Mythology and Folklore  


Abas  Gk.  a  son  of  Metaneira;  was  changed  by  Demeter  into  a  lizard,  because  he  mocked  the  goddess;  The  twelfth King of Argos. He was the son of Lynceus and Hypermnestra, and grandson of Danaus.  Abeona Rom. protector of children leaving the home  Abhaswaras In. a class of deities; sixty‐four in number of whose nature little is known  Abhidhana  In.  a  dictionary  or  vocabulary;  one  of  the  oldest  of  them  is  the  abhidhana  ratna  ‐  mala,  of  halayudha bhatta (circa 7th cent.), and one of the best is the abhidhana chinta‐mani of hema‐chandra.  Abhimani In. the eldest son of Brahma by his wife Swaha.  Abhimanyu In. son of Arjuna by his wife Su‐bhadra; known by the metronymic Saubhadra  Abhira, abhira In. a cowherd; according to Manu the offspring of a Brahman by a woman of the ambashtha or  medical tribe.  Abhirama‐mani In. a drama in seven acts on the history of Rama, written by Sundara Misra in 1599 A. D  Abtu Eg. the Greeks called this place Abydos; It was the seat of worship of Osiris; It was  also called Busiris,  "the  house  of  Osiris";  Egyptian  tradition  says  that  the  sun  ended  his  daily  journey  at  Abydos,  and  entered into the underworld here, through a gap in the mountains called "peq"; In the 12th dynasty it  was believed that the souls of the dead entered into the afterlife here  Abudantia  Rom.  goddess  of  luck,  abundance  and  prosperity;  she  distributed  food  and  money  from  a  cornucopia.  Abydus Gk. a town was founded in the seventh century BCE as a colony of Miletus, with permission of a Lydian  king, either Gyges or his son Ardys  Abyla Gk. a mountain, one of the Pillars of Hercules  Acestes Gk. Trpkam who lives in Sicily, who entertained Aenas  Acetes Gk. pilot of the ship whose sailors captured Dionysus. He alone recognized the god.  Achaeans Gk. division of the Greek people, said to be descended from Xuthus, a son of Hellen  Achara In. rule, custom, or usage;  the rules of practice of castes, orders, or religion  Acharya In. a spiritual teacher or guide; a title of Drona, the teacher of the Pandavas.  Achates Gk .a close friend of Aeneas, accompanied her throughout his adventures  Acheron Gk. a Thesprotia, in Epirus.     

1

Mythology and Folklore  
Achilles Gk. Achilles was the son of Peleus, king of the Myrmidones in Phthiotis, in Thessaly, and of the Nereid  Thetis. Also called Aeacides 

  Triumphant Achilles    Achyuta In. Unfallen; a name of Vishnu or Krishna  Acis Gk. according to Ovid, is the son of Faunus and Symaethis. He was beloved by the nymph Galatea, and  Polyphemus the Cyclops, jealous of him, crushed him under a huge rock.  Aclis N. Twin gods worshipped by the Teutons, said to be the sons of the Sky God.  Acricius  Gk.  son  of  Abas,  king  of  Argos  and  of  Ocaleia.  He  was  grandson  of  Lynceus  and  great  grandson  of  Danaus. His twin‐brother was Proetus.  Acropolis Gk. the Acropolis was the citadel of Athens. According to one version of the myth, it was from the  Acropolis that King Aegeus hurled himself to his death believing that his son Theseus had been killed by  the Minotaur.  Actaeon Gk. son of Aristaeus and Autonoë, a daughter of Cadmus. He was trained in the art of hunting by the  centaur Cheiron, and was afterwards torn to pieces by his own 50 hounds on mount Cithaeron.  Adbiiuta‐brahmana In. the Brahmana of miracles; a Brahmana of the samaveda, which treats of auguries and  marvels.  Adeona Rom. goddess who guides children back home. 

2

Mythology and Folklore  
Adharma In. unrighteousness; personified as' son of Brahma called "the destroyer of all beings."  Adhiratha In. a charioteer. The foster‐father of Karna, according to some he was king of Anga, and according  to others the charioteer of king Dhritarashtra; perhaps he was both  Adhwaryu In. a priest whose business it is to recite the prayers of the Yajurveda.  Adhyatma Ramayana In. a very popular work, which is considered to be a part of the Brahmanda Purana. It  has been printed in India.  Adhyatman In. the supreme spirit; the soul of the universe.  Adi‐purana In. the fires purina; a title generally conceded to the Brahma Purana  Aditi In. free, unbounded or infinity; the boundless heaven as compared with the finite earth  Aditya In. one of the names of the sun; in the early vedic times the adityas were six, or more frequently seven,  celestial deities, of whom Varuna was chief, consequently he was the Aditya.  Aditya purana In. one of the eighteen upa‐puranas  Admeta Gk. daughter of Eurystheus; for whom Hercules got thee Amazon’s girdle  Admetus Gk. son of Pheres; the founder and king of Pherae in Thessaly, and of Periclymene or Clymene. He  took part in the Calydonian chase and the expedition of the Argonauts.  Adonis Gk. according to Apollodorus a son of Cinyras and Metharme, according to Hesiod a son of Phoenix and  Alphesiboea, and according to the cyclic poet Panyasis a son of Theias, king of Assyria, who begot him  by his own daughter Smyrna.  Adrastea Gk. Cretan nymph; daughter of Melisseus to whom Rhea entrusted the infant Zeus to be reared in  the Dictaean grotto  Adrastus Gk. son of Talaus, king of Argos and of Lysimache. When Polybus died without heirs, he succeeded  him on the throne of Sicyon, and during his reign he is said to have instituted the Nemean games.  Aeacus Gk. a son of Zeus and Aegina; some traditions related that at the time when Aeacus was born, Aegina  was not yet inhabited, and that Zeus changed the ants of the island into men over whom Aeacus ruled,  or that he made men grow up out of the earth.  Aeaea Gk. a surname of Medeia, derived from Aea, the country where her father Aeëtes ruled  Aeetes Gk. king of Colchis son of the sun‐god Helios and the Oceanid Perseis, brother of Circe and Pasiphae,  and father of Medea, Chalciope and Apsyrtus.  Aegae Gk. place in Euboea near which was Poseidon’s place  Aegaeon Gk. a son of Uranus by Gaea. Aegaeon and his brothers Gyges and Cottus are known under the name  of the Uranids , and are described as huge monsters with a hundred arms and fifty heads.  Aegean Sea Gk. an arm of the Mediterranean Sea between the east coast of Greece and the west coast of Asia  Minor and bounded on the south by the island of Crete. 

3

Mythology and Folklore  
Aegeus Gk. according to some accounts a son of Pandion II, king of Athens, and of Pylia, while others call him a  son of Scyrius or Phemius, and state that he was only an adopted son of Pandion.  Aegina Gk. a daughter of the river Asopus abducted by Zeus.  Aegir N. "The Alebrewer". Vana‐God of the Sea, who lived on Hlesey Island; He was skilled in magic. He can be  good  or  evil.  He  and  Ran  have  nine  wave  daughters,  or  "undines".  He  represents  gold,  prosperity,  sailors,  sunken  treasure,  brewing,  control  of  wind  and  waves.  Mistblindi  is  his  father  and  Logi  is  his  brother.  Aegis Gk. he goatskin shield or breastplate of Zeus or Athena. Athena's shield carried at its center the head of  Medusa.  Aegisthus Gk. a son of Thyestes, who unwittingly begot him by his own daughter Pelopia. Immediately after  his birth he was exposed by his mother, but was found and saved by shepherds and suckled by a goat.  Aegyptus Gk. a son of Belus and Anchinoe or Achiroe, and twin‐brother of Danaus  Aeneas Gk. a son of Belus and Anchinoe or Achiroe, and twin‐brother of Danaus  Aeolians Gk. a division of the Greek people supposed to have descended from Aeoius; son of Hellen  Aeolus Gk. king of the winds; king of Thessaly son of Hellen, and grandson of Pyrrha and Deucalion; father of  Alcyone  Aepytus Gk. one of the mythical kings of Arcadia; He was the son of Elatus, and originally ruled over Phaesana  on the Alpheius in Arcadia.  Aequitas Rom. god of fair trade and honest merchants  Aera Cura Rom. goddess associated with the underworld.  Aero Gk. also known as Orion; son of Hyrieus, of Hyria, in Boeotia, a very handsome giant and hunter, and said  to have been called by the Boeotians Candaon.  Aerope Gk. wife of Atreus; mother of Agamemnon  Aeschylus  Gk.  the  first  of  the  three  ancient  Greek  tragedians  whose  work  has  survived,  the  others  being  Sophocles and Euripides, and is often recognized as the father of tragedy. He was killed when an eagle  dropped a tortoise on him, mistaking his bald head for a rock.  Aesculapius Gk. pupil of Chiro; god of medicine and healing  Aesir, Asynur N. A plural word meaning "pillars"; or "supports"; and is the collective name of the Old Norse  Gods  of  the  family  of  which  Odin  was  the  patriarch.  The  singular  is  Ase  or  Áss.  The  Gods  are  strong,  beautiful and bigger than ordinary  people. They live longer than humans, but they are not immortal.  Every  God  has  knowledge  in  different  categories.  They  generally  are  good,  friendly  and  helpful.  The  Vanirs who have lived in Asgard for a long time also counts as Æsir. Æsir are the gods of consciousness  and the sky as opposed to the Vanir who are the gods of the earth and biological life/the subconscious.  One  early  explanation  of  their  name  was  that  they  were  "Asia‐men",  meaning  from  Asia.  The  Gods  identified  as  Æsir  are:  Odin,  Fjorgyn,  Loki,  Thorr,  Meili,  Frigg,  Tyr,  Hermodr,  Baldr,  Hodr,  Sif,  Thrudh,  Nanna, Forseti, Sigyn, Magni, Modi, Vali, Vidar. The Æsir are direct descendants of Odin by way of the  father, or are females who have married Æsir. Aesic Gods are: Frigg's servants: Vor, Hlin, Snotra, Vara, 

4

Mythology and Folklore  
Saga,  Gna,  Syn,  Eir,  Fulla,  Sjofn,  Lofn;  Thórr's  servants:  Thjálfi,  Roskva;  and  Odin's  Valkyries.  The  Gods  identified  as  Vanir  are:  Holde, Nerthus, Njord, Freya, Freyr, Odh, Hnoss, Aegir, Ran, Ullr,  Ulla,  Gerdh,  Skirnir,  Heimdallr,  Idunna,  Bragi,  Siofyn,  Gefjon,  Skadhi,  Erde,  the  Undines,  Svol,  Ostara,  Gullveig.  The  Vanir  are  direct descendants of Holde by way of the mother, or are males  that  have  married  Vans.  Vanic  are  Mundilfari,  Mundilfara,  Mani,  Sol;  Freyr's  servants:  Byggvir,  Beyla;  Freya's  Valkyries.  The  following are not identified as either Vanir or Æsir: Hoenir, Kvasir,  Jorun, Helja.                       Aesir 

Aeternitas Rom. personification of eternity  Africus Rom. god of the Southwest wind  Agasti,  agastya  In.  a  rishi,  the  reputed  author  of  several  hymns  in  the  rig‐Veda,  and  a  very  celebrated  personage in Hindu story.  Agave  Gk.  a  daughter  of  Cadmus,  and  wife  of  the  Spartan  Echion,  by  whom  she  became  the  mother  of  Pentheus, who succeeded his grandfather Cadmus as king of Thebes.  Agenor  Gk.  son  of  Poseidon  and  Libya;  he  is  the  king  of  Phoenicia,  and  twin‐brother  of  Belus;  married  Telephassa, by whom he became the father of Cadmus, Phoenix, Cylix, Thasus, Phineus, and according  to some of Europa  Aggamemnon Gk. son of Pleisthenes and grandson of Atreus; king of Mycenae, in whose house Agamemnon  and Menelaus were educated after the death of their father; enemy of Achilles  Aghagadishta,  Nabhaganedishtha,Nabha‐nedishita  In.   a  son  of  Manu,  who  while  he  was  living  as  a  Brahmachari, was deprived of his inheritance, by his father according to the Yajur‐veda, by his brothers  according to the Aitareya Brahmana; he subsequently acquired wealth by imparting spiritual knowledge  Aghasura In. (agha the asura.) an asura who was Kansa’s general; he assumed the form of a vast serpent, and  Krishna’s companions, the cowherds, entered its mouth, mistaking it for a mountain cavern but Krishna  rescued them.  Aglaia Gk. the goddess of beauty, splendour, glory, magnificence and adornment  Aglauros Gk. a daughter of Cecrops and Agraulos; mother of Alcippe by Ares  Agnar N. Older brother of King Geirrod, son of King Hraudung; He was lost when ten winters old on a fishing  trip  with  his  brother  and,  after  being  washed  ashore,  was  looked  after  for  the  winter  by  Odin  and  Frigga. When they rowed home his brother leaped out of the boat first, kicked the boat back into the  sea. Thus the younger brother became king many years later after Odin was captured by King Geirrod  and tortured over a spit. In in series of riddles he identified himself as Odin. King Geirrod in fright fell on  his own sword and died. Agnar then ruled as a king for a long time after.  Agnayi In. wife of Agni; she is seldom alluded to in the Veda and is not of any importance.  Agneya In. son of Agni; a name of Karttikeya or mars; an appellation of the muni agastya and others 

5

Mythology and Folklore  
Agneyastra In. the weapon of fire given by Bharadwaja to Agnivesa, the son of Agni, and by him to Drona  Ai N. A Dwarf from the race of Lovar  Aidos  Gk.  the  Greek  goddess  of  shame,  modesty,  and  humility.  Aidos,  as  a  quality,  was  that  feeling  of  reverence or shame which restrains men from wrong.  Ajax Gk. a son of Telamon, king of Salamis, by Periboea or Eriboea, whereas the other Ajax, the son of Oïleus,  is  always  distinguished  from  the  former  by  some  epithet.  According  to  Homer  Ajax  joined  the  expedition of the Greeks against Troy, with his Salaminians, in twelve ships, and was next to Achilles  the most distinguished and the bravest among the Greeks.  Ajax the  Less Gk.  A strong, brave Greek warrior in the Trojan  War  who kills himself when Achilles' armor is  given to Odysseus called Ajax Telamon.  Aker Eg. the double lion god, guardian of the sunrise  and sunset; guardian of the peaks that supported the  sky; the western peak was called Manu, while the eastern peak was called Bakhu.  Akh Eg. the akh was the aspect of a person that would join the gods in the underworld being immortal and  unchangeable; it was created after death by the use of funerary text and spells, designed to bring forth  an akh; once this was achieved that individual was assured of not "dying a second time" a death that  would mean the end of one's existence.  Akhet Eg. this was the horizon from which the sun emerged and disappeared; the horizon thus embodied the  idea of both sunrise and sunset; it is similar to the two peaks of the Djew or mountain symbol with a  solar disk in the center; both the beginning and the end of each day was guarded by Aker, a double lion  god; in the New Kingdom, Harmakhet ("Horus in the Horizon") became the god of the rising and setting  sun; he was pictured as a falcon, or as a sphinx with the body of a lion; the Great Sphinx of Giza is an  example of "Horus in the Horizon".  Alaisiagae N. war Goddesses. See Valkyries.  Alcaeus Gk. Greek poet who reputedly invented Alcaic verse  Alcestis Gk. the wife of King Admetus of Thessaly, who agreed to die in place of her husband and was later  rescued from Hades by Hercules.  Alcides Gk. according to some accounts the name which Heracles (Hercules) originally bore, while, according  to Diodorus; his original name was Alcaeus  Alcinous Gk. Alcinous is the happy ruler of the Phaeacians in the island of Scheria, who has by Arete five sons  and one daughter, Nausicaa.  Alcyone  Gk.  the  daughter  of  Aeolus,  either  by  Enarete  or  Aegiale;  she  married  Ceyx,  son  of  Eosphorus,  the  Morning Star  Aldr N. Vital essence, life‐age  Ale N. literally "ale". Also means "luck" or "magical might".   Ale  Runes  N.  Men  used  Ale  runes  to  block  the  magical  enchantments  of  strange  women.  Ale  runes  were  written  inside  the  cup  from  which  the  woman  drank,  also  on  the  back  of  the  man's  hand.  The  man  would scratch the Nyd rune upon his fingernail as the final binding power. See also Vardlokkur.  

6

Mythology and Folklore  
Alecto  Gk.  is  one  of  the  Erinyes  in  Greek  mythology.  According  to  Hesiod,  she  was  the  daughter  of  Gaea  fertilized by the blood spilled from Uranus when Cronus castrated him.  Alemaeon Gk. son of Amphiaraus, who helped to destroy Thebes  Alemonia Rom. goddess who feeds unborn children  Alexander Gk. a name of Paris was the second son of Priam and Hecabe. Previous to his birth Hecabe dreamed  that she had given birth to a firebrand, the flames of which spread over the whole city.  Alf N. Elf or sometimes male ancestral spirits  Alfar N. The Elves, which are divided into three races Ljosalfar, Dokkalfar, and Svartalfar, or Light Elves, Dark  Elves and Black Elves, the last also called Dwarves. Black Elves are commonly though to be the cause of  sickness.  Their  arrows  cause  stroke  and  paralysis.  All  of  the  Alfar  are  wise  magicians.  They  will  frequently  take  an  interest  in  individual  humans,  as  shown  by  such  names  as  Alfred,  Aelfgifu,  and  so  forth The Alfar are also unpredictable, taking pleasure or offense at the slightest things. Your manners  and bearing are exceedingly important in dealing with these wights.  Àlf‐blót N. An offering to the Elves or genius loci of a place   Alfheim, Alvheim N. The world of the Elves, also called Ljøsalfheimr. The hall of Freyr  Alfrik, Algfrig N. An artistic Dwarf, a son of Mimir; With Berling, Dvalin, and Grer, he forged Freya's incredible  Brising necklace. To get the jewelry, she spent one night with each of them.  Alf‐Shot,  Elf‐Shot  N.  A  condition  that  is  caused  by  being  "shot"  by  Alfs  and  can  be  the  cause  of  physical  conditions ranging from mild muscle spasms to bone cancer and nervous degeneration, having a part of  your soul complex stolen or eaten as well as other unpleasant effects. The same effects can come from  witch‐shot and Dwarf‐shot. Also, a general malicious harmful magic sent against a particular victim.  Algron Island N. Where Odin stayed for five years  Allfather, Alföder, Alfödr N. One of the titles of Odin, "The Oldest of the Gods"  Allsvinn  N.  "Very  Fast".  He  is  one  of  Sun's  two  horses  that  drag  the  sun.  They  are  chased  by  two  wolves.  Allsvinn has protection‐runes carved on his hoofs.   Aloadae Gk. are patronymic forms from Aloeus, but are used to designate the two sons of his wife Iphimedeia  by Poseidon: viz. Otus and Ephialtes.  Aloeus  Gk.  the  son  of  Poseidon  and  Canace,  husband  first  of  Iphimedeia  and  later  of  Eriboea;  father  of  Salmoneus, and the eponym of Otus and Ephialtes, collectively known as the Aloadae.  Alpheus Gk. god of the river Alpheius in Peloponnesus, a son of Oceanus and Thetys; a passionate hunter and  fell in love with the nymph Arethusa, but she fled from him to the island of Ortygia near Syracuse, and  metamorphosed  herself  into  a  well,  whereupon  Alpheius  became  a  river,  which  flowing  from  Peloponnesus under the sea to Ortygia, there united its waters with those of the well Arethusa.  Alsvid  N.  "Very  Strong".  The  horse  that  pulls  the  chariot  of  the  moon,  driven  by  the  god  Moon;  Under  the  shoulder‐blades of the horse the gods put two bellows to cool them, and in some poems that is called  "iron‐cold" 

7

Mythology and Folklore  
Althea  Gk.  a  daughter  of  the  Aetolian  king  Thestius  and  Eurythemis;  sister  of  Leda,  Hypermnestra,  Iphiclus,  Euippus, &c; she was married to Oeneus, king of Calydon, by whom she became the mother of Toxeus,  Thyreus, Clymenus, and Meleager, and of two daughters, Gorge and Deïaneira.  Althjof N. "Mighty Thief". a soil‐dwelling Dwarf  Alves, Elves N. There are both Light Elves and Dark Elves. The Elves are good and have Freyr as their leader,  but the Black Elves or Dwarves are evil‐minded. They are skillful smiths. Light Elves and Dark Elves are  often  beautiful  and  sensible  and  have  same  size  and  appearance  as  humans.  The  Light  Elves  live  in  Alfheim and in the second heaven, Andlang, where the beautiful hall of the light elves, Gimlé is located.  The Dark Elves dwell in mounds, hillocks and rocks. The term "Dark Elves" refers to their abodes, and  not to their appearance or moral character. The Black Elves or Dwarves live in Svartalfheim.  Alvheim,  Alfheim  N.  Alvheim  is  the  world  of  the  Elves,  where  Freyr  and  the  Light  Elves  dwell.  Lysalfheim,  Freyr's hall, Breidablikk, Balders dwelling, and Heimdal's Himinborg hall are also situated in Alvheim.  Alvis  N.  "All‐knowing".  One  of  the  wisest  dwarves;  He  is  known  for  demanding  to  marry  Thrud,  Thor's  daughter. Thor challenged him until the the sun rose and turned him to stone.  Amalthea Gk. the nurse of the infant Zeus after his birth in Crete  Amarna Eg. the name given to the historical time period under the rule of Amenophis IV /Akhenaten; during  this time period there were unprecedented changes in the government, art and religion.  Amaru‐sataka  In.  a  poem  consisting  of  a  hundred  stanzas  written  by  a  king  named  amaru,  but  by  some  attributed  to  the  philosopher  sankara,  who  assumed  the  dead  form  of  that  king  for  the  purpose  of  conversing with his widow.  Amazons  Gk.  a  warlike  race  of  females,  who  act  a  prominent  part  in  several  of  the  adventures  of  Greek  mythology;  all  accounts  of  them  agree  in  the  statement,  that  they  came  from  the  country  about  the  Caucasus,  and  that  their  principal  seats  were  on  the  river  Thermodon,  in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  modern Trebizond.  Amba In. mother; a name of Durga, eldest daughter of a king of Kasi  Ambalika In. the younger widow of Vichitra‐virya and mother of Pandu by Vyasa.  Ambarisha In.  king of Ayodhya, twenty‐eighth in descent from ikshwaku; an appellation of Siva.  Ambashtha In. a military people inhabiting a country of the same name in the middle of the panjab; medical  tribe in manu  Amber. N. A stone that is sacred to Freya. When she could not find her husband Od, she shed tears of gold.  The tears that hit trees turned into amber. A kenning for amber is "Freya's Tears".  Ambika In.  a sister of Rudra, but in later times identified with urns; elder widow of Vichitra‐virya and mother  of Dhritarashtra by Vyasa.  Ambikeya In. a metronymic applicable to Ganesha, Skanda, and Dhrita‐rashtra.  Amenta Eg. the underworld; originally the place where the sun set; this name was later applied to the West  Bank of the Nile where the Egyptians built their tombs. 

8

Mythology and Folklore  
Ammon Gk. originally an Aethiopian or Libyan divinity, whose worship subsequently spread all over Egypt, a  part  of  the  northern  coast  of  Africa,  and  many  parts  of  Greece.  Greeks  called  him  Zeus  Ammon,  the  Romans Jupiter Ammon, and the Hebrews Amon.  Ammut Eg. a female demon, she is found in The Book of the Dead; she plays an important role in the Hall of  Maat.  Amnaya In. sacred tradition; the Vedas in the aggregate  Amphiaraus Gk. Amphiaraus is renowned in ancient story as a brave hero; he is mentioned among the hunters  of the Calydonian boar, which he is said to have deprived of one eye, and also as one of the Argonauts.  Amphion Gk. son of Zeus and Antiope, the daughter of Nycteus of Thebes, and twin‐brother of Zethus.   Amphitrite Gk. a Nereid, though in other places Apollodorus; calls her an Oceanid; she is represented as the  wife of Poseidon and the goddess of the sea (the Mediterranean), and she is therefore a kind of female  Poseidon.  Amphitryon Gk. son of Alcaeus, king of Troezen, by Hipponome, the daughter of Menoeceus. A great Theban  general who was originally from Tiryns in the eastern part of the Peloponnese  Amulet  Eg.  a  charm,  often  in  the  form  of  hieroglyphs,  gods  or  sacred  animals;  made  of  precious  stones  or  faience; they were worn like jewelry during life, and were included within the mummy wrappings for  the afterlife.  Amun Eg. A god who's cult center was the temple of Amun at Karnak; he was considered to be king of all the  gods and the creator of all things.  Amymone  Gk.  a  daughter  of  Danaus.  She  was  once  assaulted  by  a  satyr  near  a  spring,  but  was  saved  by  Poseidon. She fell in love with him and became by him the mother of Nauplius.  An‐.a.rya In. Unworthy or vile; people who were not aryans, barbarians of other races and religion.  Anadhrishti In. a son of Ugrasena and general of the Yadavas  Anadyomene Gk. a goddess rising out of the sea, a surname given to Aphrodite, in allusion to the story of her  being born from the foam of the sea  Anaka‐dundubhi In. drums; a name of Vasu‐deva, who was so called because the drums of heaven resounded  at his birth.  Ananda giri In. a follower of sankaracharya, and teacher and expositor of his doctrines. He was the author of a  sankara. Vijaya, and lived about the tenth century.  Ananda In. joy or happiness; an appellation of Siva and of  Bala‐rama.  Ananda‐lahari  In.  the  wave  of  joy;  a  poem  attributed  to  sankaracharya;  it  is  a  hymn  of  praise  addressed  to  parvati, consort of Siva, mixed up with mystical doctrine.  Anang In. The bodiless; a name of Kama, god of love.  Ananta In. the infinite; a name of the serpent sesha; the term is also applied to Vishnu and other deities. 

9

Mythology and Folklore  
Anargha raghava In. a drama in seven acts by Murari Misra, possibly written in the thirteenth or fourteenth  century.  Anasuya In. charity; wife of the rishi atri  Anaxarete Gk. a maiden of the island of Cyprus, who belonged to the ancient family of Teucer. She remained  unmoved by the professions of love and lamentations of Iphis, who at last, in despair, hung himself at  the door of her residence.  Ancaeus Gk. one of the heroes of the Calydonian Hunt.  Anchises Gk. the owner of six remarkable horses, which he acquired by secretly mating his own mares with  the divinely‐bred stallions of Laomedon.  Andhaka In. a demon; son of Kasyapa and Diti, with a thousand arms and heads, two thousand eyes and feet,  and called Andhaka because he walked like a blind man, although he saw very well.  Andhra, andhra In. name of a country and people in the south of India, the country of Telingana; it was the  seat of a powerful dynasty, and the people were known to Pliny as gens andaoe.  Andhra‐bhritya  In.  a  dynasty  of  kings  that  reigned  in  Magadha  somewhere  about  the  beginning  of  the  Christian era; he name seems to indicate that its founder was a native of Andhra, now Telingana.  Andhrimnir  N.  “The  one  with  soot  in  his  face”.  Andhrimnir  is  the  cook  that  slaughters  the  boar  Saehrimnir  every night. The meat is given to the hungry warriors in Valhalla.   Andlang N. Second heaven above and to the south of Asgard; Andlang is home of the beautiful hall of the light  elves, Gimlé.  Androgeus Gk. the son of Minos and king of Crete and Pasiphae. When he during a feast in Athens managed  to win every prize, he was killed by Aegeus out of envy. Athens was punished by having to provide a  number of its children for the Minotaur.  Andromache Gk. Andromache was the daughter of Eetion; ruler of the Cilician city of Thebe; she was the wife  of the Trojan hero Hector and the mother of Astyanax.  Andromeda Gk. daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia, king and queen of Ethiopia. Cassiopeia boasted that her  daughter was more beautiful than the Nereids, and in revenge Poseidon sent a flood and a sea monster  to plague the land.  Androsphinx Eg. one of three varieties of Egyptian Sphinx, having the head of a man.  Andvaranut N. A magic ring that is a part of the Nibelunggold; When the Dwarf Andvari was forced to leave  the treasure he spelled a deadly curse over it. The ring was forged by Volund.  Andvari N. A Dwarf, a shape‐shifter, who lived as a pike in a pool in Svartalfheim; He had a huge hoard of gold  and a special ring that could make gold. He lost his entire hoard to Loki when Odin and Hoener were  captured. Loki needed ransom money. Andvari pleaded to keep just the ring as it could make him gold  but Loki took it anyway. Andvari cursed the ring and said it would destroy everyone who owned it. The  ransom was paid and they were set free. The cursed gold later caused the deaths of Fafnir, Regin and  Sigurd.  Anemone Gk. the flower that represents Adonis 

10

Mythology and Folklore  
Anga In. the country of Bengal proper about Bhagalpur; its capital was Champa, or Champa‐puri; a supplement  to the Vedas.  Angada In. son of Lakshmana and king of Angadi; capital of a country near the Himalaya; son of Gada (brother  of Krishna) by Vrihati; son of Bali, the monkey king of Kishkindhya.  Angerbode Gk. the mother of Hela, the Fenris wolf and the midguard serpent.  Angerona Rom. goddess of Secrecy and protector of Rome; festival Divalia or Angeronalia December 21  Angiras In. a rishi to whom many hymns of the rig‐Veda are attributed; one of the seven maharshis or great  rishis, and also one of the ten prajapatis or progenitors of mankind  Angirasas In. a class of pitris  Angita Rom. goddess of Healing and Witchcraft  Angrboda,  Angr‐boda  N.  "She  who  betakes  sorrow".  A  Jotun‐Giantess,  the  mother,  by  Loki,  of  horrible  monster  children  Hel,  Fenrir‐wolf,  and  Jormungand,  the  Midgard  serpent;  She  lives  in  Ironwood  and  may be related to Skadi.  Anila In. the wind  Anilas In. a gana or class of deities; forty‐nine in number, connected with Anila, the wind.  Animisha In. who does not wink; a general epithet of all gods  Aniruddha In. uncontrolled; son of Pradyumna and grandson of Krishna  Anjana In. mother of Hanumat by Vayu, god of the wind  Anjana In. the elephant of the west or southwest quarter; a serpent with many heads descended from Kadru.  Ankh Eg. a symbol of life, resembling a looped cross; It was later adapted by Coptic Christians as their cross;  Widely used as an amulet.  Anna Perenna Rom. goddess of the New Year provider of food; her festival is March 15.  Anna‐purna In. full of food; a form of durga, worshipped for her power of giving food 

  Anna‐purna   

11

Mythology and Folklore  
Annarr  N.  A  by‐name  of  Odin;  Also,  the  second  husband  of  Night/Natt,  with  one  daughter  by  her  called  Earth/Erda (Nerthus)  Ansumat, ansuman In. son of Asamanjas and grandson of Sagara; he brought back to earth the horse which  had been carried off from Sagara's Aswa‐medha sacrifice and he discovered the remains of that king's  sixty thousand sons, who had been killed by the fire of the wrath of Kapila.  Antaeus Gk. the son of Poseidon and Gaia, whose wife was Tinjis.  Antaka In. the ender; a name of Yama; judge of the dead  Antariksha  In.  the  atmosphere  or  firmament  between  heaven  and  earth;  the  sphere  of  the  Gandharvas,  Apsarases, and Aakshas  Antarved In. the doab or country between the Ganges and the Jumna  Anteia  Gk.  a  daughter  of  the  Lycian  king  Iobates  and  wife  of  Proetus  of  Argos,  by  whom  she  became  the  mother of Maera.  Anteros  Gk.  the  god  of  requited  love  and  also  the  punisher  of  those  who  scorn  love  and  the  advances  of  others, or the avenger of unrequited love.  Antevorte Rom. goddess of the future  Anthropoid  Eg.  a  Greek  word  meaning;  Man‐shaped;  this  term  is  used  for  coffins  made  in  the  shape  of  a  human.  Antigone Gk. the daughter of Oedipus, king of Thebes, and Jocasta  Antilochus Gk. the son of Nestor, king of Pylos; brother of Thrasymedes and one of the suitors of Helen.  Antinous  Gk.  a  son  of  Eupeithes  of  Ithaca,  and  one  of  the  suitors  of  Penelope,  who  during  the  absence  of  Odysseus  even  attempted  to  make  himself  master  of  the  kingdom  and  threatened  the  life  of  Telemachus.  Antiope Gk. the daughter of Ares and sister to Melanippe and Hippolyte and possibly Orithyia, queens of the  Amazons. She was the wife of Theseus, and the only Amazon known to have married.  Antler N. Freyr’s deer antler without a name, which was his only weapon after he lost his self‐swinging sword;  With the antler he killed Beli, and in Ragnarok he sticks it into the Fire‐Giants leader Surt's eye before  he dies.  Anu In. Son of king yayati by his wife sarmishtha, a daitya princess; refused to exchange his youthful vigour for  the  curse  of  decrepitude  passed  upon  his  father,  and  in  consequence  his  father  cursed  him  that  his  posterity should not possess dominion.  Anubis Eg. a jackal headed god; guardian of the necropolis.  Anukramani, anukramanika In. an index or table of contents, particularly of a Veda; the anukramanis of the  Vedas follow the order of each Sanhita, and assign a poet, a metre, and a deity to each hymn or prayer.  Anumati  In.  the  moon  on  its  fifteenth  day,  when  just  short  of  its  full  in  this  stages  it  is  personified  and  worshipped as a goddess. 

12

Mythology and Folklore  
Anusara In. a rakshasa or other demon  Anuvinda In. a king of Ujjayini  Aparanta  In.  on  the  western  border;  a  country  which  is  named  in  the  Vishnu  Purana  in  association  with  countries in the north  Aparna In. according to the Hari‐vansa, the eldest daughter of Himavat and Meni; she and her two sisters, Eka‐ parna  and  Eka‐patala,  gave  themselves  up  to  austerity  and  practised  extraordinary  abstinence;  but  while her sisters lived, as their names denote, upon one leaf or on one patala (bignonia) respectively,  Aparna managed to subsist upon nothing, and even lived without a leaf (a‐parna).  Apastamba In. an ancient writer on ritual and law; author of sutras connected with the black Yajur‐veda and  of a dharma‐sastra; often quoted in law‐books.  Apava In. who sports in the waters; a name of the same import as narayana, and having a similar though not  an  identical  application;  according  to  the  Brahma  Purana  and  the  Hari‐vansa,  Apava  performed  the  office of the creator Brahma, and divided himself into two parts, male and female, the former begetting  offspring upon the latter.  Aphrodite Gk. the Greek goddess of love, beauty, and sexuality; her Roman equivalent is the goddess Venus.  Apis  bull  Eg.  the  Apis  Bull  was  sacred  to  Osiris;  it  was  revered  from  the  earliest  times,  through  the  Greco‐ Roman period.  Apollo Gk. the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the  chaste huntress Artemis  Apollodrus Gk. an ancient Greek mythology writer  Apollonius of Rhodes Gk. he is best known for his epic poem  the  Argonautica,  which  told  the  mythological  story  of  Jason  and the Argonauts' quest for the Golden Fleece, and which is  one of the chief works in the history of epic poetry.  Apple  N.  It  is  symbol  of  eternal  life.  It  is  the  tree  of  Iduna,  goddess of eternal youth. Apple's rune, Ing, represents fertility  and limitless expansion. Peorth and Cweorth are also runes of  the Apple.  Apples  of  Hesperides  Gk.  one  of  Hercules’  labors,  the  source  of  the  golden  light  of  sunset,  a  phenomena  celebrating  the  bridal of the heavenly gods Zeus and Hera.  Apsaras  In.  the  Apsarases  are  the  celebrated  nymphs  of  Indra's  heaven;  the  name,  which  signifies  'moving  in  the  water,' has some analogy to that of Aphrodite; not prominent  in the Vedas, but Urvasi and a few others are mentioned.               Apollo 

13

Mythology and Folklore  
Apsytus Gk. the son of Aeëtes and a brother of Medea and Chalciope.  Aptrburdr  N.  Rebirth.  A  process  whereby  the  essential  powers  and  characteristics  of  a  person  are  handed  down  to,  and  inherited  by,  later  generations;  This  usually  happens  naturally  and  along  genetic  lines.  With this rebirth the next generation also inherits the fate (ørlög) of the progenitor and of the whole  clan or tribe.   Apuleius Gk. latin prose writer. He was a Berber, from Madaurus. He studied Platonist philosophy in Athens  Aquert Eg. a name for the land of the dead  Aquilo Rom. god of the North Wind  Aranyaka In. belonging to the forest; certain religious and philosophical writings, which expound the mystical  sense of the ceremonies, discuss the nature of god; are attached to the Brahmanas, and intended for  study in the forest by Brahmans who have retired from the distractions of the world.  Aranyanl In. in the Rig‐veda; the goddess of woods and forests  Arbuda In. Mount Abu; name of the people living in the vicinity of that mountain  Arbuda. In. a serpent; name of an Asura slain by Indra.  Arcady Gk. a region of ancient Greece in the Peloponnesus; its inhabitants, relatively isolated from the rest of  the known civilized world, proverbially lived a simple, pastoral life.  Arcas Gk. the son of Zeus and Callisto  Arcturus Gk. the brightest star in the constellation Boötes and the third brightest individual star.  Ardha‐nari  In.  half‐woman;  a  form  in  which  Siva  is  represented  as  half‐male  and  half‐female,  typifying  the  male and female energies.  Ares Gk. the god of war; one of the Twelve Olympians, and the son of Zeus and Hera.  Arête Gk. the wife of Alcinous and mother of Nausicaa and Laodamas. She is a descendant of Poseidon.  Arethusa Gk. the daughter of Nereus and later became a fountain on the island of Ortygia in Syracuse, Sicily.  Arges Gk. the son of Uranus and Gaia. Arges was one of three Cyclopes.  Argo Gk. the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcos to retrieve the Golden Fleece  Argonauts Gk. the group of heroes who sailed with Jason after the Golden Fleece; their name derived from  their vessel, the Argo.   Argos Gk. city in Greece in the Peloponnse; dog of Odysseus who was the only one to recognize him on his  return to Ithaca; Statue of Hera.  Argus Gk. giant with a hundred eyes, who was also called Panoptes; the man who built the Argo.  Ari N. "Eagle". It is an Eagle‐Giant who frightens the dead outside Nifilhel.   Ariadne Gk. daughter of King Minos of Crete; lover of Theseus of Athens; sister of Phaedra. 

14

Mythology and Folklore  
Aridva N. A rock‐dwelling Dwarf  Arimaspi Gk. one eyed horseman living near a stream which flows with gold; guarded by the Griffine  Arion Gk. famous musician; dwelt at the court of Perander king of Corinth.  Arion Gk. first horse; offspring of Poseidon and Demeter  Arishta In. a daitya; son of Bali; attacked Krishna in the form of a savage bull, and was slain by him.  Aristaeus Gk. pastoral God; particularly keen on Honey and Diary Produce  Aristophanes Gk. Athenian comic dramatist who wrote plays which produce were from 427‐382 BCE.  Arjuna In. son of Krita‐virya; king of the Haihayas; better known under his patronymic Kirta‐virya.  Arjuna In. white; the name of the third Pandu prince  Armsvartnir N. A lake in Lyngvi Island where Fenrir‐wolf was chained  Arne Gk. daughter of Aelus; ancestress of the Boetians.  Arsinoe Gk. mother of Aesculapius      Artemis  Gk.  daughter  of  Titaness  Leto  and    Zeus;  goddess  of  hunting,    wilderness  and  wild  animals;    goddess of childbirth; protectress    of  the  girl  child  up  to  the  age  of    marriage; twin brother of Apollo.                                  Artemis 

15

Mythology and Folklore  
Artha‐sastra In. the useful arts; mechanical science  Aruna In. red, rosy; the dawn, personified as the charioteer of the sun  Arundhati  In.  the  morning  star;  personified  as  the  wife  of  the  Rishi  Vasishtha,  and  a  model  of  conjugal  excellence  Aruns Gk. second son of Demaratus in Corinth  Arusha, arushi In. red; a red horse; in the Rig‐veda the red horses or mares of the sun or of fire; the rising sun  Arvak,  Arvaker  N.  "Early  Walker"  or  'The  Early  Bird”.  One  of  Sun's  two  horses  that  drag  the  sun's  chariot  chased by the wolves Hati and Skoll. Arvaker has protection‐runes in his ear. Under the shoulder‐blades  of the horses the gods put bellows to cool them.  Arvan, arva In. a horse; one of the horses of the moon; fabulous animal; half‐horse;  half‐bird; on which the  daityas are supposed to ride.  Arya siddhanta In. the system of astronomy founded by Arya‐bhatta in his work bearing this name.  Arya,  aryan  In.  loyal,  faithful;  the  name  of  the  immigrant  race  from  which  all  that  is  Hindu  originated;  the  name  by  which  the  people  of  the  rig‐veda  called  men  of  their  own  stock  and  religion,  in  contradistinction to the Dasyus (or Dasas); a term by which we either understand hostile demons or the  rude aboriginal tribes of India, who were an‐aryas.  Arya‐bhata In. the earliest known Hindu writer on algebra  Aryaman In. a bosom friend; chief of the Pitris; one of the Adityas; one of the Viswa‐devas  Aryavarta In. the land of the Aryas; the tract between the Himalaya and the Vindhya ranges, from the eastern  to the western sea – manu  Asa, Asa‐Gods N. A God of the Æsir; The Æsir also used to refer to the Æsir and Vanir together.  Asamanjas  In.  son  of  Sagara  and  Kesini;  a  wild  and  wicked  young  man,  abandoned  by  his  father,  but  succeeded as a king; according to the iiari‐vansa, he was afterwards famous for valour under the name  of Panchajana.  Asanga In. author of some verses in the Rig‐veda; son of Playoga, but was changed into a woman by the curse  of the gods; recovered his male form by repentance and the favour of the rishi medhatithi, to whom he  gave abundant wealth, and addressed the verses preserved in the Veda.  Asara In.  a rakshasa or other demon.  Ása‐Thór N. Thor, the thunder god's full name.  Àsatrù N. The religion honoring the ancient Norse Gods; It comes from the words "Ase" which means "of the  gods" and "tru" which means religion or belief.  Ascanius Gk. son of Aeneus and Creusa; founded the city of Alba Longa thirty‐ three years after the arrival of  Trojan refugees in Italy.  Asclepius Gk. god of healing; son of Apollo; god of prophecy and the lake nymph Corinis. 

16

Mythology and Folklore  
Asgard, Asgardhr N. "Ases' Garth". World of the Æsir; The land of the Gods in the very top of the World Tree;  It is surrounded by a magical river that the Gods once set alight to kill Thjazi, the giant. A bridge called  Bifrost connects Asgard to the Underworld.   Åsgardsreia N. A band of supernatural entities, with Odin at the helm, riding across the sky at Yuletide amidst  much noise and rowdiness; See Wild Hunt  Ash tree N. the Ash tree is sacred to Odin. The Ash is considered to be the father of trees. According to Nordic  tradition, the world tree, Yggdrasil, is an Ash. The Ash is the tree of sea power, or of the power resident  in water. The first man, Askr, was made from an Ash tree. Special guardian spirits reside in the Ash. This  makes it excellent for absorbing sickness. The spirally carved druidical wand was made of Ash for this  purpose. Because Ash attracts lightning, it is also a good conductor of önd (magical force). Wood cut at  the  Summer  Solstice  is  best,  making  it  a  strong  protection  against  ill‐wishers.  In  former  times,  the  sacred High Seat Pillars of halls and temples were made of Ash. Ash has its own rune, As.   Ashtavakra  In.    a  Brahman;  son  of  Kahoda,  whose  story  is  told  in  the  Maha‐bharata.  Kahoda  married  a  daughter of his preceptor, Uddaiaka, but he was so devoted to study that he neglected his wife.  Asikni In. the vedic name of the chinab, and probably the origin of the classic Akesines.  A‐siras In. headless; spirits or beings without heads  Askr and Embla N. Origin of humanity, the first man and woman; the first man, Askr, was made from an Ash  tree. His wife, Embla, was an Elm. Odin and his two brothers Vilje and Ve found two wooden logs at the  beach. Odin gave them life, Vilje gave knowledge and Ve gave feelings and senses.   Asmaka In. son of Madayanti; the wife of Kalmasha‐pada or Saudasa  Asoka In. a celebrated king of the Maurya dynasty of Magadha; grandson of its founder Chandra‐gupta.  Asopus Gk. god of the river; son of Oceanus and Tethys  Asrama In. there are four stages in the life of a Brahman, which are called by this name.  Astika In. an ancient sage, son of Jarat‐karu by a sister of the great serpent Vasuki; he saved the life of the  serpent  Takshaka  when  Janamejaya  made  his  great  sacrifice  of  serpents,  and  induced  that  king  to  forego his persecution of the serpent race.  Astraea Gk. daughter of Zeus and Themis  Astyanax Gk. son of Hector; crown prince of Troy and princess Andromache of Cilician Thebe.  Asura In. spiritual, divine; in the oldest parts of the Rig‐Veda this term is used for the supreme spirit, and is the  same as the ahura of the Zoroastrians.  Asurl In. one of the earliest professors of the Sankhya philosophy.  Asvid, Asvido N. A ruler of the Giants.The Giant who carved runes of wisdom on Yggdrasil  Aswalayana  In.  a  celebrated  writer  of  antiquity;  he  was  pupil  of  Saunaka,  and  was  author  of  srauta  sutras,  grihya‐sutras, and other works upon ritual, as well as founder of a Sakha of the rig‐veda.  Aswa‐medha  In.  the  sacrifice  of  a  horse;  this  is  a  sacrifice,  which,  in  Vedic  times,  was  performed  by  king’s  desirous offspring. 

17

Mythology and Folklore  
Aswa‐pati In. Lord of horses; an appellation of many kings.  Aswattraman In. son of drona and kripa, and one of the generals of the Kauravas; also called by his patronymit  drauniyana.  Aswins, aswinau (dual), aswini kumaras In. horsemen; dioskouroi; two Vedic deities, twin sons of the sun or  the sky.  Asynjor, Asynju N. “The Goddesses”. The feminine version of Æsir; Also female attendants of Frigga in Vingolf;  One  of  them,  a  healer,  was  called  Eir.  Others  were  named  Fjorgyn,  Frimia,  Fimila,  and  Hnossa  the  beautiful.            Atalanta  Gk.  god  of  the  hunt,  travel  and    adventure;  daughter  of  Lasus  and    Arcadia.                      Ate Gk. goddess of mischief; author of all rash actions and their results  Atef crown Eg. the atef crown was worn by Osiris; it is made up of the white crown of Upper Egypt and the  red feathers are representative of Busiris; Osiris's cult center in the Delta.  Aten  Eg.  the  god  that  gained  its  prominence  during  the  reign  of  Akhenaten;  who  abolished  the  traditional  cults of Egypt and replaced them with the Aten. This created the first monotheistic cult in the world.  Athamas Gk. king of the prehistoric Minyans in the ancient Boetian city of Orchomenus; a cloud goddess      Atalanta 

18

Mythology and Folklore  
Atharva, atharvan In. the fourth Veda.  Atharvan In. name of a priest mentioned in the rig‐veda; represented as having drawn forth fire and to have  offered sacrifice in early times; mythologically represented as the eldest son of Brahma, to whom that  god  revealed  the  Brahma‐vidya  (knowledge  of  god),  as  a  Prajapati,  and  as  the  inspired  author  of  the  fourth Veda. At a later period he is identified with Angiras; his descendants are called Atharvanas, and  are often associated with the Angirasas.  Atharvangirasas In. this name belongs to the descendants of Atharvan and Angiras, or to the Angirasas, who  are especially connected with the Atharva‐veda, and these names are probably given to the hymns of  that Veda to confer on them greater authority and holiness.  Athatva‐veda  In.  the  Saunakiya  Chaturadhyayika,  i.e.,  Saunaka’s  treatise  in  four  chapters.  Edited  and  translated into English by Whitney. No Pratisakhya of the Sama‐veda has been discovered.    Atheling, Athling N. It means noble.  Athem N. The "breath of life" the vital force of life borne in the breath  Athena Gk. goddess of war and crafts; goddess of wisdom; heroic endeavor; daughter of Zeus 

      Athenians Gk. people of Athens  Athens Gk. capital of modern Greece; one of the most famous Greek cities and it has long played vital role in  Greek politics, religion, and culture.                Athena 

19

Mythology and Folklore  
            Atlas  Gk.  primordial  Titan  who    supported the heaven; son    of  Iapetus  and  the    Oceanid Clymene.                    Atma‐bodha In. knowledge of the soul; a short work attributed to sankaracharya.  Atman, atma In. the soul the principle of life; the supreme soul.  Atreus Gk. king of Mycenal; son of Pelops and Hippodomia.  Atreus Gk. one of the three moirae; goddess of fate and destiny  Atreya In. a patronymic from am; a son or descendant of atri  Atri In. an eater; a rishi, and author of many vedic hymns; a Maharshi or great saint, who in the Vedas occurs  especially in hymns composed for the praise of Agni, Indra, the Aswins, and the Viswa‐devas.  Atrid N. Another name for Odin  Attica Gk. southern poetion of Greek peninsula which is home to Athens.  Attis Rom. god of growth, fertility and vegetation  Aud N. Son of Nagifari and Night                     Atlas 

20

Mythology and Folklore  
Audh‐stafir N. Staves of riches. It is the result of a runecasting.  Audhumala Gk.  cow formed from the vapor, whose milk fed the giant Ymir.    Audhumla  N.  "Nourisher"  or  "Rich  Hornless  Cow";    The name of the mythological sacred cow    which  was  the  primeval  shaping  force  of    the  Cosmos,  created  from  the  moisture    where the heat from Muspelheim collided    with  the  frosty  fog  of  Niflheim.  The  great    cow  produced  Buri  by  licking  on  the  salty    rocks  of  Ginnungagap  and  nourished  the    Giant Ymir with her milk.            Augean Stables Gk. extremely nasty and smelly, warehouse of filth, straw and manure  Auja N. Good luck  Aulis Gk. goddees who watched over oaths under the name of Praxidikai; son of Ogygus.  Aurboda N. The mountain Giantess who was Gymir's wife; Together they have the son Beli and the daughter  Gerd, a beautiful Goddess that Freyr married. Freyr had to give away his self‐wielding sword to get his  bride.  Aurgelmir N. The primal being; The Frost Giants' name for Ymir  Aurochs N. The extinct wild ox of Europe, last seen alive in 1627 Symbolized by the rune Uruz  Aurora Rom.g oddess of the dawn  Aurva In. a rishi, son of Urva and grandson of bhrigu; he is described in the Maha‐bharata as bon of the sage  Chyavana by his wife.  Aurvandil N. "Seafarer". The friendly Giant who was the husband of the Sybil Groa; Aurvandil was the foster  father  of  Thjalfi  (Thorr's  servant).  On  their  way  back  from  killing  the  Giant  Hrungnir,  Thor  and  his  companions were met by a violent snowstorm and a freezing cold. Thor saved Aurvandil from a certain  death and carried him over the Elivogar straits from Jotunheimur to the citadel of the Elves. During the  trip Thor did not notice that one of Aurvandil's toes was exposed. It froze, so Thor broke it off and cast  it up into the heavens, where it still stands as the star called Aurvandil's Toe.  Aurvangar N. place in Jöruvellir where Svarin's grave‐mound is found, from  which the race of Dwarfs called  Lovar come from      Audhumla 

21

Mythology and Folklore  
Auster Rom. god of the South Wind  Austri N. "East". The Dwarf who was put in the sky's east corners by Odin, Vili and Ve; the sky is made out of  the Giant Ymir's head. The other three dwarves were Nordri, Sudri and Vestri.  Autunoe Gk. daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia; wife of Aristae  Avanti, avantika In. a name of Ujjayini; one of the seven sacred cities.  Avatara In.  descent; the incarnation of a deity, especially of vishnu.  Avatarana In. an abode of the rakshasas.  Avernus Gk. lake in Campania  Axine Gk. lookup Euxine  Ayodhya In. the modern oude; the capital of Ikshwaku; founder of the solar race, and afterwards the capital of  Rama’ it is one of the seven sacred cities.  Ayur‐veda In. the Veda of life; a work on medicine, attributed to dhanwantari, regarded as a supplement to  the atharva‐veda.  Ayus In. the first‐born son of Pururavas and Urvasi; father of Nahusha, Kshattra‐vriddha, Rambha, Raja, and  Anenas 

  B 
Ba Eg. the ba can best be described as someone's personality; Like a person's body, each ba was an individual;  It entered a person's body with the breath of life and it left at the time of death; The ba is associated  with divinity and power; It had the ability to take on different forms; in this respect the gods had many  bas; The ba of the deceased is able to move freely between the underworld and the physical world; The  ba is similar to the ka.  Babhru‐vahana In. son of Arjuna by his wife Chitrangadi; adopted as the son of his maternal grandfather, and  reigned at Manipura as his successor.  Babylon Gk. most magnificent and richest city of the ancient world.  Bacchantes Gk. female devotee of the god Dionysus.           

22

Mythology and Folklore  
Bacchus Rom. the god of wine  Badarayana  In.  a  name  of  Veda  vyasa  especially  used  for  him  as  the  reputed  author  of  the  Vedanta  philosophy;  the  author  of  the  Brahma  sutras,  published  in  the  bibliotheca  Indica.  Badari, badarikasrama In. A place sacred to Vishnu,  near  the  Ganges  in  the  Himalayas,  particularly  in  Vishnu’s  dual  form  of  nara‐ narayana.  Badava In. a mare, the submarine fire; in mythology  it is a flame with the head of a horse, called  also Haya‐siras, the horse‐head.  Bafur N. A soil‐dwelling Dwarf  Bahikas In.  People of the Panjab, so called in Panini  and  the  Maha‐bharata;  the  spoken  of  as      being impure and out of the law.    Bahu, bahuka In. a king of the solar race, who was vanquished and driven out of his country by the tribes of  Haihayas and Taiajanghas; father of Sagara.  Bahuka In. the name of Nala when he was transformed into a dwarf.  Bahulas In. the krittikas or Pleiades.  Bahv richa In. a priest or theologian of the Rig‐veda  Bakhu  Eg.  the  mythical  mountain  from  which  the  sun  rose;  the  region  of  the  eastern  horizon;  one  of  two  mountains that held up the sky, the other being Manu; these peaks were guarded by the double lion  god, Aker.  Bala‐gopala In. the boy Krishna.  Bala‐rama In. Deva are other forms of this name; elder brother of Krishna.                                     Balarama 

 

 Bacchus 

23

Mythology and Folklore  
Bala‐ramayana In. a drama by raja‐sekhara.  Balder,  Baldr,  Baldur  N.  "The  Bright  One"; Æsir son of Odin and Frigga,  who was killed by an arrow made  of mistletoe shot by the blind God  Hodor  (who  was  tricked  by  Loki)  and  resurrected;  His  wife  is  Nanna,  his  son,  Forseti.  Known  as  the  Shining  God  and  the  Bleeding  God; Sacred wells sprang from the  hoof  marks  of  his  horse.  He  represents  light,  advice,  reconciliation,  beauty,  gentleness,  reincarnation,  wisdom,  harmony,  happiness. Balder will return from  Helheim  after  Ragnarok  and  will  rule as one of the new Gods.                The death of Balder 

Balder's  Bane  N.  A  kenning  for  Mistletoe,  which  was  the  the  sole  entity  that  did  not  swear  to  never  harm  Balder;  Loki  tricked  the  god  Hodor  into  shooting  Balder  with  an  arrow  made  of  Mistletoe,  causing  Balder's death.  Bale N. ‐ Poison.  Baleya In. a descendant of Bali; a daitya.  Baleyg N. "Flame‐eyed One"; another name for Odin  Balhi In. a northern country,  Balkh; said in the Maha‐bharata to be famous for its horses, as Balkh is to the  present time.  Balhikas, bahlikas In. always associated with the people of the north, west, and ultra‐indian provinces; usually  considered to represent the bactrians or people of Balkh.  Bali In. a good and virtuous Daitya king; son of virochana, son of Prahlada, son of Hiranya‐kasipu.  Bali, balin In. the monkey king of kishkindhya, who was slain by rams, and whose kingdom was given to his  brother sugriva; friend and ally of Rama; supposed to be the son of Indra, and to have been born from  the hair (bala) of his mother.  Bana  In.  A  Daitya,  eldest  son  of  Bali,  who  had  a  thousand  arms;  friend  of  Shiva  and  enemy  of  Vishnu;  his  daughter Usha fell in love with Aniruddha, the grandson of Krishna, and had him conveyed to her by  magic art.  Bane N. slayer  Bane of branches N. A kenning for fire  Bane of Shields N. A kenning for the sword Tyrfing 

24

Mythology and Folklore  
Banga In. Bengal, but not in the modem application; in ancient times banga meant the districts north of the  bhagirathi.  Bara N. “Big Wave” One of Aegir and Ran's nine wave‐daughters who are said to be the mothers of Heimdall,  the guardian of the Bifrost Bridge.  Barbaras In. name of a people; the analogy to ' bar‐barians' is not in sound only, but in all the authorities these  are classed with borderers and foreigners and nations not Hindu.  Barhishads In. a class of pitris, who, when alive, kept up the household flame, and presented offerings with  fire; some authorities identify them with the months; their dwelling is Vaibhraja.  Bari N. A Dwarf that was instrumental in the building of Mengloth's hall, Lyr.  Barque Eg. a boat in which the gods sailed. The barque of Ra carried a host of deities across the sky each day.  Barque shrine Eg. shrines in temples in which model barques were kept; These model barques were used to  carry deities out of the temples in festival processions.  Barri Woods N. "The Leafy" A peaceful place known  to Freyr and others where Gerd was to meet Freyr for  marriage.  Barrow‐mound N. Burial mounds where the dead were placed.  Bastet Eg. a cat headed goddess; as a sun goddess she represents the warm, life giving power of the sun.  Battus Gk. a peasant who broke his promise not to tell Apollo; Hermes had stolen his Cattle.  Baucis Gk. married to Philemon in the region of Tyana.  Baudhayana In. a writer on dharma‐sastra or law; author of a sutra work  Baugi N. "The Stooping"; An Etin Giant, Suttung's brother and son of Gilling; Odin, disguised as Bölverk, tried  to get some of the Mead of Poetry by working at Baugi's farm. After Odin had spent all year working for  Baugi, he took him to Suttung, but Suttung denied Odin (as Bölverk) of any Mead. Baugi then took Odin  to the mountain of the mead and bored a small hole, with Rati, his auger. It was just big enough for  Odin, in the shape of a snake, to enter. Having second thoughts, Baugi tried to stab Odin as he slithered  through, but he was too late. Later Bölverk seduced Gunnlöd and stole the Mead of Poetry.  Bearers  of  Fate  N.  These  are  the  entities  who  are  attached  to  an  individual  and  carry  that  individual's  fate  (ørlög), thus influencing his or her life and actions. Entities that belong to this group include the fetch  (fylgja)  and  the  lesser  Norns  (nornir),  as  well  as  in  certain  instances  Valkyries  (Valkÿrjur)  and  Dises  (Disir).  Beli N. "Moaning"; Gymir's and Aurboda's son and brother to Freyr's wife, Gerd; He is the leader of the barking  Giants. Freyr was unarmed when he and Beli fought at Ragnarok, but Freyr killed him with a stag antler.  Beli's Bane N. A kenning for Freyr, who killed the Giant Beli  Bellona Rom. goddess of war and battles; her festivals were celebrated on March 24 (the Dies Sanguinis, the  Day of Blood) and June 3.  Belt of Strength N. The god Thor's magical belt which can double his strength 

25

Mythology and Folklore  
Belus Gk. grandfather of Danaids  Benben Eg. a stone resembling a pyramid, representative of a sun ray and associated with the idea of eternal  rebirth; a representation of the primordial mound.  Bennu Eg. an aspect of Ra‐Atum in the form of a phoenix; the patron of the reckoning of time; The carrier of  eternal light from the abode of the gods to the world of men.  Beowulf N. An Anglo‐Saxon hero, noted for fighting the Grendl monster; an epic poem of the same name  Berchta,  Perchta  N.  A  Germanic  Goddess  wanders  through  the  fields  during  Yuletide  bringing  them  fertility  and also causing harm. She has bulging eyes, wrinkles and tangled hair.  Bergelmir N. The Deluge Giant Bergelmir is Thrudgelmir's son and Ymir's grandson. He and his wife were the  only two Giants to survive the flood of Ymir's blood. In that way he kept the Giant race from dying. He  is called Father of all Giants.  Berling N. She was the one who forged the Love Goddess Freya's Brising necklace together with the Dwarves  Alfrik, Dvalin and Grer. The payment was that she spent one night with each of them. He is a Dwarf son  of Ivaldi.  Berserkers N. "Bear Shirts"; Men who could turn themselves into bears (like werewolves) in battle; They were  seized with an uncontrollable madness for bloodshed.  Bestla  N.  "The  little  sauna  woman";  The  Frost  Giantess  who  married  Buri's  son,  Bor,  and  gave  birth  to  the  three Gods; Odin, Vili and Ve; She is daughter to Bolthorn and Ymir, and sister to Mimir.  Beyla N. "Bee". Freyr's servant; She is married to Byggvir and they live together with Freyr and Gerd on the  farm Alfheim. Her major task there is to milk the cows.   Bhadra In. wife of Utathya.  Bhadracharu In. a son of Krishna and Rukmini.  Bhadra‐kali In. name of a goddess; in modern times it applies to Durga.  Bhadraswa In. a region lying to the east of meru; a celebrated horse, son of Uchchaih‐sravas  Bhaga In. a deity mentioned in the Vedas, but of very indistinct personality and powers; supposed to bestow  wealth and to preside over marriage, and he is classed among the adityas and viswedevas.  Bhaga‐netra‐ghna (or ‐han) In. destroyer of the eyes of Bhaga; an appellation of Shiva.  Bhagavad‐gita  In.  the  song  of  the  divine  one;  a  celebrated  episode  of  the  Maha‐bharata,  in  the  form  of  a  metrical  dialogue,  in  which  the  divine  Krishna  is  the  chief  speaker,  and  expounds  to  Arjuna  his  philosophical doctrines.  Bhagavata  purana  In.  the  Purana  "in  which  ample  details  of  duty  are  described,  and  which  opens  with  an  extract from the gayatri; that in which the death of the Asura Vritra is told, and in which the mortals  and immortals of the Saraswata kalpa, with the events that then happened to them in the world.  Bhagirathl  In.  the  ganges;  the  name  is  derived  from  Bhagiratha,  a  descendant  of  Sagara,  whose  austerities  induced siva to allow the sacred river to descend to the earth for the purpose of bathing the ashes of  Sagara's  sons,  who  had  been  consumed  by  the  wrath  of  the  sage  kapila.  Bhagiratha  named  the  river 

26

Mythology and Folklore  
Sagara, and after leading it over the earth to the sea, he conducted it to Patala, where the ashes of his  ancestors were laved with its waters and purified.  Bhalrava, bhairavi In. the terrible; names of siva and his wife devi.  Bhamatl In. a gloss on Sankara's commentary upon the Brahma sutras by Vachaspati misra.  Bhanumati In. daughter of Bhanu; a yadava chief, who was abducted from her home in dwaraka, during the  absence of her father, by the demon nikumbha  Bharadwaja In. a rishi to whom many vedic hymns are attributed; son of Brihaspati and father of Drona, the  preceptor of the pandavas.  Bharadwaja In. Drona; any descendant of Bharadwaja or follower of his teaching; name of a grammarian and  author of sutras  Bharata In. a descendant of Bharata; one of the pandu princesses  Bharata In. a hero and king from whom the warlike people called Bharatas, frequently mentioned in the Rig‐ veda,  were  descended;  the  name  is  mixed  up  with  that  of  Viswamitra.  Bharata’s  sons  were  called  Viswamitras and Viswamitra’s sons were called Bharatas.  Bharata‐varsha  In.  India,  as  having  been  the  kingdom  of  bharata;  it  is  divided  into  nine  khandas  or  parts:  indra‐dwipa, kaserumat, tamra‐varna, gabhastimat, naga‐dwipa, saumya, gandharva, varuna.  Bharati In. a name of saraswati.  Bharatri‐hari In. a celebrated poet and grammarian, who is said to have been the brother of Vikramaditya; he  wrote three satakas or centuries of verses.  Bhargava In. a descendant of Bhrigu, as Chyavana, Saunaka, Jamad‐agni; used for the latter and Parasu Rama.  Bhasha‐parichchheda In. an exposition of the nyaya philosophy  Bhaskaracharya In. a celebrated mathematician and astronomer, who was born early in the eleventh century  a.d.;  author  of  the  bija‐ganita  on  arithmetic,  the  lilavati  on  algebra,  and  the  siddhanta  siromani  on  astronomy  Bhatti‐kavya  In. a poem on the actions of Rama by Bhatti; it is of a very artificial character, and is designed to  illustrate the laws of grammar and the figures of poetry and rhetoric.  Bhauma In. son of Bhumi (the earth); metronymic of the Daitya naraka  Bhautya In. the fourteenth manu  Bhava In.  a vedic deity often mentioned in connection with Sarva the destroyer; a name of Rudra or Siva; a  manifestation of that god.  Bhava‐bhuti In. a celebrated dramatist, the author of three of the best extent Sanskrit dramas, the maha vira  charita, uttara Rama charita, and malati madhava; known as sri‐kantha, or `throat of eloquence.  Bhavishya puran In. this purana; as its name implies, should be a book of prophecies foretelling what will be.  Bhawani In. one of the names of the wife of Siva 

27

Mythology and Folklore  
Bhela In. an ancient sage who wrote upon medicine.  Bhikshu In. a mendicant; the Brahman in the fourth and last stage of his religious life  Bhima In. name of the father of Damayanti; name of Rudra or of one of his personifications.  Bhima sankara, bhimeswara In. name of one of the twelve great lingas  Bhima, bhima‐sena In. the terrible; the second of the five pandu princes; son of Vayu, the god of the wind  Bhima‐sena In.  a name of Bhima  Bhishm In.  the terrible; son of king Santanu by the holy river goddess Ganga; called Santanava, Gangeya, and  Nadi‐ja, the river‐born.  Bhishmaka  In.  an appellation  of  Siva;  king  of  Vidharbha;  father  of  Rukmin  and  of  Rukmini;  the  chief  wife of  Krishna  Bhogavati In.  The voluptuous; the subterranean capital of the nagas in the naga‐loka portion of patala  Bhoja In.  a name borne by many kings; most conspicuous among them was bhoja or bhoja‐deva, king of Dhar,  who is said to have been a great patron of literature, and probably died before 1082 a.d.; a prince of  the  yadava  race  who  reigned  at  Mrittikavati  on  the  Parnasa  river  in  Malwa;  he  is  called  also  Maha‐ bhoja; a tribe living in the vindhya mountains; a country; the modern bhojpur, bhagalpur.  Bhoja‐prabandha In.  a collection of literary anecdotes relating to king Bhoja of Dhar, written by Ballala.  Bhrigu In.  a vedic sage; one of the Prajapatis and great rishis, and is regarded as the founder of the race of the  bhrigus or bhargavas, in which was born jamad‐agni and parasu‐rama.  Bhrigus In.  roasters, consumers; a class of mythical beings who belonged to the middle or aerial class of gods;  connected with Agni, and are spoken of as producers and nourishes of fire, and as makers of chariots;  associated with the angirasas, the atharvans, ribhus.  Bhu, bhumi In.  the earth.  Bhuri‐sravas In.  A prince of the Balhikas and an ally of the kauravas, who was killed in the great battle of the  maha‐bharata  Bhuta bhuta In. a ghost, goblin; malignant spirits which haunt cementeries, lurk in trees, animate dead bodies,  and delude and devour human beings; according to the Vishnu Purana they are fierce beings and eaters  of flesh, who were created by the creator when he was incensed. In the vayu purana their mother is  said to have been krodha, anger. The bhutas are attendants of Siva, and he is held to be their king.  Bhutesa, bhuteswara In. lord of beings or of created things; a name applied to Vishnu, Brahma, and Krishna as  lord of the Bhutas or goblins; also it is applied to Siva.  Bhuvaneswara In. a ruined city in Orissa, sacred to the worship of Siva, and containing the remains of severe  temples; it was formerly called Ekamra‐kanana.  Bia Gk. minor diety; personification of Force  Bibhatsu In. loathing; an appellation of Arjuna 

28

Mythology and Folklore  
Biflidd, Biflindi N. "Spear‐shaker". Another name for Odin  Bifrost Gk. Bridge leading from the Earth called midgrad the home of gods.  Bifrost N. The rainbow bridge from earth to heaven, guarded by Heimdall; It is a bridge that only the gods can  cross. It is covered with flames to stop the frost ogres and cliff giants from scaling heaven. It will break  when the sons of Muspell ride out over at Ragnarok.  Bifur N. A soil‐dwelling Dwarf  Bil & Hjuki N. The Moon‐God, Nepur, took these children from Byrgir Well while they carried mead from the  well with Sœg ("Tub") & Simul ("Carrying‐ pole"). They followed the moon on its way until their father,  Ivaldi, battled with Nepur and reclaimed them. Bil later becomes Saga. Idun is their sister.  Bileyg N. "One whose eye deceives him"; another name for Odin  Billing N. "Twin"; Elf of the twilight or west; The Giant Billing is the master of the Vanirs. He is Gilling's brother,  Rind's father and Vali's grandfather. His warriors protect Sol and Mane.  Bilskirnir  N.  "Lightning".  Thor's  hall  at  Thurdvang;  It  is  the  biggest  building  ever  built,  with  six  hundred  and  forty floors.  Bindusara In. the son and successor of Chandra‐gupta  Birdwood N. Where the red cockerel All‐Knower comes from, perhaps a by‐name of Yggdrasil  Birth  house  Eg.  these  were  small  temples,  attached  to  the  main  temples  of  the  Late  and  Greco‐Roman  Periods;  these  small  temples  are  where  the  god  associated  with  the  main  temple  were  said  to  have  been born, or if the main temple was dedicated to a goddess it was where she bore her children.  Biton Gk. son of Cydippe; a priestess of Hera at Argos  Bjart  N.  "Shining  One”;  One  of  Freya's  eight  sisters;  The  God  of  storm  and  fishing;  Njord  is  her  father.  The  fertility God Freyr is her brother.  Black Sea Gk. shore of the island sea north Asian portion in modern ancient Greek of The Euxine.  Blid N. "The one who is mild”. Another of the Love‐Goddess Freya's eight sisters; The God of storm and fishing,  Njord is her father. The fertility God Freyr is her brother.  Blodighofi N. "The one with blood on the hoofs". Blodighofi is Freyr's horse, which was given to Skirnir, when  he rode to Jotunheim to get Gerd for him. The horse wasn't afraid of either fire or smoke.  Blodughadda N. "With blood in the hair"; One of Aegir and Ran's nine wave‐daughters who are said to be the  mothers of Heimdall; the guardian of the Bifrost bridge  Boar N. An animal sacred to Freyr; His boar, Gullinbursti, has golden bristles.  Bodn N. One of three bowls used by the dwarves Fjalar and Galar when they were making Kvæsir's blood into  the Mead of Poetry.  Boe N. In Saxo's account of the Baldr story, the son of Rind is called Boe instead of Vali.  Boetia Gk. formerly Cadmeis; plays a prominent part of the two great centres of legends Thebes. 

29

Mythology and Folklore  
Bolthorn N. "Evil Thorn". Odin's grandfather. Bolthorn is father to Bestla, Bor's wife and mother of Odin, Vili  and Ve. He is also the father of Mimir.  Bolverk N. The Giant disguise used by Odin to get the Mead of Poetry.  Bombor N. A soil‐dwelling Dwarf  Bona Dea Rom. goddess of fertility, healing, virginity and women; festival May 1  Book of the dead Eg. this is a collection of magic spells and formulas that was illustrated and written, usually  on papyrus; It began to appear in Egyptian tombs around 1600 BC; The text was intended to be spoken  by  the  deceased  during  their  journey  into  the  Underworld;  It  enabled  the  deceased  to  overcome  obstacles  in  the  afterlife;  It  did  this  by  teaching  passwords  that  allowed  the  deceased  to  turn  into  mythical creatures to navigate around hazards, while granting the help and protection of the gods, and  proclaiming the deceased's identity with the gods; The texts continue the tradition of the Pyramid Texts  and Coffin Texts; There are about 200 known spells and the choice of spells can vary from copy to copy.   Bootes Gk. a star just behind the Dipper; also called Arcturus and the Wagoner who drives the Dipper called  the Wain or Wagon.  Bor, Borr N. "The Son". A supernatural man, son of Buri, a Giant who was created when the cow Audhumla  licked at a stone; He is married to the Giantess Bestla and is the father of Odin, Vili and Ve.  Boreas Gk. purple‐winged god of north wind.  Bosphoros Gk. ford of the cow    Bragi,  Brage  N.  God  of  poetry,  eloquence,  and  boasting.  Son  of  Odin  and  Gunnlod;  married  to  Idhuna.  He  greets new arrivals to Valhalla with songs of their deeds. His virtues are wit, cunning, wisdom, music,  writing, and the arts. He is the patron of skalds and minstrels.                      Bragi                                  

30

Mythology and Folklore  
Brahma In. the first member of the Hindu triad; the supreme spirit manifested as the  active creator of the universe; he sprang from the mundane egg deposited by  the supreme first cause, and is the Prajapati, or lord and father of all creatures,  and in the first place of the Rishis or Prajapatis.                                 Brahma 

Brahma  purana  In.  in  all  the  lists  of  the  Puranas  the  Brahma  stands  first,  for  which  reason  it  is  sometimes  entitled the adi or “first” Purana; it was repeated by Brahma to Marichi, and is said to contain 10,000  stanzas, but the actual number is between 7000 and 8000.  Brahma  sutras  In.  aphorisms  on  the  Vedanta  philosophy  by  Badarayana  or  Vyasa;  also  called  Brahma  Mimamsa sutras.  Brahma vaivarta purana In. that Purana which is related by Savarni to Narada, and contains the account if the  greatness  of  Krishna,  with  the  occurrences  of  the  Radhantara‐kalpa,  where  also  the  story  of  Brahma  Varaha is repeatedly told, is called the Brahma Vaivarta Purana, and contains 18,000 stanzas.  Brahma,  Brahman  In.  the  supreme  soul  of  this  universe,  self‐existent,  absolute,  and  eternal,  from  which  all  things,  emanate,  and  to  which  all  return;  this  divine  essence  is  incorporeal,  immaterial,  invisible,  unborn, uncreated, without beginning and without end, illimitable, and inappreciable by the sense until  the film of mortal blindness is removed.  Brahmachari In. the Brahman student.  Brahmadikas In. the Prajapatis.  Brahma‐gupta In.  an astronomer who composed the Brahma‐gupta Siddhanta in a.d. 628.  Brahman  In.  the  first  of  the  four  castes;  the  sacerdotal  class,  the  members  of  which  may  be,  but  are  not  necessarily, priests; a Brahman is the chief of all created beings; his person is inviolate; he is entitled to  all honour, and enjoys many rights and privileges.  Brahmana In. belonging to Brahmans; works composed by and for Brahmans; that part of the Veda which was  intended for the use and guidance of Brahmans in the use of the hymns of the mantra, and therefore of  later  production;  but  the  Brahmana,  equally  with  the  mantra,  is  held  to  be  sruti  or  revealed  word.  Excepting its claim to revelation, it is a Hindu Talmud.  Brahmanaspati In. a Vedic equivalent of the name Brihaspati.  Brahmanda purana In. that which has declared, in 12,200 verses; the magnificence of the egg of Brahma, and  in  which  an  account  of  the  future  kalpas  is  contained,  is  called  the  Brahmanda  Purana,  and  was  revealed by Brahma.  Brahmani In. the female form; daughter of Brahma, also called Sata‐rupa  Brahma‐pura In. the city of Brahma; the heaven of Brahma, on the summit of mount Meru, and enclosed by  the river Ganga.  Brahmarshi‐desa In. Kurukshetra, the matsyas, the panchalas, and the surasenas. This land, which comes to  Brahmavartta, is the land of Brahmarshis. 

31

Mythology and Folklore  
Brahmarshis In. Rishis of the Brahman caste, founders of the gotras of Brahmans, and dwell in the sphere of  Brahma.  Brahma‐savarni In. the tenth Manu  Brahmavartta In. between the two  divine rivers,  Saraswati and Drishadwati, lies the tract of land which the  sages have named Brahmavartta, because it was frequented by the gods.” – Manu. Ii. 17.  Brahma‐veda In. a name given to the Atharvan or fourth vela; the Veda of prayers and charms.  Brahma‐yuga In. the age of Brahmans; he first on Krita‐yuga  Breidablik Gk. Balder’s home  Breidablik  N.  "Broad  Shining";  Baldr's  and  Nanna's  hall  in  Asgard;  a  magnificent  palace;  No  unclean  thing  is  permitted to be there.  Briareus Gk. also called Aegaeon; one of the three 100 armed. 50 headed; son of Uranus and Gaea.  Brihad aranyaka,  brihad upanishad  In. The brihad aranyaka Upanishad belongs to the satapatha Brahmana,  and is ascribed to the sage yajnawalkya.  Brihad‐devata In. an ancient work in Slokas by the sage saunaka, which enumerates and describes the deity or  deities  to  which  each  hymn  and  verse  of  the  rig‐veda  is  addressed;  it  frequently  recites  legends  in  support of its attributions.  Brihad‐ratha In. the tenth and last king of the Maurya dynasty; founded by Chandragupta.  Brihaspati In. In the Rig‐veda the names Brihaspati and Brahmanaspati alternate, and are equivalent to each  other; they are names of a deity in whom the action of the worshipper upon the gods is personified;  the  suppliant,  the  sacrifice,  the  priest,  who  intercedes  with  gods  on  behalf  of  men  and  protects  mankind against the wicked.  Brihat‐katha In. a large collection of tales; the original of the Katha‐sarit‐sagara.  Brihat‐sanhita In. a celebrated work on astronomy by Varaha mihira  Brimer N. is a Giant that owns the island Ókolnir. There he has his feast hall in which the Giants celebrates  when Ragnarok is coming; a hall located in Ókolnir. In it there is plenty of good drink; A refuge to those  finding it after Ragnarok  Brimir Hall at Gimle, Sindri Hall at Nidafioll, Nasatrands, Hvergelmir N. Places the remaining Gods will be sent  to after Ragnarok.  Briseis Gk. Queen of Asia Minor; daughter of Briseus  Brisingamen,  Brising  N.  "Fire‐Jewelry".  The  Brisingamen  necklace  belongs  to  Freya.  It  was  forged  by  four  dwarves and to get it she had to spend one night with each of them. This ornament can be worn either  as a belt or a necklace depending upon how Freya plans to use it. Loki once stole it.  Brizo Gk. protector of mariners  Broadland N. Another name for Vidar's hall; Also called Landvidi ("Whiteland") 

32

Mythology and Folklore  
Broadview N. Another name for Balder's Hall  Brokk N. A Dwarf; superb smith and jeweler, son of Ivaldi; He was pictured as small and blackened from the  smithy.  With  his  brother  Eitri  he  made  Sif's  golden  hair,  the  spear  Gungnir,  the  ship  Skidbladnir.  Loki  wagered his head that Brokk's brother Sindri could not forge greater magical items than these. So, Loki,  in the form of a gadfly, stung him on the hand, neck and eyelids to prevent him from helping with the  forge's bellows and winning the bet, but Loki failed. His brother Sindri created the boar Slidrugtanni for  Freyr and Freya, the ring Draupnir for Odin, and a new hammer for Thor, a hammer which would be  impossible to steal, because it would always return to its owner. Loki ran but was caught by Thor. Loki  said, "You can have my head but not my neck". So Brokk pierced holes  in Loki's lips with an awl and  sewed them up as a lesson not to brag.  Bromius Gk. a cyclope  Brynhild,  Brynhildr  N.  "Byrnie  of  Battle"  or  "Mail‐coat  of  Battle".  A  Valkyrie  and  servant  to  Odin;  a  shape‐ shifter  who  often  used  a  swan  disguise;  this  beautiful  being  fell  in  love  with  the  hero  Sigurd;  She  is  daughter to king Budle and sister to Atle and Bekkhild. She was punished by Odin, but Sigurd Fafnisbari  saved her. She married King Gunnar but really loved Sigurd. When Sigurd was killed, she threw herself  into the fire and burned to death.  Bubona Rom. goddess of horses and cattle  Buddha‐gotama  buddha  In.  the  founder  of  Buddhism.  Vishnu’s  ninth  incarnation  Buddha In. wise, intelligent; the planet mercury; son of the soma, the moon,  by Rohini, or by Tara, wife of Brihaspati                                        Buddha 

Budli N. father of Atli (Attila the Hun) and Brunhild  Buri,  Bure  N.  "Good‐looking"  or  "Great  and  Huge";  Supernatural  being  licked  from  the  salty  rocks  of  Ginnungagap by Audhumla, the primal cow. Father of Bor, who is father of Odin, Vili and Ve. Bure died  of old age, as the golden apples of Iduna had yet to appear.  Byggvir N. companion God of Freyr. The God of ale/beer and corn, Byggvir is married to Beyla. He is Freyr's  servant and lives at Freyr's farm Alfheim. His task is to take care of the world‐mill and its grist.  Byleist N. "Lightning". The Storm‐Giant Byleist is Farbauti's and Laufey's son. He has two brothers, the trickster  Loki and the Water‐Giant Helblindi.   Bylgja N. “Big Breaking Wave”. One of Aegir and Ran's nine wave‐daughters who are said to be the mothers of  Heimdall, the guardian of the Bifrost bridge.  Byrgir N. A well found in the kingdom of Ivaldi, probably connected to Mimir's Well, since its water gave the  gift of poetic power and ecstasy. Ivaldi tried to keep this secret, and sent two of his children in the dark  of night to empty out the well and bring back the mead. From this mead he allowed the Gods to drink  as much as they wanted. Nepur, the Moon‐God spied the youngsters on their way back home with a 

33

Mythology and Folklore  
pail full of mead, and abducted them and the mead. But Ivaldi fought Nepur as he passed through the  underworld and reclaimed them.   


Cabeiri Gk. Were the magical beings that protected the fruit on the island of Lemnos.  Cadmus Gk. was the father of king Athamas’ second wife and the king of Thebes.  Caduceus Gk. was a winged rod with two serpents intertwined about it, belonging to Hermes.  Calais Gk. was one of Boreas’ and Orithyia’s sons.  Calchas Gk. was the soothsayer of the Greek army in the Trojan War.  Calliope Gk. was the eldest of the 9 muses and the mother of Orpheus.  Callisto Gk. was a young nymph associated with Artemis and was raped by Zeus.  Calpe Gk. was one of Hercules’ pillars.  Calydon Gk. was the area in Greece where the Calydonian hunt took place.  Calydonian Hunt Gk. the noblest men in Greece helped get rid of a Great boar that was laying waste in the  country.  Calypso Gk. the nymph that fell madly in love with Odysseus  Camenae Gk. goddesses that cared for springs and wells and cured illnesses  Camenae Rom. goddesses of wells and springs  Camilla Gk. was a young huntress who had been abandoned as a baby to survive lone in the wilderness.  Canace Gk. was said to be the mother of Otus and Ephialtes.  Candelifera Rom. goddess of childbirth  Canopic  jar  Eg.  four  jars  used  to  store  the  preserved  internal  organs  of  the  deceased;  Each  jar  is  representative of one of the four sons of Horus; the term comes from the Greek , Canopus, a demigod  venerated in the form of a human headed jar.   Capanues Gk. was a man of mighty wealth, but humble and a true friend to all.  Capathos Gk. an island also called Pharos and was the haunt of Proteus.  Capitol Gk. a golden meadow, filled with lowing cattle.  Cardea Rom. goddess of thresholds and door hinges  Carmenta Rom. goddess of childbirth and prophecy; festival Carmentalial January 11 and 15  Carnea Rom. Goddess of the heart and other organs, and door handles; Festival June 1. 

34

Mythology and Folklore  
Carthage Gk. Hera’s pet city  Cartonnage Eg. Papyrus or linen soaked in plaster, shaped around a body; Used for mummy masks and coffins.  Cartouche Eg. a circle with a horizontal bar at the bottom, elongated into an oval within which king's names  are written; it is believed to act as a protector of the kings name; The sign represents a loop of rope  that is never ending.  Cassandra Gk. a prophetess and one of King Priam’s daughters.  Cassiopeia Gk.  Andromache’s mother and a queen.  Castalia Gk. a sacred spring in Delphi  Castor Gk. a lesser God that was said to be half mortal  Casus Gk. was a giant that once had stolen some of Hercules’ cattle and was killed for it.  Cecrops Gk. the first king of Attica.  Celaeno Gk. one of the Pleiades.  Celeus Gk. the father of Demophoon whose mother was called Metaneira.  Cenotaph Eg. from the Greek word meaning; "empty tomb"; A tomb built for ceremonial purposes that was  never intended to be used for the interment of the deceased.  Centaurs Gk.  Half‐human, half‐horse creatures  Centimanus Gk. were three giants with a hundred arms each. See Hecatonchires.  Cephalus Gk. son of Hermes and Herse and was married to Procris.  Cepheus Gk. Andromeda’s father  Cephissus Gk. a Greek river God and the father of Narcissus    Cerberus  Gk.  the  three‐headed  watch  dog  that  guarded the entrance to the underworld                                          Cerberus 

35

Mythology and Folklore  
Cercopes Gk. the twin sons of Oceanus and Theia that were turned into monkey’s of Zeus.  Ceres  Rom. the goddess of farming and the Earth; Corn  Goddess;  Eternal  Mother;  the  Sorrowing  Mother;  Grain  Mother;  Goddess  of  agriculture,  grain,  crops,  initiation,  civilization,  lawgiver  and  the love a mother bears for her child.  Ceryntia Gk.  the forest where a stag with horns of gold  lived  Cestus Gk. was Aphrodite’s girdle.  Ceyx  Gk. was the son of  Eosphorus and was married to  the demi‐Goddess Alcyone.  Chair  of  forgetfulness  Gk.  a  chair  in  Hades,  that  whoever sat on this chair forgot everything from  the past.  Chaitanya‐chandrodaya  In.  the  rise  of  the  moon  of  chaitanya;  a  drama  in  ten  acts  by  kavi‐karna‐ pura.                                   Ceres 

Chaitra‐ratha In. the grove or forest of kuvera on mandara; one of the spurs of meru; it is so called from its            being cultivated by the gandharva chitra‐ratha.    Chakora In. a kind of partride; a fabulous bird, supposed to live upon the beams of the moon  Chakra‐varti  In.  a  universal  emperor,  described  by  the  vishnu  purana  as  one  who  is  born  with  the  mark  of  vishnu’s discuss visible in his hand.  Chakshusha In. the sixth manu.  Champa In. son of Prithu‐laksha; a descendant of Yayati, through his fourth son, Anu, and founder of the city  of champa  Champa, champavati, champa‐malini, champa‐puri In. the capital city of the country of Anga; traces of it still  remain  in  the  neighbourhood  of  Bhagalpur;  it  was  also  called  Malini,  from  its  being  surrounded  with  Champaka trees as with a garland (mala).  Chamunda  In.  an  emanation  of  the  goddess  Durga,  sent  forth  from  her  forehead  to  encounter  the  demons  Chanda and Munda; described in the mMrkandeya Purana.  Chanakya  In.  a  celebrated  Brahman,  who  took  a  leading  part  in  the  destruction  of  the  nandaas,  and  in  the  elevation of Chandra‐gupta to their throne; great master of finesse and artifice, and has been called the  Machiavelli of India.  Chanda,  chandi  In.  the  goddess  Durga;  in  the  form  she  assumed  for  the  destruction  of  the  asura  called  Mahisha. 

36

Mythology and Folklore  
Chandipat, chandipatha In. a poem of 700 verses, forming an episode of the Markandeya Purana; it celebrates  Durga’s  victories  over  the  asuras,  and  is  read  daily  in  the  temples  of  that  goddess;  the  work  is  also  called Devi‐mahatmya.  Chandra In. the moon, either as a planet or a deity.  Chandra‐hasa In. a prince of the south; lost his parents soon after his birth, and fell into a state of destitution.  Chandra‐ketu In. a son of Lakshmana; king of the city of Chakora; country near the Himalayas.  Chandra‐vansa In. the lunar race; the lineage or race which claims descent from the moon.  Chanra‐kanta In. the moon‐stone; a gem or stone supposed to be formed by the congelation of the rays of the  moon; supposed to exercise a cooling influence.  Chanura In. a wrestler in the service of Kansa; was killed by Krishna.  Chaos Gk. was the vast immeasurable abyss, outrageous, dark and wild.  Charaka In. a writer on medicine who lived in Vedic times; a legend represents him as an incarnation of the  serpent sesha.  Charaka In. one of the chief schools of the Yajur‐veda  Charaka‐brahmana In.  a Brahmana of the black Yajur‐veda.  Charamanvati In. the river chambal  Charana  In.  a  Vedic  school  or  society;  explained  as  a  number  of  men  who  are  pledged  to  the  reading  of  a  certain Sakhi of the Veda, and who have in this manner become one body.  Charanas In. Panegyrists; the panegyrists of the gods  Charites Gk. was the Greek name for the graces.  Charon Gk. the boat man who sailed the boat in Hades.  Charu hasini In. sweet smiler; this epithet is used for rukmini and for Lakshmana, and perhaps for other wives  of Krishna.  Charu, charu‐deha, charu‐deshna, charu‐gupta In. sons of Krishna and Rukmini  Charu‐datta In. the Brahman hero of the drama Mrichchhakati  Charu‐mati In. daughter of Krishna and Rukmini.  Charvaka  In.  a  Rakshasa,  and  friend  of  Dur‐yodhana,  who  disguised  himself  as  a  Brahman  and  reproached  yudhishthira for his crimes, when he entered Hastina‐pura in triumph after the great battle; a sceptical  philosopher who advocated materialistic doctrines.  Chatur‐varna In. the four castes  Chaydbis Gk. a whirlpool where the sea forever spouted and roared. 

37

Mythology and Folklore  
Chedi In. name of a people and of their country; the modern chandail and boglekhand; a son of Dhrishta Ketu,  raja of the kekayas, and an ally of the pandavas  Chera In. a kingdom in the south of the peninsula, which was absorbed by its rival the Chola kingdom.  Chhandas, chhando In. metre; one of the vedangas; the oldest known work on the subject is “the chhandah‐ sastra, ascribed to Pingala, which may be as old as the second century b.c.”  Chhandoga In. a priest or chanter of the Sama‐veda  Chhandogya In. name of a Upanishad of the sama‐veda.  Chhaya In. shade; a handmaid of the sun; Sanjna, wife of the Sun, being unable to bear the fervour of her lord,  put her handmaid Chhaya in her place  Chimaera Gk. a creature with the front of a lion, a back of a serpent and the middle of a goat  Chinta‐mani  In.  the  wish‐gem;  a  jewel  which  is  suppressed  to  have  the  power  of  granting  all  desires;  the  philosopher’s  stone;  it  is  said  to  have  belonged  to  Brahma,  who  is  himself  called  by  this  name;  also  called divya‐ratna.  Chios Gk. still remains as a Greek island.  Chira‐jivin In. long‐lived; gods or deified mortals, who live for long periods.  Chiron Gk. was one of the centaurs that died for Prometheus.  Chitra‐gupta In. a scribe in the abodes of the dead; records the virtues and vices of men; recorder of Yama.  Chitra‐kuta  In.  bright‐peak:  the  seat  of  Valmiki’s  hermitage,  in  which  Rama  and  Sita  both  found  refuge  at  different times.  Chitra‐lekha  In.  a  picture:  name  of  a  nymph  who  was  skilled  in  painting  and  in  the  magic  art:  a  friend  and  confidante of usha.  Chitrangada In. daughter of king Chritra‐vahana of Mani‐purap; wife of Arjuna and mother of Babhru Vahana  Chitrangada In. the elder son of king Santanu, and brother of Bhishma: arrogant and proud, and was killed in  early life in a conflict with a Gandharva of the same name.  Chitra‐ratha In. having a fine car; he king of the Gandharvas  Chitra‐sena In. one of the hundred sons of Dhritarashtra; chief of the Yakshas  Chitra‐yajna  In.  a  modern  drama  in  five  acts  upon  the  legend  of  daksha;  the  work  of  a  pandit  named  Vaidyanatha Vachaspati.  Chola In. a country and kingdom of the south of India about tanjore: the country was called Chola Mandala,  whence comes the name Coromandel.  Chrysaor Gk. was a horse that sprang from the blood of Medusa.  Chryseis Gk. daughter of Apollo’s priest  Chrysothemis Gk. was one of Agamemnon’s daughters. 

38

Mythology and Folklore  
Chyavana, chyavana In. asage, son of the Rishi bhrigu; author of some hymns.  Cimmerians Gk. were never found as they lived on land that nobody else could reach.  Cinxia Rom. goddess of marriage  Cinyras Gk. father of Adonis  Circe Gk. a beautiful but dangerous witch that fell in love with Odysseus and kept him a prisoner on her island  Cithaeron Gk. was the Thesbian lion.  Clementia Rom. goddess of mercy and clemency  Cleobis Gk. son of Cydippe and a priestess of Hera on Argos  Clio Gk. the muse of historical poetry  Cloacina Rom. goddess of the Cloaca Maxima, the system of sewers in Rome  Clotho Gk. s daughter of Zeus and Themis and the youngest of the three fates.  Cloud‐gatherer Gk. Zeus was the cloud gatherer.  Clymene Gk. daughter of Oceanus and Tethys and the wife of Iapetus  Clytemnestra Gk. was the daughter of Leda and king Tyndareus and the wife of Agamemnon.  Clytie Gk. was an ocean nymph that fell in love with Apollo.  Cnossus Gk. was the capital of Crete and the city of king Minos.  Cocytus Gk. was one of the five rivers in Hades.  Coelus Rom. god of the sky  Coeus Gk. was a Titan, the father of Leto and the grand‐father of Apollo and Artemis.  Coffin texts Eg. texts written inside coffins of the Middle Kingdom that are intended to direct the souls of the  dead past the dangers and perils encountered on the  journey through the afterlife; More than 1,000  spells are known.  Coiler N. A kenning for the Midgard‐Serpent  Colchis Gk. was a country that lay upon the unfriendly sea.  Colonus Gk. was a beautiful area near Athens.  Colossus Eg. A more then life size statue, often of a kings, but also of gods and even private individuals; these  huge  statues  usually  flank  the  gates  or  pylons  of  temples;  they  are  believed  to  act  as  intermediaries  between men and the gods.  Concordia Rom. goddess of agreement and understanding  Conditor Rom. god of the harvest 

39

Mythology and Folklore  
Consus Rom. god of grain storage; festivals Consualia August 21 and December 15  Convector Rom. god of bringing in of the crops from the fields  Copia Rom. goddess of wealth and plenty  Corinth  Gk.  city  at  the  western  end  of  the  Isthmus,  joining  the  Peloponnesus  to  Boeotia;  the  city  was  first  named Ephyra or Ephyraea, because, as it is told, the Oceanid Ephyra was the first to dwell in Corinth.  Cornucopia  Gk.  the  horn  of  the  goat  Amalthea;  the  nurse  of  baby  Zeus  in  Greek  mythology;  one  of  her  attendant nymphs gave her Amalthea, a magical goat to nurse the divine child. When Zeus grew up, he  defeated Cronos and frees his divine brothers and sisters from his father’s stomach. They became the  gods of Olympus; Amalthea’s whorn came to be associated with an overflowing horn of plenty or how it  became detached from the goat; The horn of Amalthea overflowing with fruits, honey, and grain is an  extremely ancient symbol of the harvest.  Coronis  Gk.  daughter  of  Phlegyas;  King  of  the  Lapiths  was  one  of  Apollo's  lovers;  while  Apollo  was  away,  Coronis,  already  pregnant  with  Asclepius,  fell  in  love  with  Ischys,  son  of  Elatus;  a  white  crow  which  Apollo  had  left  to  guard  her  informed  him  of  the  affair  and  Apollo,  enraged  that  the  bird  had  not  pecked  out  Ischys'  eyes  as  soon  as  he  approached  Coronis,  flung  a  curse  upon  it  so  furious  that  it  scorched  its  feathers,  which  is  why  all  crows  are  black.  Apollo  sent  his  sister,  Artemis,  to  kill  Coronis  because he could not bring himself to. Afterward Apollo, feeling dejected, only regained his presence of  mind when Coronis' body was already aflame on a funeral pyre. Upon a sign from Apollo, Hermes cut  the unborn child out of her womb and gave it to the centaur Chiron to rise. Hermes then brought her  soul to Tartarus.  Corus Rom. god of the North West wind  Corybantes Gk. are represented as a kind of inspired people; subject to Bacchic frenzy; inspiring terror at the  celebration  of  the  sacred  rites  by  means  of  war‐dances,  noise,  cymbals,  drums,  and  arms;  they  have  been called attendants of Rhea.  Cottus Gk. was a son of Uranus and Gaea; he was one of the Hekatoncheires; a giant with a hundred hands  and fifty heads.  Cow Gk. a white bull more beautiful than any others; bull that smelled of flowers, and lowed musically; a bull  so obviously gentle that all the maidens rushed to stroke and pet it.  Crab Gk. as simply a family mess; Cancer comes into this ‘beloved’ scene when Hercules is fighting the terrible  water‐serpent, Hydra. During the battle between Heracles and Hydra; Hera sent Cancer, the giant crab,  to aid the serpent. As the violent fight took place; Cancer was nipping at Hercules feet. But Heracles,  being  so  mighty  in  strength,  killed  the  crab  by  smashing  its  shell  with  his  foot.  Hera  then  placed  the  crab's image in the night sky as a reward for its service.  Creon  Gk.  reluctant  king  of  Thebes  lost  his  son,  wife  and  niece  in  a  tragic  cycle  of  suicides  caused  by  his  inflexible will. His crushing fate was to endure a life of solitary grief and remorse. He was the brother of  Jocasta  and  a  reluctant  ruler  of  Thebes;  he  was  regent  during  the  uncertain  period  after  king  Laius,Jocasta’s husband,had been killed near the city, Creon offered the throne and the hand of Jocasta  to  any  man  who  could    resolve    the  riddle  of  the  Sphinx  and  thus  rid  Thebes  of  this  bloodthirsty  monster. 

40

Mythology and Folklore  
Cresphontes Gk. a son of Herakles (Heracles); He became king of Messenia and was Murder by another son of  Herakles,  Polyphontes;  His  wife  and  son,  Merope  and  Aepytus,  took  their  revenge  by  killing  Polyphontes.  Cretheus Gk. a son of Aeolus and Enarete; was married to Tyro,the daughter of Salmoneus; he  became the  father of Aeson, Pheres, Amythaon, and Hippolyte; he is called the founder of the town of Iolcus.  Creusa Gk. was a naiad and daughter of Gaia who bore Hypseus.  Criosphinx Eg. one of three varieties of Egyptian sphinx, having the head of a ram.   Cronus Gk. was the son of Ouranos, the sky god, and Gaia, the earth mother. He emasculated Ouranos and  sized control of the universe. He then married his sister Rhea and followed the example of Ouranos in  disposing of his children by swallowing them, because he had been warned that would be displaced by  one of his sons.  Crossways  Gk.  a  fanlisting  devoted  to  Hecate,  Hekate  (Hekátē),  or  Hekat;  the  Greek  goddess  of  crossroads,  magik (sorcery) and darkness, Hekate  Crow Gk. which Apollo had left to guard her informed him of the affair and Apollo, enraged that the bird had  not pecked out Ischys' eyes as soon as he approached Coronis, flung a curse upon it so furious that it  scorched its feathers, which is why all crows are black.  Cumae  Gk.  was  the  first  Greek  colony  on  the  mainland  of  Italy  (Magna  Graecia),  there  having  been  earlier  starts on the islands of Ischia and Sicily by colonists from the Euboean cities of Chalcis.  Cunina Rom. goddess of infants  Cupid  Rom.  he  was  usually  portrayed  as  a  cute,  capricious  child  with wings and often with a quiver of arrows or a torch to  inflame love I the hearts of gods and men; He was depicted  as a beautiful but wanton boy, armed with a quiver full of  “arrowed  desires”;  some  of  his  arrows,  however,  would  turn  people  away  from  those  who  fell  in  love  with  them.  According to one myth, Venus was jealous of PSYCHE (“the  soul”)  and  told  Cupid  to  make  her  love  the  ugliest  man  alive.  But  Cupid  fell  in  love  with  Psyche  and,  invisible,  visited  her  every  night.  He  told  her  not  to  try  to  see  him,  until the sky god Jupiter granted her immortality so that he  could  be  Cupid’s  constant  was  named  Voluptas  (“pleasure”). The god of love.  Curetes Gk. guarded the infant Zeus, clashing their spears on their  shields  in  order  that  Cronos  might  not  hear  the  child's  voice;  they  could  have  been  descendants  of  the  DACTYLS;  their  life  is  the  tune  of  pipes,  and  the  noise  of  beaten  swords;  they  have  been  described  as  flute‐players,  and  wearing  brazen  shields;  they  have  been  called  the  rearers  and  protectors  of  Zeus,  having  been  summoned  from      Phrygia to Crete by Rhea  Offspring of Gaia. 

              Cupid 

41

Mythology and Folklore  
Cybele Gk. a Phrygian goddess often identified with Rhea; her priests were the Corybantes who workshiped  her with cries and shouts and clashing cymbals and drums; lived in the wild and dangerous regions of  the earth and ruled the fiercest of animals.  Cyclopes Gk. a Giants with only one eye in their forhead; children of the earth Gaea; they ate humans, were  thick and had given Zeus the thunder and lightning as a sign of gratitude when he released them from  the underworld; They worked as Hephaestus helpers under the volcano Etna making Zeus's lightning’s,  but were killed by Apollo as a revenge for Zeus's killing his son Aclepius.  Cycnus Gk. swan; the name of the three young men change into swans; son of Apollo; ally of the Trojan war at  Troy; friend of Phaethon, placed among the stars as a swan.It sometimes said there was a fourth, son of  Aresvz, killed by Hercules.  Cydippe  Gk.  was  the  mother  of  Cleobis  and  Biton;  A  priestess  of  Hera,  was  on  her  way  to  a  festival  in  the  goddess' honor.  Cyllen Gk. mount Cyllene in Arcadia to Maia; where Hermes was born.  Cynosure Gk. name for the constellation Ursa Minor; the Little Bear.  Cynthia Gk. was Goddess of the hunt and the Moon; twin sister of Apollo.  Cyrene Gk. the daughter of Hypseus and Chlidanope; was not the least bit interested in men.  Cythera  Gk.  where  the  goddess  was  said  to  have  first  landed,  and  where  she  had  a  celebrated  temple;  the  goddess Aphrodite was born near this island.  Cytherea Gk. different form of a surname of Aphrodite. 

  D 
Dactyls Gk. they are demons believed to live on Mount Ida in Phrygia (Asia Minor), or on the Isle of Crete; they  were considered to be the first metallurgists; they discovered iron and the art of working metals by fire;  they  belonged  to  the  retinue  of  the  goddess  Cybele;  the  Dactyls  are  sometimes  identified  with  the  Cabiri,  Curetes  and  Corybantes;  mostly  because  of  the  mystery  cults  that  surrounded  those  groups;  their name is derived from daktylos ("finger") and is probably based either on their skill with metals or  on their small size.   Dactys  Gk.  was  a  fisherman  who  became  king  of  Seriphos;  he  was  a  brother  of  Polydectes  and  a  son  of  Magnes.  Dadhyanch, dadhicha In. a Vedic Rishi, son of Atharvan; name frequently occurs.  Daedalus Gk. he is an Architect and inventor who served at the court of King Minos; was a descendant of king  Erechteus of Athens.   Dain N. A ruler of the Elves 

42

Mythology and Folklore  
Daityas  In.  Titans;  descendants  from  diti  by  kasyapa;  a  race  of  demons  and  giants,  who  warred  against  the  gods and interfered with sacrifices  Dakini In. a kind of female imp or fiend attendant upon kali and feeding on human flesh; the dakinis are also  called asra‐pas, `blood drinkers.’  Daksha In. able, competent, intelligent; this name generally carried with it the idea of a creative power.  Daksha‐savarna In. the ninth Manu  Dakshayana In. connected with daksha; son or descendant of that sage.  Dakshayani In. a name of Aditi as daughter of Daksha.  Dakshina In. a present made to Brahmans; the honorarium for the performance of a sacrifice; personified as a  goddess, to whom various origins are assigned.  Dakshinachari In.  Followers of the right‐hand form of Sakta worship.  Dama In. a son; according to the Vishnu Purana, a grandson of king Marutta of the solar race  Dama‐ghosha In. king of Chedi; father of Sisu‐pala.  Damayanti  In.  wife  of  Nala  and  heroine  of  the  tale  of  Nala  and  Damayanti;  she  is  also  known  by  her  patronymic bhaimi.  Dambhodbhava  In.  a  king  whose  story  is  related  in  the  Maha‐bharata  as  an  antidote  to  price.  He  had  an  overweening  conceit  of  his  own  prowess,  and  when  told  by  his  Brahmans  that  he  was  no  match  for  Nara  and  Narayana,  who  were  living  as  ascetics  on  the  Gandha‐madana  mountain,  he  proceeded  thither  with  his  army  and  challenged  them.  They  endeavoured  to  dissuade  him,  but  he  insisted  on  fighting. Nara then took a handful of straws, and using them as missiles, they whitened all the air, and  penetrated  the  eyes,  ears,  and  noses  of  the  assailants,  until  Dambhodbhava  fell  at  Nara’s  feet  and  begged for peace.  Damodara In. a name given to Krishna because his foster‐mother tried to tie him up with a rope (dama) round  his belly (udara).  Damp With Sleet N. Another name of Hel's hall; also called "Eliudnir"  Danaans  Gk.  were  one  of  the  three  Nemedian  families  who  survived  the  Fomorian  victory;  he  brought  the  stone of destiny from Falias.  Danae Gk. Daughter of Acrisius, king of Argos; he shut her up in a bronze tower because of a prophecy that  her  son  would  kill  his  grandfather  ‐  thinking  that  held  prisoner  she  might  never  receive  a  lover,  and  never bear a child. Zeus became enamoured of her and descended in a shower of gold. As a result of  her union with Zeus she gave birth to the hero Perseus.  Danaids Gk. was the fifty daughters of Danaus; who were forced to marry their fifty male cousins but killed  them  on  their  wedding  night  (except  for  Hypermestra  who,  genuinely  loving  her  husband  Lynceus  spared  him)  with  daggers  provided  by  Danaus.  The  forty‐nine  murderers  were  subsequently  condemned  in  the  underworld  to  forever  carry  water  in  a  sieve  and  try  to  fill  a  water  jug  with  the  water. 

