February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American A1

By George Barnette
AFRO Staf Writer
Former Prince George’s
County Executive Jack
Johnson was indicted on
federal bribery, extortion
and witness and evidence
tampering charges on Feb.
14.
According to the
indictment, the 61-year-
old Johnson is accused
of conspiring – with
developers, political
candidates, public offcials
and Amrik Singh Melhi,
owner of Tick Tock Liquors
in Hyattsville, as well as
other liquor stores in the
region – to use his infuence
to produce favorable
offcial actions for the
aforementioned parties.
“Pay-to-play
government is not
democratic government,”
said U.S. Attorney Rod J.
Rosenstein in a statement.
“Anyone who seeks
benefts or approvals from
the government should be
evaluated on the merits,
without being extorted for
payments or losing out to
competitors who pay bribes.
Government employees
fagrantly abuse the public
trust when they take money
in return for offcial acts.”
By George Barnette and Shernay Williams
AFRO Staf Writers
Maryland’s Black population increased
slightly to 29.4 percent, while Blacks
seemingly migrated to southern counties,
according to new Census data released Feb. 9.
Counties such as Anne Arundel, Howard
and Charles – whose White population dipped
from 67 to 48 percent over the last decade
– experienced the largest growth spurts of
Black residents.
U.S. Rep. Donna Edwards, D-Md., said
areas such as Charles County, which was once
rural and undeveloped, are becoming more
developed as the result of urban sprawl from
the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.
She says the new racial composition
may beneft minorities during legislative
redistricting. “[Minority growth] actually
bodes well depending on where these Census
blocks are in the population and where the
population is,” Edwards said. “We get to
see what this might mean, in terms of the
prospects for additional members of the
state senate, who might be African American
and be competitive in some districts where
there hasn’t been competition [from African
Americans] before.”
Prince George’s County has also seen
growth since 2000. The county’s population
grew 7.7 percent from 801,515 to 863,420.
Despite the fallout from the foreclosure crisis,
which left the county’s economy in shambles,
offcials say they’re not surprised at the
numbers.
“I’ve actually long suspected that we were
Copyright © 2011 by the Afro-American Company
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Volume 119 No. 28
FEBRUARY 19, 2011 -
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY EDITION
Hear the AFRO on The Daily
Drum, Wednesday at 7 p.m.
Continued on A5
Character Education
Special Section insert
Continued on A5
Gonzaga Edges
DeMatha
B2
Did Civil Rights-Era Comic Book
Inspire Egyptian Protestors?
A2
Photo by Rob Roberts
Former Prince George’s County Executive Jack Johnson
faces a possible 115 years based on the indictment
handed down on Feb. 14.
Jack Johnson Indicted
By AFRO Staf
The Maryland
Department of
Transportation (MDOT) and
Washington Metropolitan
Area Transit Authority
(Metro) has selected Forest
City Washington to develop
the land around the New
Carrollton Metro Station
according to the Washington
Post.
Neither offcials
at MDOT nor Metro
would comment on the
process but did admit the
selection phase is nearing
an end. “Metro and the
Maryland Department
of Transportation are
still in the process of an
active procurement for
New Carrollton,” Metro
spokeswoman Angela
Gates told the AFRO. “The
selection team is preparing a
recommendation for Metro
Board action by the end of
March and for subsequent
action by MDOT.”
The process to select a
developer was supposed
to have happened already.
Interested companies were
to have bids submitted by
Md., Prince George’s Black
Population Increases
Developer for
New Carrollton
Station Chosen
Continued on A6
FEBRUARY 25, 2011
By Zenitha Prince
Washington Bureau Chief
President Barack Obama’s 2012 budget,
released on Valentine’s Day, is getting little
love from either side of the ideological aisle.
Republicans, who in a nod to their tea
party supporters have proposed $61 billion in
spending cuts for the current fscal year ending
Sept. 30, said Obama’s $3.73 trillion proposal
falls short of his pledge to fscal discipline.
“The President’s budget refects a complete
lack of seriousness about our present fscal
crisis. If this is our generation’s Sputnik
moment, then the White House clearly hasn’t
gotten the message,” said Republican National
Committee Chairman Reince Priebus in a
statement. “If we are serious about cutting
the size of government and creating jobs, it
is going to require real leadership from this
White House.”
The White House spending plan promises
to cut the defcit by $1.1 trillion over 10 years
but will increase the defcit by $1.65 trillion
this year before starting to scale back.
The plan refects funding boosts in areas
such as biomedical research, broadband
extension, high-speed rail, elementary
education and clean energy. “These
investments are an essential part of the
budget,” President Obama said at Baltimore’s
Parkville Middle School and Center for
Technology on Monday, “... because I’m
President Barack Obama
makes a statement about
his budget during a
news conference on the
White House complex in
Washington on Feb. 15.
Obama Budget Criticized
Continued on A3
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A2 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
Did Forgotten Civil Rights-Era Comic Book Inspire
Egypt’s Protestors?
Dr. Martin Luther King’s legacy of social justice and
nonviolent protest may have prompted thousands of Egyptian
activists to demand the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.
Georgia Rep. John Lewis (D) told MSNBC a 50-year-old comic
book about the slain civil right’s leader and the Montgomery,
Ala. bus boycott has gained notoriety in the Arab world.
“Egypt is a reliable, dependable friend of the United
States of America, but what we’re witnessing is a nonviolent
revolution occurring in Egypt and we must be on the right
side of history. ... I just heard a day or two ago that more
than 250,000 copies of The Montgomery Story in comic book
form was distributed throughout Egypt and it was copied and
translated. I believe many of the people in the streets today
have been deeply inspired
by the civil rights movement
in America and deeply
inspired by Martin Luther
King ...”
The Montgomery Story
was frst published in 1956
and highlighted the bus
boycott that ended the city’s
segregated transportation
policies. Although it
garnered little attention
stateside, Egyptian blogger
Dalia Ziada translated the
comic book into Farsi and
Arabic in 2008. According
to her blog, the Arabic and
Farsi translations inspired
Vietnamese activists and
The Montgomery Story is now being distributed throughout
other Asian countries.
“The main message I hope that Arabic readers will take
from the MLK comic book is that: change is not impossible.
It is time to stop using our muscles blindly,” said Ziada,
director of the American Islamic Congress (AIC) – a activist
group created in response to the Sept. 11 attacks – according
to TheGrio.com. “Let’s try using our intellect in innovative,
creative ways to pressure decision makers and end dictatorship,
tyranny and the suppression practiced against us.”
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Charters South African
Chapter
The world’s oldest intercollegiate fraternity founded by
African-American men has established its frst chapter in
South Africa. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, founded at Cornell
University in Ithaca, N.Y., in 1906, chartered Rho Phi Lambda
Chapter in Johannesburg on Feb. 3.
The ceremony was held during the Kenneth Harlan
Simmons Memorial Charity Dinner. Simmons, a successful
African-American architect and professor, was a longtime
member of the fraternity known for his work on equal rights,
urban planning and community development. He relocated
to South Africa in 1994 after retiring from the University of
California-Berkeley.
The event, which included an Alpha auction for education,
was presided over by the fraternity’s world leader, General
President Herman “Skip” Mason Jr., and included members of
the fraternity’s board of directors, dignitaries and more than
200 others.
The new Johannesburg chapter’s 13 charter members
relocated from America to South Africa. However, the
fraternity aims to expand by inviting native South Africans to
join the fraternity through the Rho Phi Lambda chapter.
“We are excited about establishing the frst chapter of
Alpha Phi Alpha on the African continent in the 21st century,”
said Michael Sudarkasa, chapter president and a Harvard
University-trained lawyer initiated at the University of
Michigan. “We look forward to playing an integral part in
helping to expand the fraternity’s presence in Africa in the
coming years.”

Va.’s First Black Chief of Justice Dies at 55
Leroy Hassell Sr., Virginia’s frst Black chief justice, died
Feb. 9 at a Richmond hospital, the Supreme Court of Virginia
announced in a press release. The cause of his death was not
released.
A native of Norfolk, Hassell was a graduate of the
University of Virginia and
Harvard Law School. Before
joining the Supreme Court at
34, he became partner at the
nationally recognized McGuire
Woods law frm.
Hassell was a member of
the court since 1989 and served
as chief justice from February
2003 until his death. His
successor, Chief Justice Kinser,
praised Hassell’s intellect
and “passion for the law” in a
statement.
“The Supreme Court of
Virginia and the entire judiciary
in the Commonwealth are
saddened by the death of Justice Hassell. He was devoted to the
Court and worked tirelessly to improve the administration of
justice,” Kinser said.
On Feb. 11, Hassell’s body lay in state in the state capitol
rotunda, where relatives and friends paid their fnal respects.
His funeral took place Feb. 12 at an undisclosed church where
Hassell and his family worshipped.
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A2 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
convinced that if we out-build
and out-innovate and out-
educate, as well as out-hustle
the rest of the world, the jobs
and industries of our time will
take root here in the United
States. Our people will
prosper and our country will
succeed.”
But such increases fy in
the face of the president’s
promise to address long-term
defcit reduction, Capitol Hill
Republicans said.
“He’s been eloquent
about the problem and yet
his solutions don’t address
the problem,” said Ohio
Republican Sen. Rob
Portman, former director of
the Offce of Management
and Budget under George W.
Bush, in a press conference.
“The president has chosen to
increase spending in some
places, like high-speed rail,
and then make reductions
elsewhere. But at the end
of the day, it does nothing
in terms of addressing our
budget problem because it
doesn’t reduce spending.”
“But here’s the thing,”
President Obama countered
in his speech. “While it’s
absolutely essential to live
within our means, while we
are absolutely committed to
working with Democrats and
Republicans to fnd further
savings and to look at the
whole range of budget issues,
we can’t sacrifce our future
in the process. Even as we
cut out things that we can
afford to do without, we have
a responsibility to invest in
those areas that will have the
biggest impact in our future
– and that’s especially true
when it comes to education.”
To pay for these
investments – and with an
eye to debt reduction – the
proposed budget includes a
fve-year freeze on domestic
discretionary spending, a
$78 billion deduction in
defense funds with a further
anticipation of savings from
the ending of the Iraq and
Afghanistan wars, ending
tax breaks for oil and gas
companies and ending tax
cuts to wealthy Americans.
In all the plan cuts back or
eliminates more than 200
programs and the president
has further promised to veto
any bill larded with earmarks.
The plan even includes
cuts to programs that he
cares “deeply” about, the
president added, including
a $300 million reduction in
community development
block grants, $2.5 billion
cut from the Low Income
Home Energy Assistance
Program, Pell Grant decreases
and a 50 percent funding
cut for community services
block grants. “This budget
freeze will require some
tough choices,” Obama
acknowledged. “But if we’re
going to walk the walk when
it comes to fscal discipline,
these kinds of cuts will be
necessary.”
Democratic lawmakers
and liberal advocacy groups
are decrying the cuts,
however, saying it targets
communities that are more
socioeconomically vulnerable.
“Rebuilding our economy
on the backs of the most
vulnerable Americans is
something that I simply
cannot accept,” said
Congressional Black Caucus
Chairman Emanuel Cleaver
II, D-Mo., in a statement. “I
understand that now is the
time for us as a nation to
sacrifce in order to protect
our children from a mountain
of debt; however, I am
struggling to understand how
this budget helps us to best
achieve this critical goal.
“Cutting funding
to programs
that assist hard-working
Americans, help families
heat their homes, and expand
access to graduate-level
education seems to confict
with the notion of winning the
future,” he added. “We cannot
win the future by leaving our
most vulnerable behind.”
Harking back to the
CBC’s disagreement with
the president over last year’s
extension of tax cuts for the
wealthy, Illinois Democrat
Jesse Jackson Jr. said this
budget further plays into
the GOP’s hands. “This
request for FY2012 opens the
door for the huge cuts that
Republicans are forcing us to
digest for the rest of FY2011,”
he said in a statement. “How
can we stop the Republican
cuts when the president has
one-upped them? As the
president, he should be the
last line of defense for the
most vulnerable Americans,
instead of the frst one to cut.”
Black lawmakers and
others such as John Irons,
research and policy director
of the Economic Policy
Institute, said the budget is
misguided. “The president’s
top economic priority should
be job creation, but the
proposed budget does too
little and turns too quickly
toward defcit reduction,”
said Irons in a statement,
adding that the unemployment
climate – 9 percent for 21
months and anticipated
elevated rates for the next few
years – “demands a stronger
response.”
Though he praised
the president’s proposed
investments in transportation
infrastructure, energy
research and the like, Irons
cautioned, “Unfortunately,
the funding increases in
these and other areas, while
welcome, are insuffcient
to put a major dent in
unemployment. Furthermore,
the overall freeze in domestic
discretionary spending all
but ensures that the fght to
create jobs and ensure future
economic growth will be
limited.”
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011 The Afro-American A3
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Jennifer Hudson and other
relatives positively identified
the body of her 7-year-old
nephew Monday, just hours
after his body was found in a
sport-utility vehicle sought in
connection with the murder of
Hudson’s mother and brother.
The white, 1994 Chevrolet
Suburban with Illinois license
plate X584859 was found on
Chicago’s West Side after
police received a 7 a.m. call
from a neighbor about a suspi-
cious vehicle. The man noticed
the vehicle while walking his
dog. According to the Chicago
Tribune, the boy had been shot
multiple times in the back seat
of the vehicle. The SUV, regis-
tered to Hudson’s murdered
brother, was towed with the
boy’s body inside and is being
processed by evidence techni-
cians and workers. The body
was later removed and taken to
the Cook County Medical
Examiner’s office.
Hudson and other family
members arrived at the Medical
Examiner’s office mid-after-
noon to identify the body.
Given the choice between look-
ing directly at the body or
viewing it on a wall-mounted
video screen, the family chose
the latter. According to the
Tribune, Hudson said, “Yes,
that’s him.”
A spokesman for the office
told the newspaper that Hudson
“remained strong for her fami-
ly” and was clearly its leader.
“She held hands with her fami-
ly,” the spokesman said. “It
was obviously a very emotional
moment.”
The boy – the son of Julia
Hudson, Jennifer’s sister – had
been missing since Friday,
when a relative found Julian’s
grandmother, Darnell
Donerson, 57, and his uncle,
Jason Hudson, 29, shot to death
in his grandmother’s home in
the 7000 block of South Yale
Avenue.
An Amber Alert – a desig-
nation for high-risk missing
children – was issued Friday
after Julian was discovered
missing after the murders.
Police arrested William
Balfour, the missing boy’s step-
father and estranged husband
of Julia, at his girlfriend’s
Southside apartment several
hours after the murders.
Balfour’s mother, Michele, has
told reporters that her son had
nothing to do with the slayings.
Balfour remains a suspect in
the murders but is being held in
jail for parole violation after
being convicted of attempted
murder and vehicular hijack-
ing. Cook County records show
that he pleaded guilty to both
charges in 1999. He was also
convicted in 1998 for posses-
sion of a stolen motor vehicle.
He was released from prison in
2006 after serving seven years
for the attempted murder and
car hijacking charges.
The boy remained missing
through a long weekend in
which police and volunteers
posted fliers bearing his photo-
graph around the city. On
Sunday, Jennifer Hudson asked
for the public’s help in finding
her nephew. In her MySpace
blog, she thanked fans and sup-
porters for their prayers and
offered a $100,000 reward to
anyone who returned the boy
alive.
Since the investigation,
Hudson – who gained stardom
after appearing on “American
Idol,” and then won an
Academy Award for her role in
the movie Dreamgirls – has
stayed out of the public eye.
The Chicago Tribune report-
ed that a parade of cars moved
slowly past her family’s home
Monday morning, past the
news vans, reporters and curi-
ous onlookers.
Neighbors stood
quietly and
reflected on the
violence.
In front of the Hudson’s
home, men in heavy jackets
and hooded sweatshirts came to
kiss the twin white crosses bar-
ing the names of Donerson and
Jason.
“Everybody is sick of going
through stuff like this,” Artisha
West, a former resident of the
area told the Tribune. “We all
have to stick together. All these
young children are dying, and
for what?”
