You are on page 1of 29

 

 
Consumer Attitude 
 

 
to FMCG in India 
 

 
during recession
 
Under the Guidance of Prof. Pingali 
 
Venugopal 
   

  Tapojoy Chatterjee

B08114
 
XLRI Jamshedpur
 
Acknowledgement 
I would like to thank Prof. Pingali Venugopal for giving me the opportunity to work in this project and 
guiding  me  throughout.  A  special  note  of  thanks  to  Prof.  Narsimhan  Rajkumar,  for  providing  insights 
regarding  qualitative  research.    I  would  also  like  to  thank  Mr  Sandip  Shinde  and  Ms  Riddhi  Deb  for 
helping me during the means end chains analysis.  Last but not the least, this research would not have 
been possible without the respondents, who took the survey and the interviews. 

Tapojoy Chatterjee 

B08114 

2 | P a g e  
 
 

Table of Contents 
Consumer Decision Making Process ............................................................................................................. 6 
Consumer Attitude .................................................................................................................................... 8 
FMCG Trends ............................................................................................................................................... 11 
Decision Area .............................................................................................................................................. 13 
Research Objective ..................................................................................................................................... 13 
Conceptualization ....................................................................................................................................... 13 
Output Variable ....................................................................................................................................... 13 
Throughput variables .............................................................................................................................. 14 
Research Questions (Input Variables) ..................................................................................................... 14 
Research Design .......................................................................................................................................... 15 
Exploratory Research .............................................................................................................................. 15 
In depth Interview ............................................................................................................................... 15 
Descriptive Research ............................................................................................................................... 18 
Exploratory Research .............................................................................................................................. 21 
Methodology ....................................................................................................................................... 21 
Conclusion ................................................................................................................................................... 27 
Appendix ..................................................................................................................................................... 28 
Questionnaire ..................................................................................................................................... 28 
 

3 | P a g e  
 
Table of Figures 
Figure 1: Consumer Decision Making Process .............................................................................................. 6 
Figure 2: Consumer Attitude Components ................................................................................................... 8 
Figure 3: FMCG Trends 2008 ....................................................................................................................... 11 
Figure 4: Research Design Framework ........................................................................................................ 15 
Figure 5: Means Test ................................................................................................................................... 19 
Figure 6: Hierarchical Clustering (Dendogram) for all the categories ........................................................ 20 
Figure 7: Hierarchical Value: Food and Non Alcoholic Beverages .............................................................. 23 
Figure 8: Hierarchical Value: Personal Care ................................................................................................ 24 
Figure 9: Hierarchical Value: Household Care ............................................................................................ 25 
Figure 10: Hierarchical Value: Alcoholic Beverages .................................................................................... 26 
 

4 | P a g e  
 
Executive Summary 
Indian consumer is very dynamic and has lot of subclusters which behave quite differently. Consumer as 
a whole does feel that the recession is affecting her life but does not see much perceivable difference in 
her disposable income. She has responded to the recession by changing product and brand preference. 
This is more pronounced in the commodities by going back to loose or unbranded products. In certain 
case a preference for cheaper brands has been shown. This phenomenon mainly exist in Food and Non 
Alcoholic beverages (barring carbonated drinks) where the consumer is highly price conscious but does 
look for quality along with it. In personal care, carbonated drinks and alcoholic beverages consumer is 
highly brand conscious and focuses on the quality of the product. Here her behavior has been more in 
terms of buying smaller sku’s. Household care has always been price sensitive and is still continuing to 
do  so.  The  Indian  consumer  as  a  whole  is  price  sensitive  and  this  gets  reflected  in  her  product 
preferences. 

5 | P a g e  
 
Recession plays a very interesting role  in consumer  psychology. It induces behavior which may not be 
cognitively  rational.  Consumer  worldwide  has  this  feeling  of  what  goes  up  should  come  down.  This 
attitude is very much visible in recession. Consumers believe that if the economy is behaving badly then 
it  will  get  back  to  the  normal  course  in  few  years  time 1 .  But  that  does  not  imply  that  the  consumer’s 
behavior does not change. There are certain trends that get accelerated during recession 2 : 

⎯ A demand for simplicity 
⎯ A call for ethical business governance 
⎯ A desire to economize 
⎯ A tendency to flit from one offering to another. 