43

Mythology and Folklore  
Danaus Gk. was a king of Libya; the father of fifty daughters, the 'Danaides'. His brother Aegyptus, who had  fifty sons, wanted a mass marriage, but Danaus fled with his daughters to Argos where he became king.  Eventually  Aegyptus'  sons  followed  and  demanded  the  Danaides.Danaus  agreed,  but  gave  each  daughter a weapon with which she slew her husband on their wedding night, all except Hypermestra  who spared her husband Lynceus. Lynceus killed Danaus and became king of Argos. In the underworld  the Danaides we recondemned to carry water in sieves forever.  Danavas In. descendants from Danu by the sage Kasyapa; they were giants who warred against the gods.   Danda‐dhara In. the rod‐bearer; a title of Yama, the god of death  Dandaka In. the Aranya or forest of Dandaka; lying between the Godavari and Narmada; it was of vast extent,  and some passages of the Ramayana represent it as beginning immediately south of the Yamuna; this  forest is the scene of many of Rama and Rita’s adventures, and is described as a wilderness over which  separate hermitage are scattered, while wild beasts and Rakshasas everywhere abound.  Danta‐vaktra  In.  a  Dana  king  of  Karusha  and  son  of  Virddha‐sarma;  took  a  side  against  Krishna,  and  was  eventually killed by him.  Danu In. a Danava; mother of the Danavas; the demon Kabandha.  Daphne  Gk.  Daphne  was  a  daughter  of  Peneus  and  nymph  of  Diana;  she  was  pursued  by  Apollo  and  asked  to  be  turned  into  a  tree  to  escape  him,  which  she  was,  the  tree  being  a  laurel  Daphne being the Greek name for the laurel.  Daphnis Gk. a Sicilian shepherded of the golden Age  whose beauty  won the hearts of nymphs and  muses; son of Hermes and a nymph; is raised  by  Sicillian  shepherds  when  his  mother  abandoned him.  Darada In. a country in the Hindu Kush, bordering on  Kashmir.  Darbas  In.  tearers;  Rakshasas  and  other  destructive  demons  Dardanus Gk. was a son of Zeus and Electra; he was  originally  a  king  in  Arcadia,  he  migrated  to  Samothrace  and  from  there  to  Asia  where  Teucer  gave  him  the  site  of  his  town,  Dardania. He married Bateia.                  

Dardura In. name of a mountain in the south; it is associated with the malaya mountain in the Maha bharata.  Darkdale N. The dwelling place of the dwarves, in the north, covered with gold.  Darsana In. demonstration; the shad‐darsanas or six demonstrations; the six schools of Hindu philosophy 

44

Mythology and Folklore  
Daruka In. Krishna’s charioteer; his attendant in his last days  Dasa‐kumara‐charita In. tale of the ten princes; one of the few sanskrit works written in prose; studied and  elaborate that it is classed as a kavya or poem; the tales are stories of common life, and display a low  condition of morals and a corrupt state of society.  Dasanana In. ten faced; a name of ravana.  Dasa‐ratha In. a prince of the solar race; son of aja; a descendant of Ikshwaku, and king of Ayodhya.  Dasarha, dasarha In. prince of the Dasarhas; a title of Krishna; he Dasarhas were a tribe of Yadavas.  Dasa‐rupaka  In.  an  early  treatise  on  dramatic  composition;  it  has  been  published  by  hall  in  the  bibliotheca  Indica.  Dasas In. slaves; tribes and people of indie who opposed the progress of the intrusive Aryans  Dasras In. beautiful; the elder of the two aswins, or in the dual (dasrau); the two aswins  Dasyus  In.  in  the  Vedas  they  are  evil  beings,  enemies  of  the  gods  and  men;  represented  as  being  of  a  dark  colour, and probably were the natives of India who contended with the immigrant aryans.  Dattaka‐chandrika In. a treatise on the law of adoption by Devana Bhatta  Dattaka‐mimansa In. a treatise on the law of adoption by Nanda Pandita  Dattaka‐siromani In. a digest of the principal treatises on the law of adoption  Dattatreya In. son of Atri and Anasuya; Brahman saint in whom a portion of Brahma, Vishnu, and Siva, or more  particularly Vishnu, was incarnate; had three sons, Soma, Datta, and Dur‐vasas, to whom also a portion  of the divine essence was transmitted;  the patron of Karta‐virya, and gave him a thousand arms.  Daughters  of  Aegir  N.  The  waves  of  the  sea;  the  "undines",  Aegir's  and  Ran's  nine  daughters,  born  of  the  waves  Daulis Gk. was the hometown of Tereus. The city is mentioned by Homer and it is said to be named after a  nymph Daulis; a daughter of the river‐god Cephissus.  Day  N.  At  the  creation,  the  gods  sent  Day  and  Night  to  race  across  the  sky  in  chariots  drawn  by  swift  horses.;Day is the father of the Light Elves and the personification of the daylight. He is Night's (Nott's)  son in her third marriage, with Delling. He controls the days on his horse Skinfaxi.  Daya‐bhaga  In.  law  of  inheritance;  this  title  belongs  especially  to  the  treatise  of  Jimuta  Vahana,  current  in  Bengal.  Daya‐krama‐sangraha In. a treatise on the law of inheritance as current in Bengal  Dea Dia Rom. goddess of growth; Festival in May  Dea Tacita Rom. goddess of the dead; Larentalia festival on December 23.  Dead Man's Shore N. A hall in Hel where no sunlight reaches, covered by serpent skins and dripping venom.  This  is  the  destination  after  death  of  murderers,  traitors,  adulterers;  Nidhögg  sucks  blood  from  the  bodies of the dead. 

45

Mythology and Folklore  
Decima Rom. Goddess of childbirth; with Nona and Morta she forms the Parcae (the three Fates).  Deianira  Gk.  a  princess  from  Greek  legend;  she  became  the  wife  of  Heracles  after  he  fought  for  her  with  Achelous ; was the daughter of Oeonus and the wife of Hercules.  Deidamia Gk. fell in love with Achilles and bore him Neoptolemus.  Delling N. "Day‐Spring" or "Dawn"; Red Elf of the dawn or east; lover of Nott; Day is their son. Delling is the  guard at Breidablik. His name means 'the one who is light‐complexioned'.  Delos Gk.  Place where Apollo and Artimis was born.  Delphi Gk. was the site of the Delphic oracle the most important oracle; a major site for the worship of the  god Apollo; always represented in Greek sculpture and vase‐paintings as a serpent. She presided at the  Delphic  oracle,  which  existed  in  the  cult  center  for  her  mother,  Gaia,  "Earth,"  Pytho  being  the  place  name that was substituted for the earlier Krisa.  Deluge Gk. a great flood sent by a deity or deities to destroy civilization as an act of divine retribution. It is a  widespread theme among many cultures.  Demeter Gk. was a Greek goddess of earth; she also called Ceres; She was the nourishing mother, bring forth  fruits; She was the daughter of Cronos and Rhea.  Demigod Gk. was a Greek hero; they were men who possessed god‐like strength and courage and who had  performed great tasks in the past.  Deshret Eg. The red crown. This was the crown that represented Lower Egypt (northern).   Deucalion  Gk.  was  the  son  of  Prometheus;  Warned  by  his  father  of  a  coming  flood;  Deucalion  and  his  wife  Pyrrha built an ark.  After the waters had subsided, they were instructed by a god to throw stones over  their shoulders which then became men and women.  Deva In. a deity; the gods are spoken of as thirty‐three in number, eleven for each of the three worlds.  Devaka In. father of Devaki; brother of Ugrasena  Devaki In. wife of Vasu‐Deva; mother of Krishna and cousin of Kansa; sometimes called an incarnation of Aditi,  and is said to have been born again as Primi, the wife of king Su‐tapas.  Devala In. a vedic rishi, to whom some hymns are attributed.  Devala In. music, personified as a female.  Deva‐loka In. the world of the gods; Swarga, Indra’s heaven.  Deva‐matri In. mother of the gods; an appellation of Aditi.  Deva‐rata In. a royal Rishi of the solar race; dwelt among the Videhas, and had charge of Siva’s bow, which  descended to Janaka and was broken by Rama; a name given to Sunah‐sephas.  Devarshis In. Rishis or saints of the celestial class; who dwell in the regions of the gods, such as narada; sages  who have attained perfection upon earth and have been exalted as demigods to heaven 

46

Mythology and Folklore  
Devata In. a divine being or god; the name Devatas includes the gods in general, or, as most frequently used,  the whole body of inferior gods.  Devatadhyaya‐brahmana In. the fifth Brahmana of the Sama‐veda  Devayani In. daughter of Sukra, priest of the daityas  Devera Rom. goddess of brooms used for purification.  Deverra Rom. goddess of women in labor and the patron of midwives  Dhuma‐varna  In.  smoke  coloured;  a  king  of  the  serpents;  legend  in  the  Hari‐vansa  relates  that  Yadu,  the  founder  of  the  Yadava  family,  went  for  a  trip  of  pleasure  on  the  sea,  where  he  was  carried  off  by  Dhuma Varna to the capital of the serpents; Dhuma‐varna married his five daughters to him, and from  them sprang seven distinct families of people.  Dhundhu In. an Asura who harassed the sage uttanka in his devotions; the demon hid himself beneath a sea of  sand, but was dug out and killed by king Kuvalayaswa and his 21,000 sons, who were undeterred by the  flames  which  checked  their  progress,  and  were  all  killed  but  three.  This  legend  probably  originated  from  a  volcano  or  some  similar  phenomenon.  From  this  exploit  kuvalayaswa  got  the  name  of  Dhundhumara, slayer of Dhundhu.  Dhur‐jati In. having heavy matted locks; a name of Rudra or Siva.  Dhurta‐nartaka  In.  the  rogue  actors;  afarce  in  two  parts  by  Sama  raja  Dikshita;  the  chief  object  of  this  piece  is  the  ridicule of the saiva ascetics.  Dhurta‐samagama  In.  assemblage  of  rogues; a comedy by Sekhara orJyotir  Iswara; it is somewhat indelicate, but  not devoid of humour.  Dia Gk. was a daughter of Deioneus and the  mother  of  Peririthous  by  her  husband,  Ixion  according  to  one  legend,  or  according  to  another,  by  Zeus.Perithous  is  said  to  have  received his name from the fact that  Zeus  when  he  attempted  to  seduce  Diaran  around  her  in  the  form  of  a  horse.  Dia Lucri Rom. gods of profit  Diana  Rom.  the  goddess  of  the  moon;  Fertility  Goddess;  moon  Goddess;  Huntress  Goddess;  Triple  Goddess‐  Lunar  Virgin,  Mother  of  Creatures,  the  Huntress  or  Destroyer;  Goddess  of  nature,  fertility,  childbirth, 

47

Mythology and Folklore  
wildwood, moon, forests, animals, mountains, woods, and women.  Dictynna Gk. was an epithet applied to the Cretan goddess, Britomartis, thought by some to mean 'lady of the  nets', by others to mean ' she of mount Dicte.  Dictys Gk. was a nymph from whom Mount Dicte received its name.  Dido Gk. was the reputed founder of Carthage; she was the daughter of a king of Tyre, called by some Belus,  by others Metten or Matgenus. After her father's death, her brother murdered her husband, Sichaeus.  Dig‐ambara In. clothed with space; a naked mendicant; a title of Siva.  Dig‐gajas In. the elephants who protect the eight points of the compass namely:  airavata, pundarika, vamana,  kumuda, anjana, pushpa‐dantasarva‐bhauma and su‐pratika.  Dig‐vijaya In. conquest of the regions (of the world); a part of the Maha‐bharata, which commemorates the  conquests,  affected  by  the  four  younger  Pandava  princes,  and  in  virtue  of  which  yudhi‐shthira  maintained  his  claim  to  universal  sovereignty;  a  work  by  Sankaracharya  in  support  of  the  Vedanta  philosophy, generally distinguished as sankara dig‐vijaya.  Dike Gk. was the attendant of justice to Nemesis.  Dik‐pala In. supporters of the regions; the supporters of the eight points of the compass.  Dilipa In. son of Aansumat and father of Bhagiratha; the solar race and ancestor of Rama; on one occasion he  failed  to  pay  due  respect  to  Surabhi,  the  cow  of  fortune,  and  she  passed  a  curse  upon  him  that  he  should  have  no  offspring  until  he  and  his  wife  Su‐dakshina  had  carefully  tended  Surabhi’s  daughter  Nandini.  Diomedes Gk. was a king of the Bistones; who fed his horses on human flesh, and used to throw all strangers  who entered his territories to those animals to be devoured; was killed by Hercules, who carried off the  horses.  Dione  Gk.  Was  the  Titan  Goddess  of  the  oracle  of  Dodona  in  Thesprotia, and the mother of Aphrodite by Zeus. Her name is  simply the feminine form of Zeus (Dios).  Dionysus  Gk.  the  son  of  ZEUS  and  SEMELE,  who  was  a  Theban  princess,  in  Greek  mythology,  he  is  a  youthful  god  of  vegetation, wine and ecstasy, known as the “bull‐horned god”  because he often adopted the form of this powerful beast; In  Roman  mythology,  he  is  represented  by  the  god  Bacchus.  Originally,  he  may  have  had  a  mythological  role  somewhat  similar to that of the goddess DEMETER (“mother earth”).; his  cult  in  later  times,  however,  developed  into  one  of  personal  salvation, particularly for women known as maenads.                   

              Dionysus 

Dioscuri  Gk.  the  mysterious  twin  sons  of  LEDA,  queen  of  Sparta,  were  known  to  the  Greeks  as  Castor  and  Polydeuces,  and  to  the  Romans  as  Castor  and  Pollux.  They  were  brothers  of  HELEN  and  CLYTEMNESTRA. Around all these children, except Clytemnestra, there hung a definite sense of divine  parentage, and it may well be that they were ancient deities whose worship had inclined so that their 

48

Mythology and Folklore  
exploits  could  be  told  as  the  mythological  actions  of  mortal  rulers.  Castor  and  Polydeuces  (“the  heavenly twins whom the cornbearing earth holds’) were regarded as being both dead and alive. In one  story, Polydeuces was the immortal son of Zeus while Castor was the mortal son of King Tyndareos. At  Polydeuces’ request the twins shared the divinity between them, living half the year beneath the earth  with the dead, and the other half on Mount Olympus with the gods. They are shown together in the  constellation of Gemini.  Dirce or (Dirke) Gk. the Naiad nymph of a spring of the town of Thebes in Boiotia (central Greece); her waters  were  sacred  to  the  god  Dionysus;  she  was  originally  the  wife  of  King  Lykos  of  Thebes  who,  as  punishment  for  mistreating  her  niece  Antiope,  was  tied  to  a  wild  bull  and  destroyed.  Dionysus  then  transformed her into the spring on account of her being one of devoted followers; she was probably  the same as the nymphe Derketis.  Dirgha‐sravas In. son of dirgha‐tamas; a rishi, but as in a time of famine he took to trade for a livelihood, the  rig‐veda calls him the merchant.  Dirgha‐tamas, dirgha‐tapas In. long darkness; a son of kasi‐raja, according to the maha‐bharata; of uchathya,  according to the rig‐veda; and of utathya and mamata in the puranas  Dis N. in Norse mythology, a dís ("lady", plural dísir) A ghost, spirit or deity associated with fate who can be  both  benevolent  and  antagonistic  towards  mortal  people.  Dísir  may  act as  protective  spirits  of  Norse  clans.  Their  original  function  was  possibly  that  of  fertility  goddesses  who  were  the  object  of  both  private  and  official  worship  called  dísablót,  and  their  veneration  may  derive  from  the  worship  of  the  spirits  of  the  dead.  The  dísir,  like  the  valkyries,  norns,  and  vættir,  are  almost  always  referred  to  collectively. The North Germanic dísir and West Germanic Idisi were previously believed to be related.  The dísir play roles in Norse texts that resemble those of fylgjur, valkyries, and norns, so that some have  suggested dísir is a broad term including the other beings.  Dis, Disir, Desir N. Ancestral female spirits to whom Winter Nights and Disting are holy. They watch over the  family  in  general  but  more  particularly  the  person  who  will  carry  on  the  line.The  Disirs  work  under  Freya. The Valkyries are Disir.  Disciplina Rom. goddess of discipline  Discordia Rom. goddess of discord and strife  Disease N. Disease was brought into the world by the birth of Hela, Loki's daughter.  Disting  N.  One  of the  Great  Blessings  between  Yuletide  and  Easter;  Local  things  are  often held  at this time.  Freya and Vali are often honored during this blessing as well as the Dises and Alfs.  Dithyramb Gk. an ancient Greek hymn sung and danced in honour of Dionysus, the god of wine and fertility;  the term was also used as an epithet of the god.  Diti In. a goddess or personification in the Vedas who is associated with Aditi; intended as an antithesis or as a  complement to her  Dius Fidus Rom. god of oaths  Divine adoratrice Eg. chief priestess of Amun in Thebes, an office known from the New Kingdom through the  Late Period; The office was an important vehicle of political control. 

49

Mythology and Folklore  
Divo‐dasa In. a pious liberal king mentioned in the rig‐veda; a Brahman who was the twin‐brother of ahalya;  represented  in  the  veda  as  a  very  liberal  sacrificer,  and  as  being  delivered  by  the  gods  from  the  oppressor sambara.  Djed column Eg. it is believed that the Djed is a rendering of a human backbone; It represents stability and  strength; It was originally associated with the creation god Ptah; Himself being called the "Noble Djed";   As the Osiris cults took hold it became known as the backbone of Osiris ; A djed column is often painted  on  the  bottom  of  coffins,  where  the  backbone  of  the  deceased  would  lay,  this  identified  the  person  with the king of the underworld, Osiris; It also acts as a sign of stability for the deceased' journey into  the afterlife.  Djew Eg. this means mountain; the Egyptians believed that there was a cosmic mountain range that held up  the heavens; This mountain range had two peaks, the western peak was called Manu, while the eastern  peak was called Bakhu; it was on these peaks that heaven rested; each peak of this mountain chain was  guarded by a Akerlion deity named AKER, whose job it was to protect the sun as it rose and set; The  mountain was also a symbol of the tomb and the afterlife, probably because most Egyptian tombs were  located in the mountainous land bordering the Nile valley;  In some texts we find Anubis, the guardian  of the tomb being referred to as "He who is upon his mountain”; Sometimes we find Hathor taking on  the attributes of a deity of the afterlife, at this time she is called "Mistress of the Necropolis."; She is  rendered as the head of a cow protruding from a mountainside.  Dodona  Gk.  in  Epirus  in  northwestern  Greece,  was  an  orarcle  devoted  in  prehistoric  times  to  a  Mother  Goddess known as Dione (also identified at other sites with Rhea or Gaia), and later, in historical times,  devoted to the Greek god Zeus. Zeus displaced the Mother goddess in the Bronze Age and assimilated  her as Aphrodite  Dokkalfar N. The Dark Elves, who dwell in mounds, hillocks and rocks; They have much in common with the  Disir, being thought to be in some aspects the masculine counterparts of these beings. They are great  magicians and teachers of magic, and it may have been to their abodes that Odin refers when he says  that  he  learned  his  wisdom  from  the  "men,  very  old  men  /  who  dwell  in  the  wood  of  the  home".  Blessings may be made to the Dokkalfar in one's own home, or one may seek out a place where they  dwell if one wishes to ask a favor of them. The best time to approach them is at sunset, for they are not  fond of daylight. Their appearance as very beautiful, though pale, human‐like wights in noble clothes;  The term "Dark Elves" refers to their abodes, and not to their appearance or moral character.  Dolgthvari N. A rock‐dwelling Dwarf  Dori N. A rock‐dwelling Dwarf  Dorians  Gk.  one  of  the  four  major  tribes  into  which  the  Ancient  Greeks  of  the  Classical  period  divided  themselves.  Doris Gk. An Oceanid, was a sea nymph in Greek mythology, whose name represented the bounty of the sea.  She was the daughter of Oceanus and Tethys and the wife of Nereus. She was also aunt to Atlas, the  titan who was made to carry the sky upon his shoulders, whose mother Clymene was a sister of Doris.  Doris was mother to the fifty Nereids, including Thetis, who was the mother of Achilles, and Amphitrite,  Poseidon's wife, and grandmother of Triton. Doris is a semi‐common female name.  Draugr, Draug, Draugar N. The undead, or animated corpse, also called aptrgangr ("after‐goer"). Draugrs are  extremely  strong  and  as  such  can  be  very  dangerous.  They  were  said  to  commonly  kill  the  living  by  applying a massively strong slap to  the head. Draugr's should never be looked at directly as it is said 

50

Mythology and Folklore  
that they can steel vital önd from a person by gazing at them alone. Runes are carved on gravestones to  prevent the dead from rising and walking again among men.  Draumkonur N. Dream women, able to foresee and interpret through their dreams, a witch or volva  Draupadi In. daughter of draupada, king of panchala; wife of the five pandu princes; draupadi was a amsel of  dark complexion but of great beauty, as radiant and graceful as if she had descended from the city of  the gods.  Draupnir N. "The Dropper". Odin’s gold arm‐ring, forged by Brokk; every ninth night eight new rings, as heavy  as  the  original,  drop  from  it;  Odin  gave  the  ring  to  Balder,  but  he  gave  it  back.  Odin  later  laid  it  on  Balder's funeral pyre. Balder sent it back from Hellheim with Hoenir.   Dravida  In.  the  country  in  which  the  tamil  language  is  spoken,  extending  from  madras  to  cape  comorin;  according to many, the people of this country were originally kshatriyas, but sank to the condition of  sudras from the extinction of sacred rites and the absence of brahmans.  Drishadwati  In.  a  common  female  name;  wife  of  king  divo‐dasa;a  river  forming  one  of  the  boundaries  of  brahmavarta, perhaps the kagar before its junction with the sarsuti.  Dromi N. "The Real Chain". The second chain the Gods used to tie up the Fenrir wolf. The first was Loding, and  the third was Gleipnir. The chains were forged by the dwarves.   Dromos Eg. a straight, paved avenue flanked by sphinxes.  Drona  In.  A  bucket;  a  Brahman  so  named  from  his  having  been  generated  by  his  father,  bharadwaja,  in  a  bucket.  Drop‐to‐Destruction N. The name of the stone door leading into Hel  Druhyu In. son of Yayati, by Sarmishtha; daughter of the Daitya king of Vrisha‐parvan. He refused to exchange  his youth for the curse of decrepitude passed upon his father, and in consequence yayati cursed him  that  his  posterity  should  not  possess  dominion.  His  father  gave  him  a  part  of  his  kingdom,  but  his  descendants became princess of the lawless barbarians of the north.  Drupada In. King of panchala and son of prishata; also called yajna‐sena. He was schoolfellow of drona, the  preceptor  of  the  kaurava  and  pandava  princes,  and  he  mortally  offended  his  former  friend  by  repudiating his acquaintance.  Dryads  Gk.  tree  nymphs  in  Greek  mythology.  In  Greek  drys  signifies  'oak,'  from  an  Indo‐European  root  *derew(o)‐ 'tree' or 'wood'. Thus Dryads are specifically the nymphs of oak trees, though the term has  come  to  be  used  for  all  tree  nymphs  in  general.  "Such  deities  are  very  much  overshadowed  by  the    divine figures defined through poetry and cult," Walter Burkert remarked of Greek nature deities. They  were  normally  considered  to  be  very  shy  creatures,  except  around  the  goddess  Artemis,  who  was  known to be a friend to most nymphs.  Dryope Gk. the daughter of Dryops, king of Oeta ("oak‐man") or of Eurytus (and hence half‐sister to Iole); she  was sometimes thought of as one of the Pleiades (and hence a nymph).  Duat Eg. The land of the dead; It Iies under the earth and is entered through the western horizon.  Duh‐sala In. daughter of dhrita‐rashtra; wife of jayad‐ratha. 
 

51

Mythology and Folklore  
Duh‐sasana  In.  hard  to  rule;  one  of  the  hundred  sons  of  Dhrita‐rashtra;  when  the  pandavas  lost  their  wife  Draupadi in gambling withDur‐yodhana, Duh‐sasana dragged her forward by the hair and otherwise ill  used  her.  For  this  outrage  bhima  vowed  he  would  drink  his  blood,  a  vow  which  he  afterwards  performed on the sixteenth day of the great battle.  Duneyr N. "Rest". a deer which lives in the world tree Yggdrasil together with three other deer; The second  dear is Duratror and the other two are Dwarves in deer shape.  Durathor N. "Slumber". The deer Durathor lives in Yggdrasil with three other deer. The second deer is Duneyr  and the other two are Dwarves in deer shape.  Dur‐ga In. a commentator on the nirukta  Dur‐ga In. inaccessible; the wife of Siva.  Durin N. one of the mighty dwarves, from the start of time; He knows the destiny of the old dwarves. Together  with Dvalin he forged the magic sword, Tyrfing. He is Mimir's first son, the eldest of Dwarves. He helped  his faTher build the World‐Mill to create the fertile soil needed for life on Midgard.  Dur‐mukha In. bad face; a name of one of dhritarashtra’s sons; also of one of Rama’s monkey allies, and of  several others.  Dur‐vasas In. ill‐clothed; a sage, the son of atri and anasuya, but, according to some authorities, he was a son  or emanation of Siva.  Dur‐vasasa purana In. one of the eighteen upa puranas  Dur‐yodhana In. hard to conquer; the eldest son of king Dhrita‐rashtra, and leader of the kaurava princes in  the great war of the Maha‐bharata; his birth was somewhat marvellous.  Dushana  In.  a  rakshasa  who  fought  as  one  of  the  generals  of  ravana;  killed  by  Rama.  He  was  generally  associated with ravana’s brother, khara.  Dushmanta,  dushyanta  In.  a  valiant  king  of  the  lunar,  race,  and  descended  from  puru;  he  was  husband  of  sakuntala, by whom he had a son, bharata.  Dutangada In. the ambassador angada; a short play founded on the mission of angada to demand from ravana  the restoration of sita; it is attributed to a poet named subhata.  Duva N. "The Hiding". One of Aegir and Ran's nine wavedaughters who are said to be the mothers of Heimdall,  the guardian of the Bifrost bridge  Dvalin N. A ruler of the dwarves; Dvalin is one of the most powerful dwarves. He was also a skilled smith and  able to read runes before any other Dwarf was. He forged the Brising necklace and Tyrfing, the magic  sword.  Dvergar N. Another name for the Svartalfar or Dwarves  Dwapara yuga In. the third age of the world, extending to 864,000, years.  Dwaraka,  dwaravati  In.  the  city  of  gates.  Krishna’s  capital,  in  Gujarat;  said  to  have  been  submerged  by  the  ocean seven days after his death; one of the seven sacred cities; also called abdhi‐nagari. 

52

Mythology and Folklore  
Dwarf's Ship N. A kenning for intoxication, so called because the dwarves Fjalar and Galar ransomed a ship in  exchange for the Mead of Poetry  Dwarves N. were Ivaldi's sons, but the Elves were Mimir's sons. The Dwarves are short and greedy beings that  were magots in the prehistoric Giant Ymir's body. Like goblins they fear the sun. The Dwarves are often  evil‐minded, but they are talented smiths and they have forged mostly of the Æsirs' treasures. They live  in  knotholes  and  caves,  some  of  them  in  Svartalfheim.  Nyi,  Nidi,  Nordri,  Sudri,  Austri,  Vestri,  Althiolf  ("Mighty Thief"),  Dvalin, Nar, Nain, Niping, Dain, Bifur, Bofur, Nori, Ori,  Onar, Oin, Modvitnir ("Mead‐ Wolf"),  Vig,  Gandalf  ("Magic  Elf"),  Vindalf  ("Wind  Elf"),  Thorin,  Fili,  Kili,  Fundin,  Vali,  Thror,  Throin,  Thekk,  Lit,  Vitr,  Nyr,  Nyrad,  Rekk,  Radsvinn  ("Swift  in  Counsel"),  Draupnir,  Dolgthvari,  Hor,  Hugstari,  Hlediolf,  Gloin,  Dori,  Duf,  Andvari,  Heptifili,  Har,  Siar,  Skirpir,  Virpir,  Skafinn,  Ai,  Alf,  Ingi,  Eikinskialdi  ("Oak Shield"), Fal, Frosti, Finn, Ginnar.  Dwipa In. an insular continent; the dwipas stretch out from the mountain meru as their common centre, like  the leaves of a lotus, and are separated from each other by distinct circumambient oceans.  Dwivida  In.  an  asura  in  the  form  of  a  great  ape,  who  was  an  implacable  foe  of  the  gods;  stole  bala  Rama’s  ploughshare weapon and derided him. This was the beginning of a terrific fight, in which dwivida was  felled to the earth, and the crest of the mountain on which he fell was splintered into a hundred pieces  by the weight of his body, as if the thundered had shivered it with his thunderbolt; a monkey ally of  rama.  Dyaus In. the sky, heaven; in the Vedas he is masculine deity, and is called occasionally Dyaus‐pitri, heavenly  father, the earth being regarded as the mother; he is father of Ushas, the dawn. 

  E 
Echidna Gk. half woman half snake, known as the "Mother of All Monsters" because most of the monsters in  Greek myth were mothered by her.  Echo  Gk.  an  Oread  (a  mountain  nymph)  who  loved  her  own  voice.  Zeus  loved  consorting  with  beautiful  nymphs and visited them on Earth often. Eventually, Zeus's wife, Hera, became suspicious, and came  from Mt. Olympus in an attempt to catch Zeus with the nymphs.  Edda  N.  applies  to  the  Old  Norse  Poetic  Edda  and  Prose  Edda,  both  of  which  were  written  down  in  Iceland  during  the  13th  century  in  Icelandic,  although  they  contain  material  from  earlier  traditional  sources,  reaching into the  Viking Age. The books are the main sources  of medieval skaldic tradition in Iceland  and Norse mythology.  Edda N. Both the name of a woman and the title of Snorri's Skalding (poetry) primer  Egeria Rm. a nymph attributed a legendary role in the early history of Rome as a divine consort and counselor  of the Sabine second king of Rome, Numa Pompilius, to whom she imparted laws and rituals pertaining  to ancient Roman religion. Her name is used as an eponym for a female advisor or counselor.  Egestes Rom. goddess of poverty 

53

Mythology and Folklore  
Eggther  N.  "Sword  Guarder";  the  watchman  of  the  Giants,  guards  of  the  Giants'  world,  Jotunheim;  Eggther  lives in the forest Galgvid. He is also the the guardian of Volund's sword of revenge. He plays happily on  his harp when he hears the rooster tell that Ragnarok is coming.  Egil N. Father of Thjalfi, Thor's servant, married to a Valkyrie. Brother of Volund the smith, and Slagfin.  Eikinskjaldi N. "Oak Shield". The Dwarf Eikinskjaldi was a skillful artist.  Eikthrynir,  Eiktyrnir  N.  "Oak  Thorn".  The  stag  on  roof  of  Valhalla,  that  feeds  on  the  World  Tree;  dew  drips  from his horns and flows into Hvergelmir and then into the rivers  Einherjar N. "Single Combatants". Army of all men who fall in battle, they are adopted as Odin's sons. He allots  to  them  the  halls  Valhalla  and  Vingólf.  There  they  await  Ragnarok,  when  they  will  join  the  Gods  in  fighting the Giants. They spend most of their time fighting, eating, and drinking.  Einmyria N. "Ashes". A daughter of Loki ("Fire") and Glut ("Glow"); her sister is Eisa ("Embers")  Eír N. "Mercy". Goddess of healing and medicine; One of Frigga's handmaidens, with Vor and Var; She is one of  Freya's eight sisters and Njord's daughter. She probably lives in the hall Skimmer with the rest of the  sisters.  Eisa N. "Embers". A daughter of Loki ("Fire") and Glut ("Glow"); Her sister is Einmyria ("Ashes").  Eitri  N.  A  Dwarf  and  metal  worker;  With  Brokk  he  made  the  gold  boar,  Gullinbursti,  Odin's  arm‐ring  and  Thorr's hammer Mjollnir. He was pictured as small and blackened from the smithy.The Dwarf Eitri is son  of Ivaldi and brother of Brokk and Sindri.  Eka‐chakra In. a city in the country of the kichakas; the advice of vyasa, the pandavas dwelt for a time during  their exile.  Eka‐danshtra, eka‐dnata In. having one tusk; aname of Ganesa  Ekalavya  In.  grandson  of  Deva‐sravas;  the  brother  of  Vasudeva;  brother  of  Satru‐ghna;  he  was  exposed  in  infancy, and was brought up among the nishadas, of whom he became king; assisted in a night attack  upon dwaraka, and was eventually killed by Krishna, who hurled a rock at him.  Ekamra, ekamra kanana In. a forest in utkala or orissa, which was the favourite haunt of Siva, and became a  great seat of his worship as the city of bhuvaneswara, where some very fine temples sacred to him still  remain; they have been described by Babu Rajendra lala in his great work on orissa.  Eka‐pada In. one‐footed; a fabulous race of men spoken of in the Puranas  Eka‐pana,  eka‐patala  In.  these,  with  their  sister  Aparna,  were,  according  to  the  Hari‐vansa,  daughters  of  Himavat  and  Mena;  they  performed  austerities  surpassing  the  powers  of  gods  and  danavas,  and  alarmed both worlds.  Ekashtaka In. a deity mentioned in the athar‐veda as having practised austere devotion; daughter of Prajapati;  mother of Indra and Soma.  Eldhrimnir N. "Soot from Fire". The kettle which was used by the cook Andhrimnir to boil the boar Saehrimnir;  the meat is given to the hungry einheriars in Valhalla every night. 

54

Mythology and Folklore  
Eldir  N.  "Fire‐Kindler".  Aegir's  cock;  During  one  of  Aegir's  feasts,  Eldir  tried  to  prevent  Loki  from  getting  in,  because he knew everybody said bad things about him.  Electra  Gk.  the  daughter  of  AGAMEMNON,  king  of  Mycenae,  and  CLYTEMNESTRA,  and  the  sister  of  the  matricide ORESTES; her name (which once may have meant “fire” or “spark”) refers to amber. When  Agamemnon  returned  from  the  Trojan  War  and  was  murdered  by  his  wife  and  her  lover  Aegisthus,  Electra  rescued  her  young  brother  Orestes  and  ensured  that  he  escaped  Aegisthus’  evil  intentions.  Years  later,  Orestes  returned  to  Mycenae  as  a  grown  man.  Electra  met  him  at  the  tomb  of  their  murdered father and gave him advice and encouragement. In at least one version of the myth Electra is  portrayed  as  being  so  consumed  that  she  participates  in  the  act  of  revenge  herself.  Later  she  was  overwhelmed  by  remorse,  while  her  distraught  brother  fled  before  the  FURIES,  the  deities  who  wreaked vengeance on murderers.  Electrum Eg. a mixture of gold and silver.   Electryon  Gk.  the  son  of  Perseus  and  Andromeda,  and  king  of  Tiryns  and  Mycenae  or  Medea  in  Argolis.  He  married  Anaxo,  daughter  of  his  brother  Alcaeus  and  sister  of  Amphitryon,  or  Eurydice  daughter  of  Pelops. His wife bore him a daughter Alcmena and many sons (Stratobates, Gorgophonus, Phylonomus,  Celaeneus,  Amphimachus,  Lysinomus,  Chirimachus,  Anactor,  and  Archelaus).  Electryon  had  an  illegitimate son Licymnius by Midea, a Phrygian woman. The six sons of Pterelaus, King of the Taphians,  descended  from  Electryon's  brother  Mestor  came  to  Mycenae  to  claim  a  share  of  kingdom.  When  Electryon spurned their request, they drove off his cattle; Electryon's sons battled against them, and all  but Licymnius (on one side) and Evenus (on the other) died. Evenus sold the cattle to Polyxenus of Elis.  Amphitryon, Electryon's nephew and promised in marriage to Alcmena, bought the cattle and returned  them  to  his  uncle,  but  accidentally  killed  him  as  he  threw  his  club  at  one  of  the  cows.  Electryon's  brother Sthenelus seized the throne of Mycenae, charged Amphitryon with murder, and sent him into  exile.  Eleusinian Mysteries Gk. initiation ceremonies held every year for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based  at Eleusis in ancient Greece.  Eleusis  Gk.  a  place,  where  the  cult  of  the  goddess  Demeter  existed  many  centuries  and  where  the  most  famous religious festival, called the Eleusinian mysteries where performed in the honour of this deity.  Elf‐Candle N. A kenning for the sun  Elfheim N. the region of Asgard where the elves lived.  Eliudnir N. Hel's Hall; her dish is called Hunger, her knife, Famine, her servant, Ganglati.  Elivagar N. Usually spoken of as a river, it is really a narrow stretch of ocean separating Midgard proper from  Jotunheimur  in  the  north.  This  arrangement  exactly  parallels  the  Underworld  geography:  Niflhel  is  separated from Hel proper by mountains (and perhaps a narrow stretch of underworld ocean as well).  Elli  N.  A  personification  of  old  age  who,  in  the  Prose  Edda  book  Gylfaginning,  defeats  Thor  in  a  wrestling  match.  Elli, Elde N. Utgardh‐Loki's grandmother. She was asked, as a part of a friendly game, to wrestle Thor because  she was the weakest of giants in Utgardh‐Loki's. She’d wrestling Thor down to his knees. A trick since  the thin but very strong Giantess Elli represents old age 

55

Mythology and Folklore  
Elves N. usually male and often live in forests, in mountains, or in out‐of‐the‐way places; there are two kinds  of elves: the Dökkalfar, or dark elves, and the Ljosalfar, or light elves. The Dökkalfar dwell in caves or  dark woods. The Ljosalfar live in bright places or in the sky.  Elves, Alves N. are the sons of Mimir.  Elysium  Gk.  a  section  of  the  Underworld  (the  spelling  Elysium  is  a  Latinization  of  the  Greek  word  Ἠλύσιον  Elysion). The Elysian Fields, or the Elysian Plains, were the final resting places of the souls of the heroic  and the virtuous.  Emathia Gk. an earliest and poetic name of Macedonia (region), but foremost it roughly corresponds to the  district of Bottiaea around Pella.  Embla & Askr N. Origin of humanity, the first man and woman.   Embla N. the name of the first woman  Empanda Rom. Goddess of openess, friendliness and generosity  Emusha  In. N the brahmana, a boar which raised up the earth, represented as black and with a hundred arms;  probably the germ of the varaha or boar incarnation.  Endovelicus Rom. the god of health and welfare  Endymion Gk. king of a small city‐state in the Peloponnese, likelihood Elis. According to mythology, he became  Ennead  Eg.  a  group  of  9  deities  that  are  associated  with  a  major  cult  center;  The  best  known  is  the  great  ennead of Heliopolis, It consists of Atum, Shu, Tefnut, Geb, Nut, Osiris, Isis, Seth and Nephthys.   Enyo Gk. an ancient goddess of war, acting as a counterpart and companion to the war god Ares. She is also  identified  as  his  sister,  and  daughter  of  Zeus  and  Hera,  in  a  role  closely  resembling  that  of  Eris;  with  Homer (in particular) representing the two as the same goddess. She is also accredited as the mother of  Enyalius,  a  minor  war  god,  by  Ares.  However,  the  name  Enyalius  can  also  be  used  as  a  title  for  Ares  himself.  Epaphus Gk. also called Apis, was the son of Zeus and Io and a king of Egypt; The name/word Epaphus means  "Touch". This refers to the manner in which he was conceived, by the touch of Zeus' hand. He was born  in  Euboea  (Herodotus,  Strabo)  or,  according  to  others,  in  Egypt,  on  the  river  Nile,  after  the  long  wanderings of his mother. He was then concealed by the Curetes, by the request of Hera, but Io sought  and afterward found him in Syria; he is regarded in the myths as the founder of Memphis, Egypt. With  his  wife,  Memphis  (or  according  to  others,  Cassiopeia),  he  had  one  daughter,  Libya.  Another  of  his  daughters bore the name of Lysianassa; he is also criticized Phaëton's heraldry, which prompted him to  undertake his fateful journey in his father Phoebus' chariot of the sun. Belus, another mythological king  of Egypt, is a grandson of Epaphus.  Epeus Gk. he was a Greek soldier during the Trojan War. He was the son of Panopeus and had the reputation  for being a coward. In the Iliad he participated in the boxing match at the funeral games for Patrocles  against  Euryalus  and  won.  Later  during  the  funeral  games  for  Achilleus  he  fought  Acamas  the  son  of  Theseus to a stalemate. He built the Trojan Horse, commissioned by Odysseus because Athena had told  him in a dream she would be with him to help build it. The horse was hollow and was large enough to  hold 30 Greek soldiers equipped with all their armor. Interestingly, Epeius made the Trojan horse so tall  that it could not fit through any of the gates of Troy. The trap door of the horse was fastened with a 

56

Mythology and Folklore  
special catch that only Epeius could undo. After constructing the massive horse, he chose the other 29  soldiers  that  would  accompany  him  inside  the  horse.  He  also  founded  Pisa  and  Metapontum;  son  of  King Endymion of Elis. He ran a race at Olympia, against his brothers Aetolus and Paeon, winning his  father's kingdom.  Ephialtes  Gk. was an ancient Athenian politician and an early leader of the democratic movement there. In  the late 460s BC, he oversaw reforms that diminished the power of the Areopagus, a traditional bastion  of  conservatism,  and  which  are  considered  by  many  modern  historians  to  mark  the  beginning  of  the  "radical democracy" for which Athens would become famous. These powers included the scrutiny and  control  of  office  holders,  and  the  judicial  functions  in  state  trials.  He  introduced  pay  for  public  officeholders,  reduced  the  property  qualifications  for  holding  a  public  office,  and  created  a  new  definition  of  citizenship.  Ephialtes,  however,  would  not  live  to  participate  in  this  new  form  of  government for long. In 461 BC, he was assassinated at the instigation of resentful oligarchs, and the  political leadership of Athens passed to his deputy, Pericles   Ephyre Gk. See Corinth  Epigone Gk. sons of the seven heroes against Thebes  Epimenides  Gk.  was  a  semi‐mythical  6th  century  BC  Greek  seer  and  philosopher‐poet.  While  tending  his  father's sheep, he is said to have fallen asleep for fifty‐seven years in a Cretan cave sacred to Zeus, after  which he reportedly awoke with the gift of prophecy. Plutarch writes that Epimenides purified Athens  after the pollution brought by the Alcmeonidae, and that the seer's expertise in sacrifices and reform of  funeral practices were of great help to Solon in his reform of the Athenian state. The only reward he  would accept was a branch of the sacred olive, and a promise of perpetual friendship between Athens  and Cnossus   Epimetheus  Gk.  ("hindsight",  literally  "afterthought,"  but  in  the  manner  of  a  fool  looking  behind,  while  running forward) was the brother of Prometheus ("foresight", literally "fore‐thought"), a pair of Titans  who "acted as representatives of mankind". They were the inseparable sons of Iapetus, who in other  contexts  was  the  father  of  Atlas.  While  Prometheus  is  characterized  as  ingenious  and  clever,  Epimetheus is depicted as foolish; was the one who accepted the gift of Pandora from the gods.  Erato  Gk.  she  is  one  of  the  Greek  Muses.  The  name  would  mean  "desired"  or  "lovely",  if  derived  from  the  same root as Eros, as Apollonius of Rhodes playfully suggested in the invocation to Erato  that begins  Book III of his Argonautica; Erato is the Muse of lyric poetry, especially love and erotic poetry. In the  Orphic hymn to the Muses, it is Erato who charms the sight. Since the Renaissance she is often shown  with a wreath of myrtle and roses, holding a lyre, or a small kithara, a musical instrument that Apollo or  she herself invented. In Simon Vouet's representations, two turtle‐doves are eating seeds at her feet.  Other representations may show her holding a golden arrow, reminding one of the "eros", the feeling  that she inspires in everybody, and at times she is accompanied by the god Eros, holding a torch.  Erda, Earth, Jörd N. “Earth". The Earth‐Goddess and is the mother of Thor, with Odin. Erda is daughter to the  Night‐Disir Natt/Night and her second husband of three, Annar.  Erebus Gk. he was the son of a primordial god, Chaos, and represented the personification of darkness and  shadow, which filled in all the corners and crannies of the world. His name is used interchangeably with  Tartarus and Hades since Erebus is often thought of as part of the underworld. Erebus married his sister  Nyx (goddess of the night) and their children include: Aether (god of sky), Hemera (goddess of day), the  Moirai (Fates). 

57

Mythology and Folklore  
Erechtheus  Gk.  he  was  the  name  of  an  archaic  king  of  Athens,  the  re‐founder  of  the  polis  and  a  double  at  Athens for Poseidon, as "Poseidon Erechtheus". A mythic Erechtheus and an Erechtheus given a human  genealogy  and  set  in  a  historicizing  context—  if  they  ever  were  really  distinguished  by  Athenians—  were harmonized as one in Euripides' lost tragedy Erechtheus, (423/22 BCE) . The name Erichthonius is  carried by a son of Erechtheus, but Plutarch conflated the two names in the myth of the begetting of  Erechtheus;  Athenians  thought  of  themselves  as  Erechtheidai,  the  "sons  of  Erechtheus";  In  Homer's  Iliad  he  is  the  son  of  "grain‐giving  Earth",  reared  by  Athena;  the  earth‐born  son  was  sired  by  Hephaestus,  whose  semen  Athena  wiped  from  her  thigh  with  a  fillet  of  wool  cast  to  earth,  by  which  Gaia was made pregnant; in the contest for patronship of Athens between Poseidon and Athena, the  salt spring on the Acropolis where Poseidon's trident struck was known as the sea of Erechtheus.   Ericthonius  Gk.  he  was  a  mythological  early  ruler  of  ancient  Athens,  Greece.  He  was,  according  to  some  legends,  autochthonous  (born  of  the  soil,  or  Earth)  and  raised  by  the  goddess  Athena.  Early  Greek  histories do not distinguish between him and Erectheus, his grandson, but by the fourth century B.C.  during Classical times, they are entirely distinct figures.  Eridanus Gk. one of the rivers of Hades  Erilaz N. A vitki and runemaster who is also a priest (godhi)  Erinyes  Gk.  literally  "the  angry  ones")  or  literally  "the  gracious  ones"  but  also  translated  as  "Kind‐hearted  Ones"  or  "Kindly  Ones")  or  Furies  or  Dirae  in  Roman  mythology  were  female  chthonic  deities  of  vengeance  or  supernatural  personifications  of  the  anger  of  the  dead.  A  formulaic  oath  in  the  Iliad  invokes them as "those who beneath the earth punish whosoever has sworn a false oath"; when the  mighty  Titan  Cronus  castrated  his  father  Uranus  and  threw  his  genitalia  into  the  sea,  the  Erinyes  emerged from the drops of blood, while Aphrodite was born from the crests of seafoam. According to a  variant account, they issued from an even more primordial level—from Nyx, "Night". Their number is  usually  left  indeterminate.  Virgil,  probably  working  from  an  Alexandrian  source,  recognized  three:  Alecto ("unceasing", who appeared in Virgil's Aeneid), Megaera ("grudging"), and Tisiphone ("avenging  murder"). Dante followed Virgil in depicting the same three‐charactered triptych of Erinyes; in Canto IX  of  the  Inferno  they  confront  the  poets  at  the  gates  of  the  city  of  Dis.  The  heads  of  the  Erinyes  were  wreathed  with  serpents  (compare  Gorgon)  and  their  eyes  dripped  with  blood,  rendering  their  appearance rather horrific. Other depictions show them with the wings of a bat or bird and the body of  a  dog;  in  Aeschylus's  "Eumenides",  the  Erinyes  chase  Orestes  to  avenge  Clytemnestra,  his  mother.  Orestes killed Clytemnestra to avenge the murder of his father, Agamemnon. The Erinyes chase Orestes  to Athens where Athena then intervenes. She and the Athenians judge whether Orestes deserves the  wrath of Erinyes and rule in favor of Orestes. Athena, in order to appease the Erinyes, gives them the  love of Athens and renames them the Eumenides. The Eumenides are  given red robes to replace the  black  robes  they  wore  for  most  of  the  play,  drawing  an  end  to  the  red  color  scheme  that  is  evident  throughout the play.  Eriphyle Gk. she was daughter of Talaus, was the mother of Alcmaeon and the wife of Amphiaraus. Eriphyle  persuaded  Amphiaraus  to  take  part  in  the  raid  that  initiated  the  mythic  tale  of  the  Seven  Against  Thebes,  though  she  knew  he  would  die.  She  had  been  persuaded  by  Polynices,  who  offered  her  the  necklace  of  Harmonia  for  her  assistance;  dying  Amphiaraus  charged  his  sons  Alcmaeon  and  Amphilochus  with  avenging  his  death,  and  after  Amphiaraus  died,  fulfilling  the  prophecy,  Alcmaeon  killed his mother. He was pursued by the Erinyes as he fled across Greece, eventually reaching the court  of King Phegeus, who gave him his daughter in marriage. Exhausted, Alcmaeon asked an oracle how to  assuage the Erinyes and was told that he needed to stop where the sun was not shining when he killed  his mother. That was at the mouth of the river Achelous, which had become silted up. Achelous, the 

58

Mythology and Folklore  
god  of  that  river,  offered  him  his  daughter  Callirrhoe  in  marriage  if  Alcmaeon  would  retrieve  the  necklace and clothes that Eriphyle had worn when she persuaded Amphiaraus to take part in the battle.  Alcmaeon  had  given  these  jewels  to  Phegeus,  who  had  his  sons  kill  Alcmaeon  when  he  discovered  Alcmaeon's plan: thus lest the curse be transmitted to a next generation it was dedicated to Aphrodite  at Amathus in Cyprus; Eriphyle is seen in Hades in Vergil's Aeneid, still bearing wounds inflicted by her  son. She also plays a role in Statius's Thebaid,[2] in which her desire to attain the necklace of Harmonia  is  one  of  the  catalysts  for  the  war  between  Argos  and  Thebes.  In  this  version  of  the  myth,  however,  Argia, Polynices's wife, persuades her husband to give the necklace to Eriphyle so that Amphiaraus will  join the war effort.  Eris  Gk.  is  the  Greek  goddess  of  strife  and  discord,  her  name  being  translated  into  Latin  as  Discordia.  Her  Greek opposite is Harmonia, whose Latin counterpart is Concordia. Homer equated her with the war‐ goddess Enyo, whose Roman counterpart is Bellona. The dwarf planet Eris is named after the goddess.  Eros  Gk.  according  to  some  Greek  traditions  was  the  son  of  Erebos  and  the  Night,  while  in  others  he  was  the  son  of  ARES,  god  of  war.  As  the  youngest  of  the  gods  and  companion  of  APRHODITE,  he  appeared  to  enjoy making as much mischief as he could by firing his arrows of passion  into  the  hearts  of  gods  and  humans  alike.  His  connection  with  homosexual  love  may  have  derived  from  his  supposed  relationship  to  Ares, for he was patron divinity of the Sacred Band of Thebes, which was  a group of one hundred and fifty pairs of lovers who were all killed by the  Macedonian army at the battle of Chaeronia in 338 BC. After the battle  King Philip of Macedon granted them a special burial.        Erulian N. Member of the ancient gild of runemasters who formed an inter‐tribal network of initiates in the  Germanic mysteries  Erymanthus Gk. was a River‐God of Arkadia in the Peloponnese, southern Greece; the Erymanthos River was a  tributory  of  the  Alpheios.  It  flowed  south  from  Mounts  Erymanthos  and  Pholoe,  past  the  town  of  Psophis, to merge with the Alpheios near the Eleian border.  Erysichthon Gk. was the son of Triopas. He was an arrogant and impious man who dared to fell timber in the  sacred grove of Demeter. As punishment, Ceres sent Famine to dwell in Erysichthon's entrails, so that  he was continuously tormented by an insatiable hunger. He ate up all the food in sight, and sold all his  possessions to buy more; still he was not satisfied. Finally he sold his own daughter. She appealed to  Poseidon, who had taken her virginity, for assistance, and Poseidon granted her the power to change  into  any  shape  she  wished,  thus  enabling  her  to  escape  her  new  master.  Her  father  discovered  her  ability  and  sold  her  many  times  thereafter.  Even  this  was  not  enough  to  assuage  his  raging  hunger,  however, and he eventually began to gnaw upon his own limbs, continuing his desperate quest for food  until he had consumed himself entirely.  Erythia Gk. see Hesperides  Erytus Gk. the son of Melaneus and either Stratonice or Oechalia; He married Antiope, daughter of Pylo and  had these children: Iphitus, Clytius, Toxeus, Deioneus, Molion, Didaeon, and a very beautiful daughter,  Iole. A late legend also attributes Eurytus as the father of Dryope, by his first wife; Eurytus' grandfather  was Apollo, the archer‐god, and was also a famed archer. Eurytus has been noted by some as the one  who taught Heracles the art of archery; According to Homer, Eurytus became so proud of his archery 

         Eros 

59

Mythology and Folklore  
skills  that  he  challenged  Apollo.  The  god  killed  Eurytus  for  his  presumption,  and  Eurytus'  bow  was  passed to Iphitus, who later gave the bow to his friend Odysseus. It was this bow that Odysseus used to  kill  the  Suitors  who  had  wanted  to  take  his  wife,  Penelope;  A  more  familiar  version  Eurytus'  death  involves a feud with Heracles. Eurytus promised the hand of his daughter Iole to whoever who could  defeat him and his sons in an archery contest. Heracles won the archery contest, but Eurytus reneged  on his promise, fearing that Heracles would go mad and kill any children he had with Iole, just as he has  slew the children he had with Megara; Heracles left in anger, and soon after twelve of Eurytus' mares  were stolen. Some have written that Heracles stole the mares himself, while others have said Autolycus  stole the mares and sold them to Heracles; In the search for the mares, Iphitus, who was convinced of  Heracles' innocence, invited Heracles to help and stayed as Heracles' guest at Tiryns. Heracles invited  Iphitus to the top of the palace walls and, in a fit of anger, threw Iphitus to his death. For this crime,  Heracles was forced to serve the Lydian queen Omphale as a slave for either one or three years. After  Heracles  had  married  Deianeira,  he  returned  to  Oechalia  with  an  army.  Revenge‐driven,  Heracles  sacked the city and killed Eurytus and his sons, then took Iole as his concubine. The act eventually led to  Heracles' own death, as Deianeira, fearing that Heracles loved Iole more, gave Heracles a robe smeared  with the blood of  the Centaur Nessus, believing it was a love‐charm. The blood  was poisoned by the  blood  of  the  hydra  (which  the  arrow  that  Heracles  shot  Nessus  with  had  been  dipped  in).  When  the  robe goes to Heracles, it eats into Heracles' flesh and causes his death.  Eteocles Gk. he was a king of Thebes, the son of Oedipus and either Jocasta or Euryganeia. Oedipus killed his  father Laius and married his mother without knowing his relationship to ether. When the relationship  was  revealed,  he  was  expelled  from  Thebes.  The  rule  passed  to  his  sons  Eteocles  and  Polynices.  However,  because  of  a  curse  from  their  father,  the  two  brothers  did  not  share  the  rule  peacefully.  Eteocles was succeeded by his uncle, Creon.  Eteoclus Gk. he was the son of Iphis. He participated in the attack on Thebes by the Seven Against Thebes; in  Aeschylus'  play  Seven  Against  Thebes,  Eteoclus  is  one  of  the  seven  champions  who  attack  Thebes'  seven gates. He bears a man scaling a tower with a ladder on his shield, and attacks the Neistan gates;  However, in the Phoenician Women, Eteoclus is not one of the seven who attack Thebes. Instead, he  withdraws  after  seeing  that  Zeus  is  displeased  with  the  attackers,  and  Adrastus  replaces  him  at  the  gate. Other authors, among them Diodorus, Statius, and Hyginus, agree with this list of attacker  Ethiopia Gk. first appears as a geographical term in classical sources, in reference to the Upper Nile region, as  well as all the regions south of the Sahara desert. Its earliest mention is in the works of Homer: twice in  the  Iliad,  and  three  times  in  the  Odyssey.[1]  The  Greek  historian  Herodotus  specifically  uses  it  to  describe Sub‐Saharan Africa[2] including Sudan and modern Ethiopia. The name also features in Greek  mythology, where it is sometimes associated with a kingdom said to be seated at Joppa, or elsewhere  in Asia.  Etin  N.  Developed  from  eoten  and  jötunn;  A  type  of  Giant  known  for  its  strength;  Also  a  generic  name  for  Giant, which is a living entity of great age, strength, and often great occult knowledge; Etins are usually  friendly to the Gods, while Jotuns are unfriendly.  Etin‐Home N. The eastern world, home of all giants  Etin‐Wife N. A female Etin taken in magical marriage  Etruria  Gk.  usually  referred  to  in  Greek  and  Latin  source  texts  as  Tyrrhenia  —  was  a  region  of  Central  Italy,  located in an area that covered part of what now are Tuscany, Latium, Emilia‐Romagna and Umbria. A  particularly noteworthy work dealing with Etruscan locations is D. H. Lawrence's Sketches of Etruscan  Places and other Italian essays; the ancient people of Etruria are labelled Etruscans, and their complex 

60

Mythology and Folklore  
culture  was  centered  on  numerous  city‐states  that  rose  during  the  Villanovan  period  in  the  ninth  century  BC  and  were  very  powerful  during  the  Oriental  and  Archaic  periods.  The  Etruscans  were  a  dominant  culture  in  Italy  by  650  BC,  surpassing  other  ancient  Italic  peoples  such  as  the  Ligures,  and  their influence may be seen beyond Etruria's confines in the Po River Valley and Latium, as well as in  Campania and through their contact with the Greek colonies in Southern Italy (including Sicily). Indeed,  at some Etruscan tombs, such as those of the Tumulus di Montefortini at Comeana in Tuscany, physical  evidence of trade has been found in the form of grave goods — fine faience ware cups are particularly  notable  examples.  Such  trade  occurred  either  directly  with  Egypt,  or  through  intermediaries  such  as  Greek or Etruscan sailors; Rome, buffered from Etruria by the Silva Ciminia, the Ciminian Forest, was  influenced strongly by the Etruscans, with a series of Etruscan kings ruling at Rome until 509 BC when  the last Etruscan  king Lucius Tarquinius Superbus was removed from power and the Roman Republic  was established. The Etruscans are credited with influencing Rome's architecture and ritual practice; it  was under the Etruscan kings that important structures such as the Capitolium, Cloaca Maxima and Via  Sacra were realized; the Etruscan civilization was responsible for much of the Greek culture imported  into early Republican Rome, including the twelve Olympian gods, the growing of olives and grapes, the  Latin  alphabet  (adapted  from  the  Greek  alphabet),  and  architecture  like  the  arch,  sewerage  and  drainage  systems;  the  classical  name  Etruria  was  revived  in  the  early  19th  century,  applied  to  the  Kingdom of Etruria, an ephemeral creation of Napoleon I of France in Tuscany which existed from 1801  to  1807;  the  Etruscans  were  a  diachronically  continuous  population  speaking  a  distinct  language  and  practicing a distinctive culture that ranged over the Po Valley and some of its alpine slopes, southward  along  the  west  coast  of  Italy,  most  intensely  in  Etruria,  with  enclaves  as  far  south  as  Campania,  and  inland  into  the  Appennine  mountains,  during  the  period  of  earliest  European  writing  in  the  Mediterranean Iron Age, in the second two quarters of the first millennium BC. Their prehistory can be  traced  with  certainty  to  about  1000  BC.  During  their  floruit  of  about  500  BC  they  were  a  significant  maritime power with a presence in Sardinia and the Aegean Sea. At first influential in the formation and  conduct of the Roman monarchy they came to oppose the Romans during the Roman Republic, entered  into military conflict with it, were defeated, politically became part of the republic and integrated into  Roman culture. The Etruscans had both a religion and a supporting mythology. Many Etruscan beliefs,  customs  and  divinities  became  part  of  Roman  culture,  including  the  Roman  pantheon;  the  Etruscans  believed that their religion had been revealed to them in early days by seers, the two main ones being  Tages,  a  child‐like  figure  born  from  tilled  land  and  immediately  gifted  with  prescience  and  Vegoia,  a  female  figure.  A  number  of  canonical  works  on  their  teaching  were  written  in  Etruscan  and  survived  until the middle centuries of the 1st millennium AD, when they were destroyed by the ravages of time  and by Christian elements in Roman society. After defeating the Etruscans the Romans, whose original  population  had  included  significant  Etruscan  elements,  did  not  harbor  ill‐will  against  them  but  the  Senate  voted  to  adopt  the  key  elements  of  their  revealed  religion.  It  was  in  practice  long  after  the  general  Etruscan  population  had  forgotten  the  language  and  was  perpetuated  by  haruspices  and  members of the  noble families at Rome who knew Etruscan and claimed an Etruscan descent. In the  last  years  of  the  Roman  Republic  the  religion  began  to  fall  out  of  favor  and  was  satirized  by  such  notable public figures as Marcus Tullius Cicero. The Julio‐Claudians, especially Claudius, who claimed a  remote Etruscan descent, perpetuated an obscure knowledge of the language and religion for a short  time longer, and then it was lost.  Eumaeus Gk. he was Odysseus's swineherd and friend before he left for the Trojan War. His father, Ktesios son  of Ormenos, was king of an island called Syria. When he was a young child a Phoenician sailor seduced  his  nurse,  a  Phoenician  slave,  who  agreed  to  bring  the  child  among  other  treasures  in  exchange  for  their  help  in  her  escape.  The  nurse  was  killed  by  Artemis  on  the  journey  by  sea,  but  the  sailors  continued to Ithaka where Odysseus' father Laertes bought him as a slave. Thereafter he was brought  up  with  Odysseus  and  his  sister  Ctimene  (or  Ktimene),  and  was  treated  by  Anticleia,  their  mother, 

61

Mythology and Folklore  
almost  as  Ctimene's  equal;  he  is  the  first  mortal  that  Odysseus  meets  after  his  return  to  Ithaca.  Although  he  does  not  recognise  his  old  master  —  Odysseus  is  in  disguise  —  and  has  his  misgivings,  Eumaeus treats Odysseus well, offering food and shelter to one whom he thinks is a mere indigent. On  being  pushed  to  explain  himself,  Odysseus  spins  a  distorted  tale,  misleading  Eumaeus  into  believing  that he is the son not of Laertes but of Castor.  Eumenides Gk. see Oresteia  Eumolpus  Gk.  he  was  the  son  of  Poseidon  and  Chione.  According  to  Apollodorus,[1]  Chione,  daughter  of  Boreas and Oreithyia, pregnant with Eumolpus by Poseidon, was frightened of her father's reaction so  she threw the baby into the ocean. Poseidon looked  after him and brought him to shore in Ethiopia,  where Benthesikyme, a daughter of Poseidon and Amphitrite, raised the child, who then married one of  Benthesikyme's  two  daughters  by  her  Ethiopian  husband.  Eumolpus  however  loved  a  different  daughter and was banished because of this. He went with his son Ismarus (or Immaradus) to Thrace.  There, he was discovered in a plot to overthrow King Tegyrios and fled to Eleusis; He became one of the  first priests of Demeter and one of the founders of the Eleusinian Mysteries.He initiated Heracles into  the  mysteries.  When  Ismarus  died,  Tegyrios  sent  for  Eumolpus,  they  made  peace  and  Eumolpus  inherited the Thracian kingdom.[4] Eumolpus was an excellent musician and singer; he played the aulos  and the lyre. He won a musical contest in the funereal games of Pelias. He taught music to Heracles.  During  a  war  between  Athens  and  Eleusis,  Eumolpus  sided  with  Eleusis.  His  son,  Himmarados,  was  killed by King Erechtheus. In some sources, Erechtheus also killed Eumolpus and that Poseidon asked  Zeus to avenge his son's death. Zeus killed Erechtheus with a lightning bolt or Poseidon made the earth  open up and swallow Erechtheus. Eleusis lost the battle with Athens but the Eumolpides and Kerykes,  two  families  of  priests  to  Demeter,  continued  the  Eleusinian  mysteries.  Eumolpus'  youngest  son,  Herald‐Keryx founded the lines. According to Diogenes Laertius Eumolpus was the father of Musaeus  Euphrosyne  Gk.  she  was  one  of  the  Charites,  known  in  English  also  as  the  "Three  Graces".  Her  best  remembered  representation in English is in Milton's poem of the active, joyful life, "L'Allegro". She is  also the Goddess of Joy, a daughter of Zeus and Eurynome, and the incarnation of grace and beauty.  Also  known  as  the  goddess  of  Mirth.  The  other  two  Charites  are  Thalia  (Good  Cheer)  and  Aglaea  (Beauty  or  Splendor);  She  can  be  seen  along  with  the  other  two  Graces  at  the  left  of  the  painting  in  Botticelli's  Primavera;  the  asteroid  31  Euphrosyne  is  named  after  the  goddess.  In  Modern  Greek,  the  name is usually transcribed as Effrosini.  Euripides Gk. he was the last of the three great tragedians of classical Athens (the other two being Aeschylus  and Sophocles). Ancient scholars thought that Euripides had written ninety‐five plays, although four of  those  were  probably  written  by  Critias.  Eighteen  or  nineteen  of  Euripides'  plays  have  survived  complete.  There  has  been  debate  about  his  authorship  of  Rhesus,  largely  on  stylistic  grounds  and  ignoring  classical  evidence  that  the  play  was  his.  Fragments,  some  substantial,  of  most  of  the  other  plays  also  survive.  More  of  his  plays  have  survived  than  those  of  Aeschylus  and  Sophocles  together,  because of the unique nature of the Euripidean manuscript tradition; he is known primarily for having  reshaped  the  formal  structure  of  Athenian  tragedy  by  portraying  strong  female  characters  and  intelligent  slaves  and  by  satirizing  many  heroes  of  Greek  mythology.  His  plays  seem  modern  by  comparison with those of his contemporaries, focusing on the inner lives and motives of his characters  in a way previously unknown to Greek audiences.  Europa  Gk.  a  princess  carried  off  by  Zeus  under  the  guise  of  a  white  bull.  She  was  the  daughter  of  the  Phoenician  king  Agenor  of  Tyre;  sister  of  Cadmus,  founder  of  Thebes;  and  the  personification  of  the  continent of Europe; Zeus abducted her while she played on the seashore, and crossed the sea to Crete  where  she  bore  him  three  sons:  Minos,  Rhadamanthys,  and  Sarpedon.  She  married  Asterius,  king  of 

62

Mythology and Folklore  
Crete, who adopted her sons as his heirs; Zeus gave him the bronze giant Talos to guard his realm as  recompense.  After  her  death  she  was  worshipped  in  Crete  as  Hellotis.  In  one  tradition  she  was  transformed into a bull and became the constellation Taurus.  

  The Abduction of Europa    Euros Gk. (or Eurus) was the god of the East Wind, one of the four directional Anemoi (Wind‐Gods). He was  associated with the season of autumn and dwelt near the palace of the sun‐god Helios the sun in the  far east.  Euryale Gk. she was one of the Gorgons, three vicious sisters with brass hands, sharp fangs, and hair of living,  venomous snakes. She, like her sisters, was able to turn any creature to stone with her gaze. She and  her sister Stheno were immortal, but Medusa, the last of the sisters, was mortal; They were daughters  of Phorcys and Ceto. In many stories, Euryale is noted for her bellowing cries, particularly in the tale of  Medusa's death at Perseus' hands; Another Euryale, daughter of King Minos of Crete, was the mother  of Orion, in Hesiod and other sources; there are other stories of his birth as well.  Euryalus  Gk.  refers  to  four  different  characters  from  classical  literature;  In  the  Aeneid  by  Virgil,  Nisus  and  Euryalus  are  ideal  friends  and  lovers,  who  died  during  a  raid  on  the  Rutulians;  In  Greek  mythology,  Euryalus was the son of Mecisteus. He attacked the city of Thebes as one of the Epigoni, who took the  city  and  avenged  the  deaths  of  their  fathers,  who  had  also  attempted  to  invade  Thebes.  In  Homer's  Iliad, he fought in the Trojan War, where he was brother‐in‐arms of Diomedes, and one of the Greeks 

63

Mythology and Folklore  
to  enter  the  Trojan  Horse.  He  lost  the  boxing  match  to  Epeius  at  the  funeral  games  for  Patrocles;  Euryalus was also the name of a son of Euippe and Odysseus, who was mistakenly slain by his father;  Euryalus, son Naubolus, was one of the Phaeacians encountered by Odysseus in the Odyssey.  Eurycleia Gk. is the granddaughter of Peisenor, as well as the wet‐nurse of Odysseus. As a girl she was bought  by Laertes, Odysseus' father. He treated her as his wife, but she was never his consummated lover so as  not  to  dishonor  his  real  wife,  Anticleia.  She  nursed  Odysseus  and  Telemachus,  Odysseus'  son;  Eurycleia's  name  means  "broad  fame,"  while  Anticleia  means  "anti‐fame."  The  tension  between  the  meanings  of  Eurycleia's  name  and  Anticleia's  name  reflects  the  tension  between  the  two  pillars  of  Odysseus'  life.  He  was  born  to  Anticleia,  a  noble  woman,  but  was  nursed  (and  essentially  raised)  by  Eurycleia, a lower class maid. Odysseus' fame comes from his role as a noble hero paralleled to his role  as an anonymous beggar. His heroism is essential for capturing Troy; his skills as an orator and schemer  as  well  as  his  strength  and  skills  on  the  battle  field  are  instrumental  in  the  success  of  the  Greeks.  However, he takes on the role of a beggar not once, but twice. He first appears as a beggar to sneak  into Troy and kill unsuspecting Trojan soldiers, and again when he returns home to Ithaca and plans to  kill all of Penelope's suitors. In many ways, his role as a beggar, especially when he returns to Ithaca is  far more meaningful. His re‐entry into his own home after twenty years is arguably the most important  moment of his life, perhaps suggesting that his role as a beggar ‐ and his connection with Eurycleia ‐ is  what  is  most  important  to  him;  Thus,  it  is  fitting  that  in  the  Odyssey,  Eurycleia  is  the  first  person  to  recognize him after he returns home from the Trojan War. After he enters his own house as a guest of  Penelope disguised as a beggar, Eurycleia bathes him and recognizes him by a scar just above his knee,  which he got from a boar while hunting with his grandfather Autolycus. Odysseus stops her from telling  Penelope or anyone else in the house of his true identity; Eurycleia also informs Odysseus which of his  servant girls had been unfaithful to Penelope during his absence, conspiring with Penelope's suitors and  becoming their lovers. Among them was Melantho. He hangs the twelve that Eurycleia identifies; Later,  Eurycleia  informs  Penelope  that  Odysseus  has  returned,  but  Penelope  does  not  believe  the  maid.  Penelope then tests Odysseus to prove that he is indeed her husband and asks him to move the bed  Odysseus built in their marriage‐chamber; Odysseus tells Penelope that this is not possible, as one of  the legs of the bed is built into a live olive tree, a secret that only Penelope and Odysseus would know.  She finally accepts that her husband has returned; In addition, it was Eurycleia who gives provisions and  supplies to Telemachus from the storehouse before he leaves for Pylos to seek news about Odysseus.  She takes an oath not to tell Penelope he had left until 12 days had passed; Telemachus did not want  his mother to worry any more than she already was.  Eurydice  Gk.  was  an  oak  nymph  or  one  of  the  daughters  of  Apollo  (the  god  of  light).  She  was  the  wife  of  Orpheus,  who  loved  her  dearly;  on  their  wedding  day,  he  played  joyful  songs  as  his  bride  danced  through the meadow. One day, a satyr saw and pursued Eurydice, who stepped on a venomous snake,  dying instantly. Distraught, Orpheus played and sang so mournfully that all the nymphs and gods wept  and told him to travel to the Underworld and retrieve her, which he gladly did. After his music softened  the hearts of Hades and Persephone, his singing so sweet that even the Erinyes wept, he was allowed  to take her back to the world of the living. In another version, Orpheus played his lyre to put Cerberus,  the guardian of Hades, to sleep, after which Eurydice was allowed to return with Orpheus to the world  of  the  living.  Either  way,  the  condition  was  attached  that  he  must  walk in  front  of  her  and  not  looks  back until both had reached the upper world. However, just as they reached the portals of Hades and  daylight, he could not help but turn around to gaze on her face, and Eurydice vanished again from his  sight,  this  time  forever;  the  story  in  this  form  belongs  to  the  time  of  Virgil,  who  first  introduces  the  name of Aristaeus and the tragic outcome. Other ancient writers, however, speak of Orpheus' visit to  the underworld in a more negative light; according to Phaedrus in Plato's Symposium,[2] the infernal  gods only "presented an apparition" of Eurydice to him. Ovid says that Eurydice's death was not caused  by fleeing from Aristaeus but by dancing with naiads on her wedding day. In fact, Plato's representation 

64

Mythology and Folklore  
of  Orpheus  is  that  of  a  coward;  instead  of  choosing  to  die  in  order  to  be  with  the  one  he  loved,  he  instead mocked the gods by trying to go to Hades and get her back alive. Since his love was not "true"  — meaning he was not willing to die for it — he was actually punished by the gods,[citation needed]  first by giving him only the apparition of his former wife in the underworld, and then by being killed by  women; The story of Eurydice may actually be a late addition to the Orpheus myths. In particular, the  name  Eurudike  ("she  whose  justice  extends  widely")  recalls  cult‐titles  attached  to  Persephone.  The  myth may have been derived from another Orpheus legend in which he travels to Tartarus and charms  the goddess Hecate.  Eurynome Gk. was a deity of ancient Greek religion worshipped at a sanctuary near the confluence of rivers  called the Neda and the Lymax in classical Peloponnesus. She was represented by a statue of what we  would call a mermaid. Tradition, as reported by the Greek traveller, Pausanias, identified her with the  Oceanid, or “daughter of Ocean”, of Greek poetry.  Eurystheus  Gk.  was  king  of  Tiryns,  one  of  three  Mycenaean  strongholds  in  the  Argolid:  Sthenelus  was  his  father  and  the  "victorious  horsewoman"  Nicippe  his  mother,  and  he  was  a  grandson  of  the  hero  Perseus, as was his opponent Heracles. He was married to Antimache, daughter of Amphidamas. In the  contest  of  wills  between  Hera  and  Zeus  over  whose  candidate  would  be  hero,  fated  to  defeat  the  remaining  creatures  representing  an  old  order  and  bring  about  the  reign  of  the  Twelve  Olympians,  Eurystheus was Hera's candidate and Heracles — though his name implies that at one archaic stage of  myth‐making he had carried "Hera's fame" — was the candidate of Zeus. The arena for the actions that  would  bring  about  this  deep  change  are  the  Twelve  Labors  imposed  on  Heracles  by  Eurystheus.  The  immediate necessity for the Labours of Heracles is as penance for Heracles' murder of his own family,  in  a  fit  of  madness,  which  had  been  sent  by  Hera;  however,  further  human  rather  than  mythic  motivation is supplied by mythographers who note that their respective families had been rivals for the  throne  of  Mycenae.  Details  of  the  individual  episodes  may  be  found  in  the  article  on  the  Labours  of  Heracles,  but  Hera  was  connected  with  all  of  the  opponents  Heracles  had  to  overcome;  Heracles'  human stepfather Amphitryon was also a grandson of Perseus, and since Amphitryon's father (Alcaeus)  was older than Eurystheus' father (Sthenelus), he might have received the kingdom, but Sthenelus had  banished  Amphitryon  for  accidentally  killing  (a  familiar  mytheme)  the  eldest  son  in  the  family  (Electryon).  When,  shortly  before  his  son  Heracles  was  born,  Zeus  proclaimed  the  next‐born  descendant  of  Perseus  should  get  the  kingdom,  Hera  thwarted  his  ambitions  by  delaying  Alcmene's  labour  and  having  her  candidate  Eurystheus  born  prematurely;  Heracles'  first  task  was  to  slay  the  Nemean  Lion  and  bring  back  its  skin,  which  Heracles  decided  to  wear.  Eurystheus  was  so  scared  by  Heracles' fearsome guise that he hid in a subterranean bronze winejar, and from that moment forth all  labors  were  communicated  to  Heracles  through  a  herald,  Copreus;  For  his  second  labour,  to  slay  the  Lernaean  Hydra,  Heracles  took  with  him  his  nephew,  Iolaus,  as  a  charioteer.  When  Eurystheus  found  out that Heracles' nephew had helped him he declared that the labour had not been completed alone  and as a result did not count towards the ten labours set for him; Eurystheus' third task did not involve  killing  a  beast,  but  to  capture  the  Cerynian  Hind,  a  golden‐horned  stag  sacred  to  Artemis.  Heracles  knew that he had to return the hind, as he had promised, to Artemis, so he agreed to hand it over on  the condition that Eurystheus himself come out and take it from him. Eurystheus did come out, but the  moment Heracles let the hind go, she sprinted back to her mistress, and Heracles departed, saying that  Eurystheus  had  not  been  quick  enough;  When  Heracles  returned  with  the  Erymanthian  Boar,  Eurystheus was frightened and hid again in his jar and begged Heracles to get rid of the beast; Heracles  obliged;  The  fifth  labour  proposed  by  Eurystheus  was  to  clear  out  the  numerous  stables  of  Augeias.  Striking a deal with Augeias, Heracles proposed a payment of a tenth of Augeias' cattle if the labour was  completed  successfully.  Not  believing  the  task  feasible,  Augeias  agreed,  asking  his  son  Phyleus  to  witness; Heracles rerouted two nearby rivers (Alpheis and Peneios) through the stable, clearing out the  dung  rapidly.  When  Augeias  learned  of  Heracles'  bargain  for  the  task,  he  refused  payment.  Heracles 

65

Mythology and Folklore  
brought  the  case  to  court,  and  Phyleus  testified  against  his  father.  Enraged,  Augeias  banished  both  Phyleus and Heracles from the land before the court had cast their vote. However, Eurystheus refused  to credit the labour to Heracles, as he had performed it for payment; For his seventh labour Heracles  captured  the  Cretan  Bull.  Heracles  used  a  lasso  and  rode  it  back  to  his cousin.  Eurystheus  wanted  to  sacrifice the bull to Hera his patron, who hated Heracles. She refused the sacrifice because it reflected  glory  on  Heracles.  The  bull  was  released  and  wandered  to  Marathon,  becoming  known  as  the  Marathonian  Bull;  When  Heracles  brought  back  the  man‐eating  Mares  of  Diomedes  successfully,  Eurystheus dedicated the horses to Hera and allowed them to roam freely in the Argolid. Bucephalus,  Alexander  the  Great's  horse,  was  said  to  be  descended  from  these  mares;  To  acquire  the  belt  of  Hippolyte, queen of the Amazons was Heracles's ninth task. This task was at the request of Eurystheus'  daughter, Admete; To extend what may have once been ten Labours to the canonical dozen, it was said  that  Eurystheus  didn't  count  the  Hydra,  as  he  was  assisted,  nor  the  Augean  stables,  as  Heracles  received  payment  for  his  work.  For  the  eleventh  labour  Heracles  had  to  steal  the  Apples  of  the  Hesperides;  his  final  labour  was  to  capture  Cerberus,  the  three‐headed  hound  that  guarded  the  entrance  to  Hades;  After  Heracles  died,  Eurystheus  attempted  to  destroy  his  many  children  (the  Heracleidae, led by Hyllus), who fled to Athens. He attacked the city, but was soundly defeated, and he  and his sons were killed. The stories about the killer of Eurystheus and the fate of his corpse vary, but  the  Athenians  believed  the  burial  site  of  Heracles  remained  on  their  soil  and  served  to  protect  the  country against the descendants of Heracles, who traditionally included the Spartans and Argives; After  Eurystheus' death, the brothers Atreus and Thyestes, whom he had left in charge during his absence,  took over the city, the former exiling the latter and assuming the kingship, while Tiryns returned to the  overlordship of Argos.  Euterpe  Gk.  was  one  of  the  Muses,  the  daughters  of  Mnemosyne,  fathered  by  Zeus.  Called  the  "Giver  of  delight",  when  later  poets  assigned  roles  to  each  of  the  Muses,  she  was  the  muse  of  music.  In  late  Classical times she was named muse of lyric poetry and depicted holding a flute. A few say she invented  the aulos or double‐flute, though most mythographers credit Marsyas with its invention. The river god  Strymon impregnated Euterpe; her son Rhesus led a band of Thracians and was killed by Diomedes at  Troy, according to Homer's Iliad.  Euxine Gk. is a physiographic province of the Black Sea, an abyssal plain in its central parts. Its name comes  from the Ancient Greek name Euxeinos Pontos of the Black Sea.  Evander  Gk.  or  Euander  was  a  deific  culture  hero  from  Arcadia,  Greece,  who  brought  the  Greek  pantheon,  laws and alphabet to Italy, where he founded the city of Pallantium on the future site of Rome, sixty  years before the Trojan War. He instituted the Lupercalia; The oldest tradition of its founding ascribes  to  Evander  the  erection  of  the  Great  Altar  of  Hercules  in  the  Forum  Boarium.  In  Virgil's  Aeneid,  VIII,  where Aeneas and his crew first come upon them, Evander and his people are engaged in venerating  Hercules  for  having  dispatched  the  giant  Cacus.  Virgil's  listeners  recognized  the  same  Great  Altar  of  Hercules  in  the  Forum  Boarium  of  their  own  day,  one  detail  among  the  passages  that  Virgil  has  saturated  with  references  linking  a  heroic  past  with  the  Age  of  Augustus.  As  Virgil's  backstory  goes,  Hercules had been returning from Gades with Geryon's cattle when Evander entertained him and was  the first to raise an altar to this hero. The archaic altar was destroyed in the Great Fire of Rome, AD 64;  Evander  was  born  to  Mercury  and  Carmenta,  and  his  wisdom  was  beyond  that  of  all  Arcadians.  According to Virgil, previous to the Trojan War, he gathered a group of natives to a city he founded in  Italy near the Tiber river, which he named Pallantium. Virgil states that he named the city in honor of  his  son,  Pallas,  although  Pausanias  as  well  as  Dionysius  of  Halicarnassus  say  that  Evander's  birth  city  was Pallantium, thus he named the new city after the one in Arcadia. Since he met Anchises before the  Trojan War, Evander aids Aeneas in his battle against the Rutuli under the autochthonous leader Turnus  and  plays  a  major  role  in  Aeneid  Book  XII;  Evander  was  deified  after  his  death  and  had  an  altar 

66

Mythology and Folklore  
constructed in his name on the Aventine Hill; Pallas apparently died childless, leaving the natives under  Turnus to ravage his kingdom. However, the gens Fabia claimed descent from Evander.  Eventus Bonus Rom. God of success both in commerce and in agriculture.  Everfrost N. Banquet hall of the giant Brimir   


Fabulinus Rom. God who taught children to speak.  Fafnir N.  was a son of the dwarf king Hreidmar and brother of Regin and Ótr. In the Volsunga saga, Fáfnir was  a dwarf gifted with a powerful arm and fearless soul. He guarded his father's house of glittering gold  and flashing gems. He was the strongest and most aggressive of the three brothers; Regin recounts to  Sigurd how Odin, Loki and Hœnir were traveling when they came across Ótr, who had the likeness of an  otter during the day. Loki killed the otter with a stone and the three Æsir skinned their catch. The gods  came to Hreidmar’s dwelling that evening and were pleased to show off the otter's skin. Hreidmar and  his  remaining  two  sons  then  seized  the  gods and held them captive while Loki was  made  to  gather  the  ransom,  which  was  to  stuff the otter’s skin with gold and cover its  outside with red gold. Loki fulfilled the task  by gathering the cursed gold of Andvari's as  well as the ring, Andvarinaut, both of which  were told to Loki as items that would bring  about  the  death  of  whomever  possessed  them.  Fáfnir  then  killed  Hreidmar  to  get  the all the gold for himself. He became very  ill‐natured,  so  he  went  out  into  the  wilderness  to  keep  his  fortune  to  himself,  eventually turning into a serpent or dragon  (symbol  of  greed)  to  guard  his  treasure  Fáfnir  also  breathed  poison  into  the  land  around  him  so  no  one  would  go  near  him  and  his  treasure,  wreaking  terror  in  the  hearts of the people; Regin plotted revenge  so that he could get the treasure and sent  his  foster‐son,  Sigurd,  to  kill  the  dragon.  Regin instructed Sigurd to dig a pit in which  he  could  lie  in  wait  under  the  trail  Fáfnir  used  to  get  to  a  stream  and  there  plunge  his sword, Gram, into Fafnir's heart as he crawls over the pit to the water. Regin then ran away in fear,  leaving Sigurd to the task. While digging the ditch, Odin appeared in the form of an old man with a long  beard,  advising  Sigurd  to  dig  more  trenches  for  the  blood  of  Fáfnir  to  run  into,  presumably  so  that  Sigurd does not drown in the blood. The earth quake and the ground nearby shook as Fáfnir crawled to  the water. Fáfnir also blew poison into his path as it made his way to the stream. Sigurd, undaunted,  stabbed  Fáfnir  in  the  left  shoulder  as  he  crawled  over  the  ditch  he  was  lying  in  and  succeeded  in  mortally wounding the dragon. As the great serpent lies there dying, he speaks to Sigurd and asks him 

67

Mythology and Folklore  
what his name is, what his father's and mother's names are, and who sent him to kill such a terrifying  dragon. Fafnir figures out that his own brother, Regin, plotted the dragon's death, and tells Sigurd that  he  is  happy  that  Regin  will  also  cause  Sigurd's  death.  Sigurd  tells  Fáfnir  that  he  will  go  back  to  the  dragon's lair and take all his treasure. Fáfnir warns Sigurd that all who possess the gold will be fated to  die, but Sigurd replies that all men must one day die, and it is the dream of many men to be wealthy  until that dying day, so he will take the gold without fear; Regin then returned to Sigurd after Fáfnir was  slain. Corrupted by greed, Regin planned to kill Sigurd after Sigurd had cooked Fáfnir’s heart for him to  eat and take all the treasure for himself. However,  Sigurd, having tasted Fáfnir's blood  while cooking  the heart, gained knowledge of the speech of birds and learned of Regin's impending attack from the  Oðinnic (of Odin) birds' discussion and killed Regin by cutting off his head with Gram. Sigurd then ate  some  of  Fáfnir’s  heart  and  kept  the  remainder,  which  would  later  be  given  to  Gudrun  after  their  marriage; Some versions are more specific about Fáfnir's treasure hoard, mentioning the swords Ridill  and Hrotti, the helm of terror and a golden coat of chainmail  Fáfnir's Lair N. A kenning for Gold, because of the great hoard of gold found in the lair of this dragon  Faience  Eg.  a  glazed  material,  with  a  base  of  either  carved  soapstone  or  moulded  clay,  with  an  overlay  of  blue/green colored glass.   Fal N. A Dwarf  Falcon Coat N. The magical feathered coat of the goddess Freya; when worn it turned the wearer into a falcon.  Falhofnir N. "Shaggy Forelock". Horse of the Æsir used to ride to Gladsheim, their Court of Justice, each day.  Fallfordarv N. The doorstep in the death Goddess, Hel's stronghold Eljudnir in Nifilhel  False door Eg. a door carved or painted on a wall. The ka would use this door to partake of funerary offerings.  Fama Rom. Goddess of fame and rumor  Famine N. Famine is the Death Goddess Hel's knife.  Farbaute N. is the name of the father of Loke (Loki), in Norse mythology.  Farbauti N. "Cruel Smiter". A Fire Giant; He is married to Laufey and is the father of Loki, Byleist and Helblindi.  Laufey gave birth to Loki while being struck by a bolt of fire from Farbauti.  Faring Forth N. The Seidh practice of leaving the physical body to travel forth in spirit to other realms; Travel  out of the body, astral projection  Farmagud N. "God of Cargoes". Another name for Odin  Fates Rm. from the Roman Fatae, were three goddesses known to the Greeks as the Moerae. Their origins are  uncertain, although some called them daughters of night. It is clear, however, that at a certain period  they ceased to be concerned with death and became instead those powers which decided what must  happen  to  individuals.  The  Greeks  knew  them  as  Clotho  (“the  spinner”),  Lachesis  (“the  apportioner”)  and Atropos (“the inevitable”). A late idea was that the Fates spun a length of yarn which represented  the allotted span for each mortal.  Fauna (Bona Dea) Rom. Goddess of the Earth, Mother Goddess. 

68

Mythology and Folklore  
Faunus Rm. the Roman god of the countryside and identified with the Greek Pan, god of the mountainside.  Faunus  was  said  to  be  the  grandson  of  SATURN  and  was  credited  with  prophetic  powers,  whioch  on  occasion inspired the Romans to renew efforts on the battlefield in the face of defeat. Perhaps this is  the  reason  for  Faunus  sometimes  being  seen  as  a  descendant  of  the  war  god  Mars.  His  mortal  son.  Latinus, was the king of the Latin people at the time of AENEAS’ arrival in Italy after the long voyage  from Troy.  Faunus Rom. God of the wilds and fertility; He is the protector of cattle also referred to as Lupercus; Festivals  are Lupercalia on February 15 and Faunalia on December 5.  Faustitas Rom. Goddess protectress of herds of livestock  Favonius Rom. God of the West Wind  Feathercoat N. A feathercoat transforms the user into a bird.   Febris Rom. Goddess who protected people against fevers  Fecundity  figure  Eg.  type  of  offering  bearer  rendered  at  the  base  of  temple  walls;  They are  shown  bringing  offerings into the temple; The male figures are often shown with heavy pendulous breasts and bulging  stomachs, this plumpness symbolizing the abundance of the offerings they bring.  Felicitas  Rom. Goddess of success.  Fenja N. One of the two Jotun giantesses who are able to produce gold with the giant mill "Grotte"  Fenrir,  Fenris,  Fenrisulven  N.  Monster  wolf  offspring  of  Loki  with  Giantess  Angrboda,  brother  of  Hel  and the World Serpent. The  Gods  raised  the  wolf  in  Asgard but only Tyr had the  courage to feed it. Soon the  gods  grew  concerned,  seeing  how  fast  it  grew  daily.  Nothing  could  bind  him  until  the  Dwarves  manufactured  a  chain  that  was  made  out  of  the  roots  of  a  mountain,  the  noise  of  a  moving  cat,  and  the  breath  of  a  fish.  Fenrir  bit  off Tyr's left hand when the  Gods  tricked  him  into  being  bound  with  the  fetter,  Gleipnir. They tied the chain to a great boulder (Gjöll) and drove it deep into the earth.   Fensalir N. Frigga's hall in Asgard  Feronia  Rom.  Goddess  of  freedom  and  good  harvest;  She  was  often  worshipped  by  slaves  to  achieve  their  freedom; her festival is November 15. 

69

Mythology and Folklore  
Fetch, fylgja N. An independent form, a soul aspect, that is attached to a person though not actually a part of  the person. It appears to the mind's eye in a variety of forms‐ in the form of an animal (fetch‐deer) or of  the opposite sex (fetch‐wife or fetch‐man), even in a purely geometrical shape. Its purpose is to assist  the person it is attached to in other realms.  Fetish Eg. an animal skin hanging from a stick; Was used by the cults of Osiris and Anubis.  Fides Rom. Goddess of faithfulness and good faith  Field of Warriors N. Another name for Freya's hall, also called "Folkvang".  Fili N. Soil‐dwelling Dwarf  Fimbulwinter N. "The Mighty Winter". The three‐year‐long winter that will precede Ragnarok.  Finn N. A Dwarf.  Fire Giants N. The inhabitants of Muspellheim, sworn enemies of the gods  Fjalar N. A mean Dwarf, who with the help of his brother, Galar, kills the Giant Kvæsir. They make the Mead of  Poetry  from  his  blood,  but  they  later  are  forced  to  give  it  away;  the  cock  whose  crowing  wakes  the  Giants for the final struggle of Ragnarok.  Fjölkunnig kona N. A cunning‐woman or witch, but not necessarily in a derogatory sense  Fjölkunnig madhr N. A wise man in ancient Iceland  Fjolnir N. Minor God of wisdom and learning. Possibly another name for Odin  Fjölsvid N. "One Who is Very Wise". A by‐name of Odin  Fjolvar  N.  Owns  the  island  Allgron,  where  he  and  Odin  spent  five  years  seducing seven foolish girls  Fjörgynn N. Weather God, father of Frigga.  Flærdg‐stafir N. deception runes (galdrastafir)  Flagellum Eg. a crop or whip used to ward off evil spirits.  Flame.  Eg.  this  symbol  represents  a  lamp  or  brazier  on  a  stand  from  which  a  flame  emerges;  Fire  was  embodied  in  the  sun  and  in  its  symbol  the  uraeus which spit fire; Fire also plays a part in the Egyptian concept of  the underworld; There is one terrifying aspect of the underworld which  is similar to the Christians concept of hell. Most Egyptians would like to  avoid this place with its fiery lakes and rivers that are inhabited by fire  demons.   Flora  Rom.  Goddess  of  Spring  and  the  blooming  flowers;  her  festival  Floralia,  was April 28 ‐ May 1.                         Flora     

70

Mythology and Folklore  

  Folkvang N. The domicile of Freya; Half of all warriors who die in battle arrive here; the others become eternal  warriors in Valhalla.  Folkvang,  Folkvangr  N.  "Folk‐field".  Domain  of  Freya,  which  is  also  called  "Field  of  Warriors";  Half  of  all  warriors who die in battle arrive here; the others become eternal warriors in Valhalla.  Fölkyngi N. Skilled in the magical arts, literally "much knowledge" Traditional word for "witchcraft"            Fontus Rom. God of wells and springs; Festival October 13  Forfeit‐horn N. Thor could not finish drinking the water in it. It was magically attached to the ocean. Thor's  drinking created the tides.  Formáli N. Formulaic speeches used to load action with magical intent.   Forn Sedh N. In Sweden and some other Northern European counties, Ásatrú is known by this name.  Fornax Rom. Goddess of bread baking and ovens  Forseti N. "The Presiding One". Axe‐God of justice, savior of the devout, winner of just lawsuits; He represents  justice,  good  laws,  arbitration,  peace,  fairness,  good  judgment.  Son  of  Balder  and  Nanna;  His  hall  is  called Glitner.  Fortuna Rom. Goddess of fate or luck  Foster Parents N. Fathers often used to pay to send their sons to be looked after by foster parents. This was  considered the best way to train youngsters.   

71

Mythology and Folklore  
                          Freya 

Framsynn  N.  Far‐sighted;  Blessed  with  the  gift  of  seeing  into  the  future  Franang's  Falls  N.  A  waterfall  in  Midgard  where  Loki,  who  shape‐ shifted as a salmon to hide from the gods, was captured  Freki  N.  "Ravenous";  One  of  Odin's  two  wolves;  The  other  one  is  Geri. They get all the meat that is served to Odin in Valhalla  because he himself prefers wine.  Freya,  Freyja  N.  "The  Lady".  Member  of  the  Vanir  who  lives  with  the  Æsir,  daughter  of  Njord,  sister‐consort  of  Freyr;  her  emblem  is  the  necklace  Brisingamen.  Hers  is  the  magic  of  reading  runes,  trancing  and  casting  spells.  She  is  said  to  have  taught  Seidh  to  Odin.  She  owns  a  falcon  cloak,  takes  dove form,  rides in a chariot drawn by two cats, or rides a  boar. As leader of the Valkyries, she takes half those slain in  battle  and  is  traditionally  associated  with  death  and  sexuality. She was married to the God Od, perhaps identical  to  Odin,  who  mysteriously  disappeared.  Freya  had  two  daughters, Hnoss and Gersimi, with Od.  Freya's Tears N. A kenning for Amber; When she could not find her husband Od, Freya shed tears of gold. The  tears that hit trees turned into amber.   Freyr  N.  "The  Lord";  Vana‐God,  brother‐consort  of  Freya;  son of Njord and Njord's sister, Nerthus; Fertility and  creativity God; God of Yule; God of wealth and peace  and  contentment;  Blood  was  not  allowed  to  be  spilled  through  violence,  nor  where  weapons  or  outlaws allowed on or in his holy places. He owns the  boar,  Gullinbursti,  the  ship,  Skidbladnir,  and  a  magic  sword, that moves by itself through the air. He ruled  over the land of the light elves, Alfheim. He is also the  ancestor of the royal bloodline of the Yngling family,  early rulers of Norway/Sweden/Denmark.    Friagabis N. "The Free Giver". Saxon goddess of plenty               Freyr 

72

Mythology and Folklore  
Frid  N.  "The  Good‐Looking".  One  of  the  Love‐Goddess  Freya's  eight  sisters;  The  God  of  storms  and  fishing,  Njord is her father. The Fertility God Freyr is her brother.  Frigg, Frigga, Frija N. ”The Loving”. Frigga is the clairvoyant  mistress  of  Asgard.  She  knows  the  fates  of  all  men  and  gods,  although  she  does  not  desire  to  prophesize.  Daughter of Fjorgynn and Fjordgyn; She is Odin's wife, with  whom she has six sons and one daughter, including Balder  and Hodur.  Frith N. Fruitful peace, happiness; The true Teutonic word  for  "peace"  which  carries  with  it  the  implication  of  "freedom"   Fro N. "Lord"; By‐name of Freyr   Frodi  N.  A  Vanir  god  whose  name  means  "The  Fruitful  One"  Fródleikr  N.  wisdom  or  learning;  Magical  learning  from  which all other abilities come   Frost‐Giants N. Most of the Frost Giants drowned in Ymir's  blood  when  the  gods  killed  him,  and  their  souls  migrated  down  into  the  northernmost  part  of  the  Underworld,  the  dark and foggy Niflhel. A few of the youngest Frost‐Giants  barely  escaped,  and  crawled  onto  the  beach  of  the  northernmost part of the Earth, which is called Jotunheimr      Frowe N. "Lady". By‐name of Freya  Fulgora Rom. Goddess of lightning  Fulla N. "The Filler". Sister of Frigga also called Volla. She carries the coffer of life and death. Although a virgin,  she represents aspects of sexuality. Fulla was also known as Abundia, or Abundantia in some parts of  Germany, where she was considered the symbol of the fullness of the earth. Nanna sent her a finger  ring from Hel. She is described as an Æsir Goddess with long hair and a golden snood.  Funerary cones Eg. clay cones inserted above a tombs entrance with the name and title of the deceased.  Funerary  offerings  Eg.  bread,  beer,  wine  and  other  food  items  provided  by  mourners  or  magically,  through  inscriptions and pictures in the tomb.  Furies Gk. from the Roman name, Furiae, were the avenging goddesses of Greek mythology and were known  as the Erinyes (“the angry ones”). They were born from the blood of Ouranos that fell into the womb of  GAIA,  when  CRONOS,  his  son,  castrated  him.  The  Furies  were  portrayed  as  ugly  women,  with  snakes  entwined  in  their  hair,  and  were  pitiless  to  those  mortals,  who  had  wrongly  shed  blood.  They  relentlessly  pursued  ORESTES,  who  avenged  his  father  AGAMEMNON”s  murder  by  killing  CLYTEMNESTRA, his mother. The Furies were only persuaded to abandon their persecution of Orestes                  Frigg 

73

Mythology and Folklore  
after his acquittal by the Areopagus, an ancient Athenian council presided over by the goddess ATHNA.  The  verdict  calmed  the  anger  of  the  Furies,  whose  name  was  then  changed  to  less‐threatening  Eumenides.  Furies Rom. Goddesses of Vengeance  Furina Rom. Goddess of thieves  Fylgja N. A manifestation of a part  of a person's soul that can take  on  independent action as it can contain  portions of a person’s hughr and minni. The fylgja can also be used by the person in times of need for  such  things  as  travel  to  one  of  the  nine  worlds.  Being  able  to  take  the  form  of  the  fylgja  can  be  developed over time. The fylgja generally takes on the form of an animal or of the opposite sex of the  person that it is attached to. It can and often is passed along ancestral lines.   


Gada In. a younger brother of Krishna.  Gadhi, Gathin In. a king of the Kusika race, and father of Viswamitra; was son of Kusamba, or, according to the  Vishnu Purana, he was Indra, who took upon himself that form.  Gagnrad N. “Gain‐counsellor". The name Odin chose to call him when visiting Vafthrudnir.  Galar N. A mean Dwarf and brother of Fjalar; They killed Kvasir and mixed his blood with honey in pot called  Odrerir and then vats called Son and Bodn which created the Mead of Poetry.  Galava In. a pupil of Viswamitra; according to the Hari‐vansa, Galava was son of Viswamitra, and that sage in a  time of great distress tied a cord round his waist and offered him for sale; Prince Satyavrata (q.v.) gave  him liberty and restored him to his father. From his having been bound with a cord (gala) he was called  Galava.  Galdalf N. is told to be the eighteenth of the prehistoric Dwarves. The name means 'magician'.  Galdr,  Galdor  N.  The  use  of  runes  for  magical  purposes,  specifically  verbal  incantations;  A  ritual  to  perform  magical song and poetry in a high, shrieking voice; Odin is considered the foremost practitioner.  Galdrakona N. A woman who practices galdor magic, a witch or volva; Magic chant singing done by a woman  Galdramyndur N. Literally this means a "magical sign".  Galdrastafr, Galdor‐stave N. literally "staves of incantations". A magical sign which may or may not have its  origin as a bind‐rune.Originally they were made up of bindrunes which were then stylized for magical  purposes. Used as a focus for complex magical operations.   Gamanrúnar N. joy runes  Gambantein  N.  "Magic  Branch".  A  magic  wand  given  to  Odin  by  the  Giant  Hlebard;  when  Odin  had  got  the  wand, he made Hlebard lose his mind.  Gana‐Devatas  In.  `troops  of  deities.’ Deities  who  generally  appear,  or  are  spoken  of,  in  classes.  Nine  such  classes  are  mentioned:‐  (1.)  Adityas,  (2.)  Viswas  or  Viswe‐devas;  (3.)  Vasus;  (4.)  Tushitas;  (5.) 

74

Mythology and Folklore  
Abhaswaras; (6.) Anilas; (7.) Maharajikas; (8.) Sadhyas; (9.) Rudras. These inferior deities are attendant  upon Shiva, and under the command of Ganesha. They dwell on Gana‐parvata, i.e., Kailasa.  Gana‐Pati In. See Ganesa.  Ganapatya In. a small sect who worship Gana‐pati or Ganesa as their chief deity.  Ganas In. See Gana‐devatas.  Gand,  Gandr  N.  A  magic  wand;  projected  magical  power  and  the  wand,  staff,  or  stave  which  contains  or  expresses it.  Gandaki In. the river Gandak (vulg. Gunduk), in Oude  Gandalf N. "Magic Elf". A Dwarf  Gandha‐Madana In. `intoxicating with fragrance,’ a mountain and forest in Ilavrita, the central region of the  world, which contains the mountain Meru. The authorities are not agreed as to its relative position with  Meru; a general of the monkey allies of Rama; was killed by Ravana’s son Indra‐jit, but was restored o  life by the medicinal herbs brought by Hanuman from Mount Kailasa.  Gandhara In. a country and city on the west bank of the Indus about Attock. Mahomedan geographers call it  Kandahar, but it must not be confounded with the modern town of that name; It is the Gandaritis of  the ancients, and its people are the Gandarii of Herodotus; the Vayu Purana says it was famous for its  breed of horses.  Gandhari  In.  Princess  of  Gandhara;  the  daughter  of  Subala,  king  of  Gandhara,  wife  of  Dhrita‐rashtra,  and  mother of his hundred sons; her husband was blind, so she always wore a bandage over her eyes to be  like him; her husband and she, in their old age, both perished in a forest fire; she is also called by the  patronymics Saubali and Saubaleyi; she is said to have owed her hundred sons to the blessing of Vyasa,  who, in acknowledgment of her kind hospitability, offered her a boon. She asked for a hundred sons.  Then she became pregnant, and continued so for two years, at the end of which time she was delivered  of a lump of flesh. Vyasa took the shapeless mass and divided it into 101 pieces, which he placed in as  many jars. In due time Dur‐yodhana was produced, but with such accompanying fearful portents that  Dhrita‐rashtra  was  besought,  though  in  vain,  to  abandon  him.  A  month  afterwards  ninety‐nine  other  sons came forth, and an only daughter, Duh‐sala.  Gandharva  In.  the  `heavenly  Gandharva’  of  the  Veda  was  a  deity  who  knew  and  revealed  the  secrets  of  heaven and divine truths in general. He is thought by Goldstucker to have been a personification of the  fire of the sun; the Gandharvas generally had their dwelling in the sky or atmosphere, and one of their  offices was to prepare the heavenly soma juice for the gods; they had a great partiality for women, and  had  a  mystic  power  over  them;  they  were  spirits  of  the  air,  forests,  and  mountains;  they  were  the  mates of the Apsaras; they are all male, and had differing descriptions. Sometimes they were seen as  shaggy,  damp,  and  dirty  creatures  who  were  part  man  and  part  animal;  other  times  they  were  men  with birds' legs and wings; they could be centaur‐like, half man and half horse; or they sometimes were  seen as fair men who had effeminate features.; they were known for their musical skills, their power to  cast illusions, and their skill with horses; they sometimes were the attendants of the devas, and would  often  combat  human  heroes.  If  the  hero  was  victorious,  the  Gandharva  would  help  the  hero  on  his  quest, but if the hero lost, he would be carried away,  never to be heard from again; the Gandharvas  were also the protectors of Soma, which they guarded with jealous intent.  Gandharva‐Loka In. See Loka. 