By Alan King
AFRO Staff Writer
Presidential candidate John
McCain’s attack on ACORN –
Associated Community
Organization for Reform Now –
confirms the success of the
organization, the head of the
group says.
“This is testimony to the work
we’ve done and success we’ve
had,” Maude Hurd, president of
ACORN, said in an interview
with the AFRO.
“When this attack started, we
had just announced that we had
registered 1.3 million new vot-
ers,” she said. “That’s just to say
that someone’s running scared
because of ACORN’s success.”
McCain, who is running for
president on the Republican tick-
et, lashed out at ACORN in the
final debate against Barack
Obama, contending the group “is
on the verge of maybe perpetrat-
ing one of the greatest frauds in
voter history in this country,
maybe destroying the fabric of
democracy.”
Factcheck.org, a non-partisan
Web site, found those claims to
be “exaggerated,” with “no evi-
dence of any such democracy-
destroying fraud.”
Hurd believes the McCain
charges were politically motivat-
ed.
She said, “Because it’s low-
and moderate-income people,
and people of color, I believe the
McCain campaign thinks those
voters are going to vote
Democratic, which is not neces-
sarily true.”
ACORN is no stranger to
controversy.
For 38 years, the non-partisan
organization has fought for social
and economic justice for low-
and moderate-income
Americans. With 400,000 mem-
ber families organized into more
than 1,200 neighborhood chap-
ters in 110 cities nationwide,
ACORN has over the years seen
its share of criticism while advo-
cating for affordable housing,
living wages, healthcare for the
underserved— and while organ-
izing voter registration drives.
But none has been as withering
and baseless as this one.
With the presidential election
less than two weeks away,
ACORN’s detractors allege the
organization has engaged in mas-
sive voter registration fraud after
the reported discovery of bogus
names, such as Mickey Mouse
and Dallas Cowboys players
Tony Romo and Terrell Owens,
among the names submitted to
election officials.
Hurd said those workers, who
were doing those things without
ACORN’s knowledge or permis-
sion, were fired.
“The evidence that has sur-
faced so far shows they faked
forms to get paid for work they
didn’t do, not to stuff ballot
boxes.” ACORN, she said, is the
victim of fraud, not the perpetra-
tor of it.
Hurd said the only things
bogus are the charges them-
selves. And factcheck. org
agrees.
It concluded, “Neither
ACORN nor its employees have
been found guilty of, or even
charged with, casting fraudulent
votes.”
The problem came about pri-
marily because of the way
ACORN operates. Rather than
rely on volunteers, it pays peo-
ple, many of them poor or unem-
ployed, to sign up new voters.
The idea was to help both those
being registered and those doing
the registration.
Maud explained, “We have a
zero tolerance policy for deliber-
ate falsification of registration.”
Most news account neglect to
point out that ACORN is
required by law to turn in all reg-
istration forms. And they also fail
to note that it was the organiza-
tion, in many instances, that first
brought the phony registrations
to the attention of authorities.
The McCain camp apparently
isn’t interested in those fine
points, preferring to air mislead-
ing ads that seek to link Obama
to ACORN, thereby undercutting
his political support.
McCain: I’m John McCain
and I approve this message.
Announcer: Who is Barack
Obama? A man with “a political
baptism performed at warp
speed.” Vast ambition. After col-
lege, he moved to Chicago.
Became a community organizer.
There, Obama met Madeleine
Talbot, part of the Chicago
branch of ACORN. He was so
impressive that he was asked to
train the ACORN staff.
What did ACORN in Chicago
engage in? Bullying banks.
Intimidation tactics. Disruption
of business. ACORN forced
banks to issue risky home loans.
The same types of loans that
caused the financial crisis we’re
in today.
No wonder Obama’s campaign is
trying to distance him from the
group, saying, “Barack Obama
Never Organized with ACORN.”
But Obama’s ties to ACORN run
long and deep. He taught classes
for ACORN. They even endorsed
him for President.
But now ACORN is in trouble.
Reporter: There are at least
11 investigations across the
country involving thousands of
potentially fraudulent ACORN
forms.
Announcer: Massive voter
fraud. And the Obama campaign
paid more than $800,000 to an
ACORN front for get out the vote
efforts.
Pressuring banks to issue risky
loans. Nationwide voter fraud.
Barack Obama. Bad judgment.
Blind ambition. Too risky for
America.
Since McCain’s comments,
ACORN’s 87 offices have been
bombarded with threats and
racist mail.
The day after the presidential
debate, vandals broke into the
organization’s Boston and Seattle
offices and stole computers.
After a Cleveland representative
appeared on TV, an e-mail was
sent to the local office saying she
“is going to have her life ended.”
Aworker in Providence, R.I.,
received a threatening call say-
ing, “We know you get off work
at 9” and uttered racial epithets.
Acaller to one office left a
message on the answering
machine, saying: “Hi, I was just
calling to let you know that
Barack Obama needs to get
hung. He’s a (expletive deleted)
nigger, and he’s a piece of
(expletive deleted). You guys are
fraudulent, and you need to go to
hell. All the niggers on oak trees.
They’re gonna get all hung hon-
eys, they’re going to get assassi-
nated, they’re gonna get killed.”
Another message said, “You
liberal idiots. Dumb (expletive
deleted). Welfare bums. You
guys just (expletive deleted)
come to our country, consume
every natural resource there is,
and make a lot of babies. That’s
all you guys do. And then suck
up the welfare and expect every-
one else to pay for your hospital
bills for your kids. I jus’ say let
your kids die. That’s the best
move. Just let your children die.
Forget about paying for hospital
bills for them. I’m not gonna do
it. You guys are lowlifes. And I
hope you all die.”
Hurd thinks the hate calls will
cease soon.
“In two weeks, I think these
attacks will be over. But I think it
will be harder for us to get our
name back on good graces
because they really trashed us in
the last few weeks.”
But ACORN will not be
deterred.
“We’ve been fighting for a
long time, for over 30 years, for
the rights of low- and moderate-
income people all across the
country,” Hurd said. “We’re
going to continue to fight for
economic justice in our commu-
nities.”
November 1, 2008 - November 7, 2008, The Washington Afro-American A3
TM/©2008 Sesame Workshop. All rights reserved. ©2008 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Before age five, every room is a classroom.
To find out more, go to pncgrowupgreat.com
or call 1-877-PNC-GROW.
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Fun learning opportunities are everywhere. Simple things like
counting and identifying shapes activate a child’s learning ability,
and help them enter school more prepared. That’s why PNC
founded Grow Up Great and its Spanish-language equivalent Crezca
con Éxito, a 10-year,
$
100 million program to help prepare young
children for school and life. Pick up a free bilingual Sesame Street™
“Happy, Healthy, Ready for School” kit at a PNC branch. It’s filled
with all kinds of simple, everyday things you can do to help a child
learn. Together, we can work with our communities so an entire
generation won’t just grow up... but grow up great.
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Jennifer Hudson and Relatives Identify Body of Her Slain Nephew
“She held hands with her family. It was obviously a very emotional moment.”
Courtesy Photos
Jennifer Hudson and her mom, Darnell Donerson who
was killed, as well as her brother, Jason.
Jason Hudson
Julian King, Jennnifer Hudson’s nephew.
ACORN Fights Back
Leader Calls Voter Registration Fraud Charges ‘Bogus’

I used to think
being good was enough
until I learned that
I could be great.
Today, I realize
I can choose to…
BE LEGENDARY.
Celebrate Black History with Coca-Cola
visit www.mycokerewards.com/blackhistory
©2011 The Coca-Cola Company. All Rights Reserved.
N1RZ0001_AfAmGp_5_42x10.indd 1 1/25/11 9:00 AM
“Candid and fascinating stories of black athletic heroes
whose lives changed American race relations
forever and for the good of us all.”
—John Hoberman
uni versity of washington press www.washington.edu/uwpress
BLACK ATHLETES SPEAK, 1920–2007
Edited by John C. Walter and Malina Iida
Featuring
ARTHUR ASHE JR.
DON BENNING
NIKKE FRANKE
KEN HUDSON
JENNIFER JOHNSON
SAM LACY
ALAN PAGE
MAURICE SMITH
MAE FAGGS STARR
WYOMIA TYUS
PETER WESTBROOK
MAL WHITFIELD
LENNY WILKINS
By George Barnette
AFRO Staf Writer
The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission
(WSSC) recently released a report saying it has failed in
awarding contracts to minority owned business (MBE).
The study, done by Mason Tillman Associates (MTA),
examined the contracts handed out from 2004 through
2009. It says that WSSC signifcantly underutilized MBE
in construction, architecture and engineering, goods and
services and professional services.
MTA recommended options for WSSC to consider, but
offcials at the organization say they already see the writing
on the wall to explore other options as a result of the study.
“It’s important that WSSC fosters a business
environment that is inclusive in purchasing practices,
expands contract opportunities and cultivates the growth
of small, local and minority businesses,” said Towanda
Livingston, director of the WSSC Small Local and Minority
Business Enterprise (SLMBE) Offce.
The study scrutinized bids, awards and payments to
MBEs that bid for contracts over that period in addition
to researching the regional market to determine whether
enough MBEs exist to meet WSSC’s needs.
Part of that research was to interview MBE owners to
see what kind of barriers stood in their way of receiving
contracts. According to the study, owners felt they were
held to a different standard than those of non-minority
companies as well as being disadvantaged due to a lack of
vast resources.
“Unfair tactics by WSSC managers and inspectors were
also reported by several interviewees,” the report states.
“Furthermore, there was a report that large majority-owned
frms were able to convince or coerce WSSC selection
panels to select them because the panel members would
most likely work for such Caucasian prime contractors after
leaving WSSC.”
Despite this fnding and the Commission’s
acknowledgement that it needs to change how it award
contracts, WSSC offcials said it was fair in its contracting
process. John White, WSSC public affairs manager, told
the AFRO WSSC has always been committed to providing
opportunities to these unrepresented groups. Specifcally,
White said, WSSC awarded over $77 million in contracts
and paid nearly $60 million in expenditures to MBEs.
Those numbers represented 29 percent of all contract
awarded and 26 percent of all contract expenditures
respectively.
“The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission takes
its responsibility to meet the expectations of our Minority
Business Enterprise program very seriously,” White said.
“Our success depends on our ability to manage costs,
provide safe and reliable service to our customers and
we recognize that MBE frms play a key role in helping
us achieve our goals. WSSC is committed to supporting
the growth of MBE frms and developing sustainable
relationships with our MBE frms.”
WSSC is now re-evaluating its MBE program, which
expires April 30, and hopes to have a long-term agenda
in place by then. In order to do that, it will host several
community meetings and public hearings to discuss what
should happen next. The frst community meeting took
place on Feb. 16 in Laurel. Subsequent public hearings will
take place on Feb. 23 in Upper Marlboro and Feb. 24 in
Rockville.
According to WSSC general manager and CEO Jerry N.
Johnson, this phase will be “the foundation for creating a
legally suffcient minority business enterprise program.”
Study: WSSC Failed in Awarding
Minority Contracts
Obama Budget Criticized
Continued from A1
A4 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011 February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American A5
going to have population
growth in Prince George’s
County,” Congresswoman
Edwards said. “Just
from traveling around to
neighborhoods both in Prince
George’s and Montgomery
counties, where we’ve seen
growth in the state, you can
say we may have even seen
more growth had it not been
for the current economic
crisis.”
Baltimore City was the
only jurisdiction in the state
to lose residents; in fact, as a
whole, Maryland grew by 9
percent or 480,000 residents.
Over the last decade,
Baltimore City’s population
decreased by about 1 percent
with about roughly 30,000
fewer Black residents living
in the area than Whites.
The city now has 620,961
residents, a 4.6 percent loss
and at least 10,000 fewer than
city offcials had anticipated.
Still, city leaders
downplayed the population
loss, citing a steady decline
– at higher rates – for
generations. Mayor Stephanie
Rawlings-Blake called the
2010 fgures the smallest
population decline since the
1950s. But in a statement,
she added, “We must
continue to make progress
on the core issues that matter
most to Baltimore’s families:
better schools, safer streets,
and stronger neighborhoods.”
The growth in Prince
George’s County might not
necessarily be a good thing
either. In a county with a
weakened infrastructure, an
increase in population could
further strain resources.
The county is trying to
save money wherever it
can, including possibly
eliminating over 1,000 jobs
in the school system.
One way to combat a
further strain is to make
sure there is smarter growth
in Prince George’s. That’s
a task County Executive
Rushern Baker says he must
confront to make sure the
growing population can
thrive in the county and not
be a strain on resources.
“Over the next decade,
it is my goal to not just
continue the growth of the
population, but to prioritize
‘smart-growth’ of Prince
George’s County in terms of
economic development, jobs,
better schools, more effective
and effcient government and
imploring better and more
sustainable methods of living
and growing,” Baker said in a
statement.
Last December, Census
offcials announced Maryland
would keep its eight
congressional seats, but it
remains unclear if Baltimore
City will retain three of those
seats.
Rep. Elijah Cummings,
whose district incorporates
many of Baltimore City’s
Black voters, said he is
confdent the city won’t lose
congressional representation.
“I think that our Congress
people will remain,” he said,
adding that it will only be a
matter of redistribution of the
population.
“The population loss
has not been as great as
in the past, but any loss is
traumatic. We need all we
can get,” he noted.
While John T. Willis,
former Maryland secretary
of state and a redistricting
expert, agreed it is unlikely
the city will lose the two
congressional districts
with the largest numbers of
African-American residents,
he anticipates Baltimore will
lose one of its six senate
seats and have one to three
fewer delegates in the House
depending on state line
confgurations.
According to political
talk show host and former
state senator, Larry Young,
Gov. Martin O’Malley, who
will draw new boundaries
during the frst day of the
2013 General Assembly,
should map a shared
district between the city
and Baltimore County. The
move would be justifed, as
Cummings gave up a portion
of his district 10 years ago
so the nearby county could
have a congressman, Young
said. “So this time, we need
to go back and say ‘Hey,
we helped you get a United
States congressman, ya’ll
help us keep our legislative
districts,’” he said.
The state still must adjust
census data to refect prisoner
populations as mandated by
a new state law requiring
inmates be counted based
on their last known address.
Young estimates at least half
of the state’s prisoners are
from Baltimore City, which
would greatly increase the
city’s fgures. Census offcials
are expected to release
prisoner tallies by spring.
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This week’s indictment is the continuation
of a saga that began when Johnson was
arrested with his wife on Nov. 12 at their
Mitchellville home. Three days later, nine
other people were arrested in connection with
the Johnson probe including Melhi and three
Prince George’s police offcers.
The indictment says that Johnson along
with the head of the county’s Department
of Housing and Community Development –
called Public Offcial A – accepted money,
trips, expenses, meals, drinks, hotel rooms,
airline tickets, rounds of golf, employment,
mortgage payments and campaign
contributions from Melhi and two other men
(Developer A and Developer B). There is
substantial information in the indictment
taken from wiretapped conversations between
Johnson, Public Offcial A, Developer A and
Developer B. At the time of the offenses
covered by the indictment, the head of the
Department of Housing and Community
Development was James Johnson.
One of the more interesting statements
came on the day State Sen. Ulysses Currie,
D-Dist. 25, was indicted on federal bribery
charges. Johnson, in a conversation with
Public Offcial A, urged him to use caution.
“You heard they indicted Uly Currie
tonight right?” Johnson asked.
“Yeah, 16 counts,” Public Offcial A
responded.
“Yup, damn, they really ... that’s why I
was saying man, you know we in these jobs,
we got to take ... be careful man,” Johnson
said. “You know what I’m saying. Be careful
boy, be careful.”
Johnson is also documented asking
Melhi and other people to donate to his
wife’s campaign. In one conversation with
a public offcial in the county he expressed
his disappointment with how little money his
wife was receiving on the campaign trail.
“And remember they used to be crying
all the time and your boy would go and was
able to pick things up for them,” he said. “So
now it starts coming in automatically right,
so they don’t need it anymore. Ok, but you
know what? That doesn’t have to continue to
happen.
“Tell him you need him to raise money for
my wife. Tell him to write a $4,000 check.”