Then there are also trends that tend to decline2: 

⎯ Green consumption 
⎯ Respect for authority (deference) 
⎯ Ethical consumption 
⎯ Extreme‐experience seeking 

All these behavioral trends are not homogenous across all product categories.  While certain categories 
will experience drastic changes others will continue as if nothing has happened.  

Consumer Decision Making Process 3 
 
 
 
  External  ¾ Culture/Subculture     
  Influences  ¾ Demographics 
  ¾ Family 
Self  ¾ Needs  Consumer 
  ¾ Desires 
Concept  Decision 
 
  &  Making 
 
Internal  ¾ Motives  Lifestyle 
¾ Product 
Process 
¾ Attitude 
Availability 
  Influences  ¾ SKU 
  Availability 
  ¾ Usage 
Patterns
 
Figure 1: Consumer Decision Making Process 

  Situational 
Factors 
                                                            
1
 Psychology of recession by George Katona 
2
 Understanding the post recession consumer HBR July‐2009 
3
 Adapted from Consumer Behavior by Hawkins, Best, Coney and  Mookerjee 

6 | P a g e  
 
 
 
 
 

External  •Culture / Sub‐Culture
•Demographics
Influencing  •Family
Factors •Reference Groups

Internal 
•Motives
Influencing  •Attitudes
Factors

Situational  •Product Availability
•SKU Availability
Factors •Usage pattern

 
Consumer’s decision making process is simultaneously driven by multiple factors. Decision making is a 
complex  phenomenon  and  various  factors  shape  the  consumer’s  final  decisions.  A  consumer’s  own 
perception  of  self,  her  liking  and  disliking  contribute  to  the  formation  of  self‐concept.  On  the  other 
hand, consumer leads a certain kind of life which has significant role in shaping up her behavior and her 
way  of  leading  life  is  her  lifestyle.  There  are  broadly  two  types  of  factors  that  largely  affect  the  self‐
concept and lifestyle of the consumer  

⎯ External influencing factors 
o  Some  of  these  factors  are  culture/subculture,  demographics,  family,  reference  groups 
etc. For example, a person might have developed a strong association with a particular 
type of incense stick because of family practices and religious culture. A person may also 
want to buy a premium brand because of influences by his immediate reference groups.  
⎯ Internal influencing factors 
o  Motives  and  attitudes  are  two  internal  influencing  factors.  A  consumer  may  be 
motivated to buy a fairness cream. The underlying motive is to feel confident by looking 
fairer.  On  the  other  hand,  attitude  has  three  components  and  those  are  explained  in 
detail in the following paragraphs.  

  

7 | P a g e  
 
 

Every consumer relates her self‐concept and lifestyle to desires and wants. Both desires and wants are 
highly influenced by another type of factor  

⎯ Situational factors 
o  Depending on the situational factors, like – product availability, SKU availability, usage 
pattern, payment options etc. For example, a consumer leads a very high‐ended‐life and 
wants  to  buy  a  Prada  perfume.  But  because  of  non‐availability,  she  cannot  buy  the 
product.  

Consumer Attitude 4 
The consumer’s attitude is determined by three components 

Cognitive

Affective Attitude

Connative

 
Figure 2: Consumer Attitude Components 

The  consumer’s  mind  is  stimulated  by  initiators.  Products,  situations,  retail  outlets,  sales,  personnel, 
advertisements  and  other  attitude  objects  act  as  the  stimuli  the  consumer  exposes  herself  to.    These 
stimuli  help  the  consumers  form  attitude  as  a  result  of  the  above  mentioned  three  components  of 
attitude.  

                                                            
4
 Consumer Behavior by Hawkins, Best, Coney and  Mookerjee 
 

8 | P a g e  
 
Cognitive Component  
The  cognitive  component  consists  of  a  consumer’s  beliefs  about  an  object.  For  most  attitude  objects, 
people have a number of beliefs. For example, during recession, consumers may believe that –  

⎯ Premium soaps are waste of money 
⎯ Loose tea is as good as packaged tea 
⎯ Unbranded flour has more nutritious values than branded flour 
⎯ Big companies unnecessarily increase the price of the products  

The total configuration of beliefs about any brand or product represents the cognitive component of an 
attitude toward that product. Beliefs can be about emotional benefits of owning or using a product (one 
can  believe  it  would  be  soothing  to  own  or  use  a  Palmolive  Shower  Gel)  as  well  as  about  objective 
features.  

