Architectural Education: Building Skills for a “Neverland”.

The Architectural Education is a collection of individual stories narrating the cultivation and civilization of 2 dimensional and concretized minds of young apprentices to be great architects and designers. Each narration claims the legacy of the heroic ages of Architecture to be legitimate and relevant. It is compulsory to be an heir to Bauhaus or École de Beaux-Arts methodologically; a disciple of a contemporary - prevailing architectural movement theoretically; and admirer of a particular learning or teaching theory pedagogically, notwithstanding the pitfalls of anachronism and eclecticism. In this multi-referenced so called “pluralistic” atmosphere, what the students of architecture experience is, mostly, watching the shrinking good old blue sky while falling down into the rabbit hole. All you can hear is some words about design, space, structure, art, function, philosophy, construction, techne, aesthetic. You are expected to build a meaningful whole out of them, but no one tells how to do. When you are in dark, and falling upside down, the best you can dream of, or better hope, is a Neverland. Before the end of the hole, if there is one, the students of architecture, who would not grow up to be the builders of a dreadful world, usually build their Neverland by means of imagination on the basis of knowledge. What they have in common is their belief that they can fly, and ignorance of the sirens calling to the good-looking reefs of dull indoctrination. It is a fact that each school has different theoretical preferences, pedagogical priorities, and professional contexts. Despite the variety of curricula and practices, the experience of being a student of architecture is unique. Let’s tell about that experience on flying 'second to the right and straight on till morning'.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.