The investigation is continuing and more
indictments are expected. Some are expected
to include former candidates for public offce
within the county as well as county council
members.
“These charges are the result of a long and
complex investigation by the FBI in Prince
George’s County. Rooting out corruption
is the FBI’s top criminal priority and one
we excel at,” FBI Special Agent in Charge
Richard A. McFeely said in a statement.
“This investigation will continue to seek out
corrupt offcials and acts within all levels of
Prince George’s County government.”
Johnson faces up to 115 years in prison if
convicted.
Md., Prince George’s Black Population Increases
Continued from A1
Johnson Indicted
Continued from A1
“[Minority growth] actually bodes well depending on
where these Census blocks are in the population are
and where the population is.”
By Jamaal Abdul-Alim
Special to the AFRO
Although President Barack Obama signed
a measure two months ago meant to fund
the settlement of a longstanding case known
as the Black farmers lawsuit, no payout is
in sight despite scam artists who suggest
otherwise.
That was the heart of the message
that National Black Farmers Association
president Dr. John Boyd sought to deliver
earlier this week at the National Press
Club. “We’ve had a very long struggle.
We’re still struggling,” he said in reference
to the lawsuit, which began in 1997 and
alleged the U.S. Department of Agriculture
discriminated against Black farmers on the
basis of race and failed to investigate or
respond to complaints from 1983 to 1997.
“We still don’t have the money,” said
in reference to the second settlement of the
case, meant in large part to give claimants
who still hadn’t had their cases heard under
the original case a chance to do so. “Farmers
still haven’t even begun to have their cases
heard.”
Dr. Boyd said he wanted to warn Black
farmers that they do not have to pay any
application fees to get their cases heard,
which he said some con artists in certain
remote areas of the deep South have been
getting or trying to get Black farmers to do.
“I’m here to put people on alert that they
do not have to pay a $1,000 fee,” Dr. Boyd
said, although his details about the alleged
scams were scarce.
The conference momentarily grew heated
when a Huffngton Post blogger critical of
Boyd’s advocacy suggested that most of the
individuals who hope to cash in on the $1.15
billion settlement are non-farmers seeking to
defraud the federal government, not actual
farmers.
“Not one damn dime has been paid out,”
Boyd told the blogger, Lee Stranahan, in
response. “And all of the sudden
you’ve labeled 80 percent of
these people fraudulent? Let
them go through process.”
At one point during the
Q&A, National Press Club
member and event host Karrye
Braxton threatened to call
security on Stranahan – who
carried a handheld camera
he aimed at Dr. Boyd – kept
making statements about the
case instead of asking Dr. Boyd
an actual question.
Despite Stranahan’s
questions about non-farmers
seeking to fle claims, the
settlement, formally known
as Pigford II, actually allows
not only for claims to be fled
by Black farmers who farmed
and were denied loans through
USDA agencies from 1981
through 1996, but also those
who attempted to farm and were
denied loans during the same
period.
Congress enacted legislation
that led to Pigford II in 2008
due to concerns about the large
number of late-fling applicants who did not
obtain a determination of the merits of their
claims under the original Pigford settlement
approved by a federal district court judge
in 1999, according to The Pigford Cases:
USDA Settlement of Discrimination Suits by
Black Farmers, a report prepared by the non-
partisan Congressional Research Service.
The CRS report cites concerns about
“ineffective or defective” notice regarding
the case.
Under the terms of the Pigford II
settlement agreement, claimants who
submitted late-fling requests under the
original Pigford case between Oct. 12, 1999,
and June 19, 2008, but have not had their
case heard, can seek relief of up to $50,000
plus debt relief, or choose the longer process
for damages of up to $250,000, according to
the CRS report.
The actual number of eligible claimants –
said to be in the tens of thousands – remains
to be seen, Dr. Boyd said, adding that anti-
fraud provisions would serve to prevent non-
eligible claimants from fling claims. In order
to receive a settlement payment, for instance,
claimants expose themselves to perjury for
fling a bogus claim. “At the end of the day,
those who prevail will prevail,” Dr. Boyd
said. “And those who get denied will be
denied.”
Though funding for the settlement
has been signed by President Obama, the
measure must be approved by U.S. District
Judge Paul Friedman before it can become
part of the settlement.
“I’m hopeful that Judge Friedman will
make that decision soon,” Dr. Boyd said.
Photo by Rob Roberts
Dr. John Boyd, shown in this September 2010 AFRO
fle photo, alerted Black farmers to an alleged scam,
asking them to pay application fees. He said the
farmers did not have to pay any money to apply for
the settlement.
Boyd Gives Update on Black Farmers Settlement
“At the end of the day, those who prevail will prevail.
And those who get denied will be denied.”
Community
A coalition of 130 ethnic and minority groups announced
the launch of efforts to establish the National Museum of the
American People at a press conference in the District last week.
The museum will tell the stories of all of the groups that came
to the country from prehistoric times up to the present. The
museum will refect the nation’s original national motto: “E
Pluribus Unum – From Many We Are One.”
The coalition emphasized that no federal tax dollars will
be sought to build this new national museum in Washington.
Its frst step is to seek a bipartisan presidential commission
to study the establishment of the museum and a bipartisan
Congressional resolution in support of the commission.
The museum’s mission is to advance and disseminate
knowledge about the story of the making of the American
people, to refect upon questions that are raised by that story,
and to take pride in it, according to a press release issued by the
organizers. In addition, the project will highlight the diversity
and richness of the cultures from which Americans came. It
will foster a sense of belonging to the nation by the successive
waves of people who have come here and made us the leading
economic, military, scientifc and cultural force in the world.
“The stories about the migration and immigration of our
ancestors as well as those coming today are dramatic and will
be compelling in this museum,” said Sam Eskenazi, director of
the Coalition for the National Museum of the American People,
in a prepared statement. “This will be America’s only national
institution devoted exclusively to telling the full story of the
making of the American people.
“This museum will help us all understand our own heritage
and, at the same time, the story of all other Americans,”
Eskenazi said. “As President Obama said in his inaugural
address, ‘We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn
from every end of this Earth …’”
So far, 50 notable scholars from around the nation and the
world are formally supporting establishment of the museum.
A range of scholars, including historians, anthropologists,
archeologists, ethnologists, human geographers, demographers,
geneticists, linguists and others will help tell the story. While
the museum will follow a consensus of their views, signifcant
evidence-based historic and scientifc dissenting views will
also be included. The museum’s goal will be to tell the story
with force and clarity and avoid mythology.
Eskenazi said that he envisioned the museum telling its
story as if the visitor were walking through a compelling
documentary flm about the making of the American people.
Following in the tradition of some of today’s most successful
museums such as the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the
Museum of the American People will use a mix of authentic
artifacts, mixed media, and the latest innovations of exhibition
designers.
By Robin Mazyck
Special to the AFRO
Dressed in a lovely shade of light pink with a crown placed
like royalty upon her perfectly coiffed hair, Ophelia Pinkard
was recently honored at a celebration that recognized her 75
years of active service in Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority.
With her adoring husband, John H. Pinkard Jr., by her
side, Pinkard and more than 65 members from the Arlington-
Alexandria chapter of AKA (Zeta Chi Omega) and a host of
family and friends took a stroll down memory lane.
Pinkard was initiated into the sorority in April 1935 in
Chi Chapter at Talladega College, Talladega, Ala., where she
earned a bachelor’s degree in romance languages.
When she was initiated into the sorority, AKA members
were working on the Mississippi Health Project – vaccinating
thousands against smallpox and diphtheria.
“When she was initiated, the organization was in its
infancy and there were so many challenges in our country
– segregation for example. It’s hard to comprehend how
much she has seen throughout her lifetime,” Zeta Chi Omega
President Michelle Jones said. “It warms my heart to think
about her dedication and love for our sorority. She is a wealth
of knowledge, and I was overwhelmed with joy as I listened to
her talk about the sorority and all that she has done. It is all so
amazing.”
Pinkard has been an extremely active member of Zeta Chi
Omega. She served as the chapter’s president in 1960. In this
role, she inspired countless members to reach for the stars.
One of them is Lula Lang-Jeter. Lang-Jeter has been in the
sorority for more than 50 years.
During the celebration, Pinkard was presented a certifcate
and a congratulatory letter from the sorority’s international
president of AKA and resolutions from Zeta Chi Omega
Chapter and the Mid-Atlantic regional director. She also
received a certifcate of recognition and appreciation from the
county executive of Montgomery County.
“I had the honor and pleasure of presenting Mrs. Pinkard
with a special pin from our corporate offce commemorating
her 75 years of service,” said Starr Garrett, co-Chairwoman of
Zeta Chi Omega’s committee that recognizes members who
have been in the sorority for 25 years or more. She and co-
Chairwoman Cassandra Borden, along with their committee,
planned the event. “I am so honored to be able to witness
history,” Starr said.
On display at the event were some of Pinkard’s most
treasured possessions, including her AKA scrapbook, her
sorority pins, and the crown she received when she celebrated
her 50th year in the sorority in 1986.
Guests were treated to another special surprise. “We were
blessed to have another AKA in the room who has celebrated
more than 75 years in the sorority,” said Garrett. “Mrs. Eloise
Smith was also initiated in Chi Chapter at Tallageda College
where the two were classmates.” The two AKAs, with more
than 150 years of service, have managed to maintain their
friendship.
Pinkard was all smiles during the festivities and took the
time to speak with everyone.
“I have enjoyed every minute of being with Alpha Kappa
Alpha,” she said.
At one point during the celebration, Pinkard was overheard
telling one of her sorority sisters, “I never thought I would live
to see this day. Nothing can top this.”
Katrina Moss and Starr Garrett contributed to this article.
AKA members Lula Lang‐Jeter, left, Michelle Jones,
Eloise Smith, Ophelia Pinkard and Joyce Henderson
The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program recently named the District of
Columbia’s top two youth volunteers for 2011. Kevin Iraheta, 17, of Washington, D.C.,
played an active role in educating young people in the Washington area about the dangers
of unprotected sex, the importance of HIV testing and the nature of healthy relationships as
a peer educator with a teen program at the Children’s
National Medical.
Also honored was Chaquan Barbett, 13, who
visited stores in his section of the city to ensure owners
understood that it is illegal for them to sell cigarettes,
alcoholic beverages, or prescription drugs to minors.
Both students will receive an award of $1,000, an
engraved silver medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip
to Washington, D.C., April 30-May 3 for the program’s
national recognition events, where they will join the
top two honorees from each of the other states and
the District of Columbia. Ten of them will be named
America’s top youth volunteers at that time.
In addition, Victoria McGee of the District has been
named a distinguished fnalist and will receive bronze
medallions at local ceremonies:
The Prudential Spirit of Community of Awards, the
United States’ largest youth recognition program based
exclusively on volunteer service, was created in 1995 by
Prudential Financial and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP).
The program serves to honor young people who are committed to making a positive
difference and to inspire others to consider how they can also contribute to their communities
and the world.
Courtesy Photo
Minority Groups Join to
Launch National Museum
of the American People
Local AKA Member Celebrates 75 Years in Sorority
Two D.C. Teens Honored for Community Service Eforts
By AFRO Staf
On Feb. 20, the National
Eating Disorder Association
(NEDA) will host its second
annual walk in Washington,
D.C. The walk kicks off the
organization’s 24th annual
awareness week and NEDA
invites the community to join
them at American University
for a stroll in support of those
affected by disorders like
anorexia, bulimia and binge
eating.
This year’s theme is “It’s
Time to Talk About It,” and
Lynn Grefe, president and
CEO of NEDA, said the
walk is designed to help
participants focus on health,
not unrealistic beauty ideals.
“Today’s pressure cooker
of ‘the thin ideal’ versus
obesity is creating our own
kind of body mass confusion.
Speaking out is more critical
now than ever before,” Grefe
said in a prepared statement.
“We should be measured
by the size of our hearts,
not our hips. Together, as a
society, we should focus on
health instead of beauty. We
have a lot to talk about and
this rich conversation can
help save lives by bringing
healthy common sense to the
forefront.”
While eating disorders
have historically been linked
to young, affuent White
women, people of color are
also affected. According to
a 2003 study published in
The American Journal of
UnitedHealth Group has awarded $2,500 in grants to
two Washington, D.C.-based youth-led organizations that
have developed programs to fght childhood obesity in their
communities.
The grants are part of the UnitedHealth HEROES program,
a service-learning, health literacy initiative designed to
encourage young people, working through educators and youth
leaders, to create and implement local hands-on programs
addressing childhood obesity. Grants were awarded to
schools and youth-focused, community-based programs that
have demonstrated a clear understanding of the health risks
associated with pediatric obesity; proposed creative solutions to
fghting obesity in their neighborhoods and communities; and
can be easily implemented, scaled and measured.
Kid Power earned two grants totaling $1,500 for their
“Citizen Farm Project.” The program will serve 150 youth at
fve elementary school sites and 150 youth at fve middle school
sites. Students will create skits, podcasts and documentaries,
as well as pamphlets designed to teach gardening tips, cooking
healthy foods and making healthy eating choices to youth and
families in the community.
Also receiving grant money is American University, who
received $1,000 for the “Cultivating Latino Lifestyle” project.
A group of 20 Latino high school students will be invited
to biweekly “learning sessions” at American University to
introduce a new vegetable in their diet. Each week students will
plant the new vegetable in the community garden, take feld trips
to farmers markets and more. On Global Youth Service Day in
April each student will cook a favorite recipe incorporating what
they’ve learned from the sessions for their families.
“With UnitedHealth HEROES, we are helping young people
take action to improve their overall health and quality of life
in a way that’s not only educational, but benefcial for their
communities. As people become more aware of health issues
through health literacy and advocacy initiatives, they will make
positive changes to live better lives,” said Jim Cronin, CEO of
UnitedHealthcare of the Mid-Atlantic, in a press statement.
HEROES service-learning grantees will participate in YSA’s
Semester of Service, an extended service-learning framework
that links prominent service events such as MLK Day in
January and Global Youth Service Day (GYSD) in April.
During a Semester of Service program, young people spend
the “semester” – a 12- to 14-week period of time – addressing
meaningful community needs connected to intentional learning
goals and academic standards. Each grantee project will
culminate in an event on GYSD, the largest service event in the
world.
More information about the UnitedHealth HEROES
program and service-learning is available at www.ysa.org.
UnitedHealth Awards Grants to Anti-Childhood Obesity Groups
Courtesy Photo
Second Annual Walk Raises
Awareness of Eating Disorders
Psychiatry and reported by
the New York Times, Dr. Ruth
Striegel-Moore, professor and
chairwoman of psychology
at Wesleyan University,
discovered that young Black
women were equally prone to
report binge eating. However,
Striegel-Moore believes that
minority women are less
likely to seek treatment for
eating disorders.
NEDA is a non-proft
organization dedicated to
the fght against eating
disorders and unrealistic
body image ideals. They are
also fghting for additional
support, research and access
to treatment for people living
with these illnesses.
The NEDA walk
begins at 11 a.m. at
American University, 4400
Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Registration begins at 10:30
a.m. For more information
and registrations costs, visit
nationaleatingdisorders.org.
Correction
The information the AFRO received and which formed
the basis of the community news brief, “Community Center
Renamed in Honor of D.C. Activist Reginald ‘Kiyi’ Ballard”
that was published on Jan. 26, was incorrect.
The Feb. 7 event was a community meeting to discuss
the idea of renaming the Rosedale Recreation Center after
Reginald “Kiyi” Ballard. Instead, the information given to
the AFRO both verbally and in written form suggested the
event was the actual renaming of the center.
A4 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011 February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American A5
going to have population
growth in Prince George’s
County,” Congresswoman
Edwards said. “Just
from traveling around to
neighborhoods both in Prince
George’s and Montgomery
counties, where we’ve seen
growth in the state, you can
say we may have even seen
more growth had it not been
for the current economic
crisis.”
Baltimore City was the
only jurisdiction in the state
to lose residents; in fact, as a
whole, Maryland grew by 9
percent or 480,000 residents.
Over the last decade,
Baltimore City’s population
decreased by about 1 percent
with about roughly 30,000
fewer Black residents living
in the area than Whites.