75

Mythology and Folklore  
Gandharva‐Veda in. the science of music and song, which is considered to include the drama and dancing; it is  an appendix of the Sama‐veda, and its invention is ascribed to the Muni Bharata.  Gandini In. daughter of Kasi‐raja; she had been twelve years in her mother’s womb when her father desired  her to come forth. The child told her father to present to the Brahmans a cow every day for three years,  and at the end of that time she would be born. This was done, and the child, on being born, received  the  name  of  Gandini,  `cow  daily.’  She  continued  the  gift  as  long  as  she  lived.  She  was  wife  of  Swa‐ phalka and mother of Akrura; the Ganga or Ganges.  Gandiva In. the bow of Arjuna, said to have been given by Soma to Varuna, by Varuna to Agni, and by Agni to  Arjuna.  Ganesha  (Gana  +  Isa), Gana‐Pati In. is one  of the  most popular deities  in the Hindu pantheon; he is closely  associated  with  the  daily  lives  of  millions  of  Hindus  even  today;  Ganesha  is  also  the  god  of  wisdom  and  prudence.  These  qualities  are  signified  through  his  two  wives:  Buddhi  (wisdom)  and  Siddhi  (prudence);  Ganesha  has  a  thorough  knowledge  of  the  scriptures  and  is  a  superb  scribe.  This  latter  quality  is  manifest  through  the  fact  that  he  is  the  scribe  to  whom  Vyas  Dev  (the  narrator  of  the  Hindu epic Mahabharata) narrated his enormous epic. Ganesha did  this  work  so  thoroughly  that  the  Mahabharata  is  one  of  the  most  harmonious works in the Hindu scriptures; Ganesha is represented  as  a  short,  pot‐bellied  man  with  yellow  skin,  four  arms  and  an  elephant's head with only one tusk. In his four hands he customarily  holds  a  shell,  a  chakra  (discus),  a  mace  and  a  water‐lily.  His  unusual  steed  is  a  rat.  Ganesha  is  the  second son of Shiva and Parvati. There are many versions of how he was conceived. The most popular  version is narrated hereunder.  Gang N. Olvalde's youngest son and brother to Tjatsi and Ide; When the father had died the brothers rapidly  shared his beer. This was the first time they were all quiet.  Ganga In. the sacred river Ganges; said to be mentioned only twice in the Rig‐veda. The Puranas represent the  Viyad‐ganga, or heavenly Ganges, to flow from the toe of Vishnu, and  to have been brought down from heaven, by the prayers of the saint  Bhagiratha,  to  purify  the  ashes  of  the  sixty  thousand  sons  of  King  Sagara, who had been burnt by the angry glance of the sage Kapila.  From  this  earthly  parent  the  river  is  called  Bhagirathi.  Ganga  was  angry  at  being  brought  down  from  heaven,  and  Siva,  to  save  the  earth  from  the  shock  of  her  fall,  caught  the  river  on  his  brow,  and  checked its course with his matted locks. From this action he is called  Ganga‐dhara,  `upholder  of  the  Ganges.’  The  river  descended  from  Siva’s  brow  in  several  streams,  four  according  to  some,  and  ten  according to others, but the number generally accepted is seven, being the Sapta‐sindhava, the seven  sindhus or rivers. The Ganges proper is one of the number. The descent of the Ganges disturbed the  sage Jahnu as he was performing a sacrifice, and in his anger he drank up the waters, but he relented  and allowed the river to flow from his ear, hence the Ganges has the name of Jahnavi. Personified as a  goddess, Ganga is the eldest daughter of Himavat and Mena, and her sister was Uma. She became the  wife of King Santanu and bore a son, Bhishma; who is also known by the metronymic Gangeya. Being  also, in a peculiar way, the mother of Kartikeya (q.v.), she is called Kumara‐su. Gold, according to the  Maha‐bharata, was borne by the goddess Ganga to Agni, by whom she had been impregnated. Other 

76

Mythology and Folklore  
names  and  titles  of  the  Ganges  are  Bhadra‐soma,  Gandini,  Kirata,  Deva‐bhuti,  `produced  in  heaven;’  Hara‐sekhara, `crest of Siva;’ Khapaga, `flowing from heaven;’ Mandakini, `gently flowing;’ Tri‐patha‐ga  or Tri‐srotah, `triple flowing,’ running in heaven, earth, and hell.   Ganga‐Dhara A name of Siva. See Ganga.  Ganga‐Dwara  In.  the  gate  of  the  Ganges;  the  opening  in  the  Himalaya  mountains  through  which  the  river  descends into the plains, now known as Haridwar.   Ganga‐Sagara In. the mouth of the Ganges, a holy bathing‐place sacred to Vishnu  Gangeya In. a name of Bhishma, from his reputed mother, the river goddess Ganga; also of Karttikeya.  Ganglati N. "Tardy". One of the servants of Death‐Goddess Hel and lives with her underground; Ganglati was  so slow that no one ever could tell he was moving.  Gangleri N. Another name for Odin  Ganglot N. Serving maid of Hel  Gap‐tooth N. The name of one of Thor's goats that pulls his divine chariot through the sky  Gardrofa N. "One Who Pulls Fences"; The mare Gardrofa and the horse Hamskerpir are the parents of Gna's  grey horse Hoof‐flourisher.   Garga In. An ancient sage, and one of the oldest writers on astronomy; he was a son of Vitatha. The Vishnu  Purana says, “From Garga sprang Sina (or Sini); from them were descended the Gargyas and Sainyas,  Brahmans of Kshatriya race.” The statement of the Bhagavata is, “From Garga sprang Sina; from them  Gargya,  who  from  a  Kshatriya  became  a  Brahman.”  There  were  many  Gargas;  one  was  a  priest  of  Krishna and the Yadavas.  Gargas,  Gargyas  In.  descendants  of  Garga,  who,  “although  Kshatriyas  of  birth,  became  Brahmans  and  great  Rishis.”  Gargya, Gargya Balaki In. son of Balaki; he was a Brahman, renowned as a teacher and as a grammarian, who  dealt  especially  with  etymology,  and  was  well  read  in  the  Veda,  but  still  submitted  to  receive  instruction from the Kshatriya Ajata‐satru.  Garm  N.  Hel's  monster  wolf  dog  who  guards  the  island  where  Loki  and  his  wolf‐son,  Fenrir,  are  chained.  Hound  of  the  Underworld,  the  most  evil  dog,  he  is  bound  with  iron  chains  to  guard  the  entrance  Gnipahellir until Ragnarok. In Ragnarok he and Tyr will kill each other. Also called Mánagarm  Garth N. A yard, enclosure, homestead   Garuda In. garuda is one of the three principal animal deities in the Hindu Mythology that has evolved after  the  Vedic  Period  in  Indian  history;  it  is  after  Garuda  that  the  Indonesian  National  Airlines  is  named.  Even  today,  Garuda  is  much  revered  by  devout  Hindus  for  his  ethics  and  his  strength  in  applying  his  ethics to correct evil‐doers; Garuda is the king of the birds. He mocks the wind with the speed of his  flight. As the appointed charger of Vishnu he is venerated by all, including humans; A mythical bird or  vulture, half‐man, half‐bird, on which Vishnu rides. He is the king of birds, and descended from Kasyapa  and  Vinata,  one  of  the  daughters  of  Daksha.  He  is  the  great  enemy  of  serpents,  having  inherited  his  hatred  from  his  mother,  who  had  quarrelled  with  her  co‐wife  and  superior,  Kadru,  the  mother  of  serpents; Garuda is the son of Kashyap, a great sage, and Vinata, a daughter of Daksha, a famous king. 

77

Mythology and Folklore  
He  was  hatched  from  an  egg  Vinata  laid;  he  has  the  head,  wings,  talons, and beak of an eagle and the body and limbs of a man; he  has a white face, red wings and golden body. When he was born he  was so brilliant that he was mistaken for Agni, the god of fire, and  worshipped;  Garuda  has  many  names  and  epithets.  From  his  parents he is called Kasyapi and Vainateya. He is the Suparna and  the  Garutman,  or  chief  of  birds.  He  is  also  called  Dakahaya,  Salmalin, Tarkshya, and Vinayaka, and among his epithets are the  following:‐  Sitanana,  `white  faced;’  Rakta‐paksha,  `red  winged;’  Sweta‐rohits,  `the  white  and  red;’  Suvarna‐kaya,  `golden  bodied;’  Ganganeswara,`  lord  of  the  sky;’  Khageswara,  `king  of  birds;’  Nagantaka,  and  Pannaga‐nasana,  `destroyer  of  serpents;’  Sarparati,  `enemy  of  serpents;’  Taraswin,  `the  swift;’  Rasayana,  `who  moves  like  quicksilver;’  Kama‐ charin, `who goes where he will;’ Kamayus, `who lives at pleasure;’ Chirad, `eating long;’ Vishnu‐ratha,  `vehicle of Vishnu;’ Amritaharana and Sudha‐hara, `stealer of the Amrita;’ Surendra‐jit, `vanquisher of  Indra;’ Vajra‐jit, `subduer of the thunderbolt,’ & etc.  Garuda  Purana  In.  the  description  given  of  this  Purana  is,  “That  which  Vishnu  recited  in  the  Garuda  Kalpa,  relating chiefly to the birth of Garuda from Vinata, is called the Garuda Purana, and in it there are read  19,000 stanzas.” The works bearing this name which were examined by Wilson did not correspond in  any  respect  with  this  description,  and  he  considered  it  doubtful  if  a  genuine  Garuda  Purana  is  in  existence.  Gatha  In.  a  song,  a  verse;  a  religious  verse,  but  one  not  taken  from  the  Vedas;  verses  interspersed  in  the  Sanskrit Buddhist work called Lalita‐vistara, which are composed in a dialect between the Sanskrit and  the Prakrit, and have given their name to this the Gatha dialect. The Zend hymns of the Zoroastrians  are also called Gathas.  Gatu In. a singer, a Gandharva  Gauda, Gaura In. the ancient name of Central Bengal; also the name of the capital of the country, the ruins of  which city are still visible; the great northern nation of Brahmans. See Brahman.  Gaupayanas In. sons or descendants of Gopa; four Rishis, who were the authors of four remarkable hymns in  the  Rig‐veda;  One  of  them,  named  Su‐bandhu,  was  killed  and  miraculously  brought  to  life  again.  The  hymns have been translated by Max Muller in the Journal R. A. S., vol. ii. 1866.  Gauri  In.  an  epithet  of  Devi  in  her mild  form  as  the yellow  or  brilliant one;  she  is  the  good‐hearted  mother  goddess;  Gauri  ("fair",  "white")  is  also  known  as  Parvati  and  Uma  the  consort  of  Lord  Shiva;  she  is  depicted with a bowl of rice and a spoon; it is sometimes an epithet for Varunani, wife of Varuna.  Gaut N. By‐name of Odin   Gautama In. A name of the sage Saradwat as son of Gotama; he was husband of Ahalya, who was seduced by  Indra. This seduction has been explained mythologically as signifying the carrying away of night by the  morning sun, Indra being the sun, and Ahalya being explained as meaning night; author of a Dharma‐ sastra, which has been edited by Stenzler. 3. A name common to many men.  Gautamesa In. `Lord of Gautama’ Name of one of the twelve great Lingas. See Linga.  Gautami In. an epithet of Durga; name of a fierce Rakshasi or female demon 

78

Mythology and Folklore  
Gaut's Gate N. A kenning for a shield; This is because Odin's gate, the gate to Asgard, shields Asgard from its  enemies.  Gaya In.  a city in Bihar; it is one of the seven sacred cities, and is still a place of pilgrimage, though its glory has  departed.  Gayatri In. a most sacred verse of the Rig‐veda, which it is the duty of every Brahman to repeat mentally in his  morning and evening devotions. It is addressed to the sun as Savitri, the generator, and so it is called  also Savitri. Personified as a goddess, Savitri is the wife of Brahma, mother of the four Vedas, and also  of  the  twice‐born  or  three  superior  castes;  Colebrooke’s  translation  of  the  Gayatri  is  “Earth,  sky,  heaven.  Let  us  meditate  on  (these,  and  on)  the  most  excellent  light  and  power  of  that  generous,  sportive,  and  resplendent  sun,  (praying  that)  it  may  guide  our  intellects.”  Wilson’s  version  is,  in  his  translation  of  the  Rig‐veda,  “We  meditate  on  that  desirable  light  of  the  divine  Savitri  who  influences  our pious rites.” In the Vishnu Purana he had before given a somewhat different version, “We meditate  on  that  excellent  light  of  the  divine  sun:  may  he  illuminate  our  minds.”  A  later  version  by  Benfey  is,  “May  we  receive  the  glorious  brightness  of  this,  the  generator,  of  the  god  who  shall  prosper  our  works.”  Geb Eg.  a god that is sometimes pictured with the head of a goose; Geb was called 'the Great Cackler', and as  such, was represented as a goose; It was in this form that he was said to have laid the egg from which  the sun was hatched; he was believed to have been the third divine king of earth; the royal throne of  Egypt was known as the 'throne of Geb' in honor of his great reign.   Gefn, Gefjun, Gefjon N. Vanir Goddess of gift‐giving, the All‐Giver; She is associated with sowing of fields, crop  and human fertility, celebrated with wagon rituals and plough rites at the New Year. As  an aspect of  fate,  she  is  called  in  oath  taking.  Goddess  of  unmarried  women,  also  one  of  the  maidens  in  Frigga's  palace; To her were entrusted all those who died unwedded, whom she received and made happy for  ever. She did not remain a virgin herself, but married a Giant, by whom she had four sons. Odin sent  her to Gylfi, king of Sweden to beg for some land which she might call her own. The king, amused at her  request, promised her as much land as she could plough around in one day and night. Gefjon changed  her four sons into oxen, harnessed them to a plough and cut a wide and deep furrow all around a large  piece of land. She forcibly  wrenched it away and made her  oxen drag  it down to the sea, where she  made  it  fast  and  called  it  Seeland.  Gefjon  then  married  Skjold,  one  of  Odin's  sons,  and  became  the  ancestress of the royal Danish Skioldungs.  Geirahöd N. "Spear of Battle". A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla  Geirrod N. "The one who bloods the spear". A cunning Giant and ironsmith, he caught Loki, who flew into his  castle as Frigga's falcon had got stuck. He locked Loki in a chest and starved him for three months. He  forced Loki to bring Thorr to his farm. For fun, Geirrod used tongs to pick up a lump of molten iron and  threw  it  at  Thorr.  Thorr  used  iron  gauntlets  to  catch  it,  then  flung  it  back.  It  crashed  through  pillars,  Geirrod, walls, and and into ground outside. Geirrod and his daughters, Gjalp and Greip, were killed.  Gerd, Gerdh N. "Fence". A Frost Giantess who married Freyr. Freyr's servant Skirnir was sent to woo her for  him. It was only after threats of curses death and suffering in Hel that she agreed to marry Freyr. The  beautiful Gerd is Gymir and Aurboda's daughter and Beli's sister. She is known for her shining beauty.  When she raises her arms everything shines.  Geri & Freki N. "Ravenous" & "Greedy". Two of Odin's wolves; He feeds them the food from his table. 

79

Mythology and Folklore  
Geri N. "Greedy"; Geri is one of Odin's two wolves. The other one is Freki. They get all the meat that is served  to Odin because he only drinks wine.  Gersimi N. Goddess of beauty, Freya's daughter with Od. The beautiful Hnoss is her sister. The name Gersimi  means 'jewelry'  Gestumblindi N. In the contest of riddles with King Heidrek the Wise, the last riddle about Odin's whisperings  to Balder reveal that Gestumblindi is actually Odin.  Ghata‐Karpara  In.  a  poet  who  was  one  of  the  “nine  gems”  of  the  court  of  Vikramaditya;  there  is  a  short  artificial  poem,  descriptive  of  the  rainy  season,  bearing  this  name,  which  has  been  translated  into  German by Dursch. The words mean `potsherds,’ and form probably an assumed literary name.  Ghatotkacha In. a son of Bhima by the Rakshasi Hidimba. He was killed in the great battle by Karna with the  fatal lance that warrior had obtained from Indra.  Ghosha  In.  it  is  said  in  the  Veda  that  the  Aswins  “bestowed  a  husband  upon  Ghosha  growing  old,”  and  the  explanatory  legend  is  that  she  was  a  daughter  of  Kakshivat,  but  being  a  leper,  was  incapable  of  marriage. When she was advanced in years the Aswins gave her health, youth, and beauty, so that she  obtained a husband.  Ghritachi In. an Apsaras or celestial nymph; she had many amours with great sages and mortal men. She was  mother  of  ten  sons  by  Raudraswa  of  Kusa‐nabha,  a  descendant  of  Puru,  and  the  Brahma  Vaivartta  Purana attributes the origin of some of the mixed castes to her issue by the sage Viswa‐karman; The  Hari‐vansa  asserts  that  she  had  ten  daughters  as  well  as  ten  sons  by  Raudraswa.  Another  legend  represents her as mother by Kusanabha of a hundred daughters, whom Vayu wished to accompany him  to the sky. They refused, and in his rage he cursed them to become deformed; but they recovered their  natural shape and beauty, and were married to Brahma‐datta, king of Kampila.  Giants & Giantesses N. In Old Norse the word risi meant a true Giant of great size, capable of intermarrying  with humans; they were usually beautiful and good. The jotnar, singular jötunn, had great strength and  age and were also called etins. The thursar, singular Thurs, were antagonistic, destructive, and stupid.  The Giants in Northern mythology (such as the Frost Giants, the Mountain Giants and the Fire Giants)  represent  the  raw  forces  of  Nature  in  their  primitive  form.  The  Giants  are  often  big,  clumsy,  magic‐ skilled, and sometimes evil‐minded creatures. The worst enemy of the Giants is Thor, with his powerful  hammer  Mjollnir.  Most  Giants  live  in  Jotunheim.  There  are  also  Fire  Giants  who  follow  Surt  in  Muspelheim  and  Rimthursar  (Frost  Giants)  who  came  from  the  ice‐cold  Niflheim.  All  Giants  originally  came from Ymir. It may be that the Giants were the Gods of the Stone Age, the Vanir the Gods of the  Bronze Age and the Æsir the Gods of the Iron Age.  Gilling N. "Huge Cod"; The Giant Gilling is Billing's brother. Gilling and his wife were killed by the evil Dwarves  Galar and Fjalar, who brewed the Mead of Poetry.  Gils N. Horse of the Æsir used to ride to Glasheim, their Court of Justice, each day.  Gimli N. "Hall of the Blessed". Located to the south and above Asgard in another heaven called Andlang, it is a  building with a golden roof. It is the fairest hall of all and brighter than the sun. It will survive Ragnarok,  and will be where good and righteous men go to upon death.  Ginnungagap N. The great void between Muspellheim and Niflheim before the creation; An enormous canyon  that divides red‐hot Muspelheim to the south and icy Niflheim to the north; The creation of the world 

80

Mythology and Folklore  
began at Ginnungagap, with Ymir the Giant and the primal cow,  Audhumla. The Gods kill Ymir, place  the body such that it fills the gap and finally create the world out of the carcass.  Giri‐ja In. `Mountain born’; a name of Parvati or Devi. See Devi.  Giri‐vraja In. a royal city in Magadha identified with Raja‐griha in Bihar.  Gita‐ Govinda In. a lyrical poem by Jaya‐deva on the early life of Krishna as Govinda the cowherd. It is an erotic  work,  and  sings  the  loves  of  Krishna  and  Radha,  and  other  of  the  cowherd  damsels,  but  a  mystical  interpretation has been put upon it. The poems are supposed to have been written about the twelfth  or thirteenth century. There are some translations is the Asiatic Researches by Sir W. Jones, and a small  volume of translations has been lately published by Mr. Edwin Arnold. There is also an edition of the  text, with a Latin translation and notes, by Lassen, and there are some others.  Gita In. the Bhagavad‐gita (q.v.)  Gjallarbru  N.  "Resounding  Bridge";  The  bridge  crossed  by  Hermod  on  his  way  to  Hel's  realm  in  search  of  Balder.  Gjallarhorn,  Gjall,  Gyall  N.  "The  Recalling  Horn".  Heimdall's  mighty  horn;  Its  blast  can  be  heard  all  over  the  nine worlds. It shall be blown at Ragnarok.  Gjalp  N.  "Yelling";  The  Giantess  Gjalp  is  Geirod's  daughter  and  Greip's  sister.  She  tries  to  stop  Thor  from  passing a lake by flooding it with urine.  Gjoll N. The Hel Bridge; It is thatched with gleaming gold.. From the bridge over the river Gjöll the road to Hel  lies downwards and northwards; the boulder to which the wolf Fenrir was chained. It was fastened with  another boulder called Thviti  Glad, Gyllir, Glœr, Skeidbrimir, Silfrtopp, Sinir, Gils, Falhofnir, and Lettfeti N. The Æsir's horses  Gladsheim N. "Glad‐land". One of the names of Odin's hall, also called "Shining Home", "Hlidskjalt", and "High  Seat". It lies on the plain of Ida.  Glapsvid N. Another name for Odin  Gleaming Bale N. The name of Hel's curtains  Gleipnir N. The fetter (chain) used to bind Fenrir, made by the Svartalfar from the sound of cat's footfall, a  woman's  beard,  a  mountain's  roots,  a  bear's  sinews,  a  fish's  breath,  a  bird's  spittle.  The  other  two  chains were Dromi and Loding.  Glen N. "Shine". Glen is the Light‐Disir Sun's husband. Before Ragnarok they gave birth to a daughter who they  named Sunna. She took over her mother's task in the new world.  Glimmering Misfortune N. The Death‐Goddess Hel's bed hangings; It is in her stronghold in Nifilhel.  Glitner N. The silver and gold hall of Forseti, in Asgard  Glódhker N. A fire‐pot or brazier used in ritual workings.  Glut N. "Glow". One of Loki's wives 

81

Mythology and Folklore  
Gna  N.  Frigga's  swift  messenger,  mounted  on  her  steed  Hofvarpnir  ("Hoof‐Thrower"  or  "Hoof‐Flourisher”),  would travel through fire and air, over land and sea, and was therefore considered the personification  of the refreshing breeze. She saw all that was happening on earth and told her mistress all she knew.  Gnipahellr N. The cave in front of Niflhel where the monster hounds Garm is chained.  Gnita Heath N. The place where the dragon Fáfnir guarded the hoard of gold stolen from the Dwarf Andvari  Goat N. The animal sacred to Thor; His chariot was drawn by two he‐goats.  Gobhila In. an ancient writer of the Sutra‐period; he was author of some Grihya Sutras, and of some Sutras on  grammar. The Grihya Sutras have been published in the Bibliotheca Indica.  God of the Shield N. By‐name for Ullr  Goin N. One of many serpents who gnaw at the roots of the great tree Yggdrasil  Go‐Karna In. `Cow’s ear’, a place of pilgrimage sacred to Siva, on the west coast, near Mangalore  Go‐Kula  In.  a  pastoral  district  on  the  Yamuna,  about  Mathura,  where  Krishna  passed  his  boyhood  with  the  cowherds          Golden  apples  N.  Every  year  Idunna  gives  each  god  and  goddess  a  golden  apple  to  keep  them  young. They are the apples of immortality.                                  Golden Apples at the Top of the World 

82

Mythology and Folklore  
      Golden  Fleece  Gk.  is  the  fleece  of  the  gold‐haired  winged  ram.  It  figures  in  the  tale  of  Jason  and  his  band  of  Argonauts,  who  set  out on a quest by order of King  Pelias  for  the  fleece  in  order  to  place  Jason  rightfully  on  the  throne of Iolcus in Thessaly.                      Golden Kingdom N. Another name for Asgard, also called "the White Kingdom".  Goldtooth N. Another name for Heimdall as he had teeth of gold  Göll N. "Loud Cry"or "Battle Cry". A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla  Gollinkambi, Gullinkambe N. The cockerel in Yggdrasil waits to signal the Gods and the warriors of Valhalla for  the final battle of Ragnarok.  Goloka, Go‐Loka In. "Place of cows," and "heaven," particularly Krishna's heaven; it is a later addition to the  original seven lokas, the Vaishnava concept of a realm of eternal beauty and bliss; it is also the eternal  home of Vishnu.  Go‐manta In. a great mountain in the Western Ghata, according to the Hari‐vansa it was the scene of a defeat  of Jara‐sandha by Krishna.  Go‐mati In. the Gumti river in Oude; but there are others which bore the name. One fell into the Sindhu or  Indus.  Gondlir N. Another name for Odin                    Hydra and the Golden Fleece 

83

Mythology and Folklore  
Göndul  N.  "Magic  Wand"  or  "Enchanted  Stave".  Gondul  with  Hildr  and  Skögul,  are  the  noblest  Valkyries  in  Asgard. Their task is to choose the men permitted to go to Valhalla. She is often associated with war  magic.  Go‐pala,  Go‐vinda  In.  `Cow‐keeper’  a  name  of  the  youthful  Krishna,  who  lived  among  the  cowherds  in  Vrindavana  Gopala‐tapani In. an Upanishad in honour of Krishna Printed in the Bibliotheca Indica  Go‐patha Brahmana In. the Brahmana of the Atharva or fourth Veda; It has been published by Rajendra Lala in  the Bibliotheca Indica.  Gopati‐Rishabha In. `Chief of herdsmen.’ A title of Siva; a demon mentioned in the Maha‐bharata as slain by  Krishna.  Gopis In. the cowherd damels and wives with whom Krishna sported in his youth  Gotama  In.  the  founder  of  the  Nyaya  school  of  philosophy;  he  is  called  also  Satananda,  and  is  author  of  a  Dharma‐sastra or law‐book, which has been edited by Stenzler; He is frequently called Gautama.  Govardhana Dhara In. `Upholder of Govardhana’ A title of Krishna  Go‐Vardhana  In.  a  mountain  in  Vrindavana,  which  Krishna  induced  the  cowherds  and  cowherdlesses  to  worship instead of Indra, this enraged the god, who sent a deluge of rain to wash away the mountain  and all the people of the country, but Krishna held up the mountain on his little finger for seven days to  shelter the people of Vrindavana. Indra retired baffled, and afterwards did homage to Krishna.  Govinda, Go‐Vinda In. `Cow‐keeper.’ A frequent term of address for Krishna which refers to his role as knower  of the earth and the senses and as protector of cows (go, "cow," but also "earth"); it is also a name for  Vishnu, of whom Krishna is one incarnation.  Grabak N. One of many serpents who gnaw at the roots of the great tree Yggdrasil  Grafrollud N. One of many serpents who gnaw at the roots of the great tree Yggdrasil  Graha  In.  `Seizing’  the  power  that  seizes  and  obscures  the  sun  and  moon,  causing  eclipses;  the  ascending  node, Rahu; evil spirits with which people, especially children, are possessed, and which cause sickness  and death. They are supposed to be amenable to medicine and exorcism.  Gram N. "Grim". A sword, forged by Volund, given by Odin to Sigmund; When it broke, the Dwarf Regin forged  it together and gave it to Sigurdr Fafnisbari who killed the dragon Fafnir with it.  Grane,  Grani  N.  Sigurdr's  grey  horse,  the  son  of  Sleipnir;  Grane  will  not  bear  any  other  rider  than  Sigurdr.  When Sigurdr dies even Grane dies; Grane has runes carved into his chest.  Greip N. "Strong Grip". Daughter of Geirrod who, along with the other daughter Gialp, tried to push Thorr's  seat to the ceiling to crush him; Thorr used Grid's magic pole to push back down and broke their backs.  Grendel N. The monster that was slain by Beowulf  Grer  N.  Dwarf  Grer  forged  the  love  Goddess  Freya's  beautiful  Brising  necklace,  together  with  Alfrik,  Berling  and Dvalin. To get the jewelry she spent one night with each of them 

84

Mythology and Folklore  
Grid N. "Greed" or "Peace" The Giantess who warned Thorr against Geirrod and Loki; She gave Thorr his magic  strength‐belt and iron gloves. Grid is a friendly Giantess who had a son, Vidar with Odin.  Gridarvol N. The iron rod Gridarvol belongs to the Giantess Grid. Once when Thor was going to see the Giant  Geirod, unarmed, she lent him Gridarvol and her iron‐gloves.  Griha‐sha In. `Householder’a Brahman in the second stage of his religious life. See Brahman  Grihya  Sutras  In.  Rules  for  the  conduct  of  domestic  rites  and  the  personal  sacraments,  extending  from  the  birth to the marriage of a man. (See Sutra.) The Griha Sutras of Aswalayana have been printed in the  Bibliotheca Indica.   Grim N. "The Masked One"; A by‐name of Odin  Grimnir N. A disguise Odin used when visiting a king's court. He appeared wearing a blue cloak and large hat.  The king's dogs would not bark at him.  Gritsa‐mada  In.  the  reputed  Rishi  of  many  hymns  in  the  second  Mandala  of  the  Rig‐veda,  according  to  the  Vishnu Purana he was a Kshatriya and son of Suna‐hotra, being descended from Pururavas of the Lunar  race. From him sprang Saunaka, the eminent sage versed in the Rig‐veda “who originated the system of  four  castes.”  The  Vayu  Purana  makes  Sunaka  to  be  the  son  of  Gritsa‐mada,  and  Saunaka  the  son  of  Sunaka: this seems probable. “It is related of him by Sayana that he was first a member of the family of  Angiras, being the son of Suna‐hotra. He was carried off by the Asuras whilst performing a sacrifice, but  was rescued by Indra, under whose authority he was henceforth designated as Gritsa‐mada, the son of  Sunaka or Saunaka of the race of Bhrigu. Thus the Anukramanika says of him: He who was an Angirasa,  the son of Suna‐hotra, became Saunaka of the race of Bhrigu.” According to the Maha‐bharata, he was  son of Vita‐havya, a king of the Haihayas, a Kshatriya, who became of Brahman. (See Vitahavya.) The  Maha‐bharata alludes to a legend of his having assumed the semblance of Indra, and so enabled that  deity to escape from the Asuras, who were lying in wait to destroy him. There are several versions of  the story, but they all agree that after Indra had escaped Gritsa‐mada saved himself by reciting a hymn  in which he showed that Indra was a different person.   Grjotunagardar N. "Stone‐Fence House". The place where the boasting giant Hrungnir arranged to fight the  god Thor  Groa N. The wife of Aurvandil the Bold, a sorceress who chanted spells until Hrungnir's whetstone started to  come loose from Thor's head, but Thor interrupted her with story of Aurvandil's toe getting frozen off  while Thor carried him a basket across Elivagar River. Groa got distracted and couldn't finish the spells,  so the whetstone stayed in Thor's forehead.  Grotte N. The "World Mill" belonging to the Danish  kings Frode, a grind‐mill of gold and a controller  of the  stars' movements. The millstones are so enormous that they may only  be moved by the  giant sisters  Fenja and Menja.  Guda‐kesa In. whose hair is in tufts; an epithet of Arjuna  Guha In. a name of the god of war; a king of the Nishadas or Bhils who was a friend of Rama; a people near  Kalinga who possibly got their name from him.  Guhyakas In. `hidden beings’; inferior divinities attendant upon Kuvera and guardians of his hidden treasures. 

85

Mythology and Folklore  
Gullfaxi N. "Golden Mane". The horse of the Giant Hrugnir, who raced against Odin riding Sleipnir, and lost;  Thorr obtained him when he killed the Giant, but he gave the horse to his son Magni.  Gullinbursti N. One of two boars that drag Freyr's chariot; The other one is Slidrugtanni. Gullinbursti's golden  bristles light up the dark. It was forged by the Dwarf‐smith Brokk.  Gulltop  N.  "Gold  Fringe".  Heimdall's  horse  with  a  golden  mane;  He  can  fly  with  great  speed.  Heimdall  only  rides him at formal ceremonies, for example when they were going to burn Balder's dead body.  Gullveig,  Gollveig,  Heid  N.  "Gold  Might"  or  "Gold  Thirst";  Also  called  "Golden  Branch";  "Gleaming  One";  A  member of the Vanir who came to live with the Aesir; She was a handmaiden to Freya and taught her  seidr. The gods considered her to be an abomination that did not deserve to live. Three times she was  thrown into the fire in Odin's hall and emerged whole and shining. The attempts to kill her sparked the  war between the Aesir and Vanir. Because they could not kill her, the Gods banished her to Ironwood,  where she is magically bound until Ragnarok. Gullveig may be the Giantess Agnriboda, who bore with  Loki the monsters Hel, Fenrir and the Midgard Serpent.  Gungne,  Gungnir  N.  "Swings  When  Riding".  Odin's  magical  spear,  forged  by  the  Dwarf  Brokk;  When  Odin  threw the spear over an army, it meant that they were going to die in battle and lose the war.  Gunnlod, Gunnlauth, Gunnloed N. Jotun‐Giantess, daughter of Suttung. She guards the Mead of Poetry in an  underground cavern. After Odin spent three nights with her, she let him taste it. Odin swallowed it all in  three gigantic gulps, jumped into his eagle suit and flew back to Asgard with the angry Suttung on the  chase. Nine months later Gunnlod gave birth to Bragi.  Gunnr N ."Battle". Gunnr and Róta and the youngest Norn, called Skuld, ride to choose who shall be slain and  to govern the killings.  Guptas In. a dynasty of kings who reigned in Magadha; the period of their ascendancy has been a subject of  great contention, and cannot be said to be settled.  Gurjjara In.  the country of Gujarat  Gybu auja N Give (bring) good luck  Gylfi N. King of Sweden; He gave a beggar‐woman a plough‐land, the size four oxen could plough in a day and  a night, as a reward for the way she had entertained him. This woman, Gefjon, was of the family of the  Æsir. From the north of Giantland she took four oxen (her sons by a giant), yoked them to a plough. The  plough cut went westwards and cut so deep that it rent the land in two. Gefjon called it it Zealand.  Gyllenkamme  Rooster  in  the  top  of  Yggdrasil;  He  has  a  gold  crest.  His  task  is  to  count  to  sixty;  sixty  times  twelve and then wake up the Norns sleeping around the Urdawell.  Gymir [guy‐meer] The Mountain Giant Gymir is Aurboda's husband. Together they have the son Beli and the  daughter Gerd, a beautiful Giantess who married Freyr.   


Haihaya In. this name is supposed to be derived from haya, `a horse'; a prince of the Lunar race, and great‐ grandson of Yadu; a race or tribe of people to whom a Seythian origin has been ascribed. The Vishnu 

86

Mythology and Folklore  
Purana represents them as descendants of Haihaya of the Yadu race, but they are generally associated  with borderers and outlying tribes. In the Vayu and other Puranas, five great divisions of the tribe are  named:  Tala‐janghas,  Viti‐hotras,  Avantis,  Tundikeras,  and  Jatas,  or  rather  Su‐jatas.  They  conquered  Bahu  or  Bahuka,  a  descendant  of  King  Haris‐chandra,  and  were  in  their  turn  conquered,  along  with  many other barbarian tribes, by King Sagara, son of Bahu. According to the Maha‐bharata, they were  descended from Saryati, a son of Manu. They made incursions into the Doab, and they took the city of  Kasi (Benares), which had been fortified against them by King Divo‐dasa; but the grandson of this king  Pratardana  by  name,  destroyed  the  Haihayas,  and  re‐established  the  kingdom  of  Kasi.  Arjuna‐ Kartavirya, of a thousand arms, was king of the Haihayas, and he was defeated and had his arms cut off  by Parasu‐rama.  Haimavati In. In Hindu myth an appellation of Devi as born of the Himalaya mountains.  Hair of Gold N. The long golden hair of Sif (Thor's wife) was her pride and joy. Loki, as a joke, cut off her hair.  Thor forced Loki to find a way to replace it. Loki persuaded the Dwarves to spin hair of real gold for her.  The hair grew to her skin as soon as it was put on.  Hala‐Bhrit In. bearing a plough; Bala‐rama  Halayudha In. who has a ploughshare for his weapon, i.e., Bala‐rama  Haliarunos N. Wise women of the Gothic tribe who used runes   Hall of Fate N. A beautiful hall near the spring of Urda under Yggdrasil. From it come three Disir called Norns,  whose names are Urdjr, Verdhandi, and Skuld. These women shape the lives of men.  Hall of Judgment N. The gods gathered in council in here.  Hallinskisdi N. Another name for Heimdall.  Hamfarir  N.  Hamfarir  is  shapeshifting,  traveling  around  in  an  assumed  shape  or  form  different  from  one's  usual natural form. The power to do it is called Hamrammr.  Hamingja N. A part of the soul that is passed on from generation to generation, associated with the fylgja.  Hammer  of  Thor  N.  Called  "Mjöllnir",  it  hits  every  target  at  which  it  is  thrown  and  always  returns  to  the  thrower's hand.  Hamr N. a shape the soul may take when it leaves the body. Several of the gods are able to change hamr, i.e.  move their soul into another shape or creature. Its appearance directly affects the appearance of the  lyke, or physical body. The hamr goes with the wode upon death and will assist in forming the lyke in  the next incarnation.  Hamskerpir N. "The Thick‐Skinned". Hamskerpir and the mare Gardrofa are the parents of Gna's grey horse  Hoof‐flourisher.  Hangadrott N. "The Hanging God". One of Odin's many names. He can sit by hanged people to gain knowledge  of the land of the dead. Once he went so far as to hang himself from Yggdrasil for nine days, more dead  than alive, increasing his magical powers and runic knowledge.  Hansa In. Hansa and Dimbhaka were two great warrior‐brothers mentioned in the Maha‐bharata as friends of  Jara‐sandha; a certain king also named Hansa was killed by Bala‐rama hearing that “Hansa was killed,” 

87

Mythology and Folklore  
Dimbhaka, unable to live without him, committed suicide, and when Hansa heard of this he drowned  himself in the Yamuna.  Hansa  In.  this,  according  to  the  Bhagavata  Purana  was  the  name  of  the  “one  caste”  when,  in  olden  times,  there was only “one Veda, one God, and one caste,” a name used in the Maha‐bharata for Krishna; a  mountain range north of Meru.  Hanuman,  Hanumat  In.  a  celebrated  monkey  chief;  He  was  son  of  Pavana, `the wind,’ by Anjana, wife of a monkey named Kesari. He  was able to fly, and is a conspicuous figure in the Ramayana. He  and  the  other  monkeys  who  assisted  Rama  in  his  war  against  Ravana were of divine origin, and their powers were superhuman.  Hanuman jumped from India to Ceylon in one bound; he tore up  trees,  carried  away  the  Himalayas,  seized  the  clouds,  and  performed many other wonderful exploits. His form is “as vast as  a  mountain  and  as  tall  as  a  gigantic  tower.  His  complexion  is  yellow  and  glowing  like  molten  gold.  His  face  is  as  red  as  the  brightest  ruby  while  his  enormous  tail  spreads  out  to  an  interminable  length.  He  stands  on  a  lofty  rock  and  roars  like  thunder. He leaps into the air, and flies among the clouds with a rushing noise, whilst the ocean waves  are roaring and splashing below.” In one of his fights with Ravana and the Rakshasas, they greased his  tail and set it on fire, but to their own great injury, for with it he burnt down their capital city, Lanka.  This  exploit  obtained  for  him  the  name  Lanka‐dahi.  His  services  to  Rama  were  great  and  many.  He  acted  as  his  spy,  and  fought  most  valiantly.  He  flew  to  the  Himalayas,  from  whence  he  brought  medicinal  herbs  with  which  he  restored  the  wounded,  and  he  killed  the  monster  Kala‐nemi,  and  thousands of Gandharvas who assailed him. He accompanied Rama on his return to Ayodhya, and there  he received from  him the reward  of perpetual life and youth. The  exploits of Hanuman  are favourite  topics among Hindus from  childhood to age, and paintings of them are  common. He is  called Marut‐ putra, and he has the patronymics  Anili, Maruti, &c.,  and the  metronymic Anjaneya. He  is also Yoga‐ chara, from his power in magic or in the healing art, and Rajata‐dyuti, `the brilliant.’ Among his other  accomplishments,  Hanumat  was  a  grammarian;  and  the  Ramayan  says,  “The  chief  of  monkeys  is  perfect; no one equals him in the sastras, in learning, and in ascertaining the sense of the scriptures [or  in moving at will]. In all sciences, in the rules of austerity, he rivals the preceptor of the gods. It is well  known that Hanumat was the ninth author of grammar” – Muir, iv. 490.  Hanuman‐Nataka In. A long drama by various hands upon the adventures of the monkey chief Hanuman. This  drama  is  fabled  to  have  been  composed  by  Hanuman,  and  inscribed  by  him  on  rocks.  Valmiki,  the  author  of  the  Ramayana,  saw  it  and  feared  that  it  would  throw  his  own  poem  into  the  shade.  He  complained to the author, who told him to cast the verses into the sea. He did so, and they remained  concealed there for ages. Portions were discovered and brought to King Bhoja, who directed Damodara  Misra to arrange them and fill up the lacunae. He did so, and the result was this drama. “It is probable,”  says Wilson, “that the fragments of an ancient drama were connected in the manner described. Some  of  the  ideas  are  poetical,  and  the  sentiments  just  and  forcible;  the  language  is  generally  very  harmonious,  but  the  work  itself  is,  after  all,  a  most  disjointed  and  nondescript  composition,  and  the  patchwork is very glaringly and clumsily put together.” It is a work of the tenth or eleventh century. It  has been printed in India.  Hapi Eg. the god of the Nile particularly the inundation; he is pictured as a bearded man colored blue or green,  with  female  breasts,  indicating  his  powers  of  nourishment;  as  god  of  the  Northern  Nile  he  wears  papyrus plants on his head, and as god of the southern Nile he wears lotus plants.  

88

Mythology and Folklore  
Haptagud N. "God of the Gods". Another name for Odin  Hara In. a name of Siva  Harbard N. "Grey Beard". Another name for Odin.Ferryman disguise used by Odhinn  Hari In. a name which commonly designates Vishnu, but it is exceptionally used for other gods  Hari‐Dwara In. `the gate of Hari’; the modern Hardwar; the place where the Ganges finally breaks through the  mountains into the plains of Hindusthan; it is a great place of pilgrimage.  Hari‐Hara In. a combination of the names of Vishnu and Siva, and representing the union of the two deities in  one, a combination which is differently accounted for.  Haris‐Chandra In. twenty‐eighth king of the Solar race; son of Tri‐sanku; he was celebrated for his piety and  justice; defender of the distressed.  Harita, Harita In. a son of Yuvanaswa of the Solar race; descended from Ikshwaku. From him descended the  Harita‐Angirasas. In the Linga Purana it is said, “The son of Yuvanaswa was Harita, of whom the Haritas  were  sons.  They  were,  on  the  side  of  Angiras,  twice‐born  men  (Brahmans)  of  Kshatriya  lineage;”  or  according to the Vayu, “they were the sons of Angiras, twice‐born men (Brahmans), of Kshatriya race,”  possibly meaning that they were sons raised up to Harita by Angiras. According to some he was a son of  Chyavana; author of a Dharma‐sastra or law‐book.  Harits, Haritas In. 'green'; in the Rig‐veda the horses or rather mares, of the sun, seven or ten in number, and  typical of his rays. “The prototype of the Grecian Charities.” – Max Muller.  Hari‐Vansa In. the genealogy of Hari or Vishnu; a long poem of 16,374 verses. It purports to be a part of the  Maha‐bharata,  but  it  is  of  much  later  date,  and  “may  more  accurately  be  ranked  with  the  Pauranik  compilations of least authenticity and latest date.” It is in three parts; the first is introductory, and gives  particulars of the creation and of the patriarchal and regal dynasties; the second contains the life and  adventures of Krishna: and the last and the third treats of the future of the world and the corruptions  of the Kali age. It contains many indications of its having been written in the south of the India.  Harn N. "Flax". The Goddess of flax‐dressing  Hárr N. "The High‐One". Another name of Odin  Hárr's Hall N. One of Odin's Halls  Harshana In. a deity who presides over the Sraddha offerings  Harts N. Four harts (deer) gnaw the high branches of Yggdrasil: Dáin, Dvalin, Duneyr, and Durathrór.  Haryaswa In. A grandson of the Kuvalayaswa who killed the demon Dhundhu; the country of Panchala is said  to have been named from his five (Pancha) sons. There were several others of this name.  Haryaswas In. Five thousand sons of the patriarch Daksha, begotten by him for the purpose of peopling the  earth.  The  sage  Narada  dissuaded  them  from  producing  offspring,  and  they  “dispersed  themselves  through the regions and have not returned.”  Hastina‐Pura In. The capital city of the Kauravas for which the great war of the Maha‐bharata was waged. It  was  founded  by  Hastin,  son  of  the  first  Bharata,  and  hence,  as  some  say,  its  name;  but  the  Maha‐

89

Mythology and Folklore  
bharata  and  the  Vishnu  Purana  call  it  the  “elephant  city,”  from  hastin,  an  elephant.  The  ruins  are  traceable  near  an  old  bead  of  the  Ganges,  about  57  miles  N.E.  of  Delhi,  and  local  tradition  has  preserved the name. It is said to have been washed away by the Ganges.  Hasyarnava  In.  `ocean  of  laughter’;  a  modern  comic  piece  in  two  acts,  by  a  Pandit  named  Jagadisa.  “It  is  a  severe  but  grossly  indelicate  satire  upon  the  licentiousness  of  Brahmans  assuming  the  character  of  religious mendicants.” – Wilson.  Hater  of  Byrnies  N.  A  kenning  for  the  Tyrfing,  a  magic  sword  forged  by  the  Dwarves  Durin  and  Dvalin.  The  sword killed most of the people who have owned it.  Hathor  Eg.  Hathor  was  the  goddess  of  joy,  motherhood,  and  love;  Hathor  was  originally  worshipped  in  the  form of a cow, sometimes as a cow with stars on her; Later she is represented as a woman with the  head of a cow, and finally with a human head, the face broad and placid, sometimes she  is depicted  with the ears or horns of a cow.  Hati & Skoll N. The wolves chasing the sun and moon, sons of Fenrir.  Hati Hrodvitnisson N. "One Who Hates"; A wolf that runs in front of the Lightdisir Sun and her horses over the  sky; Skoll is the wolf that runs behind Sun. They are the Fenrir wolf's sons and live in the Ironforest.  Havir‐Bhuj, Havish‐Mata In. Pitris or Manes of the Kshatriyas; inhabitants of the solar sphere  Hawks N. A kenning for 'warriors'.  Haya‐Griva In. `horse‐necked’; According to one legend, a Daitya who stole the Veda as it slipped out of the  mouth  of  Brahma  while  he  was  sleeping  at  the  end  of  a  kalpa,  and  was  killed  by  Vishnu  in  the  Fish  Avatara. According to another, Vishnu himself, who assumed this form to recover the Veda, which had  been carried off by two Daityas.  Haya‐Siras, Haya‐Sirsha In. `horse‐head’; In the Maha‐bharata it is recorded that the sage Aurva (q.v.) “cast  the  fire  of  his  anger  into  the  sea,”  and  that  it  there  “became  the  great  Haya‐siras,  known  to  those  acquainted with the Veda, which vomits forth that fire and drinks up the waters.” a form of Vishnu.  Heaven N. According to Snorri there are three heavens. First, mankind's heaven called Asgard. Second, to the  south  and  above  Asgard  is  another  place  called  Andlang.  And  third,  above  Andlang  is  a  place  called  Vidbláin.  Hector Gk. son of King Priam of Troy and his wife, Hecuba; Trojan hero and warrior  Hecuba  Gk.  the  second  wife  of  Priam,  king  of  the  city  of  Troy;  the  mother  of  Hector,  Paris,  Polydorus,  and  Cassandra  Hedjet Eg. a white crown; this was the crown of Upper Egypt (southern)  Heidh‐rún N. The positive aspects of a given runestave; "bright‐stave".  Heidi N. A witch from the 'Song of the Sybil’ raised from the dead by Odin. A farseeing witch, wise in talismans,  caster  of  spells,  cunning  in  magic;  Odin  gave  her  arm‐rings  and  necklaces  to  learn  her  lore,  to  see  through all the worlds.  Heidr N. A cunning‐woman or "witch." 

90

Mythology and Folklore  
Heidrun N. "Heath‐Run". The goat on roof of Valhalla that feeds from branches of the World Tree; from her  four udders come range beer, old beer, honey mead and wine for the Einheriar.  Heilar N. omens. If confirmations of the results of a divination are needed, omens should be taken. This is a  traditional  part  of  old  Germanic  (and  Indo‐European)  divination&emdash;  the  necessity  for  "corroborating evidence" from another medium.   Heimdall, Heimdal N. "Heaven's Mount". He is also called  "the Son of the Waves" because he was born from  the  Nine  Waves  (Aegir's  daughters)  by  Odin's  enchantment.  On  the  first  day  a  boat  drifted  towards  the  shores  of  mankind,  Aurvanga‐land.  In  the  boat  was  a  little  boy,  Heimdall,  sent  by  the  Gods. He slept on a sheaf of corn, surrounded by all  manner  of  treasures  and  tools.  The  humans  accepted him gladly, and raised him calling him Rig.  He  taught  them  to  kindle  the  holy  fire,  instructed  them  in  runic  wisdom,  taught  them  workmanship  and  handicraft,  organized  their  society,  and  originated and stabilized the three classes of men as  spoken of in the Song of Rig. Heimdall lived long as  a man among men, and the age of his rulership was  a  golden  age  of  peace  and  prosperity.  Heimdall  bedded  three  different  females  who  all  bore  children, ancestors to three different classes; earls,  farmers and serfs. When he died, his boat returned  to  take  him  back.  The  sorrowing  humans  laid  his  corpse  in  the  boat,  and  surrounded  it  with  his  treasures  and  weapons.  The  boat  then  sailed  back  to  Vanaheimr,  where  Heimdall  was  stripped  of  his  aged human shape, regained his eternal youth and  was  taken  into  Asgard.  Asa‐God  of  Light  and  the  rainbow;  "The  White  God";  he  is  the  Guardian  of  Bifrost bridge. He stands at the gate and is brilliant in white armor. His teeth are gold. He has a great  sword. He is a fierce warrior and very handsome. He has super‐sight and super‐hearing. He sleeps less  than a bird. He can hear the grass grow and see hundreds of miles away. Heimdall carries a sword and  the Gjallar horn. When a God comes to the gate, he blows the horn softly. At Ragnarok, he will blow the  Gjall  horn  in  warning  and  it  will  be  heard  throughout  the  nine  worlds.  His  horse's  name  is  Golden  Forelock.  Hel  Bridge,  Gjoll  N.  Hel  is  a  very  immaterial  place,  so  when  Hermód  came  from  heaven  and  stood  on  it,  it  shook  more than five troops of dead men crossing it on horseback. It is thatched with gleaming gold  and the maiden who guards it is called Módgud. From the bridge over the river Gjöll the road to Hel lies  downwards and northwards.  Hel,  Hela  N.    Giant  Goddess  of  Death  and  the  Underworld  which  takes  her  name;  She  rules  Helheimr  (Gniprhel, Niflhel), the home  of the  dead who have not died in battle. She was sent into Nifiheim by  Odin,  who  gave  her  authority  over  life  in  the  nine  worlds,  on  the  condition  that  she  shared  all  her  provisions  with  those  who  were  sent  to  her,  those  who  die  from  disease  or  old  age.  She  has  a  great  homestead there with extraordinarily high walls and huge gates. She is the daughter of Angrboda and  Loki, sister to Jormungand, Fenrir and Narfi. She is described as half black, half flesh‐covered. 

91

Mythology and Folklore  
Hel,  Helheim,  Helgardh,  Niflhel  N.  One  of  the  nine  worlds,  ruled  by  Hel.  It  is  the  abode  of  the  dead  who  are  not  killed  in  battle.  Most  people  end  up  here when they die. While cold,  it is not a terrible place. It is not  the  same  as  the  Christian  concept  of  Hell.  Realm  of  the  instincts; Abode of stillness and  inertia  –  unconsciousness;  The  final resting place of the soul of  the non‐Erulian  Helblindi  N.  "The  one  who  binds  to  death".  A  Water‐Giant;  His  parents  are  Farbauti  and  Laufey.  The  trickster  Loki  and  the  Storm‐Giant  Byleist  are  his  brothers.   Helen  Gk.  Known  as  Helen  of  Troy  (and  earlier  Helen  of  Sparta);  the  daughter  of  Zeus  and  Leda  (or  Nemesis);  The  wife  of   King  Menelaus  of  Sparta;  the  one  who abducted  by  Paris   and  brought about the Trojan War.                        Helen and Paris 

Helenus Gk. son of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy; the twin brother of the prophetess Cassandra; He  was also called Scamandrios.  Helgrind N. "Death Gate". The gate between the land of the living and the land of the dead  Heliades  Gk.  they  were  the  three  sisters  in  Greek  mythology;  Aegiale,  Aegle,  and Aetheria;  the  brother  of  Phaeton and they were daughters of Helios, the sun god. Heliades means "children of the sun".  Helikon (or Helicon) Gk. mountain of Boiotian in central Greece and its god; his peak lay in western of Boiotia  near Phokis, and was famed for its shrine of the Mousai (Muses).  Helle Gk. the goddess of the Hellespont Sea bridging the Aegean and Black Seas; mortal princess, the daughter  of King Athamas of Boiotia by the cloud‐nymphe Nephele  Hellen Gk. the son of Deuchalion and Pyrrha; he became the forefather of the Greeks (Hellenes); his sons were  Aeolus, Dorus and Xuthos: forefathers of the Aeolian, Dorian, Achaean and Ionian peoples.   Hellespont  Gk.  the  ancient  Greek  name  for  the  Dardanelles  Strait  which  separates  European  Turkey  from  Asian Turkey; a Strait connecting the Black Sea and the Aegean approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) 

92

Mythology and Folklore  
long  and  up  to  4  miles  (6.5  kilometers)  wide.  The  name  literally  means  Helle’s  sea  because  it  was  named after the maiden, Helle, when she fell from the back of the flying ram with the Golden Fleece  and drowned in the sea below. The ram's fleece was later hung in a grove and guarded by a dragon.   Hellos (or Helius) Gk. the Titan god of the sun; the guardian of oaths and the god of gift of sight; depicted as a  handsome, and usually beardless, man clothed in purple robes and crowned with the shining aureole of  the sun; His sun‐chariot was drawn by four steeds, sometimes winged.  Hema‐Chandra In. author of a good Sanskrit vocabulary printed under the superintendence of Colebrooke  Hemadri In.  `the golden mountain,’ i.e., Meru  Hema‐Kuta  In.  `golden  peak’;  a  chain  of  mountains  represented  as  lying  north  of  the  Himalayas,  between  them and Mount Meru.  Hephaestus Gk. was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; the son of Zeus and Hera, the King and  Queen  of  the  Gods  or  else  (according  to  some  accounts)  of  Hera  alone);  the  god  of  technology,  blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals, metallurgy, fire and volcanoes.   Hera Gk. the Olympian queen of the gods and the goddess of women and marriage; the wife and one of three  sisters  of  Zeus  in  the  Olympian  pantheon  of  classical  Greek  Mythology;  the  goddess  of  the  sky  and  starry heavens; depicted as a beautiful woman wearing a crown and holding a royal, lotus‐tipped staff.   Heracles  Gk.  the  greatest  of  all  heroes  in  Greek  mythology;  the  strongest  man  on  earth;  Besides  tremendous  physical  strength, he had great  self‐confidence  and  considered  himself  equal to the gods; son  of  Zeus  and  the  woman Alcmena, who  the  god  seduced  in  the  shape  of  her  husband  Amphitryon,  king  of  Thebes  .  He  also  had  a  twin  brother,  Iphicles,  who  was  one  night  younger  and  the  son  of  Amphitryon;  more  commonly  known  by  the  Romanized  version  of  his  name,  Hercules   

 

            Hercules and the Stymphalian birds 

Hercules Rom. god of victory and commercial enterprise 

93

Mythology and Folklore  
Herfjötur  N.  "War‐Fetter".  A  Valkyrie  who  serves  ale  to  the  Einheriar  in  Valhalla;  She  often  rides  down  to  Midgard to pick the human warriors that are brave enough to go to Valhalla.   Herjan N. "Raider". Another name for Odin.  Hermes Gk. The great messenger of the gods in Greek mythology and additionally a guide to the Underworld.  Hermes was born on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia;  the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia, daughter of Atlas  and one of the Pleiades; the god of shepherds, land travel, merchants, weights and measures, oratory,  literature,  athletics  and  thieves,  and  known  for  his  cunning  and  shrewdness;  his  symbols  include  the  tortoise, the rooster, the winged sandals, the winged hat, and the caduceus.  Hermione Gk. was the only daughter of Menelaus and Helen;  grand‐daughter of Leda, the mother of Helen  Hermod, Hermodh N. "Fast". Asa  Messenger of the  Gods; The brave  Hermod is the son of Odin and Frigga.  Odin  gave  him  the  task  to  ride  down  to  Nifilhel  to  bring  Balder  home  after  he  had  been  shot  by  his  brother  Hodur.  He  rode  to  Hel  on  Sleipnir,  Odin's  eight  legged  horse,  for  nine  nights  down  dales  so  deep  and  dark  that  he  saw  nothing,  until  he  reached  the  river  Gjöll.  He  crossed  the  bridge  and  soon  reached the gates of Hel over which Sleipner leaped easily. Hel said that if everything in the universe,  dead or alive, wept for Balder then she would release him. Balder gave him Odin's arm‐ring, Draupnir,  to take back to Odin in remembrance of him. The Æsir sent messengers throughout the worlds to ask all  to weep for Balder; but a giantess called Thökk (Loki in disguise) refused to weep, so Balder stayed in  Hel. Hermod represents honor and bravery.  Hero Gk. priestess of Aphrodite in Sestos; her lover, Leander, swam the Hellespont nightly from Abydos to see  her  Herodotus  Gk.  was  an  ancient  Greek  historian  who  was  born  in  Halicarnassus,  Caria  and  lived  in  the  5th  century BC.; he has been called the "Father of History" since he was the first historian known to collect  his  materials  systematically,  test  their  accuracy  to  a  certain  extent  and  arrange  them  in  a  well‐ constructed and vivid narrative.   Herse (or Ersa) Gk. was the goddess of the plant‐nourishing dew; the daughter of the sky‐god Zeus and moon  goddess  Selene.  Herse  may  be  the  same  as  Pandeia,  a  daughter  of  the  same  gods  described  in  the  Homeric Hymns. Another Herse, described as a daughter of Kekrops, was worshipped by the Athenians.  Herteit N. "Glad of War"; another name for Odin.  Hervor N.  She is a Valkryie daughter of Hlovde who took Volund the smith as her lover. She, along with two  other Valkryies, had flown to earth seeking love. The Norns forced each to leave their husbands after  nine years, never to return.  Hesiod Gk. Was a Greek oral poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC.   Since at least Herodotus's time, Hesiod and Homer have generally been considered the earliest Greek  poets whose work has survived, and they are often paired. Hesiod's writings serve as a major source on  Greek mythology, farming techniques, early economic thought (he is sometimes identified as the first  economist), archaic Greek astronomy and ancient time‐keeping.  Hesione Gk. a daughter of Laomedon, and consequently a sister of Priam; she was a Trojan princess, daughter  of King Laomedon of Troy, and second wife of King Telamon of Salamis.  Hesper Gk.  the evening star 

94

Mythology and Folklore  
Hesperia Gk. a daughter of the river Cebren loved by Aesacus who stepped on a poisonous serpent and died;  one of the Hesperides  Hesperides  Gk.  the  daughter  of  atlas,  who  guarded  trees  with  golden  leaves,  golden  branches  and  golden  apple  Hestia Gk. The virgin goddess of the hearth (both private and municipal) and the home. As the goddess of the  family  hearth  she  also  presided  over  the  cooking  of  bread  and  the  preparation  of  the  family  meal;  Hestia  was also the goddess of the sacrificial flame and received a share of every sacrifice to  the gods; The cooking of the communal feast of sacrificial meat was naturally a part of her domain; In  myth  Hestia  was  the  first  born  child  of  Kronos  and  Rhea  who  was  swallowed  by  her  father  at  birth.  Hestia  was  depicted  in  Athenian  vase  painting  as  a  modestly  veiled  woman  sometimes  holding  a  flowered  branch  (of  a  chaste  tree  ?);  In  classical  sculpture  she  was  also  veiled,  with  a  kettle  as  her  attribute.  Hevring  N.  "Heaving";  One  of  Aegir  and  Ran's  nine  wave  daughters  who  are  said  to  be  the  mothers  of  Heimdall, the guardian of the Bifrost bridge.  Hidge, Hugh or Hugr N. The cognitive part of the soul, the intellect or "mind".  Hidimba  (mas.),  Hidimba  (fem.)  In.  a  powerful  Asura  who  has  yellow  eyes  and  a  horrible  aspect;  he  was  a  cannibal, and dwelt in the forest to which the Pandavas retired after the burning of their house. He had  a sister named Hidimba, whom he sent to lure the Pandavas to him; but on meeting with Bhima, she  fell in  love  with  him,  and  offered  to  carry  him  away  to  safety  on  her  back.  Bhima  refused,  and  while  they were parleying, Hidimba came up, and a terrible fight ensued, in which Bhima killed the monster.  Hidimba was at first much terrified and fled, but she returned and claimed Bhima for her husband. By  his mother’s desire Bhima married her, and by her had a son named Ghatotkacha.  Hieracosphinx Eg. one of three varieties of Egyptian sphinx; having the head of a hawk  Hieratic  Eg.  from  the  Greek  word  meaning  "sacred,";  although  this  form  of  the  written  language  was  used  throughout Egyptian history, its name comes from the later periods when it was used only in religious  texts.  Hieroglyph Eg. the Egyptian picture language; From the Greek word meaning "sacred carving"; The symbols  are individual pictures that do not join together.  High priest Eg. the head of the local priesthood  Hilara Gk. the laughter‐loving; daughter of Apollo; one of the daughters of Leucippus in the story of Castor and  Polux  Hilda, Hildr N. "Battle". A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla; Göndul, Hildr and Skögul, are the  most  noble  Valkyries  in  Asgard.  Their  task  is  to  choose  the  men  permitted  to  go  to  Valhalla.  Hildr  personifies the unforgiving war.  Hildeberg "Battle Fortress";  Valkyrie  Hildegun  N.  "Battle  War".  A  Valkyrie;  The  Light‐Disir  Hildegun  was  kidnapped  when  she  was  young  and  married to the emperor of the Dwarves, Ivaldi. Their children are Idun, Hjuki and Bil.  Hildisvin N. "Battle Pig". A great sow belonging to Freya; She travels at great speeds and is sometimes riden by  Freya. 

95

Mythology and Folklore  
Hildolf  ("Battle Wolf") Mentioned in Hárbarrdsljó, Hildolf lives at Rathsey's sound.  Hildskjalf [hlid‐skyalf] ‐ The throne of Odhinn, located in Valaskjalf, from which he can see all the nine worlds   Himachala, Himadri In.  the Himalaya mountains  Himavat In. the personification of the Himalaya mountains; husband of Mena or Menaka, and father of Uma  and Ganga  Himeros (or Himerus) Gk. was the god of sexual desire; one of the young Erotes (winged Love‐Gods); at others  times he appears as one of a triad of love gods, his brothers being Eros and Pothos (Love and Passion).  Himinbjorg N. "Cliffs of Heaven" or "Mountain in the Clouds". Heimdall's hall in Asgard, located at heaven's  end where the bridge Bifröst joins heaven.  Himinglava N. "The sky shines through". One of Aegir and Ran's nine wave‐daughters who are said to be the  mothers of Heimdall, the guardian of the Bifrost bridge  Himinhrjot,  Himinhrjotur  N.  "Heavens  Clearer"  Giant  Hymir's  huge  breeding  bull  with  half‐moon  shaped  horns, the largest of his oxen. Thor used its head as bait while fishing for the Midgard Serpent.   Hindu  Mythology  In.  The  Hindus  have  created  a  rich,  complex  mythology  which  is  still  very  much  alive.  Hundreds of millions of people continue to believe in the multitudes of gods which inhabit the Hindu  pantheon. This tapestry of religion is the result of millennia of integration. The Indian sub‐continent has  been a crossroad for several cultures, and the Indian people have incorporated numerous ideas from  different faiths. In early Hindu belief, which still holds true, for nothing in Hinduism is ever discarded,  this Universal whole was called Brahmam. All beings and things, from the gods and demons, through  humans,  on  to  the  lowliest  pebble  on  the  beach,  were  and  are  part  of  this  One.  In  later  times,  the  neuter Brahmam became equated with the masculine Brahma, but the original idea is still very much a  part of Hindu thought.  Hippocrene Gk. was the name of a fountain on Mt. Helicon; it was sacred to the Muses and was formed by the  hooves of Pegasus. Its name literally translates as "Horse's Fountain" and the water was supposed to  bring forth poetic inspiration when imbibed.   Hippodamia  Gk.  was  a  daughter  of  King  Oenomaus  and  mother  of  Agamemnon,  Aegisthus,  Pittheus  and  Menelaus, Alacathous by Pelops.; her name is borne by the asteroid 692 Hippodamia  Hippodamia Gk. was the bride of King Pirithous of the Lapiths; at their wedding, Hippodamia, the other female  guests, and the young boys were almost abducted by the centaurs. Pirithous and his friend, Theseus,  led the Lapiths to victor over the centaurs. With Pirithous, she mothered Polypoetes.  Hippolyta (or Hippolyte) Gk. is the Amazonian queen who possessed a magical girdle given by her father Ares,  the god of war; The girdle was a waist belt that signified her authority as queen of the Amazons.  Hippolytus Gk. was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte; he was identified with the Roman forest  god  who  had  dedicated  himself  to  Artemis;  he  was  a  good  hunter  and  charioteer  and  rejected  all  women. He even despised Aphrodite, which made the goddess take revenge by making his stepmother  Phaedra fall desperately for him.  Hippomedon Gk. was one of the Seven against Thebes and father of Polydorus; His father was either Talaus,  the  father  of  Adrastus,  or  Aristomachus  (son  of  Talaus),  or  Mnesimachus.  If  he  is  the  son  of  Mnesimachus,  then  his  mother  is  Metidice,  daughter  of  Talaus,  which  makes  him  Adrastus's  sister's 
 

96

Mythology and Folklore  
son. He lived either at Mycenae or near the lake Lerna in Peloponessus. Aeschylus describes him as very  large and powerful. He bears a fire‐breathing typhon on his shield and attacks the gate of Athena Onca,  but is killed in the battle by Ismarus; also known as Melanion, the husband of Atalanta.  Hippomenes  Gk.  was  the  husband  of  Atalanta  whom  he  beat  in  race  by  dropping  golden  apples  which  she  stopped to pick up; a son of Megareus of Onchestus, and a great grandson of Poseidon.  Hippotades Gk. a name given to Aeolus, the son of Hippotes; King of the Winds  Hiranya‐Garbha In. `Golden egg’ or `golden womb’; In the Rig‐veda Hiranya‐garbha “is said to have arisen in  the  beginning,  the  one  lord  of  all  beings,  who  upholds  heaven  and  earth,  who  gives  life  and  breath,  whose command even the gods obey, who is the god over all gods, and the one animating principle of  their  being.”  According  to  Many,  Hiranya‐garbha  was  Brahma,  the  first  male,  formed  by  the  indiscernible eternal First Cause in a golden egg resplendent as the sun. “Having continued a year in the  egg,  Brahma  divided  it  into  two  parts  by  his  mere  thought,  and  with  these  two  shells  he  formed  the  heavens and the earth; and in the middle he placed the sky, the eight regions, and the eternal abode of  the waters.”  Hiranya‐Kasipu  In.  `Golden  dress’;  a  Daitya  who,  according  to  the  Maha‐bharata  and  the  Puranas,  obtained  from Siva the sovereignty of the three worlds for a million of years, and persecuted his son Prahlada for  worshipping  Vishnu.  He  was  slain  by  Vishnu  in  the  Nara‐sinha,  or  man‐lion  incarnation.  He  and  Hiranyaksha were twin‐brothers and chiefs of the Daityas.  Hiranyaksha In. `Golden eye’; a Daitya who dragged the earth to the depths of the ocean; he was twin‐brother  of Hiranyakasipu, and was killed by Vishnu in the Boar incarnation.  Hitopadesa In. `Good advice’; the well‐known collection of ethical tales and fables compiled from the larger  and  older  work  called  Pancha‐tantra.  It  has  been  often  printed,  and  there  are  several  translations;  among them is an edition by Johnson of text, vocabulary, and translation.  Hjámberi N. "The Helmeted One"; a by‐name of Odi  Hjolgaddsringr N. The Wheel‐nail‐rung, the Arctic Circle.  Hjuki  N.  Hjuki  and  his  sister  Bil  were  sent  up  to  the  moon  with  a  bowl  full  of  mead.  There  they  follow  the  moon on its way around the earth. Their parents are Ivaldi and the Disir Hildegun.  Hlautar N. Lots, rune‐staves  Hlaut‐tein N. Lot‐twig, or "blood‐twig", i.e. rune lots.  Hlaut‐vidhar N. Lot woods.  Hlebard  N.  The  Giant  who  gave  Odin  the  magic  wand,  Gambantein;  When  Odin  got  the  wand  he  made  Hlebard lose his mind.  Hler N.  Primal water God, also called Aegir.  Hlesey Island N. "Island of the Sea God"; an island near the undersea hall of Aegir and Ran.  Hlidskialf N. Odin's high throne in Valaskjalf from which he sees and understands everybody in the world 

97

Mythology and Folklore  
Hlin N. “The one who takes pity.  She is a Goddess of compassion and consolation; Frigga's second attendant.  She  was  sent  to  kiss  away  the  tears  of  mourners  and  pour  balm  into  hearts  wrung  by  grief.  She  also  listened to the prayers of mortals, carrying them to her mistress, and advising her at times how best to  answer  them  and  give  the  desired  relief.  She  protects  people  whom  Frigga  wishes  to  "save"  from  a  danger.  Hlodyn N. Jörd.  Hlokk N. "Noise" or "Din of Battle"; A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla; Hlokk often rides  down to Midgard to pick the human warriors that are brave enough to go to Valhalla.  Hlutr N. Lot for divination, a talismanic object; A small portable image of a deity   Hnikar, Hnikud N. "Spear Thrower"; one of the personas of Odin  Hnitbjorg N. Hall of the Giant Suttung, where he kept Mead of Poetry, guarded by his daughter, Gunnlöd  Hnitibjörg's Sea N. A kenning for any for intoxicating liquor, Hnitbjorg is where the great Mead of Poetry was  hidden .  Hnoss,  Hnossi  N.  "Treasure".  Goddess  of  beauty,  Freya's  daughter  (see  also  Gersemi);  She  is  so  lovely  that  whatever is beautiful and valuable is called "treasure" from her name.  Hod, Hodur N. "War". An immensely strong As, son of Odin and Frigg. Hodur was hunting in Iron‐Wood and  stayed overnight in a cave, where a witch bewitched him with a magical potion so that he was tricked  into swearing an oath to gain the love of Nanna, Baldur's betrothed. The magical potion filled Hodur's  heart with a burning love for his brother's fiancee. When he woke up the next morning he was filled  with  shame,  but  nevertheless  he  was  bound  by  his  oath  to  betray  his  brother  (a  sign  of  Ragnarok).  When Volund and Aurvandil handed over Freyr to the Giants, Hodur and Baldur, under the direction of  Njord,  tracked  them  down  to  northernmost  wilderness  of  the  world.  An  attempt  at  reconciliation  totally failed, and resulted in an archer's duel between Hodur and Aurvandil. Aurvandil proved himself  to be superior, but Hodur was not hurt. After Aurvandil left the Elves' citadel at Elivogar, many Giants  crossed  the  border.  Hodur  joined  these,  and  organized  them  to  do  battle  with  the  Gods,  but  was  defeated.  Baldur  brought  his  repentant  brother  (who  was  then  blind  from  battle)  back  to  Asgard.  Shortly  thereafter,  Hodur  was  tricked  by  Loki  into  shooting  an  arrow  made  of  mistletoe  at  Baldr,  causing his death. Loki knew that Hodur was the only one of the Æsir, who could possibly be suspected  of  wishing  to  harm  Baldur.  The  blood‐revenge  for  Balder's  death  was  inescapable,  even  to  the  Gods,  but  no  one  could  be  found  within  Asgard  who  would  slay  Hodur,  for  this  would  deprive  Odin  of  yet  another of his sons. The Gods were in danger of being unable to fulfill their duty of revenge. Vali was  born  to  destroy  Hodur.  Vali  was  only  one  day  old  when  he  killed  Hodur.  Hodur  will  return  from  the  dead after Ragnarok to rebuild Hropt's Hall, and the brothers will become friends again.   Hoddmimir N. "Treasure of Mimir". Another name for Yggdrasil,  Hoddmimir's Holt or Wood N. Where the humans, Life & Leifthrasir, will hide while the world is being burned  by Surt during Ragnarok. They are the two human survivors of Ragnarok who will repopulate world.  Hoenir,  Honir  N.  An  Asa‐God,  who  displayed  aggressiveness  and  bravery;  He  was  a  great  warrior  but  not  clever. After the battle between the Æsir and Vanir, he was exchanged as a hostage (for the Vanir God  Njord) to the Vanirs along with the very wise Mimir. The Vanirs took Hoenir to their leader, but when  he remained silent, Vanir beheaded Mimir and sent his head back to Odin in retaliation. He was one of 

98

Mythology and Folklore  
the gods that was present at the creation of man (the other two were Lodur and Odin). He will be one  of the gods who will survive Ragnarok.  Hofvarpnir N. "Hoof‐thrower". Magic horse of the Goddess Gna, who was Frigga's messenger; It travels across  sky and sea, offspring of Hamskerpir and Gardrofa.  Holda, Holle, Holla, Hulda N. "The Dark Grandmother" These are German names for a Goddess who rules the  weather‐‐sunshine, snow, rain. She dwells at the bottom of a well, rides a wagon, and gives the gift of  flax and spinning. She is the goddess to whom children who died as infants go.   Homer  Gk.  In  classical  tradition  is  the  ancient  Greek  epic  poet,  author  of  the  epic  poems  the  Iliad  and  the  Odyssey,  the  Homeric  Hymns  and  other  works.  Homer's  epics  stand  at  the  beginning  of  the  western  canon of literature, exerting enormous influence on the history of fiction and literature in general.  Homeric Hymns Gk. Are a collection of thirty‐three poems. They are written in dactylic hexameter, which is a  six  part  rhythmic  writing  scheme  used  frequently  in  classical  mythology.  They  have  long  been  misunderstood as shorter poems written by the famous Homer. They were in fact, written by different  anonymous  individuals  who  lived  between  500BC  to  the  Hellenistic  period,  which  ended  around  100BC.  In  reality,  they  are  named  as  such  because  they  have  a  similar  style,  language  and  rhyming  scheme as the Homeric epics. Famous examples of Homer include The Iliad and The Odyssey.  Honos Rom. god of chivalry, honor and military justice  Horg, Haerg N. Altar. Originally this referred to an outdoor altar made of stone.  Hörgr N. Pagan place of worship, an altar covered by a tent or canopy, also known as træf  Horn N. An aspect of Freya as Giver of Flax.  Horn  of  plenty  Gk.  a  goat's  horn  filled  with  grain,  flowers,  and  fruit  symbolizing  prosperity.  In  Greek  mythology, Amalthea was a goat who raised Zeus on her breast milk, in a cave, on Mount Ida of Crete.  Her horn was accidentally broken off by Zeus while playing together. The god Zeus, in remorse, gave  her back her horn  with supernatural powers, which would give whoever possessed it whatever  they wished for. The original depictions were of the goat's horn filled with fruits and flowers: deities,  especially  Fortuna,  were  depicted  with  the  horn  of  plenty.  The  cornucopia  was  also  a  symbol  for  a  woman's fertility  Horse N. The animal that is sacred to Odin.  Horses of the Sea N. A kenning for boats.  Horus Eg. a falcon headed god; Horus was so important to the state religion that Pharaohs were considered  his human manifestation and even took on the name Horus.  Horus name Eg. a king's name; it identifies the king with a form of the god Horus  Hotri In. a priest who recites the prayers from the Rig‐veda  Howe N. A type of burial mound.  Hraesvelg, Hrelsweg, Hrœsvelg N. "Corpse‐Eater". Wind‐Giant.The giant eagle that sits at the top of Yggdrasi;.  From  his  wings  comes  the  north  wind.  He  is  always  arguing  with  the  dragon  Nidhoggr.  Between  the  eagle's eyes sits a hawk. 

99

Mythology and Folklore  
Hrafn N. Raven, intelligence and knowledge  Hrauthung N. A ruler of the Giants, father of Agnar and Geirröth.  Hreidmar N. The Giant Hreidmar is a farmer‐magician. He has three sons; Fafnir, Otter, and Regin. He captured  Odin,  Loki,  and  Hœnir  for  accidentally  killing  his  son,  Otter,  and  would  not  let  them  go  until  Loki  brought  him  enough  gold to  cover  his  sons  body  inside  and  out.  Loki  stole  the  Nibelung gold  to  turn  over as  ransom. Hreidmar died as a result of the cursed gold, killed by his son Fafnir, who then took  dragon form to guard the gold hoard.  Hridvitner N. Another name for Fenrir wolf.  Hrimfaxi N. Nott's horse; drips from his bit create dew all over the world.  Hrimgrimir, Hrimnir N. "Frost Shrouded". A hideous troll who sits by the gate of Hel, a Frost Giant  Hrimthurs N. The name of the disguised Giant who offered to build Valhalla within eighteen months to protect  the Æsir from Cliff‐Giants. As his reward he wanted Freya as his wife along with Sun and Moon. They  gods agreed only if he could do it before summer. Using his horse, Svadilfari, to draw the huge rocks he  almost succeeded. Loki distracted his horse and he never finished. Soon after, he was revealed as an  evil Giant and was killed by Thor.  Hringhorni N. The name of Balder's ship. His funeral pyre was placed on this boat and it was pushed out to sea  while it burned. His wife, Nanna, who had died from grief, and his horse were also placed on the boat.  Hrishikesa In. a name of Krishna or Vishnu  Hrist N. "The Shaker". A Valkyrie assigned to carry the drinks round and look after the table service and ale‐ cups in Valhalla. Hrist and Mist bring an ale horn to Odin. They are his personal servants.  Hronn N. "Wave Suck". Hronn is one of Aegir and Ran's nine wave‐daughters who are said to be the mothers  of Heimdall, the guardian of the Bifrost Bridge.  Hropt, Hroptatyr N. "The Doomer". Another name for Odin in Valhalla  Hropt's Hall N. Valhalla, Odin's Hall.  Hrossthjofur N. Brother to Gullveig & Loki  Hrotte  N.  The  sword  Hrotte  was  a  part  of  the  gold  treasure  guarded  by  the  dragon  Fafni.  It  was  taken  by  Sigurdr Fafnisbari when he had killed the dragon.  Hrungnir,  Rungnir  N.  The  strongest  of  the  Giants,  had  a  stone  heart  with  three  points  on  it.  His  head  and  shield were also made of stone. He wagered with Odin about who had the better horse. Odin won race  to the As‐gates where the Æsir invited Hrungnir in for a drink. Hrungnir got drunk and threatened to  remove  Valhalla,  bury  Asgard,  kill  the  Gods,  and  take  Freyia  and  Sif  with  him.  He  was  challenged  by  Thor  to  a  battle.  When  Thorr  killed  him,  a  piece  of  the  Giant's  whetstone  lodged  in  Thorr's  head.  Hrungnir's horse, Gullfaxi, was given by Thorr to his son, Magni.  Hrym N. Leader of the Giants, who will steer the great ship Naglfar at Ragnarok  Hugauga N. The mind's eye used for purposes of magical visualization. Identical with the ajña chakra, or "third  eye" in the forehead.  

100

Mythology and Folklore  
Hughr N. The hughr is the conscious part of the soul, the thought process. The hughr is said to go to either  Valhalla, Hel or to some other godly abode upon death.  Hugi,  Huge  N.  Hugi  is  the  personification  of  the  Giant  Utgardh‐Loki's  thoughts.  When  the  Æsirs  visited  Utgardh, Hugi competed with the fast human boy, Tjalfi. Huge won because thought always is faster.  Huginn & Munnin N. "Thought" and "Memory"; Odin's two ravens. These Giant ravens bring news of the nine  worlds to Odin.  Hugrúnar,  Hugrunes  N.  Mind  runes,  by  which  one  gains  intelligence;  closely  related  to  Malrunes  are  the  Hugrunes  (or  Hog  runes);  The  word  is  related  to  the  name  of  one  of  Odin's  two  attendant  ravens,  Huginn,  "Thought".  These  are  the  mind‐power  runes.  Traditionally  they  should  be  written  upon  the  runemaster's  chest  and  'secret  parts'.  Their  function  is  to  bring  mental  excellence  to  the  user.  As  in  former times, Hugrunes are one of the most powerful and effective means of mind‐consciousness.  Huldra,  Hulder  N.  Female  wood‐  or  mountain  –sprites;  they  are  very  beautiful  and  lure  men,  but  may  be  revealed by their cowtail; A runic charm, a "smjorhnutter" was carved on top of freshly churned butter  so that the hulder would not steal it. See Huldru‐folk.  Huldru‐folk N. The "hidden folk" are halfway in nature between trolls and landvaettir. They are peoples of the  mound and forest, not slain by sunlight, but who often try to capture mortals by tricks and magic. They  can be both helpful and harmful to humans. They are keepers of magical wisdom, generally related to  the lore of plants and healing, though they also cause sickness at times.  Hunas In. According to Wilson, “the White Huns or Indo‐Scythians, who were established  in the Panjab and  along  the  Indus  at  the  commencement  of  our  era,  as  we  know  from  Arrian,  Strabo,  and  Ptolemy,  confirmed  by  recent  discoveries  of  their  coins,”  and  since  still  further  confirmed  by  inscriptions  and  additional coins. Dr. Fitzedward Hall says, “I am not prepared to deny  that the ancient Hindus, when  they spoke of the Hunas, intended the Huns. In the Middle Ages, however, it is certain that a race called  Huna was understood by the learned of India to form a division of the `Kshatriyas.”   Hun‐Desa In.  the country round Lake Manasarovara  Hunger N. Hunger is the Death Goddess Hel's plate. It is probably in her dark stronghold, Eljudnir in Nifilhel.  Hurler N. A kenning for Thor.  Hushka  Huvishka  In.  a  Tushkara  or  Turki  king,  whose  name  is  mentioned  in  the  Raja  Tarangini  as  Hushka,  which  has  been  found  in  inscriptions  as  Huvishka,  and  upon  the  corrupt  Greek  coins  as  Oerki.  He  is  supposed to have reigned just at the commencement of the Christian era.  Hvedrungs N. Another name for Fenrir.  Hvergelmir N. A mountain located in Hel on which is found the world mill. It is the worst place of all, where  the Nidhogg dragon knaws on the evil dead.  Hvergelmir  Spring  N.  "Seething  Cauldron";  The  Well  of  Hvergelmir,  guarded  by  the  dragon  Nidhogg;  In  Niflheim, it lies under a root of Yggdrasil, the World Tree. It is the lowest level of the Well of Wyrd, from  which the forces of primal water holding yeast and venom flow.  Hyacinth  (or  Hyacinthus)  Gk.  is  a  divine  hero  from  Greek  mythology;  the  son  of  Clio  and  Pierus,  King  of  Macedonia.  Hyacinth  was  a  beautiful  youth  beloved  by  the  god  Apollo.  According  to  myth,  the  two  attempted to beat each other in discus. They took turns throwing it, until Apollo, to impress his lover, 

101

Mythology and Folklore  
threw  it  with  all  his  might.  Hyacinth  ran  to  catch  it,  to  inturn  impress  Apollo,  and  was  struck  by  the  discus as it fell to the ground ‐ he died.  Hyades  Gk.  they  are  a  sisterhood  of  nymphs  that  bring  rain;  the  Hyades  were  daughters  of  Atlas  (by  either  Pleione or Aethra, one of the Oceanides) and sisters of Hyas in most tellings, although one version gives  their parents as Hyas and Boe.  Hyde N. Body shape or image; the quasi‐physical part of the soul which gives a person shape and form; It may  be collected and reformed by magical power (hamingja) according to will (hugr).  Hydra  Gk.  a  fabulous  nine‐ headed  water‐snake  which grew two heads for  every  one  which  was  cut  off; Heracles defeated the  beast  by  applying  a  burning  brand  to  the  severed neck stumps.                  Hyge N. Thought, intuition.                          Hygea  Gk.  goddess  of  Health,  said  sometimes  to  be  daughter  of  Aesculapius                Hygea      Hydra     

102

Mythology and Folklore  
Hylas Gk. The armor‐bearer of Hercules who was very dear to him. He was drawn under the water by a water  nymph who fell in love with him. As she tried to kiss him, she threw her arms around his neck and drew  him down into the depths and he was seen no more.  Hyllus Gk. (Hyllos) a Lydian giant  Hylonome  Gk.  A  female  centaur  who  killed  herself  when  her  husband  the  centaur  Cyllarus  was  slain  in the  battle with  the Lapiths.  Hym,  Hymir  N.  Tyr's  foster  father;  the  violent  Giant  Hymir  can  smash  massive  stone  columns  with  power  from  his  eyes.  His  mother  had  1,800  heads  and  his  wife  has  900  heads.  He owns the kettle Seaboiler which is miles deep. He was  fishing  with  Thor  when  Thor  caught  Jormungand.  A  terrible  battle  ensued.  Hymir  panicked  and  cut  the  line  and  let  loose  the  Serpent,  so  Thorr  punched  him  overboard.  Hymen Gk. HYMENAIOS (Hymen or  Hymenaeus) was the god of  weddings, or more specifically of the wedding hymn which  was  sung  by  the  train  of  the  bride  as  she  was  led  to  the  house  of  the  groom.  Hymenaios  was  numbered  amongst  the Erotes, the youthful gods of love. As one of the gods of  song, he was usually described as a son of Apollo and a Muse.            

      Hylonome 

 

Hyndla N. Hyndla is a Giantess that rests in death slumber in  a  cave.  She  knows  how  every  God,  Giant,  Dwarf  and  Alf  is  related  to  each  other.  She  is  great  at  solving  inheritance  disputes.  Giantess  who  keeps  the  genealogy  lists  and  the  Memory Beer  Hyperboreans  Giants  Gk.  (Gigantes  Hyperboreioi)  Three  giant  sons  of  the  North‐Wind  who  were  the  priests  of  the  fabulous Hyperborean tribe of the far north.  Hyperboreans  Gk.  (Hyperboreoi)  A  tribe  of  blessed  men  favoured by Apollo who dwelt in a land of eternal spring far  beyond  the  wintry  moutains  of  the  North‐Wind.  They  were  happy  people  who  were  always  banqueting  and  holding  joyful  revelry.  They  gave  Perseus  the  winged  sandals,  magic  wallet, and a cap which made the wearer invisible.  Hyperes  Gk.  (or  HYPERENOR)  A  King  of  Troizenos  in  the  Argolis  (southern  Greece)  and  founder  of  the  town  of  Hypereia. He was a son of Poseidon and the Pleaid Alkyone.                         Hyperboreans 

103

Mythology and Folklore  
Hyperia Gk. (Hypereia) a Naiad nymph daughter of the river Inachus in southern Greece  Hyperion Gk. the father of the sun, the moon, and the dawn; one of the notable Titans in mythology. One of  the six elder Titans, who represented the light of heaven and the cosmic ordering of days and months.   Hypermnestra Gk. She was the only one of the fifty daughters of Danaus that did not kill her husband, and this  is how it happened: Danaus and his fifty daughters fled in fear of his twin brother Aegyptus. The fifty  sons of Aegyptus followed them, and forced Danaus to make his daughters marry them. Danaus, since  he hated his brother, gave each of his daughters a pin to murder their husbands on their wedding night.  Hypermnestra was the only one who spared her husband, Lynceus. She did this because she fell in love  with him and didn't want to kill him. Because of this, Lynceus made her the ancestress of the kings of  Argives. She was also rewarded by being sent straight to Elysium when she died. Elysium is the land of  Orchards, a wonderful, heavenly place.  Hypnus  Gk.  (Hypnos)  the  winged  daemon  (spirit)  of  sleep;  Hios  three  sons  are  Morpheus,  Icelus,  and  Phantasus  Hypostyle  hall  Eg.  from  the  Greek  word  meaning;  "bearing  pillars";  it  is  a  term  used  to  describe  the  grand,  outermost halls; they are believed to represent a grove of trees.   Hypsipyle Gk. Daughter of Dionysus’s son Thoas, king of the island of Lemnos. When the women of Lemnos,  furious at their husbands’ betrayal, murdered all the men on the island, Hypsipyle hid her father and  aided  his  escape.  She  became  queen  of  the  island  and  welcomed  the  Argonauts  when  they  landed;  eventually she bore twin sons to the Argonaut Jason.  Hyrieus  Gk.  the  first  Lord  and  Eponym  of  the  town  of  Hyria  in  Boiotia  (central  Greece);  he  was  a  son  of  Poseidon and the Pleaid Alkyone.  Hyrrokin N. "Fire Smoke". A Jotun‐Giantess with enormous strength, who rides a wolf with a bridle of snakes;  At Balder's wake his ship funeral ship, Ringhorne, had to be shoved, burning, into the sea, but the gods  couldn't even budge the huge ship. Even Thor gave up, and the Gods sent for Hyrrokkin. The formidable  giantess lauched the ship with a mighty shove  Hysminae Gk. (Hysminai) the personifications of fighting, ruthless spirits of the battlefield   


Iacchus Gk. (Iakkhos) A torch‐bearing deity of the processions of the Eleusinian Mysteries who personified the  ritual cry "iakkhe". He was a demi‐god or daimon attendant of the goddess Demeter and the leader‐in‐ chief  of  the  Eleusinian  Mysteries.  He  personified  the  ritual  cry  of  joy  iakhe  of  the  procession  of  the  initiates. Iakkhos was depicted as a young man holding the twin torches of the Mysteries, usually in the  company of Demeter, Kore and other Eleusinian gods.  Ialebion Gk. a co‐King of Liguria (in Western Europe) with his brother Derkynos; both were sons of Poseidon  Iapetus  Gk. (Iapetos) one of the six elder Titans; the ancestor of mankind, who represented mortality  Iarnvidiur N. The trollwife Giantess of Ironwood Forest in Midgard, who breeds wolves.  Iasion Gk. a springtime consort of the goddess Demeter and patron‐deity of the Samothracian Mysteries 

104

Mythology and Folklore  
Iaso Gk. the goddess of recovery, one of the daughters of the divine physician Asclepius   Iasus Gk. father of Atalanta by Clymene; he was the son of King Lycurgus of Arcadia; he is also known as Iasius  Ibu Eg. the tent of purification; this is the place where mummification was preformed  Ibycus  Gk.  An  Ancient  Greek  lyric  poet,  a  citizen  of  Rhegium  in  Magna  Graecia,  probably  active  at  Samos  during the reign of the tyrant Polycrates and numbered by the scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria in the  canonical list of nine lyric poets.  Icarius  Gk.  An  Attican  man  who  was  instructed  by  the  god  Dionysos  in  the  making  of  wine  when  he  first  arrived in the country. Introducing this gift to his fellows, Ikarios was stoned to death by the drunken  peasants,  who  thought  they  had  been  poisoned.  Regaining  their  senses  in  the  morning  they  secretly  buried him. His daughter Erigone came in search of her missing father with her faithful dog Maira. Upon  discovering  the  body  she  hanged  herself  from  a  tree  and  the  dog  leapt  into  a  well.  Dionysos  was  angered  by  their  deaths,  and  after  transferring  Ikarios,  Erigone  and  Maira  to  the  stars  as  the  constellations Bootes, Virgo and Canis Major, inflicted the land with drought and drove the Athenians  maidens mad causing them to hang themselves. In accordance with an oracle a festival was instituted  in honour of the dead heroes to appease the god's wrath.  Icelus  Gk.  (Ikelos)  A  daemon  (spirit)  of  prophetic  dreams  who  appeared  in  the  sleep  of  kings  as  an  animal  shaped phantasm. His brothers, Morpheus and Phantasus, assumed the forms of men and inanimate  objects.  Ichthyes Gk. (Ikhthyes) A pair of large fish which rescued the goddess Aphrodite and her son Eros when they  were fleeing the raging monster Typhon.       Ichthyocentaurs Gk. (Ikhthyokentauroi)  Two  fish‐tailed  marine  centaurs,  named  Aphros  and  Bythos,  who  carried  new‐born  goddess  Aphrodite  ashore  in  a  cockle‐ shell. They had the upper‐bodies  of  men,  and  the  lower‐quarters  of fish‐tailed horses.         Ida Gk. a nymph of Mount Ida on the Greek island of Crete; she was one of the nurses of the god Zeus who  nursed him with the milk of the goat Amaltheia.  Ida  In.  In  the  Rig‐veda  Ida  is  primarily  food,  refreshment,  or  a  libation  of  milk;  thence  a  stream  of  praise,  personified  as  the  goddess  of  speech.  She  is  called  the  instructress  of  Manu,  and  frequent  passages  ascribe to her the first institution of the rules of performing sacrifices. According to Sayana, she is the  goddess presiding over the earth. A legend in the Satapatha Brahmana represents her as springing from                 Ichthyocentaurs 

105

Mythology and Folklore  
a sacrifice, which Manu performed for the purpose of obtaining offspring. She was claimed by Mitra‐ Varuna,  but  remained  faithful  to  him  who  had  produced  her.  Manu  lived  with  her,  and  praying  and  fasting to obtain offspring, he begat upon her the race of Manu. In the Puranas she is daughter of the  Manu Vaivaswata, wife of Budha (Mercury), and mother of Pururavas. The Manu Vaivaswata, before he  had sons, instituted a sacrifice to Mitra and Varuna for the purpose of obtaining one; but the officiating  priest mismanaged the performance, and the result was the birth of a daughter, Ida or Ila. Through the  favour  of  the  two  deities  her  sex  was  changed,  and  she  became  a  man,  Su‐dyumna.  Under  the  malediction of Siva, Su‐dyumna was again turned into a woman, and, as Ila, married Budha or Mercury.  After she had given birth to Pururavas, she, under the favour of Vishnu, once more became Su‐dyumna,  and was the father of three  sons. According to another version of the legend, the Manu’s eldest son  was named Ila. He having trespassed on a grove sacred to Parvati, was changed into a female, Ila. Upon  the supplications and prayers of Ila’s friends, Siva and his consort conceded that the offender should be  a male one month and a female another. There are other variations in the story, which is apparently  ancient.  Idaia  Gk. a nymph of Mount Ida in the region of Troy; wife of the River Scamander  Idas Gk. a Prince and Hero of Messenia (in southern Greece) who was, according to some, a son of Poseidon  and Arene (most, however, say his father was King Aphareus).  Idavida In. daughter of Trinabindu and the Apsaras Alambusha; there are different statements in the Puranas  as  regards  her;  she  is  represented  to  be  the  wife  of  Visravas  and  mother  of  Kuvera,  or  the  wife  of  Pulastya and mother of Visravas.  Idavoll,  Idavollen  N. "Field of Tides". The central plain of Asgard near the spring  of Urda;  Odin's a first task  after the creation was build a hall here in which there were seats for twelve gods, in addition to his own  high‐seat. It will be inhabited again after the Ragnarok, when earth will rise out of the sea and be green  and fair.  Ide N. Giant Ide is Olvalde's middle son. Gang is his little brother and Tjatsi his big brother. When the father  had died the brothers shared the beer. That was the first time they were all quiet.  Idis, Idisi N. In Germanic mythology, Goddesses of fate related to the Norns. In the first Merseburger Magic  Poem  they  also  appear  as  battle  virgins  after  the  manner  of  Valkyries  and  as  fetter‐  and  bonds‐ loosening magic women. See Dis.  Idomeneus Gk. King on Crete who was Deucalion's son and Minos's grandson. He was one of Helen's suitors  and  fought  bravely  with  the  Greeks  in  the  Trojan  War.  On  his  journey  back  from  the  war  a  storm  threatened to sink his fleet, and he promised Poseidon to make the first living thing he met at home a  sacrifice to the god if he would only return safely. Since it was his son who first greeted him, Idomeneus  denied Poseidon his sacrifice, and so Crete was stuck with plague. Idomeneus people then exiled their  king, who ended his days in Calabria in Asia Minor, where he built a temple to Athena.  Idun, Iduna, Idhunna N. "She Who Renews". Goddess of eternal life and youth, keeper of the golden apples of  youth and immortality, wife of Bragi; Every year she gives one apple to every Æsir.  Iduna Nor. Daughter of the dwarf Svald, and wife of Bragi. She kept in a box the golden apples which the gods  tasted as often as they wished to renew their youth. Loki on one occasion stole the box and hid it in a  wood; but the gods compelled him to restore it.  Idyia Gk. (Eidyia) the youngest of the Oceanides and wife of Aeetes king of Colchis 

106

Mythology and Folklore  
Ieb Eg. This is the heart; The Egyptians believed the heart was the center of all consciousness, even the center  of life itself; When someone died it was said that their "heart had departed."; It was the only organ that  was not removed from the body during mummification; In the Book of the dead, it was the heart that  was  weighed  against  the  feather  of  Maat  to  see  if  an  individual  was  worthy  of  joining  Osiris  in  the  afterlife.  Ikshwaku In. Son of the Manu Vaivaswat, who was son of Vivaswat, the sun. “He was born from the nostril of  the Manu as he happened to sneeze.” Ikshwaku was founder of the Solar race of kings, and reigned in  Ayodhya at the beginning of the second Yuga or age. He had a hundred sons, of whom the eldest was  Vikukshi. Another son, named Nimi, founded the Mithila dynasty. According to Max Muller the name is  mentioned once, and only once, in the Rig‐veda. Respecting this he adds: “I take it, not as the name of a  king, but as the name of a people, probably the people who inhabited Bhajeratha, the country washed  by the northern Ganga or Bhagirathi.” Others place the Ikshwakus in the northwest.  Ilion Gk. a city known as Troy, which was built by Ilos.  Ilissus Gk. (Ilissos) a river of Athens and its watery spirit; the stream of the Ilissos flowed through the town of  Athens. It flowed into the Saronic Gulf just south of the port of Peiraios. Other Attic rivers personified  by the Athenians were the Eridanos, a small tributory of the Ilissos, and the twin‐streamed Kephisos to  the north.  Ilithyia Gk. the goddess of childbirth and labour pains; according to some there were two Eileithyiai, one who  furthered  birth  and  one  who  protracted  the  labour.  Her  name  means  "she  who  comes  to  aid"  or  "relieve" from the Greek word elêluthyia. Her Roman counterpart was Natio ("Birth") or Lucina ("Light  bringer").   Ilium Rm. A new city which was founded on the site in the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus. It flourished  until the establishment of Constantinople and declined gradually during the Byzantine era.  Illyria Gk. was a region in the western part of the Balkan Peninsula inhabited by the Illyrians, a heterogeneous  coalition of tribes.  Imbrasus Gk. (Imbrasos) a River‐God of the island of Samos in the Greek Aegean; he Imbrasos stream was a  small stream on Samos Island. Other personified Aegean island rivers included the Inopos of Delos, and  Amnisos of Krete.  Imra In. the supreme god of Kafirstan in Hindu Kush (a great mountain system of Central Asia)  Inachus    Gk.  (Inakhos)  A  river  of  Argos  in  southern  Greece  and  its  spirit.  When  Poseidon  and  Hera  were  contesting for dominion of Argos, he ruled in favour of Hera, causing Poseidon to dry up his stream.  Indivia Rom. goddess of jealousy  Indra  In.  The  god  of  the  firmament,  the  personified  atmosphere.  In  the  Vedas  he  stands  in  the  first  rank among the gods, but he is not uncreate, and  is represented as having a father and mother: “a  vigorous god begot him; a heroic female brought  him forth.” He is described as being of a ruddy or  golden  colour,  and  as  having  arms  of  enormous  length;  “but  his  forms  are  endless,  and  he  can  assume  any  shape  at  will,”  He  rides  in  a  bright 

107

Mythology and Folklore  
golden  car,  drawn  by  two  tawny  or  ruddy  horses  with  flowing  manes  and  tails.  His  weapon  is  the  thunderbolt, which he carries in his right hand; he also uses arrows, a great hook, and a net, in which he  is said to entangle his foes. The soma juice is his especial delight; he takes enormous draughts of it, and  stimulated by its exhilarating qualities, he goes forth to war against his foes, and to perform his other  duties. As deity of the atmosphere, he governs the weather and dispenses the rain; he sends forth his  lightning’s  and  thunder,  and  he  is  continually  at  war  with  Vritra  or  Ahi,  the  demon  of  drought  and  inelement  weather,  whom  he  overcome  with  his  thunderbolts,  and  compels  to  pour  down  the  rain.  Strabo describes the Indians as worshipping Jupiter Pluvius, no doubt meaning Indra, and he has also  been  compared  to  Jupiter  Tonans.  One  myth  is  that  of  his  discovering  and  rescuing  the  cows  of  the  priests or of the gods, which had been stolen by an Asura named Pani or Vala, whom he killed, and he is  hence called Vala‐bhid. He is frequently represented as destroying the “stone‐built cities” of the Asuras  or  atmospheric  demons,  and  of  the  Dasyus  or  aborigines  of  India.  In  his  warfare  he  is  sometimes  represented  as  escorted  by  troops  of  Maruts,  and  attended  by  his  comrade  Vishnu.  More  hymns  are  addressed  to  Indra  than  to  any  other  deity  in  the  Vedas,  with  the  exception  of  Agni.  For  he  was  reverenced in his beneficient character as the bestower of rain and the cause of fertility, and he was  feared as the awful ruler of the storm and director of the lightning and thunder. In many places of the  Rig‐veda  the  highest  divine  functions  and  attributes are  ascribed  to  him.  There  was  a  triad  of  gods  –  Agni, Vayu, and Surya – which held a pre‐eminence above the rest, and Indra frequently took the place  of Vayu. In some parts of the Veda, as Dr. Muir remarks, the ideas expressed of Indra are grand  and  lofty; at other times he is treated with familiarity, and his devotion to the soma juice is dilated upon,  though  nothing  debasing  is  perceived  in  his  sensuality.  Indra  is  mentioned  as  having  a  wife,  and  the  name  of  Indrani  or  Aindri  is  invoked  among  the  goddesses.  In  the  Satapatha  Brahmana  she  is  called  Indra’s beloved wife.       In the later mythology Indra has fallen into the second rank. He is inferior to the triad, but he is the  chief of all the other gods. He is the regent of the atmosphere and of the cast quarter of the compass,  and he reigns over Swarga, the heaven of the gods and of beatified spirits, which is a region of great  magnificence  and  splendour.  He  retains  many  of  his  Vedic  characteristics,  and  some  of  them  are  intensified.  He  sends  the  lightning  and  hurls  the  thunderbolt,  and  the  rainbow  is  his  bow.  He  is  frequently  at  war  with  the  Asuras,  of  whom  he  lives  in  constant  dread,  and  by  whom  he  is  often  worsted. But he slew the demon Vrita, who, being regarded as a Brahman, Indra had to conceal himself  and make sacrifice until his guilt was purged away. His continued love for the soma juice is shown by a  legend in the Maha‐bharata, which represents him as being compelled by the sage Chyavana to allow  the  Aswins  to  partake  of  the  soma  libations,  and  his  sensuality  has  now  developed  into  an  extreme  lasciviousness.  Many  instances  are  recorded  of  his  incontinence  and  adultery,  and  his  example  is  frequently referred to as an excuse in cases of gallantry, as by King Nahusha when he tried to obtain  Indra’s  wife  while  the  latter  was  hiding  in  Vritra.  According  to  the  Maha‐bharata  he  seduced,  or  endeavoured to seduce, Ahalya, the wife of the sage Gautama, and that sage’s curse impressed upon  him  a  thousand  marks  resembling  the  female  organ,  so  he  was  called  Sa‐yoni;  but  these  marks  were  afterwards changed to eyes, and he is hence called Netra‐yoni, and Sahasraksha `the thousand‐eyed.’  In the Ramayana it is related that Ravana, the Rakshasa king of Lanka or Ceylon, warred against Indra in  his  own  heaven,  and  that  Indra  was  defeated  and  carried  off  to  Lanka  by  Ravana’s  son  Megha‐nada,  who for this exploit received the title of Indra‐jit (q.v.), `conqueror of Indra.’ Brahma and the gods had  to sue for the release of Indra, and to purchase it with the boon of immortality to the victor. Brahma  then  told  the  humiliated  god  that  his  defeat  was  a  punishment  for  the  seduction  of  Ahalya.  The  Taittiriya  Brahmana  states  that  the  chose  Indrani  to  be  his  wife  in  preference  to  other  goddesses  because  of  her  voluptuous  attractions,  and  later  authorities  say  that  he  ravished  her,  and  slew  her  father, the Daitya Puloman, to escape his curse. Mythologically he was father of Arjuna (q.v.), and for  him  he  cheated  Karna  of  his  divine  coat  of  mail,  but  gave  Karna  in  recompense  a  javelin  of  deadly 

108

Mythology and Folklore  
effect.  His  libertine  character  is  also  shown  by  his  frequently  sending  celestial  nymphs  to  excite  the  passions of holy men, and to beguile them from the potent penances, which he dreaded.       In the Puranas many stories are told of him, and he appears especially in rivalry with Krishna. He  incurred  the  wrath  of  the  choleric  sage  Dur‐vasas  by  slighting  a  garland  of  flowers,  which  that  sage  presented to him, and so brought upon himself the curse that his whole dominion should be whelmed  in ruin. He was utterly defeated by the Daityas, or rather by their ally, Raja, son of Ayus, and grandson  of Pururavas, and he was reduced to such a forlorn condition that he, “the god of a hundred sacrifices,”  was compelled to beg for a little sacrificial butter. Puffed up by their victory, his conquerors neglected  their duties, and so they became the easy prey of Indra, who recovered his dominion. The Bhagavata  Purana represents him as having killed a Brahman, and of being haunted by that crime, personified as a  Chandali.     Indra  had  been  an  object  of  worship  among  the  pastoral  people  of  Vraja,  but  Krishna  persuaded  them to cease this worship. Indra was greatly enraged at this, and sent a deluge of rain to overwhelm  them; but Krishna lifted up the mountain Govardhana on his finger to shelter them, and so held it for  seven days, till Indra was baffled and rendered homage to Krishna. Again, when Krishna went to visit  Swarga,  and  was  about  to  carry  off  the  Parijata  tree,  Indra  resented  its  removal,  and  a  fierce  fight  ensued, in which Indra was worsted, and the tree was carried off. Among the deeds of Indra recorded  in the Puranas is that of the destruction of the offspring of Diti the Puranas is that of the destruction of  the offspring of Diti in her womb, and the production there from of the Maruts and there is a story of  his  cutting  off  the  wings  of  the  mountains  with  his  thunderbolts,  because  they  were  refractory  and  troublesome. Indra is represented as a fair man riding on a white horse or an elephant, and bearing the  vajra or thunderbolt in his hand. His son is named Jayanta. Indra is not the object of direct worship, but  he receives incidental adoration and there is a festival kept in his honour called Sakra‐dhwajot Thana,  `the raising of the standard of Indra.’     Indra’s  names  are  many,  as  Mahendra,  Sakra,  Maghavan,  Ribhuksha,  Vasava,  Arha,  Datteya.  His  epithets  or  titles  also  are  numerous.  He  is  Vritra‐han,  `the  destroyer  of  Vritra;’  Vajra‐pani,  `of  the  thunderbolt hand;’ Megha‐vahana, `borne upon the clouds;’ Paka‐sasana, `the subduer of Paka;’ Sata‐ kratu,  `of  a  hundred  sacrifices;’  Deva‐pati  and  Suradhipa,  `chief  of  the  gods;’  Divas‐pati,  `ruler  of  the  atmosphere;’  Marutwan,  `lord  of  the  winds;’  Swarga‐pati,  `lord  of  paradise;’  Jishnu,  `leader  of  the  celestial host;’ Puran‐dara, `destroyer of cities;’ Uluka, `the owl;’ Ugra dhanwan, `of the terrible bow,’  and  many  others.  The  heaven  of  Indra  is  Swarga;  its  capital  is  Amaravati;  his  palace,  Vaijayanta;  his  garden,  Nandana,  Kandasara,  or  Parushya;  his  elephant  is  Airavata;  his  horse,  Uchchaiah‐sravas;  his  chariot, Vimana; his charioteer, Matali; his bow, the rainbow, Sakra‐dhanus; and his sword, Paran‐ja.  