Many  beliefs  about  attributes  are  evaluative  in  nature;  for  example,  comfortable  bathing  experience, 
attractive  fragrance  and  effective  performance  are  generally  viewed  as  positive  beliefs.  The  more 
positive  beliefs  associated  with  a  brand,  the  more  positive  each  belief  is,  and  the  easier  it  is  for  the 
individual to recall the beliefs, the more favorable the overall cognitive component is presumed to be. 
And because of all the components of an attitude are generally consistent, the more favorable attitude 
is. This logic underlines what is known as the multi‐attribute attitude model.  

Affective Component 
Feelings  or  emotional  reactions  to  an  object  represent  the  affective  component  of  an  attitude.  A 
consumer states ‘I love Five Star’ or ‘Five Star is awfully sweet’ is expressing the result of an emotional 
or  affective  evaluation  of  the  product.  This  overall  evaluation  may  be  simply  a  vague,  general  feeling 
developed without cognitive information or beliefs about the product. Or it may be the result of several 
evaluations of the product’s performance on each of several attributes.  

Because  products  are  evaluated  in  the  context  of  a  specific  situation,  one’s  affective  reaction  to  a 
product may change as the situation changes. For example, if a consumer is very strongly loyal to L’Oreal 
shampoo, during recession the consumer might continue to use the same brand because of its affective 
attitude towards the product. She might be even ready to cut down on the expenses for other products 
to accommodate her favorite brand.  

Due  to  unique  motivations  and  personalities,  past  experiences,  reference  groups,  and  physical 
conditions, individuals may evaluate  the same belief differently.  Some individuals may have a positive 
feeling  toward  the  belief  that  ‘Five  Star  is  made  by  a  large  multinational  firm’,  whereas  others  could 
respond negatively.  

Connative Component 
The behavioral or connative component of an attitude is one’s tendency to respond in a certain manner 
toward  an  object  or  activity.  A  series  of  decisions  to  purchase  or  not  purchase  Five  Star  or  to 
recommend  it  or  other  brands  to  friends  would  reflect  the  behavioral  or  connative  component  of  an 

9 | P a g e  
 
attitude.  This  component  provides  response  tendencies  or  behavioral  intentions.  Actual  behaviors 
reflect these intentions as they are modified by the situation in which the behavior will occur.  

Since behavior is directed toward an entire object, it is less likely to be attribute‐specific than are either 
beliefs  or  affect.  However,  this  is  always  not  the  case,  particularly  with  respect  to  retail  outlets.  For 
example,  many  consumers  buy  ready‐to‐eat  foods  at  modern  retail  formats,  but  purchase  meats  and 
fresh  vegetables  at  regular  supermarkets.  Thus,  for  retail  outlets,  it  is  possible  and  common  to  react 
behaviorally to specific beliefs about the outlet. This is generally difficult to do with products because 
consumers have to either buy or not buy the complete product.   

10 | P a g e  
 
FMCG Trends  
India (U+R) - Value Offtake (00,000 Rs.)
calender Calender Change in Value
Quarter 1 Quarter 4 Offtake
TOTAL FMCG MARKET 2,832,873 2,781,625 51,248.2
% % %
BISCUITS 9.1 9.1 -51.6
EDIBLE OILS 12.5 11.9 -28.0
PACKAGED RICE 7.3 7.1 -19.0
WASHING POWDERS/LIQUIDS 5.7 6.3 -18.6
PACKAGED TEA 5.0 5.2 -8.2
SKIN CREAMS 4.1 4.1 -6.9
DETERGENT CAKES/BARS 3.8 4.0 -4.7
SALTY SNACKS 3.5 3.5 -3.7
TOOTH PASTES 3.0 3.0 -3.5
HAIR OILS 2.5 2.5 -3.2
SHAMPOO 2.4 2.4 -2.9
CHOCOLATE 2.1 2.1 -2.3
BEVERAGES 2.0 2.1 -2.2
IODISED SALT 1.6 1.8 -1.6
PACKAGED ATTA 1.5 1.6 -1.6
PALMOLEIN REFINED OIL 1.9 1.5 -1.6
VERMICELLI & NOODLE 1.3 1.3 -1.1
CONFECTIONERY - TOFFEE/HBC 1.1 1.1 -0.9
MILK FOODS 1.0 1.1 -0.8
CLEANERS - UTENSIL 0.9 1.0 -0.7
TALCUM POWDERS 1.0 0.9 -0.6
SOAP CAKES/BARS 0.9 0.9 -0.6
COFFEE 0.8 0.8 -0.6
TOOTH BRUSH 0.8 0.7 -0.5
TOILET SOAPS 7.8 7.8 0.0
LIPSTICKS 0.4 0.3 0.0
NAIL ENAMEL 0.3 0.3 0.1
BREAKFAST CEREALS 0.2 0.2 0.2
CLEANERS - TOILET 0.2 0.2 0.7
CLEANERS - FLOOR 0.1 0.1 1.2
TOOTH POWDERS 0.6 0.6 1.6
AIR FRESHNERS 0.1 0.1 2.0