The city now has 620,961
residents, a 4.6 percent loss
and at least 10,000 fewer than
city offcials had anticipated.
Still, city leaders
downplayed the population
loss, citing a steady decline
– at higher rates – for
generations. Mayor Stephanie
Rawlings-Blake called the
2010 fgures the smallest
population decline since the
1950s. But in a statement,
she added, “We must
continue to make progress
on the core issues that matter
most to Baltimore’s families:
better schools, safer streets,
and stronger neighborhoods.”
The growth in Prince
George’s County might not
necessarily be a good thing
either. In a county with a
weakened infrastructure, an
increase in population could
further strain resources.
The county is trying to
save money wherever it
can, including possibly
eliminating over 1,000 jobs
in the school system.
One way to combat a
further strain is to make
sure there is smarter growth
in Prince George’s. That’s
a task County Executive
Rushern Baker says he must
confront to make sure the
growing population can
thrive in the county and not
be a strain on resources.
“Over the next decade,
it is my goal to not just
continue the growth of the
population, but to prioritize
‘smart-growth’ of Prince
George’s County in terms of
economic development, jobs,
better schools, more effective
and effcient government and
imploring better and more
sustainable methods of living
and growing,” Baker said in a
statement.
Last December, Census
offcials announced Maryland
would keep its eight
congressional seats, but it
remains unclear if Baltimore
City will retain three of those
seats.
Rep. Elijah Cummings,
whose district incorporates
many of Baltimore City’s
Black voters, said he is
confdent the city won’t lose
congressional representation.
“I think that our Congress
people will remain,” he said,
adding that it will only be a
matter of redistribution of the
population.
“The population loss
has not been as great as
in the past, but any loss is
traumatic. We need all we
can get,” he noted.
While John T. Willis,
former Maryland secretary
of state and a redistricting
expert, agreed it is unlikely
the city will lose the two
congressional districts
with the largest numbers of
African-American residents,
he anticipates Baltimore will
lose one of its six senate
seats and have one to three
fewer delegates in the House
depending on state line
confgurations.
According to political
talk show host and former
state senator, Larry Young,
Gov. Martin O’Malley, who
will draw new boundaries
during the frst day of the
2013 General Assembly,
should map a shared
district between the city
and Baltimore County. The
move would be justifed, as
Cummings gave up a portion
of his district 10 years ago
so the nearby county could
have a congressman, Young
said. “So this time, we need
to go back and say ‘Hey,
we helped you get a United
States congressman, ya’ll
help us keep our legislative
districts,’” he said.
The state still must adjust
census data to refect prisoner
populations as mandated by
a new state law requiring
inmates be counted based
on their last known address.
Young estimates at least half
of the state’s prisoners are
from Baltimore City, which
would greatly increase the
city’s fgures. Census offcials
are expected to release
prisoner tallies by spring.
feb 2 – may 1 | tickets on sale now
17th & m sts nw | ngmuseum.org
for nearly 500 years, african americans have taken a journey from struggle to triumph.
local partners:
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This week’s indictment is the continuation
of a saga that began when Johnson was
arrested with his wife on Nov. 12 at their
Mitchellville home. Three days later, nine
other people were arrested in connection with
the Johnson probe including Melhi and three
Prince George’s police offcers.
The indictment says that Johnson along
with the head of the county’s Department
of Housing and Community Development –
called Public Offcial A – accepted money,
trips, expenses, meals, drinks, hotel rooms,
airline tickets, rounds of golf, employment,
mortgage payments and campaign
contributions from Melhi and two other men
(Developer A and Developer B). There is
substantial information in the indictment
taken from wiretapped conversations between
Johnson, Public Offcial A, Developer A and
Developer B. At the time of the offenses
covered by the indictment, the head of the
Department of Housing and Community
Development was James Johnson.
One of the more interesting statements
came on the day State Sen. Ulysses Currie,
D-Dist. 25, was indicted on federal bribery
charges. Johnson, in a conversation with
Public Offcial A, urged him to use caution.
“You heard they indicted Uly Currie
tonight right?” Johnson asked.
“Yeah, 16 counts,” Public Offcial A
responded.
“Yup, damn, they really ... that’s why I
was saying man, you know we in these jobs,
we got to take ... be careful man,” Johnson
said. “You know what I’m saying. Be careful
boy, be careful.”
Johnson is also documented asking
Melhi and other people to donate to his
wife’s campaign. In one conversation with
a public offcial in the county he expressed
his disappointment with how little money his
wife was receiving on the campaign trail.
“And remember they used to be crying
all the time and your boy would go and was
able to pick things up for them,” he said. “So
now it starts coming in automatically right,
so they don’t need it anymore. Ok, but you
know what? That doesn’t have to continue to
happen.
“Tell him you need him to raise money for
my wife. Tell him to write a $4,000 check.”
The investigation is continuing and more
indictments are expected. Some are expected
to include former candidates for public offce
within the county as well as county council
members.
“These charges are the result of a long and
complex investigation by the FBI in Prince
George’s County. Rooting out corruption
is the FBI’s top criminal priority and one
we excel at,” FBI Special Agent in Charge
Richard A. McFeely said in a statement.
“This investigation will continue to seek out
corrupt offcials and acts within all levels of
Prince George’s County government.”
Johnson faces up to 115 years in prison if
convicted.
Md., Prince George’s Black Population Increases
Continued from A1
Johnson Indicted
Continued from A1
“[Minority growth] actually bodes well depending on
where these Census blocks are in the population are
and where the population is.”
By Jamaal Abdul-Alim
Special to the AFRO
Although President Barack Obama signed
a measure two months ago meant to fund
the settlement of a longstanding case known
as the Black farmers lawsuit, no payout is
in sight despite scam artists who suggest
otherwise.
That was the heart of the message
that National Black Farmers Association
president Dr. John Boyd sought to deliver
earlier this week at the National Press
Club. “We’ve had a very long struggle.
We’re still struggling,” he said in reference
to the lawsuit, which began in 1997 and
alleged the U.S. Department of Agriculture
discriminated against Black farmers on the
basis of race and failed to investigate or
respond to complaints from 1983 to 1997.
“We still don’t have the money,” said
in reference to the second settlement of the
case, meant in large part to give claimants
who still hadn’t had their cases heard under
the original case a chance to do so. “Farmers
still haven’t even begun to have their cases
heard.”
Dr. Boyd said he wanted to warn Black
farmers that they do not have to pay any
application fees to get their cases heard,
which he said some con artists in certain
remote areas of the deep South have been
getting or trying to get Black farmers to do.
“I’m here to put people on alert that they
do not have to pay a $1,000 fee,” Dr. Boyd
said, although his details about the alleged
scams were scarce.
The conference momentarily grew heated
when a Huffngton Post blogger critical of
Boyd’s advocacy suggested that most of the
individuals who hope to cash in on the $1.15
billion settlement are non-farmers seeking to
defraud the federal government, not actual
farmers.
“Not one damn dime has been paid out,”
Boyd told the blogger, Lee Stranahan, in
response. “And all of the sudden
you’ve labeled 80 percent of
these people fraudulent? Let
them go through process.”
At one point during the
Q&A, National Press Club
member and event host Karrye
Braxton threatened to call
security on Stranahan – who
carried a handheld camera
he aimed at Dr. Boyd – kept
making statements about the
case instead of asking Dr. Boyd
an actual question.
Despite Stranahan’s
questions about non-farmers
seeking to fle claims, the
settlement, formally known
as Pigford II, actually allows
not only for claims to be fled
by Black farmers who farmed
and were denied loans through
USDA agencies from 1981
through 1996, but also those
who attempted to farm and were
denied loans during the same
period.
Congress enacted legislation
that led to Pigford II in 2008
due to concerns about the large
number of late-fling applicants who did not
obtain a determination of the merits of their
claims under the original Pigford settlement
approved by a federal district court judge
in 1999, according to The Pigford Cases:
USDA Settlement of Discrimination Suits by
Black Farmers, a report prepared by the non-
partisan Congressional Research Service.
The CRS report cites concerns about
“ineffective or defective” notice regarding
the case.
Under the terms of the Pigford II
settlement agreement, claimants who
submitted late-fling requests under the
original Pigford case between Oct. 12, 1999,
and June 19, 2008, but have not had their
case heard, can seek relief of up to $50,000
plus debt relief, or choose the longer process
for damages of up to $250,000, according to
the CRS report.
The actual number of eligible claimants –
said to be in the tens of thousands – remains
to be seen, Dr. Boyd said, adding that anti-
fraud provisions would serve to prevent non-
eligible claimants from fling claims. In order
to receive a settlement payment, for instance,
claimants expose themselves to perjury for
fling a bogus claim. “At the end of the day,
those who prevail will prevail,” Dr. Boyd
said. “And those who get denied will be
denied.”
Though funding for the settlement
has been signed by President Obama, the
measure must be approved by U.S. District
Judge Paul Friedman before it can become
part of the settlement.
“I’m hopeful that Judge Friedman will
make that decision soon,” Dr. Boyd said.
Photo by Rob Roberts
Dr. John Boyd, shown in this September 2010 AFRO
fle photo, alerted Black farmers to an alleged scam,
asking them to pay application fees. He said the
farmers did not have to pay any money to apply for
the settlement.
Boyd Gives Update on Black Farmers Settlement
“At the end of the day, those who prevail will prevail.
And those who get denied will be denied.”
Community
A coalition of 130 ethnic and minority groups announced
the launch of efforts to establish the National Museum of the
American People at a press conference in the District last week.
The museum will tell the stories of all of the groups that came
to the country from prehistoric times up to the present. The
museum will refect the nation’s original national motto: “E
Pluribus Unum – From Many We Are One.”
The coalition emphasized that no federal tax dollars will
be sought to build this new national museum in Washington.
Its frst step is to seek a bipartisan presidential commission
to study the establishment of the museum and a bipartisan
Congressional resolution in support of the commission.
The museum’s mission is to advance and disseminate
knowledge about the story of the making of the American
people, to refect upon questions that are raised by that story,
and to take pride in it, according to a press release issued by the
organizers. In addition, the project will highlight the diversity
and richness of the cultures from which Americans came. It
will foster a sense of belonging to the nation by the successive
waves of people who have come here and made us the leading
economic, military, scientifc and cultural force in the world.
“The stories about the migration and immigration of our
ancestors as well as those coming today are dramatic and will
be compelling in this museum,” said Sam Eskenazi, director of
the Coalition for the National Museum of the American People,
in a prepared statement. “This will be America’s only national
institution devoted exclusively to telling the full story of the
making of the American people.
“This museum will help us all understand our own heritage
and, at the same time, the story of all other Americans,”
Eskenazi said. “As President Obama said in his inaugural
address, ‘We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn
from every end of this Earth …’”
So far, 50 notable scholars from around the nation and the
world are formally supporting establishment of the museum.
A range of scholars, including historians, anthropologists,
archeologists, ethnologists, human geographers, demographers,
geneticists, linguists and others will help tell the story. While
the museum will follow a consensus of their views, signifcant
evidence-based historic and scientifc dissenting views will
also be included. The museum’s goal will be to tell the story
with force and clarity and avoid mythology.
Eskenazi said that he envisioned the museum telling its
story as if the visitor were walking through a compelling
documentary flm about the making of the American people.
Following in the tradition of some of today’s most successful
museums such as the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the
Museum of the American People will use a mix of authentic
artifacts, mixed media, and the latest innovations of exhibition
designers.
By Robin Mazyck
Special to the AFRO
Dressed in a lovely shade of light pink with a crown placed
like royalty upon her perfectly coiffed hair, Ophelia Pinkard
was recently honored at a celebration that recognized her 75
years of active service in Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority.
With her adoring husband, John H. Pinkard Jr., by her
side, Pinkard and more than 65 members from the Arlington-
Alexandria chapter of AKA (Zeta Chi Omega) and a host of
family and friends took a stroll down memory lane.
Pinkard was initiated into the sorority in April 1935 in
Chi Chapter at Talladega College, Talladega, Ala., where she
earned a bachelor’s degree in romance languages.
When she was initiated into the sorority, AKA members
were working on the Mississippi Health Project – vaccinating
thousands against smallpox and diphtheria.
“When she was initiated, the organization was in its
infancy and there were so many challenges in our country
– segregation for example. It’s hard to comprehend how
much she has seen throughout her lifetime,” Zeta Chi Omega
President Michelle Jones said. “It warms my heart to think
about her dedication and love for our sorority. She is a wealth
of knowledge, and I was overwhelmed with joy as I listened to
her talk about the sorority and all that she has done. It is all so
amazing.”
Pinkard has been an extremely active member of Zeta Chi
Omega. She served as the chapter’s president in 1960. In this
role, she inspired countless members to reach for the stars.
One of them is Lula Lang-Jeter. Lang-Jeter has been in the
sorority for more than 50 years.
During the celebration, Pinkard was presented a certifcate
and a congratulatory letter from the sorority’s international
president of AKA and resolutions from Zeta Chi Omega
Chapter and the Mid-Atlantic regional director. She also
received a certifcate of recognition and appreciation from the
county executive of Montgomery County.
“I had the honor and pleasure of presenting Mrs. Pinkard
with a special pin from our corporate offce commemorating
her 75 years of service,” said Starr Garrett, co-Chairwoman of
Zeta Chi Omega’s committee that recognizes members who
have been in the sorority for 25 years or more. She and co-
Chairwoman Cassandra Borden, along with their committee,
planned the event. “I am so honored to be able to witness
history,” Starr said.
On display at the event were some of Pinkard’s most
treasured possessions, including her AKA scrapbook, her
sorority pins, and the crown she received when she celebrated
her 50th year in the sorority in 1986.
Guests were treated to another special surprise. “We were
blessed to have another AKA in the room who has celebrated
more than 75 years in the sorority,” said Garrett. “Mrs. Eloise
Smith was also initiated in Chi Chapter at Tallageda College
where the two were classmates.” The two AKAs, with more
than 150 years of service, have managed to maintain their
friendship.
Pinkard was all smiles during the festivities and took the
time to speak with everyone.
“I have enjoyed every minute of being with Alpha Kappa
Alpha,” she said.
At one point during the celebration, Pinkard was overheard
telling one of her sorority sisters, “I never thought I would live
to see this day. Nothing can top this.”
Katrina Moss and Starr Garrett contributed to this article.
AKA members Lula Lang‐Jeter, left, Michelle Jones,
Eloise Smith, Ophelia Pinkard and Joyce Henderson
The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program recently named the District of
Columbia’s top two youth volunteers for 2011. Kevin Iraheta, 17, of Washington, D.C.,
played an active role in educating young people in the Washington area about the dangers
of unprotected sex, the importance of HIV testing and the nature of healthy relationships as
a peer educator with a teen program at the Children’s
National Medical.
Also honored was Chaquan Barbett, 13, who
visited stores in his section of the city to ensure owners
understood that it is illegal for them to sell cigarettes,
alcoholic beverages, or prescription drugs to minors.
Both students will receive an award of $1,000, an
engraved silver medallion, and an all-expense-paid trip
to Washington, D.C., April 30-May 3 for the program’s
national recognition events, where they will join the
top two honorees from each of the other states and
the District of Columbia. Ten of them will be named
America’s top youth volunteers at that time.
In addition, Victoria McGee of the District has been
named a distinguished fnalist and will receive bronze
medallions at local ceremonies:
The Prudential Spirit of Community of Awards, the
United States’ largest youth recognition program based
exclusively on volunteer service, was created in 1995 by
Prudential Financial and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP).
The program serves to honor young people who are committed to making a positive
difference and to inspire others to consider how they can also contribute to their communities
and the world.
Courtesy Photo
Minority Groups Join to
Launch National Museum
of the American People
Local AKA Member Celebrates 75 Years in Sorority
Two D.C. Teens Honored for Community Service Eforts
By AFRO Staf
On Feb. 20, the National
Eating Disorder Association
(NEDA) will host its second
annual walk in Washington,
D.C. The walk kicks off the
organization’s 24th annual
awareness week and NEDA
invites the community to join
them at American University
for a stroll in support of those
affected by disorders like
anorexia, bulimia and binge
eating.