 

 

Indra‐Dyumna In. son of Su‐mati and grandson of Bharata; there were several of the names, among them a  king of Avanti, by whom the temple of Vishnu was built, and the image of Jagan‐natha was set up in  Orissa.   Indra‐Jit In. Megha‐nada, son of Ravana. When Ravana went against Indra’s forces in Swarga, his son Megha‐ nada accompanied him, and fought most valiantly. Indra himself was obliged to interfere, when Megha‐ nada,  availing  himself  of  the  magical  power  of  becoming  invisible,  which  he  had  obtained  from  Siva,  bound  Indra  and  carried  him  off  to  Lanka.  The  gods,  headed  by  Brahma,  went  thither  to  obtain  the  release  of  Indra,  and  Brahma  gave  to  Megha‐nada  the  name  Indra‐jit,  conqueror  of  Indra.’  Still  the  victor refused to release his prisoner for anything less than the boon of immortality. Brahma refused,  but Indra‐jit persisted in his demand and achieved his object. One version of the Ramayana states that  Indra‐jit was killed and had his head cut off by Lakshmana, who surprised him while he was engaged in  a sacrifice. 

109

Mythology and Folklore  
Indra‐Kila In. the mountain Mandara  Indra‐Loka In. Indra’s heaven; Swarga  Indrani  In.  Wife  of  Indra,  and  mother  of  Jayanta  and  Jayanti.  She  is  also  called  Sachi  and  Aindri.  She  is  mentioned  a  few  times  in  the  Rig‐veda,  and  is  said  to  be  the  most  fortunate  of  females,  “for  her  husband  shall  never  die  of  old  age.”  The  Taittiriya  Brahmana  states  that  Indra  chose  her  for  his  wife  from a number of competing goddesses, because she surpassed them all in voluptuous attractions. In  the Ramayana and Puranas she appears as the daughter of the Daitya Puloman, from whom she has the  patronymic Paulomi. She was ravished by Indra, who killed her father to escape his curse. According to  the Maha‐bharata, King Nahusha became enamoured of her, and she escaped from him with difficulty.  Indrani has never been held in very high esteem as a goddess.  Indra‐Pramati In. an early teacher of the Rig‐veda, who received one Sanhita direct from Paila  Indra‐Prastha In. the capital city of the Pandu princes; the name is still known, and is used for a part of the city  of Delhi  Indra‐Sena (mas.), Indra‐Sena (fem.) In. names of the son and daughter of Nala and Damayanti.  Indu In. the moon  Indu‐Mani In. the moon gem  Indu‐Mati In. sister of Bhoja, king of Vidarbha, who chose Prince Aja for her husband at her swayam‐vara; she  was killed by Narada’s garland falling upon her while asleep in an arbour.  Ing, Ingvi, Ingvi‐Frey N. Fertility God (see also Freyr) ; Patronial deity of England, God of protection. Vana‐God  of Earth and fertility; The Swedish royal line called themselves Ynglings, as did the Anglo‐Saxon line of  Berenicia.  Ingun N. Mother or consort of Freyr; She may have been a face of Nerthus. She is the Progenetrix, Birthgiver  and Devourer.  Innangardhs N. social, ordered space; space inside the enclosure of  human culture            Ino Gk. a woman transformed into a sea‐goddess after she leapt into  the  sea  to  escape  her  crazed  husband;  she  became  a  protectress of sailors who rescued men from drowning.   

110

Mythology and Folklore  
                        Io  Gk.  A  Naiad  nymph  daughter  of  the  river  Inachus in the south of Greece. She was loved by  Zeus who transformed her into a cow to hide her  from  the  jealous  gaze  of  his  wife  Hera.  But  the  goddess  was  not  fooled  and  sent  a  maddening  gladfly to torment Io which drove her to wander  all  the  way  to  Egypt,  where  she  gave  birth  to  Epaphus, ancestor of all the Pharaohs.             Iobates  Gk.  he  was  a  Lycian  king,  father  of  Antea  and  Philonoe;  the  king  who  sent  Bellerophon  against  the  Chimaera.      Iolaus  Gk.  He  was  a  Theban  divine  hero,  son  of  Iphicles,  Heracles's brother, and Automedusa. He was famed for  being Heracles's nephew and for helping with some of  his  Labors.  Through  his  daughter  Leipephilene  he  was 

111

Mythology and Folklore  
considered to have fathered the mythic and historic line of the kings of Corinth, ending with Telestesi.              Iolco Gk. an ancient city in Thessaly, central‐eastern Greece (near the modern city of Volos)      Iole Gk. the daughter of Eurytus; Eurytus promised Iole  to  whoever  could  beat  his  sons  in  an  archery  contest.  Heracles  won  but  Eurytus  abandoned  his  promise.  Heracles killed him and his sons, and abducted Iole.                                 Iole and Hercules                          Iolaus 

Ion Gk. The illegitimate child of Creüsa, daughter of Erechtheus and wife of Xuthus. Creusa conceived Ion with  Apollo then she abandoned the child. Apollo asked Hermes to take Ion from his cradle. Ion was saved  (and raised) by a priestess of the Delphic Oracle. Later, Xuthus was informed by the oracle that the first  person he met when leaving the oracle would be his son, and this person was Ion. He interpreted it to  mean that he had fathered Ion, when, in fact, Apollo was giving him Ion as an adoptive son. Creusa was  planning  on  killing  Ion  due  to  her  jealousy  that  Xuthus  had  a  son  while  she  was  still  childless.  At  the  same time, Ion was planning on doing harm to Creusa. In the end, Creusa found out that Ion was her  child, and only Xuthus' adopted child. His story is told in the tragedy Ion by Euripides.  Ionian  Sea  Gk.  An  arm  of  the  Mediterranean  Sea,  south  of  the Adriatic Sea.  It is  bounded  by  southern  Italy  including Calabria, Sicily and the Salento peninsula to the west, and by southwestern Albania, including 

112

Mythology and Folklore  
Saranda and Himara, and a large number of Greek islands, including Corfu, Zante, Kephalonia, Ithaka,  and Lefkas to the east.  Ionians Gk. One of the four major tribes into which the Classical Greeks considered the population of Hellenes  to have been divided (along with the Dorians, Aeolians and Achaeans).  Ionides  Gk.  Four  Naiad  nymph  daughters  of  the  river  Cytherus  in  the  south  of  Greece  whose  springs  were  reputed to possess healing properties. Their waters were believed to cure aches and pains.They were  similar to another set of healing Eleian Nymphs, the Anigrides.   Iord, Jord, Jorth, Erda N. "Earth". Giantess mother of Thorr by Odin  Iormungand N. See Jormungand; the World Serpent.  Iottun villum, or Jötna villur N. Literally means "the bewilderments of the etins" (giants) and refers to some  unknown formula of murk staves used by the etins to delude and confuse. Human magicians can also  control such things.        Iphicles  Gk.  he  is  the  half‐brother  of  Heracles;  being  the  son  of  Alcmene  and  her  human  husband  whereas  Heracles  was  her  son  by  Zeus.  Iphicles  was  the  father  of  Heracles'  charioteer Iolaus.              Iphicles  Iphigenia  Gk.  Tragic  daughter  of  Agamemnon  and  Clytemnestra  who  was  sacrificed  to  Artemis  so  that  the  Greeks  would  be  able  to  sail  off  to Troy.  Under  the  pretence  that  she  was  to  be  married  to  Achilles,  Iphigenia was invited to Aulis, where the army  camp  was. There she  was killed and the Greeks could  leave.  The  sacrifice  of  Iphigenia  turned  Clytemnestras  love  for  her  husband  turn  into  hate,  and  she  revenged  her  daughter  by  killing  Agamemnon  on  his  return  from  Troy.  According  to  one  version  she  was  never  slain  but  a  deer  was  put  in  her  place  at  the  altar  and  Iphigenia  was  taken  by  Artemis  to  Tauria  where  she  became  the  goddesses  priestess  only  to  be  taken  back  to  Mycenae  by  her  brother  Orestes later. 

113

Mythology and Folklore  

  Iphigenia    Iphimedea Gk. the consort of Aloeus and the mother of the Giants: Otos and Ephialtes  Iphis  Gk.  A  daughter  of  Ligdus  and  Telethusa,  of  Phaestus  in  Crete.  She  was  brought  up  as  a  boy,  because,  previous to her birth, her father had ordered the child to be killed, if it should be a girl. When Iphis had  grown up, and was to be betrothed to Ianthe, the difficulty thus arising was removed by the favour of  Isis, who had before advised the mother to treat Iphis as a boy, and now metamorphosed her into a  youth.  Iravat In. a son of Arjuna by his Naga wife Ulupi   Iravati In.  the river Ravi or Hydraotes  Irene Gk. (Eirene) the goddess of peace and the season of spring, one of the three Horae (Seasons) 

Iris Gk. the golden‐winged goddess of the rainbow and messenger of the gods 

114

Mythology and Folklore  

    Irminsul N. The world column, i.e. Yggdrasil.  Iron‐gloves N. Thor has a pair of heavy iron‐gloves that he uses when he swings his great hammer Mjollnir.  Iron‐Wood N. A forest to the north and east of Midgard where witches and Troll women live. Here one Jotun‐ Giantess  had  given  birth  too  many  giant  sons,  all  of  them  wolves.  Her  sons  include:  Mánagarm  (or  Garm), Hati Hróvitnisson and Skoll.  Isa  In.  `Lord’;  a  title  of  Siva;  name  of  a  Upanishad  (q.v.),  which  has  been  translated  by  Dr.  Roer  in  the  Bibliotheca Indica  Isana In. a name of Siva or Rudra, or of one of his manifestations; he is guardian of the northeast quarter  Isarnkol  N.  Isarnkol  is  a  kind  of  cooling  system  on  the  horses  Allsvinn  and  Arvaker's  shoulders.  They  need  protection from the sun they are dragging.  Isha In. The Hindu protector of the north‐eastern hemisphere (as successor of Soma). He is one of the Maruts,  as well as the fifth manifestation of Shiva. Isha has five heads, ten arms and rides on a ram or a bull. His  attributes are a book, a drum, an axe and a noose. 

115

Mythology and Folklore  
Ishti‐Pasas In. `Stealers of offerings’ Rakshasas and other enemies of the gods, who steal the oblations  Isis Eg. Isis was a great enchantress, the goddess of magic; she is often represented as a woman wearing on  her head the hieroglyphic symbol of her name, which represents a throne or seat. 

Ismene  Gk.  a  Naiad  nymph  daughter  of  the  River  Asopus  in  the  south  of  Greece  and  wife  of  King  Argus,  the  ancient  patronym  of  the  Argive  region.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

          Ismene and Antigone 

Ismenis Gk. a Naiad daughter of the River Ismenos of Boeotia in central Greece loved by the god Faunus  Ismenus Gk. (Ismenos) a river of Boeotia in the heart of Greece and its deity 

116

Mythology and Folklore  
Istrus Gk. (Istros) a deity of the Scythian river Danube  Iswara In. `Lord’ a title given to Siva  Iswara Krishna In. author of the philosophical treatise called Sankhya Karika  Ithaca Gk. an island located in the Ionian Sea, in Greece; the home of Odysseus, whose delayed return to the  island is one of the elements of the Odyssey's plot. 

  Ithaca    Ithax Gk. the messenger of the Titans  Ithyphallic Eg. from the Greek word meaning "with erect penis"; various gods are represented in this form;  most notably Min and Amun  Itihasas  In.    legendary  poems;  Heroic  history;  “Stories  like  those  of  Urvasi  and  Pururavas.”  The  term  is  especially applied to the Maha‐bharata  Itys  Gk.  was  the  son  of  Procne  and  Tereus.  Tereus  loved  his  wife's  sister,  Philomela.  He  raped  her,  cut  her  tongue out and held her captive so she could never tell anyone. Philomela wove a tapestry that told her  story  and  gave  it  to  Procne.  In  revenge,  Procne  killed  her  son  by  Tereus,  Itys,  and  fed  him  to  Tereus  unknowingly. Tereus tried to kill the sisters but all three were changed by the Olympic Gods into birds:  Tereus  was  a  hoopoe;  Philomela  was  a  swallow;  Procne  was  a  nightingale  whose  song  is  a  song  of  mourning for her son Itys.  Iulus Gk. the name of the son of the troianischen Prince Aeneas  Ivaldi, Ivalde N. Also called Vidfinner and Svigdar ("Champion Drinker"). Ivaldi is the emperor of the Dwarves  and father to Brokk, Eitri and Sindri. He has the children Idun, Bil and Hjuki with his wife Hildegun. His  name means 'the one who has power'. The progenitor of all craftsmen Dwarves  

117

Mythology and Folklore  
Ixion Gk. The son of Antion and Perimela. He was a king in Thessaly and a thoroughly bad hombre. His sins  began when he married Dia the daughter of Eioneus but, failed to bring the agreed bride price. Eioneus  held  his  mares  as  security  on  the  dept.  Ixion  then  lured  Eioneus  to  his  kingdom  with  the  promise  of  payment. Once there he murdered Eioneus by throwing him into a flaming pit.  Iynx Gk. the goddess‐nymph of a magical love‐charm known as the iynx; the iynx was a spinning wheel with a  wryneck bird attached   


Jabali, Javali In. A Brahman who was priest of King Dasa‐ratha, and held sceptical philosophical opinions. He is  represented  in  the  Ramayana  as  enforcing  his  views  upon  Rama,  who  decidedly  repudiated  them.  Thereupon he asserted that his atheistical arguments had been used only for a purpose, and that he  was really imbued with sentiments of piety and religion. He is said to have been a logician, so probably  he belonged to the Nyaya school.  Jacchus Gk. (Iakkhos) the torch‐bearing daemon who led the procession of the Eleusinian Mysteries  Jagad‐Dhatri (Dhata) In. `Sustainer of the world.’ An epithet given to both Saraswati and Durga  Jagan‐Matri (Mata) In. `Mother of the world.’ One of the names of Siva’s wife  Jagan‐Natha  In.  `Lord  of  the  world.’  A  particular  form  of  Vishnu,  or  rather  of  Krishna.  He  is  worshipped  in  Bengal and other  parts of India, but Puri, near the town of Cuttack, in  Orissa, is the great seat of his  worship, and multitudes of pilgrims resort thither from all parts, especially to the two great festivals of  the Snana‐yatra and Ratha‐yatra, in the months of Jyaishtha and Ashadha. The first of these is when the  image is bathed, and in the second, or car festival, the image is brought out upon a car with the images  of his brother Bala‐rama and sister Su‐bhadra, and is drawn by the devotees. The legend of the origin of  Jagan‐natha is peculiar. Krishna was killed by a hunter, and his body was left to rot under a tree, but  some  pious  persons  found  the  bones  and  placed  them  in  a  box.  A  devout  king  named  Indra‐dyumna  was  directed  by  Vishnu  to  form  an  image  of  Jagan‐natha  and  to  place  the  bones  of  Krishna  inside  it.  Viswa‐karma, the architect of the gods, undertook to make the image, on condition of being left quite  undisturbed till the work was complete. After fifteen days the king was impatient and went to Viswa‐ karma, who was angry, and left off work before he had made either hands or feet, so that the image  has only stumps. Indra‐dyumna prayed to Brahma, who promised to make the image famous, and he  did so by giving to it eyes and a soul, and by acting as high priest at its consecration.  Jahnavi In. the Ganges  Jahnu  In.  a  sage  descended  from  Pururavas;  he  was  disturbed  in  his  devotions  by  the  passage  of  the  river  Ganga, and consequently drank up its waters. He afterwards relented, and allowed the stream to issue  from his ear, hence Ganga is called Jahnavi, daughter of Jahnu.  Jaimini In. a celebrated sage; a disciple of Vyasa; he is said to have received the Sama‐veda from his master,  and to have been its publisher or teacher. He was also the founder of the Purva‐mimansa philosophy.  The text of Jaimini is printed in the Bibliotheca Indica.  Jaiminiya‐Nyaya‐Mala‐Vistara In. a work on philosophy by Madhava; it has been edited by Goldstucker and  Cowell. 

118

Mythology and Folklore  
Jajali In. A Brahman mentioned in the Maha‐bharata as having by ascetism acquired a supernatural power of  locomotion, of which he was so proud that he deemed himself perfect in virtue and superior to all men.  A voice from the sky told him that he was inferior to Tuladhara, a Vaisya and a trader. He went to this  Tuladhara and learnt wisdom from him.  Jalambhara In. Was one of the asuras. At one point he attained so much power that he was able to conquer  the world. He was the son of Ganga and the sea. His birth was at the urging of Shiva. It seemed that one  day, the gods went to visit Shiva at his home on Mount Kailasa. They entertained him with songs and  dancing, and he was so pleased with their display, that he offered to grant them any wish. Indra asked  that  he  be  made  as  great  a  warrior  as  Shiva  himself  was.  Shiva  granted  the  request,  and  the  gods  departed.  Shiva  wondered  what  Indra  planned  to  do  with  this  new  power;  as  he  was  pondering,  his  Anger at Indra's wish became manifest, a black shape who appeared before the god. It asked that Shiva  make it look like the god. Shiva did so, then ordered his Anger to go to the river Ganges and have her  mate with the sea. Their union produced a son; when he was born, the earth trembled and wept, and  the  universe  shook  with  thunder.  Brahma  perceived  the  power  of  the  child,  and  named  him  Jalamdhara. He could fly on the winds, float over the  oceans, and tame the most savage  of lions. He  was to be the instrument of Shiva's uncontrolled Anger to seek revenge on the gods.  Jala‐Rupa In. the fish or the Makara on the banner of Kama  Jala‐Sayin In. `Sleeping on the waters.’ An appellation of Vishnu, as he is supposed to sleep upon his serpent  couch on the waters during the rainy season, or during the submersion of the world.  Jalg, Jalk N. "Gelding". Another name for Odin  Jamad‐Agni In. A Brahman and a descendant of Bhrigu. He was the son of Richika and Satya‐vati, and was the  father of five sons, the youngest and most renowned of whom was Parasu‐rama. Jamad‐agni’s mother,  Satya‐vati, was daughter of King Gadhi, a Kshatriya. The Vishnu Purana relates that when Satya‐vati was  pregnant,  her  Brahman  husband,  Richika  prepared  a  mess  for  her  to  eat  for  the  purpose  of  securing  that her son should be born with the qualities of a Brahman. He also gave another mess to her mother  that  she  might  bear  a  son  with  the  character  of  a  warrior.  The  women  changed  the  messes,  and  so  Jamad‐agni, the son of Richika, was born as a warrior‐Brahman, and Viswamitra, son of the Kshatriya  Gadhi,  was  born  as  a  priest.  The  Maha‐bharata  relates  that  Jamad‐agni  engaged  deeply  in  study  and  “obtained entire possession of the Vedas.” He went to King Renu or Prasena‐jit of the Solar race and  demanded  of  him  his  daughter  Renuka.  The  king  gave  her  to  him,  and  he  retired  with  her  to  his  hermitage, where the princess shared in his ascetic life. She bore him five sons, Rumanwat, Sushena,  Vasu, Viswavasu, and Parasu‐rama, and she was exact in the performance of all her duties. One day she  went out to bathe and beheld a loving pair sporting and dallying in the water. Their pleasure made her  feel envious so  she was “defiled by  unworthy thoughts, and  returned wetted but not purified by the  stream.” Her husband beheld her “fallen from perfection and shorn of the lustre of her sanctity.” So he  reproved her and was exceeding wroth. His sons came into the hermitage in the order of their birth,  and he commanded each of them in succession to kill his mother. Influenced by natural affection, four  of them held their peace and did nothing. Their father cursed them and they became idiots bereft of all  understanding.  When  Parasu‐rama  entered,  he  obeyed  his  father’s  order  and  struck  off  his  mother’s  head  with  his  axe.  The  deed  assuaged  the  father’s  anger,  and  he  desired  his  son  to  make  a  request.  Parasu‐rama  begged  that  his  mother  might  be  restored  to  life  in  purity,  and  that  his  brothers  might  regain their natural condition. All this the father granted.       The  mighty  Karta‐virya,  king  of  the  Haihayas,  who  had  a  thousand  arms,  paid  a  visit  to  the  hermitage of Jamad‐agni. The sage and his sons were out, but his wife treated her guest with all proper  respect.  Unmindful  of  the  hospitality  he  had  received;  Karta‐virya  threw  down  the  trees  round  the 

119

Mythology and Folklore  
hermitage,  and  carried  of  the  calf  of  the  sacred  cow,  Surabhi,  which  Jamad‐agni  had  acquired  by  penance. Parasu‐rama returned and discovered what had happened, he then pursued Karta‐virya, cut  off  his  thousand  arms  with  arrows,  and  killed  him.  The  sons  of  Karta‐virya  went  in  revenge  to  the  hermitage of Jamad‐agni, and in the absence of Parasu‐rama slew the pious sage without pity. When  Parasu‐rama found the lifeless body of his father, he laid it on a funeral pile and vowed that he would  extirpate  the  whole  Kshatriya  race.  He  slew  all  the  sons  of  Karta‐virya,  and  “thrice  seven  times”  he  cleared the earth of the Kshatriya caste.   Jamadagnya In. the patronymic of Parasu‐rama  Jambavat In. King of the bears. A celebrated gem called Syamantaka had been given by the Sun to Satra‐jit.  He, fearing that Krishna would take it from him, gave it to his brother, Prasena. One property of this  jewel was to protect its wearer when good, to ruin him when bad. Prasena was wicked and was killed  by  a  lion,  which  was  carrying  off  the  gem  in  its  mouth,  when  he  was  encountered  and  slain  by  Jambavat. After sena’s disappearance, Krishna was suspected of having killed him for the sake of the  jewel. Krishna with a large party tracked the steps of Prasena, till it was ascertained that he had been  killed by a lion, and that the lion had been killed by a bear. Krishna then tracked the bear, Jambavat,  into  his  cavern,  and  a  great  fight  ensued  between  them.  After  waiting  outside  seven  or  eight  days,  Krishna’s followers went home and performed his funeral ceremonies. On the twenty‐first day of the  fight,  Jambavat  submitted  to  his  adversary,  gave  up  the  gem,  and  presented  to  him  his  daughter,  Jambavati,  as  an  offering  suitable  to  a  guest.  Jambavat  with  his  army  of  bears  aided  Rama  in  his  invasion of Lanka, and always acted the part of a sage counsellor.  Jambavati In. daughter of Jambavat; king of the bears; wife of Krishna and mother of Samba  Jambha In. name of several demons; of one who fought against the gods and was slain by Indra, who for this  deed was called Jambha‐bhedin. Also of one who fought against Arjuna and was killed by Krishna.  Jambu‐Dwipa In. "Rose‐apple island" One of the seven islands or continents of which the world is made up.  The great mountain, Meru, stands in its centre, and Bharata‐varsha or India is its best part. Its varshas  or divisions are nine in number:‐ (1.) Bharata, south of the Himalayas and southernmost of all. (2.) Kim‐ purusha (3.) Hari‐varsha. (4.) Ila‐vrita, containing Meru. (5.) Ramyaka. (6.) Hiran‐maya. (7.) Uttara‐Kuru,  each to the north of the preceding one. (8.) Bhadraswa and (9.) Ketu‐mala lies respectively to the east  and west of Ila‐vrita, the central region.  Jambu‐Mali In. a Rakshasa general of Ravana. He was killed by Hanuman  Janaka In. King of Mithila, of the Solar race. When Nimi, his predecessor, died without leaving a successor, the  sages subjected the body of Nimi to attrition, and produced from it a prince “who was called Janaka,  from  being  born  without  a  progenitor.”  He  was  the  first  Janaka,  and  twenty  generations  earlier  than  Janaka  the  father  of  Sita;  king  of  Videha  and  father  of  Sita,  remarkable  for  his  great  knowledge  and  good works and sanctity. He is called Sira‐dhwaja, `he of the plough banner,’ because his daughter Sita  sprang  up  ready  formed  from  the  furrow  when  he  was  ploughing  the  ground  and  preparing  for  a  sacrifice  to  obtain  offspring.  The  sage  Yajnawalkya  was  his  priest  and  adviser.  The  Brahmanas  relate  that he “refused to submit to the hier‐archical pretensions of the Brahmans, and asserted his right of  performing sacrifices without the intervention of priests.” He succeeded in his contention, for it is said  that  through  his  pure  and  righteous  life  he  became  a  Brahman  and  one  of  the  Rajarshis.  He  and  his  priest Yajnawalkya are thought to have prepared the way for Buddha.  Janaki In. a patronymic of Sita 

120

Mythology and Folklore  
Janamejaya In. a  great king who  was son of Parikshit; great‐grandson of Arjuna. It was to this king that the  Maha‐bharata was recited by Vaisampayana, and the king listened to it in expiation of the sin of killing  a  Brahman.  His  father,  Parikshit,  died  from  the  bite  of  a  serpent,  and  Janemajaya  is  said  to  have  performed a great sacrifice of serpents (Nagas) and to have conquered the Naga people of Taksha‐sila.  Hence he is called Sarpa‐sattrin, `serpent‐sacrificer.’ There were several others of the same name.  Janarddana In. `The adored of mankind’ A name of Krishna, but other derivations are offered, a `extirpator of  the wicked,’ by Sankaracharya  Jana‐Sthana In. a place in the Dandaka forest where Rama sojourned for a while in his exile      Janus Rom. the god of gates and  doors 

     

             

 

Japetus  Gk.  (Iapetos)  one  of  the  six‐Titan  brothers  imprisoned  by  Zeus in the pit of Tartarus            Jaras In. `Old age’; The hunter who unwittingly killed Krishna.  Jara‐Sandha In. Son of Brihad‐ratha, and king of Magadha. Brihad‐ratha had two wives, who after being long  barren  brought  forth  two  halves  of  a  boy.  These  abortions  were  regarded  with  horror  and  thrown  away. A female man‐eating demon named Jara picked them up and put them together to carry them  off. On their coming in contact a boy was formed, who cried out so lustily that he brought out the king  and his two queens. The Rakshasi explained what had happened, resigned the child, and entired. The  father  gave  the  boy  the  name  of  Jara‐sandha,  because  he  had  been  put  together  by  Jara.  Future 

121

Mythology and Folklore  
greatness  was  prophesied  for  the  boy,  and  he  became  an  ardent  worshipper  of  Siva.  Through  the  favour  of  this  god  he  prevailed  over  many  kings,  and  he  especially  fought  against  Krishna,  who  had  killed Kansa the husband of two of Jarasandha’s daughters. He besieged Mathura, and attacked Krishna  eighteen times, and was as often defeated; but Krishna was so weakened that he retired to Dwaraka.  Jara‐sandha had many kings in captivity, and when Krishna returned from Dwaraka, he, with Bhima and  Arjuna, went to Jara‐sandha’s capital for the purpose  of slaying their enemy and liberating the kings.  Jara‐sandha  refused  to  release  the  kings,  and  accepted  the  alternative  of  a  combat,  in  which  he  was  killed by Bhima.  Jarat‐Karu In. an ancient sage who married a sister of the great serpent Vasuki; father of the sage Astika  Jarita  In.  A  certain  female  bird  of  the  species  called  Sarngika,  whose  story  is  told  in  the  Maha‐bharata.  The  saint Manda‐pala, who returned from the shades because he had no son, assumed the form of a male  bird, and by her had four sons. He then abandoned her. In the conflagration of the Khandava forest she  showed great devotion in the protection of her children, and they were eventually saved through the  influence of Manda‐pala over the god of fire. Their names were Jaritari, Sarisrikta, Stamba‐mitra, and  Drona. They were “interpreters of the Vedas;” and there are hymns of the Rig‐veda bearing the names  of the second and third.  Jarnsaxa  N.  "Iron  Sword".  Giantess  lover  of  Thorr  and  mother  of  his  sons  Magni  and  Modi;  May  have  been one of the Asynjor  Jarnvidur N. A forest to the north‐east of Midgard where  witches and Troll women live. See Iron‐Wood.  Jasion  Gk.  (Iasion)  aspring‐time  consort  of  the  goddess  Demeter  Jason    Gk.  (Iason)  a  great  Thessalian  hero  who  led  the  Argonauts in the quest for the Golden Fleece  Jatasura  In.  a  Rakshasa  who  disguised  himself  as  a  Brahman  and  carried  off  Yudhi‐shthira,  Saha‐deva,  Nakula, and Draupadi; he was overtaken and killed  by Bhima                          Jason with the Golden Fleece 

Jata‐Vedas  In.  a  Vedic  epithet  for  fire;  “The  meaning  is  explained  in  five  ways:  ‐  (1.)  Knowing  all  created  beings; (2.) Possessing all creatures or everything existent; (3.) Known by created beings; (4.) Possessing  vedas,  riches;  (5.)  Possessing  vedas,  wisdom.  Other  derivations  and  explanations  are  found  in  the  Brahmanas,  but  the  exact  sense  of  the  word  seems  to  have  been  very  early  lost,  and  of  the  five  explanations given, only the first two would seem to be admissible for the Vedic texts. In one passage a  form, Jata‐veda, seems to occur.” – Williams. This form of the term, and the statement of Manu that 

122

Mythology and Folklore  
the Vedas were milked out from fire, air, and the sun, may perhaps justify the explanation, `producer of  the Vedas.’  Jatayu, Jatayus In. According to the Ramayana, a bird who has son of Vishnu’s bird Garuda, and king of the  vultures.  Others  say  he  was  a  son  of  Aruna.  He  became  an  ally  of  Rama’s  and  he  fought  furiously  against  Ravana  to  prevent  the  carrying  away  of  Sita.  Ravana  overpowered  him  and  left  him  mortally  wounded.  Rama  found  him  in  time  to  hear  his  dying  words,  and  to  learn  what  had  become  to  Sita.  Rama  and  Lakshmana  performed  his  funeral  rites  to  “secure  his  soul  in  the  enjoyments  of  heaven,”  whither he ascended in a chariot of fire. In the Puranas he is the friend of Dasa‐ratha. When that king  went to the ecliptic to recover Sita from Sani (Saturn), his carriage was consumed by a glance from the  eye of the latter, but Jatayu caught the falling king and saved him. The Padma Purana says Dasa‐ratha  assailed Saturn because of a dearth, and when he and his car were hurled from heaven, Jatayu caught  him.  Jatila In. a daughter of Gotama, who is mentioned in the Maha‐bharata as a virtuous woman and the wife of  seven husbands  Jaya‐Deva In. a poet; author of the Gita‐govinda  Jayad‐Ratha In. A prince of the Lunar race, son of Brihanmanas. He was king of Sindhu, and was “indifferently  termed Raja of the Sindhus or Saindhavas, and Raja of the Sauviras, or sometimes in concert Sindhu‐ sauviras,”  the  Saindhavas  and  Sauviras  both  being  tribes  living  along  the  Indus.  Jayad‐ratha  married  Duh‐sala, daughter of Dhrita‐rashtra, and was an ally of the Kauravas. When the Pandavas were in exile  he called at their forest abode while they were out hunting and Draupadi was at home alone. He had  with  him  six  brothers  and  a  large  retinue,  but  the  resources  of  the  Pandavas  were  equal  to  the  occasion, and Draupadi was able to supply five hundred deer with accompaniments for breakfast. This  is  explained  by  the  statement  that  Yudhi‐shthira,  having  worshipped  the  sun,  obtained  from  that  luminary an inexhaustible cauldron, which was to supply all and every viand that might be required by  the Pandavas in their exile. Jayad‐ratha was captivated by the charms of Draupadi, and tried to induce  her to elope with him. When he was indignantly repulsed he carried her off by force. On the return of  the  Pandavas  they  pursued  the  ravisher,  defeated  his  forces,  and  made  him  prisoner.  His  life  was  spared  by  command  of  Yudhi‐shthira,  but  Bhima  kicked  and  beat  him,  terribly,  cut  off  his  hair,  and  made  him  go  before  the  assembled  Pandavas  and  acknowledge  himself  to  be  their  slave.  At  the  intercession of Draupadi he was allowed to depart. He was killed, after a desperate conflict, by Arjuna  on the fourteenth day of the great battle.    Jayanta In. son of Indra also called Jaya  Jayanti In. daughter of Indra; she is called also Jayanti, Deva‐sena, and Tavishi  Jimuta In. a great wrestler, who was overcome and killer by Bhima at the court of Virata  Jimuta‐Vahana In. `Whose vehicle is the clouds’ A title of Indra. A name borne by several persons, and among  them by the author of the Daya‐bhaga  Jinx Gk. (Iynx) the nymph of the magical love‐charm known as the iynx  Jishnu In.  name of Arjuna  Jocasta Gk. a daughter of Menocenes; she was the wife of Laius and, by him, mother (and wife) of Oedipus,  and mother (by Oedipus) of Antigone, Eteocles, Polynices and Ismene

123

Mythology and Folklore  

Jocasta

Jord, Jorth, Erda N. "Earth"; Giantess mother of Thorr by Odhinn   Jormungand,  Iormungandr,  Midgardsormr  N.  The  World  Serpent,  who  is  extremely  formidable  but  an  essential part of the world's structure, and cannot be removed. It is the offspring of Loki and the Giant  Angr‐Boda,  along  with  Hela,  Narfi,  and  Fenris‐wolf.  The  name  Jormungand  means  'Huge  Pole'.  Odin,  fearing evil intent, flung the serpent into the sea, where it grew so large that it surrounded the earth  biting its own tail.  Jormungrund N. "Giant Land"; The underworld was the first created world, the home of Mimir and the good  giants and evil frost giants.   Joruvellir N. Place where the race of Dwarves called Lovar comes from.  Jötun,  Jotunn  N.  A  race  of  Giants.  The  Jotuns  come  in  many  shapes  and  colours,  from  gastly  monsters  to  creatures  so  beautiful  that  they  outshine  both  humans  and  Gods.  The  Thursar,  singular  Thurs,  were  antagonistic, destructive, and stupid. A number of the Jotuns were welcomed as members of the Æsir.  Loki is of Jotun heritage but was adopted as Odin's blood‐brother. There are also May stories of Æsir  having affairs with fair Jotun maidens. The Jotuns represent nature's forces of Chaos, compared to the  Gods  who  constantly  try  to  keep  the  world  at  staus  quo.  Ragnarok  will  be  the  final  battle  of  these  forces. Trolls, giants and goblins, known from folk tales, are more recent variants of Jotuns. 

124

Mythology and Folklore  
Jotunheim, Jotunheimr N. The world of the Giants. The realm of the Jotuns, outside both Asgard and Midgard;  the realm's borders are constantly moved eastward, as Ginnungagap is constantly edging westward.  Judgment  of  Paris  Gk.  A  contest  between  the  three  most  beautiful  goddesses  of  Olympos‐‐Aphrodite,  Hera  and Athena‐‐for the prize of a golden apple addressed to "the fairest". 

  The Judgment of Paris          Juno Rom. the queen of the gods; Jupiters wife and  sister,  sister  to  Neptune  and  Pluto,  daughter  of  Saturn,  mother  of  Juventas,  Mars,  and  Vulcan;  Protectress  of  the  Roman  state;  She  was the guardian of the Empire's finances and  considered the Matron Goddess of all Rome.           

125

Mythology and Folklore  
  Jupiter Rom. the king of the gods; He is the god of Sky, Lightning and Thunder; He is the son of Saturn and  brother  of  Neptune,  Pluto  and  Juno,  who  is  also  his  wife;  His  attribute  is  the  lightning  bolt  and  his  symbol the eagle, who is also his messenger; He was also considered the Patron god of Rome, and his  temple was the official place of state business and sacrifices.                    Juravale's Marsh N. The place where the Dwarves of the line of Dvalin made their dwelling, their stone hall,  Joruvellir.  Jushka In. a Turushka or Turki king, who ruled in Kashmir and in Northern India  Juturna Rom. goddess of lakes, wells and springs; her festivals are January 11 and August 23.  Juventas Rom. Goddess of youth  Jwala‐Mukhi In. `Mouth of fire’ a volcano; a celebrated place of pilgrimage in the Lower Himalayas, north of  the Panjab, where fire issues from the ground. According to the legend, it is the fire which Sati, the wife  of Siva, created, and in which she burnt herself.   Jyamagha In. A king of the Lunar race, proverbial “most eminent among husbands submissive to their wives.”  Saibya, his wife, was barren, but he was afraid to take another wife till, having overcome an enemy and  driven  him  from  his  country,  the  daughter  of  the  vanquished  king  became  his  captive.  She  was  beautiful, and Jyamagha desired to marry her. He took her in his chariot and carried her to his palace to  ask  the  assent  of  his  queen.  When  Saibya  saw  the  maiden,  she  was  filled  with  jealousy,  and  angrily  demanded who the “light‐hearted damsel.” was. The king was disconcerted, and humbly replied, “She  is the young bride of the future son whom thou shalt bring forth.” It had ceased to be with Saibya after  the  manner  of  women,  but  still  she  bore  a  son  who  was  named  Vidarbha,  and  married  the  captive  princess.   Jyotisha In. astronomy; one of the Vedangas; the object of this Vedanga is to fix the most auspicious days and  seasons  for  the  performance  of  sacrifices.  There  has  been  little  discovered  that  is  ancient  on  this  subject; only one “short track, consisting of thirty‐six verses, in a comparatively modern style, to which  scholars cannot assign an earlier date than 300 years B.C.”                       Jupiter 

126

Mythology and Folklore  


Ka Eg. The ka is usually translated as "double", it represents a person's double; It is what we would call a spirit  or  a  soul;  The  ka  was  created  at  the  same  time  as  the  physical  body;  It  was  believed  that  the  ram‐ headed god Khnum crafted the ka on his potter's wheel at the time of a person’s birth; A persons ka  would live on after their body had died; It was thought that when someone died they "met their ka";  The ka existed in the physical world and resided in the tomb (House of the Ka); It had the same needs  that the person had in life, which was to eat, drink, etc; The Egyptians left offerings of food, drink, and  worldly possessions in tombs for the ka to use.   Kabandha In. Disciple of Su‐mantu, the earliest teacher of the Atharva‐veda; a monstrous Rakshasa slain by  Rama; said to have been a son of the goddess Sri; described as “covered with hair, vast as a mountain,  without  head  or  neck,  having  a  mouth  armed  with  immense  teeth  in  the  middle  of  his  belly,  arms  a  league long, and one enormous eye in his breast.  Kacha In. son of Brihaspati; became a disciple of Sukra or Usanas; the priest of the Asuras; wife of a Kshatriya  Kadambari In. a Gandharva princess; daughter of Chitra‐ratha and Madira  Kadru  In.  daughter  of  Daksha;  one  of  the  thirteen  that  were  married  to  Kasyapa;  mother  of  “a  thousand  powerful many‐headed serpents  Kahoda In. a learned Brahman, father of Ashtavakra;  had an argument  at the court of Janaka by a Buddhist  sage,  and  as  a  penalty  was  thrown  into  the  river  and  was  recovered  by  his  son,  who  overcame  the  supposed Buddhist sage, and thus brought about a restoration.   Kaikasi In. daughter of the Rakshasa Su‐mali and his wife Ketu‐mati; wife of Visravas; and mother of Ravana  Kaikeya In. name of a country and of its king; father‐in‐law of Krishna; his five sons were allies of the pandavas  Kaikeyas, Kekayas In. the people of Kaikeya, one of the chief nations in the war of the Maha‐bharata  Kaikeye In. princess of Kaikeya; wife of King Dasa‐ratha; mother of Bharata, his third son  Kailasa. In.  mountain  in  the  Himalayas,  north  of  the  Manasa  lake;  Siva’s  paradise  is  said  to  be  on  Mount  Kailasa, so also in Kuvera’s abode; also called Gana‐parvata and Rajatadri, `silver mountain.’  Kaitabha In. a horrible demon; sprang from the ear of Vishnu while he was asleep at the end of a kalpa, and  were about to kill Brahma, who was lying on the lotus springing from Vishnu’s navel.   Kakshivat, Kakshivan In. a Vedic sage particularly connected with the  worship  of the Aswins; son of Dirgha‐ tamas and Usij; author of several hymns in the Rig‐veda; was also called Pajriya, because he was of the  race of Pajra.  Kakudmin In. a name of Raivata  Kala In. `Time’; a name of Yama, the judge of the dead; addressed as the source and ruler of all things  Kalaka  In.  wife  of  Kasyapa;  was  a  daughter  of  Daksha,  but  the  Vishnu  Purana  states  that she  and  her  sister  Puloma  were  daughters  of  the  Dana  Vaiswanara,  who  were  both  married  to  Kasyapa,  and  bore  him  60,000  distinguished  Danavas,  called  Paulomas  and  Kalakanjas,  who  were  powerful,  ferocious,  and  cruel. 

127

Mythology and Folklore  
Kala‐mukhas In.`Black faces'; people who sprang from men and Rakshasa females  Kalanas In. a Brahman who yielded to the inducements of Alexander the Great and left his native country to  accompany the court of the conqueror; He afterwards repented of what he had done and burnt himself  at Pasargada.   Kala‐yavana In. (Lit. `Black Yavana,’ Yavana meaning a Greek or foreigner.); a foreign king who led an army of  barbarians to Mathura against Krishna; who being disturbed from sleep by a kick from Kala yavana, cast  a fiery glance upon him and reduced him to ashes. This legend appears to indicate an invasion from the  Himalayas;  son  of  a  Brahman  named  Garga  who  had  an  especial  spite  against  the  Yadavas,  and  was  begotten by him on the wife of a childless Yavana king.   Kalha Pandit In. author of the Raja Tarangini, a history of Kashmir  Kali yuga In. the fourth or present age of the world, which is to endure for 432,000 years. It commenced in  3102 B.C.   Kali In. the spirit of evil; in playing dice Kali is the ace, and so is a  personification  of  ill  luck;  had  seven  flickering  tongues  of  flame for devouring oblations of butter   Kali‐dasa In. The greatest poet and dramatist of India; was one of  “the  nine  gems”  that  adorned  the  court  of  King  Vikramaditya at Ujjayini.  Kalika. In. the goddess Kali  Kalindi In. a name of the river Yamuna, as daughter of Kalinda (the  sun)  Kalinga In. country along the Coromandel coast, north of Madras      Kali 

Kaliya In.  a  serpent  king  who  had  five  heads,  and  dwelt  in  a  deep  pool  of  the  Yamuna,  with  numerous  attendant serpents; his mouths vomited fire and smoke  Kalki, Kalkin In. the white horse; Vishnu’s tenth incarnation, which is yet to come  Kalliope Gk. one of the Muses, who was appointed by Zeus to decide the fate of Adonis. When she declared  that  he  must  divide  his  time  between  Persephone  and  Aphrodite,  the  goddess,  inflamed,  caused  the  Thrakian  Bakkantes  to  slay  Kalliope's  son  Orpheus  (some  say  also  to  punish  him  for  scorning  women  and only consorting in love with boys).   Kalmasha‐pada In. a king of the Solar race; son of Su‐dasa (hence he is called Saudasa); and a descendant of  Ikshwaku.   Kalpa, Kalpa sutras In. one of the Vedangas; a ceremonial directory or rubric expressed in the form of Sutras;  short technical rules  Kama, Kama‐deva In. the god of love  Kama‐dhenu In. the cow which grants desires, belonging to the sage Vasishtha; was produced at the churning  of the ocean; was also called Kama‐duh, Savala, and Surabhi 

128

Mythology and Folklore  
Kamakshi In. A form of Devi worshipped at Kamarupa‐tirtha in Assam  Kamandaki In. author of a work known by his name on “The Elements of Polity”   Kamapura In. the north‐eastern part of Bengal and the western portion of Assam; the name still survives as  Kamarup  Kambojas In.  a  race  or  tribe  always  associated  with  the  tribes  living  to  the  northwest;  and  famous  for  their  horses; they were among the races conquered by King Sagara  Kampilya  In. The  city  of  King  Drupada  in  the  country  of  the  Panchalas, where  the  swayam‐vara  of  Draupadi  was  held;  corresponds  with  the  Kampila  of  modern  times,  situated  in  the  Doab  on  the  old  Ganges,  between Badaun and Farrukhabad.  Kamyaka In. the forest in which the Pandavas passed their exile on the banks of the Saraswati  Kanada In. the sage who founded the Vaiseshika school of philosophy  Kanchi In. one of the seven sacred cities, hodie Conjeveram  Kandarpa In. the Hindu Cupid  Kandarshi In. a Rishi who teaches one particular Kanda or part of the Vedas  Kandu In. a sage who was beguiled from long and severe austerities by Pramlocha, a nymph sent from heaven  by Indra for this purpose.   Kanishka In. a name recorded in the Raja Tarangini of three great Turushka  Kansa In. a tyrannical king of Mathura; son of Ugra‐sons; cousin of Devaki the mother of Krishna  Kansa‐Baha In. a drama in seven acts upon the destruction of Kansa by Krishna; the author is called Krishna  Kavi, and the play was probably written about two centuries ago  Kanwa In. name of a Rishi to whom some hymns of the Rig‐veda are ascribed; he is sometimes counted as one  of the seven great Rishis; the sage who brought up Sakuntala as his daughter  Kanwas In. the descendants or followers of Kanwa  Kanya‐Kubha In. The modern form of the name is Kanauj or Kinnauj; an ancient city of Hindustan on the Kali‐ nadi,  an  affluent  of  the  Ganges,  and  lying  a  little  to  the  west  of  the  latter;  was  once  the  capital  of  powerful dynasty; was known to classical geographers as “Canogyza.”; a great national division of the  Brahman caste.  Kanya‐kumari In. `The virgin‐damsel.’; a name of Durga; her worship extended to the southernmost extremity  of India in the days of Pliny, and `Kumari’ still appears in the name Cape Comorin.  Kapardin In.  a  peculiar  braid  or  knot  of  hair;  this  epithet  is  applied  to  Siva,  to  one  of  the  Rudras,  and  some  others  Kapi‐Dhwaja In. an epithet of Arjuna, because he bore an ape 

129

Mythology and Folklore  
Kapila In.  a  celebrated  sage;  the  founder  of  the  Sankhya  philosophy;  the  Hari‐vansa  makes  him  the  son  of  Vitatha; he is sometimes identified with Vishnu and sometimes with Agni; said to have destroyed the  hundred thousand sons of King Sagara with a glance.   Kapila,  Kapila‐Vastu In.  a  town  on  the  river  Rohini,  an  affluent  of  the  Rapti,  which  was  the  capital  of  Suddhodana, the father of Gotama Buddha  Kapisa In. mother of the Pisachas, who bear the metronymic Kapiseya  Kára N. A Valkyrie, one of the Disir.  Karali In. one of the seven tongues of Agni (fire), but in later days a name of the terrible consort of Siva  Kardama In. one of the Prajapatis who sprang from Brahma; was a son of Daksha or a son of Pulaha  Kari N. Primal air deity;  Karl N. One of Rig's (Heimdall's) sons after his journey to Midgard to father a new people.   Karma‐mimansa In. the Purva‐mimansa  Karma‐Mimansa‐Sutra In. a work on the Vedanta philosophy, ascribed to Jaimini  Karna In. son of Pritha or Kunti by Surya, the sun, before her marriage to Pandu; was thus half‐brother of the  Pandavas, but this relationship was not known to them till after his death.   Karna‐Pravaranas In. men whose ears served them for coverings; they are mentioned in the Maha bharata,  Ramayana, and other works  Karnata,  Karnataka In.  the  country  where  the  Canarese  language  is  spoken,  in  the  central  districts  of  the  Peninsula, including Mysore; the name “Carnatic” is derived from this.  Karta‐virya In. son of Krita‐virya, king of the Haihayas; sprung from the race of Atri, he sought and obtained  these boons, viz., a thousand arms and a golden chariot that went wheresoever he willed it to go; the  power  of  restraining  wrong  by  justice;  the  conquest  of  the  earth  and  the  disposition  to  rule  it  righteously; invincibility by enemies, and death at the hands of a man renowned over the whole world.   Karttikeya In. the god of war and the planet Mars; also called Skanda; son of Siva or Rudra, and to have been  produced without the intervention of a woman   Karushas  In.  people  of  Malwa,  inhabiting  the  back  of  the  Vindhya  mountains;  said  to  be  descended  from  Karusha, one of the sons of the Manu Vaivaswata  Kasi  Khanda In.  a  long  poem;  forming  a  part  of  the  Skanda  Purana;  gives  a  very  minute  description  of  the  temples of Siva in and around Benares, and is presumably anterior to the Mahomedan conquest.  Ka‐tantra In. a Sanskrit grammar by Sarva‐varman; edited by Eggeling for the Bibliotheca Indica  Kata‐pru In. a class of beings similar to or identical with the Vidya‐dharas  Kathaka In. a school or recension of the Yajur‐veda, occupying a position between the Black and the White; is  supported to be lost 

130

Mythology and Folklore  
Katharnava In. compilation of miscellaneous stories in four books; the first two are the originals of the Hindi  Baital Pachisi and Singhasan Battisi  Katha‐sarit‐sagara In.  a  collection  of  popular  stories  by  Soma‐deva‐bhatta  of  Kashmir;  made  about  the  beginning of the twelfth century; drown from a larger work called Brihat‐katha  Katyayani In. a name of Durga  Kaukon  Gk.  a  Prince  of  Olenos  or  Messenia  (in  southern  Greece);  a  son  of  Poseidon  and  Astydameia;  the  daughter of Phorbas  Kaumara In. the creation of the Kumaras  Kaumodaki In. the mace of Krishna; presented to him by Agni when engaged with him in fighting against Indra  and burning the Khandava forest  Kaundinya In. an ancient sage and grammarian; offended Siva, but was saved from that god’s wrath by Vishnu  Kaunteya  In.  son  of  Kunti;  a  metronymic  applicable  to  Yudhi‐shthira,  Bhima,  and  Arjuna,  but  commonly  applied to Arjuna  Kauravas In. descendants of Kuru; a patronymic especially supplied to the sons of Dhrita‐rashtra  Kausambi In. the capital of Vatsa, near the junction of the Ganges and Jumna; an inscription found at Karra on  the  Ganges  mentions  that  place  as  being  situated  in  Kausambi‐mandala,  the  circle  of  Kausambi;  but  General Cunningham identifies the place with the village of Kosam, said to be still called Kosambi nagar  on the Jumna, about thirty miles above Allahabad; it is the scene of the drama Ratnavali.  Kausika In. A devotee mentioned in the Maha‐bharata as having gone to a hell of torment for having pointed  out to robbers a road by which they pursued and killed some persons who fled from them.  Kausikas In. descendants of Kusika; in one of the hymns of the Rig the epithet is given to Indra  Kausiki In. the river Kosi in Bihar, but there were more rivers than one bearing this name; Satyavati, mother of  Jamadagni is said to have been changed into a river of this name  Kaustubha In.  a celebrated jewel obtained at the churning of the ocean, and worn by Vishnu or Krishna on his  bosom  Kautilya In. another name of Chanakya, the minister of Chandra‐gupta  Kauts In. a rationalistic philosopher; who lived before the days of Yaska the author of the Nirukta  Kautuka‐sarvaswa In. a modern farce, in two acts, by a Pandit named Gopi‐natha; it is a satire upon princes  who addict themselves to idleness and sensuality, and fail to patronise the Brahmans  Kavasha, Kavasha‐Ailusha In. son of Ilusha by a slave girl; was the author of several hymns in the tenth book  of the Rig‐veda  Kavavya In. The son of a Kshatriya by a Nishada female, who is related in the Maha‐bharata to have risen by  virtue, knowledge, and devotion from the state of a Dasyu to perfection.  Kavi‐raja In. author of a poem of studied ambiguity called Raghava‐Pandaviyam 

131

Mythology and Folklore  
Kavya‐prakasa In. a work on poetry and rhetoric by Mammata Bhatta of Kashmir; has been printed at Calcutta  Kavyas, Kavyas In. a class of Pitris; according to some they are the Manes of men of the third caste  Kedaresa, Kedara‐Natha In. a name of Siva; name of one of the twelve great Lingas; it is a shapeless mass of  stone at Kedara‐natha in the Himalayas  Kelainos Gk. the eponymous Lord of the Phrygian city of Kelainos (in Asia Minor); was a son of Poseidon and  the Danais Kelaino  Keli‐Kila In. a demigod attendant upon Siva  Kena, Kenopanishad In. name of a Upanishad translated by Dr. Roer for the Bibliotheca Indica  Kenkhrias  Gk.  a  Lord  of  Korinthos  (southern  Greece)  and  Eponym  of  its  harbour  Kenkhrai;  he  was  a  son  of  Poseidon and the Nymphe Peirene  Kerakas In. one‐footed men who live in forests, according to the Maha‐bharata  Kerala In. the country of Malabar proper on the western coast  Keres  Gk.  The  monstrous  female  daemons  of  violent  death  which  swooped  over  the  battlefield  in  the  thousands, ripping the souls of the dying from their bodies and casting them down into Hades.   Kerkyon  Gk.  A  barbaric  King  of  Eleusis  (in  Attika)  who,  according  to  some,  was  a  son  of  Poseidon  and  the  daughter of Amphiktyon (but others claimed he was a son of Hephaistos or a mortal named Brankhos).   Kesava In. `Having much or fine hair’; a name of Vishnu or Krishna  Kesi,Kesin In. a demon who fought with and was defeated by Indra; a Daitya who took the form of a horse and  attacked Krishna, but was killed by that hero’s thrusting his arm into his jaws and rending him asunder.  Kesi‐Dhwaja In.  son  of  Krita‐dhwaja  Kesi‐dhwaja;  was  endowed  with  spiritual  knowledge;  had  a  cousin,  Khandikya, who was diligent in the way of works and was renowned for religious rites.   Kesini In. wife of Visravas and mother of Ravana; also called Kaikasi  Ketu In. the descending node in astronomy; represented by a dragon’s tail; also a comet or meteor, and the  ninth of the planets; said to be a Danava, and son of Viprachitti and Sinhika; also called A‐kacha  Khandava,  Khandava‐Prastha In.  a  forest  and  country  on  the  banks  of  the  Yamuna,  which  the  Pandavas  received  as  their  moiety  when  Dhrita‐rashtra  divided  his  kingdom;  in  it  they  built  the  city  of  Indra‐ prastha and made it their capital; the forest was consumed with fire by the god Agni assisted by Krishna  and Arjuna.  Khara  In. a  man‐eating  Rakshasa;  wife  of  Kasyapa;  mother  of  Yakshas  and  Rakshasas,  called  after  her  Khasutmajas  Kharybdis Gk. an immortal she‐Giant who was chained beneath the Straits of Messina where her inhalations  formed a massive whirlpool; Kharybdis was a daughter of Poseidon and Gaia  Khasas, Khasakas, Khasikas In. an outlying or border people classed with the Sakas and other northern tribes;  traces of them might be sought among the barbarous tribes on the north‐east of Bengal, the Khasiyas. 

132

Mythology and Folklore  
Khatwanga In. also called Dilipa; a prince of the Solar race; in a battle between the gods and the demons he  rendered great assistance to the former, who desired him to ask a boon. He begged that he might know  the duration of his life, and the answer was, “Only an hour.” He hastened to the world of mortals, and  by earnest prayer he became united with the supreme being, Vishnu.   Khepresh Eg. the blue crown was a ceremonial crown  Khepri Eg. a scarab headed god; the Egyptians believed that Khepri pushed the sun across the sky in much the  same fashion that a dung beetle (scarab) pushed a ball of dung across the ground.  Khet Eg. this is a flame or fire; fire was embodied in the sun and in its symbol the uraeus which spit fire; Fire  also  plays  a  part  in  the  Egyptian  concept  of  the  underworld;  There  is  one  terrifying  aspect  of  the  underworld which is similar to the Christians concept of hell; Most Egyptians would like to avoid this  place with its fiery lakes and rivers that are inhabited by fire demons.  Khios Gk. a King and Eponym of the island of Khios (in the Greek Aegean). He was a son of Poseidon and a  Khian Nymphe.   Khnum  Eg.  a  ram  headed  god;  his  name  means  to  create;  he  was  the  creator  of  all  things  that  are  and  all  things that shall be; he created the gods and he fashioned mankind on a potter’s wheel  Khrysaor Gk. a Giant King of the island of Erytheia (in the Atlantic Ocean) and / or Iberia (Spain); he was a son  of Poseidon and Medousa  Khryses Gk. a King of Orkhomenos (in central Greece); he was a son of Poseidon and Khrysogeneia  Khu Eg. a spiritual entity often mentioned in association with the ba; it was viewed as an entirely spiritual and  absolutely immortal being  Kichaka In. Brother‐in‐law of the king of Virata, who was commander of the forces and general director of the  affairs of the kingdom; made love to Draupadi, and was slain by Bhima, who rolled his bones and flesh  into a ball, so that no one could tell how he was killed.  Kikata In. a country inhabited by people who were not Aryans; it is identified with Magadha or South Bihar  Kilatakuli In. (Kilata + Akuli.) two priests of the Asuras, who, according to the Satapatha Brahmana, exercised a  special influence between Manu and an “Asura‐slaying voice.”  Kim‐purusha In. an indescribable man; one of a low type; partaking of the nature and appearance of animals  Kinfylgja  N.  Personification  of  inherited  traits  and  might;  usually  dwells with  the  head  of family,  or  else  the  most suitable member.  Kin‐naras In.  mythical  beings  with  the  form  of  a  man  and  the  head  of  a  horse;  celestial  choristers  and  musicians, dwelling in the paradise of Kuvera on Kailasa; they sprang from the toe of Brahma with the  Yakshas, but according to others, they are sons of Kasyapa; also called Aswa‐mukhas Turanga‐vaktras,  `horse‐faced,’ and Mayus.  Kiratarjuniya In. A poem descriptive of the combat between Siva in the guise of a Kirata or mountaineer and  the  Pandu  prince  Arjuna;  the  story  is  first  told  in  the  Maha‐bharata,  and  has  been  worked  up  in  this  artificial poem of eighteen cantos by Bharavi; part of it has been translated into German by Schutz.  

133

Mythology and Folklore  
Kiratas In. foresters and mountaineers living in the mountains east of Hindustan; described in the Ramayana  as “islanders, who eat raw fish, live in the waters, and are men‐tigers; their females are described as  “gold‐coloured  and  pleasant  to  behold,”  and  as  having  “sharp‐pointed  hair‐knots.”;  they  are  perhaps  the Cirrhadae placed on the Coromandel Coast by classic writers.  Kirmira In. a monster Rakshasa; brother of Vaka; He opposed the entrance of the Pandavas into the Kamyaka  forest,  and  threatened  that  he  would  eat  Bhima.  A  furious  combat  ensued,  in  which  Bhima  and  he  hurled large trees at each other, but the demon was at length strangled and had all his bones broken by  Bhima.  Kishkindhya In. a country in the peninsula; thought to be in the Mysore, which was taken by Rama from the  monkey king Bali, and given back to his brother Su‐griva, the friend and ally of Rama. The capital city  was Kishkindhya.  Kjalar N. Another name for Odin.  Kleio Gk. One of the nine Mousai, Goddesses of Music and Song who was cursed by Aphrodite to fall in love  with a mortal man, Pieros, as punishment for criticising the goddess' love of Adonis  Kobold N. Saxon: a house‐sprite. Small human‐shaped beings that live in or near barns and stables; If treated  kindly, they are friendly.   Kohala In. an ancient sage to whom the invention of the drama is attributed; also a writer on music  Kolga  N.  “Cool".  Kolga  is  one  of  Aegir  and  Ran's  nine  wave  daughters  who  are  said  to  be  the  mothers  of  Heimdall, the guardian of the Bifrost Bridge.  Kona, konur N. designates female (seidhkona, Spåkone, draumkona, etc.)   Kora Gk. a name of Persephone  Kosala In. a country on the Sarayu river; having Ayodhya for its capital; the name is variously applied to other  countries  in  the  east,  and  in  the  south,  and  in  the  Vindhya  mountains;  it  probably  widened  with  the  dominions of its rulers, and part of Birar is called Dakshina‐Kosala, the Southern Kosala.  Kotavi,  Kotari,  Kottavi In.  a  mystical  goddess,  the  tutelary  deity  of  the  Daityas,  and  mother  of  Bana  the  demon; the name is sometimes applied to Durga  Kratu  In. one  of  the  Prajapatis,  and  sometimes  reckoned  among  the  great  Rishis  and  mind‐born  sons  of  Brahma; the Vishnu Purana says that his wife Samnati brought forth the 60,000 Valikhilyas, pigmy sages  no bigger than a joint of the thumb.  Krauncha In. A pass situated somewhere in the Himalayas, said to have been opened by Parasu‐rama with his  arrows to make a passage from Kailasa to the southwards.   Kravyad In.  Rakshasa  or  any  carnivorous  animal;  the  Veda,  Agni  is  in  one  place  called  a  Kravyad  of  terrible  power. Fire is also a Kravyad in consuming bodies on the funeral pile.   Kripa In.  Son  of  the  sage  Saradwat,  and  the  adopted  son  of  King  Santanu;  became  one  of  the  Privy  Council  at  Hastinapura,  and  was  one  of  the  three  surviving  Kuru  warriors  who  made  the 

134

Mythology and Folklore  
murderous night attack upon the camp of the Pandavas; was also called Gautama and Saradwata.  Kripa, Kripi In. wife of Drona and mother of Aswatthaman  Krishna  In. Means  'black’; the son of Devaki, is in the Chhandogya Upanishad, where he appears as a scholar.  There was a Rishi of the name who was a son of Viswaka; there was also a great Asura so named, who  with  10,000  followers  committed  fearful  devastation,  until  he  was  defeated  and  skinned  by  Indra.  In  another  Vedic  hymn,  50,000  Krishnas  are  said  to  have  been  slain,  and  it  is  added  in  another  that  his  pregnant wives were slain with him that he might leave no posterity. This is supposed to have reference  to the Rakshasas or to the dark‐coloured aborigines of India.      Kritanta In. a name of Yama; the god of death  Krita‐varman In. a Kuru warrior; one of the last surviving three who made the murderous night attack upon  the camp of the Pandavas  Krita‐Virya In. Son of Dhanaka and father of the Arjuna who is better know by his patronymic Karta‐virya Krita‐ virya was a great patron of the Bhrigus, and according to the Puranas, “he ruled over the whole earth  with might and justice, and offered 10,000 sacrifices. Of him this verse is still recited, ‘The kings of the  earth will assuredly never pursue his steps in sacrifice in munificence, in devotion, in courtesy, and in  self‐control'.  Krita‐yuga In. the first age of the world, a period of 1,728,000 years  Krittikas In. the Pleiades; the six nurses of Karttikeya, the god of war; they were daughters of a king according  to one legend; wives of Rishis according to another  Kriya‐Yoga‐Sara In. portion of the Padma Purana treating of rites and ceremonies  Krodha, Krodha‐Vasa In. One of the many daughters of Daksha and sister‐wives of Kasyapa; wwas the mother  “of all sharp‐toothed monsters, whether on the earth, amongst the birds, or in the waters, that were  devourers of flesh.”  Kromos Gk. the eponymous Lord of Krommyon in Korinthos (in southern Greece)'; he was a son of Poseidon  Kshanada‐Chara In. ‘Night walkers’; Ghosts of evil character, goblins, Rakshasas  Kshapanaka In. an author who was one of “the nine gems” at the court of Vikramaditya  Kshatriya In. the second or regal and warrior caste  Kshattri In. a name by which Vidura was familiarly called; the term, as explained in Manu, means the son of a  Sudra father and Brahman mother, but Vidura’s father was a Brahman and his mother a slave girl.  Kshemaka In. son of Nira‐mitra or Nimi;  the last prince of the Lunar race. There is a memorial verse quoted in  the Vishnu Purana which say, “The race which gave origin to Brahmans and Kshatriyas, and which was  purified by regal sages, terminated with Kshemaka in the Kali age.”  Kshema‐Vriddhi In.  a general  of  the Salwas  who  had  a  command  in  the army  which  attacked  Dwaraka;  was  defeated by Krishna’s son, Samba.                                Krishna 

135

Mythology and Folklore  
Kteatos  Gk.  one  of  the  Molionidai;  saimese  twins  and  Princes  of  Olenos  in  Akhaia  (Southern  Greece).  They  were sons of Molione and Poseidon (or her husband Aktor).   Kula‐Parvatas In. ‘Family mountains.’ a series or system of seven chains of mountains in Southern India. They  are Mahendra, Malaya, Sahya, Suktimat, Riksha (for which Gandha‐madana is sometimes substituted),  Vindhya  and  Paripatra.  Mahendra  is  the  Orissa  chain;  Malaya,  the  hills  of  Malabar  proper,  the  south  part  of  the  Western  Ghats;  Sahya,  the  northern  parts  of  the  Western  Ghats;  Suktimat  is  doubtful;  Riksha,  the  mountains  of  Gondwana;  Vindhya  is  here  applied  to  the  eastern  division  of  the  Vindhya  mountains; and Paripatra, or Pariyatra as it is frequently written, applies to the northern and western  portions of the same range. The classification seems to have been known to Ptolemy, for he specifies  seven ranges of mountains, but his names are not in accord.  Kulika In. one of the eight serpents kings; described as of a dusky brown colour and having a half‐moon on his  head  Kulindas In. a people living in the north‐west  Kulluka‐Bhatta  In. the  famous  commentator  on  Manu,  whose  gloss  was  used  by  Sir  W.  Jones  in  making  the  translation of Manu.  Kumara‐Sambhava In. ‘The birth of the war god (Kumara).’ A poem by Kali‐dasa. The complete work consists  of  sixteen  cantos,  but  only  seven  are  usually  given,  and  these  have  been  translated  into  Latin  by  Stenzler. Parts have been rendered into English verse by Griffiths. There are several editions of the text.  Kumari In. ‘The damsel.’ An epithet of Sita, also of Durga. Cape Comorin.  Kumarila‐bhatta, Kumarila‐swami In. A celebrated teacher of the Mimansa philosophy and opponent of the  Buddhists,  whom  he  is  said  to  have  extirpated  by  argument  and  by  force.  He  was  prior  to  Sankaracharya, in whose presence he is recorded to have burnt himself.  Kumbha‐Karna In.  Son  of  Visravas  by  his  Rakshasa  wife  Kesini,  and  full  brother  of  Ravana.  A  monster  who,  under the curse of Brahma (or, as otherwise represented, as a boon), slept for six months at a time and  remained  awake  for  only  a  single  day.  When  Ravana  was  hard  pressed  by  Rama  he  sent  to  arouse  Kumbha‐karna.  This  was  effected  with  great  difficulty.  After  drinking  2000  jars  of  liquor  he  went  to  consult with his brother, and then took the field against the monkey army. He beat down Su‐griva, the  monkey chief, with a large stone, and carried him a prisoner into the city of Lanka. When he returned  to the battle he encountered Rama, and after a stout fight he was defeated, and Rama cut off his head.  Kumuda In. ‘A lotus’; Naga or serpent king whose sister, Kumudvati, married Kusa, son of Rama  Kumura In. a name of Skanda; god of war. In the Brahmanas the term is applied to Agni  Kumuras In. Ming‐born sons of Brahma, who, declining to create progeny, remained ever boys and ever pure  and innocent. There were four of them, Sanat‐kumara, Sananda, Sanaka, and Sanatana; a fifth, Ribhu, is  sometimes added.   Kundina‐Pura In. the capital of Vidarbha; it survives as the modern Kundapur, situated about 40 miles east of  Amaravati, in Birar  Kuntala In. a country in the Dakhin, about Adoni; the Dakhin 

136

Mythology and Folklore  
Kunti In.  (also  called  Pritha  and  Parshni);  daughter  of  the  Yadava  prince  Sura,  king  of  the  Surasenas,  whose  capital was Mathura on the Yamuna. She was sister of Vasu‐deva, and was given by her father to his  childless cousin Kunti‐bhoja, by whom she was brought up.   Kunti‐Bhoja In. king of the people called Kuntis; the adoptive father of Kunti  Kurma‐Avatar In. the tortoise incarnation  Kuru In. a prince of the Lunar race; son of Samvarana by Tapati; a daughter of the sun. He ruled in the north‐ west of India over the country about Delhi. A people called Kurus, and dwelling about Kuru‐kshetra in  that part of India, are connected with him. He was ancestor both of Dhrita‐rashtra and Pandu, but the  patronymic Kaurava is generally applied to the sons of the former.  Kuru‐Jangala In. a forest country in the upper part of the Doab  Kuru‐Kshetra In. ‘The field of the Kurus.’ A plain near Delhi where the great battle the Kauravas and Pandavas  was fought. It lies south‐east of Thanesar, not far from Panipat, the scene of many battles in later days.  Kusa In. One of the twin sons of Rama and Sita. After the death of Rama, his two sons Kusa and Lava became  kings of the Southern and Northern Kosalas, and Kusa built Kusa‐sthali or Kusavati in the Vindhyas, and  made it his capital.  Kusa‐Dhwaja In. a brother of Janaka; king of Mithila; consequently uncle of Sita. His two daughters, Mandavi  and Sruta‐kirtti, were married to Bharata and Satru‐ghna, the sons of Janaka. Some make him king of  Sankasya, and others king of Kasi, and there are differences also as to his genealogy.  Kusamda In.  son of Kusa and a descendant of Pururavas; he engaged in devout penance to obtain a son equal  to Indra, and that god was so alarmed at his austerities, that he himself became incarnate as Gadhi, son  of Kusamba.  Kusa‐Sthali In. A city identical with or standing on the same spot as Dwaraka. It was built by Raivata, and was  the capital of his kingdom called Anarta. When Raivata went on a visit to the region of Brahma, his city  was destroyed by Punya‐janas, i.e., Yakshas or Rakshasas.  Kusa‐Vati In. the capital of Southern Kosala; built upon the Vindhyas by Kusa; son of Rama  Kushmandas In. ‘Gourds’; a class of demigods or demons in the service of Siva  Kusika In. King who, according to some, was the father of Viswamitra, or, according to others, the first of the  race of Kusikas from whom Gadhi, the father of Viswamitra descended.  Kusuma‐pura In.  ‘The city of flowers’; Patali‐putra or Patra  Kusumayudha In. a  name of Kama, or Cupid as the bearer of the bow (ayudha) of flowers (Kusuma)  Kutsa In.  a  Vedic  Rishi  and  author  of  hymns;  he  is  represented  as  being  persecuted  by  Indra,  but  on  one  occasion he was defended by that god against the demon Sushna. It is said that Indra took him to his  palace, and that they were so much alike that Sachi or Pushpotkata, Indra’s wife, did not know which  was her husband.  Kuvalaswa, Kuvalasyawa In. A prince of the Solar race, who, according to the Vishnu Purana, had 21,000 sons,  but  the  Hari‐vansa  numbers  them  only  as  100.  Attended  by  his  sons  he  attacked  the  great  Asura,  Dhundhu,  who  lived  in  a  sea  of  sand,  and  harassed  the  devotions  of  the  pious  sage  Uttanka.  They 

137

Mythology and Folklore  
unearthed  the  demon  and  slew  him,  from  which  exploit  Kuvalaswa  got  the  title  of  Dhundhu‐mara,  slayer of Dhundhu; but all his sons except three perished by the fiery breath of the monster.  Kuvalayapida In.  an  immense  elephant,  or  a  demon  in  elephantine  form,  belonging  to  Kansa;  employed  by  him  to  trample  the  boys  Krishna  and  Bala‐rama  to  death.  The  attempt  failed  and  the  elephant  was  killed.  Kuvera In. in the Vedas; a chief of the evil beings or spirits living in the shades: a sort of Pluto, and called by his  patronymic Vaisravana. Later he is Pluto in another sense, as god of wealth, and chief of the Yakshas  and Guhyakas. He was son of Visravas by Idavida, but he is sometimes called son of Pulastya, who was  father of Visravas.   Kvaesir, Kvasir N. A wise human created by the Gods with spit in a truce between the Æsir and Vanir. He knew  the answer to any question asked of him. He traveled far and wide over the world to teach his wisdom.  On one visit to some Dwarves was killed by two of them, Fjalar and Galar, who brewed his blood with  honey and made the Mead of Poetry. This mead eventually became the property of the giant Suttung  and drunk by Odin.  Kvasir's Blood N. A kenning for poetry, because the Mead of Poetry was made from Kvasir's blood.  Kykhreus  Gk.  a  King  of  the  island  of  Salamis  (in  southern  Greece);  he  as  a  son  of  Poseidon  and  the  Naias  Salamis  Kyknos Gk. a King of Kolonai in the Troad (Asia Minor) and ally of the Trojans in their war with the Greeks; he  was a son of Poseidon and Kalyke whom his father made invulnerable to weapons.     


  Labdacus Gk. the only son of Polydorus and a king of Thebes; Labdacus was a grandson of Thebes' founder,  Cadmus. His mother was Nycteis, daughter  of Nycteus. Polydorus died while Labdacus  was  a  young  child,  leaving  Nycteus  as  his  regent,  although  Lycus  soon  replaced  him  in  that  office.  When  Labdacus  had  grown,  he  ruled  Thebes  for  a  short  time.  He  died  while he was still young, after he lost a war  with  the  king  of  Athens,  Pandion,  over  their borders.      Labyrinth  Gk.  An  elaborate  structure  designed  and  built  by  the  legendary  artificer  Daedalus  for  King  Minos  of  Crete  at 

138

Mythology and Folklore  
Knossos.  Its  function  was  to  hold  the  Minotaur,  a  creature  that  was  half  man  and  half  bull  and  was  eventually killed by the Athenian hero Theseus. Daedalus had made the Labyrinth so cunningly that he  himself could barely escape it after he built it. Theseus was aided by Ariadne, who provided him with a  skein of thread, literally the "clew", or "clue", so he could find his way out again.                                           Labyrinth 

Lacedaemon  Gk.  A  son  of  Zeus  by  Taygete,  was  married  to  Sparta,  the  daughter  of  Eurotas,  by  whom  he  became the father of Amyclas, Eurydice, and Asine. He was  king  of  the  country  which  he  called  after  his  own  name,  Lacedaemon,  while  he  gave  to  his  capital the  name  of  his  wife, Sparta. He was believed to have built the sanctuary of  the  Charites,  which  stood  between  Sparta  and  Amyclae,  and  to  have  given  to  those  divinities  the  names  of  Cleta  and  Phaënna.  An  heroum  was  erected  to  him  in  the  neighbourhood of Therapne. His name was the other name  of Sparta.  Lachesis Gk. (Lakhesis) One of the three Fates  Lactans Rom. God of agriculture  Ladon (1) Gk. a hundred‐headed dragon which guarded the  golden apples of the Hesperides; it was slain by Heracles.   Ladon (2) Gk. a river of Arcadia and its god  Lady  of  Wild  Things  Gk.  Artemis  was  goddess  of  chastity,  virginity, the hunt, the moon, and the natural environment.  Artemis is the daughter of Zeus and Leto. Her twin brother  is Apollo. She is the lady of the wild things.               Ladon 

Laelaps Gk. (Lailaps) a magical dog that was destined always to catch is prey; it was turned to stone by Zeus  when it was set to chase the Teumessian Fox ‐ a beast was fated never to be caught.  Laerad N. A famous tree in Valhalla on which the goat Heidrún and the Hart (deer) Eikthyrnir feeds.  Laertes.  Gk.  the  son  of  Arcesius  and  Chalcomedusa;  he  was  the  father  of  Odysseus  (who  was  thus  called  Laertiades, Λαερτιάδης) and Ctimene by his wife Anticlea, daughter of the thief Autolycus. Laërtes was  an  Argonaut  and  participated  in  the  hunt  for  the  Calydonian  Boar.  Laërtes's  title  was  King  of  the  Cephallenians, which he presumably inherited from his father Arcesius and grandfather Cephalus. His  realm included Ithaca and surrounding islands, and perhaps even the neighboring part of the mainland  of other Greek city‐states. 

139

Mythology and Folklore  
Laestrygones Gk (Laistrygones) a tribe of man‐eating giants encountered by Odysseus on his travels  Laevatein N.  The magic‐wand Laevatein was forged by Loki and is kept by Sinmara in a bowl made of tough  iron that has nine locks. Laevatein means "Lie Stick" or "Wand of Destruction". At Ragnarok Loki intends  to use it to kill the cock Vithofnir to prevent it from crowing and warning of their approach into battle.  To possess the shining feather found in front of Vithofnir's gaze is the only bribe Sinmara would take to  give up this weapon. Laevatein is also used as a kenning for "sword".  Laghu‐Kaumudi In.  a  modern  and  very  much  simplified  edition  of  Panini’s  Grammar  by  Varada  Raja;  it  has  been edited and translated by Dr. Ballantyne  Laistrygon Gk. the first King of the Laistrygones, a tribe of man‐eating Giants; he was a son of Poseidon  Laius Gk. Laios of Thebes was a divine hero and key personage in the Theban founding myth. Son of Labdacus,  he was raised by the regent Lycus after the death of his father. He was the father of Oedipus, husband  of Queen Jocasta. His own son killed him.  Lakshmana In. son of King Dasa‐ratha by his wife Sumitra; he was the twin brother of Satru‐ghna, and the half‐ brother and especial friend of Rama‐chandra. Under the peculiar circumstances of his birth, one eighth  part of the divinity of Vishnu became manifest in him.   Lakshmi In.  The  word  occurs  in  the  Rig‐veda  with  the  sense  of  good  fortune, and in the Atharva‐veda the idea becomes personified in  females  both  of  a  lucky  and  unlucky  character.  The  Taittiriya  Sanhita, as explained by the commentator, makes Lakshmi and Sri  to  be  two  wives  of  Aditya,  and  the  Satapatha.  Lakshmi  is  said  to  have  four  arms,  but  she  is  the  type  of  beauty,  and  is  generally  depicted  as  having  only  two.  In  one  hand  she  holds  a  lotus.  “She  has no temples, but being goddess of abundance and fortune, she  continues  to  be  assiduously  courted,  and  is  not  likely  to  fall  into  neglect.”  Other  names  of  Lakshmi  are  Hira,  Indira,  Jaladhi‐ja,  ‘ocean‐born;’ Chanchala or Lola, ‘the fickle,’ as goddess of fortune;      Loka‐mata, ‘mother of the world.’    

 

Lakshmi 

Lalita‐Vistara In.  a  work  in  Sanskrit  verse  on  the  life  and  doctrines  of  Buddha;  it  has  been  printed  in  the  Bibliotheca Indica  Lamia (1) Gk. (Lamia Libys) a terrifying phantom who preyed on children. She had the ability to remove her  eyes  Lamia (2) Gk. (Lamia Korinthia) A vampiress who seduced a young Corinthian man in order to drink his blood.  Her illusions were exposed by a sage and she was driven away.  Lamiae Gk. (Lamiai) Vampiric monsters who appeared as ghostly, handsome women. They lured young men to  their beds to drank their blood and fed on their flesh.  Lamides Gk. Naiad nymphs of the river Lamos who nursed the infant Dionysus 

140

Mythology and Folklore  

  Lamides 

Lamos  Gk.  a  river  of  Cilicia  or  Mount  Helicon  in  Boeotia  and  its  god;  he  and  his  sons  and  daughters  were  nurses of the god Dionysus  Lampades Gk. the torch‐bearing nymphs of Hades; they formed part of the retinue of Hecate in her night‐time  jaunts.  Lampetia Gk. a nymph daughter of Helios who cared for her father's sheep‐flocks on the island of Thrinacie  Land of Morning N. The light to the east of Jormungrund.  Landvaettir  N.  Guardian  earth  sprites;  In  this  group  can  be  classed  all  the  beings  who  guard  certain  places,  those  who  are  bound  to  rocks,  streams,  or  trees,  and  the  lesser  nature  spirits  in  general.  The  landvaettir are visible to the sensitive and to those faring forth from their bodies. They also appear in  dreams. They do not change shape, but an individual landvaettr may appear as almost anything.  Langia Gk. the Naiad nymph of a Nemean spring  Lanka In. The island of Ceylon or its capital city. The city is described in the Ramayana as of vast extent and of  great magnificence, with seven broad moats and seven stupendous walls of stone and metal. It is said  to  have  been  built  of  gold  by  Viswa‐karma  for  the  residence  of  Kuvara,  from  whom  it  was  taken  by  Ravana.  The  Bhagavata  Purana  represents  that  the  island  was  originally  the  summit  of  Mount  Meru,  which was broken off by the god of the wind and hurled into the sea; name of one of the Sakinis or evil  spirits attendant on Siva and Devi.  Laocoon Gk. Priest of Apollo in Troy who told his fellow Trojans to destroy the wooden horse the Greeks had  given them. By thrusting his spear into the side of the horse, he wanted them to hear the noise of the  weapons in there, but the sound was silenced by the gods. To stop him to further convince the Trojans,  Poseidon sent two snakes that killed Laocoon and his two sons. 

141

Mythology and Folklore  
Laodamia  Gk. the mother of Sarpedon by Zeus; a daughter of Bellerophon; killed by Artemis one day when  she was weaving  Laomedon  Gk.  a  Trojan  king;  son  of  Ilus;  brother  of  Ganymedes  and  father  of  Priam,  Astyoche,  Lampus,  Hicetaon,  Clytius,  Cilla,  Proclia,  Aethilla,  Medesicaste,  Clytodora,  and  Hesione;  Tithonus  is  also  described  by  most  sources  as  Laomedon's  eldest  legitimate  son  and  most  sources  omit  Ganymedes  from the list of Laomedon's children, but indicate him as his uncle instead; Laomedon's possible wives  are Placia, Strymo (or Rhoeo) and Leucippe.  Lapithae Gk. a mythical race, whose home was in Thessaly in the valley of the Peneus; The genealogies make  them  a  kindred  race  with  the  Centaurs,  their  king  Peirithoiis  being  the  son,  and  the  Centaurs  the  grandchildren (or sons) of Ixion.  Lares Rom. Guardian spirits of the house and fields  Larissa Gk. a city and the capital of the Thessaly periphery of Greece and capital of the Larissa Prefecture  Lata In. a country comprising Kandesh and part of Guzerat about the Mhye river  Latmus  Gk.  A  ridge  of  many  spurs  running  in  an  east‐west  direction  along  the  north  shore  of  the  former  Latmian Gulf on the coast of Caria, which became part of Hellenised Ionia.  Latyayana In. author of a Sutra work; it has been printed in the Bibliotheca Indica  Laufey  N.  "Wooded  Isle".  Fire  Giantess  Laufey  is  Farbauti's  wife  and  mother  of  Loki,  Byleist  and  Helblindi.  Laufey gave birth to Loki after she had been struck by a bolt of fire from Farbauti. She is also called Nál.  Lausus  Gk.  The  son  of  the  ousted  Etruscan  king  Mezentius,  and  fought  with  him  against  Aeneas  and  the  Trojans in Italy  Lava In. one of the twin sons of Rama and Sita; he reigned at Sravasti  Lavanya In.  a  Rakshasa;  son  of  Madhu  by  Kumbhinasi;  the  sister  of  Ravana  and  daughter  of  Visravas.  He  inherited  from  his  father  an  invincible  trident  which  had  been  presented  to  him  by  Siva.  He  was  surprised  without  his  weapon  and  killed  by  Satru‐ghna.  Lavana  was  king  of  Mathura  and  Satru‐ghna  succeeded him.  Laverna  Rom. Goddess of unlawful gain and trickery  Lector  priest  Eg.  translates  as  "One  who  bears  the  ritual  book";  this  priests  function  was to  recite  from  the  ritual texts  Leda Gk. daughter of the Aetolian king Thestius; wife of the king Tyndareus, of Sparta; Her myth gave rise to  the popular motif in Renaissance and later art of Leda and the Swan; she was the mother of Helen of  Troy, Clytemnestra and Castor and Pollux  spelled Kastor and Polydeuces.  Leikin N. Also called Hela or Hel.  Leirbrimir N. A Clay‐Giant.  Lemnos Gk. an island in the northern part of the Aegean Sea, it is part of the Greek prefecture of Lesbos  Leod‐runa N. Old High German: song‐rune. 

142

Mythology and Folklore  
Lerna Gk. a region of springs and a former lake near the east coast of the Peloponnesus, south of Argos  Lethe  Gk.  one  of  the  five  rivers  of  Hades;  also  known  as  the  Ameles  potamos  (river  of  unmindfulness);  the  Lethe flowed around the cave of Hypnos and through the Underworld, where all those who drank from  it  experienced  complete  forgetfulness;  was  also  the  name  of  the  Greek  spirit  of  forgetfulness  and  oblivion, with whom the river was often identified.  Leto  Gk.  a  daughter  of  the  Titans  Coeus  and  Phoebe;  Kos  claimed  her  birthplace;  In  the  Olympian  scheme,  Zeus is the father of her twins, Apollo and Artemis, the Letoides, which Leto conceived after her hidden  beauty accidentally, caught the eyes of Zeus.  Leucippus Gk. (Leukippos), the son of Oenomaüs; king of Pisa and he was in love with Daphne and approached  her in the disguise of a maiden and thus hunted with her,  but Apollo's jealousy caused his discovery  during the bath, and he was killed by the nymphs.  Leucothea  Gk.  A  sea  goddess  first  mentioned  in  Homer’s  Odyssey,  in  which  she  rescued  the  Greek  hero  Odysseus from drowning. She was customarily identified with Ino, daughter of the Phoenician Cadmus;  because she cared for the infant god Dionysus, the goddess Hera drove Ino (or her husband, Athamas)  mad so that she and her son, Melicertes, leaped terrified into the sea. Both were changed into marine  deities—Ino as Leucothea, Melicertes as Palaemon.  Liber Rom. God of fertility and nature; Festival  March 17  Libera Rom. fertility Goddess  Liberalitas  Rom. God of generosity  Libertas  Rom. Goddess of freedom  Libethra Gk. or Leibethra was a city close to Olympus where Orpheus was buried by the Muses. His tomb was  later destroyed by a flood of the river Sys where orpheus body was buried.  Libitina Rom. Goddess of funerals  Lich, Lik N. The physical part of the soul‐body (psycho‐physical) complex. also called lyke   Lich, Lik, Lyke N. The physical body.  Lidskjalv N. Odin's high seat in Valhalla from which he has a grand view of all the worlds; Freyr was sitting on  the high seat when he discovered Gerd, with whom he fell in love  Lif  &  Leifthrasir,  Liv  &  Livtrase  N.  Two  human  survivors  of  Ragnarok  who  will  repopulate  world.  Mimir  had  already seen the future of Ragnarok, and read the signs, which proved that a terrible fate was in store  for  the  world.  He  did  not  want  the  clan  of  Men  descended  from  Askur  and  Embla  to  become  irretrievably spoilt from distress and sin, so he sought out two children, pure and unspoiled, in order to  preserve  them.  In  Midgard  he  found  Lif  and  Leifthrasir,  and  ordered  his  sons  to  build  for  them  a  magnificent palace in the land of morning‐light to the east of Jormungrund, a palace called Breidablik  surrounded by the greenest of woods. The palace was also built for Baldur, whose fate Mimir had also  foreseen.  Likhita In. author of a Dharma‐sastra or code of law  Líkn‐stafir N. Health staves (runes). 

143

Mythology and Folklore  
Lilavati  In. ‘Charming.’  The  fanciful  title  of  that  chapter  of  Bhaskara’s  Siddhanta‐siromani  which  treats  of  arithmetic and geometry. It has been translated by Colebrooke and Dr. Taylor, and the text has been  printed.  Lima Rom. Goddess of thresholds  Limrúnar, Limrunes N. Runes used for healing. To get the best results from Limrunes, they should be carved  on the south‐facing bark or leaves of the corresponding tree. The rune Ul is a Limrune of great power,  invoking Waldh. See also Biargrunes.  Lina N. Flax, fertility, the sacred plant of the goddess Frigg.  Lindorm N. Snake‐like ribbon pattern containing runes   Linga, Lingam In. the male organ; the phallus; the symbol under which Siva is universally worshipped. It is of  comparatively modern introduction and is unknown to the Vedas, but it receives distinct notice in the  Maha‐bharata.   Linus Gk. son of Apollo and Psamathe of Argos; He was deserted by his mother on a hillside and devoured by  dogs; When Psamathe's father learned what his daughter had done, he had her killed.  Lit N. Lit is a small Dwarf who was running around as Balder's funeral boat was being pushed in the sea. Thor  was in a bad mood so when Lit got in the way, Thor kicked the Dwarf into the fire.  Lityerses Gk. A natural son of Midas; lived at Celaenae in Phrygia; engaged in rural pursuits, and hospitably  received all strangers that passed his house, but he then compelled them to assist him in the harvest,  and whenever they allowed themselves to be surpassed by him in their work, he cut off their heads in  the evening, and concealed their bodies in the sheaves, accompanying his deed with songs.  Ljøsalfar N. The Light Elves are wights of light, air and thought who dwell in the upper reaches of Midgardhr's  atmosphere,  which  is  ruled  by  Freyr.  They  are  often,  though  not  always,  personified  as  feminine,  in  contrast to the Svartalfar, who are almost always masculine. The Ljøsalfar are the keepers and teachers  of wisdom and they are the source of earthly inspiration.  Ljóssalfheimr N. Home of the Light Elves  Ljothatal N. The list of charms in the Havamal.  Loading formáli N. As a final way of setting the purpose of each lot, to speak its ørlög, a poetic formáli should  be  spoken  over  it.  This  could  be  one  of  the  old  traditional  verses  from  one  of  the  rune  poems,  or  a  special verse of your own making. This or some other similar formula, can also act as a mnemonic in  actual rune readings.  Loading N. The part of a ritual in which the sacred power that has been called upon is channeled into the holy  drink or object (such as a runestave or bindrune).  Loddfafnir N. The wandering skald who recites the Runatál, the verses which he claims to have received from  Odin.  Lodur N. Lodur gave appearance and speech to the first humans. He is identified with Vé by some and Loki by  others. 

144

Mythology and Folklore  
Loeding, Leyding N. Loding is the second strong chain the Gods used to tie up the Fenrir wolf. The first chain  was Dromi, and the third, that worked, was Gleipnir. All three chains were forged by the Dwarves.  Loegr N. Invasive sorcery commanding spirits, operative magic  Lofar N. The descendants of which were: Draupnir and Dólgthrasir, Hár, Haugspori, Hlévangur, Glói, Dori, Ori,  Dufur, Andvari, Skirfir, Virfir, Skáfidur, Ái, Álf and Yngvi, Eikinskjaldi, Fjalar and Frosti, Finn and Ginnar:  Lofn  N.  Goddess  of  forbidden  love  and  of  passionate  love  affairs,  an  attendant  to  Frigga;  Her  duty  was  to  remove all obstacles from the path of lovers. Her name means "Praise" or "Love".  Logi, Loge N. "Flame". A Fire‐Giant who served Utgardh‐Loki; He competed and won against Loki in eating the  most  meat.  It  was  a  trick.  Logi  is actually  "flame",  which  burns  more  quickly  than  one  can  eat.  Logi's  father is Mistblindi and Aegir is his brother.  Loha‐mukhas In.  ‘Iron‐faced  men’;  described  in  the  Maha‐bharata  as  swift,  one‐footed,  undecaying,  strong  men‐eaters.  Loka In. a world; a division of the universe. In general the tri‐loka or three worlds are heaven, earth, and hell.  Another classification enumerates seven, exclusive of the infernal regions, also seven in number which  are classed under Patala. The upper worlds are:‐ (1.) Bhur‐loka, the earth. (2.) Bhuvar‐loka, the space  between  the  earth  and  the  sun,  the  region  of  the  Munis,  Siddhas,  &c.  (3.)  Swar‐loka,  the  heaven  of  Indra, between the sun and the polar star. (4.) Mahar‐loka, the usual abode of Bhrigu and other saints,  who are supposed to be co‐existent with Brahma. During the conflagration of these lower worlds the  saints ascend to the next, or (5.) Jana‐loka, which is described as the abode of Brahma’s sons, Sanaka,  Sananda, and Sanat‐kumara. Above this is the (6.) Tapar‐loka, where the deities called Vairagis reside.  (7.) Satya‐loka or  Brahma‐loka, is the abode of Brahma, and translation to this world exempts beings  from further birth.   Lokaloka In. ‘A world and no world,’ A fabulous belt of mountains bounding the outermost of the seven seas  and dividing the visible world from the regions of darkness. It is “ten thousand yojanas in breadth, and  as many in height, and beyond it perpetual darkness invests the mountains all around, which darkness  is again encompassed by the shell of an egg.” It is called also Chakra‐vada or Chakra‐vala.  Loki, Loki Laufeyiarson N. A Giant who become the  blood‐brother of  Odin. Son of the Giant Farbauti (Cruel  Smiter) and Giantess Laufrey; Pleasing and handsome, evil in character, capricious in behavior, cunning,  he  is  known  as  the  Trickster  God,  called  "Father  of  Lies",  Shape‐changer,  Sky‐Traveler.  Originally,  he  was the God of Fire. He has fiery red hair and is extremely funny and witty. He would do anything to  make  people  laugh.  Eventually,  his  pranks  devolved  into  practical  jokes  with  a  streak  of  viciousness.  Loki  ("Fire")  first  married  Glut  ("Glow"),  who  bore  him  two  daughters,  Eisa  ("Embers")  and  Einmyria  ("Ashes").  Besides  this  wife,  Loki  is  also  said  to  have  wedded  the  Giantess  Angr‐boda  ("Anguish‐ Boding")  [possibly  Gullveig],  who  dwelt  in  Jötunheim,  and  who  bore  him  the  three  monsters  Hel,  Goddess  of  death,  the  Midgard  snake  Iörmungandr,  and  the  wolf  Fenris.  Loki  also  bore  (as  a  female)  Sleipnir, the eight legged horse, after a mating with a Giant stallion called Svadilfari. His last wife was  Sigyn,  with  whom  he  had  sons  Vali  and  Narfi.  Loki  admitted  to  Frigg  that  it  was  his  fault  Balder  was  killed and could not return from Hel. The Æsir pursued him, so he ran away and hid in a mountain cabin  with four doors so that he could see out of it in all directions. Often during the day, he changed himself  into a salmon to hide in the waterfall of Fránang. While sitting indoors over a fire one day, Loki took  linen twine and invented the fishing net. Odin saw him from Hlidskjálf. Throwing the net on to the fire,  Loki jumped up and out into the river. When the Æsir arrived, Kvasir saw the ashes and understood it  was made for catching fish. The Aesir made a net and tried to catch him with it. Loki leaped away but 

145

Mythology and Folklore  
was  caught  by  the  tail  by  Thor.  Loki  was  captured and put into a cave. Taking three flat  stones, the gods set them up on end and bored  a hole through each. Then Loki's sons, Vali and  Narfi,  were  captured.  The  Æsir  changed  Vali  into a wolf and he tore apart his brother Narfi.  The  Æsir  took  Narfi's  entrails  and  with  them  bound Loki over the edges of the three stones ‐  one  under  his  shoulder,  the  second  under  his  loins,  the  third  under  his  knee‐joints  ‐  and  these  bonds  became  iron.  Then  Skadi  took  a  poisonous snake and fastened it up over him so  that  the  venom  from  it  should  drop  on  to  his  face.  His  wife  Sigyn,  however,  sits  by  him  holding a basin under the poison drops. When  the basin becomes full she goes away to empty  it, but in the meantime the venom drips on to  his face and then he shudders so violently that  the  whole  earth  shakes  causing  earthquakes.  There he will lie in bonds until Ragnarök. All his  fetters will break at Ragnarok. Then Loki and all the Frost Giants and the whole family of Hel will board  the boat Nagifar and join the Sons of Muspell to battle the Æsir.    Loma‐Harshana In. (or Roma‐harshana); a bard or pane‐gyrist who first gave forth the Puranas  Loma‐pada In. (or Roma‐pada); a king of Anga, chiefly remarkable for his connection with Rishya‐sringa  Long‐Beard N. By‐name of Odin  Lopamudra  In. A  girl  whom  the  sage  Agastya  formed  from  the  most  graceful  parts  of  different  animals  and  secretly  introduced  into  the  palace  of  the  king  of  Vidarbha,  where  the  child  was  believed  to  be  the  daughter of the king. Agastya had made this girl with the object of having a wife after his own heart,  and  when  she  was  marriageable  he  demanded  her  hand.  The  king  was  loath  to  consent,  but  was  obliged  to  yield,  and  she  became  the  wife  of  Agastya.  Her  name  is  explained  as  signifying  that  the  animals  suffered  loss  (lopa)  by  her  engrossing  their  distinctive  beauties  (mudra),  as  the  eyes  of  the  deer, &c. She is also called Kaushitaki and Vara‐prada. A hymn is the Rig‐veda is attributed to her.  Lopt N. Another name for Loki.  Lot N. A runic talisman (rune‐tine) used for divinatory purposes.   Lotis Gk. a nymph, who in her escape from the embraces of Priapus was metamorphosed into a tree, called  after her Lotis.  Lotus Eg. a symbol of birth and dawn; it was thought to have been the cradle of the sun on the first morning of  creation, rising from the primeval waters; the lotus was a common architectural motif, particularly used  on capitals   Lotus‐eater Gk. One of a tribe encountered by the Greek hero Odysseus during his return from Troy, after a  north wind had driven him and his men from Cape Malea (Homer, Odyssey, Book IX).  

146

Mythology and Folklore  
Lovar N. Race of Dwarves from Svarin's grave‐mound to Aurvangar in Jöruvellir  Lucifer Rom. God of the morning star  Lucina Rom. Goddess of childbirth and midwifery  Luna  Gk.  also  known  as  Selene  in  greek  mythology,  was  the  Titan  goddess  of  the  moon;  was  depicted  as  a  woman either riding side saddle on a horse or in a chariot drawn by a pair of winged steeds.  Luna Rom. Goddess of the moon  Lyaeus Gk. the god who frees men from care and anxiety, a surname of Bacchus  Lycaon Gk. was the cruel king of Arcadia, son of Pelasgus and Meliboea, who tested Zeus by serving him a dish  of a slaughtered and dismembered child in order to see whether Zeus was truly omniscient.  Lycia  Gk.  an  ancient  kingdom  in  Asia  Minor  (the  Asian  portion  of  modern  Turkey;  Mythologically,  Lycia  was  beleaguered by the Chimaera, a fire‐breathing monster that was part lion, part goat and part snake.  Lycomedes Gk. a king of the Dolopians in the island of Scyros, near Euboea; father of Deidameia; grandfather  of Pyrrhus or Neoptolemus  Lycurgus Gk. An impious king of the Edonians of Thrake who attacked Dionysos when the god was traveling  through his land instructing men in the art of winemaking or, in another version of the tale, while the  god  was  still  a  child  in  the  care  of  the  Nymphs  of  Mount  Nysa;  As  the  troupe  fled,  Lykourgos  struck  down the god's nurse Ambrosia with his axe The rest dived into the sea where they were given refuge  by the goddess Thetis.  Lycus  Gk.  a  ruler  of  the  ancient  city  of  Ancient  Thebes  (Boeotia);  his  rule  was  preceded  by  the  regency  of  Nycteus, and he was succeeded by the twins Amphion and Zethus  Lydia Gk. a region ruled in ancient times by King Croesus; centrally located in what is today Turkey  Lyfja N. The mountain on which Mengloth's hall, Lyr, is found, called the "Mountain of Healing".  Lyke, Lich, Lik N. The physical body. See also Hamr.  Lynceus  Gk.  a  king  of  Argos,  succeeding  Danaus;  he  is  named  as  a  descendant  of  Belus  through  his  father  Aegyptus,  who  was  the  twin  brother  of  Danaus.  Danaus  had  fifty  daughters,  the  Danaides,  while  Aegyptus had fifty sons including Lynceus, whose name when translated means 'wolf'.  Lyngvi Island N. Fenrir is bound on this island on Armsvartnir Lake.  Lyr N. Mengloth's hall, built on Lyfja, the "Mountain of Healing".It is protected by a moat of "flickering flame".  It has a golden floor built by the Dwarves.   


