You are on page 1of 9

Visuals

Basic Components of a HIR Visual
Title

Subtitle (descriptive)

Visual

“Bleeds” off of page like a photo

Caption

Credit

General Steps for Visuals
1. Read article and think of visual ideas. 2. Select one visual style. 3. Research using article, online sources, journals, etc. to find statistics, facts, figures, and descriptions that are appropriate to your planned visual. Avoid heavy reliance on “less credible/academic” sources such as Wikipedia. 4. Create visual in appropriate program according to specific steps listed on following pages. 5. Place visual in article in InDesign. 6. Write caption, title, and subtitle. Also don’t forget credits!

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 7 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

TRADITIONAL HIR VISUALS Graphs
Graphs allow the reader to compare and contrast different countries, events, statistics, etc. or follow a trend over time. There are multiple types of graphs, so decide what type of graph would be most appropriate for the data that you want to present.

Bar graph/Histogram
A bar graph is a good compare/contrast tool. It can also show trends over a certain amount of time. Histograms can provide another dimension of information (see “Where to?...the City”)

Bar graph

Histogram

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 8 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

Line graph
Line graphs are useful in showing growth and decline. It is also a good way to show various trends over time. Like the bar graph, it can be used as compare/contrast but is more adept at showing change over time than bar graphs.

Pie chart
Pie charts are best for proportions. Using statistics, pie charts can visually display proportions in a simple and effective manner.

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 9 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

Scatter plot
Scatter plots show distribution. When there are multiple data points to be displayed, scatter plots are very good. Data points can cluster in certain areas of the graph or be spread out over a large area.

Stacked line/bar graph
Stacked graphs are a hybrid of line graphs and pie charts. It shows proportions and trends over time.

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 10 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

Flow chart
Flow charts provide more text than graphs. They show the progression of ideas, policies, etc.

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 11 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

Maps
Maps are most appropriate for articles that reference a wide variety of locales, especially lesser-known areas of the world. By showing statistics, events, etc. on a map, the reader can be better oriented geographically when going through the article.

1. Open the map previews (personal > map resources > premier map resources index) and find the appropriate map 2. In the map resources folder, open the map (in illustrator) 3. In Layers, delete everything unnecessary (names, colors, etc) until only the outlined map remains 4. Make the borders black 5. Select the to-be-shaded areas and shade them (note: only use different shades of black) 6. In File > Print Setup, change the paper size to one that will contain the entire map; if necessary, make the map itself smaller to fit the page (make sure to hold the shift button when resizing) 7. Save the map (File > Export) in the visuals folder under the appropriate issue in TIFF format 8. Open the map in Photoshop 9. Use the magic wand tool to select all the water, then use the paint bucket tool to shade the water grey (CMYK: 0 0 0 9) 10. Save the map again. 11. Place the map in InDesign

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 12 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

Tables
Tables are appropriate when lots of statistics and number need to be succinctly organized. It can be very “texty” and should be considered being reorganized into another visual element.

Timelines
Timelines are a visual and textual combination in order to show key events over the years. It makes use of a good number of photos; therefore, one timeline may be enough for each issue because of photo costs.

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 13 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

ADDITIONAL POSSIBLE HIR VISUALS New! Cosmograph

Organizational chart

Pictograph

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 14 of 15 Last revised: April 2006

Graph images taken without permission from http://www.ais.msstate.edu/AEE/Tutorial/graphictypes.html

APPENDIX
Purpose & Visuals Costs Causes/effects Trends Organizational relationships Policies/procedures Decisions/alternatives Chronology Comparison/contrast Advantages/disadvantages Statistics Events Tables X X X X X X X X X X X Line graphs X X TYPE OF VISUAL Bar Pie Flow graphs charts charts X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Maps Tree diagrams Timeline X X X X X X X X X

P U R P O S E

X

X X

X X

X

Harvard International Review Media Department

Guide to Layout

Page 15 of 15 Last revised: April 2006