This year’s theme is “It’s
Time to Talk About It,” and
Lynn Grefe, president and
CEO of NEDA, said the
walk is designed to help
participants focus on health,
not unrealistic beauty ideals.
“Today’s pressure cooker
of ‘the thin ideal’ versus
obesity is creating our own
kind of body mass confusion.
Speaking out is more critical
now than ever before,” Grefe
said in a prepared statement.
“We should be measured
by the size of our hearts,
not our hips. Together, as a
society, we should focus on
health instead of beauty. We
have a lot to talk about and
this rich conversation can
help save lives by bringing
healthy common sense to the
forefront.”
While eating disorders
have historically been linked
to young, affuent White
women, people of color are
also affected. According to
a 2003 study published in
The American Journal of
UnitedHealth Group has awarded $2,500 in grants to
two Washington, D.C.-based youth-led organizations that
have developed programs to fght childhood obesity in their
communities.
The grants are part of the UnitedHealth HEROES program,
a service-learning, health literacy initiative designed to
encourage young people, working through educators and youth
leaders, to create and implement local hands-on programs
addressing childhood obesity. Grants were awarded to
schools and youth-focused, community-based programs that
have demonstrated a clear understanding of the health risks
associated with pediatric obesity; proposed creative solutions to
fghting obesity in their neighborhoods and communities; and
can be easily implemented, scaled and measured.
Kid Power earned two grants totaling $1,500 for their
“Citizen Farm Project.” The program will serve 150 youth at
fve elementary school sites and 150 youth at fve middle school
sites. Students will create skits, podcasts and documentaries,
as well as pamphlets designed to teach gardening tips, cooking
healthy foods and making healthy eating choices to youth and
families in the community.
Also receiving grant money is American University, who
received $1,000 for the “Cultivating Latino Lifestyle” project.
A group of 20 Latino high school students will be invited
to biweekly “learning sessions” at American University to
introduce a new vegetable in their diet. Each week students will
plant the new vegetable in the community garden, take feld trips
to farmers markets and more. On Global Youth Service Day in
April each student will cook a favorite recipe incorporating what
they’ve learned from the sessions for their families.
“With UnitedHealth HEROES, we are helping young people
take action to improve their overall health and quality of life
in a way that’s not only educational, but benefcial for their
communities. As people become more aware of health issues
through health literacy and advocacy initiatives, they will make
positive changes to live better lives,” said Jim Cronin, CEO of
UnitedHealthcare of the Mid-Atlantic, in a press statement.
HEROES service-learning grantees will participate in YSA’s
Semester of Service, an extended service-learning framework
that links prominent service events such as MLK Day in
January and Global Youth Service Day (GYSD) in April.
During a Semester of Service program, young people spend
the “semester” – a 12- to 14-week period of time – addressing
meaningful community needs connected to intentional learning
goals and academic standards. Each grantee project will
culminate in an event on GYSD, the largest service event in the
world.
More information about the UnitedHealth HEROES
program and service-learning is available at www.ysa.org.
UnitedHealth Awards Grants to Anti-Childhood Obesity Groups
Courtesy Photo
Second Annual Walk Raises
Awareness of Eating Disorders
Psychiatry and reported by
the New York Times, Dr. Ruth
Striegel-Moore, professor and
chairwoman of psychology
at Wesleyan University,
discovered that young Black
women were equally prone to
report binge eating. However,
Striegel-Moore believes that
minority women are less
likely to seek treatment for
eating disorders.
NEDA is a non-proft
organization dedicated to
the fght against eating
disorders and unrealistic
body image ideals. They are
also fghting for additional
support, research and access
to treatment for people living
with these illnesses.
The NEDA walk
begins at 11 a.m. at
American University, 4400
Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Registration begins at 10:30
a.m. For more information
and registrations costs, visit
nationaleatingdisorders.org.
Correction
The information the AFRO received and which formed
the basis of the community news brief, “Community Center
Renamed in Honor of D.C. Activist Reginald ‘Kiyi’ Ballard”
that was published on Jan. 26, was incorrect.
The Feb. 7 event was a community meeting to discuss
the idea of renaming the Rosedale Recreation Center after
Reginald “Kiyi” Ballard. Instead, the information given to
the AFRO both verbally and in written form suggested the
event was the actual renaming of the center.
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American A3
Developer
Continued from A1
A6 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
Feb 12 – May 22
Tickets: 804.340.1405 or www.VMFA.museum
“As gorgeous as sculpture gets anytime, anywhere.”
— New York Times
Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria has been co-organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and Fundación Botín,
Santander, Spain, in collaboration with the National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria.
Te exhibition has been supported, in part, by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts,
and by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and Humanities.
At VMFA, the exhibition is presented by Dominion Resources and supported by the Julia Louise Reynolds Fund and the Lettie Pate
Whitehead Evans Exhibition Endowment. Media Partners: CBS 6, Style Weekly, and Virginia Living
IMAGE: Figure of a King, early to mid-16th century, copper alloy. Photo courtesy Museum for African Art and
Fundación Botín/Karin L. Willis. © National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria.
200 N. Boul evar d | Ri chmond | www.VMFA. museum
Nov. 5, 2010, with a fnal
decision by Dec. 16. However,
the Post reports that the
bidding phase was extended to
December and the process is
taking longer than expected.
Metro offcials say the
delay isn’t a bad thing. They
believe the extra time has
allowed for a deeper and
more competitive group of
proposals. “The request for
qualifcations was designed to
foster an open and competitive
selection,” Gates said. “The
pool of proposals was among
the strongest Metro has
seen for its development
opportunities in Prince
George’s County.”
Forest City Washington is
the development group behind
the ongoing redevelopment
projects at Waterfront Metro
Station and the Yards, the
Capital Riverfront district
near Nationals Stadium, in
the District. The company
says it specializes in mixed-
use, residential and military
housing development.
The New Carrollton Metro
Station is already home to
Metro’s Orange Line, Amtrak,
Greyhound and the MARC
Camden Line. It will also be
a stop on the proposed Purple
Line which will run from
New Carrollton to downtown
Bethesda, Md.
Despite those resources,
though, the land around
the station is a wasteland
of parking garages and
empty lots. Offcials within
the county and at the two
agencies leading the charge
say it’s time to fx that issue.
“This is the only place in
the country with this kind of
rail conversion,” said Steven
Goldin, Metro’s director of
real estate, told the AFRO last
year. “On top of that, you’ve
got the IRS facility there with
1.2 million square feet and
5,000 employees so it’s a
place that [General Services
Administration] already
knows and likes.
“When you put all those
things together, it’s a site
that we think is the jewel
of the crown of all of the
undeveloped sites around
metro stations.”
The New Carrollton
site will be home to one of
the largest transit oriented
development projects on the
east coast and will be the
largest development project in
Prince George’s County since
National Harbor. It’ll feature
offce, retail and residential
development opportunities
that will put it on par with
locations in Arlington, the
District and Montgomery
County.
Organizers are still hoping
that groundbreaking on the
project begins in early 2013.
“The pool of
proposals
was among the
strongest Metro
has seen for
its development
opportunities in
Prince George’s
County.”
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American A7

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3
Black history belongs to all of us. It’s not just other people’s stories from the past. It’s how these stories are passed down, reflected upon and used to start new chapters.
In our schools, in the workplace and in the community, new leaders are taking a stand and creating positive change every day. This shows us that Black History is alive
and well. And this is why we celebrate. Wells Fargo honors Black History and all pioneers of progress.
wellsfargo.com
© 2011 Wells Fargo Bank N.A., All rights reserved. Member FDIC.
25561
01.11.11
Carol H Williams
bt
100 News
M25561_0008_BHM_L
By Tia Lewis
Special to the AFRO
Thank you. The two simple yet indelible words were the
backdrop of the U.S. Department of Defense’s 60th anniversary
of the Korean War Commemoration, which celebrates African
American’s contributions to the three-year battle.
Held in the Pentagon’s
Auditorium, the event drew
military veterans, decorated
service men and women,
civilians, families and friends
who came out to pay homage to
the African-American men who
valiantly battled on the Korean
peninsula to restore peace
abroad even as their human
rights were denied at home.
Though their contributions
may not have been appreciated
then, a stirring rendition of the
“Star Spangled Banner” and
the Presentation of Colors set
the tone for a ceremony which
would recognize them as full-
fedged heroes and equals to all
men who served.
Jean Davis, outreach
manager of the event, began the
afternoon’s affair by recognizing
the guests of honor and their
“self sacrifce that paved the
way for democracy.”
“Those who returned from
that far off war received no
parade; there was no media
event to celebrate their
accomplishments. In many
respects that is why we are here
today to reassure our Korean
War veterans that America does remember the forgotten
victory,” said Davis.
Following meditation, Col. David J. Clark, director of the
60th Anniversary War Commemoration Committee, remarked
on the war’s legacy and the veterans’ unwavering loyalty during
a time of segregation.
“If you think about it, this is one on of the most selfess
patriotic acts of sacrifce in American history and for this reason
alone America owes an unpayable debt to its African-American
veterans… Thank God for African-American patrons.” These
contributions, and those of other African-American troops,
propelled the military to become fully integrated in the 1960s,
he added.
Following Clark’s words, ally and benefactor of the men’s
heroic efforts Brig. Gen. Lee Seo Young, South Korean defense
attaché, extended his gratitude to the service men for their
brave and devoted allegiance and commitment to defending
Korea’s freedom.
“Because of the courage of many service men, the Korean
fag still fies over the Republic of Korea. You won freedom,
democracy and prosperity for our nation; that is what you
fought for and that is what the Republic of Korea stands for
now.”
Lasting from the 1950 to 1953, the Korean War claimed
the lives of more than 5,000 Black Americans. Pegged as “the
forgotten victory,” the African-American presence in the battle
hides even deeper in history than the battle itself; it is rarely
discussed. However, its lack of exposure doesn’t lessen its impact
or importance as it forever changed the relationship of two
continents and initiated the desegregation of the armed services.
According to the event’s press release, in 1948, President
Harry S. Truman signed Executive Order 9981, securing the
full integration of America’s
Armed Services. Thus,
America went to war in Korea
for the frst time in her history
with a military that refected
her diversity.
The ceremony culminated
with the words of keynote
speaker, Ronald M. Joe, of the
Senior Executive Service.
“For too long, these were
soldiers in the shadows…
forgotten heroes,” he said.
“Today it should be clear to
you, all of you, that you are
forgotten no more.”
Joe applauded the armed
forces for their “impressive
progress towards President
Truman’s vision of an inclusive
military that refects the ideal
of the nation but encouraged
more diversity in upper ranks.”
He added, “The
transformation of the armed
forces remains unfnished.
Women and minorities are still
underrepresented in leadership
positions.
“[Even] in 2011, we are
still faced with the quality of
treatment, offce making issues
and the senior core is not as
diverse as it should be. We need to make sure that the pathways
to senior offce positions are open to all.”
In admiration of the veterans’ selfess fght, he said,
“Because of you we can build a big bridge and we can go
across it to a better nation.”
The event ended with a viewing of the flm, For the Love
of Liberty: The Story of America’s Black Patriots and a panel
discussion with seven distinguished service men, led by Robert
V. Morris, author of Black Faces of War.
Pentagon Marks Blacks’ Service in Korean War
Courtesy Photo
Col. Harry Townsend, USA retired, left; Staf Sgt. Edward Hill, USMC retired; Lt. Gen. William Earl Brown, USAF retired;
Brig. Gen. Lee Seo Young, defense attaché, Embassy of Republic of Korea; Col. David J. Clark, director, DoD 60th
Anniversary of the Korean War Anniversary Commemoration Committee; Capt. Thomas J. Hudner Jr., USN retired,
Medal of Honor recipient; David N. Smith, U.S. Army veteran; Gunnery Sgt. Reuben McNair, USMC retired; and Cmdr.
Dana Gordon, USN
A8 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
By Kenneth J. Cooper
America’s Wire
Conservative Republicans and
commentators have frequently blamed
the housing crisis on the Community
Reinvestment Act (CRA), which encourages
banks to make loans in the low- and
moderate-income areas where they operate.
But a study to be released this week and a
bipartisan commission conclude that the
federal law had little impact on the crisis.
The 1977 law, designed to prevent
redlining in less prosperous neighborhoods,
requires banking examiners to consider how
many loans a bank has made in these urban
neighborhoods and rural communities when
fnancial institutions seek approval to open
new branches, acquire other banks or merge.
Critics charged that the CRA forced banks
to approve mortgages for poor, unqualifed
buyers who could not maintain payments
and went into default or foreclosure, causing
the housing market to collapse. That charge
was also leveled often at the affordable-
housing goals of Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, federally sponsored enterprises that buy
mortgages made by private lenders.
But the Democratic majority of the
Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission
established by Congress concluded in
January that the 1977 law was “not a
signifcant factor in subprime lending or
the crisis.” Ben Bernanke, chairman of
the Federal Reserve, had made a similar
statement two years ago, but the criticism
continued.
The Democrats on the bipartisan
commission also found that the affordable
housing goals “contributed marginally” to
purchase of risky mortgages by Fannie and
Freddie.
Maurice Jourdain-Earl heard in those
criticisms an accusation that minorities had
caused the crisis—though he says race was
rarely mentioned except by some bloggers.
“It’s more innuendo,” Jourdain-Earl says,
calling the CRA “generically a code word” for
lending to minorities who cannot afford home
loans. He says the same applied to affordable
housing goals. His frm, ComplianceTech, is
releasing a study this week concluding that
mortgage lending to African Americans and
Hispanics has declined by 62 percent since the
housing downturn began.
Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., then
chairman of the House Financial Services
Committee, has also said he detected
racial code language in criticisms by some
conservative Republicans. “In the wake of the
affordable housing goals of Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac (and) the CRA, they get to take
shots at poor people. And let’s be honest, the
fact that some poor people are Black doesn’t
hurt, either, from their standpoint,” the Boston
Herald quoted Frank as saying in 2008 at a
local forum on foreclosures.
Grover Norquist, president of Americans
for Tax Reform and a prominent conservative,
told the Herald that he and other critics did
not blame “low-income African Americans”
he said had been victimized by the law, but
rather Frank and Sen. Christopher Dodd,
D-Conn., who then chaired the Committee on
Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, and has
retired from Congress. The Herald labeled the
CRA one of the country’s “minority-lending
laws.”
See full story on Afro.com.
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1
5

Holly Robinson Peete
Rodney Peete
Lt. General Russel Honoré
(U.S. Army, Ret.)
Rita Mack
Professor
Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
They come from every walk of life, but they share one vision – a selfless
commitment to enriching their communities. McDonald’s
®
Annual 365 Black
®
Award salutes our honorees for working hard every day to make a difference.
For more information, visit
What do an Actress, Quarterback, Educator,
Entrepreneur and General have in common?
©

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M
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a
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Study Concludes Loans to Minorities
Did Not Cause Housing Crisis
Real Estate
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American A9
(NNPA) – One of the
frst places state and federal
governments look to make
cutbacks in an attempt to
balance their ballooning
budgets is in the penal system.
As a result, ex-offender re-
entry programs that help
rehabilitate those who are at
risk for returning to prison
are on the chopping block.
Sure, cutting funding to these
programs may help balance
budgets in the short term. But,
as ex-offenders become repeat
offenders and return to jail or
prison, we end up shelling out
more money in the long run to incarcerate them. Additionally,
communities and individuals will continue to be victimized by
crime and trapped in a seemingly never-ending cycle.
Recently, USA Today reported on these cutbacks and the
impact they could have on states across the country. Florida,
for example, saw a small decrease in the number of ex-
offenders who committed a new felony while on probation.
Instead of looking at the bigger picture and continuing to
invest in programs designed to reduce recidivism, Florida, in
an attempt to get its fscal house in order, plans to cut such
programs. Other states are also weighing signifcant budget
cuts to all parts of their criminal justice systems.
This is just bad business. In many states, the number of ex-
offenders committing new crimes has increased, partly because
of cuts to programs that help them transform their lives and
stay out of prison.