Maat Eg. the concept of order, truth, regularity and justice which was all important to the ancient Egyptians; it  was the duty of the pharaohs to uphold maat 

147

Mythology and Folklore  
Machaon  Gk.  a  son  of  Asclepius;  with  Podalirius,  his  brother,  he  led  an  army  from  Thessaly  (or  possibly  Messenia) in the Trojan War on the side of the Greeks; He, along with his brother, were highly valued  surgeons and medics. In the Iliad he was wounded and put out of action by Paris.  Mada In. described in the Maha‐bharata as “a fearful open‐mouthed monster, created by the sage Chyavana,  having  teeth  and  grinders  of  portentous  length,  and  jaws  one  of  which  enclosed  the  earth  and  the  other  the  sky,”  who  got  Indra  and  the  other  gods  into  his  jaws  “like  fishes  in  the  mouth  of  a  sea  monster.”  Madayanti In.  wife  of  King  Saudasa  or  Kalmasha‐pada;  she  was  allowed  to  consort  with  the  sage  Vasishtha.  According to some this was a meritorious act on the king’s part and a favour to Vasishtha; according to  others it was for the sake of obtaining progeny.   Madhava In. a name of Krishna or Vishnu  Madhava,  Madhavacharya In.  A  celebrated  scholar  and  religious  teacher.  He  was  a  native  of  Tuluva,  and  became prime minister of Vira Bukka Raya, king of the great Hindu state of Vijaya‐nagara, who lived in  the fourteenth century. He was brother of Sayana, the author of the great commentary on the Veda, in  which work Madhava himself is believed to have shared.   Madhavi In. a name of Lakshmi  Madhu In. a demon slain by Krishna; Another, or the same demon, said to have been killed by Satru ghna  Madhu‐Chhandas In. a son of Viswamitra, who had fifty sons older and fifty younger than this one; but they  are spoken of as “a hundred sons.” He is the reputed author of some hymns of the Rig‐veda  Madhu‐kasa In. described in the Atharva‐veda as “the brilliant grand‐daughter of the Maruts; mother of the  Adityas, the daughter of the Vasus, the life of creatures, and the centre of immortality  Madhuraniruddha In. a drama in eight acts by Sayani Chandra Sekhara; it is quite a modern work  Madhu‐sudana In. ‘Slayer of Madhu’ a name of Krishna  Madhya‐desa In. the middle country, described by manu as “the tract situated between the Himavat and the  Vindhya  ranges  to  the  east  of  Vinasana  and  to  the  west  of  Prayaga  (Allahabad).”  Another  authority  makes it the doab.  Madhyandina  In.  a  Vedic  school;  a  subdivision  of  the  Vajasaneyi  school,  and  connected  with  the  Satapatha  Brahmana.  It  had  also  its  own  system  of  astronomy,  and  obtained  its  name  from  making  noon  (Madhya‐dina) the starting‐point of the planetary movements  Madira In. a name of Varuni; wife of Varuna; goddess of wine  Madra In.  name  of  a  country  and  people  to  the  north‐west  of  Hindustan;  its  capital  was  Sakala,  and  the  territory extended from the Biyas to the Chinab, or, according to others, as far as the Jhilam.  Madri In. a sister of the king of the Madras; second wife of Pandu, to whom she bore twin‐sons, Nakula and  Sahadeva; but the Aswins are alleged to have been their real father; she became a sati on the funeral  pile of her husband.  Maenad  Gk.  the  female  followers  of  Bacchus  (Dionysus);  the  most  significant  members  of  the  Thiasus,  the  god's  retinue.  Their  name  literally  translates  as  "raving  ones";  often  the  maenads  were  portrayed  as 

148

Mythology and Folklore  
inspired  by  him  into  a  state  of  ecstatic  frenzy,  through  a  combination  of  dancing  and  drunken  intoxication.  Magadha In. the country of South Bihar, where the Pali language was spoken  Magha In. a poet, son of Dattaka; author of one of the great artificial poems called, from its subject, Sisupala‐ badha, or, from its author, Magha‐kavya  Maghavat, Maghavan In. a name of Indra  Magic N. The magic used by our northern ancestors covered an amazing range of subjects and possibilities:  Shapeshifting, incantations, runic divination, "sitting‐out", weather and element magic, evil eye, image  magic,  necromancy,  counter‐magic,  charms,  prophecy  and  second‐sight,  herbalism,  healing  and  poisons,  "platform  magic",  mind  control,  death  magic  and  curses,  sexual  magic,  ghost  lore,  battle  magic.  Many  of  these  overlap  one  another,  with  shamanic  techniques  complementing  herbalism  and  healing, as an example. Also see Galdor and Seid.  Magni  N.  "The  Powerful";  son  of  Thorr  and  Jarnsaxa;  extremely  strong  at  birth;  Magni  kills  Nidhogg  in  Ragnarok which he survives with his brother Modi. The brothers inherit Mjollnir.  Maha‐Bali In.  a title of the dwarf Bali, whose city is called Maha‐bali‐pura,” or Seven Pagodas near Madras  Maha‐Bharata In. ‘The great (war of the) Bharatas’; the great epic poem of the Hindus, probably the longest in  the world. It is divided into eighteen parvas or books, and contains about 220,000 lines. The poem has  been subjected to much modification and has received numerous comparatively modern additions, but  many of its legends and stories are of Vedic character and of great antiquity. They seem to have long  existed in a scattered state, and to have been founded many of the poems and dramas of later days,  and  among  them  is  the  story  of  Rama,  upon  which  the  Ramayana  itself  may  have  been  based.  According  to  Hindu  authorities,  they  were  finally  arranged  and  reduced  to  writing  by  a  Brahman  or  Brahmans. There is a good deal of mystery about this, for the poem is attributed to a divine source.   Maha‐Devi In. ‘The great goddess’; a name of Devi, the wife of Siva  Maha‐kala  In. ‘Great Time’; a name of Siva in his destructive character. One of the twelve great Lingas. In the  caves  of  Elephanta  this  form  of  Siva  is  represented  with  eight  arms.  In  one  hand  he  holds  a  human  figure; in another, a sword or sacrificial axe; in a third, a basin of blood; in a fourth, the sacrificial bell;  with two he is drawing behind him the veil, which extinguishes the sun; and two are broken off. Chief of  the Ganas or attendants on Siva.  Maha‐Kavyas  In. ‘Great  poems’  six  are  classified  under  this  title:  ‐  (1.)  Raghu‐vansa;  (2.)  Kumara  sambhava;  (3.) Megha‐duta; (4.) Kiratarjuniya; (5.) Sisupala‐badha; (6.) Naishadha‐charitra.  Maha‐Padma Nanda In. the last of the Nanda dynasty  Maha‐Pralaya  In. a  total  dissolution  of  the  universe  at  the  end  of  a  kalpa,  when  the  seven  lokas  and  their  inhabitants,  men,  saints,  gods,  and  Brahma  himself,  are  annihilated.  Called  also  Jahanaka,  Kshiti,  and  Sanhara  Maha‐Puranas In. ‘The great Puranas’ The Vishnu and the Bhagavata, the two great Puranas of the Vaishnavas  Maha‐Purusha In. ‘The great or supreme male’; the supreme spirit. A name of Vishnu  Maharajikas In. a Gana or class of inferior deities, 236 or 220 in number 

149

Mythology and Folklore  
Maha‐Rashtra In. the land of the Mahrattas  Maha‐sena In. ‘The great captain’ a name of Kastikeya, god of war  Mahat In. the great intellect produced at the creation  Mahatmya In.  ‘Magnanimity’ a legend of a shrine or other holy place  Maha‐vira Charita In. ‘The exploits of the great hero (Rama).’ A drama by Bhava‐bhuti, translated into English  by Pickford. There are several editions of the text  Maha‐yogi In. ‘The great ascetic’ A name of Siva  Maha‐yuga In. a great Yuga or age, consisting of 4,320,000 years  Mahendra In. a name of Indra; one of the seven mountain ranges of India; the hills, which run from Gondwans  to Orissa and the Northern Circars  Maheswara In. a name of Siva  Mahisha,  Mahishasura In.  the  great  Asura  or  demon  killed  by  Skanda  in  the  Maha‐bharata;  also  a  demon  killed by Chanda or Durga.  Mahismati  In.  the  capital  of  Karta‐virya;  king  of  the  Talajanghas,  who  had  a  thousand  arms.  It  has  been  identified by Colonel Tod with the village of Chuli Mahesar, which, according to him, is still called “the  village of the thousand armed.”  Mahodaya In. a name of the city of Kanauj  Mahoraga In. (Maha + uraga) ‘Great serpent’ The serpent Sesha, or any other great serpent  Maia Gk. the eldest of the Pleiades; the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione;  She and her sisters, born on  Mount  Cyllene  in  Arcadia,  are  sometimes  called  mountain  goddesses,  oreads,  for  Simonides  of  Ceos  sang of "mountain Maia" (Maiaoureias) "of the lively black eyes"; Maia was the oldest, most beautiful  and shyest. Aeschylus repeatedly identified her with Gaia.  Maia Rom. Goddess of fertility and Spring  Maiesta Rom. Goddess of honor and reverence  Mainaka  In. A  mountain  stated  in  the  Maha‐bharata  to  be  north  of  Kailasa;  so  called  as  being  the  son  of  Himavat and Menaka. When, as the poets sing, Indra clipped the wings of the mountains, this is said to  have been the only one, which escaped. This mountain, according to some, stands in Central India, and,  according to others, near the extremity of the Peninsula.  Maitreya  In. a  Rishi;  son  of  Kusarava;  disciple  of  Parasara.  He  is  one  of  the  interlocutors  in  the  Vishnu  and  Bhagavata Puranas.  Maitreyi In. wife of the Rishi Yajnawalkya, who was indoctrinated by her husband in the mysteries of religion  and philosophy  Maitri,  Maitrayani  In. an  Upanishad  of  the  Black  Yajur‐veda;  it  has  been  edited  and  translated  by  Professor  Cowell for the Bibliotheca Indica 

150

Mythology and Folklore  
Makandi In. a city of the Ganges, the capital of Southern Panchala  Makara In. A huge sea animal, which has been taken to be the crocodile, the shark, the dolphin, &c., but is  probably a fabulous animal. It represents the sign Capricornus in the Hindu zodiac, and is depicted with  the head and forelegs of an antelope and the body and tail of a fish. It is the vehicle of Varuna, the god  of the ocean, and its figure is borne on the banner of Kama‐deva, god of love. It is also called Kantaka,  Asita‐danshtra, ‘black teeth,’ and Jala‐rupa, ‘water form.’  Makhavat In. a name of Indra  Malava In. the country of Malwa  Malavikagnimitra In.  (Malavika  and  Agnimitra);  a  drama  ascribed  to  Kali‐dasa,  and  although  inferior  to  his  other productions, it is probably his work. The text, with a translation, has been published by Tullberg.  There is a German translation by Weber, an English one by Tawney, and a French one by Foucaux. The  text has been printed at Bombay and Calcutta.  Malaya In. the country of Malabar proper; the mountains bordering Malabar  Malina‐Mukha In. ‘Black faced’ Rakshasas and other demons, represented as having black faces  Malini In. ‘Surrounded with a garland (mala)’ of Champa trees; a name of the city of Champa  Mallikarjuna In. a name of Siva; one of the twelve great Lingas  Mallinatha In. a poet; author of commentaries of great repute on several of the great poems, as the Raghu‐ vansa, Megha‐duta, Sisupala‐budha  Málrúnar,  Malrunes  N.  Speech  runes,  by  which  one  gains  eloquence;  generally,  the  Malrunes  are  used  in  magic that brings advantage to the rune user by means of speech; A Malrune is a runic formula that is  spoken,  called,  or  sung  to  achieve  the  desired  magical  result.  Malrunes  are  effective  in  areas  of  life  where words are important. They can be used to gain compensation against injuries, especially in legal  actions. When they are used for this purpose, they should be written upon the walls, pillars and seats of  the  place  where  the  case  is  being  tried.  Malrunes  are  also  used  in  the  word  magic  of  poetry  and  invocation.   Mana  N.  The  Finnish  Death  Goddess  of  the  Kalevala. Her  realm  is  called  Manala;  A  vital essence  that  is  the  pure energy of Love and Harmony.  Manasa In. ‘The intellectual’ a name of the Supreme Being Thus defined in the Maha‐bharata: “The primeval  god, without beginning or dissolution, indivisible, undecaying, and immortal, who is known and called  by great Rishis Manasa.”  Manasa, Manasa‐Devi In. sister of the serpent king Sesha; wife of the sage Jarat‐karu. She is also called Jagad‐ gauri, Nitya (eternal), and Padmavati. She had special power in counteracting the venom of serpents,  and was hence called Visha‐hara.  Manasa, Manasa‐Sarovara In. The lake Manasa in the Himalayas. In the Vayu Purana it is stated that when the  ocean fell from heaven upon Mount Meru, it ran four times round the mountain, then it divided into  four rivers which ran down the mountain and formed four great lakes, Arunoda on the east, Sitoda on  the west, Maha‐bhadra on the north, and Manasa on the south. According to the mythological account,  the river Ganges flows out of it, but in reality no river issues from this lake, though the river Satlej flows  from another and larger lake called Ravana‐hrada, which lies close to the west of Manasa. 

151

Mythology and Folklore  
Manasa‐Putras In. ‘Mind (born) sons’ the seven or ten mind‐born sons of Brahma  Manas‐Tala In. the lion on which Devi rides  Manavi In. the wife of Manu; also called Manayi  Manda‐Karni In. A sage who dwelt in the Dandaka forest, and is said in the Ramayana to have formed a lake,  which  was  known  by  his  name.  His  austerities  alarmed  the  gods,  and  Indra  sent  five  Apsarases  to  beguile him from his penance of “standing in a pool and feeding on nothing but air for 10,000 years.”  They succeeded, and became his wives, and inhabited a house concealed in the lake, which, from them,  was called Panchapsaras.  Mandakini In. the heavenly Ganges; the Ganges; an arm of the Ganges, which flows through Kedara natha. A  river near the mountain Chitra‐kuta (q.v.) in Bundelkhand. It was near the abode of Rama and Sita, and  is mentioned both in the Ramayana and Maha‐bharata. It would seem to be the modern Pisuni.  Mandala In. ‘A circle, orb’ a circuit or territorial division, as Chola‐mandala, i.e., Coromandel. According to one  arrangement, the Sanhita of the Rig‐veda is divided into ten Mandalas  Mandala‐Nritya In. a circular dance; the dance of the Gopis round Krishna and Radha  Manda‐Paa In. A childless saint, who, according to the Maha‐bharata, after long perseverance in devotion and  asceticism,  died  and  went  to  the  abode  of  Yama.  His  desires  being  still  unsatisfied,  he  inquired  the  cause, and was told that all his devotions had failed because he had no son, no putra (put, ‘hell,’ tra,  ‘drawer’), to save him from hell. He then assumed the form of a species of bird called Sarngika, and by a  female of that species, who was called Jarita, he had four sons.  Mandara In. the great mountain, which the gods used for the churning of the ocean; it is supposed to be the  mountain so named in Bhagalpur, which is held sacred  Mandavi In. daughter of Kusa‐dhwaja; cousin of Sita; wife of Rama’s brother Bharata  Mandehas In. a class of terrific Rakshasas, who were hostile to the sun and endeavored to devour him  Mandhatri In.  a king; son of Yuvanaswa, of the race of Ikshwaku, and author of a hymn in the Rig‐veda. The  Hari‐vansa  and  some  of  the  Puranas  make  Mandhatri  to  have  been  born  in  a  natural  way  from  his  mother Gauri, but the Vishnu and Bhagavata Puranas tell an extraordinary story about his birth, which  is probably based upon a forced derivation of his name.   Mandodari In. Ravana’s favourite wife and the mother of Indra‐jit  Mandukeya In. a teacher of the Rig‐veda, who derived his knowledge from his father, Indra‐pramati  Mandukya In. name of an Upanishad translated by Dr. Roer in the Bibliotheca Indica  Manegarm, Moongarm N. The mighty wolf ever bred, Manegarm chases the Moon every night. In the battle  of  Ragnarok  he  finally  catches  the  Moon.  He  eats  corpses  and  spatter  heavens  with  lifeblood.  Manegarm has given birth by a Giantess in the Ironforest.  Manes Gk. the deified souls of the dead; the spirit or shade of a particular dead person  Manes Rom. similar to the Lares, Genii and Di Penates; they were the souls of deceased loved ones; They were  honored during the Parentalia and Feralia in February 

152

Mythology and Folklore  
Mangala In. the planet Mars, identified with Kartikeya, the god of war; he was son of Siva and the Earth, and  as son of the Earth is called Angaraka, Bhauma, Bhumi‐putra, Mahisuta  Manheimur N. The name of the land where the Aesir settled during their absence from Asgard during the war  with the Vanir.  Måni ‐ Moon‐God. Moon is the son of Mundilfari and the Light‐Disir Sol's brother. Together with his sister Sol  he was placed in the sky by the Æsirs. Moon is chased by the wolf Manegarm.  Mania Rom. Goddess of the dead  Mani‐Bhadra In. the chief of the Yakshas and guardian of travelers  Manimat In. a Rakshasa slain by Bhima  Mani‐Pura  In.  A  city  of  the  seacoast  of  Kalinga,  when  Babhru‐vahana,  the  son  of  Arjuna,  dwelt.  Wheeler  identifies it with the modern Munnipur or Muncepore, east of Bengal; but this is very questionable.  Manmatha In. a name of Kama; god of love  Manthara In. An ugly deformed slave, nurse of Queen Kaikeyi, who stirred up her mistress’s jealousy against  Rama chandra, and led her to persuade King Dasa‐ratha to banish Rama from court. Satru‐ghna beat  her and threatened to kill her, but she was saved by his brother Bharata.  Mantra In. that portion of the Veda, which consists of hymns, as distinct from the Brahmanas  Manu  Eg.  the  mythical  mountain  on  which  the  sun  set;  the  region  of  the  western  horizon;  one  of  two  mountains that held up the sky, the other being BAKHU; These peaks were guarded by the double lion  god, AKER  Manu. In. (From the root man, to think.) ‘The man.’ This name belongs to fourteen mythological progenitors  of  mankind  and  rulers  of  the  earth,  each  of  whom  holds  away  for  the  period  called  a  Manwantara  (manu‐antara), the age of a Manu, i.e., a period of no less than 4,320,000 years.   Manwantara In. (Manu‐antara). The life or period of a Manu, 4,320,000 years  Mardoll N. "Shining over the Sea"; an aspect of Freya  Maricha In. a Rakshasa; son of Taraka. According to the Ramayana he interfered with a sacrifice, which was  being  performed  by  Viswamitra,  but  was  encountered  by  Rama,  who  discharged  a  weapon  at  him,  which  drove  him  one  hundred  yojanas  out  to  sea.  He  was  afterwards  the  minister  of  Ravana,  and  accompanied  him  to  the  hermitage  where  Rama  and  Sita  were  dwelling.  There,  to  inveigle  Rama,  he  assumed the shape of a golden deer, which Rama pursued and killed. On receiving his death‐wound he  resumed  a  Rakshasa  form  and  spake,  and  Rama  discovered  whom  he  had  killed.  In  the  meanwhile  Ravana had carried off Sita.  Marichi In. chief of the Maruts; name of one of the Prajapatis. He is sometimes represented as springing direct  from Brahma. He was father of Kasyapa, and one of the seven great Rishis  Marisha In. daughter of the sage Kandu; wife of the Prachetasas, but from the mode of her birth she is called  “the nursling of the trees, and daughter of the wind and the moon.” She was mother of Daksha. Her  mother was a celestial nymph named Pramlocha, who beguiled the sage Kandu from his devotions and  lived with him for a long time. When the sage awoke from his voluptuous delusion, he drove her from 

153

Mythology and Folklore  
his  presence.  “She,  passing  through  the  air,  wiped  the  perspiration  from  her  with  the  leaves  of  the  trees,” and “the child she had conceived by the Rishi came forth from the pores of her skin in drops of  perspiration.  The  trees  received  the  living  dews,  and  the  winds  collected  them  into  one  mass.  Soma  matured  this  by  his  rays,  and  gradually  it  increased  in  size  till  the  exhalations  that  had  rested  on  the  tree  tops  became  the  lovely  girl  named  Marisha.”  Vishnu  Purana.  According  to  the  same  authority  Marisha  had  been  in  a  former  birth  the  childless  widow  of  a  king.  Her  devotion  to  Vishnu  gained  his  favour,  and  he  desired  her  to  ask  a  boon.  She  bewailed  her  childless  state,  and  prayed  that  in  succeeding births she might have “honourable husbands and a son equal to a patriarch.” She received  the promise that she should have ten husbands of mighty prowess, and a son whose posterity should  fill  the  universe.  This  legend  is  no  doubt  an  addition  of  later  date,  invented  to  account  for  the  marvellous origin of Marisha.  Markandeya In. a sage; the son of Mrikanda; reputed author of the Markandeya Purana. He was remarkable  for his austerities and great age, and is called Dirghayus, ‘the long‐lived.’  Marpessa  Gk.  was  a  grand‐daughter  of  Ares;  an  Aetolian  princess;  she  was  kidnapped  by  Idas  but  loved  by  Apollo as well; Zeus made her choose between them; According to another myth she was the daughter  of the river god Euenus and Alcippe.  Mars Rom. the god of war, spring, growth in nature, agriculture, terror, anger, revenge, courage and fertility;  Protector  of  cattle;  The  son  of  Jupiter  and  Juno,  he  was  the  god  of  war;  Mars  was  regarded  as  the  father  of  the  Roman  people  because  he  was  the  father  of  Romulus,  the  legendary  founder  of  Rome,  and husband to Bellona; He was the most prominent of the military gods that were worshipped by the  Roman legions.  Marsyas Gk. a central figure in two stories involving music: in one, he picked up the double flute (aulos) that  had been abandoned by Athena and played it, in the other, he challenged Apollo to a contest of music  and lost his hide and life; In Antiquity, literary sources often emphasise the hubris of Marsyas and the  justice of his punishment.  Marttanda In. in the Vedas the sun or sun god  Martya‐Mukha In. ‘Human‐faced’ aany being in which the figures of a man and animal are combined  Maruts In. the storm gods; who hold a very prominent place in the Vedas, and are represented as friends and  allies of Indra  Marutta In. a descendant of Manu Vaivaswata. He was a Chakravarti, or universal monarch, and performed a  celebrated  sacrifice.  “Never,”  says  the  Vishnu  Purana,  “was  beheld  on  earth  a  sacrifice  equal  to  the  sacrifice of Marutta. All the implements and utensils wee made of gold. Indra was intoxicated with the  libations  of  soma  juice,  and  the  Brahmans  were  enraptured  with  the  magnificent  donations  they  received.  The  winds  of  heave  encompassed  the  rite  as  guards,  and  the  assembled  gods  attended  to  behold it.” According to the Vayu Purana, Marutta was taken to heaven with his kindred and friends by  Samvarta, the officiating priest at this sacrifice. But the Markandeya Purana says he was killed after he  had  laid  down  his  crown  and  retired  to  the  woods;  A  king  of  the  solar  race,  who  was  killed  by  Vapushmat, and fearfully avenged by his son Dama.  Masataba Eg. the Arabic word meaning; "bench"; Used to describe tombs of the Early Dynastic Period and Old  Kingdom; The basic form resembled a bench  Matali In. charioteer of Indra 

154

Mythology and Folklore  
Matanga In. ‘An elephant’ a man who was brought up as a Brahman but was the son of a Chandala. His story,  as told in the Maha‐bharata, relates that he was mercilessly goading an ass’s foal, which he was driving.  The  mother  ass,  seeing  this,  tells  her  foal  that  she  could  expect  no  better,  for  her  driver  was  no  Brahman but a Chandala. Matanga, addressing the ass as “most intelligent,” begged to know how this  was,  and  was  informed  that  his  mother  when  intoxicated  had  received  the  embraces  of  a  low‐born  barber, and that he, the offspring, was a Chandala and no Brahman. In order to obtain elevation to the  position of a Brahman, he went through such a course of austerities as alarmed the gods. Indra refused  to  admit  him.  He  persevered  again  for  a  hundred  years,  but  still  Indra  persistently  refused  such  an  impossible  request,  and  advised  him  to  seek  some  other  boon.  Nothing  daunted,  he  went  on  a  thousand  years  longer,  with  the  same  result.  Though  dejected  he  did  not  despair,  but  proceeded  to  balance himself on his great toe. He continued to do this for a hundred years, when he was reduced to  mere skin and bone, and was on the point of falling. Indra went to support him, but inexorably refused  his  request,  and,  when  further  importuned,  “gave  him  the  power  of  moving  about  like  a  bird,  and  changing  his  shape  at  will,  and  of  being  honoured  and  renowned.”  In  the  Ramayana,  Rama  and  Sita  visited the hermitage of Matanga near Rishya‐mukha Mountain.  Matari‐Swan In. an aerial being who is represented in the Rig‐veda as bringing down or producing Agni (fire)  for the Bhrigus; by some supposed to be the wind  Mathura In. An ancient and celebrated city on the right bank of the Yamuna, surviving in the modern Muttra.  It was the birthplace of Krishna and one of the seven sacred cities. The Vishnu Purana states that it was  originally  called  Madhu  or  Madhu‐vana,  from  the  demon  Madhu,  who  reigned  there,  but  that  when  Lavana, his son and successor, was killed by Satru‐ghna, the conqueror set up his own rule there and  built a city which he called Madhura or Mathura.  Matris In. ‘Mothers’ The divine mothers. These appear to have been originally the female energies of the great  gods, as  Brahmani or Brahma, Maheswari of Siva, Vaishnavi of Vishnu, Indrani or Aindri of Indra, &c.  The number of them was seven or eight or sixteen, but in the later mythology they have increased out  of number. They are connected with the Tantra worship, and are represented as worshipping Siva and  attending upon his son Kartikeya.  Matsya In. the Fish Incarnation; name of a country  Matsya purana In. This Purana is so called from its contents having been narrated to Manu by Vishnu in the  form of a fish (Matsya). It consists of between 14,000 and 15,000 stanzas. This work “is a miscellaneous  compilation, but includes in the contents the elements of a genuine Purana. At the same time, it is of  too mixed a character to be considered as a genuine work of the Pauranik class. Many of its chapters  are  the  same  as  parts  of  the  Vishnu  and  Padma  Puranas.  It  has  also  drawn  largely  from  the  Maha‐ bharata. “Although a Saiva work, it is not exclusively so, and it have no such sectarial absurdities as the  Kurma and Linga.”  Mattr N. personal beneficial force  Matuta Rom. Goddess of the dawn; harbors and the Sea; Patron of newborn babies; her festival day is June 11  Mauneyas In. a class of Gandharvas; sons of Kasyapa, who dwelt beneath the earth, and were sixty millions in  number.  They  overpowered  the  Nagas,  and  compelled  them  to  flee  to  Vishnu  for  assistance,  and  he  sent Purukutsa against them, who destroyed them.   Maurya  In. The  dynasty  founded  by  Chandra‐gupta  at  Patali‐putra  (Patna)  in  Magadha.  According  to  the  Vishnu  Purana,  the  Maurya  kings  were  ten  in  number  and  reigned  137  years.  Their  names  were  (1.) 

155

Mythology and Folklore  
Chandra‐gupta,  (2.)  Bindu‐sara,  (3.)  Asoka‐vardhana,  (4.)  Su‐yasas,  (5.)  Dasa‐ratha,  (6.)  Sangata,  (7.)  Sali‐suka, (8.) Soma‐sarman, (9.) Sasa‐dharman, (10.) Brihad‐ratha. The names vary in other Puranas.   Maya  In.  illusion  personified  as  a  female  form  of  celestial  origin,  created  for  the  purpose  of  beguiling  some  individual.  Sometimes  identified  with  Durga  as  the  source of spells, or as a personification of the unreality  of  worldly  things.  In  this  character  she  is  called  Maya‐ devi or Maha‐maya; A name of Gaya, one of the seven  sacred  cities; a  Daitya  who  was  the  architect  and  artificer of the Asuras, as Viswa‐karma was the artificer  of  the  Suras  or  gods.  He  was  son  of  Viprachitti  and  father of Vajra‐kama and Mandodari, wife of Ravana. He  dwelt  in  the  Deva‐giri  mountains  not  very  far  from  Delhi, and his chief works were in the neighbourhood of  that  city,  where  he  worked  for  men  as  well  as  Daityas.  The  Maha‐bharata  speaks  of  a  palace  he  built  for  the  Pandavas. In the Hari‐vansa he appears frequently both  as victor and vanquished in contests with the gods.   

           Maya 

Maya‐devi,  Mayavati  In. wife  of  the  demon  Sambara.  She  brought  up  Pradyumna,  the  son  of  Krishna,  and  subsequently married him. Pradyumna is represented as being a revived embodiment of Kama, the god  of love; and in accordance with this legend Maya‐vati is identified with his wife Rati, the Hindu Venus.   Mead N. A type of ale brewed from honey and water and thought to be the nectar of the gods. Mead is the  drink which made the Germanic tribes fierce...and also extremely inebriated. It is the celebrated drink  of  Beowulf,  made  from  fermented  honey.  Apparently  when  put  in  a  horn  (the  preferred  Germanic  drinking  vessel),  it  left  a  residue  at  the  tip  of  the  horn  which  turned  into  ergot,  a  hallucinogenic  by‐ product,  which  probably  explains  their  fanaticism  in  battle.  However,  in  certain  Eastern  European  countries, mead is still a popular home‐brewed drink, and is very simple to concoct:   Mead of Poetry N. The Mead of Poetry is very special mead which makes the drinker a poet. The mead was  made of Kvæsir's blood mixed with honey by Fjalar and Galar.  Meander Gk. a river in Greek mythology; patron deity of the Meander river (modern Büyük Menderes River) in  Caria, southern Asia Minor (modern Turkey); He is one of the sons of Oceanus and Tethys, and is the  father of Cyanee, Samia and Kalamos.  Medea  Gk.  a  woman  in  Greek  mythology;  she  was  the  daughter  of  King  Aeëtes  of  Colchis,  niece  of  Circe,  granddaughter  of  the  sun  god  Helios,  and  later  wife  to  the  hero  Jason,  with  whom  she  had  two  children: Mermeros and Pheres.; In Euripides's play Medea, Jason leaves Medea when Creon,  king of  Corinth, offers him/his daughter, Glauce, the play tells of how Medea gets her revenge on her husband  for this betrayal.  Medhatithi In. name of a Kanwa who was a Vedic Rishi. There is a legend in one of the Upanishads that he was  carried  up  to  heaven  by  Indra  in  the  form  of  a  ram,  because  the  god  had  been  pleased  with  his  austerities. Cf. Ganymede.  Medini In. the earth.  Meditrina  Rom. Goddess of wine and health; her festival is the Meditrinalia on October 11 

156

Mythology and Folklore  
Medu N. Mead, inspiration, transformation.  Medusa  Gk.    a  Gorgon;  a  chthonic  monster;  a  daughter  of  Phorcys  and  Ceto;  Only  Hyginus,  (Fabulae,  151)  interposes a generation and gives another chthonic pair as parents of Medusa, until he gave it to the  goddess Athena to place on her shield; In classical antiquity the image of the head of Medusa appeared  in the evil averting device known as the Gorgoneion.  Mefitas  Rom. Goddess of poisonous vapors from the earth  Megaera Gk.  Iis one of the Erinyes in Greek mythology; she is the cause of jealousy and envy, and punishes  people who commit crimes, especially marital infidelity; Like her sisters Alecto and Tisiphone, she was  born of the blood of Uranus when Cronus castrated him. In modern French (mégère) and Portuguese  (megera), derivatives of this name are used to designate a jealous or spiteful woman; In modern Greek,  Italian and Russian, the word megera indicates an evil and/or ugly woman.  Megara  Gk.    the  oldest  daughter  of  Creon,  king  of  Thebes;  in  reward  for  Heracles'  defending  Thebes  from  Orchomenus  in  single‐handed  battle,  Creon  offered  his  daughter  Megara  to  Heracles  and  he  brought  her home to the house of Amphitryon; she bore him a son and a daughter, whom Heracles killed when  Hera struck him with temporary  madness, in their hero‐tombs in Thebes they were venerated as the  Chalkoarai; in some sources Heracles slew Megara too, in others, she was given to Iolaus when Heracles  left Thebes forever.  Megha‐duta  In. ‘Cloud  messenger.’  A  celebrated  poem  by  Kali‐dasa;  banished  Yaksha  implores  a  cloud  to  convey  tidings  of  him  to  his  wife.  It  has  been  translated  into  English  verse  by  Wilson,  and  there  are  versions in French and German. The text has been printed with a vocabulary by Johnson.  Megha‐nada In. son of Ravana; See Indra‐jit.  Megin N. A personal force, distinct from physical power or strength, the possession of which assures success  and good fortune.  Meile N ”Mile Stepper"; Meile is Thor's relatively unknown brother.  Meinvættir N. Evil spirits who do one personal injury  Mekala In. Name of a mountain from which the Narmada river is said to rise, an form which it is called Mekala  and this name, who probably lived in the vicinity of this mountain. Their kings were also called Mekalas,  and there appears to have been a city Mekala.  Melampus  Gk.  A  legendary  soothsayer  and  healer,  originally  of  Pylos,  who  ruled  at  Argos.  He  was  the  introducer of the worship of Dionysus, according to Herodotus, who asserted that his powers as a seer  were derived from the Egyptians and that he could understand the language of animals; a number of  pseudepigraphal works of divination were circulated in Classical and Hellenistic times under the name  Melampus.  Melanion Gk. Also known as Hippomenes; was the husband of Atalanta.  Meleager Gk. A hero venerated in his temenos at Calydon in Aetolia; he was already famed as the host of the  Calydonian  boar  hunt  in  the  epic  tradition  that  was  reworked  by  Homer;  Meleager  was  the  son  of  Althaea and the vintner Oeneus and, according to some accounts father of Parthenopeus and Polydora.  Melicertes Gk. Sometimes Melecertes, later called Palaemon is the son of the Boeotian prince Athamas and  Ino, daughter of Cadmus. 

157

Mythology and Folklore  
Mell N. A sacred hammer.  Mellona Rom. Goddess and protector of bees.  Melpomene  Gk.  Muse  in  Greek  mythology.  She  was  the  muse  of  tragedy,  despite  her  joyous  singing;  she  is  often  represented  with  a  tragic  mask  and  wearing  the  cothurnus,  boots  traditionally  worn  by  tragic  actors. Often, she also holds a knife or club in one hand and the tragic mask in the other. On her head  she is shown wearing a crown of cypress.  Mena Rom. goddess of menstruation  Mena,  Menaka In.  Daughter  of  Vrishn‐aswa.  A  Brahmana  tells  a  strange  story  of  Indra  having  assumed  the  form of Mena and then fallen in love with her. In the Puranas, wife of Himavat and mother of Uma and  Ganga,  and  of  a  son  named  Mainaka.  An  Apsaras  sent  to  seduce  the  sage  Viswamitra  from  his  devotions, and succeeding in this object, she became the mother of the nymph Sakuntala.  Menat Eg. A protective amulet invoking the divine favor; it was usually worn on a string of beads at the back  of the neck, probably as a counterpoise to items of jewelry worn in front.  Menelaus Gk. A legendary King of Mycenaean (pre‐Dorian) Sparta. Husband of Helen; he was the son of Atreus  and  Aerope,  and  brother  of  Agamemnon  king  of  Mycenae  and,  according  to  the  Iliad,  leader  of  the  Spartan  contingent  of  the  Greek  army  during  the  War.  Prominent  in  both  the  Iliad  and  Odyssey,  Menelaus was also popular in Greek vase painting and Greek tragedy; the latter more as a hero of the  Trojan War than as a member of the doomed House of Atreus.  Mengingjord, Megingjardar N. "Strength Increaser". Thor's strength belt; with it wrapped around his stomach  Thor becomes twice as strong and twice as angry.  Mengloth N. The bride of Svipdag who lives on the Lyfja Mountain in Lyr hall; Svipdag had to take a perilous  journey to marry her.  Menhed Eg. A scribes pallet; Writing was a very important skill to the ancient Egyptians; It was practiced by a  group called scribes; The writing equipment used by scribes consisted of a palette, which held black and  red  pigments,  a  water  jar,  and  a  pen;  To  be  a  scribe  was  a  favorable  position,  even  some  kings  and  nobles are show proudly displaying scribe palettes.  Menja N. Jotun‐Giantess, sister of Fenja, the two women responsible for turning King Frodes giant mill, Grotte.  Menoecceus  Gk.  son  of  Creon;  in  the  war  of  the  seven  Argives  against  Thebes,  Teiresias  declared  that  the  Thebans  should  conquer  if  Menoecceus  would  sacrifice  himself  for  his  country.  Menoecceus  accordingly  killed  himself  outside  the  gates  of  Thebes;  relates  that  Menoeceus  killed  himself  in  consequence of an oracle of the Delphian god; his tomb was shown at Thebes near the Neitian gate.  Mens Rom. goddess of the mind and consciousness; her festival is May 8.  Mentor Gk. Son of Alcimus and a friend of Odysseus, who, on quitting Ithaca, entrusted to him the care of his  house.  Athena  assumed  his  appearance  when  she  conducted  Telemachus  to  Pylos.  On  Odysseus'  return, Mentor assisted him in the contest with the suitors, and brought about reconciliation between  him and the people. 

158

Mythology and Folklore  
      Mercury  Rm.  roman  name  of  Hermes;  he  is  an  Olympian  messenger  god;  The  god  of  thieves,  commerce  and  travelers;  His  main  festival,  the  Mercuralia,  was  celebrated on May 15 and on this day the merchants  sprinkled  their  heads  and  their  merchandise  with  water  from  his  well  near  the  Porta  Capena.  The  symbols  of  Mercury  are  the  caduceus  (a  staff  with  two intertwined snakes) and a purse (a symbol of his  connection with commerce).                Mermaids  N.  The  mermaids  appear  in  Norse  lore  as  well,  and  lure  unsuspecting  seafarers’  off‐course  with  their beautiful song. Aegir and Ran's nine wave‐daughters are undines or mermaids.  Merope Gk. Is one of the seven Pleiades, daughters of Atlas and Pleione. The Pleiades were virgin companions  of  Artemis;  Merope  lived  on  Chios,  and  was  often  pursued  by  Orion  but  she  did  not  love  Orion;  she  known to be the wife of Polybus, foster‐mother of Oedipus.  Meru In. A fabulous mountain in the navel or centre of the earth, on which is situated Swarga, the heaven of  Indra,  containing  the  cities  of  the  gods  and  the  habitations  of  celestial  spirits.  The  Olympus  of  the  Hindus; regarded as a terrestrial object, it would seem to be some mountain north of the Himalayas. It  is also Su‐meru, Hemadri, ‘golden mountain;’ Ratnasanu, ‘jewel peak;’ Karnikachala, ‘lotus mountain;’  and Amaradri and Deva‐parvata, ‘mountain of the gods.’  Meru‐Savarnas In. The ninth, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth Manus, said to be the “mind‐engendered sons of a  daughter of Daksha by himself and the three gods Brahma, Dharma, and Rudra, to whom he presented  her on Mount Meru.” The signification of the appellation Meru is obvious; that of Savarna or Savarni  signifies that they were all of one caste (varna).  Messe‐dag stave N. Wooden almanac showing holy days only. See Primestave.   Messene Gk. Daughter of Triopas, and wife of Polycaon, whom she induced to take possession of the country  which was called after her, Messenia; she is also said to have introduced there the worship of Zeus and  the mysteries of the great goddess of Eleusis; she was honored with a temple and heroic worship.                       Mercury 

159

Mythology and Folklore  
Messor Rom. a god of agriculture and mowing  Metaneira Gk. The wife of Celeus, and mother of Triptolemus, received Demeter on her arrival in Attica.  Metis Gk. The Titan goddess of good counsel; she was an adviser to Zeus in the Titan War, but when it was  prophesied  that  she  would  bear  a  son  greater  than  his  father,  the  god  put  her  away  inside  his  belly.  Their daughter Athena was born from the cracked skull of the god.  Mickle N. Great (in the sense of large); mighty.  Midas Gk. Phrygian king who did a favor for Dionysus and was granted what has since been called the Midas  touch.  Middle‐Garth N. The world of humankind.   Midgard,  Midgardhr  N.  The  material  universe,  the  dwelling  place  of  humanity.  The  world  of  mankind;  The  realm of humanity, which the gods built out of Ymir's eyebrows as a protection against the Jotuns.   Midgardsormr  N.  One  of  Loki's  children,  a  serpent  that  circles  Midgard.  Brother  to  Hel  and  the  Fenrir‐wolf.  Thor will kill the snake during Ragnarok. See Iormungand; World Serpent.  Milanion Gk. son of Amphidamas; husband of Atalante who became the father of Parthenopaeus  Mimansa In. a school of philosophy, See Darsana.  Mimir's Well N. The source wisdom and intelligence; this well lies under the root of Yggdrasill in Asgard and is  guarded by the head of Mimir. Odin came there and asked for a single drink from the spring, but he did  not get it until he had given one of his eyes to Mímir.  Mimisbrunnur N. Mimir's Well.  Min Eg. In early times Min was a sky‐god whose symbol was a thunderbolt; His title was Chief of Heaven; He  was also seen as a rain god that promoted the fertility of nature, especially in the growing of grain.  Minerva Rm. the Olympian goddess of crafts and war; Roman name of Athena  Minerva  Rom.  Goddess  of  Wisdom,  Learning,  the  Arts,  Sciences,  Medicine,  Dyeing,  Trade,  and  of  War;  Daughter of Jupiter, protectress of commerce, industry and education; Honored at the spring equinox  with her main festival, March 19 ‐ 23, called the Quinquatria; On June 13 the minor Quinquatrus was  observed.  Minjika  (mas.)  and  Minkika  (fem.)  In.  Two  beings,  according  to  the  Maha‐bharata  sprang  from  the  seed  of  Rudra, which was split upon a mountain. They are to be worshipped by those who desire the welfare of  children.  Minni N. The faculty of "memory"; the images stored in the deep mind from aeons past. The reflective part of  the soul, the memory‐‐personal and transpersonal; Also myne  Minos Gk. King of Crete. His insult to the gods eventuated in the birth of the Minotaur; had Daedalus build the  Labyrinth.  Minotaur Gk. A  monster, half‐man,  half‐bull, born  of  Queen Pasiphae's  god‐inflicted infatuation with a bull;  terror  of  the  Labyrinth;  he  was  fed  a  diet  of  sacrificial  youths  and  maidens  until  slain  by  the  hero  Theseus. 

160

Mythology and Folklore  

  Minotaur and Theseus    Minyae Gk. An ancient race of heroes at Orchomenos, Iolcos, and other places; their ancestral hero, Minyas, is  said to have migrated from Thessaly into the northern parts of Boeotia, and there to have established  the powerful race of the Minyans with the capital of Orchomenos. As the greater part of the Argonauts  is descended from the Minyans, they are themselves called Minyae.  Minyans Gk. Were an autochthonous group inhabiting the Aegean region; the extent to which the prehistory  of  the  Aegean  world  is  reflected  in  literary  accounts  of  legendary  peoples,  and  the  degree  to  which  material  culture  can  be  securely  linked  to  language‐based  ethnicity  have  been  subjected  to  repeated  revision.  Mirkwood N. A magic, dark forest from which three Valkrye maidens flew in search of husbands.  Mirmir N. "The Murmuring". Mirmir is Bolthorn's son, Betsla's brother, and Odin's mother's brother. Mimer is  a  proto‐etin  (Giant)  and  the  wisest  of  all  beings,  holder  of  all  knowledge  that  has  ever  existed,  who  lived by Mimir's Well. At the end of the war with the Vanirs, Mirmir was sent as a hostage. The Vanirs  chopped off his head and sent it back to Asgard. Odin galdored over the head, reviving it, and now it  lives in the well. Mirmir is God of all the waters beneath the earth.  Mist N. "The Mist" or "The Fog". The Valkyrie Mist is one of Odin's two servants. Her major task is to serve the  Einheriars in Valhalla of the four kinds of mead that comes from the goat Heidrun. Mist and Hrist bring  an ale horn to Odin.  Mistblindi N. "Fog Blind". Mistblindi is father to the Ocean Giant Aegir and the Fire Giant Logi. 

161

Mythology and Folklore  
Mistletoe N. The mistletoe was sacred to the Druids and to the Norse. It was considered to be the great healer  and has both male and female qualities. It was so well regarded by the Norse (because it was sacred to  Freyja)  that  they  refused  to  fight  in  the  vicinity  of  Mistletoe.The  custom  of  hanging  Mistletoe  in  the  house to promote peace comes from this. Generally regarded today as a symbol of love and purity; By  an  oversight,  Mistletoe  was  the  only  entity  in  the  universe  that  did  not  swear  to  not  cause  harm  to  Balder. Loki used  magic to make an arrow  of Mistletoe, and tricked Balder's blind brother, Hodur, to  shoot at Balder. The arrow struck and killed Balder.   Mistress of the house Eg. Housewife, title given to married ladies from the Middle Kingdom onwards.  Mit sinn ok megin N. Old Norse phrase meaning "belief in one's own Might and Main", found in the Icelandic  sagas describing those who did not sacrifice to the Germanic Gods, but rather believed in themselves.   Mitakshara In. a commentary of Vijnaneswara on the Smriti or text‐book of Yajnawalkya; the authority of this  book  is  admitted  all  over  India,  with  the  exception  of  Bengal  proper.  The  portion  on  inheritance  has  been translated by Colebrooke and into French by Orianne. The text has been printed in India.  Mithila In. A city, the capital of Videha or North Bihar, which corresponds to the modern Tirhut and Puraniya,  between  the  Gandaki  and  Kosi  rivers.  It  has  given  its  name  to  one  of  the  five  northern  nations  of  Brahmans (see Brahman), and to a school of law. It was the country of King Janaka, and the name of his  capital, Janaka‐pura, still survives in “Janakpoor,” on the northern frontier.  Mitra In. She is probably connected with the Persian Mithra, a form of the sun. In the Vedas he is generally  associated with Varuna, he being the ruler of the day and Varuna the ruler of the night. They together  uphold and rule the earth and sky, guard and world, encourage religion, and chastise sin. He is one of  the Adityas or sons of Aditi.  Mjollnir N. "Smasher" or "Crusher"; Thor's hammer, forged by the Dwarf Brokk, hits everything that Thor aims  at  and  always  comes  back  to  his  hand.  Thor  can  reduce  its  size  to  hang  it  around  his  neck.  Thor's  Hammer is one of the most popular pieces of jewelry of the Viking era.  Mlechhas In. Foreigners, barbarians, people not of Aryan race.  Mnemosyne Gk. Was Titan goddess of memory and remembrance and the inventress of language and words;  was also a goddess of time. She represented the rote memorization required, before the introduction  of writing, to preserve the stories of history and sagas of myth. In this role, she was represented as the  mother of the Mousai (Muses), originally patron goddesses of the poets of the oral tradition.  Modgud N. The grim skeleton Modgunn is the guardian by the Gjallarbridge Bridge that goes over the river  Gjoll  to  the  kingdom  of  death,  Hel.  She  extracts  a  toll  of  blood  before  permitting  one  to  cross.  She  demands everyone who passes tell their name and family.  Modi N. "The Brave. Son of Thorr and Jarnsaxa; He is very brave. He will survive the Ragnarok with his brother,  Magni.  Modin N. "Tired". A horse belonging to the Dwarf Dvalin  Modsognir, Durin N. Dwarves; the Dwarves were originally maggots but given intelligence by Gods.  Modvitnir N. "Mead‐Wolf". A Dwarf  Moha‐mudgara In. ‘Hammers for ignorance;’ a poem, explaining the Vedanta philosophy. It has been printed  and translated by Neve. 

162

Mythology and Folklore  
Moira Gk. supreme even over the Olympian gods; Greek godess of fate or necessity  Moirae Gk. Were the goddesses who controlled the destiny of everyone from the time they were born to the  time they died; the fates were often depicted as ugly hags, cold and unmerciful.  Moly Gk. In the story, Hermes gave this herb to Odysseus to protect him from Circe's magic spells that will be  cast on him if he went to her home to rescue his friends.   Moneta Rom. goddess of prosperity  Mood N. The emotional part of the soul closely allied with the wode.  Moon Gk. Represented by the Greek goddess Selene.  Mopsus Gk. He was one of the Lapithae of Oechalia or Titaeron (Thessaly), and one of the Calydonian hunters;  he is also mentioned among the combatants at the wedding of Peirithous, and was a famous prophet  among the Argonauts; he was represented on the chest of Cypselus.  Morkkurkalve N. A golum, or Mud‐Giant, created by the Jotuns to help Rungnir in his fight with Thor. He is  shaped  from  mud,  with  a  mare's  heart.  He  is  nine  miles  tall  and  his  chest  is  three  miles  wide.  He  collapsed during the battle.  Morpheus Gk. He Greek god of dreams; he lies on an ebony bed in a dim‐lit cave, surrounded by poppy; he  appears  to  humans  in  their  dreams  in  the  shape  of  a  man;  he  is  responsible  for  shaping  dreams,  or  giving shape to the beings which inhabit dreams; Morpheus, known from Ovid's Metamorphoses, plays  no part in Greek mythology. His name means "he who forms or molds" and is mentioned as the son of  Hypnos, the god of sleep; “Morphine” is derived from his name.  Mors Rom. god of death  Morta Rom. Goddess of death and one of the three Parcae.  Mortuary cult Eg. People who provided funerary offerings for nourishment of the deceased  Mortuary Eg. Pertaining to the burial of the dead  Mortuary  priest    Eg.  Called  the  "servant  of  the  ka";  this  was  a  Person  who  was  appointed  to  bring  daily  offerings to a tomb.   Mother  Earth  Gk.  The  first  Greek  god  was  actually  a  goddess;  she  is  Gaia,  or  Mother  Earth,  who  created  herself out of primordial chaos. From her fertile womb all life sprang, and unto Mother Earth all living  things must return after their allotted span of life is over.   Mrichchhakati  In. ‘The  toy‐cart.’  A  drama  in  ten  acts  by  King  Sudraka,  supposed  to  be  the  oldest  Sanskrit  drama  extant,  and  to  have  been  written  in  the  first  or  second  century  A.D.  The  country  over  which  Sudraka reigned is not known.   Mrigaka‐lekhara In. a play in four acts, written by Viswa‐natha at Benares; the piece takes its name from the  heroine, a princess of Kamarupa. It is a comparatively modern work.  Mrityu In. a name of Yama, the god of the dead  Mugdha‐bodha In. A standard Grammar by Vopadeva; written towards the end of the thirteenth century. It  has been edited by Bohtlingk, and there are several Indian editions.  

163

Mythology and Folklore  
Muka  In. a  Danava;  son  of  Upasunda;  he  assumed  the  form  of  a  wild  boar  in  order  to  kill  Arjuna,  but  was  himself killed by Siva in his form of the Kirata or mountaineer.   Mukhagni In. spirits or goblins with faces of fire; perhaps meteors  Mummy  Eg.  From  the  Persian  word;  "moumiya";  a  preserved  corpse  by  either  natural  or  artificial  means;  Mummification involved thoroughly drying the body to remove the source of decay.  Munda In. an appellation of Ketu; name of a demon slain by Durga  Mundilfari N. "Travels like a pendulum". Father of the beautiful Sun and her brother Moon; The Gods thought  Sun and Moon were too beautiful so they put them in the sky.  Muni In.  “A holy sage, a pious and learned person, endowed with more or less of a divine nature, or having  attained  to  it  by  rigid  abstraction  and  mortification.  The  title  is  applied  to  the  Rishis,  and  to  a  great  number  of  persons  distinguished  for  their  writings  considered  as  inspired,  as  Panini,  Vyasa.”  Their  superhuman powers over gods and men have been often displayed in blessings, but more frequently in  curses.  Munin N. "Memory". One of Odin's two black ravens; Everyday the ravens fly out all over the world, returning  and reports what they have seen.  Mura, Muru In. A great demon that had seven thousand sons; he was an ally of the demon Naraka, who ruled  over  Prag‐jyotisha,  and  assisted  him  in  the  defence  of  that  city  against  Krishna.  He  placed  in  the  environs  of  the  city  “nooses  the  edges  of  which  were  as  sharp  as  razors,”  but  Krishna  cut  them  to  pieces with his discus, slew Muru, “and burnt his severe thousand sons like moths with the flame of the  edge of his discus.”  Murari In. ‘The foe of Mura;’ an appellation of Krishna  Murk‐stave N. The negative aspects of a given runestave.  Musala In. The pestle‐shaped club carried by Bala‐rama. It was named Saunanda.  Muses Gk. Greek goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences; they were believed to inspire all artists,  especially poets, philosophers, and musicians; the Muses were the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne,  the goddess of memory; muses sat near the throne of Zeus, king of the gods, and sang of his greatness  and of the origin of the world and its inhabitants and the glorious deeds of the great heroes; from their  name words such as music, museum, mosaic are derived. 

164

Mythology and Folklore  

  The Muses    Mushtika  In.  A  celebrated  boxer  in  the  service  of  Kansa,  who  directed  him  to  kill  Krishna  or  Bala‐rama  in  a  public encounter, but Bala‐rama overthrew him and kill him.  Muspell, Muspellheim, Muspellheimr N. Land of fire. The first world to exist; A bright, flaming, hot world in  the southern region, home of the Fire‐Giants; Realm of fiery sparks, abode of expansion and electricity.  The force of pure energy constantly expanding away from itself  Mut Eg. Mut was the divine mother goddess, the queen of all gods; She is portrayed as a woman wearing a  vulture headdress, with the double crown (Pshent) of upper and lower Egypt.   Muta Rom. Goddess of silence  Mutinus Mutunus Rom. God of fertility  Mycenae  Gk.  Real  city  of  the  Heroic  Age  of  great  wealth  as  revealed  by  archaeology;  in  myth,  said  to  have  been founded by Perseus.  Myne N. The faculty of "memory"; the images stored in the deep mind from aeons past. The reflective part of  the soul, the memory‐‐personal and transpersonal; See also Minni  Myrkstafr N. The negative aspects of a given runestave. "Murk‐stave"  Myrmidons  Gk.  People  from  Aegina  which  was  created  out  of  ants  when  the  island  had  been  desolated  because of a plague; also mentioned in Odysseus’ journey  Myrrha  Gk.  The  daughter  of  Cinyras  and  Cenchreis,  who  lusted  for  her  father;  while  Myrrha's  mother,  Cenchreis, was away at Ceres' festival, Myrrha had sex with her father, Cinyras; who bore Adonis. 

165

Mythology and Folklore  
Myrtilus Gk. Son of Hermes by Cleobule; he was the charioteer of Oenomaus, king of Elis, and having betrayed  his  master;  he  was  thrown  into  the  sea  by  Pelops  near  Geraestus  in  Euboea;  and  that  part  of  the  Aegean is said to have thenceforth been called after him the Myrtoan sea. At the moment he expired,  he pronounced a curse upon the house of Pelops, which was hence harassed by the Erinnyes of that  curse. His father placed him among the stars as Auriga.  Myrtle Gk. one of Aphrodite’s most important sacred plants and animals which attributed in classical art   


Naenia  Rom. Goddess of funerals.  Naga‐loka In. Patala, the residence of the Nagas.  Naga‐nandana In. a Buddhist drama in five acts by Sri Harsha Deva; it has been translated by Boyd. The text  has been printed.  Nagara  In.  a  city;  there  are  seven  sacred  cities  which  confer  eternal  happiness  –  (1)Ayodhya,  (2)Mathura,  (3)Maya  (Gaya),  (4)Kasi  (Benares),  (5)Kanchi  (Conjeveram),  (6)  Avantika  (Ujjayini),  (7)Dwaraka  or  Dwaravati.  Naglfar  N.  "The  ship  with  rivets".  Naglfar  is  a  ship  that  the  Death  Goddess  Hel  created  using  dead  humans'  fingernails.  When  people  trim  their  fingernails,  the  construction  of  Nagelfar  is  delayed.  It  will  be  launched at Ragnarok from Jotunheim loaded with armed Jotuns, ready to fight the Gods.  Nahusha In. son of Ayus the eldest son of Pururavas, and father of Yayati; this king is mentioned by Manu as  having come into conflict with the Brahmans, and his story is repeated several times with variations in  different parts of the Maha‐bharata as well as in the Purnas, the aim and object of it evidently being to  exhibit the retribution awaiting any man who derogates from the power of Brahmans and the respect  due to them.  Naiads Gk. Are fresh‐water nymphs who inhabited the rivers, streams, lakes, marshes, fountains and springs  of  the  earth;  they  were  immortal,  minor  divinities  who  were  invited  to  attend  the  assemblies  of  the  gods on Mount Olympus.   Naikasheyas  In.  Carnivorous  imps  descended  from  Nikasha,  mother  of  Ravana.  They  are  called  also  Nikashatmajas.  Nairrita In. belonging to the south‐west quarter; the regent of that quarter; an imp, goblin, or Rakshasa  Nakahatras In. mansions of the moon, lunar asterisms; at first they were twenty‐seven in  number, but they  were  increased  to  twenty‐eight.  They  are  said  to  be  daughters  of  Daksha  who  were  married  to  the  moon.   Nakula  In.  the  fourth  of  the  Pandu  princes;  he  was  the  twin  son  of  Madri,  the  second  wife  of  Pandu,  but  mythologically he was son of the Aswins, or more specifically of the Aswin Nasatya. He was taught the  art of training and managing horses by Drona, and when he entered the service of the king of Virata he  was master of the horse. He had a son named Niramitra by his wife Karenu‐mati, a princess of Chedi.   Nala‐kuvaraala In. a son of Kuvera 

166

Mythology and Folklore  
Nalodaya In. (Nala + udaya). ‘The rise of Nala;’ a poem describing the restoration to power of king Nala after  he had lost his all; it is ascribed to a Kali‐dasa, but the composition is very artificial, and the ascription  to  the  great  Kali‐dasa  may  well  be  doubted.  The  text  has  been  printed,  and  there  is  a  metrical  translation by Yates.  Namuchi In. a demon slain by Indra with the foam of water; the legend of Namuchi first appears in the Rig‐ veda,  where  it  is  said  that  Indra  ground  “the  head  of  the  slave  Namuchi  like  a  sounding  and  rolling  cloud,” but it is amplified by the commentator and also in the Satapatha Brahmana and Maha‐bharata.  When  Indra  conquered  the  Asuras  there  was  one  Namuchi  who  resisted  so  strongly  that  he  overpowered Indra and held him. Namuchi offered to let Indra go on promise not to kill him by day or  by night, with wet or with dry. Indra gave the promise and was released, but he cut off Namuchi’s head  at twilight, between day and night, and with foam of water, which was, according to the authorities,  neither  wet  nor  dry.  The  Maha‐bharata  adds  that  the  dissevered  head  followed  Indra  calling  out  “O  wicked slayer of thy friend.”  Nanda In. the cowherd by whom Krishna was brought up; a king, or dynasty of kings, of Magadha, that reigned  at Patali‐putra, and was overthrown by Chandra‐gupta the Maurya about 315 B.C.   Nandana In. the grove of Indra, lying to the north of Meru  Nandi In. the bull of Siva; the Vayu Purana makes him the son of Kasyapa and Surabhi. His image, of a milky  white colour, is always conspicuous before the temples of Siva. He is the chamberlain of Siva, chief of  his personal attendants (ganas), and carries a staff of office. He is guardian of all quadrupeds. He is also  called  Salankayana,  and  he  has  the  appellations  of  Nadi‐deha  and  Tandava‐talika,  because  he  accompanies with music the tandava dance of his master.  Nandi‐mukha In. A class of Pitris or Manes, concerning whose character there is a good deal of uncertainty.  Nandini In. The cow of plenty belonging to the sage Vasishtha, said to have been born of Surabhi, the cow of  plenty that was produced at the churning of the ocean.   Nanna, Anna, Inanna N. "The Moon". Asa‐Goddess, wife of Balder, mother of Forseti; She dies of heartache  after Balder's death and is burned with him on his funeral boat, along with his chopped up horse and a  misfortunate Dwarf who Thor kicked in at the last minute.  Naos Eg. Shrine in which divine statues were kept, especially in temple sanctuaries; A small wooden naos was  normally  placed  inside  a  monolithic  one  in  hard  stone;  the  latter  are  typical  of  the  Late  Period,  and  sometimes elaborately decorated; Also used as a term for temple sanctuary.  Nara In. the original eternal man  Naraka In. a place of torture to which the souls of the wicked are sent. Manu enumerates twenty‐one hells: ‐  Tamisra,  Andha‐tamisra,  Maha‐raurava,  Raurava,  Naraka,  Kalasuta,  Maha‐naraka,  Sanjivana,  Maha‐ vichi, Tapana, Sampratapana, Sanhata, Sakakola, Kudmala, Puti‐mrittika, Loha‐sanku, Rijisha, Panthana,  Salmali, Asi‐patra‐vana, and Loha‐daraka. Other authorities vary greatly as to the numbers and names  of the hells.   Naraka In. an Asura, son of the Earth; In the Maha‐bharata and Vishnu Purana he is said to have carried off the  ear‐rings  of  Aditi  to  the  impregnable  castle  of  Prag‐jyotisha,  but  Krishna,  at  the  request  of  the  gods,  went there and killed him and recovered the jewels. In the Hari‐vansa the legend differs. According to  this, Naraka, king of Prag‐jyotisha, was an implacable enemy of the gods. He assumed the form of an  elephant and having carried off the daughter of Viswa‐karma, he subjected her to violation. He seized 

167

Mythology and Folklore  
the daughters of the Gandharvas, and of gods and  of men, as well as the Apsarasas themselves, and  had more than 16,000 women, for whom he built a splendid residence. He also appropriated to himself  jewels, garments, and valuables of all sorts, and no Asura before him had ever been so horrible in his  actions.  Narcissus Gk. A handsome youth who fall in love with his own reflection in a pool and was caused to break the  heart of the nymph Echo. 

  Narcissus and Echo    Narfi N. Narfi is son of Loki and Sigyn. Narfi was killed by his brother Vali, who was turned into a wolf. When  Loki  was  punished,  the  Gods  used  Narfi's  intestines  to  bind  him  onto  rocks  under  a  poisonous  snake  which dripped its venom onto him.  Narmada  In.  the  Nerbudda  river,  which  is  esteemed  holy;  the  personified  river  is  variously  represented  as  being  daughter  of  a  Rishi  named  Mekala  (from  whom  she  is  called  Mekala  and  Mekala‐kanya),  as  a  daughter of the moon, as a ‘mind‐born daughter’ of the Somapas, and as sister of the Nagas. It was she  who  brought  Purukutsa  to  the  aid  of  the  Nagas  against  the  Gandharvas,  and  the  grateful  snake‐gods  made her name a charm against the venom of snakes. According to the Vishnu Purana, she had a son  by  Purukutsa  who  has  named  Trasadasyu.  The  Matsa  Purana  gives  Duh‐saha  as  the  name  of  her  husband.  The  Hari‐vansa  is  inconsistent  with  itself.  In  one  place  it  makes  her  wife  of  Purukutsa  and  mother  of  Trasadasyu;  in  another  it  makes  her  the  wife  of  Trasadasyu.  She  is  also  called  Reva  and  Purva‐ganga, and, as a daughter of the moon, Indu‐ja and Somodbhava.  Nasatya In. name of one of the Aswins; it is also used in the plural for both of them.  Nastrond N. Site of the hall of evildoers in Hel; The dragon Nidhogg knaws at corpses here  Natron  Eg.  a  naturally  occurring  salt  used  as  a  preservative  and  drying  agent  during  mummification;  It  is  a  mixture of four salts that occur in varying proportions: sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium  chloride and sodium sulfate.  

168

Mythology and Folklore  
Natt , Nott, Night. N. "Night". Natt, a Night‐Disir, is the daugher of Norvi. She has been married three times.  With  Nagifari,  her  first  husband,  she  had  a  son,  Aud.  Her  second  husband  was  Annarr,  father  of  her  daughter Earth/Erda (Jõrd). With Delling ("Dawn"), her third husband, she had a son, Dag/Day. Natt is  also the mother of Njord. Natt and Dag circle the world on their horses. Natt's horse is Hrimfaxi ("Frost  Mane"). Dag's is Skinfaxi ("Shining Mane").  Nausicaa Gk. The Phaeacian princess who met the shipwrecked Odysseus when she was washing clothes on  the shore; this young princess was looked after by Eurymedusa, a woman from Aperaea.  Nava‐ratna In. The nine‐gems: pearl, ruby, topaz, diamond, emerald, lapis lazuli, coral, sapphire, and one not  identified  called  Go‐meda.  The  nine  gems  of  the  court  of  Vikrama,  probably  meaning  Vikramaditya,  whose era the Samvat begins in 56 B.C. A verse gives their names as Dhanwantari, Kshapanaka, Amara  Sinha,  Sanku,  Vetala‐bhatta,  Ghata‐karpara,  Kali‐dasa,  Varaha‐mihira,  and  Vararuchi.  The  date  of  Vikramaditya  is  by  no  means  settled.  Bhau  Daji  endeavours  to  identify  Vikrama  with  Harsha  Vikramaditya, who lived in the middle of the sixth century.  Naxos Gk. an island in the Aegean Sea  Nebu Eg. This is the Egyptian word  for gold, which was considered a divine metal, it was thought to be the  flesh of the gods; Its polished surface was related to the brilliance of the sun; Gold was important to the  afterlife  as  it  represents  aspects  of  immortality;  By  the  New  Kingdom,  the  royal  burial  chamber  was  called the "House of Gold."   Necessitas  Rom. Goddess of destiny.  Necropolis  Eg.  The  Greek  word  meaning;  "city  of  the  dead"  normally  describes  large  and  important  burial  areas that were in use for long periods.  Need‐fire N. Fire kindled directly from wood without flint by friction; A person's intense driving motivation to  achieve a desired end.  Nehallennia N. "The Fruitful One". Great mother of sea and vegetation; Goddess of plenty, seafaring, fishing,  fruitfulness; her symbol is a cornucopia  Neith  Eg.  A  goddess  of  the  hunt;  She  may  have  also  been  a  war  goddess;  Neith  was  pictured  as  a  woman  wearing the red crown of Lower Egypt, holding a bow and crossed arrows; Her cult sign was a shield  and crossed arrows.  Nekhbet Eg. A goddess portrayed as a vulture; Protectress of Upper Egypt.  Neleus Gk. The son of Poseidon and Tyro; he was the twin brother of Pelias and contested with him for the  crown;  Neleus  moved  to  Messenia  and  became  king  of  Pylos.  When  Heracles  visited  him  with  the  request  of  cleansing  him  from  a  blood‐debt,  Neleus  refused.  Heracles  destroyed  Pylos,  and  killed  Neleus with all his sons, except for Nestor.  Nemean lion Gk. preternatural beast with an impenetrable pelt, nevertheless vanquished by Hercules as one  of his Labors  Nemes Eg. a striped head cloth worn by Pharaohs  Nemesis Gk. Is the goddess of divine justice and vengeance; her anger is directed toward human transgression  of the natural, right order of things and of the arrogance causing it; Nemesis pursues the insolent and 

169

Mythology and Folklore  
the wicked with inflexible vengeance. Her cult probably originated from Smyrna; she is regarded as the  daughter of Oceanus or Zeus, but according to Hesiod she is a child of Erebus and Nyx.  Nemestrinus  Rom. God of the woods.  Nemeton N. Sanctuary, often a sacred grove of trees  Neoptolemus Gk. A young warrior and son of Achilles and Deidameia, the daughter of Lycomedes, was also  called Pyrrhus; at Troy he showed himself in every respect worthy of his great father, and at last was  one of the heroes that were concealed in the wooden horse.  Nephele Gk. a nymph; the first wife of Athamas, and mother of Phrixus and Helle; when she was driven away  by her husband, she protected her children against the threats of their stepmother Ino.  Nephthys  Eg.  a  goddess,  the  twin  sister  of  Osiris,  Isis  and  Seth;  She  plays  an  important  role  in  the  Osiris  legend; her name means 'Lady of the House' it's thought to be referring to Osiris' Palace.  Neptune  Rom.  the  god  of  the  sea;  the  God  and  patron  of  Horses  and  Horse  Racing  as  Neptune  Equester.  Neptunalia was celebrated on July 23; the trident is Neptune's attribute.  Neptune Rom. the Olympian god of the sea; Roman name of Poseidon  Nepur N. Moon‐God. He abducted king Ivaldi's sons, Bil & Hjuki. as they tried to take mead from their fathers  well. He had to release them when Ivaldi caught him as he rode through the underworld.  Nereids  Gk.  The  fifty  daughters  of  the  sea‐god  Nereus,  one  of  whom  bestowed  a  crown  upon  Theseus;  the  Nerieds saved the Argonauts from the Wandering Rocks.  Nereus Gk. sea‐god; thought of as being very old and correspondingly wise; father of the Nereidss  Nerthus N. Mother Earth Goddess, primal earth mother. She is the oldest Scandinavian Goddess whose name  has come down to us. Some connect her with Frigga. Possibly an older version of Njord (as the opposite  sex) or his sister/wife with whom he has Freyr and Freya; she was a fertility Goddess whose worship  was centered in Denmark; she lived in a grove on a sacred island; Once a year she traveled across the  land in a wagon bringing a season of peace and plenty. When she tired, she returned to her island and  was bathed in a lake by slaves who were later drowned.  Nessus Gk. centaur killed by Hercules with arrows dipped in Hydra venom; tricked the hero's wife into saving  his blood for a potion that ultimately killed the hero when he donned a shirt dipped in it.  Nestor Gk. The son of Neleus, king of Pylos, and Chloris; he was the only one who was spared when Heracles  slew  his  father  and  his  brothers;  Nestor  helped  fight  the  centaurs,  participated  in  the  hunt  for  the  Calydonian  boar  and  was  one  of  the  Argonauts.  When  he  was  already  of  advanced  age,  he  still  participated  in  the  expedition  against  Troy,  where  he,  as  oldest  of  the  Greek  heroes,  excelled  in  wisdom, eloquence, and bravery.  Neter  Eg.  This  seems  to  be  the  Egyptian  word  for  the  forces  that  are  god  or  a  group  of  gods,  although  the  exact meaning is unknown.   Neter‐khertet Eg. This translates as "divine subterranean place"; A name for the land of the dead.   

170

Mythology and Folklore  
    Nibelunggold  N.  A  treasure  that  was  first  owned  by  the  Dwarf  Andvari, which was stolen by the  Æsirs. Andvari then spoke a curse  over  the  magic  ring  Andvaranut.  Hreidmar  received  Andvari's  hoard  and  a  cursed  gold  ring  from  Odin,  as  compensation  for  the  death  of  his  son,  Otter,  but  he  refused  to  share  any  with  his  other  sons.  Fáfnir  and  Regin  killed their father, but then Fafnir  would  not  share  the  gold  with  Regin.  Fáfnir  went  to  a  cave  on  the  Gnita  Heath  and,  making  a  lair  there,  turned  himself  into  a  dragon  to  guard  the  gold.  Many  years later, Regin killed the Fafni  dragon,  with  the  aid  of  Sigurdr,  and  reclaimed  the  gold.  Sigurdr  killed  Regin  and  abandoned  the  gold.        Nid, Nídh N. An insult which is also a curse, calling upon the Landvaettir to drive out the miscreant. "Nidering"  is the worst thing any northerner could be called. Egil Skallagrimsson set up a "nidhin‐pole" to magically  banish Erik Bloddaxe from Norway. It worked.   Nidagha In. a Brahman; son of Pulastya, who dwelt “at Vira‐nagara, a large handsome city on the banks of the  Devika river” (the Gogra); he was a disciple of the sage Ribhu, and when Ribhu went to visit his disciple,  Nidagha  entertained  him  reverentially.  Ribhu  instructed  him  in  divine  knowledge  until  he  learned  to  “behold all things as the same with himself, and, perfect in holy knowledge, obtained final liberation.”  Nidana‐sutra In. an old work upon the metres of the Vedas  Nidavellir N. Land of the Dwarves  Nidering,  Nídhingr,  Nithling  N.  A  wretched  coward;  a  vile  wretch.  The  very  worst  insult  one  could  say  to  another.  Nidfjoll N. "Dark Mountains" A hall, called Sindri, is found in this mountain range. It will be a refuge to those  finding it at Ragnarok. 

171

Mythology and Folklore  
Nidhi  In.  Nine  treasures  belonging  to  the  god  Kuvera.  Each  of  them  is  personified  or  has  a  guardian  spirit,  which  is  an  object  of  worship  among  the  Tantrikas.  The  nature  of  these  Nidhis  is  not  clearly  understoosd.  See  a  note  by  Wilson  on  verse  534  of  the  Megha‐duta,  collected  works,  IV.  372.  Their  names are Kachchhapa, Mukunda, Nanda (or Kunda), Kharba, Makara, Nila, Sankha, Padma, and Maha‐ padma. The Nidhis are called also Nidhana, Nikara, and Sevadhi.  Nidhing  Pole  N.  "Pole  of  insult".  A pole  with  a  horse's  head  or  carving  of  the  victim  in  an  obscene  posture,  sued for serious insult and damaging curses.   Nidhoggr N. "Bites in anger". The terrible dragon that guards the Spring of Hvergelmir in Niflheim and gnaws  Yggdrasil's root to the north; Nidhoggr is always arguing with the eagle in the top of the tree.  Nidra In. Sometimes said to be a female form of Brahma, at others to have been produced at the churning of  the ocean.  Niflehel N. The location of Hela's Helheim, the domain of the dead who don't qualify for Valhalla. It lies in the  northernmost part of the Niflheim underworld. There are passages connecting Jotunheimur to Niflhel.  Jotunheimur contains the Giants that survived the blood‐flood, but Niflhel has the souls of the Giants  that drowned.  Niflheim,  Niflheimr  N.  The  lowest  level  of  the  nine  worlds.  The  realm  of  mist  becoming  ice,  abode  of  contraction  and  magnetism.  The  force  of  antimatter,  a  point  of  constantly  pulling  in  on  itself,  like  a  "black hole"; The northern world of the ice and unbearable cold, north of Asgard, home of the Frost‐ Giants.  It  is  the  location  of  a  frozen  well  known  as  Hvergelmir.  Here  Hel  created  her  Domain  of  the  Dead, Helheim. 

  Niflheim    Nikasha In. a female demon; the mother of Ravana; the mother of carnivorous imps called Pisitasanas, or by  their metronymic Naikusheyas and Nikashatmajas 

172

Mythology and Folklore  
Nike Gk. The Greek personification of victory; she can run and fly at great speed; she is a constant companion  of  Athena;  Nike  is  the  daughter  of  Pallas  and  Styx,  and  the  sister  of  Cratos,  Bia,  and  Zelus;  she  was  represented as a woman with wings, dressed in a billowing robe with a wreath or staff.  Nikumbh In. A Rakshasa who fought against Rama He was son of Kumbha‐karna; an Asura who, according to  the Hari‐vansa, received the boon from Brahma that he should die only by the hands of Vishnu. He was  king  of  Shat‐pura  and  had  great  magical  powers,  so  that  he  could  multiply  himself  into  many  forms,  though he commonly assumed only three. He carried off the daughters of Brahma‐datta, the friend of  Krishna, and that hero attacked him and killed him under different forms more than once, but he was  eventually slain outright by Krishna, and his city of Shat‐pura was given to Brahma‐datta.  Nila In. A mythic range of mountains north of Meru;  A mountain range in Orissa; A monkey ally of Rama;  A  Pandava warrior killed by Aswatthaman.  Nile Gk. A river derived from the name of Greek god of the river, Neilos.  Nilometer Eg. Staircase descending into the Nile and marked with levels above low water; Used for measuring,  and in some cases recording, inundation levels; the most famous are on Elephantine Island and on Roda  Island in Cairo.  Nimi In. son of Ikshwaku, and founder of the dynasty of Mithila; he was cursed by the sage Vasishtha to lose  his  corporeal  form,  and  he  retorted  the  imprecation  upon  the  sage.  Both  abandoned  the  bodily  condition  Vasishtha  was  born  again  as  the  issue  of  Mitra  and  Varuna,  but  "the  corpse  of  Nimi  was  preserved from decay by being embalmed with fragrant oils and resins, and it remained entire as if it  were immortal." The gods were willing to restore him to bodily life but Nimi declined, declaring that the  separation  of  soul  and  body  was  so  distressing  that  he  would  never  resume  a  corporeal  shape  and  become liable to it again." To this desire the god assented, and Nimi was placed by them in the eyes of  al  living  creatures,  in  consequence  of  which  their  eyelids  are  ever  opening  and  shutting."‐Vishnu  Purana. A wink of the eye is called nimisha, and the legend was probably built upon the resemblance of  the two words.  Nine bows Eg. A term given to the defeated enemies of Egypt  Nine  Worlds  of  Norse  Mythology  N.  The  world‐tree  Yggdrasil  contains  the  whole  of  creation,  embraced  by  nine worlds. 1) Asgardhr ‐‐ world of the Æsir, the land of the Gods. 2) Vanaheim ‐‐ world of the Vanir. 3)  Midgardh  ‐‐  world  of  men.  4)  Jotunheim  ‐‐  world  of  the  Giants.  5)  Svartalfaheim  ‐‐  world  of  the  Dwarves. 6) Alfheim or Lysalfheim ‐‐ world of the Light‐Elves. 7) Muspellheim ‐‐ world of fire, a bright,  flaming,  hot  world  in  the  southern  region,  home  of  the  Fire‐Giants.  8)  Niflheim  ‐‐  world  of  ice  and  terrible cold, in the far north, home of the Frost‐Giants, and 9) Helheim or Niflhel‐‐world of the dead.  Some  versions  of  the  mythology  refer  to  Eight  Worlds,  combining  Niflheim  and  Helheim,  or  Seven  Worlds, in which Lysalfheim is the home of Freyr and Light Elves and is not considered a "world". The  Light‐Elves also have a hall, Gimle, which is found in Andlang, one of the heavens above Asgardr. The  other heaven above Asagardr is Vidblain.  Ninus  Gk.  King  of  Assyria  and  the  eponymous  founder  of  the  city  of  Nineveh,  which  itself  sometimes  called  Ninus; he was said to have been the son of Belos, and to have conquered in 17 years all of western Asia  with the help of Ariaeus, king of Arabia.  Niobe  Gk.  She  was  the  daughter  of  Tantalus;  Niobe  was  the  queen  of  Thebes  (the  principle  city  in  Boetia),  married to Amphion, King of Thebes.  Niorun N. Niorun is the Goddess of dreams. The Dwarves call nighttime Dream‐Niorun. 

173

Mythology and Folklore  
Nirirriti In. Death personified as a goddess; sometimes regarded as the wife and sometimes as the daughter of  A‐dharma; one of the Rudras  Nirnaya‐sindhu In. a work on religious ceremonies and law by Kamalakara; it has been printed at Bombay and  Benares.  Nishada In. a mythic range of mountains lying south of Meru, but sometimes described as on the east. It is  north of the Himalaya; the country of Nala, probably the Bhil country.  Nishada In. a mountain tribe dwelling in the Vindhya Mountains, said to have been produced from the thigh of  Vena;  the  Bhils  or  foresters,  and  barbarians  in  general;  any  outcast,  especially  the  offspring  of  a  Brahman father and Sudra mother.  Nisunbha In. An Asura killed by Durga. See Sumbha.  Nisus  Gk.  Son  of  Pandion  and  Pylia,  was  a  brother  of  Aegeus,  Pallas,  and  Lycus,  and  husband  of  Abrote,  by  whom he became the father of Scylla; Nisus died because his daughter Scylla, who had fallen in love  with Minos, had pulled out the purple or golden hair which grew on the top of her father's head, and  on which his life depended.  Niti‐Manjari In. a work on ethics by Dya Dwiveda, exemplified by stories and legends with special reference to  the Vedas. Some specimens are given in the Indian Antiquary, vol v.  Niti‐Sastras  In. works  on  morals  and  polity,  consisting  either  of  proverbs  and  wise  maxims  in  verse,  or  of  stories and fables inculcating some moral precept and illustrating its effects. These fables are generally  in prose interspersed with pithy maxims in verse.  Njörd, Niord N. "Stiller‐of‐storms". Vana‐God of seafaring; He controls wind, stills sea and fire. He is the son of  Nott (Night). He lives in Noatun ("Boat Town"). His first wife was Nerthus, with whom he had his most  famous  children,  Freyr  and  Freyja.  He  had  eight  more  daughters.  He  was  briefly  married  to  Giantess  Skadi who picked him for his beautiful feet, by mistake, thinking he was Balder. Njord and Skadi could  not agree on where to live. She didn't like his home, and he didn't like hers, so they split up.  Noatun N. "Ship Yard" or "Boat Town"; Hall of the god Njörd  Nome Eg. From the Greek, nomos; this is an administrative province of Egypt; the nome system started in the  Early  Dynastic  Period;  During  some  periods,  when  there  was  a  highly  centralized  government  the  nomes had little political importance.  Nona  Rom.  Goddess  of  pregnancy;  one  of  the  Parcae  with  the  Goddesses  Morta  and  Decima,  the  Roman  Fates.  Nordri N. "North". The Dwarf Nordri was put in the sky's north corner by Odin, Vili and Ve. The sky is made out  of the Giant Ymir's head.  Norfe N. The Giant Norfe is the father of the disir Night. He was the first who built anything in Jotunheim.  Norn N. Usually had taken as the singular of the Nornir, the three Disir Fates of Norse myth known as Urdhr,  Verdhandi,  and  Skuld,  and  representing  the  past,  present  and  future.The  embodiments  of  ørlög  and  causality. There are three Norns, Urdhr (that‐which‐is), Verdhandi (that‐which‐is‐becoming), and Skuld  (that‐which‐should‐be) who shape the turnings of Wyrd through the worlds. Each person is also said to  have  his  or  her  own  lesser  norns  who  bring  his  or  her  personal  weird.  These  may  be  related  to  or 

174

Mythology and Folklore  
identical with the Disir and Valkyrja, who also embody personal ørlög. Also known by the Saxons as the  Weird or Wyrd Sisters  Notus Gk. The god of the South Wind, which is a very warm and moist wind; he is the son of Eos and Astraeus;  the Romans called him Auster.  Nox Rom. personification of the night  Nu Eg. A swirling watery chaos from which the cosmic order was produced; in the beginning there was only  Nu. See also the creation myths  Nundina  Rom. Goddess of the ninth day, on which the newborn child was given a name.  Nut Eg. Nut was originally a mother‐goddess who had many children; The hieroglyph for her name, which she  is often seen wearing on her head is a water pot, but it is also thought to represent a womb; As the sky  goddess, she is shown stretching from horizon to horizon, touching only her fingertips and toes to the  ground. 

  Nut    Nykur N. A Kelpie, a malignant water‐elemental, usually in the form of a horse.  Nysa  Gk.  daughter  of  Aristaeus,  who  was  believed  to  have  brought  up  the  infant  god  Dionysus,  and  from  whom one of the many towns of the name of Nysa was believed to have derived its name   


Obarator Rom. God of ploughing  Obelisk Eg. From the Greek word meaning; "a spit"; It is a monumental tapering shaft usually made of pink  granite;  Capped  with  a  pyramidion  at  the  top;  Obelisks  are  solar  symbols  similar  in  meaning  to  pyramids, they are associated with an ancient stone called BENBEN in Heliopolis; They were set in pairs,  at the entrances of temples, and to some Old Kingdom tombs.  

175

Mythology and Folklore  
Occator Rom. God of harrowing  Ocean Gk. A river, personified as a god, which ushered from the Underworld and flowed around the flat earth  in a circle.  Oceanids Gk. Where the nymphs of the great ocean, the daughters of Oceanus and Tethys; there were well  over  4,000  of  these  Oceanids.  They  were  sometimes  shy,  but  at  other  times  they  were  passionate  lovers.  Most  of  the  time  nymphs  were  kind  to  mortals,  but  they  sometimes  punished  people  who  mistreated  them;  in  the  forest,  nymphs  were  represented  with  fauns  and  satyrs;  Oceanids  could  sometimes found playing around the keels of ships; Nymphs lived for a long time, but they were usually  not considered immortal.  Ocyrrhoe Gk. The daughter of Chiron and the nymph Chariclo; because she performed as a seer, Apollo turned  her into a mare.  Od  N.  Od  has  two  beautiful  daughters,  Hnoss  and  Gersimi,  with  the  beautiful  fertility  goddess  Freya.  This  mysterious husband of Freyrja disappeared, and she mourned for him with tears of gold. No reason is  ever  given  for  his  disappearance  other  than  that  he  was  a  "traveller".  The  name  Od  may  be  another  form of the name Odin.  Ódhr  N.  Inspiration,  fury;  given  to  humankind  by  Odhin's  brother  Hoenir.  Cognate  to  Modern  German  Wut  and English wood (used archaically to mean madness)..  Odhrærir, Odhroerir N. "Exciter or Stirrer of Inspiration". This is both a name of the Mead of Poetry and its  container, which Odin stole from Suttung's daughter The Mead, was actually stored in three cauldrons:  Odhroerir, Son, and Bodhn.   Odian N. A technical term for the "theology" of the Erulian. Distinguished from the Odinist by the fact that the  Odian does not worship Odhinn but seeks to emulate his pattern of self‐transformation   Odin,  Odhinn,  Woden  N.  Ruler  of  the  Æsir,  God  of  the  runes,  inspiration,  shamanism,  magic  and  war;  God  of  the  hanged  and  the  Wild  Hunt;  God  of  storm, rain and harvest. A shape‐shifter, he makes  men mad or possessed with a blind raging fury. He  produces  the  battle  panic  called  "battle‐fetter".  Three different frenzies or madness are his gifts to  humankind:  the  warrior  in  battle,  the  seer  in  trance,  and  the  poet  in  creativity.  Subtle,  wily,  mysterious and dangerous, he often ignores pacts  made in honor with humans. Attended by his two  ravens,  two  wolves  and  the  Valkyries;  Feared  by  ordinary  people  and  worshiped  only  by  princes,  poets,  the  berzerkers,  and  sorcerers.  Unpredictable  when  invoked.  "I  call  myself  Grim  and  Ganglari,  Herian,  Hialmberi,  Thekk,  Third,  Thunn,  Unn,  Helblindi,  High,  Sann,  Svipal,  Sanngetal, Herteit, Hnikar, Bileyg, Baleyg, Bolverk,  Fiolnir,  Grimnir,  Glapsvinn,  Fiolsvinn,  Sidhott,  Sidskegg,  Sigfather,  Hnikud,  All‐father,  Atrid,  Farmatyr,  Oski  ("God  of  Wishes"),  Omi,  Just‐as‐

176

Mythology and Folklore  
high, Blindi, Gondlir, Harbard, Svidur, Svidrir, Ialk, Kialar, Vidur, Thror, Ygg, Thund, Vakr, Skilfing, Vafud,  Hropta‐Tyr,  Gaut,  Veratyr."  Other  names  include  Tveggi  and  Gagnrath.  Odin  married  Erda/Jörd,  with  whom he had a son, Thor. With his wife Frigga, he had Hermod, Hodur and Balder. His third wife was  Rinda, who bore Vali. Grid is a friendly Giantess who had his son, Vidar. Giantess Gunnlod gave birth to  Bragi  after  Odin  spent  three  nights  with  her  and  stole  the  Mead  of  Poetry.  He  was  also  said  to  have  married  Saga,  and  to  have  visited  her  daily  in  the  crystal  hall  of  Sokvabek.  His  other  consorts  were  Skadi, and the nine undines (the wave‐daughters of Aegir and Ran) that bore Odin Heimdall.   Odin,  Vili,  Ve  N.  The  three‐fold  form  of  Odin  as  warrior,  shaman  and  wanderer.  Sometimes  Vili  and  Ve  are  referred to as Odin's "brothers". Odin (spirit), Vili (will) and Ve (holy) were the sons of Börr (who was  son of the Giant Buri) and his wife Bestla, a Giantess (who was daughter of Bolthorn).  Odinism N. An alternative name for Àsatrú, so called because Wodan/Odhinn was the chief of the gods. An  Odinist is a follower of a follower of Woden‐Vili‐Vé.  Odra In. the country of Orissa; a man of that country  Odysseus  Gk.  King  of  an island  off the  western  coast  of  Greece  or  known  as  Ithaca;  one  of  the  heroes  who  fought at Troy; encountered many perils on his homeward trip, among them were the Cyclops and the  Sirens.  Oedipus  Gk.  The  son  of  Laius  and  Jocasta,  king  and  queen  of  Thebes;  he  was  adapted  by  King  Polybus  and  Queen Merope of Corinth; fulfilled a prophecy that said he would kill his father and marry his mother,  and thus brought disaster on his city and family.  Oeneus/Oineus  Gk.  a  Calydonian  king;  son  of  Porthaon  and  Euryte,  husband  of  Althaea  and  father  of  Deianeira,  Meleager,  Toxeus,  Clymenus,  Periphas,  Agelaus,  Thyreus  (or  Phereus  or  Pheres),  Gorge,  Eurymede, Mothone, Perimede and Melanippe (although Meleager's and Deianeira's fathers could also  have  been  Ares  and  Dionysus  respectively);  Oeneus  was  also  the  father  of  Tydeus  by  Periboea,  daughter of Hipponous, though Tydeus was exiled from Aetolia and appears in myths concerning Argos;  he introduced winemaking to Aetolia, which he learned from Dionysus.  Oenone Gk. The first wife of Paris of Troy, whom he abandoned for the queen Helen of Sparta; a mountain  nymph on Mount Ida in Phrygia, a mountain associated with the Mother Goddess Cybele, alternatively  Rhea; her father was Cebren, a river‐god; her very name links her to the gift of wine.  Oenopion  Gk.  Son  of  Rhadamanthys  or  Dionysus  and  Ariadne;  was  a  legendary  king  of  Chios,  said  to  have  brought winemaking to the island. He had one daughter: Merope.  Oeta Gk. a mountain in Thessaly west of the city of Thermopylae in Greece  Ófreskr, Ófreskir N. Second‐sighted, one with vision of events in the spirit world  Ogdoad Eg. Term describing the group of 8 deities associated with Hermopolis; it contained four couples who  symbolized  the  state  of  the  world  before  creation;  the  group  usually  consists  of:  Nun  and  Naunet,  representing the primeval waters; Huh and Hauhet, being endless space; Kuk and Kauket are darkness;  Amun and Amaunet; represent that which is hidden.  Oileus Gk. the king of Locris; his father was given as Odoedocus (whom Oileus succeeded as King of Locris) and  his mother as Agrianome (daughter of Perseon); husband of Eriopis, who bore him a son named Ajax.  Oileus was also the father of Medon, who is usually regarded as illegitimate; Medon's mother was said  to be a nymph named Rhene. Oileus was also an Argonaut. 

177

Mythology and Folklore  
Okolnir N. A land of warmth created after Ragnarok. A refuge to those finding it at Ragnarok; Site of the hall of  Brimnir  Old  Man  of  the  Sea  Gk.  a  primordial  figure  who  could  be  identified  as any  of  several  water‐gods,  generally  Nereus or Proteus, but also Triton, Pontus, Phorcys or Glaucus. He is the father of Thetis (the mother of  Achilles);  can  answer  any  questions  if  captured,  but  capturing  him  means  holding  on  as  he  changes  from one form to another.   Olive  Gk.  A  tree;  the  result  of  a  contest  held  between  Athena  and  Poseidon;  it  was  also  believed  that  the  Greek gods were born under the branches of the olive tree.  Olvalde N. "Emperor of the Ale". The father of Tjatsi, Gang and Ide; He lives with Tjatsi in Trymheim, When he  died the brothers shared his beer.  Olympians Gk. Group of 12 gods who ruled after the overthrow of the Titans; named after their dwelling place  Mount  Olympus;  among  of  these  are  Zeus,  Poseidon,  Hades,  Hestia,  Hera,  Aris,  Athena,  Apollo,  Aphrodite, Hermes, Artemis and Hephaestus.   Olympus Gk. The abode of the chief god Zeus; the foremost gods of the Greek pantheon have their palaces at  the  summit;  it  is  here  that  the  gods  assemble  to  consume  nectar  and  ambrosia  ("immortal"),  the  substances which reinforces their immortality. According to the myth, the top of the Olympus, which is  covered in snow and hidden in the clouds, reaches all the way into the Aether; the highest mountain of  Greece and lies on the border of Macedonia and Thessaly 

Olympus 

178

Mythology and Folklore  
Om In. a word of solemn invocation, affirmation, benediction, and consent, so sacred that when it is uttered  no one must hear it; the word is used at the commencement of prayers and religious ceremonies, and  is generally placed at the beginning of books. It is a compound of the three letters a, u, m, which are  typical of the three Vedas; and it is declared in the Upanishads, where it first appears, to have a mystic  power  and  to  be  worthy  of  the  deepest  meditation.  In  later  times  the  monosyllable  represents  the  Hindu  triad  or  union  of  the  three  gods,  a  being  Vishnu,  u  Siva,  and  m  Brahma.  This  monosyllable  is  called Udgitha.  Omkara In. the sacred monosyllable 'Om'; name of one of the twelve great lingas  Omphale Gk. a daughter of Iardanus, either a king of Lydia, or a river‐god. Omphale was queen of the kingdom  of Lydia in Asia Minor; she was the wife of Tmolus, the oak‐clad mountain king of Lydia.  Ónd N. Vital breath or universal soul; Everything in the universe possessed önd; this önd can be viewed as a  spirit, special character, or impersonal powe;. It is an active essence which belongs both to the material  and magical domains. In plants, önd gives medicinal powers; in foodstuffs it is the essence which makes  children grow and gives us the energy to keep alive. In living plants, it is the resident soul. This soul can  be  lost,  degenerate  or  be  stolen,  and  consecration  rituals  are  designed  to  prevent  this.  Where  it  is  concentrated in special ways, here are the places of power in the landscape, places where önd may be  manifested  in  many  possible  ways.  It  may  appear  as  Earth  spirits  (landvaettir  or  land  wights);  hytersprites, yarthkins etc., each having beneficial or harmful effects upon human activities conducted  there. Geomants, magicians, traditional hunters and farmers have always had a subtle rapport with the  the landscape and the qualities inherent in it.   Öndvegissulur N. Main pillars of a wooden temple, the most sacred part, into which the Reginnaglar (sacred  nails) were hammered.  On‐lay N. A spell or incantation pronounced on a place.   Opening of the mouth Eg. This ceremony was performed at the funeral to restore the senses of the deceased;  the ceremony was done by touching an adze to the mouth of a mummy or statue of the deceased, it  was believed to restore the senses in preparation for the afterlife.  Opet Eg. A great religious festival that took place in Thebes during the inundation; The god Amun was taken  from his temple at Karnak and brought to visit his wife, Mut at her temple of Luxor.  Ophion /Ophioneus Gk. Ruled the world with Eurynome before the two of them were cast down by Cronus  and Rhea.  Ops Rom. Goddess of the fertile earth, abundance, sowing, harvest and wealth; One of her festivals was on  August  10,  another  festival  was  the  Opalia,  which  was  observed  on  December  9;  the  Opeconsiva,  on  August 25 was her primary festival, but was participated in only by her priests and the Vestal Virgins.  Oracle  Gk.  A  person  considered  to  be  a  source  of  wise  counsel  or  prophetic  opinion,  predictions  or  precognition  of  the  future,  inspired  by  the  gods.;  is  a  form  of  divination;  oracles  in  Greek  mythology  were Pythia, priestess to Apollo at Delphi, and the oracle of Dione and Zeus at Dodona in Epirus, other  temples  of  Apollo  were  located  at  Didyma  on  the  coast  of  Asia  Minor,  at  Corinth  and  Bassae  in  the  Peloponnese, and at the islands of Delos and Aegina in the Aegean Sea only the Delphic Oracle was a  female; all others were male.  Orbona Rom. goddess of parents who lost their children 

179

Mythology and Folklore  
Orchil N. Orchil, the Saxon goddess who is under the brown earth, in a vast cavern, where she weaves at two  looms.  With  one  hand  she  weaves  life  upward  through  the  grass;  with  the  other  she  weaves  death  downward  through  the  mould;  and  the  sound  of  the  weaving  is  Eternity,  and  the  name  of  it  in  the  Green  World  is  Time.  And,  through  all,  Orchil  weaves  the  weft  of  Eternal  Beauty,  that  passeth  not,  though her soul is Change.   Orcus Rom. God of death and the underworld; also a god of oaths and punisher of perjurers.  Oreads/Orestiad  Gk.  A  type  of  nymph  that  lived  in  mountains,  valleys,  ravines;  they  differ  from  each  other  according to their dwelling: the Idae were from Mount Ida, Peliades from Mount Pelia, etc.; they were  associated with Artemis, since the goddess, when she went out hunting, preferred mounts and rocky  precipices.  Orestes Gk. The son of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon; he is the subject of several Ancient Greek plays and of  various  myths  connected  with  his  madness  and  purification,  which  retain  obscure  threads  of  much  older ones.  Orion Gk. A giant  huntsman in Greek  mythology  whom Zeus placed among the stars as the constellation of  Orion; first appears as a great hunter in the Odyssey, where Odysseus sees his shade in the underworld.  Orithyia  Gk.  The  daughter  of  King  Erechtheus  of  Athens  and  his  wife,  Praxithea,  in  Greek  mythology;  her   brothers were Cecrops, Pandorus, and Metion, and her sisters were Procris, Creusa, and Chthonia.   Orlög or Ørlög N. "Ur‐law" or "ur‐layer", "fate"; Ørlög literally means "primal layers" or "primal laws," the past  action of an individual or the cosmos that shapes present reality, and that which should come about as  a  result  of  it.  Its  root  concept  is  "wyrd".  Ørlög  is  Old  Norse  for  cycle  of  fate,  or  for  the  unalterable  destiny of the world. Ørlög encompasses all, including the gods. One aspect of ørlög is the "Ragnarök".  Ørlög is the collective wyrd of the world as a whole, whereas "wyrd" is more individual.   Orpheus Gk. A legendary figure, described by most ancient sources as Thracian, and venerated throughout the  ancient Hellenised world as a heroic, civilising benefactor to mankind; he was the inspiration and focus  for Orphic cults, myths and literature.  Orpheus Gk. A legendary figure, described by most ancient sources as Thracian, and venerated throughout the  ancient Hellenised world as a heroic, civilising benefactor to mankind ; he was the inspiration and focus  for Orphic  cults,  myths  and  literature; "the  father  of  songs"  and  asserts  him  as  a  son  of  the  Thracian king Oeagrus and the Muse Calliope;  the greatest of all poets and musicians: it was said that  while Hermes had invented the lyre, Orpheus perfected it; Orpheus' music and singing could charm the  birds, fish and wild beasts, coax the trees and rocks into dance and divert the course of rivers; he was  one  of  the  handful  of Greek  heroes to  visit the  Underworld  and  return;  his  music  and  song  even  had  power over Hades.  Orthia Gk. surname of the Artemis who is also called Iphigeneia or Lygodesma, and must be regarded as the  goddess of the moon; her worship was probably brought to Sparta from Lemnos.  Ortygia Gk. A little island and it is the historical centre of the city of Syracuse, Sicily; an island, also known as  Città Vecchia (Old City), contains many historical landmarks; this is where goddess Leto stopped to gave  birth to Artemis.  Orúnar N. Ale runes, by which one gains protection through higher consciousness and power  Orvandil N. A Giant, a Star Hero, first husband of Sif and father of Ullr. (Sif later married Thorr). 

180

Mythology and Folklore  
Oshadhi‐prastha In. 'The place of medicinal herbs;' a city in the Himalaya mentioned in the Kumara Sambhava.     Oshtha‐karnakas In. a person whose lips extended to their ears, mentioned in the Maha‐bharata.  Osiris  Eg.  a  supreme  god  and  judge  of  the  dead;  the  symbol  of  resurrection  and  eternal  life;  provider  of  fertility  and  prosperity  to  the  living;  A  bearded  man  wearing  white  mummy  wrappings;  Wearing  the  atef  crown  and  holding  the  symbols  of  supreme  power,  the  flail  and  crook;  His  skin  is  green  to  represent vegetation or red to represent the earth.  Osiris Pillar Eg. Pillar; mostly in an open court or portico, with a colossal statue of a king forming its front part;  unlike  caryatids  in  Classical  architecture,  the  statues  are  not  weight‐bearing  elements;  Most  are  mummiform, but not all; the connection with Osiris is doubtful.  Oski, Óski N. "Fulfiller of Desire". A by‐name of Odin  Ossa Gk. Goddess or spirit (daimon) of rumour, report and gossip; she was also, by extension, the dual spirit of  fame and good repute in a positive sense, and infamy and scandal in the bad.  Ostracon  Eg.  From  the  Greek  word  meaning;  "potsherd";  a  chip  or  shard  of  limestone  or  pottery  used  as  a  writing tablet; Ostraca are known from all periods; but 19th and 20th‐Dynasty examples are the most  common; the texts can be anything from a simple shopping list to drafts of hieroglyphic inscriptions.  Othr N. One of the divine lovers of the Goddess Freya.  Othrys  Gk.  A  mountain  in  Thessaly;  the  headquarters  of  the  Titans  when  they  fought  with  Gods;  it  was  the  base of the Titans during the ten year war with the Olympian Gods known as the Titanomachy.  Otter N. Otter is Hreidmar's son and brother to Fafnir and Regin. He could turn himself into an otter. When he  was killed by the Æsir, his father demanded the Nibelunggold as blood‐payment. It was given to him,  but cursed.  Otus  Gk.  A  mythological  hero  from  Kyllini,  Elis;  he  participated  in  the  Trojan  War  and  his  commander  was  Epeus of Elis; in Hector's exit from the Trojan walls, he fought in a drastic battle. There, Hector killed  Schedius,  commander  of  Phocaea  and  Polydamas  of  Otus  commander  of  Epeus'  generation  where  it  correctly  said  by  Homer.  He  saw  Otus  dead,  the  friend  of  Meges,  his  commander  which  came  from  Dulichium, he attacked Polydamas in which he fled with a godlike help (Apollo's intervention). Meges  killed in Crosemus.  Ouranos  Gk.  Uranus  in  Roman;  the  first  ruler  of  the  universe,  created  by  Gaea  when  she  emerged  from  Chaos.Ouranos,  with  Gaea,  became  the  father  of  theTitans,  the  Cyclopes  and  the  Hecatoncheires  (hundred‐handed  ones);  he  was  afraid  that  some  of  his  children  would  rebel  against  him,  so  he  imprisoned them within Gaea's earth womb. Kronos,  the youngest of the Titans, freed his siblings by  castrating his father. Ouranos' blood gave birth to the Furies, and Aphrodite was born of the discarded  member when it fell into the foaming sea.  Outdweller N. Inhabitant of the Utangardhs; uncanny wight.   Ovid  Gk.  A  Roman  poet  who  is  best  known  as  the  author  of  the  three  major  collections  of  erotic  poetry:  Heroides,  Amores,  and  Ars  Amatoria.  He  is  also  well  known  for  the  Metamorphoses,  a  mythological  hexameter  poem;  the Fasti,  about  the  Roman  calendar;  and  the  Tristia  and  Epistulae  ex  Ponto,  two  collections of poems written in exile on the Black Sea; the author of several smaller pieces, the Remedia 

181

Mythology and Folklore  
Amoris,  the  Medicamina  Faciei  Femineae,  and  the  long  curse‐poem  Ibis.  He  also  authored  a  lost  tragedy, Medea. He is considered a master of the elegiac couplet, and is traditionally ranked alongside  Virgil and Horace as one of the three canonic poets of Latin literature. The scholar Quintilian considered  him the last of the canonical Latin love elegists; his poetry, much imitated during Late Antiquity and the  Middle  Ages,  decisively  influenced  European  art  and  literature  and  remains  as  one  of  the  most  important sources of classical mythology.  Owl Gk. firmly linked with Athena, the Goddess of wisdom (and in later times, of battle); a creature sacred to  Athena, Goddess of the night who represented wisdom. Athena, the Greek Goddess of Wisdom had a  companion Owl on her shoulder, which revealed unseen truths to her. Owl had the ability to light up  Athena's blind side, enabling her to speak the whole truth, as opposed to only a half truth.   


Pactolus Gk. A Phrygian river with significant deposits of gold in ancient times; these were attributed to the  legendary King Midas, who had been granted the ability to transmute whatever he touched into gold.  The king found drawbacks to this power and was permitted to wash it away in the river. Mythological  fiction intersects with historical fact in that the Pactolus was source of the wealth of King Croesus, who  ruled in the sixth century B.C.E. Both the legendary Midas and historical Croesus survive in figures of  speech. One speaks of the "Midas touch" and being "as rich as Croesus".  Pada In. The Pada text of the Vedas, or of any other work, is one in which each word (pada) stands separate  and distinct, not joined with the next according to the rules of sandhi (coalition). See Patha.   PADMA Padmavatl In. a name of Lakshmi  Padma‐Kalpa In.  The last expired kalpa or year of Brahma.   Padma‐Purana,Padma‐Purana  In.    This  purana  generally  stands  second  in  the  list  of  Puranas,  and  is  thus  described: ‐ "That which contains an account of the period when the world was a golden lotus (padma),  and  of  all  the  occurrences  of  that  time,  is,  therefore,  called  Padma  by  the  wise.  It  contains  55,000  stanzas." The work is divided into five books or Khandas: ‐ "(1)Srishti Khanda, or section  on creation;  (2)Bhumi Khanda, on the earth; (3) Swarga Khanda, on heaven; (4)Patala Khanda, on the regions below  the earth; (5)Uttara Khanda, last or supplementary chapter. There is also current a sixth division, the  Kriya‐yoga‐sara, a treatise on the practice of devotion." These denominations of the various divisions  convey  but  an  imperfect  and  partial  notion  of  their  heterogeneous  contents,  and  it  seems  probable  that the different sections are distinct works associated together under one title. There is no reason to  consider  any  of  them  as  older  than  the  twelfth  century.  The  tone  of  the  whole  purana  is  strongly  Vaishnava;  that  of  the  last  section  especially  so.  In  it  Siva  is  represented  as  explaining  to  Parvati  the  nature and attributes of Vishnu and in the end the two join in adoration of that deity. A few chapters  have been printed and translated into Latin by Wollheim.   Padmavatl In.  a name of a city; it would seem, from the mention made of it in the drama Malati Madhava, to  lie in the Vindhya Mountains  Paean Gk. The designation of the physician of the Olympian gods, who heals, for example, the wounded Ares  and  Hades;,  used  also  in  the  more  general  sense  of  deliverer  from  any  evil  or  calamity  and  was  thus  applied  to  Apollo  and  Thanatos,  or  Death,  who  are  conceived  as  delivering  men  from  the  pains  and  sorrows of life. 

182

Mythology and Folklore  
Pahlava In. name of people; Manu places the Pahlavas among the northern nations, and perhaps the name is  connected with the word Pahlavi, i.e., Persian. They let their beards grow by command of King Sagara.  According to Manu, they were Kshatriyas who had become outcasts, but the Maha‐bharata says they  were  created  from  the  tail  of  Vasishtha's  cow  of  fortune  and  the  Ramayana  states  that  they  sprang  from her breath. They are also called Pahnavas.   Paijavana In. name of the King Sudas; his patronymic as son of Pijavana   Paila In. a learned man who was appointed in ancient days to collect the hymns of the Rig‐veda; he arranged it  in two parts, and must have been a coadjutor of Veda Vyasa.   Paka‐Sasana In.  A name of Indra, and of Arjuna as descended from Indra.   Palaemon Gk. a youngsea‐god who, with his mother Leukothea, came to the aid of sailors in distress; he was  originally  a  mortal  child  named  Melikertes  whose  parents  incurred  the  wrath  of  Hera  when  they  fostered the young god Dionysos. His father was driven into a murderous rage by Hera. Ino fled with  Melikertes in her arms, after he had killed their other child, and fleeing leapt off the cliffs into the sea.  There  the  pair  were  transformed  into  sea‐gods  and  received  the  names  Palaimon  and  Leukothea.  Palaimon  was  depicted  in  Greco‐Roman  mosaic  as  either  a  dolphin‐riding  boy,  or  a  fish‐tailed  Triton‐ child.  Pales Rom. Goddess of shepherds and flocks; her festival was the Palilia, on April 21.  Palladium  Gk.  An  image  of  great  antiquity  on  which  the  safety  of  a  city  was  said  to  depend;  signified  the  wooden statue (xoanon) of Pallas Athena that Odysseus and Diomedes stole from the citadel of Troy;  meant anything believed to provide protection or safety — a safeguard.  Pallas Athena Gk. the goddess of war, civilization, wisdom, strength, strategy, crafts, justice and skill in Greek  mythology; Minerva, Athena's Roman incarnation, embodies similar attributes; a shrewd companion of  heroes and the goddess of heroic endeavour. She is the virgin patron of Athens. The Athenians built the  Parthenon on the Acropolis of her namesake city, Athens, in her honour (Athena Parthenos).   Pallas  Gk.  One  of the  Giantess  born  of  the  blood  which  spilled  onto  Gaia  when  Cronus  castrated  her  father  Uranus; confronted Athena during the Gigantomachy, where she killed her and turned her skin into a  shield (the Aegis); sometimes referred to as being goat‐like.    Pampa In. a river, which rises in the Rishyamuka Mountain and falls into the Tungabhadra below Anagundi;  also a lake in the same locality   Pan  Gk.  The  god  of  shepherds  and  flocks,  of  mountain  wilds,  hunting  and  rustic  music,  as  well  as  the  companion  of  the  nymphs;  his  name  originates  within  the  Greek  language,  from  the  word  paein  (Πάειν), meaning "to pasture."; has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as  a  faun  or  satyr;    his  homeland  is  in  rustic  Arcadia,  he  is  recognized  as  the  god  of  fields,  groves,  and  wooded glens; because  of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring; ancient Greeks  also considered him to be the god of theatrical criticism; in Roman religion and myth counterpart was  Faunus, a nature god who was the father of Bona Dea, sometimes identified as Fauna.  Pancha‐Chuda In. name of Rambha   Panchajana  In.    Name  of  a  demon  who  lived  in  the  sea  in  the  form  of  a  conch‐shell;  he  seized  the  son  of  Sandipani, under whom Krishna learnt the use of arms. Krishna rescued the boy, killed the demon, and  afterwards used the conch‐shell for a‐horn.; A name of Asamanjas (q.v.).  