 
Figure 3: FMCG Trends 2008 5 

                                                            
5
 AC Nielsen survey 2008 

11 | P a g e  
 
If  we  look  at  two  periods,  one  in  the  initial  three  months  of  recession  and  one  in  the  recent  quarter, 
there is decrease in total FMCG off take. The drivers are essentials like – biscuits, edible oils, packaged 
rice and washing powders. Biscuits account for 50% of the decrease in off take. This can be explained by 
following reasons –  

⎯ Down  gradation  from  premium  to  popular  or  mass  segments  ;  e.g.  cookies,  cream  biscuits  to 
marie biscuits 
⎯ Decrease in frequency of purchase – the saving attitude might be responsible for this 
⎯ Purchase of smaller pack‐sizes 
⎯ Contraction of purchase basket ; e.g. – multiple brands/segments to single brand/segment 
⎯ Probable flight from packaged rice to loose rice 

This  trend  of  drop  in  offtake  continues  in  negotiable  also.  These  categories  are  –  skin  creams, 
detergents,  salty  snacks,  tooth  pastes,  hair  oils,  shampoo,  chocolate  and  beverages.  These  categories 
can further be divided into two brackets –  

Regular negotiable 

These categories are not essentials for every consumer. However, there are consumers who use them 
and  are  very  regular  as  compared  to  the  irregular  consumers.  There  is  heterogeneity  observed  in  this 
bracket. Eg. – skin creams, detergent, tooth pastes and hair oils. The probable reasons for drop are as 
follows –  

⎯ Skin cream category has smaller SKUs (Fair & Lovely 9 gm etc) and a trend towards moving to 
these smaller SKUs 
⎯ Detergent and shampoos – more usage of sachets and therefore drop in offtake ; also premium 
brands to popular brands 
⎯ Within tooth pastes, down gradation to low priced brands – like Babool, Anchor, Cibaca Top etc. 
Also, there can be flight towards tooth powders. (As offtake in tooth powders has increased) 

Occasional negotiables  

 These  categories  are  driven  by  impulse  purchase  and  occasional  usage.  E.g.  –  salty  snacks,  chocolate 
beverage. The drop is mainly explained by change in mindset and treating these categories as frills. This 
might have led to reduction in frequency and allocation to lower share in the wallet.  

On  the  other  hand,  there  are  categories  which  show  almost  no  movement,  e.g.  –  salt,  atta,  noodles, 
coffee.  MFD,  tooth  brush  etc.  This  can  be  explained  by  the  fact  that  these  categories  are  more  like 
commodities. There is not much differentiation in terms of brands. These are essentials also. AS a result, 
there is not much change in the buying behavior.  

And there are frill categories, like – nail enamel, floor cleaners, air freshener, breakfast cereals etc. In 
the  Indian  context,  these  are  treated  as  frills.  These  have  very  select  buyer‐bases  and  they  refuse  to 
change their buying behavior even in times of recession. In fact, they show marginal increase in the off 
take.  

12 | P a g e  
 
Decision Area 

Design of Marketing Strategy for FMCG during recession

Research Objective 
 

  “A research to study Indian consumer’s attitude towards FMCG during 
recession” 
 

Conceptualization 
 
Surrogates

Measurands
INPUT THROUGH  OUTPUT
PUT
 

Output Variable 
 

Attitude towards various FMCG categories 
and reason behind that attitude
 

   

13 | P a g e  
 
Throughput variables 
The consumer’s attitude is determined by three components 

Cognitive

Affective Attitude

Connative

Research Questions (Input Variables) 
Cognitive 
• Does the consumer believe that he is in a recession 
• Does the consumer believe that his disposable income has decreased 
• Why has he changed his buying behavior or why not? 