Any state considering such cuts should look to
Michigan for guidance. Budget gaps and increasingly high
unemployment rates have led lawmakers there to address both
problems with a novel plan: Help ex-offenders fnd and keep
jobs that will keep them out of prison. According to a report
by the Institute for Research on Poverty, Michigan has used
job placement programs to cut the prison population by about
15 percent during the last four years and has saved more than
$200 million each year.
Here’s hoping other locales will follow Michigan’s lead.
With your help, maybe they can. Call or write your county,
state, and federal legislators and demand they not be so
shortsighted; ask that they avoid making budget cuts to prison
re-entry programs at all costs.
In these diffcult economic times, it is only reasonable that
lawmakers conserve resources where they can. The criminal
justice system, particularly ex-offender re-entry programs, is
not the place to make these cuts. Our lawmakers must think
about the effect these budget reductions will have on our
overall safety and the economic impact they will have on
taxpayers down the road.
Greg Mathis is a nationally syndicated reality TV show
host and retired Michigan judge recognized for his advocacy
campaigns and book “Street Judge.”
“All persons born or
naturalized in the United
States, and subject to the
jurisdiction thereof, are
citizens of the United States
and of the State wherein they
reside. No State shall make
or enforce any law which
shall abridge the privileges
or immunities of citizens of
the United States; nor shall
any State deprive any person
of life, liberty, or property,
without due process of law;
nor deny to any person within
its jurisdiction the equal
protection of the laws.” Section I of the 14th Amendment
The immigration debate has taken another ugly turn. First,
Arizona passed a law, now under federal challenge, granting
unprecedented powers to police to stop and demand proof of
citizenship from anyone they suspect of being in the country
illegally. Now, two United States senators, a congressman and
at least 14 states have proposed amending or reinterpreting
the 14th Amendment of the Constitution to deny citizenship to
U.S.-born children of undocumented immigrants.
The 14th amendment effectively overturned the Supreme
Court’s infamous 1857 Dred Scott decision which ruled that
no slave or descendent of a slave could ever be a United States
citizen. Since its ratifcation in 1868, the 14th Amendment’s
clear statements on birthright citizenship, due process and
equal protection, have formed the basis for a large measure
of social and economic reforms. In fact, the Supreme Court
cited the violation of the 14th Amendment’s “equal protection”
clause as a major factor in its 1954 Brown v. Board of
Education decision ending segregation in
American schools. The 14th Amendment’s
most famous “birthright” defense came in
1898, when the Supreme Court, in United
States v. Wong Kim Ark, upheld the citizenship
of a child born in the United States to Chinese
immigrant parents who lived in San Francisco
but were not legal citizens.
The law is clear: Anyone born on American
soil, regardless of race or ethnicity, is entitled
to automatic citizenship. For more than 100
years, that has been a fundamental principle
of American democracy. But recently,
anti-immigration forces across the country
have claimed that large numbers of illegal
immigrants are crossing the border simply to
have what they derisively call “anchor babies”
– children who automatically qualify for the
benefts of United States citizenship.
Despite the fact that this rarely occurs, Sen.
David Vitter of Louisiana and Sen. Rand Paul
of Kentucky have introduced legislation that
would amend the 14th Amendment and deny citizenship to the
U.S born children of immigrants unless at least one parent has
permanent resident status, is a naturalized citizen or is serving
in the U.S. military.
Last year, in what appeared to be a mid-term election
campaign ploy, a number of conservative senators said
they might call hearings to air their opposition to automatic
citizenship for the children of undocumented immigrants.
Most observers and scholars think that a push to amend the
Constitution is likely to fail given that it would require votes
from 67 senators, 290 representatives and ratifcation by 38
states.
But that has not stopped its supporters. On the frst day
of the new Congress, Rep. Steve King of Iowa chose what
he believes is a less arduous route by introducing legislation
that would outlaw birthright citizenship by amending the
Immigration and Nationality Act.
While opponents of birthright citizenship contend their
intent is to curb illegal immigration, this is clearly another
divisive step that would weaken America’s tradition and
strength as a nation of immigrants.
Our message to anyone attempting to rewrite history and
the law for their own political purposes is clear: Don’t mess
with the 14th Amendment.
Marc H. Morial is the president and CEO of the National
Urban League.
Opinion
Marc H. Morial
Don’t Mess With the 14th Amendment
Judge Greg
Mathis
Mathis’ Mind: Save Ex-Inmate Programs
President Obama’s
March 9, 2009, signing of
an executive order removing
barriers to embryonic stem
cell research was momentous not only for the scientifc
community, which had previously operated under onerous
restrictions, but also to those who suffer from diseases for
which there is currently no treatment. But while embryonic
stem cells may hold the most promise, the availability of such
treatment is years, perhaps decades, away. The reality is that
people with poor bodies need help today. These are people
for whom conventional treatments have failed and for whom
embryonic stem cell treatment in the United States is a distant
dream. Autologous stem cell treatment, which uses stem
cells taken from one’s own body, is safe and effective, but is
currently prohibited in the U.S. for readily available treatment
of injuries and diseases. Autologous therapy has been shown to
successfully treat heart disease and Type 2 diabetes which data
shows disproportionately affect Blacks. Given the potential
medical beneft to Blacks and the opportunity to bring together
seemingly disparate interest groups – from the progressive
to the conservative ends of the political spectrum – around
a critical health care and civil rights issue, President Obama
should immediately order the Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) to clarify regulations that have been incorrectly
interpreted as classifying one’s own stem cells as a “drug.”
Unlike embryonic therapies, autologous therapy can help
and is helping sick people now. Unfortunately, our current
health care policy discourse has been monopolized by partisan
debates over medical insurance reform, thus obscuring any
truly holistic debate on health care. Consequently, stem
cell therapies are seldom, if ever, discussed as an integral
part of the future of health care in the U.S. as a tool for both
treatment and prevention of disease. And on the rare occasion
that mainstream media outlets do discuss stem cells, their
discussions are often uninformed and myopic, focusing only
on the embryonic variety and the quasi-religious controversies
that distort their future use. These discussions not only stife
thoughtful debate over the scientifc merit of embryonic stem
cells, but they also stife debate about viable alternatives that
are politically non-controversial, proven to work and ready
for wider availability. For example, there has been signifcant
coverage of federal litigation concerning the constitutionality
of the mandate Affordable Care Act, but little to no coverage
of litigation between Dr. Chris Centeno and the FDA over
whether the FDA can legally regulate the use of autologous
stem cells. This must change.
Simply put, autologous stem cells are the body’s own
stem cells that can be extracted from bone marrow or fat
tissue. They can be separated out, multiplied in culture and
readministered to the same patient. This procedure has been
used to successfully treat a variety of common conditions, such
as tendon, cartilage and bone damage. Preliminary data show
that similar therapies, using autologous mesenchymal stem
cells, can even successfully treat heart disease and myocardial
infarction. Dr. Richard Burt at Northwestern University has
successfully treated neurological conditions such as CIDR and
multiple sclerosis. Although autologous stem cell therapy is
safe, other countries such as India, China and Germany have
surpassed the U.S. in making this treatment available to people
who need it because in the U.S., the FDA improperly classifes
a person’s own stem cells as a biologic “drug.” Consequently,
our own stem cells are subjected to a long, arduous, disease-
by-disease clinical trial process, a process which requires a
signifcant fnancial investment. This means that people with
potentially treatable diseases must either languish or raise
the tens of thousands of dollars needed to travel overseas for
treatment. We should not have to do this.
Blacks should care about autologous therapies because of
their potential to treat heart disease and diabetes, debilitating
and potentially deadly diseases which disproportionately
affect Blacks. According to the U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services’ Offce of Minority Health, Blacks are
more likely than Whites to have and die from heart disease.
The American Heart Association found that heart disease
and stroke are the No. 1 and No. 3 killers of Blacks. But
preliminary results from clinical trials have demonstrated
increased exercise capacity, decrease in pain and increased
ejection fractions in patients with severely damaged heart
tissue. In the case of diabetes, we know that Blacks are
disproportionately affected by Type 2 diabetes. According
to Brancati et. al., (2000) Black men are 20-50 percent more
likely and Black women are more than 100 percent more likely
than Whites to have or develop diabetes. However, in a study
conducted at the Don Roberto Fernandez Vina Foundation in
Argentina, 85 percent of participants who had diabetes were
able to abandon insulin or insulin stimulating drugs when stem
cells from their own bone marrow were injected directly into
the pancreas.
But Blacks should not advocate for the immediate
availability of autologous therapies simply because of its
potential to heal countless Black Americans. It should also
do so because this is an issue that encapsulates many of the
values that Blacks have historically championed: helping racial
minorities, persons with disabilities and others whose political
voices have been muffed by a recalcitrant government;
ensuring de facto equality between all groups that help
constitute the diverse fabric of the American citizenry; making
sure every American has quality health care and not just
medical insurance, regardless of their physical or economic
stations in life; and sustaining a deep respect for civil and
human rights through movements that challenge status quo
policies that, when applied, reveal themselves to be deleterious
to vulnerable people. Indeed,
this issue has the potential
to unite seemingly disparate
interest groups in a coalition
for healing. The most obvious
stakeholders might be Blacks
and persons with disabilities, but interest convergence can
also be found with social conservatives, many of whom seek
alternatives to embryonic stem cell treatment. The possibility
of such a coalition should not be dismissed. Rather, it should
be embraced if it means that the result is easing the suffering
of Americans who rely on their elected offcials to remove
restrictions that make them less healthy.
People with poor bodies, who perhaps needlessly endure
perpetual physical penury, cannot wait to be made whole.
President Obama and congressional leadership should adopt
autologous stem cell therapy as an integral part of their health
care, disability rights and civil rights platforms. Furthermore,
President Obama should direct the FDA to clarify regulations
that incorrectly defne autologous treatment as a “drug” and
should eliminate any and all other relevant legal impediments
to the immediate availability of autologous stem cell therapies.
Major media outlets should incorporate the issue into the
health care debate as a viable avenue of treatment that is
worthy of increased television, print and web coverage. They
should also make sure to distinguish between embryonic,
autologous and other stem cell varieties during news coverage.
Finally, all Americans should educate themselves about the
varieties of stem cell therapies and put more pressure on
decisionmakers to bring true health care to those who need it
the most.
A. Rahman Ford, J.D., M.A., is a doctoral candidate
in the Department of Political Science at the University of
Pennsylvania. Ford suffers from a debilitating, muscle-wasting
A. Rahman Ford
Why We Should Care About Autologous Stem Cell
“People with poor bodies, who perhaps needlessly endure
perpetual physical penury, cannot wait to be made whole.”
A10 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011






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February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American B1
By Andrea L. “Aunni” Young
Special to the AFRO
The executive board of the Association for Study of the African American Life and
History (ASALH)hosted a briefng on the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War and
the 112th Congress at the Capitol Visitors Center on Feb. 3.
The briefng, directed by Sylvia Cyrus, executive director of ASALH, presented impactful
information to support the sesquicentennial celebration of the American Civil War.
Panelists included Dr. Frank Smith, executive director for the African American
Civil War Museum; Dr. Darryl Scott, ASALH vice president for programs; Bob
Beatty, director of programs, American Association for State and Local History
(AASLH) and Ron Armstead, executive director, CBC Veterans Brain Trust.

The Bufalo Soldiers
lend support to the
African American
Civil War cause.
Katherine Hall, stafer for Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill.,
and Sterling Henry, Capitol Hill representative for the
African American Civil War Museum
Ron Armstead, executive director of
Veterans Brain Trust at the podium
and Dr. Darryl Scott, vice president
for programs, ASALH
Alan Spears,
National Parks
Conservation
association’s
legislative
representative
Debra Stepp, ASALH and
George Henry, chief of staf for
Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y.
John W. Franklin, National Museum of the African
American History & Culture; Frank Smith, founding
director, African American Civil War Museum
and Andrea Young, AFRO social writer
Louis Hicks, ASALH board member; Bob Beatty, director of programs,
AASLH; Sylvia Cyrus, ASALH executive director; Frank Smith,
director, African American Civil War Museum; John W. Franklin,
National Museum of the African American History & Culture and Ron
Armstead, executive director, Veterans Brain Trust
Ron Armstead; Shirley Smith, ASALH Luncheon Committee; Natalie Howard, ASALH president; Frank Smith;
Sylvia Cyrus; Allie Latimer; Emma King; Delores Tucker Branch and John W. Franklin.
By Andrea L. “Aunni”Young
Special to the AFRO
The red carpet sizzled
as Black Entertainment
Television (BET) held its
fourth annual BET Honors
Awards show taping in
Washington, D.C. recently.
This year, BET honored the
legendary actress Cicely
Tyson for her life’s work in
the theatrical arts; Oscar
Award-winning Jamie
Foxx for his career in
entertainment; supermodel
and entrepreneur Iman
for her service to others;
publishing mogul Linda
Johnson Rice for her career
in media; Herbie Hancock for
his life’s work in the musical
arts and historian/educator
Lonnie Bunch for his work in
education.
The show was executive
produced by Stephen
Hill, president of music
programming and specials
for BET Networks; Lynne
Harris Taylor, vice president
of specials for BET Networks
and John Cossette of John
Cossette Productions.
The awards show
featured exciting
performances by Yolanda
Adams and the Cicely L.
Tyson Concert Choir, D.C.’s
own Tank, R&B group
Guy, R&B performer Ne-
Yo, the legendary Chick
Corea Quartet, Keyshia
Cole, Angelique Kidjo, and
Naturally 7. Some of the
presenters included Hill
Harper, Jimmy Jam, Noah
Gray Cabey, Cedric the
Entertainer, and Anika Noni
Rose. Actress Gabrielle
Union served as event host
for the third consecutive
year.
All private ticket sales
for the BET Honors Awards
Show will be given to
the Washington, D.C.
Martin Luther King Jr.
National Memorial Project
Foundation this year. The
show airs Feb. 21.
Linda Johnson Rice, Johnson
Publishing Company and BET
honoree for media
Actress Nicole Ari Parker and
husband, actor Boris Kodjoe
BET Honor for Service
award recipient, Iman
Cicely Tyson speaks with
the media
Jamie Foxx and his date
April Watts of
the WHW Show
Aaron and Damion Hall of R&B group Guy with WPGC’s
own Anji Corley
Actor and presenter Hill Harper speaks
with April Watts of the WHW Show
U.S. Attorney
General Eric
Holder
April Woodard, “BET
News”personality
Singer Lalah Hathaway
R&B performer Ne-Yo
Gospel artist
Yolanda
Adams gives
an anointed
performance
in honor of
Cicely Tyson
Washington, D.C. Mayor
Vincent Gray
Model and successful entrepreneur
B. Smith with husband and producer
Dan Gasby
Anika Noni Rose,
actress and award
presenter
Chance Jackson, a reporter for the Fab
Empire, D.C.’s own Ginuwine, and Ursula
Lauriston, Washington Life magazine
Gabrielle Union,
host of the 2011
BET Honors Awards
Show
Photos by Markette Smith and Andrea L. “Aunni” Young
Sterling Henry, Capitol Hill representative for the African
American Civil War Museum; Frank Smith, founding
director, African American Civil War
Museum; Debra Stepp, ASALH and Louis
Hicks, ASALH board member and
co-chairman, BHM Luncheon Committee
P
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B2 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
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By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
There isn’t any love
lost between Washington
Catholic Athletic
Conference (WCAC)
powers the DeMatha Stags
and the Gonzaga Eagles.
So fttingly, on Feb. 13
the two schools gathered
to exchange pleasantries
at Washington, D.C.’s
Gallaudet University.
Games between the
two schools typically
draw enough of a crowd
to surpass the home
gymnasium capacities of
both programs and their
latest clash wasn’t any
different. In front of an
energetic audience of nearly
2,000, the D.C.-based
Eagles survived a late
DeMatha run to hold on for a
62-52 victory.
A 15-7 second quarter
allowed Gonzaga to take a
nine-point lead into halftime
over DeMatha and the
second-half run saw the
margin swell to as much
as 37-24. But, as expected,
DeMatha, the Hyattsville,
Md. private school, made
a run to even things up.