183

Mythology and Folklore  
Panchajanya In.  Krishna's conch, formed from the shell of the sea‐demon Panchajana.   Panchala In. a name of a country; from the Maha‐bharata it would seem to have occupied the Lower Doab;  Manu places it near Kanauj; it has sometimes been identified with the Panjab, and with a little territory  in  the  more  immediate  neighbourhood  of  Hastinapur."  Wilson  says,  "A  country  extending  north  and  west  from  Delhi,  from  the  foot  of  the  Himalayas  to  the  Chambal"  It  was  divided  into  Northern  and  Southern  Panchalas,  and  the  Ganges  separated  them.  Cunningham  considers  North  Panchala  to  be  Rohilkhand, and South Panchala the Gangetic Doab. The capital of the former was Ahi‐chhatra, whose  ruins are found near Ramnagar, and of the latter Kampilya, identical with the modem Kampila, on the  old Ganges between Badaun and Farrukhabad.  Pancha‐Lakshana In.  The five distinguishing characteristics of a Purana; see purana  Panchali In.  Draupadi as princess of Panchala   Panchanana In.  ‘Five faced.’ An epithet applied to Siva.   Panchapsaras In. name of a lake; see Manda‐karni   Pancha‐Sikha One of the earliest professors of the Sankhya philosophy.   Pancha‐Tantra In. a famous collection of tales and fables in five (pancha) books (tantra); it was compiled by a  Brahman named Vishnu‐sarman, about the end of the fifth century A.D., for the edification of the sons  of a king, and was the original of the better‐known Hitopadesa. This work has reappeared in very many  languages  both  of  the  East  and  West,  and  has  been  the  source  of  many  familiar  and  widely  known  stories. It was translated into Pahlavi or Old Persian by order of Naushirvan in the sixth century A.D. In  the  ninth  century  it  appeared  in  Arabic  as  Kalila  o  Damna,  then,  or  before,  it  was  translated  into  Hebrew,  Syriac,  Turkish,  and  Greek;  and  from  these,  versions  were  made  into  all  the  languages  of  Europe, and it became familiar in England as Pilpay's Fables (Fables of Bidpai). In modem Persia it is the  basis  of  the  Anwar‐isuhaili  and  Iyar‐i  Danish.  The  latter  has  reappeared  in  Hindustani  as  the  Khirad‐ afroz.  The  stories  are  popular  throughout  Hindustan,  and  have  found  their  way  into  most  of  the  languages and dialects. There are various editions of the text and several translations.   Panchavati In. a place in the great southern forest near the sources  of  the Godavari, where  Rama passed a  long  period  of  his  banishment.  It  has  been  proposed  to  identify  it  with  the  modem  Nasik,  because  Lakshmana cut off Surpa‐nakha's nose (nasika) at PanchavatL   Panchavinsa In.  See Praudha Brahmana.   Pancha‐Vriksha In.  'Five trees;' the five trees of Swarga, named Mandara, Parijataka, Santana, Kalpa‐vriksha,  and Hari‐chandana.   Panchopakhyana In.  The Pancha‐tantra  Pandarus/Pandaros Gk. A famous archer and the son of Lycaon; fights on the side of Troy in the Trojan War,  first  appears  in  Book  Two  of  the  Iliad.  In  Book  Four,  he  shoots  Menelaus  and  wounds  him  with  an  arrow, sabotaging a truce that could potentially have led to the peaceful return of Helen of Troy; he is  goaded  into  breaking  the  truce  by  the  gods,  who  wish  for  the  destruction  of  Troy  then  wounds  Diomedes with an arrow and acts as Aeneas' charioteer; later killed by Diomedes by having his spear  strike him in the face, severing his tongue; is also the name of a companion of Aeneas in Virgil's Aeneid.   Pandavas In.  The descendants of Pandu 

184

Mythology and Folklore  
Pandora  Gk.  The  first  woman;  each  god  helped  create  her  by  giving  her  unique  gifts.  Zeus  ordered   Hephaestusto mold her out of earth as part of the punishment of mankind for Prometheus' theft of the  secret  of  fire,  and  all  the  gods  joined  in  offering  her  "seductive  gifts";  she  opened  a  jar  (pithos),  in  modern  accounts  sometimes  mistranslated  as  "Pandora's  box"  ,  releasing  all  the  evils  of  mankind—  although the particular evils, aside from plagues and diseases, are not  specified — leaving only Hope  inside once she had closed it again; she opened the jar out of simple curiosity and not as a malicious  act. 

  Pandrosus Gk. A daughter of Cecrops, sister to Herse and Aglauro; she was by Hermes the mother of Ceryx   Pandu    In.  ‘The  pale.’  Brother  of  Dhrita‐rashtra,  king  of  Hastina‐pura  and  father  of  the  Pandavas  or  Pandu  princes. See Maha‐bharata.   Pandya In.  Pandya, Chola, and Chera were three kingdoms in the south of the Peninsula for some centuries  before  and  after  the  Christian  era.  Pandya  was  well  known  to  the  Romans  as  the  kingdom  of  King 

185

Mythology and Folklore  
Pandion,  who  is  said  to  have  sent  ambassadors  on  two  different  occasions  to  Augustus  Caesar.  Its  capital was Madura, the Southern Mathura. Pa1ldya seems to have fallen under the ascendancy of the  Chola kings in the seventh or eighth century.   Panini In.  The celebrated grammarian, author of the work called Paniniyam. This is the standard authority on  Sanskrit  grammar,  and  it  is  held  in  such  respect  and  reverence  that  it  is  considered  to  have  been  written by inspiration. So in old times Panini was placed among the Rishis and in more modern days he  is represented to have received a large portion of his work by direct inspiration from the god Siva. It is  also said that he was so dull a child that he was expelled from school, but the favour of Siva placed him  foremost  in  knowledge.  He  was  not  the  first  grammarian,  for  he  refers  to  the  works  of  several  who  preceded him. The grammars that have been written since his time are numberless, but although some  of  them  are  of  great  excellence  and  much  in  use,  Panini  still  reigns  supreme,  and  his  rules  are  incontestable. “His work," says Professor Williams "is perhaps the most original of all productions of the  Hindu  mind."  The  work  is  written  in  the  form  of  Sutras  or  aphorisms,  of  which  it  contains  3996,  arranged  in  eight  (ashta)  chapters  (adhyaya),  from  which  the  work  is  sometimes  called  Ashtadhyayi.  These  aphorisms  are  exceedingly  terse  and  complicated.  Special  training  and  study  are  required  to  reach  their  meaning.  Colebrooke  remarks,  that  "the  endless  pursuit  of  exceptions  and  limitations  so  disjoins  the  general  precepts,  that  the  reader  cannot  keep  in  view  their  intended  connection  and  mutual relations. He wanders in an intricate maze, and the key of the labyrinth is continually slipping  from his hand." But it has been well observed that there is a great difference between the European  and Hindu ideas of a grammar. In Europe, grammar has hitherto been looked upon as only a means to  an end, the medium through which knowledge of language and literature is acquired. With the Pandit,  grammar was a science; it was studied for its own sake, and investigated with the minutest criticism;  hence, as Goldstucker says, "Panini's work is indeed a kind of natural history of the Sanskrit language."  Panini  was  a  native  of  Salatura,  in  the  country  of  Gandhara,  west  of  the  Indus,  and  so  is  known  as  salottariya. He is described as a descendant of Panin and grandson of Devala. His mother's name was  Dakshi, who probably belonged to the race of Daksha, and he bears the metronymic Daksheya. He is  also  called  Ahika.  The  time  when  he  lived  is  uncertain,  but  it  is  supposed  to  have  been  about  four  centuries  B.C.  Goldstucker  carries  him  back  to  the  sixth  century,  but  Weber  is  inclined  to  place  him  considerably later. Panini's grammar has been printed by Bohtlingk, and also in India. See Goldstucker's  Painini, his Place in Literature."  Panis  In.    'Niggards;'  in  the  Rig‐veda,  "the  senseless,  false,  evil‐speaking,  unbelieving,  un‐praising,  unworshipping  Panis  were  Dasyus  or  envious  demons  who  used  to  steal  cows  and  hide  them  in  caverns." They are said to have stolen the cows recovered by Sarama (q.v.).   Pannaga In. a serpent, snake; see Naga.   Panope  Gk.  Also  the  name  of  one  of  the  daughters  of  Thespius  and  Megamede;  she  bore  Heracles  a  son,  Threpsippas; among of two of the Nereids.  Pantheon. Eg. The gods; collectively as a group  Papa‐Purusha In.  'Man of sin.' a personification of all wickedness in a human form, of which all the members  are great sins. The head is brahmanicide, the arm cow killing, the nose woman‐murder, &c.   Paphos Gk. A small, coastal and very romantic city in the southwest of Cyprus; named after the daughter of  Aphrodite and the legendary Greek sculptor Pygmalion and was the capital of Cyprus in Greco‐Roman  times. 

186

Mythology and Folklore  
Papyrus Eg. The main Egyptian writing material, and an important export; The earliest papyrus dates to the Ist  Dynasty,  the  latest  to  the  Islamic  Period;  Oddly  enough,  the  papyrus  plant  became  extinct  in  Egypt,  being reintroduced in the 1960's; it is now an important link in the tourist trade; Sheets were made by  cutting the stem of the plant into strips. These strips were soaked in several baths to remove some of  the  sugar  and  starches;  These  strips  were  then  laid  in  rows  horizontally  and  vertically;  Then  it  was  beaten  together,  activating  the  plant's  natural  starches  and  forming  a  glue  that  bound  the  sheet  together; Separate sheets were glued together to form a roll.  Paradas In. a barbarous people dwelling in the north‐west; Manu says they were Kshatriyas degraded to be  Sudras.   Paramarshis In.  (Parama‐rishis); the great Rishis; see Rishi  Paramatman In.  The supreme soul of the universe  Parameshthin  In.    ‘Who  stands  in  the  highest  place;'  a  title  applied  to  any  superior  god  and  to  some  distinguished mortals. A name used in the Vedas for a son or a creation of Prajapati.    Parasara In.  A Vedic Rishi to whom some hymns of the Rig‐veda are attributed. He was a disciple of Kapila,  and  he  received  the  Vishnu  purana  from  Pulastya  and  taught  it  to  Maitreya.  He  was  also a  writer  on  Dharma‐sastra, and texts of his are often cited in "books on law. Speculations as to his era differ widely,  from 575 B.C. to 1391 B.C., and cannot be trusted. By an amour with Satyavati he was father of Krishna  Dwaipayana, the Vyasa or arranger of the Vedas. According to the Nirukta, he was son of Vasishtha, but  the Maha‐bharata and the Vishnu purana make him the son of Saktri and grandson of Vasishtha. The  legend  of  his  birth,  as  given  in  the  Maha‐bharata,  is  that  King  Kalmasha‐pada  met  with  Saktri  in  a  narrow path, and desired him to get out of the way. The sage refused, and the Raja struck him with his  whip. The sage refused, and the Raja so that he became a man‐eating Rakshasa. In this state he ate up  Saktri, whose wife, Adrisyanti, afterwards gave birth to Parasara.  When this child grew up and heard  the particulars of his father’s death, he instituted a sacrifice for the destruction of all the Rakshasas, but  was  dissuaded  from  its  completion  by  Vasistha  and  other  sages.  As  he  desisted,  he  scattered  the  remaining  sacrificial  fire  upon  the  northern  face  of  the  Himalaya,  where  it  still  blazes  forth  at  the  phases of the moon, consuming Rakshasas, forests, and mountains.  Parasara‐Purana In.  See Purana.   Parasikas In.  Parasikas or Farsikas; i.e., Persians  Parasu‐Rama In.  ‘Rama with the axe;’ the first Rama and the sixth Avatara of Vishnu; he was a Brahman, the  fifth  son  of  Jamad‐agni  and  Renuka.  By  his  father’s  side  he  descended  from  Bhrigu,  and  was,  par  excellence, the Bhargava; by his mother’s side he belonged to the royal race of the Kusikas. He became  manifest in the world at the beginning of the Treta‐yuga, for the purpose of repressing the tyranny of  the Kshatriya or regal caste. His story is told in the Maha‐bharata and in the Puranas. He also appears in  the  Ramayana,  but  chiefly  as  an  opponent  of  Rama‐chandra.  According  to  the  Maha‐bharata,  he  instructed Arjuna in the use of arms, and had a combat with Bhishma, in which both suffered equally.  He is also represented as being present at the Great War council of the Kaurava princes. This Parasu‐ rama, the sixth Avatara of Vishnu, appeared in the world before Rama or Rama‐chandra, the seventh  Avatara, but they were both living at the same time, and the elder incarnation showed some jealousy of  the  younger.  The  Maha‐bharata  represents  Parasu‐rama  as  being  struck  senseless  by  Rama‐chandra,  and  the  Ramayana  related  how  Parasu‐rama,  who  was  a  follower  of  Siva,  felt  aggrieved  by  Rama’s  breaking  the  bow  of  Siva,  and  challenged  him  to  a  trial  of  strength.  This  ended  in  his  defeat,  and  in  some way led to his being “excluded from a seat in the celestial world.” In early life Parasu‐rama was 

187

Mythology and Folklore  
under the protection of Siva, who instructed him in the use of arms, and gave him the parasu, or axe,  from which he is named. The first act recorded of him by the Maha‐bharata is that, by command of his  father,  he  cut  off  the  head  of  his  mother,  Renuka.  She  had  incensed  her  husband  by  entertaining  impure  thoughts,  and  he  called  upon  each  of  his  sons  in  succession  to  kill  her.  Parsu‐rama  alone  obeyed,  and  his  readiness  so  pleased  his  father  that  he  told  him  to  ask  a  boon.  He  begged  that  his  mother might be restored pure to life, and for himself, that he might be invincible in single combat and  enjoy length of days. Parasu‐rama’s hostility to the Kshatriyas evidently indicates a severe struggle for  the supremacy between them and the Brahmans. He is said to have cleared the earth to the Brahmans.  The  origin  of  his  hostility  to  the  Kshatriyas  is  thus  related:  ‐  Kasta‐virya,  a  Kshatriya,  and  King  of  the  Haihayas, had a thousand arms. This king paid a visit to the hermitage of Jamad‐agni in the absence of  that sage, and was hospitably entertained by his wife, but when he departed he carried off a sacrificial  calf  belonging  to  their  host.  This  act  so  enraged  Parasu‐rama  that  he  pursued  Karta‐virya,  cut  off  his  thousand  arms  and  killed  him.  In  retaliation  the  sons  of  Karta‐virya  killed  Jamad‐agni,  and  for  that  murder Parasu‐rama vowed vengeance against them and the whole Kshatriya race. “Thrice seven times  did  he  clear  the  earth  of  the  Kshatriya  caste,  and  he  filled  with  their  blood  the  five  large  lakes  of  Samanta‐panchaka.”  He  then  gave  the  earth  to  Kasyapa,  and  retired  to  the  Mahendra  Mountains,  where he was visited by Arjuna. Tradition ascribes the origin of the country of Malabar to Parasu‐rama.  According to one account he received it as a gift from Varuna, and according to another he drove back  the ocean and cut fissures in the Ghats with blows of his axe. He is said to have brought Brahmans into  this country from the north, and to have bestowed the land upon them in expiation of the slaughter of  the  Kshatriyas.  He  bears  the  appellations  Khanda‐parasu,  ‘who  strikes  with  the  axe,’  and  Nyaksha,  ‘inferior.’    Paravasu In.  See Raibhya and Yava‐krita  Parcae Rom. Goddesses of fate; The Goddesses Nona, Morta and Decima make up the group; the three Parcae  are also called Tria Fata.  Parijata  In.    The  tree  produced  at  the  churning  of  the  ocean,  “and  the  delight  of  the  nymphs  of  heaven,  perfuming  the  world  with  its  blossoms.”  It  was  kept  in  Indra’s  heaven,  and  was  the  pride  of  his  wife  Sachi,  but  when  Krishna  visited  Indra  in  Swarga,  his  wife  Satya‐bhama  induced  him  to  carry  the  tree  away,  which  led  to  a  great  fight  between  the  two  gods  and  their  adherents,  in  which  Indra  was  defeated.  The  tree  was  taken  to  Dwaraka  and  planted  there,  but  after  Krishna's  death  it  returned  to  Indra's heaven.  Parikshit  In.    a  son  of  Abhimanyu  by  his  wife  Uttari;  grandson  of  Arjuna,  and  father  of  Janamejaya.  He  was  killed by Aswatthaman in the womb of his mother and was born dead, but he was brought to life by  Krishna,  who  blessed  him  and  cursed  Aswatthaman;  when  Yudhi‐shthira  retired  from  the  world,  Parikshit  succeeded  him  on  the  throne  of  Hastina‐pura.  He  died  from  the  bite  of  a  serpent,  and  the  Bhagavata Purana is represented as having been rehearsed to him in the interval between the bite and  his death. Also written Parikshit.  Paripatra In.  The  northern part of the Vindhya range  of mountains; according to the Hari‐vansa, it was the  scene  of  the  combat  between  Krishna  and  Indra,  and  its  heights  sank  down  under  the  pressure  of  Krishna's feet; also called Pariyatra   Paris Gk. The son of Priam and Hecuba,  king and queen  of Troy; was abandoned on Mt. Ida because it was  prophesied  that  he  would  cause  the  destruction  of  Troy,  but  there  he  was  raised  by  shepherds  and  loved by the nymph Oenone. Later he returned to Troy, where he was welcomed by Priam. Paris was  chosen  to  settle  a  dispute  among  the  goddesses  Hera,  Athena,  and  Aphrodite,  all  of  whom  claimed  possession of the apple of discord, a golden fruit inscribed “to the fairest.” It had been thrown among 

188

Mythology and Folklore  
the guests at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis by Eris, who sought revenge because she had not been  invited.  Hera  tried  to  bribe  Paris  with  royal  greatness  and  riches,  and  Athena  offered  him  success  in  war, but Paris awarded the apple to Aphrodite, who promised him Helen, the most beautiful of women.  With Aphrodite's help he abducted Helen from King Menelaus of Sparta; thus he brought on the Trojan  War. In the war Paris killed Achilles, but was himself fatally wounded by Philoctetes.  Parishad In.  A college or community of Brahmans associated for the study of the Vedas.   Parisishta In. a supplement or appendix; a series of works called Parisishtas belong to the Vedic period, but  they are the last of the series, and indicate a transition state. They A supply information on theological  or ceremonial points which had been passed over in the Sutras, and they treat everything in a popular  and  superficial  manner,  as  if  the  time  was  gone  when  students  would  spend  ten  or  twenty  years  of  their lives in fathoming the mysteries and mastering the intricacies of the Brahmana literature."‐Max  Muller.   Parivrajaka In. a religious mendicant; a Brahman in the fourth stage of his religious life; see Brahman   Parjanya In. A Vedic deity, the rain‐god or rain personified. Three hymns in the Rig‐veda are addressed to this  deity, and one of them is very poetical and picturesque in de‐ scribing rain and its effects. The name is  sometimes  combined  with  the  word  vata  (wind),  parjanya‐vata,  referring  probably  to  the  combined  powers and effects of rain and wind. In later times he is regarded as the guardian deity of clouds and  rain, and the name is applied to Indra; one of the Adityas.   Parnassus  Gk.  A  mountain  of  limestone  in  central  Greece  that  towers  above  Delphi,  north  of  the  Gulf  of  Corinth,  and  offers  scenic  views  of  the  surrounding  olive  groves  and  countryside;  this  mountain  was  sacred to Apollo and the Corycian nymphs, and the home of the Muses; the ark of Deucalion comes to  rest on the slopes of Parnassus; Orestes spent his time in hiding on Mount Parnassus; was sacred to the  god Dionysus; also the home of Pegasus, the winged horse of Bellerophon.   Parshada In.  Any treatise on the Vedas produced in Parishad or Vedic college.   Partha  In.  a  son  of  Pritha  or  Kunti.;  a  title  applicable  to  the  three  elder  Pandavas,  but  especially  used  for  Arjuna.   Parthenon Gk. A temple in the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the Greek goddess Athena, whom the  people  of  Athens  considered  their  protector;  showed  Lapiths  fighting  centaurs,  Olympians  battling  Giants  and  perhaps  scenes  from  the  Trojan  War;  symbolized  the  power  and  religious  devotion  of  Athens.   Parthenope Gk. One of the Sirens; daughter of Stymphalus with Heracles the mother of Everes .  Parthenopeus Gk. One of the Seven Against Thebes and the son of Atalanta and Hippomenes, Meleager, or  Ares,  or  perhaps  the  son  of  Talaus;  father  of    Promachus;  he  was  exposed  by  his  mother  on  Mount  Pathenius,  so  that  she  would  be  thought  a  virgin  and  he  was  rescued  by  a  shepherd,  along  with  Telephus, the son of Auge and Heracles, and the two boys were good friends. Parthenopeus went with  Telephus  to  Teuthrania,  where  he  helped  him  repulse  Idas's  invasion  of  the  kingdom.  Parthenopeus  was killed while attacking Thebes, by Periclymenus, Amphidicus, or Asphodicus.   Parthenos    Gk.  a  princess  of  the  Island  of  Naxos  who,  along  with  her  sister  Molpadia,  leapt  into  the  sea  to  escape  the  wrath  of  their  stepfather  Staphylos;  Apollo  then  transformed  the  two  maidens  into  goddesses  (through  apotheosis).  Some  claimed  the  god  was  their  natural  father.  Parthenos  was 

189

Mythology and Folklore  
worshipped in the Karian town of Bubastos and her sister Hemithea in the nearby town of Kastabos;  the virgin, a surname of Athena at Athens, where the famous temple Parthenon was dedicated to her.   Parvati In.  'The mountaineer;' a name of the wife of Siva; see Devi   Pasiphaë Gk. The daughter of Helios, the Sun, by the eldest of the Oceanids, Perse; like her doublet Europa,  her origins were in the East, in her case at Colchis, the palace of the Sun; she was given in marriage to  King  Minos  of  Crete.  With  Minos,  she  was  the  mother  of  Ariadne,  Androgeus,  Glaucus,  Deucalion,  Phaedra,  and  Catreus.  She  was  also  the  mother  of  "starlike"  Asterion,  called  by  the  Greeks  the  Minotaur,  after  a  curse  from  Poseidon  caused  her  to  experience  lust  for  and  mate  with  a  white  bull  sent by Poseidon. "The Bull was the old pre‐Olympian Poseidon," Ruck and Staples remark. In the Greek  literalistic  understanding  of  a  Minoan  myth,  in  order  to  actually  copulate  with  the  bull,  she  had  the  Athenian  artificer  Daedalus  construct  a  portable  wooden  cow  with  a  cowhide  covering,  within  which  she was able to satisfy her strong desire.The effect of the Greek interpretation was to reduce a more‐ than‐human  female,  daughter  of  the  Sun  itself,  to  a  stereotyped  emblem  of  grotesque  bestiality  and  the shocking excesses of female sensuality and deceit.   Pasu‐Pati In.  'Lord of creatures.' A name of Rudra or of one of his manifestations; see Rudra  Patala In.  the infernal regions, inhabited by Nagas (serpents), naityas, Danavas, Yakshas, and others; they are  seven  in  number,  and  their  names,  according  to  the  Vishnu  Purina,  are  Atala,  Vitala,  Nitala,  Gabhastimat,  Mahitala,  Butala,  and  Patala,  but  these  names  vary  in  different  authorities.  The  Padma  Purana gives the names of the seven regions and their respective rulers as follow: (1) Atala, subject to  Maha‐maya; (2) Vitala, ruled by a form of Biva called Hitakeswara; (3) Butala, ruled by Bali; (4) Talatala,  ruled  by  Maya;  (5)  Mahatala,  where  reside  the  great  serpents;  (6)  Rasatala,  where  the  Daityas  and  Dinavas dwell; (7) Patala, the lowermost, in which Vasuki reigns over the chief Nagas or snake‐gods. In  the Siva Purana there are eight: Patala, Tala, Atala, Vitala, Tala, Vidhi‐patala, Sarkari‐bhumi, and Vijaya.  The sage Narada paid a visit to these regions, and on his return to the skies gave a glowing account of  them, declaring them to be far more delightful than Indra's heaven, and abounding with every kind of  luxury and sensual gratification.   Patali‐Putra  In.    The  Palibothra  of  the  Greek  writers,  and  described  by  them  as  being  situated  at  the  confluence of the Erranaboas (the Bone river) with the Ganges. It was the capital of the Nandas, and of  the Maurya dynasty, founded by Chandra‐ gupta, which succeeded them as rulers of Magadha. The city  has been identified with the modern Patna; for although the Bone does not now fall into the Ganges  there,  the  modern  town  is  smaller  in  extent  than  the  ancient  one,  and  there  is  good  reason  for  believing that the rivers have changed their courses.   Patanjala In. the Yoga philosophy; see Darsana  Patanjali In. the founder of the Yoga philosophy, (See Darsana.) The author of the Maha‐bhashya, a celebrated  commentary on the Grammar of Panini, and a defence of that work against the criticisms of Katyayana;  he is supposed to have written about 200 B.C. Rim Krishna Gopal Bhandarkar, a late inquirer, says, "He  probably wrote the third chapter of his Bhashya between 144 and 142 B.C. Weber, however, makes his  date  to  be  25  A.D.  He  is  also  called  Gonardiya  and  Gonikaputra.  A  legend  accounting  for  his  name  represents that he fen as a small snake from heaven into the palm of Panini (pata, 'fallen;' anjali, 'palm  ').   Patha  In.    'Reading.'  There  are  three  forms,  called  rathas,  in  which  the  Vedic  text  is  read  and  written  :‐(1.)  Sanhita‐  patha,  the  ordinary  form,  in  which  the  words  coalesce  according  to  the  rules  of  Sandhi;  (2.) 

190

Mythology and Folklore  
pada‐patha,  in  which  each  word  stands  separate  and  independent;  (3.)  Krama‐patha,  in  which  each  word is given twice, first joined with the word preceding and then with the word following.   Patroclus Gk. The son of Menoetius, grandson of Actor, King of Opus, and was Achilles' beloved comrade and  brother‐in‐arms; accidentally killed his friend, Clysonymus, during an argument over a game of dice. His  father  fled  with  Patroclus  into  exile  to  evade  revenge,  and  they  took  shelter  at  the  palace  of  their  kinsman King Peleus of Phthia. There Patroclus apparently first met Peleus' son Achilles. Peleus sent the  boys to live in the wilderness and be raised by Chiron, the cave‐dwelling wise King of the Centaurs.   Pattana  In.    'City;'  several  great  places  have  been  known  as  Pattan  or  'the  city.'  Soma‐natha  was  Pattan;  Anhalwara is still known as Pattan, and there is also Patna.   Paulomas In.  Kasyapa by his wife Puloma had many thousand "distinguished Danavas called Paulomas, who  were powerful, ferocious, and cruel." They were killed by Arjuna.   Paundra, Paundraka In.  Belonging to the country of Pundra; the conch‐shell of Bhishma.   Paundraka  In.  A  pretender,  who,  on  the  strength  of  being  a  Vasudeva,  or  descendant  of  one  named  Vasu‐ deva,  set  himself  up  in  opposition  to  Krishna,  who  was  son  of  Vasu‐deva,  and  assumed  his  style  and  insignia; he was supported by the king of Kasi (Benares), but he was defeated and killed by Krishna, and  Benares was burnt.   Pauravas In. descendants of Puru of the Lunar race; see Puru  Pausanias Gk. a Greek scholar who lived during the second century A.D.; well educated and well connected,  he traveled in Greece and Asia Minor and took in the local antiquities. Some historians believe that he  was also a doctor; he believed in the Greek mythology of the day, including creatures such as griffins,  giants and satyrs, but he made practical interpretations of organic remains, arguing that the skeletons  of supposed giants he encountered had belonged to mortals, not dieties.   Pavan In. a 'Wind;' the god of the wind; see vayu.   Pax Rom. Goddess of peace; her festivals are January 3 and 30 and July 4.  Peacock Gk. the bird of Hera, queen of the Gods; one myth told of Argus, Hera's hundred eyed giant whose  job it was to spy on Zeus and discover his trysting places. When he discovered Zeus with the maiden Io,  Zeus changed Io into a cow to escape Hera's wrath. Hera saw through the disguise and requested the  cow as a gift, and Zeus could not refuse her. She entrusted Argus to watch Io day and night so she could  not  be  changed  back  to  her  true  form.  Zeus  then  sent  Hermes,  messenger  of  the  gods  and  god  of  thieves and trickery, to recover Io. Knowing that he could not escape detection from Argus' 100 eyes,  Hermes began to play sleepy tunes on his flute and one by one Argus' eyes closed and he fell asleep.  Hermes then cut off his head. When Hera found Argus, she removed his one‐hundred eyes and placed  them on the tail of her favorite bird, the peacock.  Pegasus Gk. a winged divine horse, usually white in color; he was sired by Poseidon, in his role as horse‐god,  and foaled by the Gorgon Medusa; he was the brother of Chrysaor, born at a single birthing when his  mother  was  decapitated  by  Perseus.  Greco‐Roman  poets  write  about  his  ascent  to  heaven  after  his  birth  and  his  obeisance  to  Zeus,  king  of  the  gods,  who  instructed  him  to  bring  lightning  and  thunder  from Olympus. Friend of the Muses, Pegasus is the creator of Hippocrene, the fountain on Mt. Helicon.  He was captured by the Greek hero Bellerophon near the fountain Peirene with the help of Athena and  Poseidon. Pegasus allows the hero to ride him to defeat a monster, the Chimera, before realizing many 

191

Mythology and Folklore  
other exploits. His rider, however, falls off his back trying to reach Mount Olympus. Zeus transformed  him into the constellation Pegasus and placed him in the sky.  

  Pegasus    Peitho Gk. the goddess who personifies persuasion and seduction; her Roman name is Suadela; attendant or  companion of Aphrodite, was intimately connected to the goddess of love and beauty; the daughter of  the Titans Tethys and Oceanus, which would make her an Oceanid and therefore sister of such notable  goddesses as Tyche, Doris, Metis, and Calypso.   Pelasgus Gk.The eponymous ancestor of the Pelasgians, the mythical inhabitants of Greece who established  the worship of the Dodonaean Zeus, Hephaestus, the Cabeiri, and other divinities. In the different parts  of  the  country  once  occupied  by  Pelasgians,  there  existed  different  traditions  as  to  the  origin  and  connection of Pelasgus. The Ancient Greeks used to believe even he was the first man.   Peleus Gk. The son of king Aeacus of Aegina; he had to escape the island after killing his half brother Phocus  together with his other brother Telamon. The people of the island, the Myrmidons, came with him, and  he became the myrmidons' king in Thessaly; his wife was the Nereid Thetis, who he had captured after  holding her tight while she was tring to escape, transforming herself into fire, water and beasts. All the  gods  were  invited  to  their  wedding  except  Eris,  goddess  of  conflicts,  and  she  punished  them  by  throwing a golden apple with the inscription "to the most beautiful" into the banquet. This led to an  argument between Hera, Athena and Aphrodite which as a consequence became the beginning of the  Trojan  War.  Peleus  and  Thetis  had  Achilles,  and  Peleus  was  to  outlive  both  him  and  his  grandson  Neoptolmenus; he was also one of the hunters of the Calydonian boar, and also one of the Argonauts.   Pelias  Gk.  King  of  Iolcus  in  Greek  mythology,  the  son  of  Tyro  and  Poseidon;  his  wife  is  recorded  as  either  Anaxibia,  daughter  of  Bias,  or  Phylomache,  daughter  of  Amphion.  He  was  the  father  of  Acastus,  Pisidice, Alcestis, Pelopia, Hippothoe, Asteropia, and Antinoe; twin brother of Neleus; he killed Sidero;  he power‐hungry and he wished to gain dominion over all of Thessaly. To this end, he banished Neleus 

192

Mythology and Folklore  
and Pheres, and locked Aeson in the dungeons in Lolcus. While in there, Aeson married and had several  children,  most  famously,  Jason.  Aeson  sent  Jason  to  Chiron  the  centaur,  on  Mount  Pelium,  to  be  educated while Pelias, paranoid that he would be overthrown, was warned by an oracle to beware a  man wearing one sandal; hold the Olympics in honor of Poseidon when Jason, rushing to Lolcus (by the  modern  city  of  Volos),  lost  one  of  his  sandals  in  the  flooded  river  Anaurus,  while  helping  someone  cross.  In  Virgil's  Aeneid,  Hera  had  diguised  herself  as  an  old  woman,  whom  Jason  helped  across  the  river  and  then  lost  his  sandal.  When  Jason  entered  Lolcus,  he  was  announced  as  a  man  wearing  one  sandal. Paranoid, Pelias asked him what he (Jason) would do if confronted with the man who would be  his downfall. Jason responded that he would send that man after the Golden Fleece. Pelias took that  advice  and  sent  Jason  to  retrieve  the  Golden  Fleece.  Pelias  thought  the  Argo  had  sunk,  and  this  was  what  he  told  Aeson  and  Promachus,  who  committed  suicide  by  drinking  poison  or  were  both  killed  directly  by  Pelias.  While  Jason  searched  for  the  Golden  Fleece,  Hera,  who  was  still  angry  at  Pelias,  conspired  to  make  him  fall  in  love  with  Medea,  whom  she  hoped  would  kill  Pelias.  When  Jason  and  Medea  returned,  Pelias  still  refused  to  give  up  his  throne.  Medea  conspired  to  have  Pelias'  own  daughters (Peliades) kill him. She told them she could turn an old ram into a young ram by cutting up  the old ram and boiling it. During the demonstration, a live, young ram jumped out of the pot. Excited,  the girls cut their father into pieces and threw them in a pot, in the expectation that he would emerge  rejuvenated. Pelias did not survive. Pelias' son Acastus later drove Jason and Medea to Corinth and so  reclaimed the kingdom.   Pelion Gk. the pass of Gods and heroes; it was hymned by the ancient Greeks for the thick vegetation and its  mystic beauty; is a mountain at the southeastern part of Thessaly in central Greece, forming a hook‐like  peninsula between the Pagasetic Gulf and the Aegean Sea; took its name from the mythical king Peleus,  father of Achilles was the homeland of Chiron the Centaur, tutor of many ancient Greek heroes, such as  Jason, Achilles, Theseus and Heracles. It was in Mount Pelion, near Chiron's cave, that the marriage of  Thetis and Peleus took place. The uninvited goddess Eris, to take revenge for having been kept outside  the  party,  brought  a  golden  apple  with  the  inscription  "To  the  Fairest".  The  dispute  that  then  arose  between  the  goddesses  Hera,  Aphrodite  and  Athene  resulted  in  events  leading  to  the  Trojan  War.  When the giants Otus and Ephialtes attempted to storm Olympus, they piled Mount Pelion upon Mount  Ossa.   Pelops Gk. King of Pisa in the Peloponnesus; he was the founder of the House of Atreus through his son of that  name; he was venerated at Olympia, where his cult developed into the founding myth of the Olympic  Games, the most important expression of unity, not only for the Peloponnesus, "island of Pelops", but  for all Hellenes. At the sanctuary at Olympia, chthonic night‐time libations were offered each time to  "dark‐faced" Pelops in his sacrificial pit (bothros) before they were offered in the following daylight to  the sky‐god Zeus;son of Tantalus and Dione or Euryanassa. Of Phrygian or Lydian birth, he departed his  homeland  for  Greece,  and  won  the  crown  of  Pisa  (or  Olympia)  from  King  Oenomaus.  Pelops  was  credited with numerous children,  begotten on his wife Hippodameia,  daughter of Oenomaus. Pelops'  sons include Pittheus, Alcathous, Dias, Pleisthenes, Atreus, Thyestes, Copreus, and Hippalcimus. Pelops  and Hippodameia also had several daughters, some of whom married into the House of Perseus, such  as  Astydameia  (who  married  Alcaeus),  Nicippe  (who  married  Sthenelus),  and  Eurydice  (who  married  Electryon). By the nymph Axioche, Pelops was father of Chrysippus.   Penates Rom. Gods of the storeroom and the household.  Penelope Gk. the faithful wife of Odysseus, who keeps her suitors at bay in his long absence and is eventually  reunited  with  him;  daughter  of  Icarius  and  his  wife  Periboea.  She  only  has  one  son  by  Odysseus,  Telemachus,  who  was  born  just  before  Odysseus  was  called  to  fight  in  the  Trojan  War;  she  waited  twenty years for the final return of her husband,during which she has a hard time snubbing marriage 

193

Mythology and Folklore  
proposals  from  108  odious  suitors  (led  by  Antinous  and  including  Agelaus,  Amphinomus,  Ctessippus,  Demoptolemus, Elatus, Euryades, Eurymachus and Peisandros).   Peneus Gk. a river god, one of the three‐thousand Rivers, a child of Oceanus and Tethys. The nymph Creusa  bore  him  one  son,  Hypseus,  who  was  King  of  the Lapiths,  and  three  daughters,  Cyrene,  Daphne,  and  Stilbe.  Penthesilea  Gk.  An  Amazonian  queen,  daughter  of  Ares  and  Otrera,  and  sister  of  Hippolyta,  Antiope  and  Melanippe. Quintus Smyrnaeus explains more fully than pseudo‐Apollodorus how Penthesilea came to  be at Troy: she had killed Hippolyta  with a spear when they  were hunting deer; this accident caused  Penthesilea so much grief that she wished only to die, but, as a warrior and an Amazon, she had to do  so honorably and in battle; she therefore was easily convinced to join in the Trojan War, fighting on the  side of Troy's defenders.   Pentheus Gk. A king of Thebes, son of the strongest of the Spartes, Echion, and of Agave, daughter of Cadmus,  the founder of Thebes, and the goddess Harmonia; king of Thebes, Cadmus, abdicated in favor of his  grandson, Pentheus, due to his old age. Pentheus soon banned the worship of the god Dionysus, who  was the son of his aunt Semele, and did not allow the women of Cadmeia to join in his rites. An angered  Dionysus caused Pentheus' mother and his aunts, Ino and Autonoë, along with all the other women of  Thebes, to rush to Mount Cithaeron in a Bacchic frenzy. Because of this, Pentheus imprisoned Dionysus,  but his chains fell off and the jail doors opened for him. Dionysus then lured Pentheus out to spy on the  Bacchic  rites.  The  daughters  of  Cadmus  saw  him  in  a  tree  and  thought  him  to  be  a  wild  animal.  Pentheus  was  pulled  down  and  torn  limb  from  limb  by  them  (as  part  of  a  ritual  known  as  the  sparagmos), causing them to be exiled from Thebes. Some say that his own mother tore his head off;  name "Pentheus", as Dionysus and Tiresias both point out, means "Man of Sorrows" and derives from  πένθος, pénthos, sorrow or grief, especially the grief caused by the death of a loved one; even his name  destines him for tragedy. Pentheus was succeeded by his uncle Polydorus.   Per Nefer Eg. a place where some of the purification and mummification rituals took place  Perdix Gk. Nephew and student of Daedalus; he invented the saw and the compass. Daedalus became jealous  of  him;  he  is  killed  by  Daedalus  when  the  inventor  lets  him  fall  off  a  cliff;  he  died,  and  Athena  gives  Daedelus the mark of a murderer.   Pergamos/Pergamus Gk. son of Pyrrhus and Andromache; in a contest for the kingdom of Teuthrania, he slew  its king Areius, and then named the town after himself Pergamus, and in it he erected a sanctuary of his  mother.  

194

Mythology and Folklore  
Persephone Gk. the Queen of the Underworld, the korē (or young maiden), and a daughter of Demeter and  Zeus;  Persephone  had  a  double  function  as  a  cthonian  and  vegetation  goddess  In  the  Olympian  version,  she  becomes  the  consort  of  Hades  when  he  becomes  the  deity  that  governs  the  underworld.  She  is  also  the  symbol  of  vegetation  which  shoots  forth  in  spring  and  the  power  of  which  withdraw  into  the  earth  at  other  seasons  of  the  year.  In  the  myth  when  Hades  abducted  her  in  the  underworld,  her  mother  Demeter  caused  a  terrible  drought  and  Zeus  allowed  her  to  return  to  her  mother,  but  she  was  obliged  to  spend  one  season  in  the  underworld;  her  central  myth  was  the  context  of  the  secret  initiatory  mysteries  rites  in  the  Eleusinian  mysteries  where she was worshipped  alongside  with  her  mother  Demeter.  These  mysteries  promised  to  the  participants a reward in the  future life.    Perseus Gk. The son of Zeus and Danaë; wife of Andromeda; the Greek hero who killed the Gorgon Medusa  Pet Eg. This is the sky depicted as a ceiling which drops at the ends, the same way the real sky seems to reach  for the horizon; This sign was often used in architectural motifs; the top of walls, and door frames; It  symbolizes the heavens.  Phaeacians Gk. One of a race of people inhabiting the island of Scheria visited by Odysseus on his way home  from the Trojan War  Phaedra  Gk.  Daughter  of  Pasiphaë  and  wife  of  Theseus  who  killed  herself  after  accusing  her  stepson  Hippolytus of rape.  Phaedrus Gk. Son of Helios; killed when trying to drive his father's chariot and came too close to earth 

195

Mythology and Folklore  
Phalguna In. a name of Arjuna; name of a month  Phantasus Gk. One of the sons of Hypnos, god of sleep, who gives dreams of inanimate objects  Phaon Gk. a boatman of Mitylene in Lesbos; he was old and ugly when Aphrodite came to his boat.  Phaon  ferried her over to Asia Minor and accepted no payment for doing so. In return, she gave him a box of  ointment. When he rubbed it on himself, he became young and beautiful. Many were captivated by his  beauty.  Pherae  Gk.    Ancient  Greek  town  in  southeastern  Thessaly;  in  mythology,  it  was  the  home  of  King Admetus,  whose wife, Alcestis, Heracles went into Hades to rescue. In history, it was more famous as the home of  the fourth‐century B.C. tyrants Jason and Alexander of Pherae, who took control of much of Thessaly  before their defeat by the Thebans.  Phidias  Gk.  A  Greek  sculptor,  painter  and  architect,  who  lived  in  the  5th  century  BC,  and  is  commonly  regarded as one of the greatest of all sculptors of Classical Greece, Phidias' Statue of Zeus at Olympia  was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Phidias also designed the statues of the goddess  Athena on the Athenian Acropolis, namely the Athena Parthenos inside the Parthenon and the Athena  [2] Promachos,  a  colossal  bronze  statue  of  Athena  which  stood  between  it  and  the  Propylaea,   a  monumental gateway that served as the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. Phidias was the son of a    certain Charmides of Athens. Philoctetes or Philocthetes Gk. the son of King Poeas of the city of Meliboea in Thessaly; when Heracles wore  the shirt of Nessus and built his funeral pyre, no one would light it for him except for Philoctetes or in  other  versions  his  father  Poeas.  This  gained  him  the  favor  of  the  newly  deified  Heracles.  Because  of  this, Philoctetes or Poeas is given Heracles' bow and poisoned arrows.  Philomela Gk. (princess of Athens), who in Greek myth was raped and had her tongue cut out by her brother‐ in‐law Philomela (mother of Patroclus)  Phineus Gk. Killed by Perseus; the son of Agenor, was a king of Thrace and a prophet. Because he prophesied  too  truly,  revealing  too  much  of  the  gods'  truth  to  humans,  Zeus  blinded  him  and  set  the  Harpies  to  plague  him.  Whenever  Phineus  sat  down  to  eat,  the  Harpies  would  swoop  down  and  steal  the  food;  what  little  food  they  left  would  be  foul‐smelling  and  unpalatable.  When  Jason  and  the  Argonauts  arrived in Phineus' land, they rid his household of the curse by having the winged Boreads pursue the  Harpies;  the  goddess  Iris  prevented  the  Boreads  from  killing  the  Harpies  by  promising  that  Phineus  would  not  be  troubled  again.  In  return  for  the  Argonauts'  help,  Phineus  foretold  the  results  of  their  quest, and revealed to them how they should get past the hazard of the Symplegades.  Phlegethon Gk. The river Phlegethon (English translation: "flaming") or Pyriphlegethon ( English translation:  "fire‐flaming") was one of the five rivers in the infernal regions of the underworld, along with the rivers  Styx, Lethe, Cocytus, and Acheron. Plato describes it as "a stream of fire, which coils round the earth  and flows into the depths of Tartarus." It was parallel to the river Styx. It is said that the goddess Styx  was in love with Phlegethon, but she was consumed by his flames and sent to Hades. Eventually when  Hades allowed her river to flow through, they reunited.  Phobos  Gk.  (Ancient  Greek    "Fear")  the  personification  of  horror  in  Greek  mythology;  he  is  the  offspring  of  Ares and Aphrodite. He was known for accompanying Ares into battle along with his brother, Deimos,  the goddess Enyo, and his father’s attendants. Timor is his Roman equivalent. Considering the accounts  in  Greek  mythology,  Phobos  is  more  of  a  personification  of  the  fear  brought  by  war  and  does  not  appear as an actual character in any mythology. 

196

Mythology and Folklore  
Phoebe Gk. (“golden‐wreathed" in English), the feminine counterpart of the name Phoebus, was one of the  original  Titans,  who  were  one  set  of  sons  and  daughters  of  Uranus  and  Gaia.  She  was  traditionally  associated with the moon (see Selene), as in Michael Drayton's Endimion and Phœbe, (1595), the first  extended treatment of the Endymion myth in English. Her consort was her brother Coeus, with whom  she had two daughters, Leto, who bore Artemis and Apollo, and Asteria, a star‐goddess who bore an  only daughter Hecate.  Phoebus Gk. The Latin form of Greek Phoibos "Shining‐one"(also spelled Pheabus) a byname used in classical  mythology for either the god Apollo, or the god Helios, or the sun, generally.  Phol N. Saxon god of male fertility (aspect of Balder)  Pholus  Gk.  A  wise  Centaur  killed  indirectly  through  the  actions  of  Herakles  who  lived  in  a  cave  on  or  near  Mount Pelion.  Phorcys(also Phorkys) Gk. A primordial sea god, generally cited (first in Hesiod) as the son of Pontus and Gaia.  According  to  the  Orphic  hymns,  Phorcys,  Cronus  and  Rhea  were  the  eldest  offspring  of  Oceanus  and  Tethys. Classical scholar Karl Kerenyi conflated Phorcys with the similar sea gods Nereus and Proteus.  His wife was Ceto, and he is most notable in myth for fathering by Ceto a host of monstrous children  collectively  known  as  the  Phorcydes.  In  extant  Hellenistic‐Roman  mosaics,  Phorcys  was  depicted  as  a  fish‐tailed merman with crab‐claw fore‐legs and red‐spiked skin.  Phrixus Gk. or Phryxus The son of Athamas, king of Boiotia, and Nephele (a goddess of clouds). His twin sister  Helle  and  he  were  hated  by  their  stepmother;  Ino  hatched  a  devious  plot  to  get  rid  of  the  twins,  roasting all of Boeotia's crop seeds so they would not grow.  Phrygia Gk. a kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now modern‐day Turkey; the Phrygians  (Phruges or Phryges) initially lived in the southern Balkans; according to Herodotus, under the name of  Bryges (Briges), changing it to Phruges after their final migration to Anatolia, via the Hellespont.  Picus Rom. God of agriculture  Pieria Gk. one of the prefectures of Greece; it is located in the southern part of Macedonia, in the Periphery of  Central  Macedonia.  Its  capital  is  the  town  of  Katerini.  Pieria  is  the  smallest  prefecture  within  Macedonia. The name Pieria originates from the ancient tribe and the ancient country of Pieris.  Pierides Gk. The muses, a name derived from their place birthplace in Thessaly  Pierus  Gk.  Son  of  Thessalian  Magnes  and  Meliboea,  was  the  lover  of  muse  Clio  and  father  of  Hyacinth  and  Rhagus.  Pierus  was  loved  by  muse  Clio  because  Aphrodite  had  inspired  her  with  the  passion,  as  a  punishment for deriding the goddess' own love for Adonis.  Pierus  Gk.  the  eponym  of  Pieria,  son  of  Makednos  and  father  by  Antiope  or  Euippe  of  the  Pierides,  nine  maidens who wanted to outshine the Muses; they afterwards entered into a contest with the Muses,  and being conquered, they were transformed into birds called Colymbas, lyngx, Cenchris, Cissa, Chloris,  Acalanthis, Nessa, Pipo, and Dracontis. These names were taken from actual names of birds in ancient  Greek, such as the wryneck, hawk, jay, duck, goldfinch, and four others with no recognizable modern  equivalents.  Pierus  is  sometimes  said  to  be  have  been  father  of  Linus  or  Oeagrus  and  therefore  the  grandfather of Orpheus.  Pietas Rom. Goddess of piety 

197

Mythology and Folklore  
Pindar Gk. (Latin: Pindarus) (ca. 522–443 BC), An Ancient Greek lyric poet. Of the canonical nine lyric poets of  ancient Greece, Pindar is the one whose work is best preserved. Quintilian described him as "by far the  greatest of the nine lyric poets, in virtue of his inspired magnificence, the beauty of his thoughts and  figures,  the  rich  exuberance  of  his  language  and  matter,  and  his  rolling  flood  of  eloquence".  The  Athenian  comic  playwright  Eupolis  is  said  to  have  remarked  that  the  poems  of  Pindar  "are  already  reduced to silence by the disinclination of the multitude for elegant learning".  Pindar Gk. the first Greek poet whose works reflect extensively on the nature of poetry and on the poet's role  Pindaraka In.  A watering‐place on the coast of Gujarat, near Dwaraka, resorted to occasionally by Krishna. It  still  survives  as  a  village,  and  is  held  in  veneration.  It  is  about  twenty  miles  from  the  north‐west  extremity of the Peninsula.   Pingala In. the great authority on the Chhandas or Prosody of the Vedas; he is supposed to have written about  two centuries B.C. 2. Name of one of the serpent kings sometimes identified with the foregoing.   Pippalada In. a school of the Atharva‐veda, founded by a sage of that name    Pirene Gk. (fountain) in Corinth, a nymph in Greek mythology  Pirithous Gk. (also transliterated as Perithoos, Peirithoos or Peirithous) was the King of the Lapiths in Thessaly  and husband of Hippodamia, at whose wedding the famous Battle of Lapiths and Centaurs occurred. He  was a son of "heavenly" Dia, fathered either by Ixion or by Zeus. His best friend was Theseus. In Iliad I,  Nestor numbers Pirithous and Theseus "of heroic fame" among an earlier generation of heroes of his  youth,  "the  strongest  men  that  Earth  has  bred,  the  strongest  men  against  the  strongest  enemies,  a  savage mountain‐dwelling tribe whom they utterly destroyed". No trace of such an oral tradition, which  Homer's listeners would have recognized in Nestor's allusion, survived in literary epic.  Pisacha‐Loka In.  See Loka.    Pisachas In.  (mas.), Pisachi (fem.); fiends, evil spirits, placed by the Vedas as lower than Rakshasas; the vilest  and most malignant (order of malevolent beings; accounts differ as to their origin. The Brahmana and  the  Maha‐bharata  say  that  they  were  created  by  Brahma,  together  with  the  Asuras  and  Rakshasas,  from the stray drops of water: which fell apart from the drops out of which gods, men, gandharvas, &c.,  had  been  produced.  According  to  Manu  they  spring  from  the  Prajapatis.  In  the  puranas  they  are  represented as the offspring of Kasyapa by his wife Krodhavasa, or Pisacha, or Kapisa.    Pisitasinas, Pisitasins In.  Carnivorous and cannibal imps descended from Nikasha.    Pita‐Maha In. a paternal grandfather; a name of Brahma as the great father of all  Pitambara In.  'Clothed in yellow garments;' a name of Vishnu.     Pitha‐Sthana In. ' seat or a place of a seat;' "Fifty‐ one places where, according to the Tantras, the limbs of Sati  fell when scattered by her husband Siva, as he bore her dead body about and tore it to pieces after she  had put an end to her existence at Daksha's sacrifice. This part of the legend seems to be an addition to  the original fable, made by the Tantras, as it is not in the Puranas(see Daksha.) It bears some analogy to  the  Egyptian  fable  of  Isis  and  Osiris.  .At  the  Pitha‐sthanas,  however,  of  Jwala‐mukhi,  Vindhya‐  vasini,  Kali‐ghat,  and  others,  temples  are  erected  to  the  different  forms  of  Devi  or  Sati,  not  to  the  phallic  emblem  of  Maha‐deva,  which,  if  present,  is  there  as  an  accessory,  not  as  a  principal;  and  the  chief  object  of  worship  is  a  figure  of  the  goddess‐a  circumstance  in  which  there  is  an  essential  difference  between the temples of Durga and the shrines of Osiris."‐Wilson.  

198

Mythology and Folklore  
Pitri‐Loka In. See Loka.   Pitri‐Pati In. 'The lord of the Manes;' Yama, judge of the dead   Pitris In.  Patres, the fathers; the Manes; this name is applied to three different classes of beings: 1. The Manes  of  departed  forefathers,  to  whom  pindas  (balls  of  rice  and  flour)  and  water  are  offered  at  stated  periods. 2. The ten Prajapatis or mythical progenitors of the human race. 3. "According to a legend in  the  Hari‐vansa  and  in  the  vayu  purana,  the  first  Pitris  were  the  sons  of  the  gods.  The  gods  having  offended Brahma by neglecting to worship him, were cursed by him to become fools; but, upon their  repentance, he directed them to apply to their sons for instruction. Being taught accordingly the rites of  expiation  and  penance  by  their  Sons,  they  addressed  them  as  fathers;  whence  the  Sons  of  the  gods  were the first Pitris. "The account given of the Pitris is much the same in all the Puranas.”They agree in  distinguishing them into seven classes, three of which are without form, or composed of intellectual,  nonelementary  substance,  and  assuming  what  forms  they  please;  and  four  are  corporeal.  When  the  puranas come to the enumeration of the particular classes, they somewhat differ, and the accounts in  all the  works  are  singularly  imperfect."  The  incorporeal  Pitris,  according  to  one  enumeration,  are  the  Vairajas,  Agnishwattas,  and  Barhishads.  The  first  of  these  seem  also  to  be  called  Subhaswaras,  Somasads,  and  Saumyas.  The  corporeal  are  the  Sukalas  or  Su‐kalins,  Angirasas,  Su‐swadhas,  and  Somapas. The Sukalas are also called Manasas; the Somapas are also called Ushmapas; the Angirasas  seem also to be called Havishmats, Havirbhujas, and Upahutas; and the Su‐swadhas are apparently the  same as the Ajyapas and Kavyas or Kavyas. The Vairajas are the Manes of great ascetics and anchorites,  the Agnishwattas are the Pitris of the gods, the Barhishads of demons, the Somapos of Brahmans, the  Havishmats of Kshatriyas, the Ajyapas of Vaisyas, and the Su‐kalins of the Sudras; but one authority, the  Hari‐vansa,  makes  the  Somapas  belong  to  the  Sudras,  and  the  Su‐kalins  to  the  Brahmans,  and  there  appears  to  be  good  reason  for  this.  Other  names  are  given  by  Dr.  F.  Hall  from  various  authorities  (Vishnu  Purana,  ai.  339):  Rasmipas,  Phenapas,  Sudhavats,  Girhapatyas,  Ekasringas,  Cha‐turvedas,  and  Kalas. Besides these there are the Vyamas, ‘fumes,' the Pitris of the barbarians. The Rig‐veda and Manu  make two independent classes, the Agni‐dagdhas and the agni‐dagdhas, those ‘who when alive kept up  (or did not keep up) the household flame,' and presented (or did not present) oblations with fire. The  Vishnu purana makes the Barhishads identical with the former, and the Agnishwattas with the latter.  Yama,  god  of  the  dead,  is  king  of  the  Pitris,  and  Swadha,  ‘oblation,'  is  sometimes  said  to  be  their  mother, at others their wife. – Wilson, Vishnu Purana, ai. 157,339. See Manu, ai. 192.   Piyadasi See Asoka.   Pl  n  Greek  myth;  another  name  for  the  Muses;  nine  maidens  of  Thessaly,  who  were  defeated  in  a  singing  contest by the Muses and turned into magpies for their effrontery  Platform  magic  N.  The  magic  circle  is  a  feature  of  more  southerly  practices  which  does  not  appear  in  the  north.  Instead  there  were  three  method  of  isolating  the  magician  from  the  world  around  him‐  or  herself.  One  was  the  ox‐hide,  which  was  marked  with  nine  squares  and  stood  or  sat  upon.  A  second  was the setting out of hurdles, or lengths of wood, to form a skeletal nine square arrangement, with  the  center  square  being  occupied.  The  third  method  was  the  platform,  literally  what  it  says,  usually  supported  by  four  posts  and  high  enough  of  the  ground  for  someone  to  get  underneath,  which  happened in at least one tale in which runes cut on the supports countered the ritual in progress above.  Pleiades Gk. is likely a Bronze Age artifact known as the Nebra sky disk, dated to approximately 1600 BC. Some  Greek astronomers considered them to be a distinct constellation, and they are mentioned by Hesiod,  and in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. They are also mentioned three times in the Bible (Job 9:9 and 38:31,  as  well  as  Amos  5:8).  The  Pleiades  (Krittika)  are  particularly  revered  in  Hindu  mythology  as  the  six 

199

Mythology and Folklore  
mothers of the war god Skanda, who developed six faces, one for each of them. Some scholars of Islam  suggested that the Pleiades (Ats‐tsuraiya) are the Star in Najm which is mentioned in the Quran.  Pllakapya  In.  an  ancient  sage  who  wrote  upon  medicine,  and  is  supposed  to  have  been  an  incarnation  of  Dhanwantari    Pluto Rom. god of the underworld  Poeas or Poias Gk. one of the Argonauts and a friend of Heracles; as  an Argonaut, Poeas is identified as the greatest archer of the  group.  When  facing  the  giant  Talos,  some  accounts  say  Medea drugged the bronze giant and Poeas shot an arrow to  poison him in his heel; Poeas was also the king of Meliboea in  Thessaly.  Poena (also Poine) Gk. the spirit of punishment and the attendant of  punishment to Nemesis, the goddess of divine retribution; the  Latin  word  poena,  "pain,  punishment,  penalty",  gave  rise  to  English words such as subpoena. The original root of the word  is  from  the  Ancient  Greek  "poini"  (ποινή),  also  meaning  penalty.  Poena Rom. Goddess of punishment                       Pluto and Cerberus 

Poetry N. Poetry was a powerful weapon in the northern magician's armory, and the majority of charms and  incantations were in verse. Two possible metres can be used for charms.The first, incantation metre, is  composed  in  the  following  manner.  Lines  one  and  three  have  four  stresses,  and  are  divined  by  a  caesura (a pause in a line of verse dictated by sense or natural speech rhythm rather than by metrics)  into two half‐lines with two stresses in each. The first stressed syllable of the second half‐line had to  alliterate with either or both of the stresses in the first half‐line. Lines two and four were not broken  and contained only two or three stressed syllables, not four. Line five would be the same as line four,  but  with  slight  verbal  variation  in  the  content.The  second  form  was  chant  metre.  This  varied  from  incantation metre only that it did not use a fifth line.   Polybus Gk. He was the king of Corinth and husband of either Merope or Periboea. He raised Oedipus as his  adopted son, who had been abandoned by his parents Laius and Jocasta of Thebes in Greece. He was  the father of Alcinoe. The news of Polybus' death by natural causes was announced by a messenger to  Jocasta in Sophocles' Oedipus the King, in which it is (falsely) taken to mean that Oedipus did not kill his  father.  This  would  mean  that  prophecy  that  Oedpius  would  murder  his  father  and  marry  his  mother  would be false. Since Polybus only adopted Oedipus and was not his actual father, Oedipus could and  did kill his father and fulfill the prophecy.  Polydectes  Gk.  the  ruler  of  the  island  of Seriphos,  son  of Magnes  and an  unnamed  naiad;  Polydectes  fell in  love with Danaë when she and her son Perseus were saved by his brother Dictys (see: Acrisius). Perseus  was  very  protective  of  his  mother  and  wouldn't  allow  Polydectes  near  Danaë.  Therefore,  Polydectes  wanted to get rid of him so he could marry her. He thereby hatched a plot. 

200

Mythology and Folklore  
Polydeuces Gk. a figure in Greek mythology; he is also the twin brother of Castor and the son of Zeus and Leda  of Sparta, who was a mortal. He and Castor form the constellation Gemini. The twins were born from  eggs  after  Zeus  visited  Leda  as  a  swan.  Since  one  parent  was  mortal  and  the  other  immortal,  Castor  became mortal whereas Polydeuces became immortal; was known as a boxer and won many Olympic  events. He was also one of Jason's Argonauts on Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece. During the quest,  Polydueces proved himself by killing an evil king and allowing the quest to continue.   Polydorus Gk. (son of Priam) a Trojan, and King Priam's youngest son during the Trojan War; he was sent with  gifts  of  jewelry  and  gold  to  the  court  of  King  Polymestor  to  be  kept  safe  during  the  Trojan  War.  The  fighting was getting vicious and Priam was frightened for the child's safety. After Troy fell, Polymestor  threw Polydorus to his death to take the treasure for himself. Hecuba, Polydorus' mother, eventually  avenged her son. This story is depicted in Hecuba by Euripides.  Polydorus Gk. son of Cadmus and Harmonia, and father of Labdacus by his wife Nycteis, daughter of Nycteus   Polyhymnia Gk. ("the one of many hymns") was in Greek mythology the Muse of sacred poetry, sacred hymn  and  eloquence  as  well  as  agriculture  and  pantomime.  She  is  depicted  as  very  serious,  pensive  and  meditative, and often holding a finger to her  mouth,  dressed in a long  cloak and veil and resting her  elbow  on  a  pillar.  Polyhymnia  is  also  sometimes  accredited  as  being  the  Muse  of  geometry  and  meditation.   Polyidus  of  Thessaly  Gk.  (also  Polyides,  Polydus)  English  translation:  "well‐grounded",  "wise")An  ancient  Greek  military  engineer  of  Philip,  who  made  improvements  in  the  covered  battering‐ram  (testudo  arietaria, poliorceticus krios) during Philip's siege of Byzantium in 340 BC. His students were Diades of  Pella and Charias, who served in the campaigns of Alexander the Great. Polyidus was the inventor of  Helepolis.   Polykleitos Gk. (or Polyklitos, Polycleitus, Polyclitus) called the Elder, was a Greek sculptor in bronze of the  fifth  and  the  early  4th  century  BC.  Next  to  Phidias,  Myron  and  Kresilas,  he  is  considered  the  most  important  sculptor  of  Classical  antiquity:  the  4th‐century  catalogue  attributed  to  Xenocrates  (the  "Xenocratic  catalogue"),  which  was  Pliny's  guide  in  matters  of  art,  ranked  him  between  Phidias  and  Myron.   Polyneices Gk. the son of Oedipus and his wife/mother Jocasta, after Oedipus was banished from Thebes, he  and his brother Eteocles ruled the city jointly.  Eventually, however, the two fell into a quarrel.  Eteocles  banished his brother Polyneices, who went to Argos for help.  There was then a battle between Thebes  and  Argos.   Before  the  war  began,  however,  Polyneices  learned  that  he  would  succeed  if  he  had  the  support  of  his  father.   Therefore,  he  attempted  to  gain  the  blessing  of  his  father  Oedipus,  who  was  living in Athens.  Oedipus sternly refused his son.  Polyphemus Gk. The gigantic one‐eyed son of Poseidon and Thoosa in Greek mythology, one of the Cyclopes;  his name means "everywhere famous". Polyphemus plays a pivotal role in Homer's Odyssey: He was a  Cyclops  (plural  Cyclopes)  in  Greek  meaning  "round  eye",  a  mythical  semi‐human  monster  of  huge  proportions, with a single eye at the centre of his forehead, usually described as a one‐eyed giant. The  island where they are thought to have dwelt is a remote part of Sicily, where they lived in caves and  eating  raw  flesh  of  any  kind  (including  human),  and  also  keeping  goats  and  sheep.  They  led  a  fairly  solitary existence. 

201

Mythology and Folklore  

  Polyphemus    Polyphontes Gk. the son of Autophonus; in the Iliad, when the Argives attack Thebes in an attempt to regain  the  throne  for  Polynices  that  his  brother,  Eteocles,  holds,  Tydeus,  a  leader  of  the  Thebans,  enters  Thebes  as  an  embassy,  and  finding  all  the  Theban  leaders  together  challenges  them  to  contests  of  arms,  all  of  which  he  wins.  This  angers  Eteocles,  who  sends  Polyphontes  and  Maion  as  leaders  of  a  group  of  fifty  men  who  ambush  Tydeus  on  his  way  back  to  his  army.  Tydeus  slays  all  of  these  but  [1] Maion,  whom  the  gods  advise  him  to  spare.   In  Aeschylus'  play  Seven  against  Thebes,  however,  Polyphontes is one of the seven Theban defenders who face the Argive champions at Thebes' gates. He    faces Capaneus at the Electran gates. Polyxena  Gk.  The  youngest  daughter  of  King  Priam  of  Troy  and  his  queen,  Hecuba;  she  is  considered  the  Trojan  version  of  Iphigenia,  daughter  of  Agamemnon  and  Clytemnestra.  Polyxena  is  not  in  Homer's  Iliad, appearing in works by later poets, perhaps to add romance to Homer's austere tale.  Pomona  Gk.  the  goddess  of  plenty  in  Roman  mythology,  her  name  comes  from  the  Latin  word,  pomum,  meaning "fruit." She scorned the love of Silvanus and Picus but married Vertumnus after he tricked her,  disguised as an old woman. Her high priest was called the flamen Pomonalis. The pruning knife was her  attribute;  was  a  uniquely  Roman  goddess,  unusual  in  that  she  was  never  identified  with  any  Greek  counterpart. She was particularly associated with the blossoming of trees rather than with the harvest.  Pomona Rom. Goddess of fruit trees and orchards  Pontus (or Pontos , English translation: "sea") Gk. an ancient, pre‐Olympian sea‐god, one of the protogenoi,  the "first‐born"; Pontus was the son of Gaia, the Earth: Hesiod says that Gaia brought forth Pontus out 

202

Mythology and Folklore  
of herself, without coupling. For Hesiod, Pontus seems little more than a personification of the sea, ho  [2] pontos, "the Road", by which Hellenes signified the Mediterranean Sea.  With Gaia, he was the father  of Nereus (the Old Man of the Sea),  Porphyrion Gk. a giant, one of the sons of Uranus and Gaia; after the Olympian gods imprisoned the Titans in  Tartarus, Porphyrion was one of twenty‐four anguipede giants who made war on Olympus.During the  Giant's  revolt  on  Olympus,  Porphyrion  attempted  to  strangle  Hera.  An  arrow  from  the  bow  of  Eros  inspired  Porphyrion  with  lust  for  Hera,  and  he  tore  her  robes  and  would  have  forced  her,  but  an  enraged  Zeus  shot  him  with  a  thunderbolt.  The  giant  sprang  back  up  from  this  attack,  but  Hercules  mortally wounded him with an arrow.   Portunes Rom. God of ports and harbors; He is the guardian of storehouses and locked doors; the Portunalia  were observed on August 17  Porus Rom. God of plenty  Poseidon  Gk.  (Latin:  Neptūnus;  Roman  name  Neptune)  the  god  of  the  sea,  earthquakes  and  horses  and,  "Earth‐ Shaker,"  of  earthquakes;  although  he  was  officially  one  of  the  supreme  gods  of Mount Olympus, he spent most of his  time  in  his  watery  domain;  Poseidon  was  brother  to  Zeus  and  Hades.  These  three  gods  divided  up  creation.  Zeus  was  ruler  of  the  sky,  Hades  had  dominion  of  the  Underworld  and  Poseidon was given all water, both fresh  and salt.   Postverta Rom. Goddess of the past  Potina Rom. Goddess of children's drinks  Prabhasa In. a place of pilgrimage on the coast  of  Gujarat  near  to  Dwaraka,  and  also  near to the temple of Soma‐natha.   Prabhavatl In. wife of Pradyumna   Prachanda‐Pandava  In.    'The  incensed  Pandavas;' a drama in two acts by Raja  Sekhara,  the  main  incident  in  which  is  the  outrage  of  Draupadi  by  the  assembled Kaurava princes  PRACHETAS  In.    One  of  the  Prajapatis;  An  ancient  sage  and  lawgiver;  the  ten  Prachetasas  were  sons  of  Prachina‐barhis  and  great‐grandsons  of  Prithu,  and,  according  to  the  Vishnu  purana,  they  passed  ten  thousand years in the great ocean, deep in meditation upon Vishnu, and obtained from him the boon  of becoming the  progenitors of mankind. They took to wife Marisha: daughter of Kandu, and Daksha  was their son. See Daksha.  

203

Mythology and Folklore  
Prachyas In.  The people of the east; those easts of the Ganges; the Prasa of the Greeks  Pradhana In.  Matter; primary matter, or nature as opposed to spirit  Pradyumna  In.  a  son  of  Krishna  by  Rukmini.  When  a  child  only  six  days  old,  he  was  stolen  by  the  demon  Sambara and thrown into the ocean. There he was swallowed by a fish, which was afterwards caught  and carried to the house of Sambara. When the fish was opened, a beautiful child was discovered, and  Maya‐devi  or  Maya‐vati,  the  mistress  of  Sambara's  household,  took  him  under  her  care.  The  sage  Narada informed her who the child was, and she reared him carefully. When he grew up she fell in love  with him, and informed him who he was .and how he had been carried off by Sambara. He defied the  demon to battle, and after a long conflict slew him. Then he flew through the air with Mayavati, and  alighted in  the inner  apartments  of  his  father's  palace.  Krishna  presented  him  to  his  mother  Rukmini  "with  the  virtuous  Mayavati  his  wife,"  declaring  her  really  to  be  the  goddess  Ratio  Pradyumna  also  married Kakudmati, the daughter of Rukmin, and had by her a son named Aniruddha. Pradyumna was  killed at Dwaraka: in the presence of his father during a drunken brawl Though Pradyumna passed as  the son of Krishna, he was, according to the legend, a revival or resuscitation of Kama, the god of love,  who was reduced to ashes by the fiery glance of Siva, and so the name Pradyumna is used for Kama(see  Kama.)  The  Vishnu  Purana  puts  the  following  words  into  the  mouth  of  Narada  when  he  presented  Pradyumna  to  Rukmini:  “When  Manmatha  (the  deity  of  love)  had  perished,  the  goddess  of  beauty  (Rati), desirous to secure his revival, assumed a delusive form, and by her charms fascinated the demon  Sambara, and exhibited herself to him in various illusory enjoyments. This son is the descended Kama;  and this is (the goddess) Rati, his wife. There is no occasion for any uncertainty; this is thy daughter‐in‐ law." In the Hari‐vansa he has a wife named Prabhavati, daughter of King Vajra‐nabha. When he went  to see her for the first time, he changed himself into a bee and lived in a garland of flowers, which had  been prepared for her. According to the Maha‐bharata, he was Sanat‐kumara, the son of Brahma.     Pradyumna‐Vijaya In. ‘Pradyumna victorious;' a drama in seven acts upon the victory of Pradyumna over the  Daitya Vajra‐nabha, written by Sankara Dikshita about the middle of the last century. “The play is the  work of a Pandit, not of a poet.”‐Wilson.    Praenomen  Eg.  This  is  a  king's  first  cartouche  name,  which  he  adopted  on  his  accession;  also  called  the  "throne name;" It consists of a statement about the god Ra  Pragjyotisha In.  A city situated in the east, in Kama‐rupa on the borders of Assam. See Naraka.  Prahlada, Prahrada In.  A Daitya, son of Hiranya‐ kasipu and father of Ba1i Hiranya‐kasipu, in his wars with the  gods, had wrested the sovereignty of heaven from Indra and dwelt there in luxury. His son Prahlada,  while yet a boy, became an ardent devotee of Vishnu, which so enraged his father that he ordered the  boy to be killed; but not the weapons of the Daityas, the fangs of the serpents, the tusks of the celestial  elephants, nor the flames of fire took any effect, and his rather was constrained to send him back to his  preceptor, where l1e continued so earnest in performing and promoting the worship of Vishnu that he  eventually  obtained  final  exemption  from  existence.  According  to  some  accounts,  it  was  to  avenge  Prahlada, as well as to vindicate his own insulted majesty, that Vishnu became incarnate as the Nara‐ sinha. ‘man‐lion,' and slew Hiranya‐kasipu. After the death of his father, Prahlada became king of the  Daityas and dwelt in Patala; but, according to the Padma Purana, he was raised to the rank of Indra for  life, and finally united with Vishnu. The Padma Purana carries the story farther back to previous birth. In  this previous existence Prahlada was a Brahman named Soma‐sarman, fifth son of Siva‐sarman. His four  brothers died and obtained union with Vishnu, and he desired to follow them. To accomplish this he  engaged in profound meditation, but he allowed him to be disturbed by an alarm of the Daityas, and so  was born again as one of them. He took the part of his race in the war between them and the gods, and  was killed by the discus of Vishnu, after that he was again born as son of Hiranya‐kasipu. 

204

Mythology and Folklore  
Praj3odha‐Chandrodaya  In.    'The  rise  of  the  moon  of  knowledge;'  a  philosophical  drama  by  Krishna  Misra,  who  is  supposed  to  have  lived  about  the  twelfth  century;  it  has  been  translated  into  English  by  Dr.  Taylor, and into German by Rosenkranz and by Hirzel.   Praja‐Pati In.  'Lord of creatures,' a progenitor, creator. In the Veda the term is applied to Indra, Savitri, Soma,  Hiranya‐garbha,  and  other  deities.  In  Manu  the  term  is  applied  to  Brahma  as  the  active  creator  and  supporter of the universe; so Brahma is the Prajapati. It is also given to Manu Swayam‐bhuva himself,  as the son of Brahma and as the secondary creator of the ten Rishis, or "mind‐born sons" of Brahma,  from  whom  mankind  has  descended.  It  is  to  these  ten  sages,  as  fath6IS  of  the  human  race,  that  the  name  Prajapati  most  commonly  is  given.  They  are  Marichi,  Atri,  Angiras,  and  Pulastya.  Pulaha,  Kratu,  Vasishtha, Prachetas or Daksha, Bhrigu, and sarada. According to some authorities the Praja‐patis are  only seven in number, being identical with the seven great Rishis. (See Rishi) The number and names of  the praja‐patis vary in different authorities: the Maha‐bharata makes twenty‐one.   Prakasas In.  Messengers of Vishnu, also called Vishnu‐dutas.     Prakrita In.  The Prakrits are provincial dialects of the Sanskrit, exhibiting more or less deterioration from the  original  language; and  they  occupy  an  intermediate  position  between  that  language  and  the  modern  vernaculars of India, very similar to that of; the Romance languages between the Latin and the modern  languages of Europe. They resemble the European languages also in another respect: they have in them  a small proportion of words, which have not been affiliated on the original classical language, and are  apparently remnants of a different tongue and an older race. The Prakrits are chiefly known from the  dramas  in  which  kings  and  Brahmans  speak  Sanskrit,  while  characters  of  inferior  position  speak  in  different prakrits. Sometimes these Prakrit passages are so very debased that it hardly seems possible  for  them  to  be  specimens  of  really  spoken  vernaculars.  Such  passages  may  perhaps  be  comic  exaggerations  of  provincial  peculiarities.  The  Prakrits  have  received  careful  study,  and  the  Prakrita‐ prakasa,  a  Grammar  by  Vararuchi,  translated  by  Professor  Cowell,  was  probably  written  about  the  beginning of the Christian era. See Katyayana.     Prakriti In.  Nature; matter as opposed to spirit. The personified will of the Supreme in the creation, and the  prototype of the female sex, identified with Maya or illusion; the Sakti or female energy of any deity.     Pralamba In.  An Asura killed by Krishna, according to the Maha‐bharata. His story as told in the Vishnu purana  is, that he was an Asura and a dependant of Kansa. With the object of devouring the boys Krishna and  Bala‐rama, he joined them and their playmates in jumping. Pralamba was beaten by his opponent Bala‐ rama, and by the rules of the game had to carry the victor back on his shoulders to the starting‐place.  He took up Bala‐rama and then expanded his form, and was making off with his rider when Bala‐rama  called upon Krishna for assistance. Krishna made a long speech, and ended by telling him to suspend  awhile  his  mortal  character  and  do  what  was  right.  Bala‐rama  laughed,  squeezed  Pralamba  with  his  knees,  and  beat  him  on  the  head  with  his  fists  till  his  eyes  were  knocked  out  and  his  brain  forced  through his skull, so that he fell to the ground and expired.     Pralaya In. dissolution of the world at the end of a kalpa  Pramathas In. a class of demi‐gods or fiends attendant upon Siva  Pramlocha In.  A celestial nymph sent by Indra to beguile the sage Kandu from his devotion and austerities.  She lived with him for some hundreds of years, which were but as a day to the sage. When he awoke  from his delusion  he drove the nymph from his presence. The child with whom she was  pregnant by  him  came  forth  from  her  body  in  drops  of  perspiration,  which  she  left  upon  the  leaves  of  the  trees.  These drops congealed and became eventually the lovely nymph Marisha (q.v.).    

205

Mythology and Folklore  
Prana In. 'Breath or life;' in the Atharva‐veda it is personified and a hymn is addressed to it.     Prasanna‐Raghava In. a drama by Jaya‐deva in seven acts; it has been printed at Benares.     Prasena In. son of Nighna and brother of Satra‐jit or Sattra‐jita; he was killed by a lion. See Syamantaka.     Prasna In. name of an Upanishad     Prasuti In. a daughter of Manu and wife of Daksha   Pratardana  In.  son  of  Divodisa,  king  of  Kasi;  the  whole  family  of  Divodasa  was  slain  by  a  king  named  Vita‐ havya. The afflicted monarch through a sacrifice performed by Bhrigu obtained a son, Pratardana, who  became a mighty warrior, and avenged the family wrongs upon his father’s foe. Vita‐havya then flew to  the sage Bhrigu for protection, and was by him raised to the dignity of a Brahmarshi.    Pratisakhyas  In.    Treatises  on  the  phonetic  laws  of  the  language  of  the  Vedas,  dealing  with  the  euphonic  combination  of  letters  and  the  peculiarities  of  their  pronunciation  as  they  prevailed  in  the  different  Sakhas  or  Vedic  schools.  These  treatises  are  very  ancient,  but  they  are  considerably  later  than  the  hymns,  for  the  idiom  of  the  hymns  must  have  become  obscure  and  obsolete  before  these  treatises  were necessary. Four such treatises are known.   Prati‐Shthana  In.  An  ancient  city,  the  capital  of  the  early  kings  of  the  lunar  race;  “it  was  situated  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  confluence  of  the  Ganges  and  Jumna,"  opposite  to  the  modern  Allahabad.  The  capital of Salivahana on the Godavari, supposed to be the same as "Pattan" or "Pyetan."     Praudha‐Brahmana In. one of the eight Brahmanas of the Sama‐veda; it contains twenty‐five sections, and is  therefore also called Pancha‐vinsa.     Prayaga In. the modern Allahabad; the place where the Ganges, Jumna, and the fabled subterranean Sarasvati  unite, called also Tri‐veni, ‘the triple braid.' It has always been a celebrated place of pilgrimage.     Preta In. a ghost; an evil spirit animating a dead carcase, and haunting cemeteries and other places    Priam Gk. the king of Troy during the Trojan War and youngest son of Laomedon; modern scholars derive his  name from the Luwian compound Priimuua, which means "exceptionally courageous".  Priapos Gk. (Latinized as Priapus), a minor rustic fertility god, protector of livestock, fruit plants, gardens and  male genitalia. Priapus was best noted for his large, permanent erection, which gave rise to the medical  term priapism; was described as the son of Aphrodite by Dionysus, perhaps as father or son of Hermes,  son of Zeus or Pan, depending on the source.   Priapus Gk. described as the son of Aphrodite by Dionysus, perhaps as father or son of Hermes; son of Zeus or    Pan, depending on the source. Priapus Rom. god of gardens, viniculture, sailors and fishermen  Primestave N. Wooden almanac with day, month, lunar and solar rotation and holy days engraved with runic  symbols. Also called a "Cog Alamac"  Primsigning  N.  An  agreement  to  think  about  becoming  a  baptized  Christian  which  Norsemen  undertook  in  order  to  trade  with  Christian  communities.  One  could  delay  baptism  for  quite  a  while  by  use  of  the  primsigning. 

206

Mythology and Folklore  
Prishadhra In. A son of Manu Vaivaswata, who, according to the Hari‐vansa and the puranas, became a Sudra  because he killed the cow of his religious preceptor.     Prishata In.  Drupada's father  Prisni In.  In the Vedas and Puranas, the earth, the mother of the Maruts; the name is used in the Vedas also  for a cow. There were several females of this name, and one of them is said to have been a new birth of  Devaki.     Pritau In. a king of the solar race, a descendant of Ikshwaku; there are many Prithus. See Prithi.   Pritha In. A name of Kunti    Prithi, Prithu, Prithi‐Vainya In.  Prithi or Prithi‐vainya, i.e., Prithi, son of Vena, is mentioned in the Rig‐veda,  and  he  is  the  declared  Rishi  or  author  of  one  of  the  hymns.  The  Atharva‐veda  says,  "  She  (Viraj)  ascended: she came to men. Men called her to them, saying, ‘Come, Iravati.' Manu Vaivaswata was her  calf, and the earth her vessel Prithi‐vainya milked her; he milked from her agriculture and grain. Men  subsist  on  agriculture  and  grain."  The  Satapatha  Brahmana  refers  to  Prithi  as  "first  of  men  who  was  installed  as  a  king."  These  early  allusions  receive  a  consistent  form  in  the  puranas,  and  we  have  tile  following legend: ‐ Prithi was son of Vena, son of Anga He was called the first king, and from him the  earth received her name Prithivi. The Vishnu Purana says that the Rishis "inaugurated Vena monarch of  the earth," but he was wicked by nature and prohibited worship and sacrifice. Incensed at the decay of  religion, pious sages beat Vena to death with blades of holy grass in the absence of a king robbery and  anarchy arose, and the Munis, after consultation, proceeded to rub the thigh of the dead king in order  to produce a son. There came forth "a man like a charred log, with fiat face and extremely short." This  man  became  a  Nishida,  and  with  him  came  out  the  sins  of  ‐the  departed  king.  The  Brahmans  then  rubbed the right arm of the corpse, "and from it sprang the majestic Prithu, Vena's son, resplendent in  body, glowing like the manifested Agni ... At his birth all creatures rejoiced, and through  the birth of  this  virtuous  son  Vena,  delivered  from  the  hell  called  Put,  ascended  to  heaven."  Prithu  then  became  invested with universal dominion; his subjects, who had suffered from famine, be‐sought him for the  edible  plants,  which  the  earth  withheld;  in  anger  he  seized  his  bow  to  compel  her  to  yield  the  usual  supply.  She  assumed  the  form  of  a  cow  and  fled  before  him.  Unable  to  escape,  she  implored  him  to  spare her, and promised to restore all the needed fruits if a calf were given to her, through which she  might  be  able to  secrete  milk.  "He  therefore,  having  made  Swayam‐bhuva  Manu  the  calf,  milked  the  earth, and received the milk into his own hand for the benefit of mankind. Thence preceded all kinds of  corn and vegetables upon which people subsist now and perpetually. By granting life to the earth Prithu  was as her father, and she thence derived the patronymic appellation Prithivi." This milking the earth  has been made the subject of much allegory and symbolism. The Matsya Purina specifies a variety of  milkers,  gods,  men,  Nagas,  Asuras,  &c,  in  the  follow  style:  ‐  "The  Rishis  milked  the  earth  through  Brihaspati; their calf was Soma, the Vedas were the vessel, and the milk was devotion." Other Puranas  agree  with  only  slight  deviations.  "These  mystifications,"  says  Wilson,  "are  all,  probably,  subsequent  modifications  of  the  original  simple  allegory  which  typified  the  earth  as  a  cow,  who  yielded  to  every  class of beings the milk they desired, or the object of their wishes."     Prithvi  In.    'The  broad;'  the  earth  or  wide  world;  in  the  Vedas  the  earth  is  personified  as  the  mother  of  all  beings,  and  is  invoked  together  with  the  sky.  According  to  the  Vedas  there  are  three  earths  corresponding to the three heavens, and our earth is called Bhumi. Another name of the earth is Urvi,  ‘wide.’ In the Vishnu Purina she is represented as receiving her name from a mythical person named  Prithu, who granted her life, and so was to her as a father. See above, Prithi or Prithu  Priya‐Darsi In.  See Asoka.    

207

Mythology and Folklore  
Priyam‐Vada In. a Vidya‐dhara, son of the king of the Gandharvas  Priya‐Vrata  In.  one  of  the  two  sons  of  Brahma  and  Sata‐rupa;  or,  according  to  other  statements,  a  son  of  Manu  Swayam‐bhuva.  "Priya‐vrata  being  dissatisfied  that  only  hall  the  earth  was  illuminated  at  one  time by the solar rays, followed the sun seven times round the earth in his own flaming car of equal  velocity, like another celestial orb, resolved to turn night into day."' He was stopped by Brahma. "The  ruts  which  were  formed  by  the  motion  of  his  chariot  wheels  were  the  seven  oceans.  In  this  way  the  seven continents of the earth were made." ‐Bhagavata Purana. In the Vishnu Purana his wife is stated  to be Kamya, daughter of Kardama, by whom he had ten sons and two daughters. Three  of the sons  adopted a religious life, and Priya‐vrata divided the seven continents among the others.  Procne Gk. (Or Prokne) Sister to Philomela; wife of Tereus, and mother of Itys  Procris Gk. the daughter of Erechtheus, king of Athens and his wife, Praxithea; she married Cephalus, the son  of  Deioneus.  Procris  had  at  least  two  sisters,  Creusa  and  Orithyia.  Sophocles  wrote  a  tragedy  called  Procris  which  has  been  lost,  as  has  a  version  contained  in  the  Greek  Cycle,  but  at  least  six  different  accounts of her story still exist.  Procrustes  Gk.  or  "the  stretcher  [who  hammers  out  the  metal]",  also  known  as  Prokoptas  or  Damastes  ("subduer"); was a rogue smith and bandit from Attica who physically attacked people, stretching them,  or  cutting  off  their  legs  so  as  to  make  them  fit  an  iron  bed's  size.  In  general,  when  something  is  Procrustean different lengths or sizes or properties are fitted to an arbitrary standard; the Greek myth,  Procrustes was a son of Poseidon with a stronghold on Mount Korydallos, on the sacred way between  Athens and Eleusis.  Proetus Gk. a mythical king of Argos and Tiryns; his father Abas, son of the last surviving and died Danaid, had  ruled  over  Argos  and  married  Ocalea.  However,  Proetus  quarreled  continually  with  his  twin  brother  Acrisius, inventing shields or bucklers in the process. Proetus started out as king of Argos, and held the  throne for about seventeen years, but Acrisius defeated and exiled him and he fled to King Jobates or  Amphianax in Lycia, and married his daughter Antea or Stheneboea.  Prometheus  Gk.  (Ancient Greek:  "forethought")Titan,  the  son  of  Iapetus  and  Themis,  and  brother  to  Atlas,  Epimetheus  and  Menoetius.  He  was  a  champion  of  mankind,  known  for  his  wily  intelligence,  which  stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals. Zeus then punished him for his crime by having him bound  to a rock while a great eagle ate his liver every day only to have it grow back to be eaten again the next  day. His myth has been treated by a number of ancient sources, in which Prometheus is credited with –  or blamed for – playing a pivotal role in the early history of mankind.  Pronaos Eg. A pillared room in front of the naos sanctuary of a temple; usually completely or half open in the  front; The location of this room varies with the design of the temple.  Prophet Eg. This translates as "God's Servant"; there was usually a ranking; the high priest of Amun at Thebes  was called "The First Prophet of Amun"; below him were the Second Prophet and so on; the head of the  local cults, was often called "Overseer of Prophets."   Propylon Eg. gateway that stands in front of a Pylon  Prorsa Postverta Rom. goddess of women in labor  Protesilaus Gk. (Ancient Greek: Πρωτεσίλαος, Protesilaos), A hero in the Iliad who was venerated at cult sites  in Thessaly and Thrace. Protesilaus was the son of Iphicles, a "lord of many sheep"; as grandson of the  eponymous  Phylacos,  he  was  the  leader  of  the  Phylaceans.  Hyginus  surmised  that  he  was  originally 

208

Mythology and Folklore  
known  as  Iolaus,   but  was  reeferrd  to  as  Protesilaus  after  being  the  first  (protos)  to  die  at  Troy;  Protesilaus was one of the suitors of Helen. He brought forty black ships with him to Troy, drawing his  men  from  flowering  Pyrasus,  coastal  Antron  and  Pteleus,  "deep  in  grass",  in  addition  to  his  native  Phylace. Protesilaus was the first to land: "the first man who dared to leap ashore when the Greek fleet  touched the Troad, Pausanias recalled, quoting "the author of the epic called the Cypria"  Proteus Gk. An early sea‐god, one of several deities whom Homer calls the "Old Man of the Sea", whose name  suggests the "first" (from Greek ‐ protos, "first"), as protogonos (πρωτόγονος) is the "primordial" or the  "firstborn".  He  became  the  son  of  Poseidon  in  the  Olympian  theogony  or  of  Nereus  and  Doris,  or  of  Oceanus and a Naiad, and was made the herdsman of Poseidon's seals, the great bull seal at the center  of the harem. He can foretell the future, but, in a mytheme familiar from several cultures, will change  his shape to avoid having to; he will answer only to someone who is capable of capturing him.  Providentia Rom. goddess of forethought  Proving N. Proving refers to both the runes being cut and the person doing the cutting. The concept of magical  initiation was as valid for a runemaster as for anyone else, and the knowledge imparted orally and in  practical demonstration would only have been communicated to the worthy, who would have to prove  their worth. And any single inscription, once cut, would need to be proven before it was known to be of  use to the runemaster, enabling it to be added to the corpus of knowledge that individual accumulated.   Psamathe Gk. a Nereid, the lover of Aeacus and mother of Phocus; in the tragedy Helen by Euripides, she was  married to king Proteus of Egypt;  was the daughter of Crotopus, the King of Argos and mother of Linus  by Apollo. She feared her father and gave the infant Linus to shepherds to rise. He was torn apart by  dogs  after  reaching  adulthood  and  Psamathe  was  killed  by  her  father,  for  which  Apollo  sent  a  child‐ killing  plague  to  Argos;  Nereid  goddess  of  sand  beaches.  Her  name  means  "the  Sand‐Goddess"  from  psammos, sand and theia, goddess; was the wife of Proteus, the old seal‐herder of Poseidon. She bore  him a mortal son and a sea‐nymph daughter.   Pshent Eg. The Crown of upper and lower Egypt, the red crown and the white crown put together to represent  a  unified  Egypt;  Although  Egypt  was  not  always  a  unified  nation  it  was  stronger  that  way;  Therefore  unification was desirable; Narmer (Menes), the founder of the First Dynasty around 3100 B.C., was the  first man recorded wearing this crown.  Psyche  Gk.  the  deification  of  the  human  soul;  she  was  portrayed  in  ancient  mosaics  as  a  goddess  with  butterfly wings (because psyche is also the Greek word for 'butterfly'). The Greek word psyche literally  means "spirit, breath, life or animating force".Psyche was originally the youngest daughter of the king  and queen of Sicily, and the most beautiful person on the island. Suitors flocked to ask for her hand.  She eventually boasted that she was more beautiful than Aphrodite (Venus) herself, and Aphrodite sent  Eros to transfix her with an arrow of desire, to make her fall in love with the nearest person or thing  available. But even Eros (Cupid) fell in love with her, and took her to a secret place, eventually marrying  her and having her made a goddess by Zeus (Jupiter).  Ptah Eg. He is a creator god; the patron of architects, artists and sculptors; It was Ptah who built the boats for  the souls of the dead to use in the afterlife.  Pudicitia Rom. goddess of modesty and chastity  Pulaha  In.    Name  of  one  of  the  Praja‐patis  and  great  Rishis  His  wife  was  Kshama,  and  he  had  three  sons,  Kardama, Arva‐rivat, and Sahishnu; a Gandharva  
]

209

Mythology and Folklore  
Pulastya  In.  one  of  the  Praja‐patis  or  mind‐born  sons  of  Brahma,  and  one  of  the  great  Rishis;  he  was  the  medium  through  which  some  of  the  puranas  were  communicated  to  man.  He  received  the  Vishnu  Purana from Brahma and communicated it to Parasara, who made it known to mankind. He was father  of Visravas, the father of Kuvera and Ravana, and all the Rakshasas are supposed to have sprung from  him.   Pulindas.In. barbarians; barbarous tribes living in woods and mountains, especially in Central India; but there  were some in the north and on the Indus  Puloman In. a Danava and father of Sachi, wife of Indra; he was killed by Indra when he wished to curse that  deity for having ravished his daughter.   Pundarikaksha In. 'The lotus‐eyed;' a name of Vishnu  Pundra  In.  a  country  corresponding  "to  Bengal  proper,  with  part  of  South  Bihar  and  the  Jungle  Mahals;"  a  fabulous city between the Hima‐vat and Hema‐kuta  Punya‐Sloka (mas.), Punva‐Sloka (fem.) In. ‘Hymned in holy verse;’ an appellation applied to Krishna, Yudhi‐ shthira, and Nala, also to Draupadi and Sati.   Purana  In.    'Old,'  hence  an  ancient  legend  or  tale  of  olden  times;  the  Puranas  succeed  the  Itihasas  or  epic  poems, but at a considerable distance of time, and must be distinguished from them. The epics treat of  the legendary actions of heroes as mortal men, the Puranas celebrate the powers and works of positive  gods, and represent a later and more extravagant development of Hinduism, of which they are in fact  the Scriptures. The definition of a Purana by Amara Sinha, an ancient Sanskrit lexicographer, is a work"  which has five distinguishing topics: (1) The creation of the universe; (2) Its destruction and renovation;  (3)  The  genealogy  of  gods  and  patriarchs;  (4)  The  reigns  of  the  Manus,  forming  the  periods  called  Manwantaras. (5) The history of the Solar and Lunar races of kings. "These are the Pancha‐lakshanas or  distinguishing marks, but no one of the puranas answers exactly to the description; some show a partial  conformity with it, others depart from it very widely. The Vishnu purana is the one, which best accords  with  the  title.  Wilson  says,  "A  very  great  portion  of  the  contents  of  many  is  genuine  and  old.  The  sectarial interpolation or embellishment is always sufficiently palpable to be set aside without injury to  the  more  authentic  and  primitive  material;  and  the  Puranas,  although  they  belong  especially  to  that  stage of the Hindu religion in which faith in some one divinity was the prevailing principle, are also a  valuable  record  of  the  form  of  Hindu  belief  which  came  next  in  order  to  that  of  the  Vedas,  which  grafted  hero.  Worship  upon  the  simpler  ritual  of  the  latter,  and  which  had  been  adopted,  and  was  extensively, perhaps universally, established in India at the time of the Greek invasion. " According to  the  same  authority,  Pantheism  "  is  one  of  their  invariable  characteristics,"  and  underlies  their  whole  teaching,  "although  the  particular  divinity  who  is  all  things,  from  whom  all  things  proceed,  and  to  whom all things return, is diversified according to their individual sectarian bias." The puranas are all  written in verse, and their invariable form is that of a dialogue between an exponent and an inquirer,  interspersed  with  the  dialogues  and  observations  of  other  individuals.  Thus  Pulastya  received  the  Vishnu  Purana  from  Brahma;  he  made  it  known  to  Parasara,  and  Parasara  narrated  it  to  his  disciple  Maitreya.  The  Puranas  are  eighteen  in  number,  and  in  addition  to  these  there  are  eighteen  Upa  Puranas  or  subordinate  works.  The  Puranas  are  classified  in  three  categories,  according  to  the  prevalence in them of the qualities of purity, gloom, and passion. Those in which the quality of Sattwa  or purity prevail are: (1) Vishnu, (2) Naradiya, (3) Bhagavata, (4) Garuda, (5) Padma, (6) Varaha  Puran‐Jaya  In.    'City‐conqueror;'  a  prince  of  the  solar  race,  son  of  Vikukshi  His  story,  as  told  in  the  Vishnu  Purana, is that in the Treta age there was war between the gods and the Asuras, in which the former  were worsted. They had re‐ course to Vishnu for assistance, and he detcted them to obtain the aid of 

210

Mythology and Folklore  
Puran‐jaya, into whose person he promised to infuse a portion of him. The prince complied with their  wishes, and asked that their chief, Indra, would assume the form of a bull and carry him, the prince,  upon his hump. This was done, and thus seated Puran‐jaya destroyed all the enemies of the gods. As he  rode on the hump he obtained the cognomen of Kakut‐stha. In explanation of his title Puran‐jaya, the  Bhagavata purana says that he took the city of the Daityas situated in the west.     Purochana In.  The emissary of Dur‐yodhana who at‐ tempted to burn the Pandavas in their house and was  burnt in his own house by Bhima. See Maha‐bharata.     Puru In. the sixth king of the lunar race, youngest son of Yayati and Sarmishtha; he and his brother Yadu were  founders of two great branches of the lunar race. The descendants of Puru were called Pauravas, and of  this race came the Kauravas and Pandavas. Among the Yadavas or  descendants of Yadu was Krishna.  See Yayati.    Purukutsa  In.    A  son  of  Mandhatri,  into  whose  person  Vishnu  entered  for  the  purpose  of  destroying  the  subterranean Gandharvas, called Mauneyas. He reigned on the banks of the Narmada, and that river  personified as one of the Nagas was his wife. By her he had a son, Trasadasyu. The Vishnu Purana is  said to have been narrated to him by "Daksha and other venerable sages."     Puru‐Ravas In. in the Vedas, a mythical personage connected with the sun and the dawn, and existing in the  middle  region  of  the  universe;  according  to  the  Rig‐veda  he  was  son  of  Ila,  and  a  beneficent  pious  prince;  but  to  Maha‐bharata  says,  "We  have  heard  that  Ila  was  both  his  mother  and  his  father.  The  parentage usually assigned to him is that he was son of Budha by Ila, daughter of Manu, and grandson  of the moon." Through his mother he received the city of pratishthana. (See Na) He is the hero of the  story and of the drama 01 Vikrama and Urvasi, or the "Hero and the Nymph." Puru‐ravas is the Vikrama  or  hero,  and  Urvasi  is  an  Apsaras  who  came  down  from  Swarga  through  having  incurred  the  imprecation of Mitra and Varuna. On earth Puru‐ravas and she became enamoured of each other, and  she agreed to live with him upon certain conditions "I have two rams," said the nymph, "which I love as  children. They must be kept near my bed‐ side, and never suffered to be carried away. You must also  take  care  never  to  be  seen  by  me  undressed;  and  clarified  butter  alone  must  be  my  food."  The  inhabitants of Swarga were anxious for the return of Urvasi, and knowing the compact made with Puru‐ ravas,  the  Gandharvas  came  by  night  and  stole  her  rams.  Puru‐ravas  was  undressed,  and  so  at  first  refrained from pursuing the robbers, but the cries of Urvasi impelled him to seize his sword and rush  after them. The Gandharvas then brought a vivid flash of lightning to the chamber which displayed the  person  of  Puru‐ravas  So  the  charm  was  broken  and  Urvasi  disappeared.  Puru‐ravas  wandered  about  demented in search of her, and at length found her at Kuru‐kshetra bathing with four other nymphs of  heaven. She declared herself pregnant, and told him to come there again at the end of a year, when  she  would  deliver  to  him  a  son  and  remain  with  him  for  one  night.  Puru‐ravas,  thus  comforted,  returned to his capital. At the end of the year he went to the trysting‐place and received from Urvasi his  eldest son, Ayus. The annual interviews were repeated until she had borne him five more sons (Some  authorities  increase  the  number  to  eight,  and  there  is  considerable  variety  in  their  names.)  She  then  told him that the Gandharvas had determined to grant him any boon he might desire. His desire was to  pass his life with Urvasi. The Gandharvas then brought him a vessel with fire and said, " Take this fire,  and, according to the precepts of the Vedas, divide it into three fires j then, fixing your mind upon the  idea  of  living  with  Urvasi,  offer  oblations,  and  you  shall  assuredly  obtain  your  wishes.  "He  did  not  immediately obey this command, but eventually he fulfilled it in an emblematic way, and "obtained a  seat in the sphere of the Gandharvas. and was no more separated from his love." Aa a son of Ila, his  metronymic is Aila. There is a hymn in the Rig‐veda, which contains an obscure conversation between  Pururavas and Urvasi. The above story is first told in the Satapat Brahmana, and afterwards reappears 

211

Mythology and Folklore  
in the Puranas. The Bhagavata Purana says, "From Puru‐ravas came the triple Veda in the beginning of  the Treta (age)."  Purusha‐Narayana In. the original male; the divine creator Brahma  Purusha‐Sukta In. a hymn of the Rig‐veda in which the four castes are first mentioned; it is considered to be  one of the latest in date. See Muir's Texts, i. p. 7.  Purushottama In. Literally 'best of men;' but the word Purusha is here used in its mythic sense of soul of the  universe, and so the compound means the "supreme soul" It is a title of Vishnu, and asserts his right to  be considered the Supreme God. So the Hari‐vansa says, "Purushottama is whatever is declared to be  the highest, Purusha the sacrifice, and everything else which is known by the name of Purusha."  Purushottama ‐Kshetra In. the sacred territory round about the temple of Jagannatha in Orissa  Purva‐Mimansa In. a school of philosophy; see Darsana   Pushan In. A deity frequently mentioned in the Vedas, but he is not  of  a distinctly defined character. Many  hymns  are  addressed  to  him.  The  word  comes  from  the  root  push,  and  the  primary  idea  is  that  of  "nourisher"  or  Providence.  So  the  Taittiriya  Brahmana  says,  “When  Prajapati  formed  living  creatures  Pushan  nourished  them.”  The  account  given  in  Bohtlingk  and  Roth’s  Dictionary,  and  adopted  by  Dr.  Muir,  is  as  follows:  ‐  “Pushan  is  a  protector  and  multiplier  of  cattle  and  of  human  possessions  in  general. As a cowherd he carries an ox‐goad, and he is drawn by goats. In the character of a solar deity,  he  beholds  the  entire  universe,  and  is  a  guide  on  roads  and  journeys  and  to  the  other  world.  He  is  called the lover of his sister Surya. He aids in the revolution of day and night and shares with Soma the  guardianship of living creatures. He is invoked along with the most various deities, but most frequently  with Indra and the Bhaga.” He is a patron of conjurors, especially of those who discover stolen goods,  and he is connected with the marriage ceremonial, being besought to take the bride’s hand and bless  her. (See Muir’s Texts, v. 171.) In the Nirukta, and in works of later date, Pushan is identified with the  sun.  He  is  also  called  the  brother  of  Indra,  and  is  enumerated  among  the  twelve  Adityas.  Pushan  is  toothless,  and  feeds  upon  a  kind  of  gruel,  and  the  cooked  oblations  offered  to  him  are  of  ground  materials,  hence  he  is  called  Karambhad.  The  cause  of  his  being  toothless  is  variously  explained.  According  to  the  Taittiriya  Sanhita,  the  deity  Rudra,  being  excluded  from  a  certain  sacrifice,  shot  an  arrow at the offering and pierced it. A portion of this sacrifice was presented to Pushan, and it broke his  teeth. In the Maha‐bharata and in the Puranas the legend takes a more definite shape. “Rudra (Siva), of  dreadful power, ran up to the gods present at Daksha’s sacrifice, and in his rage knocked out the eyes  of Bhaga with a blow, and, incensed, assaulted Pushan with his foot, and knocked out his teeth as he  was  eating  the  purodasa  offering.”  In  the  Puranas  it  is  not  Siva  himself,  but  his  manifestation  the  Rudras, who disturbed the sacrifice of the gods and knocked Pushan’s teeth down his throat. Pushan is  called Aghrini, ‘splendid;’ Dasra, Dasma, and Dasma‐varchas, ‘of wonderful appearance or power,’ and  Kapardin (q.v.).   Pushkara In.  A blue lotus; a celebrated tank about five miles from Ajmir; one of the seven Dwipas(See Dwipa);  the  name  of  several  persons.  Of  the  brother  of  Nala  to  whom  Nala  lost  his  kingdom  and  all  that  he  possessed  in  gambling.  Of  a  son  of  Bharata  and  nephew  of  Rama‐chandra,  who  reigned  over  the  Gandharas.   Pushkaravati In. a city of the Gandharas not far from the Indus; and the Pouse kielofati of Hiouen Thsang  Pushpa‐Danta In. 1. One of the chief attendants of Siva; he incurred his master’s displeasure by listening of his  private conversation with Parvati and talking of it afterwards. For this he was condemned to become a 

212

Mythology and Folklore  
man,  and  so  appeared  in  the  form  of  the  great  grammarian  Katyayana.  2.  One  of  the  guardian  elephants. See Loka‐pala.   Pushpaka In. a self‐moving aerial car of large dimensions, which contained within it a palace or city. Kuvera  obtained it by gift from Brahma, but it was carried off by Ravana, his half‐brother, and constantly used  by him. After Rama‐chandra had slain Ravana, he made use of this capacious car to convey himself and  Sita, with Lakshmana and all his allies, back to Ayodhya; after that he returned it to its owner, Kuvera. It  is also called Ratna‐varshuka, “that rains jewels.”   Pushpa‐Karandini In. a name of Ujjayini  Pushpa‐Mitra In. The first of the Sunga kings, who succeeded the Mauryas, and reigned at Patali‐putra. In his  time the grammarian Patanjali is supposed to have lived.     Pushpotkata In. a Rakshasi, the wife of Visravas and mother of Ravana and Kumbha‐karna.    Put In. a hell to which childless men are said to be condemned; “A name invented to explain the word putra,  son (hell‐saver); A female demon, daughter of Bali She attempted to kill the infant Krishna by suckling  him, but was herself sucked to death by the child.  Puta Rom. goddess of the pruning of vines and trees  Pygmalion Gk. is a legendary figure of Cyprus. Though Pygmalion is the Greek version of the Phoenician royal  name  Pumayyaton,  he  is  most  familiar  from  Ovid's  Metamorphoses,  X,  in  which  Pygmalion  was  a  sculptor who fell in love with a statue he had carved.Pygmalion was a Cypriot sculptor  who carved a  woman  out  of  ivory.  According  to  Ovid,  after  seeing  the  Propoetides  prostituting  themselves  (more  accurately, they denied the divinity of Venus and she thus ‘reduced’ them to prostitution), he was 'not  interested in women', but his statue was so fair and realistic that he fell in love with it. In the vertex,  Venus (Aphrodite)'s festival day came. For the festival, Pygmalion made offerings to Venus and made a  wish. "I sincerely wished the ivory sculpture will be changed to a real woman." However, he couldn’t  bring himself to express it. When he returned home, Cupid sent by Venus kissed the ivory sculpture on  the  hand.  At  that  time,  it  was  changed  to  a  beautiful  woman.  A  ring  was  put  on  her  finger.  It  was  Cupid’s ring which made love achieved. Venus granted his wish.  Pylades Gk. the son of King Strophius of Phocis and of Anaxibia; daughter of Atreus and sister of Agamemnon  and Menelaus; he is mostly known for his strong friendship or homosexual relationship with his cousin  Orestes, son of Agamemnon.  Pylon Eg. From the Greek word meaning "gate"; it is a monumental entrance wall of a temple; Pylons are the  largest and least essential parts of a temple that is usually built last; some temples have more than one  set, the temple at Karnak has 10 Pylons.  Pyramid texts Eg. Texts on the walls of the pyramids of the end of the 5th through 8th Dynasties  Pyramidion  Eg.  Capstone  of  a  pyramid  or  the  top  of  an  obelisk;  Sometimes  called  a  benben  stone  or  primordial  mound;  The  pyramidion  was  decorated  and  became  a  symbolic  object  that  was  the  focal  point of the small brick pyramids of private tombs.  Pyrrhus Gk. King of Epirus and one of the most illustrious generals of antiquity; was born about 318 BC and  died in 272 BC; was left an orphan in childhood and was placed on the throne of his ancestors when  about twelve years of age, and reigned peacefully five years, when advantage was taken of his absence  to transfer the crown to his great‐uncle, Neoptolemus.  