Affective 
• Is there any emotional connect to product usage during recession 

Connation 
• What  are  the  product  categories  in  which  the  consumer  has  changed  brands  or  buying 
behavior? 
• How has he changed his buying behavior? 

 
 
 
 
 
 

14 | P a g e  
 
Research Design 
A research design is the framework or plan of a study, which is used as a guide to collect and analyze 
data.. A research design ensures that the study will be relevant to the problem and will use economical 
procedures.  The  major  types  of  research‐design  frameworks  can  be  classified  into  three  basic  types: 
Exploratory, Descriptive, or Causal.  We would be using the Exploratory or the In‐Depth Research Design 
and the Predictive Research Design in our analysis. 

Exploratory Research 
The  general  objective  in  exploratory  research  is  to  gain  insights  and  ideas.  It  is  particularly  helpful  in 
breaking  large,  vague  problem  statements  into  smaller,  more  precise  sub‐problem  statements.  The 
exploratory research will help us in determining the various factors that influence the buying behavior of 
the FMCG users. For our analysis, there are two ways in which the exploratory research would be carried 
out: In depth interview and then laddering. 

  In‐depth  Predictive  Problem‐Solving 

Sensitive,  Socially  In‐depth  interview,  Observation (Unobtrusive)  Simulated  market‐


Desirable  case‐studies  studies 

Motives  Projective  Observation  (for  behavior),   


Projective  Techniques  (for 
Techniques  ‐ 
state of mind) 

Aware,  Focused  Group  Survey  Laboratory Experiments 


Not sensitive,  Discussion 
No social desirability 

Figure 4: Research Design Framework 

In depth Interview 
The  technique  that  was  used  was  in‐depth  interviews  that  were 
used to gauge the factors that impact the decision making process. 
The  method  of  sampling  chosen  for  this  primary  research  was 
convenient sampling as well as availability sampling to ensure that 
the  interviewees  were  consumers  of  the  product  and  responses 
obtained were relevant.  

In this case this was the relevant technique since there was a high 
probability  of  obtaining  socially  relevant  answers  in  a  focus  group 
discussion due to the nature of the product category.  The objective 
of the interview was to:‐ 

15 | P a g e  
 
‐ Identify whether is actually perceiving recession or not. 
‐ Identify categories where the consumer is changing his behavior. 
‐ Determine whether the decision to continue product usage or change brands is due to cognition 
or some affective component 

Interviews  were  conducted  on  12  respondents  from  the  cities  of  Jamshedpur  and  Mandi  Gobindgarh. 
The overall structure of the interview was made informal with me just giving direction to the procedings. 
Of the the 12 respondents 9 were female and 3 were male. 

Findings 
‐ Majority of the consumers accepted that they were in a recession 
‐ Most of them could not though foresee any change in disposable income 
‐ Most of them have changed or planned to change their brands in the following categories 
o Food  
ƒ Cereals 
ƒ Spices 
ƒ Salt 
ƒ Soup 
ƒ Ready to eat – (Pre‐Cooked &Frozen foods) 
ƒ Biscuits 
o Non‐Alcoholic Beverages 
ƒ Juices 
ƒ Carbonated drinks 
ƒ Tea 
ƒ Coffee 
ƒ Packaged Milk 
o Alcoholic Beverages 
ƒ Whiskey 
ƒ Rum 
ƒ Scotch 
ƒ Vodka 
o Personal Care 
ƒ Face Creams 
ƒ Colored Cosmetics 
ƒ Soaps 
ƒ Shampoos 
ƒ Tooth Paste 
ƒ Deodorants 
ƒ Hair Oil 
o Household Care 
ƒ Washing Powder 
ƒ Floor Cleaner 

16 | P a g e  
 
ƒ Toilet Cleaner 
ƒ Kitchen Cleaner 
‐ The decision to change the product is more affective rather than any product knowledge as such 

17 | P a g e  
 
Descriptive Research 
The objective of this part of the research is to  

‐ Which categories have exactly shown any perceptible difference 
‐ Is there any trend amongst the categories as such? 

For this, a survey was conducted amongst the people for Jamshedpur and Mandi Gobindgarh (Punjab). 
They were asked to 

‐ Confirm whether they think that there is any recession or not 
‐ Has there been any change in their disposable income 
‐ Identify  categories  from  exploratory  research  which  the  consumer  downgraded  in  terms  of 
brand preference and how many times. 