DeMatha, ranked seventh in
the area by The Washington
Post, slowly chipped away at
the Eagles’ lead as the third
quarter’s fnal minutes ticked
off, shortening the score to
43-38 before the start of the
fnal quarter.
DeMatha took a late lead
on a dunk by sophomore
center BeeJay Anya to
make it 45-44, sending the
DeMatha faithful into a
frenzy. But No. 4 Gonzaga
would respond, courtesy of
a clutch three-pointer from
sophomore point guard Nate
Britt that put them back in
control for good.
“We were up early and
DeMatha made their run and
got back the lead [but] Nate
(Britt) hit the big three to get
us back on our end,” said
Gonzaga coach Steve Turner.
Turner made sure to
preach rebounding to his
team between timeouts as
their lead whittled away.
With a towering front court
of players measuring 6-feet,
7-inches and taller, DeMatha
is one of the city’s biggest
teams, but Gonzaga made
sure to stick to their game
plan.
“Coach was just telling
us to keep our composure
the whole time,” sophomore
forward Kris Jenkins said.
“We knew they were going
to make a run, it was just
a matter of when. We
responded well and got the
win.”
“We wanted to make them
shoot outside shots and keep
them out the lane because
they’re a big team,” Jenkins
said. “We wanted to box
them out and keep them off
the boards because they get a
lot of put-backs and we were
able to do that for the most
part tonight.”
The victory offcially
puts Gonzaga (20-5, 12-3)
at the top of the WCAC, a
half-game ahead of DeMatha
(19-6, 11-3). Both teams will
meet again on Feb. 20 at
DeMatha High School.
AFRO Photo/John Moore
Flying to the hoop with 245 pounds of agility, sophomore
Eagle Kris Jenkins adds two points to the Gonzaga win
against the Stags of DeMatha.
D.C. Catholic High School Basketball
Gonzaga Starts Fast, Holds on
Late to Edge DeMatha
By Perry Green
AFRO Sports Editor
Howard University men’s basketball team
has already lost several players to injuries
this season, including team captain Calvin
Thompson. They would lose yet another
major contributor on Valentine’s Day as
leading scorer and rebounder Mike Phillips
missed the entire second half of a 76-68 loss
to Norfolk State (8-16 overall, 6-6 in the
MEAC) in a Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
men’s game at Echols Hall in Norfolk, Va.
According to Howard sports information,
Phillips had already scored half his average
of 14 points per game and was getting into
a rhythm offensively in the frst half when
he suddenly limped to the
bench with an ankle injury.
Howard sports
information says the
6-foot-7-inch sophomore
native of Fredericksburg,
Va., received treatment at
halftime and apparently
tested out the ankle on the
court, but head coach Kevin
Nickelberry didn’t want to
risk further injury.
Howard men’s squad
(5-20 overall, 3-9 in the
MEAC) has now lost two
straight games and will
return to action on Feb.
19 in a home game against
Florida A&M University.
Meanwhile, Howard
women’s basketball team
advanced to an 11-15 overall record – 7-5
MEAC – thanks to redshirt sophomore
Saadia Doyle who scored a double-double
of 38 points with 10 rebounds to help the
Lady Bison dominate the Norfolk State Lady
Spartans, 66-49, on Feb. 14.
Howard started the game with a 7-0 run
and never looked back. Doyle’s career-high
performance boosted the Lady Bison’s total
feld goal percentage to 45. Tamoria Holmes
was the only other player to score double-
digit points for Howard with 11 points and
fve rebounds. The Lady Bison will see its
next action on Feb. 19 when they host their
annual Pink Zone initiative with a game
against FAMU at 2 p.m.
Courtesy Photo/Howard University
Saadia Doyle (redshirt sophomore) scored a double-
double of 38 points with 10 rebounds in a 66-49 win over
Norfolk State on Feb. 14.
Howard University Basketball
Bison Lose Another Key Player to Injury
Doyle’s Career-Best Pushes Lady Bison to 7-5 MEAC
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American B3
www.afro.com
By Brandi Forte
Special to the AFRO
While millions of American viewers tune in to “American
Idol” each week, lifestyle tycoon, entrepreneur and home
décor designer B. Smith is
kicking off an offcial search
for the next great singer in the
nation’s capital.
B. Smith, the longtime
owner of B. Smith’s
restaurant in Manhattan
and exclusive enclave Sag
Harbor, launched her own
homegrown singing audition
at B.Smith’s in Union Station.
Participants are required to be
between the ages of 21-30.
Nearly 30 aspiring singers
from the metropolitan area
participated in the audition.
According to general manager
Andres Haynes, the winner
will receive a $1,000 cash
prize. Other rewards include
performances at B. Smith’s
in Union Station, scheduled
performances at area night
clubs, a free trip to New York
City to perform at B. Smith’s
on Restaurant Row and a
studio recording with Jolley
Production Company.
“B. Discovered brings something different,” said Haynes.
“This is for local members of the community who can really
sing and have great talent. Out of 28 participants we will select
eight who will showcase their talents every week at B.Smith’s
restaurants.”
The ambiance of the audition whispered a silent eagerness
as singers warmed up their falsettos quietly in a reserved
space.
“Someone needs to see me. I’m different from the rest,”
said Davon Wright, a theater graduate from the University of
the District of Columbia (UDC). Wright, along with her two
besties Jonathan Walker and Gina Rose, are a unique trio. All
three trained vocalists are students or graduates of UDC and
aspire to “be heard.”
Wright delivered a classical sound, while Walker’s voice is
reminiscent of Eddie Levert from the O’Jays and Rose’s sound
is a blend of Teena Marie and Chaka Khan – evident as she
fearlessly sang the latter’s “Ain’t Nobody.”
Walker, a sociology major, auditioned minutes after Rose.
The judges politely asked if he’d ever performed.
He smiled and responded, “Yes, I performed ‘The Wiz’ at
UDC on a $500 budget.” The judges laughed. Walker closed
his eyes for four seconds and replied, “I will sing ‘Believe in
Yourself’ from ‘The Wiz.’”
The judges gave him a nod of approval.
Walker sang poignantly, “Believe in yourself, right from
the start/ You’ll have brains You’ll have a heart/You’ll have
courage/ To last your whole life through/If you believe in
yourself/If you believe in yourself/ If you believe in yourself/
As I believe in you.”
Like Wright, Walker and Rose, dozens of other hopefuls
are waiting to see whether they will be included in B. Smith’s
coveted lineup of great singers. Until then, visit bsmith.com
for more updates.

B. Smith Kicks Of  ‘B. Discovered: An Ofcial Search for D.C.’s
Next Great Singer’
Stock Photo
B. Smith’s in Union Station is looking for the District’s next great singer, who will win a
cash prize and a free trip to New York City.
Book Review
Raw Law: An Urban Guide to Criminal Justice
By Kam Williams
Special to the AFRO
“I understand that it is really hard out there, when you target a community. I think of this
generation as a generation of great swimmers left in an ocean. As you navigate your way
through life, some of you will get out of the water safely.
But the sharks own the ocean, and one such shark is the criminal justice system. In most
criminal cases, the enemy is clear. It is the system itself.
I am a criminal trial attorney. I have been doing this for 23 years… Each and every time I
step into a courtroom on a criminal matter, I am ready to wage war because, as quiet as it is
kept, criminal justice is war.
Consistently, I represent kids from the hood or the streets who really think they know
something I don’t about court. But the truth is, when you do not know the rules,or you choose
to ignore them, you get burnt.
In order to teach you this, I have opened my fles. Just understand that this system has never
been anywhere you wanted it to be and is not headed anywhere you want it to go.”
• Excerpted from Chapter One - “Rules Rule” (pgs.1 -6)
One thing they never teach you in school is that America has a two-
tiered system of justice, or that if you are Black, you never want to fnd
yourself caught in its duplicitous clutches. But all you need is a little
common sense to know that there has been a surge in the incarceration rate
of brothers over the last quarter-century to the point where there are now
around a million Blacks behind bars.
For, after Congress passed harsher drug statutes with mandatory
minimum sentences in 1987, “Whether by design or happenstance,” as
publisher Tiffany Chiles recalls in the introduction
of Raw Law, “the government started locking up all
of our men.” Is there anything that can be done to
prevent yourself from adding to the statistics?
Absolutely, according to Muhammad Ibn Bashir,
author of this practical survival guide. Although
he’s a veteran criminal attorney, Bashir is well-enough grounded to be
able to break his sage advice down into readily-accessible layman terms.
In so doing, he warns not only of bad infuences lying in wait in the
inner-city but of traps being set by corrupt cops willing “to violate the
citizen’s rights so easily.” Not one to mince his words, he goes on to state,
“I don’t trust any police offcer to report or testify to the whole truth.”
He further adds that even if the cops have unfairly arrested a young
Black man for possession of narcotics, “whether they were his drugs or
not will not matter to anyone other than him and maybe his mother.”
Bashir is very empathetic about the overall plight of po’ folk because,
“No one wants to live in a community where kids with less than a ninth-grade education, and
an even lower level of community pride or self-respect, play war games on the street to the
destruction of innocent babies and grandmothers.”
Thus, it should come as no surprise that he sees the slums as an ocean teeming with sharks,
and a place to be escaped from at frst chance. A priceless primer on negotiating your way
around the dangerous waters of the criminal justice system designed for folks who need it the
most.
Alice in Niggerland
Written by Richard Coleman, this radically different take on the classic childhood story,
Alice in Wonderland, recalls the very true story of “Alice.” Coleman regards her as a character
“with malice toward none and charity for all,” despite a life riddled with adversity.
At the age of four, Alice and her siblings were left with Ca’lil, an old woman who is
missing an arm and had a steel plate in her head. Situated in an impoverished land known as
“Niggerland,” this book shows how Alice’s overcomes what Coleman refers to as a life “which
would have turned the rest of us mortals into wards of mental hospitals, or prison inmates. . .”
By the time Alice enters the ninth grade she is legally blind and epileptic and offered the
opportunity to attend the Governor Morehead School for the blind in Raleigh. Six weeks after
she got there, she found out that she was pregnant and expelled from the school. She was sent
back to “Niggerland,” where her life begins to unravel. This book chronicles Alice’s quest to
“be somebody” and play the hand fate had unfairly dealt.
Final word: A heart-wrenching spin on a seemingly lighthearted classic.
Available now. For more information, visit Authors’BooksDirect.com.
The Greedy Mouth and Upset Stomach
With his new series of children’s books, author and musician Larry Yates encourages
children to adopt healthy eating habits early on. The frst book in the series, The Greedy Mouth
and Upset Stomach, uses colorful images and easy-to-read text that shows how every morsel of
food impacts the body.
Second in Yates’ series is The Greedy Mouth and Achy Tooth, which
focuses on dental hygiene and the benefts of fresh
food.
In an interview with the Los Angeles Sentinel,
Yates said he wrote the books to combat the growing
rate of childhood obesity and its complications.
“It is such a tragedy to witness so many children
suffer from diseases and health issues caused by
obesity. I can’t stand by and watch another child
die because of poor nutrition,” said Yates, who also heads Mechisedec
Publishing Key Note Entertainment. “I urge everyone to get involved and help their child,
student or patient make healthy choices so they can live long enough to have a future.”
Final word: A fun look at serious issues.
Available now. For more information, visit thegreedymouth.com.
Reader’s Corner
Courtesy Photos
Muhammad
Ibn Bashir is a
veteran criminal
attorney.
Raw Deal is
a guide to
surviving the U.S.
criminal justice
system.
Judith T. Allen, an arranger/composer in Maryland, has
released the song, “You Are My Brother” as an inspirational
song for Americans of all backgrounds.
“I hope people will sing ‘You Are My Brother’ in
villages, towns, cities and even in the United Nations. I want
to use the magic of music to heal differences among people,”
Allen said in a prepared statement.
Allen is a retired District music school teacher where she
served thousands of students. Her tenure included working
in D.C. elementary schools and as assistant principal and
interim principal at Duke Ellington School of the Arts.
Allen has also coached numerous professional musicians at
churches and choirs throughout the region.
In 1972, Allen composed and arranged “You Are
My Brother” for a D.C. Community Brotherhood
Program. “When I was an elementary school vocal music
teacher in Washington, D.C., I witnessed community
activities that did not demonstrate caring, sharing and
gratitude among students and adults. Too often, girls and
boys showed indifference to their teachers and fellow
students. I realized then there was a new teachable moment
through music,” Allen added.
This “teachable moment” led to success for the song and
in 1973 when ‘You Are My Brother’ was performed at the
All-School Choral Music Festival.
The song is performed on YouTube by the D.C. Boys
Choir at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVttsmZ4su0
and is available for download on CD Baby.
Courtesy Photo
Judith Allen, composer (left) joins members of the DC
Boys Choir as they feature their CD You Are My Brother,
a song of peace and healing. Eleanor Stewart, DC Boys
Choir founder/director, stands on the end at the right.
Maryland Composer Releases DC Boys Choir to Inspire Brotherhood, Love
B4 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
www.afro.com
Faith Pulse
Dorothy Dorrah-Evans,
a member of Third Street
Church of God and “mother”
of the church, was honored
recently by fellow church
members and family during
the celebration of her 105th
birthday party, held at the
Northwest facility where the
Rev. Dr. Cheryl Sanders is
pastor.
Evans was born in
Washington, D.C., in 1906
at the Columbia Hospital for
Women located in Northwest
Washington. She had two
siblings, Eunice and Louella,
who are deceased. She was
educated in Washington
and graduated from Allen
University in Columbia, S.C.,
in 1926.
Dorothy taught at several
schools in South Carolina
before coming back to
Washington to work one
summer at the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing. “The
money was good...so I stayed
there until I retired in 1960,”
Evans said. “Another reason
I retired was to take care of
my mother, who was ailing.”
When she lived in Clinton,
S.C., she was actively
involved at Hebron Baptist
Church where some of
the church members were
her students at Bell Street
Elementary School. Many
of them still keep in contact
with her.
Before joining Third
Street Church of God,
Dorothy was a member of the
Bethlehem Baptist Church in
Southeast Washington. There,
she was the superintendent
of the Sunday school and
director of the nursery school.
At Third Street Church of
God, she is active with the
Wednesday night Bible class,
the women’s program and the
Silent Workers.
Dorothy was married to
Robert Lewis Dorrah for
almost 40 years until his
death in 1980. They had
no children and enjoyed
traveling and spending time
with family and friends all
over the country. “Bob”
was the cousin of one of
her friends and co-workers,
Claudia Dorrah Ferguson,
who traveled with them from
time to time. Dorothy later
married Joseph Evans.
Dorothy lives by the
motto, “love and serve the
Lord; he will give you long
life.” Besides loving the
Lord, she loves President
Barack Obama and is happy
she voted and witnessed the
country’s African-American
president. Her wish is to
meet him someday.
She lived in Anacostia
on Shannon Place S.E. until
she was 100 years old before
moving in 2006 to live with
her niece and nephew, Adrian
and William Blount, in
Temple Hills, Md.
“Mrs. Evans is regular in
her attendance… flled with
wisdom and history,” Rev.
Sanders said. “She loves the
Lord, her church and her
family.”
Photo by Herb Quarles
The Rev. Dr. Cheryl Sanders, left, congratulates Dorothy Dorrah-Evans on the occasion
of her 105th birthday. With them is Evans’ niece, Adrian Blount.
Local Church Honors Centenarian Member
By Herb Quarles
Special to the AFRO
HU Chapel Services
The Rev. Dr. John W.
Kinney will be the guest
speaker during the 11 a.m.
worship service on Feb.
20 in Cramton Auditorium
on the campus of Howard
University, 2455 Sixth St.
N.W. He is dean of the
School of Theology at
Virginia Union University
in Richmond, Va. Father
Michael Louis Pfeger will he
guest preacher on Feb.27.
Chapel services are
broadcast the following week
each Sunday at 11 a.m. on
Howard University radio
station, WHUR-FM 96.3.
Recordings of chapel
services may be ordered by
mail with the Media Ministry
Order Form. Recordings are
also available immediately
after the worship service
or may be purchased in
person Monday through
Friday between 10 a.m. and
5 p.m. Call 202-806-7280
or visit chapel.howard.edu/
Information for additional
information. The e-mail
address is chapel@howard.
edu.