213

Mythology and Folklore  
Pythia  Gk.  Commonly  known  as  the  Oracle  of  Delphi;  was  the  priestess  at  the  Temple  of  Apollo  at  Delphi,  located on the slopes of Mount Parnassus; was widely credited for her prophecies inspired by Apollo  Python  Gk.  A  huge  serpent  that  was  killed  by  the  god  Apollo  at  Delphi  either  because  it  would  not  let  him  found  his  oracle,  being  accustomed  itself  to  giving  oracles,  or  because  it  had  persecuted  Apollo’s  mother, Leto, during her pregnancy.    


Quirinus  Rom. Old Sabine god  with mysterious  origins; Became  very important as a figure of the  state; His  festival, the Quirinalia, was celebrated on February 17.  Quiritis Rom. goddess of motherhood   


Ra  Eg.  From  very  early  times  Ra  was  a  sun  god;  He  took  on  many  of  the  attributes  and  even  the  names  of  other gods as Egyptian myths evolved; He is often pictured as a hawk or as a hawk headed man with a  solar disk encircled by a uraeus on his head; He is often pictured wearing the double crown of upper  and lower Egypt.   Radha In. wife of Adhiratha and foster‐mother of Karna; the favourite mistress and consort of Krishna while he  lived  as  Go‐pala  among  the  cowherds  in  Vrinda‐vana;  she  was  wife  of  Ayana‐ghosa,  a  cowherd.  Considered  by  some  to  be  an  incarnation  of  Lakshmi,  and  worshipped  accordingly.  Some  have  discovered a mystical character in Radha, and consider her as the type of the human soul drawn to the  ineffable god, Krishna, or as that pure divine love to which the fickle lover returns.  Radheya In. a metronymic of Karna  Radhika In. a diminutive and endearing form of the name Radha  Radsvinn N. "Swift in Counsel". A Dwarf  Raga  (mas.),  Ragini  (fem.)  In.  The  Ragas  are  the  musical  modes  or  melodies  personified,  six  or  more  in  number, and the Raginis are their consorts.     Raghava In. descendant of Raghu, a name of Rama   Raghava‐Pandaviya  In.  a  modern  poem  by  Kavi  Raja,  which  is  in  high  repute;  it  is  an  artificial  work,  which  exhibits extraordinary ingenuity in the employment of words. As its name implies, the poem celebrates  the actions of Raghava, i.e., Rama, the descendant of Raghu, and also those of the Pandava princes. It  thus recounts at once in the same words the story of the Ramayana and that of the Maha‐bharata; and  the composition is so managed that the words may be understood as applying either to Rama or the  Pandavas. It has been printed.     Raghava‐Vilasa In. a poem on the life of Rama by Viswa‐natha, the author of the Sahitya‐darpana 

214

Mythology and Folklore  
Raghu  In.    a  king  of  the  solar  race;  according  to  the  Raghu‐vansa,  he  was  the  son  of  Dilipa  and  great‐ grandfather  of  Rama,  who  from  Raghu  got  the  patronymic  Raghava  and  the  title  Raghu‐pati,  chief  of  the race of Raghu. The authorities disagree as to the genealogy of Raghu, but all admit him to be an  ancestor of Rama.   Raghu‐Pati In.  See Raghu.     Raghu‐Vansa In. ‘The race of Raghu;’ the name of a celebrated poem in nineteen cantos by Kali‐dasa on the  ancestry  and  life  of  Rama;  it  has  been  translated  into  Latin  by  Stenzler,  and  into  English  by  Griffiths.  There are other translations and many editions of the text.    Ragnarök N. "Doom of the Gods". Presaged by several harsh winters in a row, it wills the end of the era. There  will be battles all over the world, with brother vs. brother. The wolf will swallow the sun, and the moon  will be caught by other wolf. Stars will disappear, mountains will fall, and trees will be uprooted. Fenrir‐ wolf will get free. There will be tidal waves as the Midgard Serpent goes ashore. Naglfar will be loosed  from  its  moorings  and  captured  by  Giant  Hrym.  The  sky  will  open  and  sons  of  Muspell  will  come  through,  with  Surt  riding  in  front  amid  fire.  The  Bifrost  Bridge  will  collapse.  All  will  meet  in  battle  at  Vigrid field. Heimdall will blow Giallarhorn. Odin will battle and be killed by Fenri ‐wolf. Thor will fight  the Midgard Serpent, Freyr will battle Surt, and Tyr will fight Garm. Vidar will break the jaw of Fenrir  after  it  swallows  Odin.  Surt  will  burn  entire  world,  and  the  earth  will  sink  into  the  ocean.  After  Ragnarok, Earth will rise out of sea, and crops will grow. Vidar and Vali will be alive and will dwell at  Idavoll. Modi ("Wrath") and Magni ("Might") will inherit Mjollnir. Baldr & Hod will return from Hel. Life  & Leifthrasir, two human survivors of Ragnarok, will repopulate world.  Rahu In.  Rahu and Ketu are in astronomy the ascending and descending nodes. Rahu is the cause of eclipses,  and the term is used to designate the eclipse itself. He is also considered as one of the planets, as king  of meteors, and as guardian of the south‐west quarter. Mythologically Rahu is a Daitya who is supposed  to seize the sun and moon and swallow them, thus obscuring their rays and causing eclipses. He was  son of Vipra‐chitti and Sinhika, and is called by his metronymic Sainhikeya. He had four arms, and his  lower part ended in a tail. He was a great mischief‐maker, and when the gods had produced the Amrita  by churning the ocean, he assumed a disguise, and insinuating himself amongst them, drank some of it.  The sun and moon detected him and informed Vishnu, who cut off his head and two of his arms, but, as  he had secured immortality, his body was placed in the stellar sphere, the upper parts, represented by  a dragon’s head, being the ascending node, and the lower parts, represented by a dragon’s tail, being  Ketu  the  descending  node.  Rahu  wreaks  his  vengeance  on  the  sun  and  moon  by  occasionally  swallowing  them.  The  Vishnu  Purana  says,  “Eight  black  horses  draw  the  dusky  chariot  of  Rahu,  and  once  harnessed  are  attached  to  it  for  ever.  On  the  Parvans  (nodes,  or  lunar  and  solar  eclipses)  Rahu  directs  his  course  from  the  sun  to  the  moon,  and  back  again  from  the  moon  to  the  sun.  The  eight  horses of the chariot of Ketu, swift as the wind, are of the dusky red colour of lac, or of the smoke of  burning  straw.”  Rahu  is  called  Abhra‐pisacha,  ‘the  demon  of  the  sky;’  Bharani‐bhu,  ‘born  from  the  asterism  Bharani;’  Graha,  ‘the  seizer;’  Kabandha,  ‘the  headless’;  A  sage  who  was  the  friend  of  Bharadwaja he had two sons, Arvavasu and Paravasu. The latter, under the curse of Bharadwaja, killed  his father, mistaking him for an antelope, as he was walking about at night covered with an antelope’s  skin. Arvavasu retired into the forest to obtain by devotion a remission of his brother’s guilt. When he  returned, Paravasu charged him with the crime, and he again retired to his devotions. These so pleased  the gods that they drove away Paravasu and restored Raibhya to life. See Yava‐krita.   Rain‐God Gk. Zeus is the Lord of the Sky and the God of Rain  Raivat In. son of Reva or Revata; also called Kakudmin. He had a very lovely daughter named Revati, and not  deeming any mortal worthy of her, he went to Brahma to consult him. At the command of that god he 

215

Mythology and Folklore  
bestowed  her  upon  Balarama.  He  was  king  of  Anarta,  and  built  the  city  of  Kusasthali  or  Dwaraka  in  Gujarat, which he made his capital; One of the Manus (the fifth).  Raivata,  Raivataka.  In.  the  range  that  branches  off  from  the  western  portion  of  the  Vindhya  towards  the  north, extending nearly to the Jumna  Raja Sekhara In. a dramatist who was the author of the dramas Viddha‐Salabhanjika and Prachanda‐Pandava;  he was also the writer of Karpura‐Manjari, a drama entirely in Prakriti. Another play, Bala‐Ramayana, is  attributed to him. He appears to have been the minister of some Rajput, and to have lived about the  beginning of the twelfth century.   Raja‐Griha In. the capital of Magadha; its site is still traceable in the hills between Patna and Gaya     Rajanya In. a Vedic designation of the Kshatriya caste  Rajarshi (Raja‐rishi) In. A Rishi or saint of the regal caste.; A Kshatriya who, through pure and holy life on earth  has been raised as a saint or demigod to Indra’s heaven, as Viswa‐mitra, Puru‐ravas.    Raja‐Suya In. ‘A royal sacrifice.’ A great sacrifice performed at the installation of a king, religious in its nature  but political in its operation, because it implied that he who instituted the sacrifice was a supreme lord,  a king over kings, and his tributary princes were required to be present at the rite.     Raja‐Tarangini  In.  A  Sanskrit  metrical  history  of  Kashmir  by  Kalhana  Pandit.  It  commences  with  the  days  of  fable and comes down to the year 1027 A.D. The author probably lived about 1148 A.D. This is the only  known  work in Sanskrit which deserves the name  of a history. The text has been printed in Calcutta.  Troyer published the text with a French translation. Wilson and Lassen have analysed it, and Dr. Buhler  has lately reviewed the work in the Indian Antiquary.     Raji In. A son of Ayus and father of 500 sons of great Valour. In one of the chronic wars between the gods and  the Asuras it was declared by Brahma that the victory should be gained by that side which Raji joined.  The Asuras first sought him, and he undertook to aid them if they promised to make him their king on  their victory being secured. They declined. The heavenly hosts repaired to him and undertook to make  him their Indra. After the Asuras were defeated he became king of gods, and Indra paid him homage.  When he returned to his own city, he left Indra as his deputy in heaven. On Raji’s death Indra refused  to  acknowledge  the  succession  of  his  sons,  and  by  the  help  of  Brihaspati,  who  led  them  astray  and  effected their ruin, Indra recovered his sovereignty.     Raka In. A Rakshasi, wife of Visravas and mother of Khara and Surpa‐nakha.    Rakshasa‐Loka In. See Loka.    Rakshasas In.  Goblins or evil spirits. They are not all equally bad, but have been classified as of three sorts –  one as a set of beings like the Yakshas, another as a sort of Titans or enemies of the gods, and lastly, in  the  common  acceptation  of  the  term,  demons  and  fiends  who  haunt  cemeteries,  disturb  sacrifices,   harass devout men, animate dead bodies, devour human beings, and vex and afflict mankind in all sorts  of ways. These last are the Rakshasas of whom Ravana was chief, and according to some authorities,  they are descended, like Ravana himself, from the sage Pulastya. According to other authorities, they  sprang from Brahma’s foot. The Vishnu Purana also makes them descendants of Kasyapa and Khasa, a  daughter of Daksha, through their son Rakshas; and the Ramayana states that when Brahma created  the waters, he formed certain beings to guard them who were called Rakshasas (from the root raksh, to  guard, but the derivation from this root may have suggested the explanation), and the Vishnu Purana 

216

Mythology and Folklore  
gives  a  somewhat  similar  derivation.  It  is  thought  that  the  Raksas  of  the  epic  poems  were  the  rude  barbarian races of India who were subdued by the Aryans.       When  Hanuman  entered  the  city  of  Lanka  to  reconnoitre  in  the  form  of  a  cat,  he  saw  that  “the  Rakshasas sleeping in the houses were of every shape and form. Some of them disgusted the eye, while  some were beautiful to look upon. Some had long arms and frightful shapes; some were very fat and  some were very lean: some were mere dwarfs and some were prodigiously tall. Some had only one eye  and  others  only  one  ear.  Some  had  monstrous  bellies,  hanging  breasts,  long  projecting  teeth,  and  crooked  thighs’  whilst  others  were  exceedingly  beautiful  to  behold  and  clothed  in  great  splendour.  Some had two legs, some three legs, and some four legs. Some had the heads of serpents, some the  heads of donkeys, some the heads of horses, and some the heads of elephants.” – (Ramayana).  The  Rakshas  have  a  great  many  epithets  descriptive  of  their  characters  and  actions.  They  are  called  Anusaras, Asaras, and Hanushas, ‘killers or hurters;’ Ishti‐pachas, ‘stealers of offerings;’ Sandhya‐balas,  ‘strong  in  twilight;’  Kashapatas,  Naktancharas,  Ratri‐charas,  and  Samani‐shadas,  ‘night‐walkers;’  Nri‐ jagdhas  or  Nri‐chakshas,  ‘cannibals;’  Palalas,  Paladas,  Palankashas,  Kravyads,  ‘carnivorous;’  Asra‐pas,  Asrik‐pas,  Kauna‐pas,  Kilala‐pas,  and  Rakta‐pas,  ‘blood‐drinkers;’  Dandasukas,  ‘biters;’  Praghasas,  ‘gluttons;’  Malina‐mukhas,  ‘black‐faced;’  Karburas,  &c.  But  many  of  these  epithets  are  not  reserved  exclusively for Rakshasas.    

Rakta‐Vija  In.    An  Asura  whose  combat  with  the  goddess  Chamunda  (Devi)  is  celebrated  in  the  Devi‐ mahatmya. Each drop of his blood as it fell on the ground produced a new Asura, but Chamunda put an  end to this by drinking his blood and devouring his flesh.     Rama In.  There are three Ramas: Parasu‐rama, Rama‐chandra, and Bala‐rama; but it is to the second of these  that the name is specially applied.  Rama, Rama‐Chandra In.  Eldest son of Dasa‐ratha, a king of the Solar race, reigning at Ayodhya. This Rama is  the  seventh  incarnation  of  the  god  Vishnu,  and  made  his  appearance  in  the  world  at  the  end  of  the  Treta or second age. His story is briefly told in the Vana Parva of the Maha‐bharata, but it is given in full  length as the grand subject of the Ramayana. King Dasa‐ratha was childless, and performed the Aswa‐ medha sacrifice with scrupulous care, in the hope of obtaining offspring. His devotion was accepted by  the gods, and he received the promise of four sons. At this time the gods were in great terror and alarm  at  the  deeds  and  menaces  of  Ravana,  the  Rakshasa  king  of  Lanka,  who  had  obtained  extraordinary  power, in virtue of severe penances and austere devotion to Brahma. In their terror the gods appealed  to  Vishnu  for  deliverance,  and  he  resolved  to  become  manifest  in  the  world  with  Dasa‐ratha  as  his  human father. Dasa‐ratha was performing a sacrifice when Vishnu appeared to him as a glorious being  from out of the sacrificial fire, and gave to him a pot of nectar for his wives to drink. Dasa‐ratha gave  half of the nectar to Kausalya, who brought forth Rama with a half of the divine essence, a quarter to  Kaikeyi, whose son Bharata was endowed with a quarter of the deity, and the fourth part to Su‐mitra,  who  brought  forth  two  sons,  Lakshmana  and  Satru‐ghna,  each  having  an  eighth  part  of  the  divine  essence. The brothers were all attached to each other, but Lakshmana was more especially devoted to  Rama and Satru‐ghna to Bharata.       The two sons of Su‐mitra and the pairing off of the brothers have not passed without notice. The  version of the Ramayana given by Mr. Wheeler endeavours to account for these circumstances. It says  that  Dasa‐ratha  divided  the  divine  nectar  between  his  senior  wives,  Kausalya,  and  Kaikeyi,  and  that  when the younger, Su‐mitra, asked for some, Dasa‐ratha desired them to share their portions with her.  Each  gave  her  half,  so  Sumitra  received  two  quarters  and  gave  birth  to  two  sons:  “from  the  quarter  which she received from Kausalya she gave birth to Lakshmana, who became the ever‐faithful friend of  Rama, and from the quarter she received from Kaikeyi she gave birth to Satru‐ghna, who became the 

217

Mythology and Folklore  
ever‐faithful friend of Bharata.” This account is silent as to the superior divinity of Rama, and according  to it all four brothers must have been equals as manifestations of the deity.]        The  four  brothers  grew  up  together  at  Ayodhya,  but  while  they  were  yet  striplings,  the  sage  Viswamitra  sought  the  aid  of  Rama  to  protect  him  from  the  Rakshasas.  Dasa‐ratha,  though  very  unwilling,  was  constrained  to  consent  to  the  sage’s  request.  Rama  and  Lakshmana  then  went  to  the  hermitage of Viswamitra, and there Rama killed the female demon Taraka, but it required a good deal  of  persuasion  from  the  sage  before  he  was  induced  to  kill  a  female.  Viswamitra  supplied  Rama  with  celestial  arms,  and  exercised  a  considerable  influence  over  his  actions.  Viswamitra  afterwards  took  Rama and his brothers to Mithila to the court of Janaka king of Videha. This king and a lovely daughter  named Sita, whom he offered in marriage to any one who could bend the wonderful bow which had  once belonged to Siva. Rama not only bent the bow but also broke it, and thus won the hand of the  princess, who became a most virtuous and devoted wife. Rama’s three brothers also were married to a  sister and two cousins of Sita.     This  breaking  of  the  bow  of  Siva  brought  about  a  very  curious  incident,  which  is  probably  an  interpolation of a later date, introduced for a sectarian purpose. Parasu‐rama, the sixth incarnation of  Vishnu, the Brahman exterminator of the Kshatriyas, was still living upon earth. He was a follower of  Siva, and was offended at the breaking of that deity’s bow. Notwithstanding that he and Rama  were  both incarnations of Vishnu, he challenged Rama to a trial of strength and was discomfited, but Rama  spared his life because he was a Brahman.Preparations were made at Ayodhya for the inauguration of  Rama as successor to the throne. Kaikeyi, the second wife of Dasa‐ratha, and mother of Bharata, was  her  husband’s  favourite.  She  was  kind  to  Rama  in  childhood  and  youth,  but  she  had  a  spiteful  humpbacked female slave named  Manthara. This woman worked upon the maternal affection of her  mistress until she aroused a strong feeling of jealousy against Rama. Kaikeyi had a quarrel and a long  struggle with her husband, but he at length consented to install Bharata and to send Rama into exile for  fourteen  years.  Rama  departed  with  his  wife  Sita  and  his  brother  Lakshmana,  and  travelling  southwards,  he  took  up  his  abode  at  Chitra‐kuta,  in  the  Dandaka  forest,  between  the  Yamuna  and  Godavari. Soon after the departure of Rama, his father Dasa‐ratha died, and Bharata was called upon to  ascend the throne. He declined, and set out for the forest with an army to bring Rama back. When the  brothers  met  there  was  a  long  contention.  Rama  refused  to  return  until  the  term  of  his  father’s  sentence  was  completed,  and  Bharata  declined  to  ascend  the  throne.  At  length  it  was  arranged  that  Bharata  should  return  and  act  as  his  brother’s  vicegerent.  As  a  sign  of  Rama’s  supremacy  Bharata  carried back with him a pair of Rama’s shoes, and these were always brought out ceremoniously when  business had to be transacted. Rama passed ten years of his banishment moving from one hermitage to  another, and went at length to the hermitage of the sage Agastya, near the Vindhya mountains. This  holy man recommended Rama to take up his abode at Panchavati, on the river Godavari, and the party  accordingly  proceeded  thither.  This  district  was  infested  with  Rakshasas,  and  one  of  them  named  Surpa‐naka, a sister of Ravana, saw Rama and fell in love with him. He repelled her advances, and in her  jealousy she attacked Sita. This so enraged Lakshmana that he cut off her ears and nose. She brought  her brothers Khara and Dushana with an army of Rakshasas to avenge her wrongs, but they were all  destroyed. Smarting under her mutilation and with spretoe injuria formoe, she repaired to her brother  Ravana, in Lanka, and inspired him by her description with a fierce passion for Sita. Ravana proceeded  to Rama’s residence in an aerial car, and his accomplice Maricha having lured Rama from home, Ravana  assumed  the  form  of  a  religious  mendicant  and  lulled  sita’s  apprehensions  until  he  found  an  opportunity to declare himself and carry her off by force to Lanka. Rama’s despair and rage at the loss  of his faithful wife were terrible. He and Lakshmana went in pursuit and tracked the ravisher. On their  way they killed Kabandha, a headless monster, whose disembodied spirit counselled Rama to seek the  aid of Su‐griva, king of the monkeys. The two brothers accordingly went on their way to Su‐griva, and  after  overcoming  some  obstacles  and  assisting  Su‐griva  to  recover  Kishkindhya,  his  capital,  from  his 

 

218

Mythology and Folklore  
usurping brother Balin, they entered into a firm alliance with him. Through this connection Rama got  the appellations of Kapi‐prabhu and Kapi‐ratha. He received not only the support of all the forces of Su‐ griva and his allies, but the active aid of Hanuman, son of the wind, minister and general of Su‐griva.  Hanuman’s  extraordinary  powers  of  leaping  and  flying  enabled  him  to  do  all  the  work  of  reconnoitering.  By  superhuman  efforts  their  armies  were  transported  to  Ceylon  by  “Rama’s  bridge,”  and  after  many  fiercely  contested  battles  the  city  of  Lanka  was  taken,  Ravana  was  killed  and  Sita  rescued. The recovery of his wife filled Rama with joy, but he was jealous of her honour, received her  coldly, and  refused to take her back. She asserted her purity in touching and dignified language, and  determined  to  prove  her  innocence  by  the  ordeal  of  fire.  She  entered  the  flames  in  the  presence  of  men and gods, and Agni, god of fire, led her forth and placed her in Rama’s arms unhurt. Rama then  returned,  taking  with  him  his  chief  allies  to  Ayodhya.  Re‐united  with  his  three  brothers,  he  was  solemnly  crowned  and  began  a  glorious  reign,  Lakshmana  being  associated  with  him  in  the  government. The sixth section of the Ramayana here concludes; the remainder of the story is told in  the  Uttara‐kanda,  a  subsequent  addition.  The  treatment  which  Sita  received  in  captivity  was  better  than might have been expected at the hands of a Rakshasa. She had asserted and proved her purity,  and  Rama  believed  her;  but  jealous  thoughts  would  cross  his  sensitive  mind,  and  when  his  subjects  blamed him for taking back his wife, he resolved, although she was pregnant, to send her to spend the  rest of her life at  the hermitage of  Valmiki. There she was delivered of  her twin  sons Kusa and Lava,  who bore upon their persons the marks of their high paternity. When they were about fifteen years old  they wandered accidentally to Ayodhya and were recognised by their father, who acknowledged them,  and recalled Sita to attest her innocence. She returned, and in a public assembly declared her purity,  and called upon the earth to verify her words. It did so. The ground opened and received “the daughter  of the furrow,” and Rama lost his beloved and only wife. Unable to endure life without her, he resolved  to follow, and the gods favoured his determination. Time appeared to him in the form of an ascetic and  told  him  that  he  must  stay  on  earth  or  ascend  to  heaven  and  rule  over  the  gods.  Lakshmana  with  devoted fraternal affection endeavoured to save his brother from what he deemed the baleful visit of  Time. He incurred a sentence of death for his interference, and was conveyed bodily to Indra’s heaven.  Rama with great state and ceremony went to the river Sarayu, and walking into the water was hailed by  Brahma’s voice of welcome from heaven, and entered “into the glory of Vishnu.”       The  conclusion  of  the  story  is  told  in  the  version  of  the  Ramayana  used  by  Mr.  Wheeler  differs  materially. It represents that Sita remained in exile until her sons were fifteen or sixteen years of age.  Rama had resolved upon performing the Aswa‐medha sacrifice; the horse was turned loose, and Satru‐ ghna followed it with an army. Kusa and Lava took the horse and defeated and wounded Satru‐ghna.  Rama then sent Lakshmana to recover the horse, but he was defeated and left for dead. Next Bharata  was  sent  with  Hanuman,  but  they  were  also  defeated.  Rama  then  sent  out  himself  to  repair  his  reverses.  When  the  father  and  sons  came  into  each  other’s  presence,  nature  spoke  out,  and  Rama  acknowledged  his  sons.  Sita  also,  after  receiving  an  admonition  from  Valmiki,  agreed  to  forgive  her  husband.  They  returned  to  Ayodhya.  Rama  performed  the  Aswa‐medha,  and  they  passed  the  remainder of their lives in peace and joy.       The incidents of the first six kandas of the Ramayana supply the plot of Bhava‐bhuti’s drama Maha‐ vira‐charita. The Uttara‐khanda is the basis of his Uttara‐rama‐charita. This describes Rama’s jealousy,  the  banishment  of  Sita,  and  the  birth  of  her  sons;  but  the  subsequent  action  is  more  human  and  affecting than in the poem. Rama repents of his unjust treatment of his wife, and goes forth to seek  her. The course of his wanderings is depicted with great poetic beauty, and his meeting with his sons  and his reconciliation with Sita are described with exquisite pathos and tenderness. The drama closes  when  “All  conspires  to  make  their  happiness  complete.”The  worship  of  Rama  still  holds  its  ground,  particularly  in  Oude  an  Bihar,  and  he  has  numerous  worshippers.  “It  is  noteworthy,”  says  Professor  Williams,  “that  the  Rama  legends  have  always  retained  their  purity,  and,  unlike  those  of  Brahma, 

 

219

Mythology and Folklore  
Krishna,  Siva,  and  Durga,  have  never  been  mixed  up  with  indecencies  and  licentiousness.  In  fact,  the  worship  of  Rama  has  never  degenerated  to  the  same  extent  as  that  of some  of  these  other  deities.”  This  is  true;  but  it  may  be  observed  that  Rama  and  his  wife  were  pure;  there  was  nothing  in  their  characters  suggestive  of  license;  and  if  “the  husband  of  one  wife”  and  the  devoted  and  affectionate  wife  had  come  to  be  associated  with  impure  ideas,  they  must  have  lost  all  that  gave  them  a  title  to  veneration. The name of Rama, as “Ram! Ram!’ is a common form of salutation.    Rama‐Giri In.  ‘The hill of Rama.’ It stands a short distance north of Nagpur.  Rama‐Setu In. ‘Rama’s bridge,’ constructed for him by his general, Nala, son of Viswa‐karma, at the time of his  invasion of Ceylon. This name is given to the line  of rocks in the channel between the continent and  Ceylon, called in maps “Adam’s bridge.”   Ramatapaniyopanishad  In.  An  Upanishad  of  the  Atharva‐veda,  in  which  Rama  is  worshipped  as  the  supreme god and the sage Yajnawalkya in his glorifier. It has been printed and translated by Weber in  his Indische Studien, vol. ix.  Ramayana In. ‘The Adventures of Rama.’ The oldest of the Sanskrit epic poems, written by the sage Valmiki. It  is supposed to have been composed about five centuries B.C., and to have received its present form a  century  or  two  later.  The  MSS.  Of  the  Ramayana  vary  greatly.  There  are  two  well‐known  distinct  recensions, the Northern and the  Bengal. The Northern is the older and the purer; the additions and  alterations  in  that  of  Bengal  are  so  numerous  that  it  is  not  trustworthy,  and  has  even  been  called  “spurious.”  Later  researches  have  shown  that  the  variations  in  MSS.  Found  in  different  parts  of  India  are  so  diverse  that  the  versions  can  hardly  be  classed  in  a  certain  number  of  different  recensions.  Unfortunately the inferior edition is the one best known to Europeans. Carey and Marshman translated  two books of it, and Signor Gorresio has given an Italian translation of the whole. Schlegel published a  Latin  translation  of  the  first  book  of  the  Northern  recension.  The  full  texts  of  both  these  recensions  have  been  printed,  and  Mr.  Wheeler  has  given  an  epitome  of  the  whole  work  after  the  Bengal  recension. There is also a poetical version by Griffiths.       Besides the ancient Ramayana, there is another popular work of comparative modern times called  the Adhyatma Ramayana. The authorship of it is ascribed to Vyasa, but it is generally considered to be a  part  of  the  Brahmanda  Purana.  It  is  a  sort  of  spiritualised  version  of  the  poem,  in  which  Rama  is  depicted as a saviour and deliverer, as a god rather than a man. It is divided into seven books, which  bear the same names as those of the original poem, but it is not so long.      The Ramayana celebrates the life and exploits of Rama (Rama‐chandra), the loves of Rama and his  wife Sita, the rape of the latter by Ravana, the demon king of Ceylon, the war carried on by Rama and  his monkey allies against Ravana, ending in the destruction of the demon and the rescue of Sita, the  restoration of Rama to the throne of Ayodhya, his jealousy and banishment of Sita, her residence at the  hermitage of Valmiki, the birth of her twin sons Kusa and Lava, the father’s discovery and recognition of  his children, the recall of Sita, the attestation of her innocence, her death, Rama’s resolution to follow  her, and his translation to heaven.     The Ramayana is divided into seven kandas or sections, and contains about 50,000 lines. The last of  the seven sections is probably of later date than the rest of the work. ‐‐‐‐  1. Bala‐kanda The boyhood of Rama.   2.  Ayodhya‐kanda  The  scenes  at  Ayodhya,  and  the  banishment  of  Rama  by  his  father,  King  Dasa‐ratha.  

 

 

220

Mythology and Folklore  
3. Aranya‐kanda ‘Forest section.’ Rama’s life in the forest, and the rape of Sita by Ravana.   4. Kishkindhya‐kanda Rama’s residence at Kishkindhya the capital of his monkey ally, King Su‐ griva.   5.  Sundara‐kanda  ‘Beautiful  section.’  The  marvellous  passage  of  the  straits  by  Rama  and  his  allies and their arrival in Ceylon.   6.  Yuddha‐kanda  ‘War  section.’  The  war  with  Ravana,  his  defeat  and  death,  the  recovery  of  Sita, the return to Ayodhya and the coronation of Rama. This is sometimes called the Lanka to  Ceylon Kanda.   7. Uttara‐kanda ‘Later section.’ Rama’s life in Ayodhya, his banishment of Sita, the birth of his  two sons, his recognition of them and of the innocence of his wife, their reunion, her death,  and his translation to heaven.     The writer or the compilers of the Ramayana had a high estimate of its value, and it is  still held in very great veneration. A verse in the introduction says, “He who reads and repeats this  holy  life‐giving  Ramayana  is  liberated  from  all  his  sins  and  exalted  with  all  his  posterity  to  the  highest heaven;” and in the second chapter Brahma is made to say, “As long as the mountains and  rivers shall continue on the surface of the earth, so long shall the story of the Ramayana be current  in the world.”   Rambha In.  An Apsaras or nymph produced at the churning of the ocean, and popularly the type of female  beauty. She was sent by Indra to seduce Viswamitra, but was cursed by that sage to become a stone,  and remain so for a thousand year. According to the Ramayana, she was seen by Ravana when he went  to Kailasa, and he was so smitten by her charms that he ravished her, although she told him that she  was the wife of Nala‐kuvara, son of his brother Kuvera.    Rameswara  In.    ‘Lord  of  Rama.’  Name  of  one  of  the  twelve  great  Lingas  set  up,  as  is  said,  by  Rama  at  Rameswaram  or  Ramisseram,  which  is  a  celebrated  place  of  pilgrimage,  and  contains  a  most  magnificent temple.    Rammaukinn N. One possessed by superhuman strength through the practice of the northern martial arts.  Ramopakhyana In.  ‘The story of Rama,’ as told in the Vana‐parva of the Maha‐bharata. It relates many, but  far from all, of the incidents celebrated in the Ramayana; it makes no mention of Valmiki, the author of  that poem, and it represents Rama as a human being and a great hero, but not a deity.    Ran N. "The Ravager"; Vana‐Goddess; wife of Aegir; mother of the 9 undines or "daughers of the waves"; She  is the Sea Goddess and Goddess of death for those who perish at sea. She collects drowned people in  her net. She is unpredictable and malicious.  Rana‐neidda N. She brings spring renewal and grass for the reindeer.  Rándgrídr N. "Counsel of Peace" or "Shield of Peace". A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla  Rani  N.  The  snout  of  a  boar.  See  Svínfylking:  Norse  boar‐cult  warriors  who  fought  in  wedge‐formation  with  two champions, 'the rani' (snout) to the fore.  Rantideva In.  A pious and benevolent king of the Lunar race, sixth in descent from Bharata. He is mentioned  in the Maha‐bharata and Puranas as being enormously rich, very religious, and charitable and profuse  in his sacrifices. The former authority says that he had 200,000 cooks, that he had 2000 head of cattle 

221

Mythology and Folklore  
an as many other animals slaughtered daily for use in his kitchen, and that he fed innumerable beggars  daily with beef.    Ratatosk  N.  "Teeth  That  Find".  The  squirrel  that  lives  in  Yggdrasil;  He  runs  up  and  down  the  trunk  carrying  insults between the dragon Nidhogg and the eagle that dwells in the top branches.  Rati In. ‘Love, desire.’ The Venus of the Hindus, the goddess of sexual pleasures, wife of Kama the god of love,  and  daughter  of  Daksha.  She  is  also  called  Reva,  Kami,  Priti,  Kama‐patni,  ‘wife  of  Kama,’  Kama‐kala,  ‘part of Kama;’ Kama‐priya, ‘beloved of Kama;’ Raga‐lata, ‘vine of love;’ Mayavati, ‘deceiver;’ Kelikila,  ‘wanton;’ Subhangi, ‘fair‐limbed.’    Ratnavali In. ‘The necklace.’ A drama ascribed to a king of Kashmir named Sri Harsha Deva. The subject of the  play is the loves of Udayana or Vatsa, prince of Kausambi, and Vasava‐datta, princess of Ujjayini. It was  written between 1113 and 1125 A. D., and has been translated by Wilson. There are several editions of  the text.     Rauchya In. The thirteenth Manu. See Manu.    Raudra In. A descendant of Rudra. A name of Karttikeya, the god of war.     Ravana.In. The demon king of Lanka or Ceylon, from which he expelled his half‐brother Kuvera. He was son of  Visravas  by  his  wife  Nikasha,  daughter  of  the  Rakshasa  Su‐mali.  He  was  half‐brother  of  Kuvera,  and  grandson of the Rishi Pulastya; and as Kuvera is king of the Yakshas, Ravana is king of the demons called  Rakshasas.  Pulastya  is  said  to  be  the  pro  genitor,  not  only  of  Ravana,  but  of  the  whole  race  of  Rakshasas.  By  penance  and  devotion  to  Brahma,  Ravana  was  made  invulnerable  against  gods  and  demons,  but  he  was  doomed  to  die  through  a  woman.  He  was  also  enabled  to  assume  any  form  he  pleased. All Rakshasas are malignant and terrible, but Ravana as their chief attained the utmost degree  of wickedness, and was a very incarnation of evil He is described in the Ramayana as having "ten heads  (hence  his  names  Dasanana,  Dasa‐kantha,  and  Pankti‐griva),  twenty  arms,  and  copper‐coloured  eyes,  and bright teeth like the young moon. His form was as a thick cloud or a mountain, or the god of death  with open mouth. He had all the marks of royalty, but his body bore the impress of wounds inflicted by  all the divine arms in his warfare with the gods. It was scarred by the thunderbolt of Indra, by the tusks  of Indra's elephant Airavata, and by the discus of Vishnu. His strength was so great that he could agitate  the  seas  and  split the  tops  of  mountains.  He  was  a  breaker  of  all  laws  and  a  ravisher  of  other  men's  wives.  ...Tall  as  a  mountain  peak,  he  stopped  with  his  arms  the  sun  and  moon  in  their  course,  and  prevented  their  rising."  The  terror  he  inspires  is  such  that  where  he  is  "the  sun  does  not  give  out its  heat,  the  winds  do  not  blow,  and  the  ocean  becomes  motionless."  His  evil  deeds  cried  aloud  for  vengeance, and the cry reached hen Yen. Vishnu declared that, as Ravana had been too proud to seek  protection against men and beasts, he should fall under their attacks, so Vishnu became incarnate as  Rama‐chandra for the express purpose of destroying Ravana, and vast numbers of monkeys and bears  were  created  to  aid  in  the  enterprise.  Rama's  wars  against  the  Rakshasas  inflicted  such  losses  upon  them  as  greatly  to  incense  Ravana.  Burning  with  rage,  and  excited  by  a  passion  for  Sita,  the  wife  of  Rama,  he  left  his  island  abode,  repaired  to  Rama's  dwelling,  assumed  the  appearance  of  a  religious  mendicant, and carried off Sita to Lanka. Ravana urged Sita to become his wife, and threatened to kill  and eat her if she refused. Sita persistently resisted, and was saved from death by the interposition of  one of Ravana's wives. Rama called to his assistance his allies Su‐griva and Hanuman, with their hosts of  monkeys and bears. They built Rama's bridge, by which they passed over into Lanka, and after many  battles  and  wholesale  slaughter  Ravana  was  brought  to  bay  at  the  city  of  Lanka.  Rama  and  Ravana  fought together on equal terms for a long while, victory sometimes inclining to one sometimes to the  other. Rama with a sharp arrow cut off one of Ravana's heads, “but no sooner did the head fall on the  ground  than  another  sprang  up  in  its  room.”Rama  then  took  an  arrow  which  had  been  made  by 

222

Mythology and Folklore  
Brahma, and discharged it at his foe. It entered his breast, came out of his back, went to the ocean, and  then  returned  clean  to  the  quiver  of  Rama.  "Ravana  fell  to  the  ground  and  expired,  and  the  gods  Bounded celestial music in the heavens, and assembled in the sky and praised Rama as Vishnu, in that  he had slain that Ravana who would otherwise have caused their destruction." Ravana, though he was  chief among  Rakshasas, was a Brahman on his father's side; he was well versed in Sanskrit, used the  Vedic ritual, and his body was burnt with Brahmanical rites. There is a story that Ravana made each of  the gods perform some menial office in his household: thus Agni was his cook, Varuna supplied water,  Kuvera furnished money, Vayu swept the house, &c. The Vishnu Purana relates that Ravana, "elevated  with wine, came on his tour of triumph to the city of Mahishmati, but there he was taken prisoner by  King Karta‐virya, and confined like a beast in a corner of his capital " The same authority states that, in  another birth, Ravana was Sisu‐pala. Ravana's chief wife was Mandodari, but he had many others, and  they were burnt at hip obsequies. His sons were Megha‐nada, also called Indra‐jit, Ravani, and Aksha;  Tri‐sikha or Tri‐siras, Devantaka, Narantaka and Atikaya. See Nandisa.  Ravi In. The Sun. See Surya.  Reading N. The part of a ritual in which a mythic‐poetic text is recited in order to place the gathering into a  mythic time/space, to engage in the mythic flow of timelessness; "Reading" the runes involves knowing  the runes and their correspondences, to ensure that what was being cut, be it for secular or magical  purposes,  was  appropriate.  There  is  also  a  close  correspondence  to  the  modern  sense  of  "psychic  reading", namely consulting for divination.  Rede N. Counsel, advice; the part of a ritual in which the purpose of the working is stated  Regin N. Dwarf Regin is the son of Hreidmar and brother to Otter and Fafni. He killed his father, and later the  dragon Fafnir, with the help of Sigurdr Fafnisbari and his sword Gram, to get the Nibelunggold.  Reginleif N. "Heritage of the Gods". A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla  Reginnaglar N.  Sacred nails hammered into the main pillars of a wooden temple.   Renuka In. Daughter of King Prasenajit or Renu, wife of Jamad‐agni, and mother of Parasu‐rama. A sight of the  connubial  endearments  of  King  Chitra‐ratha  and  his  wife  inspired  her  with  impure  thoughts,  and  her  husband, perceiving that she had “fallen from perfection,” desired her sons to kill her. Ru‐manvat, Su‐ shena, and Vasu, the three seniors, declined, and their father cursed them so that they became idiots.  Parasu‐  rama,  the  fourth  son,  cut  off  her  head,  which  act  so  gratified  his  father  that  Jamad‐agni  promised him whatever blessings he de‐ sired Among other things, Parasu‐rama asked that his mother  might be brought back to life in ignorance of her death and in perfect purity. He also desired that his  brothers might be restored to their senses. All this Jamad‐agni bestowed She was also called Konkana.  Reva In.  The Narmada River.  Reva In.  Wife of Karna; A name of Rati.  Revanta In. A son of Surya and Sanjna. Ire is chief of the Guhyakas, and is also called Haya‐vahana.  Revatl In. Daughter of King Raivata and wife of Bala‐rama. She was so beautiful that her father, thinking no  one  upon  earth  worthy  of  her,  repaired  to  the  god  Brahma  to  consult  him  about  a  husband  Brahma  delivered a long discourse on the glories of Vishnu, and directed Raivata to proceed to Dwaraka, where  a portion of Vishnu was incarnate in the person of Bala‐rama. Ages had elapsed while Raivata was in  heaven  without  his  knowledge.  When  he  returned  to  earth,  "he  found  the  race  of  men  dwindled  in  stature, reduced in vigour, and enfeebled in intellect." He went to Bala‐rama and gave him Revati, but 

223

Mythology and Folklore  
that  hero,  "beholding  the  damsel  of  excessively  lofty  height,  he  shortened  her  with  the  end  of  his  ploughshare, and she became his wife." She had two sons. Revati is said to have taken part with her  husband in his drinking bouts.  Reyn til Runa N. A Rune‐Gild slogan. It is an Old Norse way of saying something pretty close to "study runes  deeply". Rune‐Gild members often sign off with "RTR" or "Reyn til Runa."  Rhadamanthus  Gk.  A  wise  king,  the  son  of  Zeus  and  Europa  and  was  raised  by  Asterion.;  his  brothers  were  Sarpedon and Minos; he had two sons, Gortys and Erythrus; he was made one of the three judges of  the dead in the underworld after his death  Rhea  Gk.  The  wife  of  Cronus  who  made  it  a  practice  to  swallow  their  children.;  She  tricked  Cronus  into  swallowing a rock, saving her son Zeus.  Rhesus Gk. A Thracian king who fought on the side of Trojans in the Iliad; a son of king Eïoneus in Thrace, and  an ally of the Trojans in their war with the Greeks he possessed horses white as snow and swift as the  wind, which were carried off by night by Odysseus and Diomedes, the latter of whom murdered Rhesus  himself in his sleep; also described as a son Euterpe one of the muses and the river god Strymon, and  he  was  raised  by  fountain  nymphs;  was  killed  in  his  tent,  and  his  famous  steeds  were  stolen  by  Diomedes and Odysseus  Rhoecus Gk. He attempted to rape Atalanta along with Hylaeus; he was killed by Atalanta with a single arrow  Rhoetus Gk. One of the giants who was slain by Bacchus; usually called Eurytus  Ribhu In. 'Clever, skilful.' An epithet used for Indra, Agni, and the Adityas. In the Puranic mythology, Ribhu is a  "Son of the Supreme Brahma, who, from his innate disposition, was of a holy character and acquainted  with  true  wisdom."  His  pupil  was  Nidagha,  a  son  of  Pulastya,  and  he  took  especial  interest  in  his  instruction,  returning  to  him  after  two  intervals  of  a  thousand  years"  to  instruct  him  further  in  true  wisdom."  The  Vishnu  Purana,  "originally  composed  by  the  Rishi  (Narayana),  was  communicated  by  Brahma to Ribhu." He was one of the four Kumaras (q.v.)  Ribhukshan In. The first of the three Ribhus. In the plural, the three Ribhus.  Ribhus  In.    Three  sons  of  Su‐dhanwan,  a  descendant  of  An‐giras,  severally  named  Ribhu,  Vibhu,  and  Vaja.  Through  their  assiduous  performance  of  good  works  they  obtained  divinity,  exercised  superhuman  powers, and became entitled to receive praise and adoration. They are supposed to dwell in the solar  sphere, and there is an indistinct identification of them with the rays of the sun; but, whether typical or  not,  they  prove  the  admission,  at  an  early  date,  of  the  doctrine  that  men  might  become  divinities.‐  Wilson.  They  are  celebrated  in  the  Rig‐veda  as  skilful  workmen,  who  fashioned  Indra's  chariot  and  horses, and made their parents young again. By command of the gods, and with a promise of exaltation  to  divine  honours,  they  made  a  single  new  sacrificial  cup  into  four.  They  are  also  spoken  of  as  supporters of the sky.  Richika In.  A Rishi descended from  Bhrigu and husband of Satyavati, son of Urva and father of Jamad‐agni.  (See  Viswamitra.)  In  the  Maha‐bharata  and  Vishnu  Purana  it  is  related  that  Richika  was  an  old  man  when he demanded in marriage Satyavati, the daughter of Gadhi, king of Kanya‐kubja. Unwilling to give  her to so old a man, Gadhi demanded of him 1000 white horses, each of them having one black ear.  Richika  obtained  these  from  the  god  Varuna,  and  so  gained  his  wife.  According  to  the  Ramayana,  he  sold his son Sunah‐sephas to be a sacrifice.  Riddhi In.  'Prosperity.' The wife of Kubera, god of wealth. The name is also used for Parvati, the wife of Siva. 

224

Mythology and Folklore  
Rig N. "God of Society's Order". A by‐name of Heimdall  Rig‐Veda In.  See Veda.  Rig‐veda One, which is considered to belong to the Sakhala‐sakha of this Veda, and is ascribed to Saunaka. It  has been edited and translated into German by Max Muller, and into French by M. Regnier.   Rig‐Vidhana In.  Writings which treat of the mystic and magic efficacy of the recitation of hymns of the Rig‐ veda, or even of single verses. Some of them are attributed to Saunaka, but probably belong only to the  time of the Puranas. ‐ Weber.  Rime Giants N. Frost Jotuns from the first era after the creation of the world.  Rimfaxi,  Hrimfaxi  N.  "Frosty  Mane".  Natt's  horse  which  runs  over  the  sky  every  day  and  dribbles  the  morningdew in the grass  Rimkalk N. "Crystal Cup". A cup used for drinking mead. Gerd gave Freyr's servant Skirnir Rimkalk mead and  the same was served to the Æsirs in Aegir's hall.  Rimstock N. Danish wooden almanac; See Primstave  Rind, Rinda N. Rime‐Giantess; Primal goddess of the frozen earth; Mother of Vali, by Odin  Ringhornir N. Ringhornir is Balder's funeral ship. When he was buried he and his wife, Nanna, who died of a  broken heart, were put in the ship and it was set on fire and pushed out in the ocean.  Ring‐oath N. Baugeidhr; The holiest of oaths, represented by the arm‐ring, which was the holiest symbol of  troth; According to Eyrbyggja saga, the oath‐ring always lay on the harrow, and had to be made of at  least  an  ounce  of  precious  metal.  The  godhi  was  expected  to  wear  it  on  his  arm  at  the  Thing  (law‐ meeting) and at other times when he called upon the might of the gods or touched them most closely  Ris, Risi N. Old Norse the word risi meant a true Giant of great size, capable of intermarrying with humans;  they  were  usually  beautiful  and  good.  The  jotnar,  singular  jötunn,  had  great  strength  and  age.  Etins  were  usually  friendly  with  the  Gods.  The  thursar,  singular  Thurs,  were  particularly  antagonistic,  destructive, and stupid.   Rishabh In. a Son of Nabhi and Meru, and father of a hundred sons, the eldest of whom was Bharata. He gave  his  kingdom  to  his  son  and  retired  to  a  hermitage,  where  he  led  a  life  of  such  severe  austerity  and  abstinence, that he became I mere  “collection of skin and fibres, and went the way of all flesh.” The  Bhagavata purana speaks of his wanderings in the western part of the Peninsula, and connects him with  the establishment of the Jain religion in those parts. The name of the first Jain Tirthakara or saint was  Rishabha.  Rishi In.  An inspired poet or sage. The inspired persons to whom the hymns of the Vedas were revealed and  under whose names they stand. “The seven Rishis” (saptarshi), or the Praja‐patis, “the mind‐born sons”  of  Brahma,  are  often  referred  to.  In  the  Satapatha  Brahmana  their  names  are  given  as  Gotama,  Bharadwaja,  Viswamitra,  Jamad‐agni,  Vasishtha,  Kasyapa,  and  Atri  The  Maha‐bharata  gives  them  as  Marichi, Atri, Angiras, Pulaha, Kratu, Pulastya, and Vasishtha. The Vayu Purana adds Bhrigu to this. list,  making eight, although it still calls them "seven." The Vishnu Purina, more consistently, adds Bhrigu and  Daksha, and calls them the nine Brahmarshis (Brahma‐rishis). The names of Gautama, Kanwa, Valmiki,  Vyasa,  Manu,  and  Vibhandaka  are  also  enumerated  among  the  great  Rishis  by  different  authorities.  Besides these great Rishis there are many other Rishis. The seven Rishis are represented in the sky by 

225

Mythology and Folklore  
the seven stars of the Great Bear, and as such are called Riksha and Chitra‐sikhandinas, ‘having bright  crests.’  Rishi‐Brahmana In.  An old Anukramani, or Index of the Sama‐veda.  Rishya‐Muka In.   A mountain in the Dakhin, near the  source of the Pampa river and the lake Pampa.  Rama  abode there for a time with the monkeys.  Rishya‐Sringa In.  'The deer‐horned.' A hermit, the son of Vibhandaka, descended from Kasyapa. According to  the Ramayana and Maha‐bharata he was born of a doe and had a small horn on his forehead. He was  brought  up  in  the  forest  by  his  father,  and  saw  no  other  human  being  till  he  was  verging  upon  manhood. There was great drought in the country of Anga, and the king, Lomapada, was advised by his  Brahmans to send for the youth Rishya‐sringa, who should marry his daughter Santa, and be the means  of obtaining rain. A number of fair damsela were sent to bring him. He accompanied them back to their  city, the desired rain fell, and he married Santa. This Santa was the adopted daughter of Lomapada; her  real father was Dasa‐ratha, and it was Rishya‐sringa who performed that sacrifice for Dasa‐ratha which  brought about the birth of Rama.  Rist, Hrist N. "Spear Thrower'’; The Valkyrie Rist is one of Odin's two servants. Her task is to serve the men in  Valhalla the never‐ceasing four kinds of mead that comes from the goat Heidrun.  Ristir, Rister N. Carving‐tool, used for runes; A kind of knife. One "rists" i.e. carves the runes.  Ritu‐Parna In.  A king of Ayodhya, and son of Sarva‐kama, into whose service Nala entered after he had lost his  kingdom. He was “skilled profoundly in dice.”  Ritu‐Sanhara In.  ‘The round of the seasons.’ A poem attributed to Ka1i‐dasa. This poem was published by Sir  W. Jones, and was the first Sanskrit work ever printed. There are other editions. It has been translated  into Latin by Bohlen.   Rivers  of  the  Nine  Worlds  N.  The  following  are  the  rivers  of  the  Nine  World:  Sid,  Vid,  Sekin,  Ekin,  Svol,  Gunnthro, Fiorm, Fimbulthul, Gipul, Gopul, Gomul, Geirvimul, Thyn, Vin, Tholl, Boll, Grad, Gunnthrain,  Nyt, Not, Nonn, Hronn, Vina, Veg, Svinn, Thiodnuma.  Rlbhavas In.  See Ribhus.  Robigo  Rom. Goddess of corn.  Robigus Rom. God who protected corn from diseases; His festival, the Robigalia, took place on April 25.  Rock‐cut  tomb  Eg.  Method  of  excavating  tombs  that  begun  during  the  Middle  Kingdom;  The  burials  in  the  Valley of the Kings are perhaps the best known Rock‐cut tombs.   Rohinl In.  1. Daughter of Kasyapa and Surabhi, and mother of horned cattle, including Kama‐dhenu, the cow  which grants desires. 2. Daughter of Daksha and fourth of the lunar asterisms, the favourite wife of the  moon.  3.  One  of  the  wives  of  Vasu‐deva,  the  father  of  Krishna  and  mother  of  Bala‐rama.  She  was  burned  with  her  husband's  corpse  at  Dwaraka.  4.  Krishna  himself  also  had  a  wife  so  called,  and  the  name is common.    Rohita In.  ‘Red.’ A red horse; a horse of the sun or of fire. 1. A deity celebrated in the Atharva‐veda, probably  & form of fire or the sun. 2. Son of King Haris‐chandra. He is also called Rohitaswa. The fort of Rohtas is  said to derive its name from him. See Haris‐chandra.    

226

Mythology and Folklore  
Roma Rom. Personified Goddess of the City of Rome.  Roma‐Harshana In.  See Loma‐harshana.    Roskva N. "The Quick"; Roskva is a human girl, but she lives in Bilskirnir with Thor and Sif. Tjalfi is her brother  and Groa and Egil Skytten are her parents.  Róta N. "She Who Causes Turmoil"; Gunnr and Róta, and the youngest Norn, called Skuld, ride to choose who  shall be slain and to govern the killings.  Rown N. A verb meaning "to whisper sacred things (that is, runes)". It is the verb‐form of rune.  Rudra In.  ‘A howler or roarer; terrible.’ In the Vedas Rudra has many attributes and many names. He is the  howling terrible god, the god of storms, the father of the Rudras or Maruts, and is sometimes identified  with  the  god  of  fire.  On  the  one  hand  he  is  a  destructive  deity  who  brings  diseases  upon  men  and  cattle, and upon the other he is a beneficent deity supposed to have a healing influence. These are the  germs  which  afterwards  developed  into  the  god  Siva.  It  is  worthy  of  note  that  Rudra  is  first  called  Maha‐deva in the White Yajur‐veda. As applied to the god Siva, the name of Rudra generally designates  him  in  his  destructive  character.  In  the  Brihad‐aranyaka  Upanishad  the  Rudras  are  "ten  vital  breaths  (prana) with the heart (manas) as eleventh." In the Vishnu purana the god Rudra is said to have sprung  from the forehead of Brahma, and at the command of that god to have separated his nature into male  and female, then to have multiplied each of these into eleven persons, some of which were white and  gentle others black and furious. Elsewhere it is said that the eleven Rudras were sons of Kasyapa and  Surabhi, and in another chapter of the same Purana it is represented that Brahma desired to create a  son, and that Rudra came into existence as a youth. He wept and asked for a name. Brahma gave him  the  name  of  Rudra;  but  he  wept  seven  times  more,  and  so  he  obtained  seven  other  names:  Bhava,  Sarva, Isana, Pasupati, Bhima, Ugra, and Maha‐deva. Other of the Puranas agree in this nomenclature.  These names are sometimes used for Rudra or Siva himself, and at others for the seven manifestations  of him, sometimes called his sons. The names of the eleven Rudras vary considerably in different books.    Rudra‐Savarna In.  The twelfth Manu. See Manu.   Rukmin  In.    A  son  of  King  Bhishmaka  and  king  of  Vidharbha,  who  offered  his  services  to  the  Pandavas  and  Kauravas in turn, but was rejected by both on account of his extravagant boastings and pretensions. He  was brother of Rukmini, with whom Krishna eloped. Rukmin pursued the fugitives and overtook them,  but his army was defeated by Krishna, and he owed his life to the entreaties of his sister. He founded  the city of Bhoja‐kata, and was eventually killed by Bala‐rama.     Rukmini In.  Daughter of Bhishmaka, king of Vidarbha. According to the Hari‐vansa she was sought in marriage  by Krishna, with whom she fell in love. But her brother Rukmin was a friend of Kansa, whom Krishna  had  killed,  He  therefore  opposed  him  and  thwarted  the  match.  Rukmini  was  then  betrothed  to  Sisu‐ pala, king of Chedi, but on her wedding day, as she was going to the temple, “Krishna saw her, took her  by the hand, and carried her away in his chariot.” They were pursued by her intended husband and by  her brother Rukmin, but Krishna defeated them both, and took her safe to Dwaraka, where he married  her. She was his principal wife and bore him a son, Pradyumna (q. v.). By him also she had nine other  sons and one daughter. These other sons were Charu‐deshna, Su‐deshna, Charu‐deha, Su‐shena, Charu‐ gupta,  Bhadra‐charu,  Charu‐vinda,  Su‐charu,  and  the  very  mighty  Charu;  also  one  daughter,  “Charu‐ mati.” At Krishna's death she and seven other of his wives immolated themselves on his funeral pile.  Ruma In.  Wife of the monkey king Su‐griva.  Rumina Rom. Goddess of nursing mothers. 

227

Mythology and Folklore  
Rune laying N. An operation of runic divination in which the lots are not thrown, but rather laid in their steads  of meaning.  Rune N. The original meaning of the word "rune" in most Germanic languages is "secret" or "mystery". A rune  is not simply a letter or character in an alphabet‐‐it is that and much more. Every rune is made up of  three elements or aspects: 1) a sound (song); 2) a stave (shape); 3) a rune (hidden lore). he sound or  phonetic value of the rune is its vibratory quality in the air, in space. This is the magical‐creative quality  that is inherent in speech. This is a cosmic principle with which runesters work when they sing or speak  the runes in acts of Galdr. The shape of the rune‐stave is the spatial or visible quality of the rune. This  aspect can be the most deceptive because we put so much emphasis on what we see. The visible staves  (characters) are only reflections of the actual runes, which remain forever hidden from our five senses,  They exist in a realm beyond the three dimensions and are only approximated in the two‐dimentional  diagrams we can see. The runes themselves are complex and multifaceted and fit within a web‐work  which only further complicates the picture. No one definition of a rune is possible, for each rune is in  and  of  itself  infinite  and  without  bounds.  In  practical  terms  the  rune  is  the  sum  total  of  lore  and  information on the stave and the sound. The song is the vibration, the stave is the image, and the rune  is the lore needed to activate the magic. Thorsson, Northern Magic.  Runestave N. The physical shape of a runic character, or the physical object onto which the shape is carved  (especially when carved in wood.  Rungne, Rungnir, Hrungnir N. The strongest Giant in Jotunheim. His head is made of stone and so is also his  pentagram‐shaped heart. He is very boastful. Thor killed him in a fight.  Rym N. "Old and Powerless" The Storm Giant who controls the rudder on Naglfar, the ship that Hel, the Death  Goddess, built using dead people's nails.  Rÿnstr N. "One most skilled in runes"; General term for one involved in deep‐level rune skill.   


Sa Eg. The Sa was a symbol of protection; Its origins are uncertain, but it is speculated that it represents either  a rolled up herdsman's shelter or a papyrus life‐preserver used by ancient Egyptian boaters; Either way  it is clearly a symbol of protection; From early times the Sa plays an important part in jewelry design; It  is  often  used  in  conjunction  with  symbols,  particularly  the  ankh,  was  and  djed  signs;  We  often  find  Taurt, the hippopotamus goddess of childbirth, resting her paw on a standing Sa sign.   Sabalaswas In.  Sons of Daksha, one thousand in number, brought forth after the loss of the Haryaswas. Like  their  predecessors,  they  were  dissuaded  by  Narada  from  begetting  off‐spring,  and  “scattered  themselves through the regions” never to return.  Sachi In.  Wife of Indra. See Indrani.   Sadhyas  In. A Gana or class of inferior deities; the personified rites and prayers of the Vedas who dwell with  the gods or in the intermediate region between heaven and earth. Their number is twelve according to  one authority, and seven teen according to another, and the Puranas make them sons of Dharma and  Sadhya, daughter of Daksha.   

228

Mythology and Folklore  
Sæhrimnir N. "The Sea Striped". Each evening the boar Sæhrimnir is slaughtered, cut up, and cooked, to serve  the warriors in Valhalla, but every morning he's alive and healthy again.  Saff tomb Eg. An Arabic word that means "row", it describes the rock‐cut tombs of the early 11th Dynasty that  consisted of a row of openings on the hillside.  Sága N. "Seeress". Daughter or consort of Odin, one of the Asynjor (female Æsir); She is invoked for recall and  memory. She resides by the stream of time and events. She was an attendant to Frigg. Some consider  her just an aspect of Frigg. The sagas or songs of history are named for her. She resides by the stream  of  time  and  events.  She  lived  in  Sokvabek,  a  crystal  hall,  and  drank  daily  from  the  river  of  time  with  Odin. Saga was once called Bil. She is invoked for recall and memory. The sagas or songs of history are  named for her. At Ragnarok, she is the one who will see the flames from the elves territory; The word  saga "history" and "story". The fundamental meaning of saga is "a narrative". The sagas of the medieval  Nordic world, principally preserved in manuscripts written in Iceland, are the written narratives of this  civilization. Sagas most nearly approximate our historical novels ‐ but are often leavened with myth and  magic.  Sagara In.  A king of Ayodhya, of the Solar race, and son of King Bahu, who was driven out of his dominions by  the Haihayas. Bahu took refuge in the forest with his wives. Sagara's mother was then pregnant, and a  rival wife, wing jealous, gave her a drug to prevent her delivery. This poison confined the child is the  womb for seven years, and in the interim Bahu died. The pregnant wife wished to ascend his pyre, but  the sage Aurva forbad her, predicting that she would give birth to a valiant universal monarch. "When  the child was born, Aurva gave him the name of Sagara (sa, ‘with,’ and gara, ‘poison’). The child grew  up, and having heard his father's history, he vowed that he would exterminate the Haihayas and the  other  barbarians,  and  recover  his  ancestral  kingdom.  He  obtained  from  Aurva  the  Agneyastra  or  fire  weapon,  and,  armed  with  this;  he  put  nearly  the  whole  of  the  Haihayas  to  death  and  regained  his  throne. He would also “have destroyed tile Sakas, Yavanas, Kambojas, paradas, and Pahlavas,” but they  applied  to  Vasishtha,  Sagara's  family  priest,  and  he  indeed  Sagara  to  spare  them,  but  “he  made  the  Yavanas shave their heads entirely; the Sakas he compelled to shave (the upper) half of their heads; the  Paradas wore their hair long; and the Pahlavas let their beards grow in obedience to his commands.”  Sagara married two wives, Su‐mati, the daughter of Kasyapa, and Kesini, the daughter of Raja Vidarbha,  but having no children, he besought the sage Aurva for this boon. Aurva promised that one wife should  have  one  son;  the  other,  sixty  thousand.  Kesini  chose  the  one,  and  her  son  was  Asamanjas,  through  whom the  royal line was continued. Su‐mati had sixty thousand sons. Asamanjas was a wild immoral  youth,  and  his  father  abandoned  him.  The  other  sixty  thousand  sons  followed  the  courses  of  their  brother, and their impiety was such that the gods complained of them to the sage Kapila and the god  Vishnu. Sagara engaged in the performance of an Aswa‐medha or sacrifice of a horse, but although the  animal was guarded by his sixty thousand sons, it was carried off to Patala. Sagara directed his sons to  recover it. They dug their way to the infernal regions, and there they found the horse grazing and the  sage Kapila seated close by engaged in meditation. Conceiving him to be the thief, they menaced him.  with their weapons. Disturbed from his devotions," he looked upon them for an instant, and they were  reduced to ashes by the (sacred) flame that darted from his person. "Their remains were discovered by  Ansumat,  the  son  of  Asamanjas,  who  prayed  Kapila  that  the  victims  of  his  wrath  might  be  raised  through his favour to heaven. Kapila promised that the grandson of AnS1lmat should be the means of  accomplishing  this  by  bringing  down  the  river  of  heaven.  Ansumat  then  returned  to  Sagara,  who  completed  his  sacrifice,  and  he  gave  the  name  of  Sagara  to  the  chasm  which  his  sons  had  dug,  and  Sagara  means  ‘ocean.’  The  son  of  Ansumat  was  Dilipa,  and  his  son  was  Bhagiratha.  The  devotion  of  Bhagiratha  brought  down  from  heaven  the  holy  Ganges,  which  flows  from  the  toe  of  Vishnu,  and  its  waters having laved the ashes of the sons of Sagara, cleansed them from all impurity. Their Manes were  thus  made  fit  for  the  exequial  ceremonies  and  for  admission  into  Swarga.  The  Ganges  received  the 

229

Mythology and Folklore  
name of Sagara in honour of Sagara, and Bhagirathi from the name of the devout king whose prayers  brought her down to earth. (See Bhagirathi) The Hari‐vansa adds another marvel to the story. Sagara's  wife  Su‐mati  was  delivered  of  a  gourd  containing  sixty  thousand  seeds,  which  became  embryos  and  grew. Sagara at first placed them in vessels of milk, but afterwards each one had a separate nurse, and  at ten months they all ran about. The name of Sagara is frequently cited in deeds conveying grants of  land in honour of his generosity in respect of such gifts.    Saha‐Dev  In.  The  youngest  of  the  five  Pandu  princes,  twin  son  of  Madri,  the  second  wife  of  Pandu,  and  mythologically son of the Aswins, or more specifically of the Aswin Dasra. He was learned in the science  of  astronomy,  which  he  had  studied  under  Drona,  and  he  was  also  well  acquainted  with  the  management of cattle. (See Maha‐bharata.) He had a SOD named Su‐hotra by his wife Vijaya.  Sahasraksha In.  ‘Thousand ‐eyed.’ An epithet of lndra.   Sahitya‐Darpana  In.    ‘The  mirror  of  composition.’  A  celebrated  work  on  poetry  and  rhetoric  by  Viswanatha  Kavi  Raja,  written  about  the  fifteenth  century.  It  has  been  translated  into  English  for  the  Bibliotheca  Indica. There are several editions of the text.   Saibya In.  Wife of Haris‐chandra (q.v.); wife of Jyamagha (q.v.); wife of Sata‐dhanu (q. v.).   Saindhavas In.  The people of Sindhu or Sindh, of the country between the Indus and the Jhilam.   Saiva Purana In.  Same as Siva Purana.   Saka In.  An era commencing 78 A.D., and called the era of Salivahana. Cunningham supposes its epoch to be  connected with a defeat of the Sakas by Salivahana.   Sakala In.  The city of the Bahikas or Madras, in the Panjab. It has been identified with the Sagala of Ptolemy  on the Hyphasis (Byas), south‐west of Lahore. Cunningham says it is the Sangala of Alexander.   Sakalya In.  An old grammarian and expositor of the Vedas who lived before the time of Yaska. He is said to  have divided a Sanhita of the Veda into five, and to have taught these portions to as many disciples. He  was also called Veda‐mitra and Deva‐mitra.   Sakapujni, Sakapurni In.  An author who arranged a part of the Rig‐veda and appended a glossary. He lived  before the time of Yaska.   Sakas In.  A northern people, usually associated with the Yavanas. Wilson says, "These people, the Sakai and  Sacre  of  classical  writers,  the  Indo‐Scythians  of  Ptolemy,  extended,  about  the  commencement  of  our  era, along the West of India, from the Hindu Koh to the mouths of the Indus." They were probably Turk  or Tatar tribes, and were among those recorded as conquered by King Sagara, who compelled them to  shave  the  upper  half  of  their  heads.  They  seem  to  have  been  encountered  and  kept  back  by  King  Vikramaditya of Ujjayini, who was called Sakari, ‘foe of the Sakas.’   Sakatayana  In.  An  ancient  grammarian  anterior  to  Yaska.  and  Panini.  Part  of  his  work  is  said  to  have  been  lately discovered by Dr. Buhler.   Sakha In.  ‘Branch, Sect.’ The Sakhas Of The Vedas Are The Different Recensions Of The Same Text As Taught  And Handed down traditionally by different schools and teachers, showing some slight variations, the  effect of long‐continued oral tradition. See Veda.   Sakinls In.  Female demons attendant on Durga.  

230

Mythology and Folklore  
Sakra In.  A name of lndra.   Sakrani In.  Wife of Indra. See Indrani.   Sakra‐Prastha In.  Same as Indra‐prastha.   Sakta In.  A worshipper of the Saktis.   Sakti In.  The wife or the female energy of a deity, but especially of Siva. See Devi and Tantra.   Sakti,  Saktri  In.    A  priest  and  eldest  son  of  Vasishtha.  King  Kalmasha‐pada  struck  him  with  a  whip,  and  he  cursed the king to become possessed by a man‐eating Rakshasa. He himself became the first victim of  the momster he had evoked.   Sakuni In.  Brother of Queen Gandhari, and so uncle of the Kaurava princes. He was a skilful gambler and a  cheat, so he was selected to be the opponent of Yudhi‐shthira in the match in which that prince was  induced  to  stake  and  lose  his  all.  He  also  was  known  by  the  patronymic  Saubala,  from  Su‐bala,  his  father.   Sakuntala In. A nymph who was the daughter of Viswamitra by the nymph Menaka. She was born and left in a  forest, where she was nourished by birds until found by the sage Kanwa. She was brought up by this  sage in his hermitage as his daughter, and is often called his daughter. The loves, marriage, separation,  and re‐union of Sakuntala and King Dushyanta are the subject of the celebrated drama Sakuntala. She  was  mother  of  Bharata,  the  head  of  a  long  race  of  kings,  who  has  given  his  name  to  India  (Bharata‐ varsha), and the wars of whose descendants are sung in the Maha‐bharata. The story of the loves of  Dushyanta and Sakuntala is, that while she was living in the hermitage of Kanwa she was Been in the  forest by King Dushyanta, who fell in love with her. He induced her to contract with him a Gandharva  marriage,  that  is,  a  simple  declaration  of  mutual  acceptance.  On  leaving  her  to  return  to  his  city,  he  gave  her  a  ring  as  a  pledge  of  his  love.  When  the  nymph  when  back  to  the  hermitage,  she  was  so  engrossed with thoughts of her husband that she heeded not the approach of the sage Dur‐vasas, who  had  come  to  visit  Kanwa,  so  that  choleric  saint  cursed  her  to  be  forgotten  by  her  beloved.  He  afterwards relented, and promised that the curse should be removed as soon as Dushyanta should see  the ring. Sakuntala, finding herself with child, set off to her husband; but on her way she bathed in a  sacred pool, and there lost the ring. On reaching the palace, the king did not recognise her and would  not own her, so she was taken by her mother to the forest, where she gave birth to Bharata. Then it  happened that a fisherman caught a large fish and in it found a ring which he carried to Dushyanta. The  king  recognised  his  own  ring,  and  he  soon  afterwards  accepted  Sakuntala  and  her  son  Bharata.  Kali‐ dasa's  drama  of  Sakuntala  was  the  first  translation  made  from  Sanskrit  into  English.  It  excited  great  curiosity  and  gained  much  admiration  when  it  appeared.  There  are  several  recensions  of  the  text  extant. The text has been often printed, and there are many translations into the languages of Europe.  Professor Williams has published a beautifully illustrated translation.   Sál N. the "shade", after‐death image.  Salagrama  In.    A  stone  held  sacred  and  worshipped  by  the  Vaishnavas,  because  its  spirals  are  supposed  to  contain or to be typical of Vishnu. It is an ammonite found in the river Gandak, and is valued more or  less highly according to the number of its spirals and perforations.   Salamis Gk. A nymph in Greek mythology; the daughter of the river god Asopus and Metope, daughter of the  Ladon, another river god; she was carried away by Poseidon to the island which was named after her,  whereupon she bore the god a son Cychreus who became king of the island 

231

Mythology and Folklore  
Salivahana In.  A celebrated king of the south of India, who was the enemy of Vikramaditya, and whose era,  the Saka, dates from A.D. 78. His capital was Prati‐shthana on the Godavari. He was killed in battle at  Karur.   Salmoneus  Gk.  King  of  Elis  and  son  of  Aeolus;  he  pretended  to  be  Zeus  and  demanded  sacrifices,  threw  torches to imitate lightning, and made noises like thunder with his chariot; he was destroyed by Zeus  and his kingdom with a thunderbolt  Salu N. "Sun‐kissed", i.e. health.  Salus  Rom. Goddess of health and prosperity; Festival was celebrated on March 30.  Salwa In.  Name of a country in the west of India, or Rajasthan; also the name of its king.   Salya In.  King of the Madras, and brother of Madri, second wife of Pandu. In the great war he left the side of  the panda‐ vas and went over to the Kauravas. He acted as Charioteer of Karna in the great battle. At  the  death  of  Karna  he  succeeded  him  as  general,  and  commanded  the  army  on  the  last  day  of  the  battle, when he was slain by Yudhi‐shthira.   Sama‐Veda In. The third Veda. See Veda.   Sama‐Vidhana  Brahmana  In.  The  third  Brahmana  of  the  Sama‐veda.  It  has  been  edited  and  translated  by  Burnell.   Samayacharika Sutras In.  Rules for the usages and practices of everyday life. See Sutras.  Samba In.  A son of Krishna by Jambavati, but the Linga Purana names Rukmini as his mother. At the swayam‐ vara of Draupadi he carried off that princess, but he was pursued by Dur‐yodhana and his friends and  made prisoner. Bala‐rama undertook to obtain his release, and when that hero thrust his ploughshare  under the ramparts of Hastina‐pura and threatened it with ruin, the Kauravas gave up their prisoner,  and Bala‐ rama took him to Dwaraka, There he lived a dissolute life and scoffed at sacred things. The  devotions of the three great sages, Viswamitra, Dur‐vasas, and Narada, excited the ridicule of Samba  and his boon companions. They dressed samba up to represent a woman with child and took him to the  sages,  inquiring  whether  he  would  give  birth  to  a  boy  or  a  girl.  The  sages  answered,  "This  is  not  a  woman, but the son of Krishna, and he shall bring forth an iron club which shall destroy the whole race  of Yadu, ...and you and all your people shall perish by that club." Samba accordingly brought forth an  iron club, which Ugrasena caused to be pounded and cast into the sea. These ashes produced rushes,  and the rushes when gathered turned into clubs, or into reeds which were used as swords. One piece  could not be crushed. This was subsequently found in the belly of a fish, and was used to tip an arrow,  which arrow was used by the hunter Jaras, who with it unintentionally killed Krishna. Under the curse  of Dur‐vasas, Samba became a leper and retired to the Panjab, where by fasting, penance, and prayer  he obtained the favour of Surya (the sun), and was cured of his leprosy. He built a temple to the sun on  the banks of the Chandra‐bhaga (Chinab), and introduced the worship of that luminary.   Samba‐Purana In.  See purana.    Sambara In. In the Vedas, a demon, also called a Dasyu, who fought against King Divodasa, but was defeated  and had his many castles destroyed by Indra. He appears to be a mythical personification of drought, of  a kindred character to Vritra, or identical with him. In the puranas a Daitya who carried off Pradyumna  and  threw  him  into  the  sea,  but  was  subsequently  slain  by  him.  (See  Pradyumna.)  He  was  also  employed by Hiranya‐kasipu to destroy Prahlada. 

232

Mythology and Folklore  
Sambhu In.  A name of Siva; also one of the Rudras.  Sambuka  In.    A  Sudra,  mentioned  in  the  Raghu‐vansa,  who  performed  religious  austerities  and  penances  improper for a man of his caste, and was consequently killed by Rama‐chandra.  Saml In.  The Acacia suma, the wood of which is used for obtaining fire by friction. So Agni, or fire, is called  Sami‐garbha, ‘having the Sami for its womb.’ It is sometimes personified and worshipped as a goddess,  Sami‐devi.  Sampati  In.    A  mythical  bird  who  appears  in  the  Ramayana  as  son  of  Yishnu's  bird  Garuda,  and  brother  of  Jatayus. According to another account he was son of Aruna and Syeni. He was the ally of Rama.  Samvarana In.  Son of Raksha, fourth in descent from lkshwaku, and father of Kuru. According to the Maha‐ bharata  he  was  driven  from  Hastina‐pura  by  the  panchalas,  and  forced  to  take  refuge  among  the  thickets of the Indus. When the sage Yasishtha joined his people and became the Raja's family priest,  they recovered their country under Kuru.  Samvarta In.  The writer of a Dharma‐sastra or code of law bearing his name.  Samvat, Samvatsara In. 'Year.' The era of Vikramaditya, dating from 57 B.C.  Sanais‐Chara In.  'Slow‐moving.' A name of Sani or Saturn.  Sanaka, Sananda, Sanatana, Sanat‐Kumara In.  The four Kumaras or mind‐born sons of Brahma. Some specify  seven.  Sanat‐kumara  (or  Sanat‐sujata)  was  the  most  prominent  of  them.  They  are  also  called  by  the  patronymic Vaidhatra. See Kumara.  Sanat‐Kumara Purana In.  See Purana.  Sancus Rom. God of oaths and good faith.  Sandhya  In.    'Twilight.'  It  is  personified  as  the  daughter  of  Brahma  and  wife  of  Siva.  In  the  Siva  Purana  it  is  related that Brahma having attempted to do violence to his daughter, she changed herself into a deer.  Brahma then assumed the form of a stag and pursued her through the sky. Siva saw this, and shot an  arrow which cut off the head of the stag. Brahma then reassumed his own form and paid homage to  Siva. The arrow remains in the sky in the sixth lunar mansion, called Ardra, and the stag's head remains  in the fifth mansion, Mriga‐siras.  Sandhya‐Bala  In.    ‘Strong  in  twilight.’  Rakshasas  and  two  Aswins  and  other  demons,  supposed  to  be  most  powerful at twilight.  Sandilya In.  A descendant of Sandila. A particular sage who was connected with the Chhandogya Upanishad;  one  who  wrote  a  book  of  Sutras,  one  who  wrote  upon  law,  and  one  who  was  the  author  of  the  Bhagavata heresy: two or more of these  may be one and the same person. The Sutras or aphorisms  have been published in the Bibliotheca Indica.  Sandipani In.  A master‐at‐arms who gave instruction to Bala‐rama and Krishna.  Sandracottus In.  See Chandra‐gupta.  Sangita‐Ratnakara In.  A work on singing, dancing, and pantomime, written by Sarangi Deva  Sanhita In.  That portion of a Veda which comprises the hymns. See Veda. 

233

Mythology and Folklore  
Sanhitopanishad In.  The eighth Brahmana of the Sama‐veda. The text with a commentary has been published  by Burnell.  Sani In.  The planet Saturn. The regent of that planet, represented as a black man in black garments. Sani was  a son of sun and Chhaya, but another statement is that he was the offspring of Bala‐rama and Revati.  He is also known as Ara, Kona, and Kroda (cf. Kf6.0,), and by the patronymic Saura. His influence is evil,  hence he is called Krura‐dris and Krura‐lochana, the evil‐eyed one.’ He is also Manda, ‘the slow;’ Pangu,  ‘tile lame;’ Sanais‐chara, ‘slow‐moving; ‘Saptarchi, I seven‐rayed;’ and Asita, ‘the dark.’  Sanjaya In. The charioteer of Dhrita‐rashtra. He was minister also, and went as ambassador to the Pandavas  before the great war broke out. He is represented as reciting to Dhrita‐rashtra the Bhagavad‐gita. His  patronymic is Gavalgani, son of Gavalgana;  A king of Ujjayini and father of Vasava‐datta.   Sanjna In.  ‘Conscience.’ According to the Puranas, she was daughter of Visva‐karma and wife of the sun. She.  had  three  children  by  him,  the  Manu  Vaivaswata,  Yama,  and  Yami  (goddess  of  the  Yamuna  river).  “Unable  to  endure  the  fervours  of  her  lord,  Sanjna  gave  him  Chhaya  (shade)  as  his  ‐  handmaid,  and  repaired to the forests to practise devout exercises.” The sun beheld her engaged in austerities in the  form of a mare, and he approached her as a horse. Hence sprang the two Aswins and Revanta. Surya  then took Sanjna back to his own dwelling, but his effulgence was still so overpowering, that her father,  Viswa‐karma, placed the sun upon his lathe, and cut away an eighth part of his brilliancy. She is also call  Dyu‐ mayi, 'the brilliant,' and Maha‐virya, ‘the very powerful.’  Sankara In. ‘Auspicious.’ A name of Siva in his creative character or as chief of the Rudras.  Sankaracharya In.  (Sankara + acharya). The great religious reformer and teacher of the Vedanta philosophy,  who lived in the eighth or ninth century. He was a native of Kerala or Malabar, and lived a very erratic  life,  disputing  with  heretics  and  popularizing  the  Vedanta  philosophy  by  his  preaching  and  writings  wherever he went. His travels extended as far as Kashmir, and he died at Kedaranath in the Himalayas  at  the  early  age  of  thirty‐two.  His  learning  and  sanctity  were  held  in  such  high  estimation  and  reverence, that he was looked upon as an incarnation of Siva, and was believed to have the power of  working  miracles.  The  god  Siva  was  the  special  object  of  his  worship,  and  he  was  the  founder  of  the  great sect of Smartava Brahmans, who are very numerous and powerful in the south. He established  the several maths or monasteries for the teaching and preservation of his doctrines. Some of these still  remain. The chief one is at Sringa‐giri or Sringiri, on the edge of the Western Ghauts in the Mysore, and  it  has  the  supreme  control  of  the  Smartava  sect.  The  writings  attributed  to  him  are  very  numerous;  chief  among  them  are  his  Bhashyas  or  commentaries  on  the  Sutras  or  aphorisms  of  Vyasa,  a  commentary on the Bhagavad‐gita, some commentaries on the Upanishads, and the Ananda‐lahari, a  hymn in praise of Parvati, the consort of Siva.  Sankara‐Vijaya  In.    ‘The  triumph  of  Sankara.’  A  biography  of  Sankaracharya  relating  his  controversies  with  heretical  sects  and  his  refutation  of  their  doctrines  and  superstitions.  There  is  more  than  one  work  bearing  this  name;  one  by  Ananda  Giri,  which  is  published  in  the  Bibliotheca  Indica  ;  another  by  Madhavacharya; the latter is distinguished as the Sankshepa Sankara‐vijaya. The work of  Ananda Giri  has been critically examined by Kashinath Trimbak Telang in the Indian Antiquary, vol. v.   Sankarshana In. A name of Bala‐rama.  Sankha In.  The writer of a Dharma‐sastra or law‐book bearing his name. He is often coupled with Likhita, and  the two seem to have worked together. 

234

Mythology and Folklore  
Sankhayana In. Name of a writer who was the author of the Sankhayana Brahmana of the Rig‐yeda, and of  certain Srauta‐sutras also called by his name;  He is the oldest known writer on the Ars Erotics, and is  author of the work called Sankhayana Kama‐sutra.  Sankhya In.  A school of philosophy. See Darsana.  Sankhya‐Darsana In. Kapila’s aphorisms on the Sankhya philosophy. They have been printed.  Sankhya‐Karika  In.  A  work  on  the  Sankhya  philosophy,  written  by  Iswara  Krishna;  translated  by  Colebrooke  and Wilson.  Sankhya‐Pravachana In. A text‐book of the Sankhya philosophy, said to have been written by Kapila himself.  Printed in the Bibliotheca Indica.  Sankhya‐Sara  In.    A  work  on  the  Sankhya  philosophy  by  Vijnana  Bhikshu.  Edited  by  Hall  in  the  Bibliotheca  Indica.  Sannyasl In.  A Brahman in the fourth and last stage of his religious life. (See Brahman). In the present day the  term has a wider meaning, and is applied to various kinds of religious mendicants who wander about  and  subsist  upon  alms,  most  of  them  in  a  filthy  condition  and  with  very  scanty  clothing.  They  are  generally devotees of Siva.  Santa In. Daughter of Dasa‐ratha, son of Aja, but adopted by Loma‐pada or Roma‐pada, king of Anga. She was  married to Rishya‐sringa.  Santanu In.  A king of the Lunar race, son of Pratipa, father of Bhishma, and in a way the grandfather of Dhrita‐ rashtra  and  Pandu.  Regarding  him  it  is  said,  “Every  decrepit  man  whom  he  touches  with  his  hands  becomes young.” (See Maha‐bharata.) He was called Satya‐vach, ‘truth‐speaker,’ and was remarkable  for his “devotion and charity, modesty, constancy, and resolution.”   Santi‐Sataka In.  A century of verses on peace of mind. A poem of repute written by Sri Sihlana.  Saptarshi In.  (Sapta‐rishi). The seven great Rishis. See Rishi.    Sapta‐Sati In.  A poem of 700 verses on the triumphs of Durga. It is also called Devi‐mahatmya.  Sapta‐Sindhava In.  ‘The seven rivers.’ The term frequently occurs in the Vedas, and has been widely known  and somewhat differently applied. It was apparently known to the Romans in the days of Augustus, for  Virgil says ‐ “Ceu septem surgens sedates amnibus altus  Per tacitum Ganges.” – Eneid, ix. 30.       They appear in Zend as the Hapta‐heando, and the early Muhammadan travellers have translated  the  term.  But  their  Saba  Sin,  'seven  rivers,'  according  to  Biruni,  applies  to  the  rivers  which  flow  northwards from the mountains of the Hindu Koh, and "uniting near Turmuz, form the river of Balkh  (the Oxus).” The hymn in which the names of the rivers have been given has the following description:‐ " Each set of seven (streams, has followed a threefold course. The Sindhu surpasses the other rivers in  impetuosity. ...Receive favourably this my hymn, O Ganga, Yamuna, Saraswati, Sutudri, Parushni; hear,  O  Marud‐vridha,  with  the  Asikni  and  Vitasta,  and  thou,  Arjikiya,  with  the  Sushoma.  Unite  first  in  thy  course with the Trishtama, the Susartu, the Rasa, and the Sweti; thou meetest with the Gomati, and the  Krumu  with  the  Kubha  and  the  Mehatnu."  According  to  this,  the  "seven  rivers"  are  ‐  (1.)  Ganga  (Ganges); (2.) Yamuna (Jumna); (3.)  Saraswati (Sarsuti); (4.) Sutudri (Satlej); (5.) Parushni;  (6.) Marud‐ vridha; (7.) Arjikiya (the Vipasa, Hyphasis Byas). Wilson says "the Parushni is identified with the Iravati"  (Hydraotes, Ravi), but in this hymn it is the Marud‐vridha which would seem to be the Iravati, because 

235

Mythology and Folklore  
it  is  said  to  unite  with  the  Asikni  (Akesines,  Chandrabhaga,  Chinab)  and  the  Vitasta  (Hydaspes  or  Jhilam). This would leave the Parushni unsettled. The other names, with the exception of the Gomati  (Gumti),  are  not  identified.  Sushoma  has  been  said  to  be  the  Sindhu,  but  in  this  hymn  the  Sindhu  is  clearly  distinct.  In  the  Maha‐bharata  the  seven  rivers  are  named  in  one  place  Vaswokasara,  Nalini,  Pavani,  Ganga,  Sita,  Sindhu,  and  Jambu‐nadi;  and  in  another,  Ganga,  Yamuna,  Plakshaga,  Rathastha,  Saryu (Sarju), Gomati, and Gandaki (Gandak). In the Ramayana and the Puranas the seven rivers are the  seven streams into which the Ganges divided after falling from the brow of Siva, the Nalini, Hladini, and  Pavani going cast, the Chakshu, Sita, and Sindhu to the west, while the Ganges proper, the Bhagirathi,  flowed to the south. The term is also used for the seven great oceans of the world, and for the country  of the seven rivers.    Sapta‐Vadhri  In.  A  Vedic  Rishi.  In  a  hymn  he  says,  "Aswins,  by  your  devices  sunder  the  wickerwork  for  the  liberation of the terrified, imploring Rishi Sapta‐vadhri." Concerning this the following old story is told.  Sapta‐vadhri  had  seven  brothers  who  determined  to  prevent  his  having  intercourse  with  his  wife.  So  they shut him up every night in a large basket, which they locked and sealed, and in the morning they  let him out. He prayed to the Aswins, who enabled him to get out of his cage during the night and to  return to it at daybreak.    Sarabha In. A fabulous animal represented as having eight legs and as dwelling in the Himalayas. It is called  also Utpadaka and Kunjararati; One of Rama's monkey allies.    Sara‐Bhanga In. A hermit visited by Rama and Sita in the Dandaka forest. When he had seen Rama he declared  that his desire had been granted, and that he would depart to the highest heaven. He prepared a fire  and entered it. His body was consumed, but there came forth from the fire a beautiful youth, and in  this form Sara‐bhanga departed to heaven.    Sarada‐Tilaka  In.  A  mystic  poem  by  Lakshmana;  A  dramatic  monologue  by  Sankara,  not  earlier  than  the  twelfth century;  Name of a Tantra.    Saradwat In.  A Rishi said to be the father of Kripa. He is also called Gautama. See Kripa.    Sarama In.  In the Rig‐veda the dog of Indra and mother of the two dogs called, after their mother, Sarameyas,  who  each  had  four  eyes,  and  were  the  watchdogs  of  Yama.  Sarama  is  said  to  have  pursued  and  recovered the cows stolen by the Panis, a myth which has been supposed to mean that Sarama is the  same as Ushas, the dawn, and that the cows represent the rays of the sun carried away by night; The  wife of Vibhishana, who attended upon Sita, and showed her great kindness when she was in captivity  with Ravana; In the Bhagavata Purana, Sarama is one of the daughters of Daksha, and the mother of  wild animals.    Sarameyas In.  The two children of Sarama, Indra's watch‐dog; they were the watchdogs of Yama, and each  had four eyes. They have been compared with the Greek Hermes.     Saranyu In.  'The  fleet runner.' A daughter of Twashtri. She has been identified with the Greek Erinnys. The  beginning  of  this  myth  is  in  a  hymn  of  the  Rig‐veda,  which  says‐  Twashtri  makes  a  wedding  for  his  daughter.  (Hearing)  this,  the  whole  world  assembles.  The  mother  of  Yama,  the  wedded  wife  of  the  great  Vivaswat  (the  sun),  disappeared;  They  concealed  the  immortal  (bride)  from  mortals.  Making  (another) of like appearance, they gave her to Vivaswat. Saranyu bore the two Aswins, and when she  had done so she deserted the two twins." In the Nirukta the story is expanded as follows :‐ " Saranyu,  the  daughter  of  Twashtri,  bore  twins  to  Vivaswat,  the  son  of  Aditi.  She  then  substituted  for  herself  another female of similar appearance, and tied in the form of a mare. Vivaswat in like manner assumed  the shape of a horse and followed her. From their intercourse sprang two Aswins, while Manu was the 

236

Mythology and Folklore  
offspring of Savarna (or the female of like appearance)." The Brihad‐devata has another version of the  same story :‐ “Twashtri had twin children, (a daughter) Saranyu and (a son) Tri siras. He gave Saranyu  in‐marriage to Vivaswat, to whom she bore Yama and Yami, who also were twins. Creating a female like  herself without her husband's knowledge, and making the twins over in charge to her, Saranyu took the  form of a mare and departed. Vivaswat, in ignorance, begot on the female who was left Manu, a royal  Rishi, who resembled his father in glory; but discovering that the real Saranyu, Twashtri's daughter, had  gone  away,  Vivaswat  followed  her  quickly,  taking  the  shape  of  a  horse  of  the  same  species  as  she.  Recognising  him  in  that  form,  she  approached  him  with  the  desire  of  sexual  connection,  which  he  gratified.  In  their  haste  his  seed  fell  on  the  ground,  and  she,  being  desirous  of  offspring,  smelled  it.  From this act sprang the two Kumaras (youths), Nasatya and Dasra, who were lauded as Aswins (sprung  from a horse)."‐ Muir's Texts, v. 227. See the Puranic version under "Sanjna."    Saraswata In.  In the Maha‐bharata the Rishi Saraswata is represented as being the son of the personified river  Saraswati. In a time of great drought he was fed with fish by his mother, and so was enabled to keep up  his  knowledge  of  the  Vedas,  while  other  Brahmans  were  reduced  to  such  straits  for  the  means  of  subsistence  that  study  was  neglected  and  the  Vedas  were  lost.  When  the  drought  was  over,  the  Brahmans flocked to him for instruction, and 60,000 acquired a knowledge of the Vedas from him. "This  legend," says Wilson, "appears to indicate the revival, or, more probably, the introduction of the Hindu  ritual  by the  race  of  Brahmans,  or  the  people  called  Saraswata,"  who  dwelt  near  the  Saraswati  river.  Saraswata Brahmans still dwell in the Panjab, and are met with in many other parts; The country about  the Saraswati river; A great national division of the Brahman caste.    Saraswati  Kanthabharana  In.    A  treatise  on  poetical  and  rhetorical  composition  generally  ascribed  to  Bhoja  Raja.    Saraswatl In.  ‘Watery, elegant.’ In the Vedas, Saraswati is primarily a  river,  but  is  celebrated  in  the  hymns  both  as  a  river  and  a  deity. The Saraswati river was one boundary of Brahmivartta,  the  home  of  the  early  Aryans,  and  was  to  them,  in  all  likelihood, a sacred river, as the Ganges has long been to their  descendants.  As  a  river  goddess,  Saraswati  is  lauded  for  the  fertilising  and  purifying  powers  of  her  waters,  and  as  the  bestower of fertility, fatness, and wealth. Her position as Vach,  the goddess of speech, finds no mention in the Rig‐veda, but is  recognised by the Brahmanas and the Maha‐bharata. Dr. Muir  endeavours to account for her acquisition of this character. He  say,  "When  once  the  river  had  acquired  a  divine  character,  it  was  quite  natural  that  she  should  be  regarded  as  the  patroness  of  the  ceremonies  which  were  celebrated  on  the  margin  of  her  holy  waters,  and  that  her  direction  and  blessing  should  be  invoked  as  essential  to  their  proper  performance  and  success.  The  connection  into  which  she  was  thus  brought  with  sacred  rites  may  have  led  to  the  further  step  of  imagining her to have an influence on the composition of the hymns which formed so important a part  of the proceedings and of identifying her with Vach, the goddess of speech." In later times Saraswati is  the wife of Brahma, the goddess of speech and learning, inventress of the Sanskrit language and Deva‐ nagari letters, and patroness of the arts and sciences. “She is represented as of a white colour, without  any superfluity of limbs, and not unfrequently of a graceful figure, wearing a slender crescent on her  brow and sitting on a lotus.”‐Wilson. The same authority states that "the Vaishnavas of Bengal have a  popular legend that she was the wife of Vishnu, as were also Lakshmi and Ganga. The ladies dis‐agreed;  Saraswati,  like  the  other  prototype  of  learned  ladies,  Minerva,  being  something  of  a  termagant,  and  Vishnu finding that one wife  was as much as he could manage, transferred Saraswati to Brahma and 

237

Mythology and Folklore  
Ganga  to  Siva,  and  contented  himself  with  Lakshmi  alone.  (See  Vach.)  Other  names  of  Saraswati  are  Bharati, Brahmi, Put‐kari, Sarada, Vagiswari. The river is now called Sarsuti. It falls from the Himalayas  and is lost in the sands of the desert. In ancient times it flowed on to the sea. A passage in the Rig‐veda  says  of  it,  “She  who  goes  on  pure  from  the  mountains  as  far  as  the  sea.”‐Max  Muller,  Veda,  45.  According  to  the  Maha‐bharata  it  was  dried  up  by  the  curse  of  the  sage  Utathya  (q.v.).  See  Sapta‐ sindhava.     Sarayu In.  The Sarju river or Gogra.    Sarcophagus Eg. From the Greek word meaning; "flesh eater"; It was the name given to the stone container  within which the coffins and mummy were placed.  Saritor Rom. God of weeding and hoeing.  Sarmishtha  In.    Daughter  of  Vrishaparvan  the  Danava,  second  wife  of  Yayati  and  mother  of  Puru.  See  Devayani.   Sarnga In.  The bow of Krishna.    Sarpedon Gk. The first Sarpedon was a son of Zeus and Europa, and brother to Minos and Rhadamanthys; was  raised  by  the  king  Asterion  and  then,  banished  by  Minos,  his  rival  in  love  for  the  young  Miletus;  he  sought refuge with his uncle, Cilix Sarpedon conquered the Milyans, and ruled over them; his kingdom  was named Lycia, after his successor, Lycus, son of Pandion II; he was granted by Zeus the privilege of  living three generations.; the second Sarpedon, king of Lycia, a descendant of the preceding, was a son  of Zeus and Laodamia, daughter of Bellerophon; became king when his uncles withdrew their claim to  Lycia; he fought on the side of the Trojans, with his cousin Glaucus, during the Trojan War becoming  one of Troy's greatest allies and heroes  Sarva, Sarva In.  A Vedic deity; the destroyer. Afterwards a name of Siva and of one of the Rudras. See Rudra.    Sarva‐Darsana Sangraha In.  A work by Madhavacharya, which gives an account of the Darsanas or schools of  philosophy, whether orthodox or heretical. It has been printed.    Sarvari  In.    A  woman  of  low  caste,  who  was  very  devout  and  looked  for  the  coming  of  Rama  until  she  had  grown old. In reward of her piety a sage raised her from her low caste, and when she had seen Rama  she burnt herself on a funeral pile. She ascended from the pile in a chariot to the heaven of Vishnu.    Sarva‐Sara In.  Name of an Upanishad.     Sasada In.  ‘Hare‐eater.’ A name given to Vikukshi (q.v.).    Sasi, Sasin In.  The moon, so called from the marks on the moon being considered to resemble a hare (sasa).    Sastra  In.    'A  rule,  book,  treatise.'  Any  book  of  divine  or  recognised  authority,  but  more  especially  the  law‐ books.    Sata‐Dhanu In.  A king who had a virtuous and discreet wife named Saibya. They were both worshippers of  Vishnu. One day they met a heretic, with whom Sata‐dhanu conversed; but the wife “turned away from  him and east her eyes up to the sun.” After a time Sata‐dhanu died and his wife ascended his funeral  pile. The wife was born again as a princess with a knowledge of her previous existence, but the husband  received the form of & dog. She recognised him in this form and placed the bridal garland on his neck.  Then she reminded him of his previous existence and of the fault, which had caused his degradation.  He  was  greatly  humiliated  and  died  from  a  broken  spirit.  After  that,  he  was  born  successively  as  a 

238

Mythology and Folklore  
jackal, a wolf, a crow, and a peacock. In each form his wife recognised him, reminded him of his sin, and  urged him to make efforts for restoration to his former dignity. At length “he was born as the son of a  person of distinction,” and Saibya then elected him as her bridegroom; and having “again invested him  with the character of her husband, they lived happily together.” When he died she again followed him  in death, and both “ascended beyond the sphere of Indra to the regions where all desires are forever  gratified.”  “This  legend,”  says  Wilson,  “is  peculiar  to  the  Vishnu  Purana,  although  the  doctrine  it  inculcates is to be found elsewhere.     Sata‐Dhanwan,  Sata‐Dhanus  In.    ‘Having  a  hundred  bows.’  A  Yadava  and  son  of  Hridika.  He  killed  Satrajit,  father of Satya‐bhama, the wife of Krishna, in his sleep, and was himself killed in revenge by Krishna,  who struck off his head with his discus.     Sata‐Dru  In.    ‘Flowing  in  a  hundred  (channels).’  The  name  of  the  river  Sutlej,  the  Zaradrus  of  Ptolemy,  the  Hesudrus of Pliny.    Sata‐Ghni In.  ‘Slaying hundreds.’ A missile weapon used by Krishna. It is described in the Maha‐bharata as a  stone set round with iron spikes, but many have supposed it to be a rocket or other fiery weapon.    Sata‐Kratu In.  ‘The god of a hundred rites;’ Indra.  Satapatha‐Brahmana In. A celebrated Brahmana attached to the White Yajur‐veda, and ascribed to the Rishi  Yajnawalkya. It is found in two sakhas, the Madhyandina and the Kanwa. This is the most complete and  systematic as well as the most important of all the Brahmanas. It has been edited by Weber.  Sata‐Rupa  In.    ‘The  hundred‐formed.’  The  first  woman.  According  to  one  account  she  was  the  daughter  of  Brahma,  and  from  their  incestuous  intercourse  the  first  Manu,  named  Swayam‐bhuva,  was  born.  Another  account  makes  her  the  wife,  not  the  mother,  of  Manu.  The  account  given  by  Manu  is  that  Brahma  divided  himself  into  two  parts,  male  and  female,  and  from  them  sprang  Manu.  She  is  also  called Savitri. See Viraj and Brahma.   Satatapa In.  An old writer on law.    Sata‐Vahana In.  A name by which Sali‐vahana is some‐times called.    Sati In.  A daughter of Daksha and wife of Rudra, i.e., Siva. The Vishnu Purana states that she "abandoned her  body in consequence of the anger of Daksha. She then became the daughter of Himavat and Mena; and  the divine Bhava again married Uma, who was identical with his (Siva's) former spouse." The authorities  generally agree that she died or killed herself in consequence of the quarrel between her husband and  father; and the Kasi Khanda, a modern work, represents that she entered the fire and became a Sati.  See Pitha‐sthana.    Satrajit,  Satrajita  In.    Son  of  Nighna.  In  return  for  praise  rendered  to  the  sun  he  beheld  the  luminary  in  his  proper  form,  and  received  from  him  the  wonderful  Syamantaka  gem.  He  lust  the  gem,  but  it  was  recovered  and  restored  to  him  by  Krishna.  In  return  he  presented  Krishna  with  his  daughter  Satya‐ bhama  to  wife.  There  had  been  many  suitors  for  this  lady's  hand,  and  one  of  them,  named  Sata‐ dhanwan, in revenge for her loss, killed Satrajit and carried off the gem, but he was afterwards killed by  Krishna.    Satru‐Ghna In.  'Foe destroyer.' Twin‐brother of Lakshmana and half‐brother of Rama, in whom an eighth part  of the divinity of Vishnu was incarnate. His wife was Sruta‐kirtti cousin of Sita. He fought on the side of  Rama and killed the Rakshasa chief Lavana. See Dasa‐ratha and Rama.   

239

Mythology and Folklore  
Saturn  Rom.  God  of  agriculture  and  the  sowing  of  seeds;  Saturnalia  began  on  December  17  and  lasted  for  seven  days;  During  this  festival,  businesses  closed  and  gifts  were  exchanged;  Saturday  is  named  after  him.  Satya‐Bhama In.  Daughter of Satrajita and one of the four  chief wives of Krishna. She had ten sons, Bhanu, Su‐ bhanu,  Swar‐bhanu,  Prabhanu,  Bhanumat,  Chandrabhanu,  Brihadbhanu,  Atibhanu,  Sribhanu,  and Pratibhanu. Krishna took her with him to Indra's  heaven,  and  she  induced  him  to  bring  away  the  Parijata tree.    Satya‐Dhriti In.  Son of Saradwat and grandson of the sage  Gautama.  According  to  the  Vishnu  Purana  he  was  father by the nymph Urvasi of Kripa and Kripi.    Satyaki. In.  A kinsman of Krishna's, who fought on the side  of  the  Pandavas,  and  was  Krishna's  charioteer.  He  assassinated  Krita‐varma  in  a  drinking  bout  at  Dwaraka, and was himself cut down by the friends of  his  victim.  He  is  also  called  Daruka  and  Yuyudhana;  and Saineya from his father, Sini.    Satya‐Loka In.  See Loka.   Satyavan In.  See Savitri.      Satya‐Vati In.  Daughter of Uparichara, king of Chedi, by an Apsaras named Adrika, who was condemned to  live on earth in the form of a fish. She was mother of Vyasa by the Rishi Parasara, and she was also wife  of  King  Santanu,  mother  of  Vichitra‐virya  and  Chitrangada,  and  grandmother  of  the  Kauravas  and  Pandavas, the rivals in the great war. The sage Parasara met her as she was crossing the river Yamuna  when she was quite a girl, and the offspring of their illicit intercourse was brought forth on an island  (dwipa) in that river, and was hence called Dwaipayana. (See Vyasa.) She was also called Gandha‐kali,  Gandha‐vati, and Kalangani; and as her mother lived in the form of a fish, she is called Dasa‐nandini,  Daseyi, Jhajhodari, and Matsyodari, ‘fish‐born.’; A daughter of King Gadhi, wife of the Brahman Richika,  mother of Jamad‐agni and grandmother of Parasu‐rama. She was of the Kusika race, and is said to pave  been transformed into the Kausiki river. See Richika and Viswamitra.    Satya‐Vrata In.  Name of the seventh Manu. See Manu; A king of the Solar race, descended from Ikshwaku. He  was  father  of  Haris‐chandra,  and  is  also  named  Vedhas  and  Trisanku.  According  to  the  Ramayana  he  was a pious king, and was desirous of performing a Sacrifice in virtue of which he might ascend bodily  to  heaven.  Vasishtha,  his  priest,  declined  to  perform  it,  declaring  it  impossible.  He  then  applied  to  Vasishtha's sons, and they condemned him to become a Chandala for his presumption. In his distress  and  degradation  he  applied  to  Viswamitra,  who  promised  to  raise  him  in  that  form  to  heaven.  Viswamitra's intended sacrifice was strongly resisted by the sons of Vasishtha, but he reduced them to  ashes, and condemned them to be born again as outcasts for seven hundred births. The wrathful sage  bore down another opposition, and Tri‐sanku ascended to heaven. Here his entry was opposed by Indra                  Saturn 

240

Mythology and Folklore  
and  the  gods,  but  Viswamitra  in  a  fury  declared  that  he  would  create  “another  Indra,  or  the  world  should  have  no  Indra  at  all.”  The  gods  were  obliged  to  yield,  and  it  was  agreed  that  Tri‐sanku,  an  immortal, should hang with his head downwards, and shine among some stars newly called into being  by Viswamitra.       The Vishnu Purana gives a more simple version. While Satya‐vrata was a Chandala, and the famine  was  raging,  he  supported  Viswamitra's  family  by  hanging  deer's  flesh  on  a  tree  on  the  bank  of  the  Ganges, so that they might obtain food without the degradation of receiving it from a Chandala : for  this charity Viswamitra raised him to heaven.     The story is differently told in the Hari‐vansa. Satya‐vrata or Tri‐sanku, when a prince, attempted to  carry  off  the  wife  of  a  citizen,  in  consequence  of  which  his  father  drove  him  from  home,  nor  did  Vasishtha,  the  family  priest,  endeavour  to  soften  the  father's  decision.  The  period  of  his  exile  was  a  time of famine, and he greatly succoured the wife and family of Viswamitra, w1lowere in deep distress  while  the  sage  was  absent  far  away.  He  completed  his  twelve  years'  exile  and  penance,  and  being  hungry one day, and having no flesh to eat, he killed Vasishtha's wondrous cow, the Kama‐dhenu, and  ate thereof himself, and gave some to the sons of Viswamitra. In his rage Vasishtha gave him the name  Tri‐sanku, as being guilty of three great sins. Viswamitra was gratified by the assistance which Satya‐  vrata  bad  rendered  to  his  family;  “he  installed  him  in  his  father's  kingdom,  ...and,  in  spite  of  the  resistance of the gods and of Vasishtha, exalted the king alive to heaven.”  