The sampling technique was first convenient sampling and then simple random in it. The population is 
the overall population of India. The sampling frame here is the voter id system.  

For the research the consumer was asked that of they had shopped for ten times last year, how many 
times did they bought a cheaper brand or a unbranded product last year. The objective here was to find 
exactly which categories suffered due to recession and to what scale 6 .  

Findings 
‐ 69.23% of the sample accepted there is a recession going on 
‐ But only 32.69% said there was any change in their disposable income 
‐ Result from categories. 
o Cereals,  Spices,  Packaged  Milk,  Ready  To  Eat  foods,  Tea,  Biscuits  and  Kitchen  Cleaners 
are the categories where the consumer have downgraded to a low price brand or loose 
product in decreasing order of magnitude. 
o Carbonated Drinks, Toothpaste, Shampoos,  Face creams, Deodorants, Color Cosmetics 
Soups , Whiskey, Hair Oil and Floor Cleaner are the category have been very particular 
about the brands and have not downgraded in any form in decreasing order 
o Toilet Cleaner , Washing Powder, Salt and soaps are categories where a certain mix of 
customers have been brand conscious while others have been value focused 

                                                            
6
 Appendix 1 Questionnaire 

18 | P a g e  
 
One-Sample Statistics
N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error Mean
Cereals 52 6.3269 1.73455 .24054
Spices 52 6.5000 1.44846 .20087
Salt 52 4.4615 1.63853 .22722
Soup 52 2.6154 1.33069 .18453
Ready To Eat 52 5.9231 1.99849 .27714
Biscuits 52 5.6923 2.00527 .27808
Juices 52 3.1538 1.81912 .25227
Carbonated Drinks 52 .8654 .90811 .12593
Tea 52 5.8462 1.86174 .25818

Coffee 52 3.1923 1.79365 .24874

Packaged Milk 52 6.1923 1.87907 .26058

Whiskey 52 2.6923 1.36538 .18934

Vodka 52 3.0577 1.48738 .20626

Face Creams 52 1.8654 1.35804 .18833

Color Cosmetics 52 2.2115 1.55092 .21507

Soaps 52 3.5192 1.61477 .22393

Shampoos 52 1.5769 1.34815 .18695

Toothpaste 52 1.1923 1.28397 .17805

Deodorants 52 2.0000 1.35762 .18827

Hair Oil 52 2.7308 1.78353 .24733

Washing Powder 52 4.0192 1.89416 .26267

Floor Cleaner 52 2.8462 1.67314 .23202

Toilet Cleaner 52 4.2308 1.46348 .20295

Kitchen Cleaner 52 5.6346 2.12390 .29453

Figure 5: Means Test 

19 | P a g e  
 
‐ The response from customers was  then passed through a cluster analysis 
o Cereals, Tea, Packaged Milk, Spices, Ready to Eat Food and Biscuits form one cluster 
ƒ In this cluster the consumer has downgraded to a private label, cheaper brand 
or  loose  product.  The  consumer  seems  to  highly  value  conscious  in  this 
category. This could be termed as Food and Non Alcoholic beverages. 
o Carbonated Drinks, Toothpaste, Shampoos, Color Cosmetics, Face Creams, Deodorants 
and Whiskey form one cluster. 
ƒ  The consumer is highly brand conscious and prefers more of quality than value 
in this region. This is more of Personal Care 
o Juices, Floor Cleaner, Vodka, Soup and Soaps form one cluster 
ƒ Here  there  exists  two  diff  set  of  consumers,  one  who  have  downgraded  and 
others who prefer quality over anything.  

Figure 6: Hierarchical Clustering (Dendogram) for all the categories

Having  found  these  clusters  the  objective  now  is  to  find  the  reasons  behind  these  consumer  attitude 
trends. For this we  conducted another exploratory  research on  the same set  of consumers to identify 
the specific rationales in each of these clusters and categories.  

