
I am so worried about Lindsay
Lohan and her “troubles.” I
stay up nights just trying to
come up with some solution to
help her dear poor troubled soul.
And, I don’t know about you, but
I’m really grateful to that judge who
someone put it, She’s the High
Priestess of Trailer Park Trash and
should have never been permitted to
procreate. That’s another one that kept
me up nights.
Then there’s Paris, well need I say
more? Seeing her perp-walked into the
was riveting. It just made you feel
empowered didn’t it?
They Don’t Get I t
When is the media going to get it
that we don’t care about the drivel
they are feeding us. I want to hear
recognized the simple truth that K- big-house just demonstrated no matter about what’s happening with Ramos
Fed is by far and away a better who you are or how much money you and Compean. Where do we stand
parent and role model to those chil- have, justice is blind and will always pre- on their pardon or better yet, new
dren than Britney could ever be. As vail. The “round-the-clock” coverage trial in a venue not poisoned by pro-

INSIDERRUMINATIONS Continues on page 81

82 WWW.AMERICANCOPMAGAZINE.COM • MARCH/APRIL 2008


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