 

Satyayana In.  Name of a Brahmans.    Satya‐Yauvana In.  A certain Vidya‐dhara.    Satyrs Gk. Deities of the woods and mountains; they are half human and half beast; they usually have a goat's  tail, flanks and hooves while the upper part of the body is that of a human, they also have the horns of  a  goat;  they  are  the  companions  of  Dionysus,  the  god  of  wine,  and  they  spent  their  time  drinking,  dancing, and chasing nymphs  Saubha  In.    A  magical  city,  apparently  first  mentioned  in  the  Yajur‐veda.  An  aerial  city  belonging  to  Haris‐ chandra,  and  according  to  popular  belief  still  visible  occasionally.  It  is  called  also  Kha‐pura,  Prati‐ margaka, and Tranga. In the Maha‐bharata an aerial or self‐supporting city belonging to the Daityas, on  the shore of the ocean, protected by the Salwa king.     Saubhari In.  A devout sage, who, when he was old and emaciated, was inspired with a desire of offspring. He  went to King Mandhatri, and demanded one of his fifty daughters. Afraid to refuse, and yet unwilling to  bestow a daughter upon such a suitor, the king temporised, and endeavoured to evade the request. It  was  at  length  settled  that,  if  anyone  of  the  daughters  should  accept  him  as  a  bridegroom,  the  king  would consent to the marriage. Saubhari was conducted to the presence of the girls; but on his way he  assumed  a  fair  and  handsome  form,  so  that  all  the  girls  were  captivated,  and  contended  with  each  other as to who should become his wife. It ended by his marrying them all and taking them home. He  caused Viswa‐karma to build for each a separate palace, furnished in the most luxurious manner, and  surrounded with exquisite gardens, where they lived a most happy life, each one of them having her  husband always present with her, and believing that he was devoted to her and her only. By his wives  he had a hundred and fifty sons; but as he found his hopes and desires for them to daily increase and  expand,  he  resolved  to  devote  himself  wholly  and  solely  to  penance  and  the  worship  of  Vishnu.  Accordingly, he abandoned his children and retired with his wives to the forest. See Vishnu Purana.    Saudasa In.  Son of King Sudas. Their descendants are all Saudasas. See Kalmasha‐pada.   

241

Mythology and Folklore  
Saunaka In.  A sage, the son of Sunaka and grandson of Gritsa‐mada. He was the author of the Brihad‐devata,  an Anu‐kramani, and other works, and he was a teacher of the Atharva‐veda. His pupil was Aswalayana.  There was a family of the name, and the works attributed to Saunaka are probably the productions of  more than one person.    Saunanda A club shaped like a pestle, which was one of the weapons of Bala‐rama.    Saura Purana In.  See Purana.  Saurashtras In.  The People of Surashtra.  Saut In. is Name of the sage who repeated the Maha‐bharata to the Rishis in the Naimisha forest.    Sauviras  In.    A  people  connected  with  the  Saindhavas  or  people  of  Sindh,  and  probably  inhabitants  of  the  western and southern parts of the Panjab. Cunningham says that Sauvira was the plain country.   Savarna In.  Wife of the sun. “The female of like appearance,” whom Saranyu, wife of Vivaswat, substituted for  herself when she fled. (See Saranyu.) Manu was the offspring of Savarna. This is the version given in the  Nirukta. In the Vishnu Purana, Savarna is daughter of the ocean, wife of Prachinabarhis, and mother of  the ten Prachetasas.    Savarna, Savarni In.  The eighth Manu. The name it used either alone or in combination for all the succeeding  Manus to the fourteenth and last. See Manu.    Savitri In.  ‘Generator.’ 1. A name used in the Vedas for the sun. Many hymns are addressed to him, and he is  some‐ times distinguished from that deity. 2. One of the Adityas.    Savitrl In. The holy verse of the Veda, commonly called Gayatri; A name of Sata‐rupa, the daughter and wife of  Brahma, who is sometimes regarded as a personification of the holy verse;  Daughter of King Aswa‐pati,  and lover of Satyavan, whom she insisted on marrying, although she was warned by a seer that he had  only  one  year  to  live.  When  the  fatal  day  arrived,  Satyavan  went  out  to  cut  wood,  and  she  followed  him. There he fell, dying, to the earth, and she, as she supported him, saw a figure, who told her that he  was Yama, king of the dead, and that he had come for her husband's spirit. Yama carried off the spirit  towards the shades, but Savitri followed him. Her devotion pleased Yama, and he offered her any boon  except the life of her husband. She extorted three such boons from Yama, but still she followed him,  and he was finally constrained to restore her husband to life.    Savya‐Sachin In.  ‘Who pulls a bow with either hand.’ A title of Arjuna.    Saxnot N. Saxon helper god  Sayana In.  Sayanacharya, the celebrated commentator on the Rig‐veda. “He was brother of Madhavacharya,  the  prime  minister  of  Vira  Bukka  Raya,  Raja  of  Vijaya‐nagara,  in  the  fourl6enth  century,  a  munificent  patron of Hindu literature. Both the brothers are celebrated as scholars, and many important works are  attributed to them; not only scholia on the Sanhitas and Brahmanas of the Vedas, but original works on  grammar and law; the fact, no doubt, being that they availed themselves of those means which their  situation and influence secured them, and employed the most learned Brahmans they could attract to  Vijaya‐nagara  upon  the  works  which  bear  their  name,  and  to  which  they  also  contributed  their  own  labour  and  learning;  their  works  were,  therefore,  compiled  under  peculiar  advantages,  and  are  deservedly held in the highest estimation.”‐Wilson.  Scaean Gates Gk. Gamous gates at Troy 

242

Mythology and Folklore  
Scamander Gk. A river god; son of Oceanus and Tethys; also thought of as the son of Zeus; the father of King  Teucer by Idaea  Scarab Eg. The dung‐rolling beetle was, to the ancient Egyptians, a symbol of regeneration and spontaneous  creation, as it seemed to emerge from nowhere; in fact it came from eggs previously laid in the sand;  Seals and amulets in scarab form were very common and were thought to possess magic powers.  Scatach N. "She who strikes fear"; A Lapp (Saami) Goddess   Scheria Gk. An island, the homeland of the Phaeacians; the last destination of Odysseus before coming back  home to Ithaca  Sciron Gk. A robber killed by Theseus;  he forced travelers to wash his feet, while they knelt before him he  kicked them off a cliff behind them where they were eaten by a sea monster (or a giant turtle); he was  pushed  by  Theseus  off  the  cliff;  Megarians  claimed  that  Sciron  was  not  a  robber,  but  a  prince  of  Megara, and son of King Pylus who was the father of Endeis, wife of Aeacus  Scorpion  Gk.  Was  a  giant  scorpion  sent  forth  by  the  earth‐goddess  Gaia  to  slay  the  giant  Orion  when  he  threatened to slay all the beasts of the earth  Scylla Gk. Beautiful sea nymph who became a sea monster because of her lover Glaucus  Scyros, island Gk. An island ruled by Lycomedes where Theseus was killed and Achilles disguised as a girl  Seaboiler N. A one‐mile‐deep kettle owned by the Giant Hymir. Since borrowed by Tyr and Thor, it has been in  Aegir's posession, and used at his big beer fests  Seasons Gk. The Horai (or Horae) were the goddesses of the seasons and the natural portions of time, they  presided  over  the  revolutions  of  the  heavenly  constellations  by  which  the  year  was  measured,  while  their three sisters spinned out the web of fate, the Horai also guarded the gates of Olympos and rallied  the stars and constellations of heaven.  Seater N. Saxon deity of Saturday = Saturn.  Securitas Rom. Goddess of security and stability.  Sed festival Eg. This is ritual meant to show royal regeneration; It was traditionally celebrated after 30 years of  a king's reign; It is a scene usually found decorating the mortuary temples of the king.  Seid,  Seidh,  Seidhr  N.  A  particular  form  of  magic,  used  primarily  by  females.  Odin  is  a  seidh  master,  having  been taught by Freya. The seidkona (seid woman) enters a trance state and connects with the spirits,  who then give her advice. Seidh trance travel is comparable to shamanistic practices.  Seidh‐hjallr N. The seidh witch's seat.  Seidkona N. Woman who practices Seidr, a volva, a seer   Seidmann  N.  The  bad  magician.  (Since  seid  is  frowned  upon  as  practiced  by  males,  it  has  a  negative  connotation.)  Sekhem Eg. A symbol of authority.  Sekhet‐aanru Eg. This mythical place was originally called the "Field of the Aanru plants"; It was believed to be  islands  in  the  Delta  where  the  souls  of  the  dead  lived;  This  was  the  abode  of  the  god  Osiris,  who 

243

Mythology and Folklore  
bestowed goodness upon his followers, and here the dead could lead a new existence complete with  an abundance of food of every kind; The Sekhet‐Aanru is in the "Fields of Peace".  Sekhet‐hetepet Eg. According to the Osiris cults the Fields of Peace was the desired location of the deceased;  They would join with their god, Osiris and become a khu, drink, plow, reap, fight, make love, never be in  a state of servitude and always be in a position of authority.  Sekhmet Eg.  A lion headed goddess; As a sun goddess she represents the scorching, burning, destructive heat  of the sun; She was a fierce goddess of war, the destroyer of the enemies of Ra and Osiris.   Selene  Gk.  The  Goddess  of  the  Moon;  daughter  of  the  Titans  Hyperion  and  Theia;  her  brother  Helios  is  the  Sun,  and  Her  sister  Eos  is  the  rosy‐fingered  Dawn;  was  depicted  as  a  beautiful  winged  goddess  who  wears a golden crown that radiates gentle light; by Zeus, she is the mother of daughters Pandia, Erse  (the Dew), and Nemea; some also say she was mother of the Nemean Lion, whom Heracles killed  Sema Eg. It is believed to represent the lungs attached to the windpipe. As a hieroglyph this symbol represents  the  unification  of  Upper  and  Lower  Egypt;  Other  symbols  are  often  added  to  further  illustrate  unification;  It  is  sometimes  bound  together  with  two  plants,  the  papyrus  and  the  lotus;  The  papyrus  represents Lower Egypt and the lotus represents Upper Egypt.    Semele Gk. A daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, at Thebes, and mother of Dionysus (Bacchus) by Zeus; her  liaison with Zeus enraged Zeus’s wife, Hera, who, disguised as an old nurse, coaxed Semele into asking  Zeus  to  visit  her  in  the  same  splendor  in  which  he  would  appear  before  Hera,  Zeus  had  already  promised to grant Semele her every wish and thus was forced to grant a wish that would kill her: the  splendour of his firebolts, as god of thunder, destroyed Semele  Semiramis  Gk.  Was  both  Nimrod's  wife  and  mother,  was  worshiped  as  the  "mother  of  god"  and  a  "fertility  goddess"  because  she  had  to  be  extremely  fertile  to  give  birth  to  all  the  pagan  incarnate  gods  that  represented Nimrod          Semonia Rom. Goddess of sowing.  Sending N. The magical technique of projecting runestaves and their powers out of the self into the world to  do their rightful work.  Sepat Eg. The ancient Egyptian term for an administrative province of Egypt.   Serapis Rom. God of the sky.  Serpents and snakes N. Countless of these are beneath Yggdrasil along with Nidhogg; some of them are called  Goin and Moin (Grafvitnir's sons), Grabak, Grafvollud, Ofnir, and Svafnir.  Sesen Eg. A lotus flower; This is a symbol of the sun, of creation and rebirth; Because at night the flower closes  and sinks underwater, at dawn it rises and opens again; According to one creation myth it was a giant  lotus which first rose out of the watery chaos at the beginning of time; From this giant lotus the sun  itself rose on the first day.  Sesha, Sesha‐Naga In.  King of the serpent race or Nagas, and of the infernal regions called Patala. A serpent  with a thousand heads which is the couch and canopy of Vishnu whilst sleeping during the intervals 9f  creation.  Sometimes  Sesha  is  represented  as  supporting  the  world,  and  sometimes  as  upholding,  the  seven patalas or hells. Whenever he yawns he causes earth‐quakes. At the end of each kalpa he vomits  venomous fire, which destroys all creation. When the gods churned the ocean they made use of Sesha 

244

Mythology and Folklore  
as  a  great  rope,  which  they  twisted  round  the  mountain  Mandara,  and  so  used  it  as  a  churn.  He  is  represented clothed in purple and wearing a white necklace, holding in one hand a plough and in the  other a pestle. He is also called Ananta, ‘the endless,’ as the symbol of  eternity. His wife was named  Ananta‐sirsha. He is sometimes distinct from Vasuki but generally identified with him. In the Puranas he  is said to be the son of Kasyapa and Kadru, and according to some authorities he was incarnate in Bala‐ rama. His hood is called Mani‐dwipa, ‘the island of jewels,’ and his palace Mani‐bhitti, ‘jewel‐walled,’ or  Mani‐mandapa, ‘jewel palace.’   Sessrumnir N. Freyia's hall in Asgard; her dwelling is called Folkvangar.  Set amentet Eg. This means "the mountain of the underworld," a common name for the cemeteries were in  the mountains or desert on the western bank of the Nile.  Seth Eg. Early in Egyptian history, Seth is spoken of in terms of reverence as the god of wind and storms; He  was even known as the Lord of Upper Egypt; Later he became the god of evil.  Setu‐Bandha In.  ‘Rama's bridge.’ The line of rocks between the continent and Ceylon called in maps “Adam's  bridge.” It is also know as Samudraru. There is a poem called Setu‐bandha or Setu‐kavya on the subject  of the building of the bridge by Rama's allies.    Shad‐Darsana In.  See Darsana.    Shad‐Vinsa In. ‘Twenty‐sixth.’ One of the Brahmanas of the Sama‐veda. It is called “the twenty‐sixth” because  it was added to the Praudha Brahmana, which has twenty‐five sections.    Shape‐shifting  N.  A  form  of  astral‐projection  or  out‐of‐body  experience.  While  the  magician's  body  lay  as  if  asleep  or  dead,  he'd  assume  the  form  of  a  bird,  beast,  fish  or  worm  (serpent)  and  travel  to  distant  places. Shape‐shift battles are recorded. Injuries to a shape‐shifter often affected the human form.  Shat‐Pura In.  ‘The sixfold cities,’ or ‘the six cities’ granted by Brahma to the Asuras, and of which Nikumbha  was king. It was taken by Krishna and given to Brahma‐datta, a Brahman. ‐Hari‐vansa.  She Eg. A pool of water; The Egyptians believed water was the primeval matter from which aII creation began;  Life in Egypt's desert climate depended on water, and a pool of water would be a great luxury; There  are many tomb paintings that show the deceased drinking from a pool in the afterlife.  Shen Eg. A loop of rope that has no beginning and no end, it symbolized eternity; The shen also seems to be a  symbol of protection; It is often seen being clutched by deities in bird form, Horus the falcon, Mut the  vulture;  Hovering  over  Pharaohs  head  with  their  wings  outstretched  in  a  gesture  of  protection;  The  word  shen  comes  from  the  word  "shenu"  which  means  "encircle,"  and in its elongated form became the cartouche which surrounded  the king's name.  Shiva  In.  the  destroyer;  is  one  of  the  three  supreme  gods  in  Hindu  mythology.  Sibyl  Gk.  The  Cumaean  Sibyl  was  the  priestess  presiding  over  the  Apollonian  oracle  at  Cumae,  a  Greek  colony  located  near  Naples,  Italy; comes (via Latin) from the ancient Greek word sibylla, meaning  prophetess                         Shiva 

245

Mythology and Folklore  
Sick Bed N. Sick Bed is the Death Goddess Hel's bed. It stands in her dark castle Eljudnir in Nifilhel.  Siddhanta In.  Any scientific work on astronomy or mathematics.    SIDDHANTA Kaumudl In.  A modern and simplified form , If panini's Grammar by Bhattoji Dikshita. It is in print.    SIDDHANTA‐Slromani  In.    A  work  on  astronomy  by  Bhaskaracharya.  It  has  been  printed,  and  has  been  translated for the Bibliotheca Indica.    Siddhas  In.    A  class  of  semi‐divine  beings  of  great  purity  and  holiness,  who  dwell  in  the  regions  of  the  sky  between the earth and the sun. They are said to be 88,000 in number.  Sidero Gk.  Known as "the Iron One"; the second wife of Salmoneus and stepmother of the twins Pelias and  Neleus;  she  mistreated  the  twins'  mother  Tyro  horribly,  incurring  their  wrath  when  they  reached  adulthood  Sif N. The second wife of Thor, Sif has the gift of prophecy. Sif  is  a  swan  maiden  and  can  assume  that  form.  She  signifies  summer  fertility  and  corn.  Having  been  married once to Orvandil, she is one of the elder races  of Gods. Ullr was her son from that union. Her golden  hair  was  cut  off  by  Loki  as  a  trick,  and  replaced  with  hair  of  gold  made  by  the  Dwarves.  She  gave  Thor  two  sons, Magni ("Might") and Modi ("Wrath") who survive  Ragnarök.  Sig N. Victory.  Signing N. Magical signs or gestures made with motions of the  hands  to  trace  various  magical  symbols  in  the  air  around  an  object  or  person  to  be  affected  by  their  power. The  magical technique of tracing runestaves in  the air to "rist them in the world"  Sigrdrifa N. "Victory Blizzard". A Valkyrie, one of the Disir  Sigrún N. "Victory Rune"; A Valkyrie, one of the Disir                              Sif 

Sigrúnar  N.  Victory  runes  runes  which  are  used  to  assist  one  in  obtaining  victory;  These  are  used  to  gain  advantage in all kinds of contests. They should be written upon the runemaster's clothing, instruments,  tools, or weapons.   Sigtyr N. "God of Victory". A by‐name of Odin  Sigurdhr Fåvnesbane (sig‐urd) N. "Dragonslayer". Human lover of the Valkyrie Brynhild; He could understand  the  speech  of  birds  and  could  shape‐shift  into  wolf  form.  He  killed  the  dragon  Fafnir,  and  Fafnir's  brother, the smith Regin. He married Gudrun, Gjuke's daughter, even though he had betrothed himself  to Brynhilde.  

246

Mythology and Folklore  
Sigyn, Siguna, Signy N. "The Faithful". Goddess wife of Loki, whose two sons are Vali and Narfi; When Loki is  punished, she stays with him holding a bowl over his face to save him from the snake venom dripping  onto him.  Sikhandin,  Sikhandini  In.    Sikhandini  is  said  to  have  been  the  daughter  of  Raja  Drupada,  but  according  to  another  statement  she  was  one  of  the  two  wives  whom  Bhishma  obtained  for  his  brother  Vichitra‐ virya. "She (the widow) perished in the jungle, but before her death she had been assured by Parasu‐ rama that she should become a man in a future birth, and cause the death of Bhishma, who had been  the author of her misfortunes." Accordingly she was born again as Sikhandin, son of Drupada. Bhishma  fell in battle pierced all over by the arrows of Arjuna, but according to this story the fatal shaft came  from the hands of Sikhandin. See Amba.    Siksha In.  Phonetics; one of the Vedangas. The science which teaches the proper pronunciation and manner  of reciting the Vedas. There are many treatises on this subject.    Silvanus Rom. God of woods and fields.  Sindhu In.  The river Indus; also the country along that river and the people dwelling in it. From Sindhu came  the  Hind  of  the  Arabs,  the  Hindoi  or  Indoi  of  the  Greeks,  and  our  India;  A  river  in  Malwa.  There  are  others of the Dame. See Sapta‐sindhava.    Sindri N. Elf‐smith who worked in Asgard; Brokk was his brother; A red‐gold roofed hall which will appear after  Ragnarok.  SINHALA, SINHALA‐Dwlpa In.  Ceylon.    Sinhasana  Dwatrinsat  In.    The  thirty‐two  stories  told  by  the  images  which  supported  the  throne  of  King  Vikramaditya. It is the Singhasan Battisi in Hindustani, and is current in most of the languages of India.    Sinhika In.  A daughter of Daksha and wife of Kasyapa; also a daughter of Kasyapa and wife of Viprachitti; A  Rakshasi who tried to swallow Hanuman and make a meal of him. He allowed her to do so and then  rent her body to pieces and departed. Her habit was to seize the shadow of the object she wished to  devour and so drag the prey into her jaws.    Sinmara N. The earth‐pale Giantess Sinmara watches the rooster Vidofner. Her magic‐wand, Laevatein, which  she keeps away from the Giants, is the only thing that can kill the rooster.  Sipra In.  The river on which the city of Ujjayini stands.    Sira‐Dhwaja In.  ‘He of the plough‐banner.’ An epithet for Janaka.    Sirens  Gk.  Three  dangerous  bird‐women,  portrayed  as  seductresses  who  lured  nearby  sailors  with  their  enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of their island  Sirius Gk. The god or goddess of the Dog‐Star of the constellation Canis Major; the pre‐dawn rising of the star  in conjunction with the sun was believed to bring on the scorching heat of midsummer  Sistrum  Eg.  The  sistrum  was  a  sacred  noise‐making  instrument  used  in  the  cult  of  Hathor;  The  sistrum  consisted  of  a  wooden  or  metal  frame  fitted  with  loose  strips  of  metal and  disks  which  jingled  when  moved; This noise was thought to attract the attention of the gods; There are two types of sistrum, an  iba, was shaped in a simple loop, like a closed horse‐shoe with loose cross bars of metal above a Hathor  head  and  a  long  handle;  The  seseshet  had  the  shape  of  a  naos  temple  above  a  Hathor  head,  with 

247

Mythology and Folklore  
ornamental loops on the sides; The rattle was inside the box of the naos; They were usually carried by  women of high rank.  Sisumara In.  ‘A porpoise.’ The planetary sphere, which, as Vishnu Purana, has the shape of a porpoise, Vishnu  being seated in its heart, and Dhruva or the pole star in its tail. “As Dhruva revolves, it causes the sun,  moon, and other planets to turn round also; and the lunar asterisms follow in its circular path, for all  the celestial luminaries are, in fact, bound to the polar star by aerial cords.”    Sisu‐Pala In.  Son of Dama‐ghosha, king of Chedi, by Sruta‐deva, sister of Vasu‐deva; he was therefore cousin  of Krishna, but he was Krishna's implacable foe, because Krishna had carried off Rukmini, his intended  wife.  He  was  slain  by  Krishna  at  the  great  sacrifice  of  Yudhi‐shthira  in  punishment  of  opprobrious  abuse.  The  Maha‐bharata  states  that  Sisu‐pala  was  born  with  three  eyes  and  four  arms.  His  parents  were inclined to cast him out, but were warned by a voice not to do so, as his time was not come. It  also foretold that his superfluous members should disappear when a certain person took the child into  his lap, and that he would eventually die by the hands of that same person. Krishna placed the child on  his  knees  and  the  extra  eye  and  arms  disappeared;  Krishna  also  killed  him.  The  Vishnu  Purana  contributes an additional legend about him. "Sisu‐pala was in a former existence the unrighteous but  valiant  monarch  of  the  Daityas,  Hiranya‐kasipu,  who  was  killed  by  the  divine  guardian  of  creation  (in  the  man‐lion  Avatara).  He  was  next  the  ten‐headed  (sovereign  Ravana),  whose  unequalled  prowess,  strength, and power were overcome by the lord of the three worlds (Rama). Having been killed by the  deity  in  the  form  of  Raghava,  he  had  long  enjoyed  the  reward  of  his  virtues  in  exemption  from  an  embodied state, but had now received birth once more as Sisu‐pala, the son of Dama‐ghosha, king of  Chedi.  In  this  character  he  renewed  with  greater  inveteracy  than  over  his  hostile  hatred  towards  Pundarikaksha  (Vishnu  ),  ...and  was  in  consequence  Blain  by  him.  But  from  the  circumstance  of  his  thoughts being constantly engrossed by the supreme being, Sisu‐pala was united with him after death,  ..,  for  the  lord  bestows  a  heavenly  and  exalted  station  even  upon  those  whom  he  slays  in  his  displeasure," He was called Sunitha, ‘virtuous.’    Sisupala‐Badha  In.    ‘The  death  of  Sisu‐pala;’  an  epic  poem  by  Magha,  in  twenty  cantos.  It  has  been  often  printed, and has been translated into French by Fauche.  Sisyphus Gk. A  king punished by being compelled to roll an immense  boulder up a hill, only to watch it roll  back down, and to repeat this throughout eternity  Sita  In.    ‘A  furrow.’  In  the  Veda,  Sita  is  the  furrow,  or  husbandry  personified,  and  worshipped  as  a  deity  presiding  over  agriculture and fruits. In the Ramayana and later works she is  daughter of Janaka king of Videha, and wife of Rama. The old  Vedic idea still adhered to her, for she sprang from a furrow  In the Ramayana her father Janaka says, “As I was ploughing  my field, there sprang from the plough a girl, obtained by me  while  cleansing  my  field,  and  known  by  name  as  Sita  (the  furrow).  This  girl  sprung  from  the  earth  grew  up  as  my  daughter.”  Hence  she  is  styled  Ayonija,  ‘not  born  from  the  womb.’  She  is  said  to  have  lived  before  in  the  Krita  age  as  Vedavati, and to be in reality the goddess Lakshmi in human  form, born in the world for bringing about the destruction of  Ravana, the Rakshasa king of Lanka, who was invulnerable to ordinary  means, but doomed to die on  account of a woman. Sita became the wife of Rama, who won her by bending the great bow of Siva.  She  was  his  only  wife,  and  was  the  embodiment  of  purity,  tenderness,  and  conjugal  affection.  She 

248

Mythology and Folklore  
accompanied her husband in his exile, but was carried off from him by Ravana and kept in his palace at  Lanka.  There  he  made  many  efforts  to  win  her  to  his  will,  but  she  continued  firm  against  all  persuasions, threats and terrors, and maintained a dignified serenity throughout. Then Rama had slain  the ravisher and recovered his wife, he received her coldly, and refused to take her back, for it was hard  to believe it possible that she had retained her honour. She asserted her purity in touching language,  and resolved to establish it by the ordeal of fire. The pile was raised and she entered the flames in the  presence of gods and men, but she remained unhurt, and the god of fire brought her forth and placed  her  in  her  husband's  arms.  Notwithstanding  this  proof  of  her  innocence,  jealous  thoughts  passed  through  the  mind  of  Rama,  and  after  he  had  ascended  his  ancestral  throne  at  Ayodhya,  his  people  blamed him for taking back a wife who had been in the power of a licentious ravisher. So, although she  was pregnant, he banished her and sent her to the hermitage of Valmiki, where she gave birth to twin  sons, Kusa and Lava. There she lived till the boys were about fifteen years old. One day they strayed to  their father's capital He recognised and acknowledged them and then recalled Sita. She returned and  publicly declared her innocence. But her heart was deeply wounded. She called upon her mother earth  to  attest  her  purity,  and  it  did  so.  The  ground  opened,  and  she  was  taken  back  into  the source  from  which she had sprung. Raffia was now disconsolate and resolved to quit this mortal life. (See  Rama.)  Sita had the appellations of Bhumi‐ja, Dharani‐suta, and Parthivi, all meaning ‘daughter of the earth.’  Sitting‐out magic N. Trance‐state magic practiced in Seid..Both motionlessness and breath control are basics  of  Útiseta,  the  "sitting  out"  which  is  used  to  set  the  seidkona  apart  form  the  world  she  normally  inhabits.  The  resulting  "not‐thinking"  has  the  same  intrinsic  value  for  the  runester,  freeing  body  and  mind and leading  to the magical trance which is required to examine and explore the nine worlds of  Norse creation.   Siva In.  The name Siva is unknown to the Vedas, but Rudra, another name of this deity, and almost equally  common, occurs in the Veda both in the singular and plural, and from these the great deity Siva and his  manifestations, the Rudras, have been developed. In the Rig‐veda the word Rudra is used for Agni, and  the Maruts are called his sons. In other passages he is distinct from Agni. He is lauded as “the lord of  Bongs, the lord of sacrifices, who hea1s remedies, is brilliant as the sun, the best and most bountiful of  gods,  who  grants  prosperity  and  welfare  to  horses  and  sheep,  men,  women,  and  cows;  the  lord  of  nourishment, who drives away diseases, dispenses remedies, and removes sin; but, on the other hand  he  is  the  wielder  of  the  thunderbolt,  the  bearer  of  bow  and  arrows,  and  mounted  on  his  chariot  is  terrible  as  a  wild  beast,  destructive  and  fierce.”  In  the  Yajur‐veda  there  is  a  long  prayer  called  Satarudriya  which  is  addressed  to  him  and  appeals  to  him  under  a  great  variety  of  epithets.  He  is  “auspicious,  not  terrible;”  “the  deliverer,  the  first  divine  physician;”  he  is  “blue‐necked  and  red‐ coloured, who has a thousand eyes and bears a thousand quivers;” and in another hymn he is called  “Tryambaka, the sweet‐scented in‐ creaser of prosperity;” “a medicine for kine and horses, a medicine  for  men,  and  a  (source  of)  ease  to  rams  and  ewes.”  In  the  Atharva‐veda  he  is  still  the  protector  of  cattle, but his character is fiercer. He is " dark, black, destroying, terrible.” He is the “fierce god,” who is  besought  to  betake  himself  elsewhere,  “and  not  to  assail  mankind  with  consumption,  poison,  or  celestial fire.” The Brahmanas tell that when Rudra was born he wept, and his father, Prajapati, asked  the reason, and on being told that he wept because he had not received a name, his father gave him  the  name  of  Rudra  (from  the  root  rod,  ‘weep’).  They  also  relate  that  at  the  request  of  the  gods  he  pierced Prajapati because of his incestuous intercourse with his daughter. In another place he is said to  have  applied  to  his  father  eight  successive  times  for  a  name,  and  that  he  received  in  succession  the  names Bhava, Sarva, Pasu‐pati, Ugradeva, Mahandeva, Rudra, Isana, and Asani. In the Upanishads his  character is further developed. He declares to the inquiring gods, “I alone was before (all things), and I  exist  and  I  shall  be.  No  other  transcends  me.  I  am  eternal  and  not  eternal,  discernible  and  undiscernible, I am Brahma and I am not Brahma.” Again it is said, “He is the only Rudra, he is lsana, he  is divine, he is Maheswara, he is Mahadeva.” “There is only one Rudra, there is no place for a second. 

249

Mythology and Folklore  
He rules this fourth world, controlling and productive; living beings abide with him, united with him. At  the time of the end he annihilates all worlds, the protector.” “He is without beginning, middle, or end;  the one, the pervading, the spiritual and blessed, the wonderful, the consort of Uma, the supreme lord,  the three‐eyed, the blue‐throated, the tranquil ...He is Brahma, he is Siva, he is Indra; he is undecaying,  supreme, self‐resplendent; he is Vishnu, he is breath, he is the spirit, the supreme lord; he is all that  hath  been  or  that  shall  be,  eternal  Knowing  him,  a  man  overpasses  death.  There  is  no  other  way  to  liberation.” In the Ramayana Siva is a great god, but the references to him having more of the idea of a  personal  god  than  of  a  supreme  divinity.  He  is  represented  as  fighting  with  Vishnu,  and  as  receiving  worship  with Brahma,  Vishnu, and Indra, but he acknowledges the divinity of Rama, and holds a less  exalted position than Vishnu. The Maha‐bharata also gives Vishnu or Krishna the highest honour upon  the whole. But it has many passages in which Siva occupies the supreme p~ and receives the homage  and worship of Vishnu and Krishna. “Maha‐deva,” it says, “is an all‐pervading god yet is nowhere seen;  he  is  the  creator  and  the  lord  of  Brahma,  Vishnu,  and  Indra,  whom  the  gods,  from  Brahma  to  the  Pisachas, worship.” The rival claims of Siva and Vishnu to supremacy are clearly displayed in this poem;  and  many  of  those  powers  and  attributes  are  ascribed  to  them  which  were  afterwards  so  widely  developed in the Puranas. Attempts also are made to reconcile their conflicting claims by representing  Siva  and  Vishnu,  Siva  and  Krishna,  to  be  one,  or,  as  it  is  expressed  at  a  later  time  in  the  Hari‐vansa,  there  is  “no  difference  between  Siva  who  exists  in  the  form  of  Vishnu,  and  Vishnu  who  exists  in  the  form of Siva.”       The  Puranas  distinctly  assert  the  supremacy  of  their  particular  divinity,  whether  it  be  Siva  or  whether  it  be  Vishnu,  and  they  have  developed  and  amplified  the  myths  and  allusions  of  the  older  writings into numberless legends and stories for the glorification and honour of their favourite god.     The Rudra of the Vedas has developed in the course of ages into the great and powerful god Siva,  the third deity of the Hindu triad, and the supreme god of his votaries. He is shortly described as the  destroying  principle,  but  his  powers  and  attributes  are  more  numerous  and  much  wider.  Under  the  name of Rudra or Maha‐kala, he is the great destroying and dissolving power. But destruction in Hindu  belief implies reproduction; so as Siva or Sankara, ‘the auspicious,’ he is the reproductive power which  is perpetually restoring that which has been dissolved, and hence he is regarded as lswara, the supreme  lord, and Maha‐deva, the great god. Under this character of restorer he is represented by his symbol  the Linga or phallus, typical of reproduction; and it is under this form alone, or combined with the Yoni,  or female organ, the representative of his Sakti, or female energy, that he is everywhere worshipped.  Thirdly,  he  is  the  Maha‐yogi,  the  great  ascetic,  in  whom  is  centred  the  highest  perfection  of  austere  penance  and  abstract  meditation,  by  which  the  most  unlimited  powers  are  attained,  marvels  an  miracles are worked, the highest spiritual knowledge is acquired, and union with the great spirit of the  universe  is  eventually  gained.  In  this  character  he  is  the  naked  ascetic  Dig‐ambara,  ‘clothed  with  the  elements,’  or  Dhur‐jati,  ‘loaded  with  matted  hair,’  and  his  body  smeared  with  ashes.  His  first  or  destructive character is sometimes intensified, and he becomes Bhairava, ‘the terrible destroyer,’ who  takes  a  pleasure  in  destruction.  He  is  also  Bhuteswara,  the  lord  of  ghosts  and  goblins.  In  these  characters he haunts cemeteries and places of cremation, wearing serpents round his head and skulls  for  a  necklace,  attended  by  troops  of  imps  and  trampling  on  rebellious  demons.  He  some‐  times  indulges  in  revelry,  and,  heated  with  drink,  dances  furiously  with  his  wife  Devi  the  dance  called  Tandava,  while  troops  of  drunken  imps  caper  around  them.  Possessed  of  so  many  powers  and  attributes, he has a great number of names, and is represented under a variety of forms. One authority  enumerates  a  thousand  and  eight  names,  but  most  of  these  are  descriptive  epithets,  as  Tri‐lochana,  ‘the three‐eyed,’ Nila‐kantha, ‘the blue‐throated,’ and Panch‐anana, ‘the five‐faced.’ Siva is a fair man  with  five  faces  and  four  arms.  He  is  commonly  represented  seated  in  profound  thought,  with  a  third  eye in the middle of his forehead, contained in or surmounted by the moon's crescent; his matted locks  are  gathered  up  into  a  coil  like  a  born,  which  bears  upon  it  a  symbol  of  the  river  Ganges,  which  he 

 

250

Mythology and Folklore  
caught  as  it fell from  heaven;  a  necklace  of  skulls  (munda‐mala),  hangs  round  his  neck,  and  serpents  twine about his neck as a collar (naga‐kundala); his neck is blue from drinking the deadly poison which  would have destroyed the world, and in his hand he holds a trisula or trident called Pinaka. His garment  is the skin of a tiger, a deer, or an elephant, hence he is called Kritti‐vasas; sometimes he is clothed in a  skin and seated upon a tiger‐skin, and he holds a door in his hand. He is generally accompanied by his  bull  Nandi.  He  also  carries  the  bow  Ajagava,  a  drum  (damaru)  in  the  shape  of  an  hour‐glass  the  Khatwanga  or  club  with  a  skull  at  the  end,  or  a  cord  (pasa)  for  binding  refractory  offenders.  His  Pramathas or attendants are numerous, and are imps and demons of various kinds. His third eye has  been very destructive. With it he reduced to ashes Kama, the god of love, for daring to inspire amorous  thoughts of his consort Parvati while he was engaged in penance; and the gods and all created beings  were destroyed by its glance at one of the periodical destructions of the universe. He is represented to  have  cut  off  one  of  the  heads  of  Brahma  for  speaking  disrespectfully,  so  that  Brahma.  Has  only  four  heads instead of five. Siva is the great object of worship at Benares under the name of Visweswara. His  heaven is on Mount Kailasa.       There are various legends respecting Siva's garments and weapons. It is said that he once visited a  forest in the form of a religious mendicant and the wives of the Rishis residing there fell in love with his  great beauty, which the Rishis, perceiving, resented; in order, therefore, to overpower him, they first  dug a pit, and by magical arts caused a tiger to rush out of it, which he slew, and taking his skin wore it  as a garment; they next caused a deer to spring out upon him, which he took up in his left hand and  ever after retained there. They then produced a red‐hot‐iron, but this too he took up and kept in his  hand as a weapon. ... The elephant's skin belonged to an Asura named Gaya, who acquired such power  that  he  would  have  conquered  the  gods,  and  would  have  destroyed  the  Munis  had  they  not  fled  to  Benares and taken refuge in a temple of Siva, who then destroyed the Asura, and, ripping up his body,  stripped off the (elephant) hide, which he cast over his shoulders for a cloak."‐Williams.     Other names or epithets of Siva are Aghora, ‘horrible; Babhru, Bhagavat, ‘divine;’ Chandra‐sekhara,  ‘moon‐crested;’  Ganga‐dhara,    ‘bearer  of  the  Ganges;’  Gilisa,  ‘mountain  lord;’  Hara,  ‘seizer;’  lsana,  ‘ruler;’  Jata‐dhara,  ‘wearing  matted  hair;’  Jala‐murtti,  ‘whose  form  is  water;’  Kala,  ‘time;’  Kalan‐jara;  Kapala‐malin, ‘wearing a garland of skulls;’ Maha‐kala, ‘great time;’ Mahesa, ‘great lord;’ Mrityunjaya,  ‘vanquisher of death;’ Pasu‐pati, ‘lord of animals;’ Sankara, Sarva, Sadasiva or Sambhu, ‘the auspicious;’  Sthanu,  ‘the  firm;’  Tryambaka,  ‘three‐eyed;’  Ugra,  ‘fierce;’  Virupaksha,  ‘of  mis‐formed  eyes;’  Viswanatha, ‘lord of all.’ 

 

Siva Purana In.  See Purana.  Sivi  In.    Son  of  Usinara,  and  king  of  the  country  also  called  Usinara,  near  Gandhara.  The  great  charity  and  devotion of Sivi are extolled in the  Maha‐bharata by the sage Markandeya. Agni having assumed the  form of a pigeon, was pursued by Indra in the shape of a falcon. The pigeon took refuge in the bosom of  Sivi,  and  the  falcon  would  accept  nothing  from  Sivi  instead  of  the  pigeon  but  an  equal  weight  of  the  king's own flesh. Sivi cut a piece of flesh from his right thigh and placed it in the balance, but the bird  was the heavier. He cut again and again, and still the pigeon drew the scale, until the king placed his  whole body in the balance. This outweighed the pigeon and the falcon flew away. On another occasion  Vishnu went to Sivi in the form of a Brahman and demanded food, but would accept no food but Sivi's  own son Vrihad‐garbha, whom he required Sivi to kill and cook. The king did so, and placed the food  before the Brahman, who then told him to eat it him‐self. Sivi took up the head and prepared to eat.  The Brahman then stayed his hand, commended his  devotion, and restoring the son to life, vanished  from sight.  Sjåmadhr N. "See‐Man". A man who sees, a seer), that phonetically comes very close to the word 'Shaman'. 

251

Mythology and Folklore  
Sjöfn, Sjofna N. "Affection". Asa‐Goddess of love, also known as Vjofn; One of the Asynjor (Æsir Goddess); It  was  her  duty  to  stop  fights  between  married  couples.  The  Sjofn  gives  love  and  sex  to  both  men  and  women. She is the mistress of the human's passion and the only one who can arrage for dissallowed  couples to be with each other.  Sjónhverfing N. A special subset of seid magic, the magical delusion or "deceiving of the sight" where the seid‐ witch affects the minds of others so that they cannot see things as they truly are. The role of seidr in  illusion  magic  is  well‐documented  in  the  sagas,  particularly  being  used  to  conceal  a  person  from  his  pursuers. Part of this power may have been due to hypnosis, for the seid‐witch could be deprived of  her powers by being deprived of her sight, and the effect faded when the victim left the presence of  the seid‐practitioner.  Skadi N. "Harm". Daughter of the Jotun‐Giant Thjatsi; Scathing Goddess of wintertime destruction, she wished  to revenge her father that the gods had killed earlier. She is offered an Aesir husband. She desires fair  Balder and so chooses the most beautiful pair of feet, which belonged to Njord. They did marry, but it  didn't  last  because  she  didn't  like  living  with  the  Æsirs.  Scandinavia  is  named  after  her‐‐the  "land  of  Skadi". Ullr was her husband after Njord. She may have been the third aspect of Nerthus. She brings the  snow  which  insures  a  good  harvest  and  she  leads  the  Wild  Hunt.  The  wolf  and  poisonous  snake  are  sacred to her.  Skald N. A poet who composes highly formal, originally magical, verse.  Skaldcraft N. The magical force of poetry; verbal magic (Galdr).  Skambha In. ‘The supporter.’ A name sometimes used in the Rig‐veda to designate the Supreme Deity. There  is  considerable  doubt  and  mystery  about  both  this  name  and  deity.  "The  meaning  of  the term,"  says  Goldstucker, "is 'the fulcrum,' and it seems to mean the fulcrum of the whole world in all it. physical,  religious, and other aspects." ‐Muir's Texts, v. 378.   Skanda In. God of war. See Karttikeya.    Skanda Purana In.  “The Skanda purana is that in which the six‐faced deity (Skanda) has related the events of  the Tatpurusha Kalpa, enlarged with many tales, and subservient to the duties taught by Maheswara. It  is  said  to  contain  81,800  stanzas:  So  it  is  asserted  amongst  mankind.”  “It  is  uniformly  agreed,”  says  Wilson, “that the Skanda Purana, in a collective form, has no existence; and the fragments, in the shape  of Sanhitas, Khandas, and Mahatmyas, which are affirmed in various parts of India to be portions of the  Purana, present a much more formidable mass of stanzas than even the immense number of which it is  said to consist. The most celebrated of these portions in Hindusthan is the Kasi Khanda, a very minute  description  of  the  temples  of  Siva  in  or  adjacent  to  Benares,  mixed  with  directions  for  worshipping  Maheswara, and a great variety of legends explanatory of its merits and of the holiness of Kasi. Many of  them are puerile and uninteresting, but some of them are of a higher character. There is every reason o  believe the greater part of the contents of the Kasi Khanda anterior to the first attack upon Benares by  Mahmud of Ghazni. The Kasi Khanda alone contains 15,000 stanzas. Another considerable work is the  Utkala Khanda, giving an account of the holiness of Orissa.” A part of this Purana has been printed at  Bombay.   Skeggjöld, Skegghol N. "Wearing a War Axe". A Valkyrie who serves ale to the Einheriar in Valhalla  Skidbladnir N. "Covered with pieces of wood". The best of ships, constructed with great ingenuity for Freyr by  the sons of Dwarf Ivaldi. It can sail in both air and water. It is big enough to hold all of the Æsir, yet it  can fold up like a cloth to go in one's pocket. 

252

Mythology and Folklore  
Skinfaxi N. Dag/Day's horse, which’s shining mane lights the sky and sea.  Skirnir N. "The Beaming One". Freyr's servant;Skirnir rides to Jotunheim to get the Giantess Gerd for him. He  gets Freyr's horse, Blodighofi, as a reward. He was also sent to the world of black‐elves and Dwarves to  have Gleipnir made.  Skögul  N.  "Battle".  A  Valkyrie  who  serves  ale  to  the  Einheriar  in  Valhalla;  Göndul,  Hildr  and  Skögul,  are  the  noblest Valkyries in Asgard. Their task is to choose the men permitted to go to Valhalla. She is often  associated with war magic.  Skoll N. One of the two fierce wolves who pursued the sun and moon. The other is Hati.Their object was to  swallow them so that the world might again be enveloped in its primeval darkness. Skoll is the wolf that  chases  the  lightdisir  Sun  and  her  two  horses.  Hati  runs  in  front  of  her.When  nature  dies  before  Ragnarok, Skoll finally gets to eat Sun. Skoll and Hati are sons of the Giantess of Iron Wood and Fenrir‐ wolf.  Skrymir N. "Big Boy". Utgard‐Loki in huge Giant‐form; Thor and his companions slept in his glove.  Skuld N. "She Who Is Becoming" or "That which shall be"; one of the Great Norns; Gunnr and Róta and the  youngest  Norn,  called  Skuld,  are  Valkyries,  who  ride  to  choose  who  shall  be  slain  and  to  govern  the  killings.  With  the  other  Fates,  Skuld  sits  at  the  Urdawell  spinning  threads  about  the  human's  future.  Skuld  comes  from  the  verb  skulu,  meaning  "shall".  In  Old  Norse  this  has  connotations  of  duty  and  obligation,  but  in  the  most  archaic  levels  when  the  term  first  arose,  it  merely  indicated  that  which  should come to pass, given past circumstances. The other Norns are Urdhr and Verdhandi.  Sleipnir  N.  The  eight‐legged  horse  that  conveyed  Odin  between  the  realms  of  spirit  and  matter  and  was  symbolic of Time.He is faster and cleverer than all the horses in the world.He can gallop over land, sea,  or through the air. Sleipnir was the child of Loki (in female form) and a Giant stallion, Svadilfari. He is  the father of Grane.  Slidrugtanni N. One of the two boars that drags the fertility God Freyr's wagon. The other boar is Gullinbursti,  who with his golden bristle, is able to lit up the darkest night.  Sllpa‐SASTRA In. The science of mechanics; it includes architecture. Any book or treatise on this science.    Smarta In.  Appertaining to the Smriti The Smarta‐sutras. See Sutras.   Smriti‐Chandrika In. A treatise on law, according w the Dravidian or Southern school, by Devana Bhatta.    Smritl  In.  ‘What  was  remembered.’  Inspiration,  as  distinguished  from  Sruti,  or  direct  revelation.  What  has  been  remembered  and  handed  down  by  tradition.  In  its  widest  application,  the  term  includes  the  Vedangas,  the  Sutras,  the  Ramayana,  the  Maha‐bharata,  the  Puranas,  the  Dharma‐sastras,  especially  the  works  of  Manu,  Yajnawalkya,  and  other  inspired  lawgivers,  and  the  Niti‐sastras  or  ethics,  but  its  ordinary application is to the Dharma‐sastras; as Manu says, “By Sruti is meant the Veda, and by Smriti  the institutes of law,” ii 10.    Snotra N. "Wise". Goddess of women's gentle wisdom and good manners; The Goddess of virtue and master  of all knowledge; She knows the value of self‐discipline.   Sobek Eg. A crocodile‐headed god; Admired and feared for his ferocity; At the command of Ra, He performed  tasks  such  as  catching  with  a  net  the  four  sons  of  Horus  as  they  emerged  from  the  waters  in  a  lotus  bloom. 

253

Mythology and Folklore  
Sokvabekk N. "Sunken‐bench" or "Deep Stream"; the home of Saga, the daughter of Odin; It was a crystal hall  is Asgard.  Sol Invictus Rom. Syrian , God of the sun.  Sól N. "Sun". The brilliant Sun Goddess mentioned in the Merseburger poems. Daughter of Munifauri, sister of  Mani ("Moon"); wife of Glen;  Rider of the chariot drawn by Alsvid and Arvak, carrier of the shield Svalin  ("Cool"); She will be consumed by the wolf Soll and be succeeded by her daughter, Sunna. Also known  as  Gull  ("Gold");  Gull  and  Sol  are  often  interchangeable  so  she  may  be  an  aspect  of  Gullveig.  Most  commentators seem to agree that Gullveig is identical with Freya. See also Sunna.  Sol Rom. God of the sun.  Soma In.  The juice of a milky climbing plant (Asclepias acida), extracted and fermented, forming a beverage  offered in libations to the deities, and drunk by the Brahmans. Its exhilarating qualities were grateful to  the priests, and the gods were represented as being equally fond of it. This soma juice occupies a large  space in the Rig‐veda; one Mandala is almost wholly devoted to its praise and uses. It was raised to the  position  of  a  deity,  and  represented  to  be  primeval,  all‐powerful,  healing  all  diseases,  bestower  of  riches, lord of other gods, and even identified with the Supreme Being. As a personification, Soma was  the god who represented and animated the soma juice, an Indian Dionysus or Bacchus.       “The  simple‐minded  Arian  people,  whose  whole  religion  was  a  worship  of  the  wonderful  powers  and  phenomena  of  nature,  had  no  sooner  perceived  that  this  liquid  had  power  to  elevate  the  spirits  and  produce  a  temporary  frenzy,  under  the  influence  of  which  the  individual  was  prompted  to,  and  capable  of,  deeds  beyond  his  natural  powers,  than  they  found  in  it  something  divine  it  was  to  their  apprehension  a  god,  endowing  those  into  whom  it  entered  with  godlike  powers;  the  plant  which  afforded  it  became  to  them  the  king  of  plants;  the  process  of  preparing  it  was  a  holy  sacrifice;  the  instruments used therefore were sacred. The high antiquity of this cultus is attested by the references  to  it  found  occurring  in  the  Persian  Avesta,  it  seems,  however,  to  have  received  a  new  impulse  on  Indian Territory.”‐  Whitney.      In later times, the name was appropriated to the moon, and some of the qualities of the soma juice  have been transferred to the luminary, who is Oshadhi‐pati, or lord of herbs. So Soma is considered the  guardian of sacrifices and penance, asterisms and healing herbs.     In the Puranic mythology Soma, as the moon, is commonly said to be the son of the Rishi Atri by his  wife  Anasuya,  but  the  authorities  are  not  agreed.  One  makes  him  son  of  Dharma;  another  gives  his  paternity  to  Prabhakara,  of  the  race  of  Atri;  and  he  is  also  said  to  have  been  produced  from  the  churning  of  the  ocean  in  another  Manwantara.  In  the  Vishnu  Purana  he  is  called  “the  monarch  of  Brahmans;” but the Brihad Aranyaka, an older work, makes him a Kshatriya. He married twenty‐seven  daughters of the Rishi Daksha, who are really personifications of the twenty‐seven lunar asterisms; but  keeping up the personality, he paid such attention to Rohini, the fourth of them, that the rest became  jealous, and appealed to their father. Daksha’s interference was fruitless, and he cured his son‐in‐law,  so that he remained childless, and became affected with consumption. This moved the pity of his wives,  and they interceded with their father for him. He could not recall his curse, but he modified it so that  the  decay  should  be  periodical,  not  permanent  hence  the  wane  and  increase  of  the  moon.  He  performed  the  Raja‐suya  sacrifice,  and  became  in  consequence  so  arrogant  and  licentious  that  he  carried  off  Tara,  the  wife  of  Brihaspati,  and  refused  to  give  her  up  either  on  the  entreaties  of  her  husband or at the command of Brahma. This gave rise to a widespread quarrel. The sage Usanas, out of  enmity to Brihaspati, sided with Soma, and he was supported by the Danavas, the Daityas, and other  foes of the gods. Indra and the gods in general sided with Brihaspati. There ensued a fierce contest, and 

 

 

254

Mythology and Folklore  
“the earth was shaken to her centre.” Soma had his body cut in two by Siva's trident, and hence he is  called  Bhagnatma.  At  length  Brahma  interposed  and  stopped  the  fight,  compelling  Soma  to  restore  Tarn  to  her  husband.  The  result  of  this  intrigue  was  the  birth  of  a  child,  whom  Tara,  after  great  persuasion, declared to be the son of Soma, and to whom the name of Budha was given: from him the  Lunar race sprung.         According to the Puranas, the chariot of Soma has three wheels, and is drawn by ten horses of the  whiteness of the jasmine, five on the right half of the yoke, and five on the left.     The moon has many names and descriptive epithets, as Chandra, Indu, Sasi, ‘marked like a hare;’  Nisakara, ‘maker of night;’ Nakshatra‐natha, ‘lord of the constellations;’ Sita‐marichi, ‘having cool rays;’  Sitansu, ‘having white rays;’ Mri‐ganka, ‘marked like a deer;’ Siva‐sekhara, ‘the crest of Siva;’ Kumuda‐ pati, ‘lord of the lotus;’ Sweta‐vaji, ‘drawn by white horses.’   

Somadeva Bhatta In. The writer or compiler of the collection of stories called Katha‐sarit‐sagara.    Somaka In. Grandfather of Drupada, who transmitted his name to his descendants.    Soma‐Loka In.  See Loka.    Soma‐Natha, Someswara In.  ‘Lord of the moon.’ The name of a celebrated Lingam or emblem of Siva at the  city of Somnath‐pattan in Gujarat. It was destroyed by Mahmud of Gazni.    Somapas In.  ‘Soma‐drinkers.’ A class of Pitris or Manes who drink the soma juice. See Pitris.    Soma‐Vansa In.  Sa Chandra‐vansa.    Somnus  Rom. God of sleep.  Son N. Son is one of three bowls used by the Dwarves Fjalar and Galar while making Kvæsir's blood into the  Mead of Poetry.  Sors Rom. God of luck.  Spae‐craft N. The craft of fore‐seeing, used by the Spåkonur in trance state. See also seid.   Spåkona N. Seidrkona, volva; one who uses utsetia, seidr. A seeress  Sparta Gk. The daughter of Eurotas by Clete; the wife of Lacedaemon (also her uncle) by whom she became  the mother of Amyclas and Eurydice of Argos (no relation to Orpheus' Eurydice); the city of Sparta is  said to have been named after her  Spes Rom. Goddess of hope.  Sphinx Eg.  A figure with the body of a lion and the head of a man, hawk or a ram.  Sphinx Gk. Has the haunches of a lion, the wings of a great bird, and the face and breast of a woman; she is  treacherous  and  merciless,  those  who  cannot  answer  her  riddle  suffer  a  fate  typical  in  such  mythological stories: they are gobbled up whole and raw, eaten by this ravenous monster  Sraddha In.  Faith, personified in the Vedas and lauded in a few hymns. 2. Daughter of the sage Daksha, wife  of the god Dharma, and reputed mother of Kama‐deva, the god of love.   

255

Mythology and Folklore  
Sraddha‐Deva, Sraddha‐Deva In.  Manu is called by the former name in the Brahmanas, and by the latter in  the Maha‐bharata. The latter is commonly applied to Yama.    Srauta In.  Belonging to the Sruti See Sruti and Sutra.    Srauta‐Sutra In.  See Sutra and Vedangas.    Sravasti In.  An ancient city which seems to have stood near Faizabad in Oude.    Sri Bhagavata In.  See Bhagavata Purana.    Sri Dama Charitra In.  A modern drama in five acts by Sama Raja Dikshita, on the sudden elevation to affluence  of Sri Daman, a friend of Krishna. It is not a good play, “but there is some vivacity in the thoughts and  much melody in the style.” –Wilson.    Sri Harsha Deva In.  A king who was author of the drama. Ratnavali.    Sri Harsha In.  A great sceptical philosopher, and author of the poem called Naishadha or Naishadhiya. There  were several kings of the name.    Sri‐Dhara Swami In.  Author of several commentaries of repute on the Bhagavad‐gita, Vishnu Purana, &c.    Sringa‐Giri  In.    A  hill  on  the  edge  of  the  Western  Ghats  in  Mysore,  where  there  is  a  math  or  monastic  establishment of Brahmans, said to have been founded by Sankaracharya.    Sringara Tilaka In.  ‘The mark of love.’ A work by Rudra Bhatta on the sentiments and emotions of lovers as  exhibited in poetry and the drama.    Sringa‐Vera In.  The modern Sungroor, a town on the left bank of the Ganges and on the frontier of Kosala and  the Bhil country. The country around was inhabited by Nishadas or wild tribes, and Guha, the friend of  Rama, was their chief.    Sri‐Saila In.  The mountain of Sri, the goddess of fortune. It is a holy place in the Dakhin, near the Krishna, and  was formerly a place of great splendour. It retains its sanctity but has lost its grandeur. Also called Sri‐ parvata.    Sri‐Vatsa In.  A particular mark, said to be a curl of hair on the breast of Vishnu or Krishna  Srl In.  ‘Fortune, prosperity.’ 1. The wife of Vishnu. (See Lakshmi.) 2. An honorific prefix to the names of gods,  kings, heroes, and men and books of high estimation.    Sruta‐Bodha In.  A work on metres attributed to Kali‐dasa. It has been edited and translated into French by  Lancereau.    Sruta‐Kirtti In.  Cousin of Sita and wife of Satru‐ghna.    Srutarshi In.  A Rishi who did not receive the Sruti (revelation) direct, but obtained it at second‐hand from the  Vedic Rishis.    Sruti In.  ‘What was heard.’ The revealed word. The Mantras and Brahmans of the Vedas are always included  in the term, and the Upanishads are generally classed with them.    Stabaz N. Germanic term for stave or stick, perhaps had to do with the fact that runes were carved on piece of  wood that most probably were used in divinatory practices. Runo and Stabaz were so intertwined that  the words eventually became synonymous. 

256

Mythology and Folklore  
Stadha N. "Standing". Bodily postures which imitate the shapes of runestaves used in galdr   Stadhagaldr N. "Posture magic"; the magical technique of assuming runic postures coupled with incantational  formulas.  Also,  the  meditational  practice  of  standing  in  a  rune's  shape  and  intoning  its  name;  Developed by German Armanen magicians. The stadha is the physical position.   Stafgardr N. Stave‐surrounded sacred enclosure  Stafr N. Stick, stave, letter, or secret lore  Stata Mater Rom. Goddess who guards against fires.  Stela Eg. A stone slab, sometimes wood, decorated with paintings, reliefs or texts; They usually commemorate  an event.   Sthali‐Devatas, Devatas In.  Gods or goddesses of the soil, local deities.    Sthanu In.  A name of Siva.    Sthapatya‐Veda In.  The science of architecture, one of the Upa‐vedas.  Sthenelus  Gk.  Attributed  to  several  different  individuals:  son  of  Perseus  and  Andromeda,  and  king  of  Mycenae;  son  of  Capaneus  and  Evadne,  he  fought  alongside  Diomedes  and  the  other  Argives  in  the  Trojan  War  and  was  one  of  the  men  who  hid  in  the  Trojan  horse;  son  of  Actor  and  a  companion  of  Heracles,  whom  he  accompanied  to  the  land  of  the  Amazons  to  steal  Hippolyte's  girdle;  son  of  Aegyptus  and  Tyria,  who  married  (and  was  killed  by)  Sthenele,  daughter  of  Danaus  and  Memphis;  father of Cycnus and King of Liguria  Sthuna, Sthuna‐Karna In.  A Yaksha who is represented in the Maha‐bharata to have changed sexes for a while  with Sikhandini, daughter of Drupada.    Stimula Rom. Goddess who incites passion in women.  Strenua Rom. Goddess of strength and vigor.  Strophius  Gk.  King  of  Phocis  and  father  of  Pylades;  the  one  who  hid  Orestes  from  his  murderous  mother,  Clytemnestra  Stymphalus Gk. A son of Elatus and Laodice a grandson of Arcas; father of Parthenope, Agamedes and Gortys.  Styx  Gk.  (meaning  "hate"  and  "detestation");  river  in  Greek  Mythology  that  formed  the  boundary  between  Earth and the Underworld (often called Hades which is also the name of this domain's ruler).  Styx Gk. Goddess of the Underworld river Styx and personification of hatred  Suadela Rom. Goddess of persuasion, especially in matters of love.  Su‐Bahu  In.  ‘Five‐armed.’  1.  A  son  of  Dhrita‐rashtra  and  king  of  Chedi;  A  son  of  Satru‐ghna  and  king  of  Mathura.    Su‐Bala  In.  A  king  of  Gandhara,  father  of  Gandhari,  wife  of  Dhrita‐rashtra;  A  mountain  in  Lanka  on  which  Hanuman alighted after leaping over the channel.   

257

Mythology and Folklore  
Su‐Bhadra  In.    Daughter  of  Vasu‐deva,  sister  of  Krishna,  and  wife  of  Arjuna.  Bala‐rama,  her  elder  brother,  wished  to  give  her  to  Dur‐yodhana,  but  Arjuna  carried  her  off  from  Dwaraka  at  Krishna’s  suggestion,  and  Bala‐rama  subsequently  acquiesced  in  their  union.  She  was  mother  of  Abhimanyu.  She  appears  especially  as  sister  of  Krishna  in  his  form  Jagan‐natha,  and  according  to  tradition  there  was  an  incestuous  intimacy  between  them.  When  the  car  of  Jagan‐natha  is  brought  out  the  images  of  Su‐ bhadra  and  Bala‐rama  accompany  the  idol,  and  the  intimacy  of  Jagan‐natha  and  Su‐bhadra  is  said  to  provoke taunts and reproaches.  Subhangi In.  ‘Fair‐limbed.’ An epithet of Rati, wife of Kama, and of Yakshi, wife of Kuvera.  Su‐Bhanu In.  Son of Krishna and Satya‐bhama.   SU‐Bodhinl In.  A commentary by Visweswara Bhatta on the law‐book called Mitakshara.    Su‐Brahmanya In.  A name of Karttikeya, god of war, used especially in the South. See Karttikeya.    Subrincinator  Rom. God of weeding.  Su‐Charu In.  A son of Krishna and Rukmini.    Su‐Darsana In.  A name of Krishna's chakra or discus weapon. See Vajra‐nabha.    Sudas In.  A king  who frequently appears in the Rig‐veda, and at whose court the rival Rishis Vasishtha and  Viswamitra are represented as living. He was famous for his sacrifices.    Su‐Deshna In.  ‘Good‐looking.’; Wife of the Raja of Virata, the patron of the disguised pandavas, and mistress  of Draupadi;  Also the wife of Balin.    Su‐Deshna In.  Son of Krishna and Rukmini.   Su‐Dharma,  Su‐Dharman  In.    The  hall  of  Indra,  “the  unrivalled  gem  of  princely  courts,”  which  Krishna  commanded  Indra  to  resign  to  Ugrasena,  for  the  assemblage  of  the  race  of  Yadu.  After  the  death  of  Krish1la it returned to Indra's heaven.    Sudra In.  The fourth or servile caste. See Varna.    Sudraka In.  A king who wrote the play called Mrichchha‐kati, ‘the toy‐cart,’ in ten acts.    Sudri N. "South". The Dwarf Sudri was put in the sky's south corner by Odin, Vili and Ve. The sky is made out of  the Giant Ymir's head.  Su‐Dyumna In.  Son of the Manu Vaivaswata. At his birth he was a female, Ila, but was afterwards changed  into a male and called Su‐Dyumna. Under the curse of Siva he again became Ila, who married Budha or  Mercury, and was mother of Pura‐ravas. By favour of Vishnu the male form was again recovered, and  Su‐dyumna became the father  of three  sons. This legend evidently has  reference to the  origin of the  Lunar race of kings.    Su‐Griva In.  ‘Handsome neck.’ A monkey king who was dethroned by his brother Balin, but after the latter had  been  killed,  Su‐griva  was  re‐installed  by  Rama  as  king  at  Kishkin‐dhya.  He,  with  his  adviser  Hanuman  and  their  army  (If  monkeys,  were  the  allies  of  Rama  in  his  war  against  Ravana,  in  which  he  was  wounded. He is said to have been son of the sun, and from his paternity he is called Ravi‐nandana and  by other similar names. He is described as being grateful, active in aiding his friends, and able to change  his form at will. His wife's name was Ruma.   

258

Mythology and Folklore  
Suhma In.  A country said to be east of Bengal.    Suka‐Saptati  In. ‘The seventy (tales) of a parrot.’ This is the original of the Tuti‐namah of the Persian, from  which the Hindustani Tota‐kahani was translated.    Sukra In.  The planet Venus and its regent. Sukra was son of Bhrigu and priest of Bali and the Daityas (Daitya‐ guru).  He  is  also  called  the  son  of  Kavi  His  wife's  name  was  Susuma  or  Sata‐parwa.  His  daughter  Devayani  married  Yayati  of  the  Lunar  race,  and  her  husband's  infidelity  induced  Sukra  to  curse  him.  Sukra is identified with Usanas, and is author of a code of law. The Hari‐vansa relates that he went to  Siva  and  asked  for  means  of  protecting  the  Asuras  against  the  gods,  and  for  obtaining  his  object  he  performed “a painful rite, imbibing the smoke of chaff with his head downwards for a thousand years.”  In his absence the gods attacked the Asuras and Vishnu killed his mother, for which deed Sukra cursed  him “to be born seven times in the world of men.” Sukra restored his mother to life, and the gods being  alarmed lest Sukra's penance should be accomplished, Indra sent his daughter Jayanti to lure him from  it.  She  waited  upon  him  and  soothed  him,  but  he  accomplished  his  penance  and  afterwards  married  her. Sukra is known by his patronymic Bhargava, and also as Bhrigu. He is also Kavi or Kavya, ‘the poet.’  The planet is called Asphujit, **; Magha‐bhava, son of Magha; Shodasansu, ‘having sixteen rays;’ and  Sweta, ‘the white.’     Sukta In.  A Vedic hymn.    Sumantra In. The chief counsellor of Raja Dasa‐ratha and friend of Rama.    Su‐Mantu In. The collector of the hymns of the Atharva‐veda; he is said to have been a pupil of Veda Vyasa,  and to have acted under his guidance.    Sumbha And Nishumbha In. Two Asuras, brothers, who were killed by Durga. These brothers, as related in the  Markandeya Purana, were votaries of Siva, and performed severe penance for 5000 years in order to  obtain  immortality.  Siva  refused  the  boon,  and  they  continued  their  devotions  with  such  increased  intensity  for  800  years  more,  that  the  gods  trembled  for  their  power.  By  advice  of  Indra,  the  god  of  love,  Kama,  went  to  them  with  two  celestial  nymphs,  Rambha  and  Tilottama,  and  they  succeeded  in  seducing the two Asuras and holding them in the toils of sensuality for 5000 years. On recovering from  their voluptuous aberration they drove the nymphs back to paradise and recommenced their penance.  At the end of 1000 years Siva blessed them “that in riches and strength they should excel the gods.” In  their  exaltation  they  warred  against  the  gods,  who,  in  despair,  appealed  in  succession  to  Brahma,  Vishnu, and Siva, but in vain. The latter advised them to apply to Durga, and they did so. She contrived  to engage the Asuras in war, defeated their forces, slew their commanders, Chanda and Munda, and  finally killed them. See Sunda.    Sumble N. The sacred ritual feast at which boasts are drunk.  Su‐Meru In. The mountain Meru, actual or personified.    Su‐Mitra In. Wife of Dasa‐ratha and mother of Lakshmana and Satru‐ghna. See Dasa‐ratha.    Summanus Rom. God of night thunder; His festival is June 20.  Su‐Mukha In. ‘Handsome face.’ This epithet is used for Garuda and for the son of Garuda.    Sunah‐Sephas  In.  The  legend  of  Sunah‐sephas,  as  told  in  the  Aitareya  Brahmana,  is  as  follows:  ‐  King  Haris‐ chandra,  of  the  race  of  Ikshwaku,  being  childless,  made  a  vow  that  if  he  obtained  a  son  he  would  sacrifice him to Varuna. A son was born who received the name of Rohita, but the father postponed, 

259

Mythology and Folklore  
under various pretexts, the fulfilment of his vow. When '1t length he resolved to perform the sacrifice,  Rohita refused to be the victim, and went out into the forest, where he lived for six years. He then met  a poor Brahman Rishi called Ajigartta, who had three sons, and Rohita purchased from Ajigartta for a  hundred cows, the second son, named Sunah‐ sephas, to be the substitute for himself in the sacrifice.  Varuna approved of the substitute, and the sacrifice was about to be per‐ formed, the father receiving  another  hundred  cows  for  binding  his  son  to  the  sacrificial  post,  and  a  third  hundred  for  agreeing  to  slaughter  him.  Sunah‐Sephas  saved  himself  by  reciting  verses  in  honour  of  different  deities,  and  was  received into the family of Viswamitra, who was one of the officiating priests. The Rama‐yana gives a  different  version  of  the  legend.  Ambarisha,  king  of  Ayodhya,  was  performing  a  sacrifice  when  Indra  carried off the victim. The officiating priest represented that this loss could be atoned for only by the  sacrifice of a human victim. The king, after a long search, found a Brahman Rishi named Richika, who  had  two  sons,  and  the  younger,  Sunah‐sephas,  was  then  sold  by  his  own  consent  for  a  hundred  thousand cows, ten millions of gold pieces, and heaps of jewels. Sunah‐sephas met with his maternal  uncle,  Viswamitra,  who  taught  him  two  divine  verses  which  he  was  to  repeat  when  about  to  be  sacrificed. As he was bound at the stake to be immolated, he celebrated the two gods Indra and Vishnu  with  the  excellent  verses,  and  Indra,  being  pleased,  bestowed  upon  him  long  life.  He  was  afterwards  called  Deva‐rata,  and  is  said  to  have  become  son  of  Viswamitra.  The  Maha‐bharata  and  the  puranas  show some few variations. A series of seven hymns in the Rig‐veda is attributed to Sunah‐sephas. See  Muir's Texts, i 355, 407, 413; Vishnu Purana, iv. 25; Muller's Sanskrit Literature, 408; Wilson's Rig‐Veda,  i 60.    Su‐Naman  In.    Son  of  Ugrasena  and  brother  of  Kansa.  He  was  king  of  the  Surasenas.  When  Kansa  was  overpowered in battle by Krishna, Su‐naman went to succour him, but was encountered and slain by  Bala‐rama.    Su‐Nanda In.  A princess of Chedi who befriended Dama‐yanti when she was deserted by her husband.    Sunda  In.    Sunda  and  Upasunda,  of  the  Maha‐bharata,  were  two  Daityas,  sons  of  Nisunda,  for  whose  destruction the .Apsaras Tilottama was sent down from heaven. They quarrelled for her, and killed each  other. See Sumbha.    Sunna N. Daughter of the lightdisir, Sol and Glen. She will succeed her mother when Sol is consumed by the  wolf Skoll.   Su‐Parnas In. ‘Fine‐winged.’ “Beings of superhuman character, as Garuda, and other birds of equally fanciful  description;  one  of  those  classes  first  created  by  the  Brahmadikas,  and  included  in  the  daily  presentation of water to deceased ancestors, &c.”‐Wilson.    Su‐Parswa In. A fabulous bird in the Ramayana. He was son of Sampati and nephew of Jatayus.    Su‐Priya In. ‘Very dear.’ Chief of the Gandharvas.    Sura In.  Wine or spirituous liquor, personified as Sura‐devi, a goddess or nymph produced at the churning of  the ocean.    Sura In. A Yadava king who ruled over the Surasenas at Mathura; he was father of Vasu‐deva and Kunti, and  grand‐father of Krishna.     Surabhi  In.  The  ‘cow  of  plenty,’  produced  at  the  churning  of  the  ocean,  who  granted  every  desire,  and  is  reverenced as “the fountain of milk and curds.” See Kama‐dhenu and Nandini.   

260

Mythology and Folklore  
Suras  In.    In  the  Vedas,  a  class  of  beings  connected  with  Surya,  the  sun.  The  inferior  deities  who  inhabit  Swarga; a god in general According to some, the word is allied to swar, heaven;’ others think it to have  sprung from the derivation assigned to asura, and as a‐sura is said to signify ‘not a god,’ sura has come  to mean. ‘god.’    Su‐Rasa In.  A Rakshasi, mother of the Nagas. ‘Then Hanuman was on his flight to Lanka against Ravana, she  tried  to  save  her  relative  by  swallowing  Hanuman  bodily.  To  avoid  this  Hanuman  distended  his  body  and  continued  to  do  so,  while  she  stretched  her  mouth  till  it  was  a  hundred  leagues  wide.  Then  he  suddenly shrank up to the size of a thumb, darted through her, and came out at her right ear.   Surasenas  In.    Name  of  a  people,  the  Suraseni  of  Arrian.  Their  capital  was  Mathura  on  the  Yamuna,  which  Manu calls Surasena.   Surpa‐Nakha  In.  ‘Having  nails  like  winnowing‐fans.’    Sister  of  Ravana.  This  Rakshasi  admired  the  beauty  of  Rama and fell in love with him. When she made advances to Rama he referred her to Lakshmana, and  Lakshmana in like manner sent her back to Rama. Enraged at this double rejection, she fell upon Sita,  and Rama was obliged to interfere forcibly for the protection of his wife. He called out to Lakshmana to  disfigure the violent Rakshasi, and Lakshmana cut off her nose and ears. She flew to her brothers for  revenge,  and  this  brought  on  the  war  between  Rama  and  Ravana.  She  descanted  to  Ravana  on  the  beauty  of  Sita,  and  instigated  his  carrying  her  off,  and  finally  she  cursed  him  just  before  the  engagement in which he was killed .  Surt N. "Black". An evil Fire Giant who guards the gates of Muspell and rules the fiery beings there. He carries  a flaming sword. His hair is burning and boiling lava covers his body. He will kill Freyr in Ragnarok.  Surya In. The sun or its deity. He is one of the three chief deities in the Vedas, as the great source of light and  warmth,  but  the  references  to  him  are  more  poetical  than  precise.  Sometimes  he  is  identical  with  Savitri and Aditya, sometimes he is distinct. “Sometimes he is called son of Dyaus, sometimes of Aditi.  In one passage, Ushas, the dawn, is his wife, in another he is called the child of the dawns; he moves  through  the  sky  in  a  chariot  drawn  by  seven  ruddy  horses  or  mares.”  Surya  has  several  wives,  but,  according to later legends, his twin sons the Aswins, who are ever young and handsome and ride in a  golden  car  as  precursors  of  Ushas,  the  dawn,  were  born  of  a  nymph  called  Aswini,  from  her  having  concealed herself in the form of a mare. In the Ramayana and Puranas, Surya is said to be the son of  Kasyapa and Aditi, but in the Ramayana he is otherwise referred to as a son of Brahma. His wife was  Sanjna, daughter of Viswa‐karma, and by her he had three children, the Manu Vaivaswata, Yama, and  the  goddess  Yami,  or  the  Yamuna  river.  His  effulgence  was  so  overpowering  that  his  wife  gave  him  Chhaya  (shade)  for  a  handmaid,  and  retired  into  the  forest  to  devote  herself  to  religion.  While  thus  engaged, and in the form of a mare, the sun saw her and approached her in the form of a horse. Hence  sprang the two Aswins and Revanta. Surya brought back his wife Sanjna to his home, and her father,  the  sage  Viswa‐karma,  placed  the  luminary  on  his  lathe  and  cut  away  an  eighth  of  his  effulgence,  trimming him in every part except the feet. The fragments that were cut off fell blazing to the earth,  and from them  Viswa‐karma formed the discus  of Vishnu, the trident  of Siva, the weapon of Kuvera,  the lance of Karttikeya, and the weapons of the other gods. According to the Maha‐bharata, Karna was  his illegitimate son by Kunti. He is also fabled to be the father of Sani and the monkey chief Su‐griva.  The Manu Vaivaswata was father of Ikshwaku, and from him, the grandson of the sun, the Surya‐vansa,  or Solar race of kings, draws its origin. In the form of a horse Surya communicated the White Yajur‐veda  to  Yajnawalkya,  and  it  was  he  who  bestowed  on  Satrajit  the  Syamantaka  gem.  A  set  of  terrific  Rakshasas called Mandehas made an attack upon him and sought to devour him, but were dispersed by  his light. According to the Vishnu Purana he ,vas seen by Sattrajita in “his proper form,” “of dwarfish  stature,  with  a  body  like  burnished  copper,  and  with  slightly  reddish  eyes.”  Surya  is  represented  in a 

261

Mythology and Folklore  
chariot  drawn  by  seven  horses,  or  a  horse  with  seven  heads,  surrounded  with  rays.  His  charioteer  is  Aruna or Vivaswat, and his city Vivaswati or Bhaswati. There are temples of the sun, and he receives  worship.  The  names  and  epithets  of  the  sun  are  number‐less.  He  is  Savitri,  ‘the  nourisher;’  Vivaswat,  ‘the brilliant;’ Bhaskara,  ‘light‐maker;’ Dina‐kara, ‘day‐maker;’ Arha‐pati, ‘lord of day;’ Loka‐chakshuh,  ‘eye  of  the  world;’  Karma‐sakshi,  ‘witness  of  the  deeds  (of  men);’  Graha‐raja,  ‘king  of  the  constellations;’ Gabhastiman, ‘possessed of rays;’ Sahasra‐kirana, ‘having a thousand rays;’ Vikarttana,  ‘shorn  of  his  beams’  (by  Viswa‐karma);  Martanda,  ‘descended  from  Mritanda,’  &c.  Surya's  wives  are  called Savarna, Swati, and Maha‐virya.   Surya Siddhanta In.  A celebrated work on astronomy, said to have been revealed by the sun (Surya). It has  been edited in the Bibliotheca Indica by Hall, and ‐there are other editions. It has been translated by  Whitney and Burgess.    Surya‐ Vansa In. The Solar race. A race or lineage of Kshatriyas which sprank from Ikshwaku, grandson of the  sun.  Rama  was  of  this  race,  and  so  were  many  other  great  kings  and  heroes.  Many  Rajputs  claim  descent from this and the other great lineage, the Lunar race. The Rana of Udaypur claims to be of the  Surya‐vansa, and the Jharejas of Cutch and Sindh assert a descent from the Chandra‐vansa. There were  two dynasties of the Solar race. The elder branch, which reigned at Ayodhya, descended from Ikshwaku  through  his  eldest  son,  Vikukshi  the  other  dynasty,  reigning  at  Mithili,  descended  from  another  of  Ikshwakus sons, named Nimi the lists of thesl1 two dynasties on the opposite page are taken from the  Vishnu Purana. The lists given by other authorities show some discrepancies, but they agree in general  as to the chief names.     Surya‐Kanta In. ‘The sun‐gem.’ A crystal supposed to be formed of condensed rays of the sun, and though cool  to the touch to give out heat in the sun’s rays. There touch, to give out heat in the sun's rays. There is a  similar moon‐stone. It is also called Dahanopala. See Chandra‐kanta.    Su‐Sarman In.  A king of Tri‐gartta, who attacked the Raja of Virata, and defeated him and made him prisoner,  but Bhima rescued the Raja and made Su‐sarman prisoner.    Sushena In.  A son of Krishna and Rukmini. 2. A physician in the army of Rama, who brought the dead to life  and performed other miraculous cures.    Sushna In. An Asura mentioned in the Rig‐veda as killed by Indra.     Susruta In. A medical writer whose date is uncertain, but his work was translated into Arabic before the end of  the eighth century. The book has been printed at Calcutta. There is a Latin translation by Hepler and  one in German by Vullers.    Suta In.  ‘Charioteer.’ A title given to Karna.    Su‐Tikshna In.  A hermit sage who dwelt in the Dandaka forest, and was visited by Rama and Sita.    Sutra In.  ‘A thread or string.’ A rule or aphorism. A verses expressed in brief and technical language, ‐a very  favourite form among the Hindus of embodying and transmitting rules. There are Sutras upon almost  every  subject,  but  “the  Sutras”  generally  signify  those  which  are  connected  with  the  Vedas,  viz.,  the  Kalpa Sutras, relating to ritual; the Grihya Sutras, to domestic rites; and the Samayacharika Sutras, to  conventional usages. The Kalpa Sutras, having especial reference to the Veda or Sruti, are called Srauta;  the  others  are  classed  as  Smarta,  being  derived  from  the  Smriti.  The  Sutras  generally  are  anterior  to  Manu, and are probably as old as the sixth century B.C. Several have been published in the Bibliotheca  Indica.   

262

Mythology and Folklore  
Suttung N. The Giant who guards the Mead of Poetry. Suttung, son of Gilling, got the Mead of Poetry from the  Dwarves Fjalar and Galar when he was avenging the murder of his parents.  Sutudri In. The river Satlej. See Sata‐dru.    Su‐Vahu In.  A Rakshasa, son of Taraka. He was killed by Rama.    Su‐Vela In.  One of the three peaks of the mountain Tri‐kuta, on the midmost of which the city of Lanka was  built.    Su‐Yodhana In.  ‘Fair fighter.’ A name of Dur‐yodhana.    Svadilfari N. "He who picks the hard way”; A stallion which belonged to a Rock Giant. Svadilfari is a very strong  horse and helped build the Asgard wall. He mated with Loki (who had shape‐shifted into the form of a  mare) and produced Sleipnir.  Svalin N. Svalin is the shield that protects Sun from the warmth of her carriage when she rides to maintain the  day rythm. Her horses also have a protection called Isarnkol.  Svanhvit N. "Swan‐White". A Valkyrie  Svartalfheim, Svartalfheimr N. The world of the Black Elves or Dwarves. A "subterranean" world of darkness  where shapes are forged   Svartalfr, Svartalfar N. Dwarves, or Black Elves; also known as Dvergar. They were created by the gods out of  the maggots that crawled through the flesh of the slain Ymir. They are very clever smiths, who forged  Freyja's necklace, Thor's hammer, Sif's golden hair, Freyr's ship, and a hoard of other treasures for the  golds. Their dwelling, Svartalfheim is beneath Midgardhr's surface, and it is there that they hoard their  gold  and  jewels.  The  dwarves  are  earthly  craft  and  power  which  give  shape  to  and  being  to  the  inspiration  of the  Ljosalfar.  It  was  Svartalfar  who  slew  Kvasir  and  made  the  mean  Odhroerir  from  his  blood, transforming the raw material of wisdom into the craft and art of poetry from which any who  could  might  drink.  The  Kobolds  of  the  German  mines  may  be  classed  as  Svartalfar,  as  may  all  of  the  knocking spirits heard in subterranean works. The Svartalfar are said to be miserly and grudging, as well  as more ill‐tempered than the other races of Alfar. The word dwarf is etymologically connected to the  idea of harming, oppressing or maliciously deceiving. Like the Dokkalfar (Dark Elves), they are skilled in  magic, having learned the runes through the Dwarf Dvalin, and they know magical songs; unlike them,  they almost never willingly teach their magical knowledge, though at times they may teach the art of  smithing  to  a  human.  ...It  is  not  uncommon  for  the  Svartalfar  to  curse  things  that they  are  forced  to  make, such as the sword Tyrfing, or that are stolen from them, such as Advari's hoard. They are also  said  to  steal  human  women  and  children,  perhaps  because  there  are  few  dwarvish  women.  Yet,  although they are often untrustworthy, viciously vengeful, and malicious, they can be surprisingly loyal  and friendly to humans who treat them well....The Svartalfar are said to be dark of complexion, ugly,  perhaps twisted; they often appear as short but very powerful men with long gray beards.  Svartrunir N. "Black Runes". Necromantic characters; runes used to communicate with departed spirits.   Sváva N. Sváva is a Valkyrie that once fell in love with Helge, the son of a king. Their story is tragic. Helge was  mortally wounded and the couple died together.  Svin N. Wild boar, formidable opposition. 

263

Mythology and Folklore  
Svínfylking N. Norse boar‐cult warriors who fought in wedge‐formation with two champions, the rani (snout)  to the fore; also the animal form taken in shapeshifting by these warriors  Swadha In. ‘Oblation.’ Daughter of Daksha and Prasuti according to one statement, and of Agni according to  another. She is connected with the Pitris or Manes, and is represented as wife of Kavi or of one class of  Pitris, and as mother of others.    Swaha In. ‘Offering.’ Daughter of Daksha and Prasuti. She was wife of Vahni or Fire, or of Abhimani, one of the  Agnis.    Swa‐Phalka In.  Husband of Gandini and father of  Akrura. He was a  man of great sanctity of character, and  where  “he  dwelt  famine,  plague,  death,  and  other  visitations  were  unknown.”  His  presence  once  brought rain to the kingdom of Kasi‐raja, where it was much wanted.    Swar In.  See Vyahriti.    Swarga  In.  The  heaven  of  Indra,  the  abode  of  the  inferior  gods  and  of  beatified  mortals,  supposed  to  be  situated on Mount Meru. It is called also Sairibha, Misraka‐vana, Tavisha, Tri‐divam, Tri‐pishtapam, and  Urdhwa‐loka. Names of heaven or paradise in general are also used for it.    Swar‐Loka In.  See Loka.   Swarochisha In. Name of the second Manu. See Manu.    Swastika In. A mystical religious mark placed upon persons or things. It is in the form of a Greek cross with the  ends bent round.   Swayam‐Bhu In.  ‘The self‐existent.’ A name of Brahma, the creator.    Swayam‐Bhuva A name of the first Manu (q.v.).    SWETA‐Dwlpa  In. ‘The white island or continent.’ Colonel Wilford attempted to identify it with Britain.    Sweta‐Ketu  In.  A  sage  who,  according  to  the  Maha‐bharata,  put  a  stop  to  the  practice  of  married  women  consorting with other men, especially with Brahmans. His indignation was aroused at seeing a Brahman  take his mother by the hand and invite her to go away with him. The husband saw this, and told his son  that there was no ground of offence, for the practice had prevailed from time immemorial. Sweta‐ketu  would  not  tolerate  it,  and  introduced  the  rule  by  which  a  wife  is  forbidden  to  have  intercourse  with  another man unless specially appointed by her husband to raise up seed to him.    Swetaswatara In. An Upanishad attached to the Yajur‐veda. It is one of the most modern. Translated by Dr.  Roel for the Bibliotheca Indica.     Syala In.  ‘A brother‐in‐law.’ A Yadava prince who insulted the sage Gargya, and was the cause of his becoming  the father of Kala‐yavana, a great foe of Krishna and the Yadava family.    Syama In. ‘The black.’ A name of Siva's consort. See Devi.    Syamantaka  In.  A  celebrated  gem  given  by  the  sun  to  Satrajita.  “It  yielded  daily  eight  loads  of  gold,  and  dispelled all fear of portents, wild beasts, fire, robbers, and famine.” But though it was an inexhaustible  source of good to the virtuous wearer, it was deadly to a wicked one. Satrajita being afraid that Krishna  would take it from him, gave it to his own brother, Prasena, but he, being a bad man, was killed by a  lion.  Jambavat,  king  of  the  bears,  killed  the  lion  and  carried  off  the  gem,  but  Krishna,  after  a  long 

264

Mythology and Folklore  
conflict,  took  it  from  him,  and  restored  it  to  Satrajita.  Afterwards  Satrajita  was  killed  in'  his  sleep  by  Sata‐dhanwan, who carried off the gem. Being pursued by Krishna and Bala‐rama, he gave the gem to  Akrura and continued his flight, but he was overtaken and killed by Krishna alone. As Krishna did not  bring back the jewel, Bala‐rama suspected that he had secreted it, and consequently he upbraided him  and parted from him, declaring that he would not be imposed upon by perjuries. Akrura subsequently  produced the gem, and it was claimed by Krishna, Bala‐rama, and Satya‐bhama. After some contention  it was decided that Akrura should keep it, and so “he moved about like the sun wearing a garland of  light.”    Syavaswa  In.  Son  of  Archananas.  Both  were  Vedic  Rishis.  In  a  hymn  he  says,  “Sasiyasi  has  given  me  cattle,  comprising horses and cows and hundreds of sheep.” The story told in explanation is that Archananas,  having seen the daughter of Raja Rathaviti, asked her in marriage for his son Syavaswa. The king was  inclined  to  consent,  but  the  queen  objected  that  no  daughter  of  their  house  had  ever  been  given  to  anyone less saintly than a Rishi. To qualify himself Syavaswa engaged in austerities and begged alms.  Among others, he begged of Sasiyasi, wife of Raja Taranta. She took him to her husband, with whose  permission  she  gave  him  a  herd  of  cattle  and  costly ornaments.  The  Raja  also  gave  him whatever  he  asked  for,  and  sent  him  on  to  his  younger  brother,  Purumilha.  On  his  way  he  met  the  Maruts,  and  lauded them in a hymn, for which the) made him a Rishi. He then returned to Rathaviti, and received  his daughter to wife.  Sychaeus Gk.  Best known as the uncle and husband of Dido; after his marriage to Dido, he was murdered by  her brother, Pygmalion  Syn N. "Truth". Guardian Goddess of doorways and of love An attendant of Frigga, Syn guarded the door of  Frigga's palace, refusing to open it to those who were not allowed to come in. When she had once shut  the  door  upon  a  would‐be  intruder  no  appeal  would  prevail  to  change  her  decision.  She  therefore  presided over all tribunals and trials, and whenever a thing was to be vetoed the usual formula was to  declare that Syn was against it.  Syr N. An aspect of Freya as the Golden Sow  Syracuse. Gk. The Greek city on the southeastern coast of the island of Sicily.  Syrinx Gk. A nymph and a follower of Artemis known for her Chastity; Pursued by the amorous Greek god Pan,  she ran to the river's edge and asked for assistance from the river nymphs.   


Tadaka In. Taraka.   Taenarum Gk. Where Hercules (Herakles) went to find the entrance to Hades (or Άδης in Greek) to fulfill his  last labor of capturing Cerberus.  Taittiriya  In.  This  term  is  applied  to  the  Sanhita  of  the  Black  Yajur‐veda.(See  Veda.)  It  is  also  applied  to  a  Brahmana, to an Aranyaka, to an Upanishad, and a Pratisakhya of the same Veda. All these are printed,  or are in course of printing, in the Bibliotheca Indica,and of the last there is a translation in that serial.  Taksha, Takshaka In. Son of Bharata, and nephew of Rama‐chandra. The sovereign of Gandhara, who resided  at and probably founded Taksha‐sila or Taxila, in the Panjab. 

265

Mythology and Folklore  
Takshaka In.  ‘One who cuts off; a carpenter.’ A name of Viswa‐karma. A serpent, son of Kadru, and chief of  snakes.    Taksha‐Sila In. A city of the Gandharas, situated in the Panjab. It was the residence of Taksha, son of Bharata  and  nephew  of  Rama‐chandra,  and  perhaps  took  its  name  from  him.  It  is  the  Taxila  of  Ptolemy  and  other classical writers. Arrian describes it as “a large and wealthy city, and the most populous between  the  Indus  and  Hydaspes.”  It  was  three  days'  journey  east  of  the  Indus,  and  General  Cunningham  has  found its remains at Sahh‐dhari, one mile north‐east of Kala‐kisarai.   Tala Vakara In. A name of the Kena Upanishad.  Talajangha In. Son of Jaya‐dhwaja, king of Avanti, of the Haihaya race, and founder of the Tala‐jangha tribe of  Haihayas. See Haihaya.    Tala‐Ketu In. ‘Palm‐banner.’ An appellation of Bhishma; also of an enemy killed by Krishna. Bala‐rama had the  synonymous appellation Tala‐dhwaja.     Talam In.  The throne of Durga.     Talatat  Eg.  This  Arabic  word  means  "three  handbreadths";  It  is  used  to  describe  the  typical  stone  building  blocks of temples of Akhenaten, they are decorated with scenes in the Amarna style; They have been  found reused at a number of other building sites.   Talus  Gk.  A  giant  man  of  bronze;  who  protected  Europa  in  Crete  from  pirates  and  invaders  by  circling  the  island's shores three times daily while guarding it.  Tamasa  In. The fourth Manu. SeeManu.  Tamasa In.  The river “Tonse,” rising in the Riksha mountains, and falling into the Ganges.     Tamra‐Lipta  In.    The  country  immediately  West  of  the  Bhagirathi;  Tamlook,  Hijjali,  and  Midnapore.  Its  inhabitants are called Tamra‐liptakas.     TAMRA‐PARNA,  TAMRA‐Parnl  In.    Ceylon,  the  ancient  Taprobane.  There  was  a  town  in  the  island  called  Tamra‐parni, from which the whole island has been called by that name.    Tandgnistr N. "Tooth Grinder". One of the two he‐goats that pulled Thor's wagon; If Thor slaughters it, it will  be alive again the next morning as long as the bones are intact.  Tandgrisner  N.  "Gap  Tooth"  or  "The  one  with  teeth  spaces".  One  of  the  two  he‐goats  that  pulled  Thor's  wagon; If Thor slaughters it, it will be alive the next morning as long as the bones are intact.  Tandu In.  One of Siva's attendants. He was skilled in music, and invented the dance called Tandava. SeeSiva.    Tandya, Tandaka In. The most important of the eight Brahmanas of the Sama‐veda. It has been published in  the B ibliotheca Indica.     Tantalus Gk. The ruler of an ancient western Anatolian city called either after his name, as "Tantalís", "the city  of Tantalus", or as "Sipylus", in reference to Mount Sipylus at the foot of which his city was located and  whose ruins were reported to be still visible in the beginning of the Common Era although few traces  remain today. 

266

Mythology and Folklore  
Tantra    In.‘Rule,  ritual.’  The  title  of a  numerous  class  of  religious  and  magical  works,  generally  of  later  date  than the Puranas, and representing a later development of religion, although the worship of the female  energy had its origin at an earlier period. The chief peculiarity of the Tantras is the prominence they  give to the female energy of the deity, his active nature being personified in the person of his Sakti, or  wife. There are a few Tantras which make Vishnu's wife or Radha the object of devotion, but the great  majority  of  them  are  devoted  to  one  of  the  manifold  forms  of  Dev!,  the  Sakti  of  Siva,  and  they  are  commonly written in the form of a dialogue between these two deities Devi, as the Sakti of Siva, is the  especial  energy  concerned  with  sexual  intercourse  and  magical  powers,  and  these  are  the  leading  topics  of  the  Tantras.  There  are  five  requisites  for  Tantra  worship,  the  five  Makaras  or  five  m's‐(1.)  Madya, wine; (2.) Mansa,flesh; (3.) Matsya, fish; (4) Mudra, parched grain and mystic gesticulations; (5.  ) Maithuna, sexual intercourse. Each Sakti has a twofold nature, white and black, gentle and ferocious.  Thus Uma and Gauri are gentle forms of the Sakti of Siva, while Durga and Kali are fierce forms. The  Saktas or worshippers of the Saktis are divided into two classes, Dakshinacharis and Vamanacharis, the  right‐handed and the left‐ handed. The worship of the right‐hand Saktas is comparatively decent, but  that of the left hand is addressed to the fierce forms of the Saktis, and is most licentious. The female  principle is worshipped, not only symbolically, but in the actual woman, and promiscuous intercourse  forms part of the orgies. Tantra worship prevails chiefly in Bengal and the Eastern provinces.    Tapar‐Loka, Tapo‐Loka In.  SeeLoka.   Tapati  In.  The  river  Tapti  personified  as  a  daughter  of  the  Sun  by  Chhaya.  She  was  mother  of  Kuru  by  Samvarana.   Tara In.  Wife of the monkey king Balin, and mother of Angada. After the death of Balin in battle she was taken  to wife by his brother, Su‐griva.     Tara, Taraka In.  Wife of Brihaspati. According to the Puranas, Soma, the moon, carried her off, which led to a  great war between the gods and the Asuras. Brahma put an end to the war and restored Tara, but she  was  delivered  of  a  child  which  she  declared  to  be  the  son  of  Soma,  and  it  was  named  Budha.  SeeBrihaspati.     Taraka In. A female Daitya, daughter off the Yaksha Su‐ketu or of the demon Sunda, and mother of Maricha.  She was changed into a Rakshasi by Agastya, and lived in a forest called by her name on the Ganges,  opposite the confluence of the Sarju, and she ravaged all the country round. Viswamitra desired Rama‐ chandra to kill her, but he was reluctant to kill a woman. He resolved to deprive her of the power of  doing  harm,  and  cut  off  her  two  arms.  Lakshmana  cut  off  her  nose  and  ears.  She,  by  the  power  of,  sorcery, assailed Rama and Lakshmana with a fearful shower of stones, and at the earnest command of  Viswamitra, the former killed her with an arrow.‐Ramayana.    Taraka  In.  Son  of  Vajranaka.  A  Daitya  whoso  austerities  made  him  formidable  to  the  gods,  and  for  whose  destruction Skanda, the god of war, was miraculously born.     Taraka‐Maya In.  The war which arose in consequence of Soma, the moon, having carried off Tara, the wife of  Brihaspati.    Tarkshya In.  An ancient mythological personification of the sun in the form of a horse or bird. In later times  the name is applied to Garuda.    Tartarus  Gk.  It  is  a  deep,  gloomy  place,  a  pit,  or  an  abyss  used  as  a  dungeon  of  torment  and  suffering  that  resides beneath the underworld.  Tatwa Samasa In.  A text book of the Sankhya philosophy, attributed to Kapila himself.   

267

Mythology and Folklore  
Taufr N. Talismanic magic; also used to refer to the talismanic object itself; for example, a bindrune amulet  Taurt Eg. A goddess who protected pregnant woman and infants; Also protectress of rebirth into the afterlife;  She is pictured as a pregnant hippopotamus with human breasts, the hind legs of a lioness and the tail  of a crocodile.  Taygete Gk. A daughter of Atlas and Pleione; one of the Pleiades; she became the mother of Lacedaemon and  Eurotas.  Teinar N. Tines (i.e. runes)  Teinéigin N. need‐fire  Teinn N. "Twig". A talismanic word for divination  Teiresias. Gk. Blind prophet of Thebes, famous for clairvoyance and for being transformed into a woman for  seven years; He was the son of the shepherd Everes and the nymph Chariclo.  Telamon  Gk.  The  son  of  the  king  Aeacus  of  Aegina;  accompanied  Jason  as  one  of  his  Argonauts,  and  was  present  at  the  hunt  for  the  Calidonian  Boar;  In  the  Iliad  he  was  the  father  of  Greek  heroes  Ajax  the  Great and Teucer the Archer by different mothers; He and Peleus were also close friends with Heracles  assisting him on his expeditions against the Amazons and against Troy.  Telemachus Gk. The son of Odysseus and Penelope; He was still an infant at the time when his father went to  Troy, and in his absence of nearly twenty years he grew up to manhood.  Telephus Gk. One of the Heraclidae, the sons of Heracles, who were venerated as founders of cities.  Telinga In. The Telugu country, stretching along the coast from Orissa to Madras.    Tellus  Rom. Goddess of the earth. Fordicidia, held on April 15 was her festival.  Tempe Gk. A valley in eastern Greece in Thessaly between Mount Olympos (Olympus) and Mount Ossa; called  the Vale of Tempe.  Tempestes Rom. Goddesses of storms.  Tereus Gk. A Thracian king; the son of Ares and husband of Procne; father of Itys.  Terminus Rom. Terminus was the god of boundaries; Festival February 23.  Terpsichore Gk. One of the nine Mousai; the goddesses of music, song and dance; In late classical times‐‐when  the Muses were assigned specific literary and artistic spheres‐‐Terpsikhore was named Muse of choral  song and dancing, and represented with a plectrum and lyre.  Terra  Mater  Rom.  (Mother  Earth)  Goddess  of  fertility  and  growth;  She  was  worshipped  on  April  15  in  the  Fordicia.  Tethys  Gk.  The  Titan  goddess  of  the  sources  fresh  water  which  nourished  the  earth;  She  was  the  wife  of  Okeanos, the earth‐encircling, fresh‐water stream, and the mother of the Potamoi (Rivers), Okeanides  (Springs,  Streams  &  Fountains)  and  Nephlai  (Clouds);  Tethys  was  imagined  feeding  her  children's  streams by drawing water from Okeanos through subterranean aquifers. 

268

Mythology and Folklore  
Teucer Gk. The son of King Telamon of Salamis and his concubine slave Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon  of Troy.  Teucri Gk. Ancestor the king ok Trojans.  Thalia Gk. One of the nine Mousai, the goddesses of music, song and dance; her name was derived from the  Greek word thaleia, meaning "rich festivity" or "blooming."; In Classical times‐‐when the Mousai were  assigned specific artistic and literary spheres‐‐Thaleia was named Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry.  Thamyris Gk. A Thracian poet who loved the beautiful youth Hyacinthus.  Thanatos Gk. The daemon personification of death; He was a minor figure in Greek mythology, often referred  to but rarely appearing in person.  The fishes' bath N. A kenning for the sea.   Thea Gk. The Titan goddess of sight (thea) and shining light of the clear blue sky; She was also, by extension,  the  goddess  who  endowed  gold,  silver  and  gems  with  their  brilliance  and  intrinsic  value;  married  to  Hyperion, the Titan‐god of light, and bore him three bright children‐‐Helios the Sun, Eos the Dawn, and  Selene the Moon  Theban Triad Gk. This consist of the gods Amun, his wife Mut, and their son Khons  Thebes  Gk.  Greek  city,  ruled  in  myth  by  Oedipus;  was  founded  by  Cadmus,  who  had  consulted  the  Delphic  Oracle while searching for his missing sister; The Oracle told Cadmus to abandon his search and follow  the nearest cow instead. Wherever the cow lay down, he was to found a new city; There was another  famous Thebes in Egypt  Themis  Gk.  Titan  goddess  of  divine  law  and  order‐‐the  traditional  rules  of  conduct  first  established  by  the  gods; she was also a prophetic goddess who presided over the most ancient oracles, including Delphoi  Themiscyra Gk. The capital of the nation of all‐female warriors called Amazons, on the river Thermodon.  Theocritus Gk. The creator of ancient Greek public poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC.   Thersander Gk. A son of Sisyphus, and father of Haliartus and Coronus; A son of Agamididas, and the father of  Lathria  and  Anaxandra,  at  Sparta;  A  son  of  Polyneices  and  Argeia,  and  one  of  the  Epigoni;  he  was  married to Demonassa, by whom he became the father of Tisamenus. After having been made king of  Thebes, he went with Agamemnon to Troy, and was slain in that expedition by Telephus; His tomb was  shown  at  Elaea  in  Mysia,  and  sacrifices  were  offered  to  him  there.  These  are  Vaishnava  Puranas,  in  which  the  god  Vishnu  holds  the  pre‐eminence.  The  Puranas  in  which  Tamas,  the  quality  of  gloom  or  ignorance, predominates are‐(1.) Matsya, (2.) Kurma, (3.) Linga, (4.) Siva, (5.) Skanda, (6.) Agni. These  are devoted to the god Siva. Those in which Rajas or passion prevails relate chiefly to the god Brahma.  They  are‐(I.)  Brahma,  (2.)  Brahmanda,  (3.)  Brahma‐vaivarta,  (4.)  Markandeya,  (5.)  Bhavishya,  (6.)  vamana.  The  works  themselves  do  not  fully  justify  this  classification.  None  of  them  are  devoted  exclusively to one god, but Vishnu and his incarnations fill the largest space. One called the vayu Purana  is in some of the Puranas substituted for the Agni, and in others for the Siva. This Vayu is apparently the  oldest  of  them,  and  may  date  as  far  back  as  the  sixth  century,  and  it  is  considered  that  some  of  the  others may be as late as the thirteenth or even the sixteenth century. One fact appears certain: they  must  all  have  received  a  supplementary  revision,  because  each  one  of  them  enumerates  the  whole  eighteen.  The  Markandeya  is  the  least  sectarian  of  the  Puranas;  and  the  Bhagavata,  which  deals  at  length with the incarnations of Vishnu, and particularly with his form Krishna, is the most popular. The 

269

Mythology and Folklore  
most  perfect  and  the  best  known  is  the  Vishnu,  which  has  been  entirely  translated  into  English  by  Professor Wilson, and a second edition, with many valuable notes, has been edited by Dr. F. E. Hall. The  text  of  the  Agni  and  Markandeya  Puranas  is  in  course  of  publication  in  the  Bibliotheca  Indica.  The  Puranas vary greatly in length. Some of them specify the number of couplets that each of the eighteen  c