20 | P a g e  
 
Exploratory Research 
For  conducting  this  research  we  use  the  means  end  chain  methodology  and  implement  it  using 
laddering.  Means‐End  Chain  (MEC)  theory  clarifies  the  mechanism  by  which  values  guide  consumer 
behaviour.  In  particular,  MEC  theory  states  that  consumers  select  offers  (products/services)  with 
attributes  that  are  instrumental  in  achieving  their  desired  consequences.  These  consequences  are 
desired  in  as  far  as  they  relate  to  consumers’  values.  MEC  has  a  long  history.  Gutman  and  Reynolds 
(1979) introduced the concept, with a focus on qualitative in‐depth understanding of consumer motives. 
Reynolds and Gutman (1988) made MEC well‐accepted by providing a hands‐on description of how to 
conduct, analyze and use MEC interviews. MEC has been a popular and ever‐evolving research domain 
since (e.g., Kaciak and Cullen 2006). MEC theory is closely related to MEC interviewing techniques. In a 
MEC interview, also frequently described as a laddering interview, respondents identify attributes and 
attribute levels of a product (e.g., strong taste), link the attribute levels to one or more consequences 
(e.g.,  feel  pleasure)  and  to  one  or  more  values  (e.g.,  hedonism).  Respondents  are  probed  to  link  the 
subsequent Attributes (A), Consequences (C) and Values (V) by repeatedly asking the question “why is 
that  important  to  you?”  and  by  means  of  additional  probing  techniques  (cf.  Reynolds  and  Gutman 
1988).  Based  on  the  resulting  MEC’s,  researchers  can  better  understand  what  a  consumer  tries  to 
achieve by consuming a product/service. From a practical perspective, MEC’s can provide indications of 
what attribute levels are important to consumers and why.  

The objective of this research is to 

‐ Identify the specific mindset and consumer attitude in each of the categories. 
‐ Map each of this mindset to the basic QSP(Quality, Service, Price) triad.  
 

The final finding would be to identify which of these three parameters influence the consumer attitude 
in these main clusters.   

Methodology 

Respondents 
We conducted means‐end chain interviews with 40 respondents, all aged between 25 and 55 years (M = 
41, SD = 4.8) and living in the Mandi Gobindgarh. In our sample, we had 35 women. 

Instrument 
A topic guide served to structure the interviews. The topic guide consisted of 4 categories: 

• Food and Non‐Alcoholic Beverages 
• Personal Care 
• Alcoholic Beverages 
• Household Care 

Data collection 
The interviews took place on the telephone and were recorded with a digital audio recorder.  

21 | P a g e  
 
Data analysis 
In line with the MEC approach, we performed a content analysis on the interview transcripts as detailed 
in Reynolds and Gutman (1988). In particular, every element was assigned a label A, C or V (for attribute, 
consequence  or  value).  As  a  point  of  reference,  we  used  the  QSP  triad.  Next,  we  constructed  A‐C‐V 
ladders. The ladders were then summarized in an implication matrix, in which we coded how often each 
element  led  to  each  other  element.  Based  on  this  implication  matrix,  we  constructed  a  Hierarchical 
Value Map. 

22 | P a g e  
 
Key findings 
Food and Non‐Alcoholic Beverages: 35 respondents finally based price as their decision making criteria 
while 20 of them also talked about quality.  

• Hence Price (Value for money) plays the most important role in this category 
• Indian consumers are opting for higher quality food and beverages but are still highly cost/value 
conscious  
• Brands are a source of credibility which usually comes from reputation and reliability 
• Many Indian shoppers consider private label food and non‐alcoholic beverages to be identical to 
famous branded equivalents  
• A resurging desire to cook more often at home has occurred 

Service  Price  Quality 

Credibility 

Value for Money  Reliability  Past Experience  Reputation  Taste  Freshness 

Figure 7: Hierarchical Value: Food and Non Alcoholic Beverages

* Here each response is equal to 0.1 cm width of the line. 

23 | P a g e  
 
Personal  Care:    41  respondents  finally  based  quality  as  their  decision  making  criteria  while  only  5  of 
them talked about price 

• The majority of Indian citizens are committed to looking their best in day‐to‐day life  
• Price  and  value  conscious  personal  care/beauty  shoppers  in  India  have  not  made  notable 
changes to their personal care shopping and usage in order to save money  
• Indian consumers are generally aware of private label personal care products but strongly value 
brand name  
• Packaging brings certain expectation and imagery of the product. 
• Indian consumers' health and beauty regimes are proving to be largely recession resistant 

Service  Price  Quality 

Credibility  Imagery 

Value for Money  Reliability  Past Experience  Reputation  Effectiveness  Packaging 

Figure 8: Hierarchical Value: Personal Care 

24 | P a g e  
 
Household Care: 24 respondents finally based price as their decision making criteria while 23 of them 
based their decision on quality 

• Price‐led  value  is  still  the  most  influential  factor  for  Indian  consumers'  household  and  laundry 
care purchases but preferences do reflect other important influences  
• The private label household care market in India is small, but Indians do not necessarily perceive 
a significant compromise in buying store branded products  
• Indians associate hygiene and cleanliness with wellbeing and this, combined with their inherent 
dislike of household chores, makes them somewhat quality conscious 

Service  Price  Quality 

Credibility  Effectiveness 

Value for Money  Reliability  Past Experience  Reputation  Cleanliness  Germ‐Kill 

  Figure 9: Hierarchical Value: Household Care

25 | P a g e  
 
Alcoholic  Beverages:  21  respondents  finally  based  price  as  their  decision  making  criteria  while  28  of 
them based their decision on quality. 

• Value  consciousness  has  had  a  similar  affect  on  Indians'  at‐home  alcoholic  beverage  choices 
compared to their out‐of‐home choices  
• Private label alcohol penetration in India is low which results in uncertainty about comparative 
quality against branded equivalents  
• Taste is the most important quality deciding factor 
• Habit and brand have more influence on Indians' alcohol purchases than price 
•  There has been little change for the majority of Indian drinkers suggesting that alcohol is largely 
'recession resistant' 

Service  Price  Quality 

Taste  Imagery 

Value for Money  Aroma  Past Experience  Smoothness  After Taste  Packaging 

Figure 10: Hierarchical Value: Alcoholic Beverages

26 | P a g e  
 
Conclusion 
Consumer  as  whole  does  feel  that  the  recession  is  affecting  her  life.  She  has  responded  more  in  the 
commodities  by  going  back  to  loose  or  unbranded  products.  In  certain  case  a  preference  for  cheaper 
brands has been shown. This phenomenon mainly exist in Food and Non Alcoholic beverages where the 
consumer is highly price conscious but does look for quality along with it. In personal care and alcoholic 
beverages  consumer  is  highly  brand  conscious  and  focuses  on  the  quality  of  the  product.  Here  her 
behavior  has  been  more  in  terms  of  buying  smaller  sku’s.  Household  care  has  always  been  price 
sensitive and is still continuing to do so. The overall reaction of the consumer is highly affective. Even 
without  much  perceivable  difference  in  disposable  income,  consumer  has  down  gradedfor  few  of  the 
categories.  This  tendency  though  seems  to  be  temporary  with  certain  categories  already  showing 
improvements. 

27 | P a g e  
 
Appendix 
Questionnaire 
1. Do you think you were hit by recession? 

Ans: Yes/No 

2. Did it lead to reduction in your disposable income? 

Ans Yes/No 

3. Suppose  you  made  10  visits  for  shopping  last  year.  How  many  times  do  you  think  you  would 
have downgraded to a private label, cheaper brand or bought loose(unpacked) in each of these 
categories: 
o  Food  
ƒ Cereals                  [   ] 
ƒ Spices                  [   ] 
ƒ Salt                  [   ] 
ƒ Soup                  [   ] 
ƒ Ready to eat – (Pre‐Cooked &Frozen foods)        [   ] 
ƒ Biscuits                 [   ] 
o Non‐Alcoholic Beverages 
ƒ Juices                  [   ] 
ƒ Carbonated drinks              [   ] 
ƒ Tea                  [   ] 
ƒ Coffee                  [   ] 
ƒ Packaged Milk                [   ] 
o Alcoholic Beverages 
ƒ Whiskey                [   ] 
ƒ Rum                  [   ] 
ƒ Scotch                  [   ] 
ƒ Vodka                  [   ] 
o Personal Care 
ƒ Face Creams                [   ] 
ƒ Colored Cosmetics              [   ] 
ƒ Soaps                  [   ] 
ƒ Shampoos                [   ] 
ƒ Tooth Paste                [   ] 
ƒ Deodorants                [   ] 
ƒ Hair Oil                 [   ] 
o Household Care 
ƒ Washing Powder              [   ] 
ƒ Floor Cleaner                [   ] 

28 | P a g e  
 
ƒ Toilet Cleaner                [   ] 
ƒ Kitchen Cleaner               [   ] 
 

29 | P a g e