Church to Host Praise
Event
ViZion’s Young Adult
Ministry at Zion Baptist
Church invites the public to
attend its Praise Christian
Club and Café at 7 p.m.
on Feb. 18 at the church
located at 4850 Blagden
Ave. N.W. Featured will be
the professional Christian
comedian Seam Sarvis who
is also a writer, producer,
director and founder of
“Gospel Comedy Praise.”
Open mic entertainment
will also be on the “menu”
and area musicians, singers
and poets are welcome to
participate in this entertaining
Christian event. Call Danielle
Williams at 202-722-4940 for
additional information.
Peoples Congregation
Anniversary Celebration
The Rev. Dr. Michael
W. Murphy, senior pstor at
Peoples Congregation UCC,
invites the community to join
him and his congregation
as they begin to celebrate
the 120th anniversary of
the church with a series of
events.
The celebration will begin
at 11 a.m. on Feb. 20 with a
special anniversary worship
service celebrating African-
American spirituals. A
“Founders Jazz Café Brunch”
will be held on March 5 and
the Founders Day Worship
Day will be held on March
6 with the Rev. Geoffrey A.
Black as the guest preacher.
He is the UCC president
and general minister. Call
the church offce at 202-
839-5511 for additional
information.
Black Nurses Group
Convenes
The Black Nurses
Association of the
metropolitan area will meet at
6 p.m. on Feb. 24 at Peoples
Congregational UC Christ
located at 4704 13th Street
N.W. A light supper will
be served. All Black nurses
are invited to join them at
the meetings that are held
on the fourth Thursday of
each month. They will host
their 31st annual salute to
the Black Nurse of the Year
and Scholarship Awards
Luncheon on March 5 at
Martin’s Crosswinds in
Greenbelt, Md. Call Diana
Wharton at 202-722-8670
or contact her via e-mail at
twinmaljar@aol.com for
tickets and other information.
Courtesy Photo
The Rev. Dr. John W. Kinney
will preach at Howard
University on Feb. 20.
Church Briefs
Marcus;
Or the Secret of Sweet
Past and present, lust
and friendship collide in
the Louisiana heat.
14th and P Streets, NW 202-332-3300 www.studiotheatre.org
by Tarell Alvin McCraney
directed by Timothy Douglas
E
X
T
E
N
D
E
D
!
MIRANDY AND BROTHER WIND
Adventure Theatre in partnership African Continuum Theatre Company present
February 25 to March 13, 2011
Atlas Performing Arts Center
as part of INTERSECTIONS: A New America Arts Festival
Purchase Tickets: Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H Street NE , Washington, DC 20002
202.399.7993
africancontinuumtheatre.com/
Winner
Caldecott
Honor Book
Winner
Coretta Scott
King Book
Award
American
Library
Association
Notable Book
WHERE THEATRE BEGINS
Lt. Col. A. Phillip Waite, Commander and Conductor
www.usafband.af.mil
FREE PERFORMANCE!
Open to the public; No tickets needed
Concert begin at 3 p.m.; Doors open at 2 p.m.
DAR CONSTITUTION HALL
18th & D Streets, NW, Washington, D.C.
Nearest Metro: Farragut North
For more information, please call our concert line:
202-767-5658 or visit our website:
Sunday, February 20
featuring dancers from
“So You Think You Can Dance”
& “Dancing with the Stars”
with
Guest Emcee Maureen Bunyan
ABC7/WJLA-TV
Sabra Johnson
Benji Schwimmer
Jamile McGee
Garry Gekhman
Where it’s more than a great performance
claricesmithcenter.umd.edu 301.405.ARTS(2787)
NORA CHIPAUMIRE
lions will roar, swans will fy, angels will wrestle
heaven, rains will break: gukurahundi
february 24 & 25 . 8PM
dance theatre
Zimbabwe-born choreographer Nora Chipaumire
burns through cultural and geographic boundaries to
illuminate the African struggle toward identity in a
visually and aurally stimulating performance.
Featuring music by omas Mapfumo and e Blacks
Unlimited. $30
ANNA DEAVERE SMITH
A Performance and Conversation,
featuring portraits from Let Me Down Easy
march 8 & 9 . 8PM
kay theatre
Join Anna Deavere Smith for excerpts from Let Me
Down Easy, followed by an intimate and open dialogue
with the audience about the characters portrayed in the
work and issues of death and dying, narrative healing
and our healthcare system. $42
SPRING 2010 @ CSPAC
NORA CHIPAUMIRE
CSPAC_AfroAmerican_021411:Layout 1 2/9/11 5:01 PM Page 1
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American B5
GCNE111555.indd 1 2/11/11 8:04 PM
B6 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
By Donal Ware
Special to the AFRO
Fuquay-Varina, N.C. – “FROM THE PRESS BOX TO
PRESS ROW,” the sports talk radio show that places major
emphasis on HBCU sports, released its ffth annual national
rankings of the top 10 HBCU football FCS recruiting classes
for 2011. FROM THE PRESS BOX TO PRESS ROW frst
ranked the top classes in 2006. The rankings are based on the
talent that was brought in and research that we did based upon
school releases, local newspaper articles and recruiting boards.
This is not an exact science, but an opinion. In this article we
rank the top fve.
1. Year in and year out, South Carolina State continues
to be ranked among our top four or fve recruiting classes
and for the second year in a row they have the top class. The
recruiting that Buddy Pough and his staff put in shows, as
the Bulldogs have won the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
title each of the last three years. What the Bulldogs do well
is recruit in South Carolina. That has been proven with gems
like quarterback Malcolm Long, the two-time Palmetto Player
of the Year, and a guy from tiny Traveler’s Rest by the name
of Will Ford, who only became the MEAC’s all-time leading
rusher a year ago. Pough and his staff were at it again when
they picked up three-star running back Julius Pendergrass
(Chester), who received offers from Kentucky and Arkansas.
They also picked up offensive lineman Jairon Harrison (James
Island) from Charleston who is a scout.com two-star recruit.
But what the Bulldogs
also continue to do well is
recruit North Carolina. In
addition to Pendergrass, the
Bulldogs picked up a pair
of three-star running backs
in Jalen Simmons (West
Charlotte) and Deion Walker
(Butler). Read more at afro.
com.
2. Bethune-Cookman
was fourth in our rankings
last year and with a strong
10-2 record, a share of
the MEAC Title and an
appearance in the FCS
Playoffs, and with a whole
year under his belt, head
coach Brian Jenkins and staff were able to get some good
talent to come to Daytona Beach. The Wildcats had a nice size
class of 28 players which included 20 high school players, fve
JUCO transfers and three Division I transfers. Quarterback
Qunetin Williams from Tampa Jefferson was named Mr.
Football in the state of Florida. Their prize recruit may be
defensive back Nick Addison, a three-star Rivals recruit from
Spoto in the Tampa area. Addison turned down offers from
Iowa State, Mississippi, New Mexico and Washington State.
Other key high school recruits include Rivals two-star recruits
running back Breon Allen of Warner Christian Academy in
South Daytona who was
offered by Pitt, Eastern
Michigan and Marshall. Read more at afro.com.
3. Rod Reed took over the duties as head football coach
at Tennessee State last year, but had always been the lead
recruiter. TSU perennially has been ranked in the top fve
of our class including a No. 1 ranking two years ago. This
was one of the most versatile classes as a lot of needs were
flled. Recruits come from eight different states. The Tigers
quarterback situation just became a little cloudier when the
Tigers signed Imonni Carswell from Plantation in Florida, a
two-star recruit who received offers from Maryland, Marshall,
and Central Michigan.
4. North Carolina Central’s new head football coach
Henry Frazier’s Prairie View A&M classes have always been
in the top fve since we have been ranking the classes. This
year is no different and in a short amount of time he was able
to get some solid commitments to the Durham school. With
initial recruiting classes you never can tell how the class will
play out but with Frazier, who usually redshirts almost all of
his freshmen, the proof is in the pudding with what he did at
PVAMU. It will be hard for Frazier to redshirt defensive back
Alex Cole from Sherwood in Olney, Md., who is an explosive
player, a great athlete, a hard hitter, is a textbook tackler and
has a knack for the ball and has good speed. He was a Rivals
two-star recruit. A Washington, D.C. native, Frazier has always
recruited his hometown area well (seven recruits to NCCU are
from the area) and he went back home to get defensive tackle
Josh Wade from McKinley Tech.
5. Florida A&M head coach Joe Taylor is in a select
class of coaches that have won MEAC titles with two different
schools. Taylor’s Rattlers won a share of the title last year and
also won in recruiting this year. Taylor and his staff signed
22 of the 25 prospects they coveted and he calls this class his
best since arriving at FAMU three years ago. Offensive line
has always been a key for Taylor as he signed eight linemen
this year. Rivals three-star recruit La’Donte Gibson (Madison,
Fla.) may be able to see action immediately. One of the prize
recruits may be Kawika Pieper from Honolulu’s Moanalua
who turned down Marshall and Duke.
See the entire top 10 on Afro.com.
7
1
7
5
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3
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Courtesy Photo/South Carolina State
University
South Carolina State
University senior ofensive
lineman Josh Harrison
2011 Top 5 HBCU Football Recruiting Classes
By Stephen D. Riley
AFRO Staf Writer
An ankle injury zapped most of the explosiveness from Friendly Patriots senior guard
Michael Johnson for much of the year, but it apparently hasn’t affected his heart. With his team
trailing the Largo Lions with just over a minute left, Johnson put the ankle woes behind him and
took over, steering the Patriots to a 60-57 win before a shocked crowd in Largo, Md., on Feb.
10.
After Largo overcame a second half Friendly lead, a dejected Friendly bench was left staring
at a fve-point defcit with little time left. That’s when Johnson came to the rescue. The sweet-
shooting guard scored a quick layup before stealing the in-bound pass and nailing a side three-
pointer to tie it with 58 seconds remaining.
With 13 seconds left and the game tied at 57-57, Johnson received a pass from Friendly
senior point guard Sherrod Baltimore and launched a corner three-pointer that sailed through the
net before pounding his chest in celebration.
Largo immediately called a timeout with 5.5 seconds still left on the clock and diagrammed
one fnal play. Largo point man Derrick Colter then took the inbounds and dribbled up the court
before launching a long-range attempt that was on line but just a little too strong. It bounced off
the back of the rim, sending a large Friendly contingent into total eruption.
The Fort Washington, Md. school has now won 16-straight games, but after the near-defeat,
the only thing head coach Rob Garner could talk about was his hobbled star. “He’s a senior and
he’s been in the program for three straight years and he’s one of our go-to guys,” Garner said.
“What a big shot. Mentally, to be able to stay in it and be able to bury a shot like that, that’s big
time.”
Friendly (17-3) is peaking at the right time while Largo (13-7) has now lost four of its last
six games. With the Prince George’s County 3A playoffs nearing, every win at this stage of the
season is huge, a reminder that Johnson issued after the game.
“It’s a big win,” Johnson said. “It sets the tone for the rest of the season. We’re battle-tested
[and] we’ve been through plenty of situations so we knew not to panic and we knew to stay
strong and get this victory.”
Pr. George’s High School Basketball
Friendly’s Johnson Pushes Patriots Past Largo
www.afro.com
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American B7
Feb. 17-19
Black Engineer of the Year
Awards (BEYA)
Marriott Wardman Park,
2660 Woodley Road, N.W.
D.C. Various times. This
event, deemed the “Oscars”
for Blacks in technology, will
honor more than two dozen
remarkable men and women
for their career achievements.
For more information: www.
beya.org.
Feb. 18
Black Cinema Festival
Kentland Community
Center, 2411 Pinebrook
Ave., Landover, Md. 12-2
p.m. Every Friday during the
month of February, Kentland
Community Center will show
a movie celebrating Black
history. For more information
and flm listings: 301-386-
2278.
Black History Showcase
Deerfeld Run Community
Center, 13000 Laurel-Bowie
Road, Laurel, Md. 6 p.m.
Children of the community
center’s after school program
will perform skits, poetry and
dance routines in celebration
of Black history. For more
information: 301-953-7882.
Feb. 19
Presidential Family Fun
Day
Smithsonian American
Art Museum, 8th and F
streets, N.W. D.C. 11:30
a.m.-3 p.m. Come celebrate
our nation’s presidents
with a day full of craft
activities, performances and
scavenger hunts. Presented
in collaboration with the
National Portrait Gallery.
For more information:
201-633-1000 or e-mail
AmericanArtPrograms@sie.
edu.
Black History Month Cruise
Spirit of Washington, 6th
and Water streets, Pier 4,
S.W. D.C. 11:30 a.m. Take an
educational and entertaining
lunch cruise in honor of those
who infuenced African-
American culture. A dee jay
will spin records from Black
music legends like Duke
Ellington, Marvin Gaye,
Michael Jackson and more.
$40. For more information:
1-866-211-3811.

Feb. 20
Living the Dream…Singing
the Dream
The Kennedy Center
Concert Hall, 2700 F St.,
N.W. D.C. 7 p.m. The
Washington Performing
Arts Society will join the
Choral Arts Society and
perform various selections in
tribute to Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. $25-$45. For more
information: 202-785-WPAS.
Quest: Five Stages on the
Road to Romance
The Bridge, The Majestic
Movie Theater, 900 Ellsworth
Drive, Silver Spring, Md.
9-11:15 a.m. In this message
series, learn where you are
on the road to romance and
discover strategies that will
help you navigate your future.
For more information: www.
thebridgedc.org.
Feb. 23
Spotlight: Our Musical
Roots in Black History
Langley Park Senior
Activity Center, 1500
Merrimac Drive, Hyattsville,
Md. 12-2 p.m. Hear the
story of the evolution of
Black music in America and
learn about the legends who
helped shape it. For more
information: 301-408-4343.
Capital Wine Festival 2011
Fairfax at Embassy Row
Hotel, 2100 Massachusetts
Ave., N.W. D.C. 7-9 p.m.
Enjoy extraordinary meals
designed to enhance the
favors of wine and spend the
evening with proprietors from
famed wineries across the
region. $85-$145. For more
information: 202-763-1453.
Feb. 26
The Formal Dinner
The Fredericksburg
Expo & Conference Center,
1320 Central Park Blvd.,
Fredericksburg, Va. 5 p.m.
The Virginia Black History
Month Association will
present its formal dinner
featuring live entertainment
and actress Tasha Smith as
the keynote speaker. For
more information: www.
quanticobhmcommittee.com.
African American Festival
Prince George’s Sports
& Learning Complex, 8001
Sheriff Road, Landover, Md.
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Learn African
dances and enjoy workshops,
performances, storytelling and
more. For more information:
301-583-2582.
Feb. 28
‘I Just Want to Tell
Somebody’
Woolly Mammoth Theater,
641 D St., N.W. D.C. 7:30
p.m. Washington-based
playwright Carole Mumin
links with Broadway star
Ronald “Smokey” Stevens
to bring forth this original
piece delving into Smokey’s
life as a dancer with Lucille
Ball, Michael Jackson and
other legends. For more
information: 877-561-8809.
Calendar
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804-503-2009
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 0000603-11
IN RE:
ELIJAH DAVID
CAULEY JR
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Elijah David Cauley Jr.
having filed a complaint
for judgment changing
Elijah David Cauley Jr.
name to Elijah David
Corley Jr. and having
applied to the court for
an Order of Publication
of the notice required by
law in such cases; it is
by the Court this 24 day
of January 2011.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 26 day
of February 2011, why
the prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Afro-American
Newspapers.
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 0000623-11
IN RE:
ETHEL DOLORES
MAYS
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Ethel Dolores Mays hav-
ing filed a complaint for
j udgment changi ng
Ethel Dolores Mays
name to Dolores Ethel
Battle and having ap-
plied to the court for an
Order of Publication of
the notice required by
law in such cases; it is
by the Court this 25 day
of January 2011.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 28 day
of February 2011, why
the prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Afro-American
Newspapers.
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 0000623-11
IN RE:
ETHEL DOLORES
MAYS
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Ethel Dolores Mays hav-
ing filed a complaint for
j udgment changi ng
Ethel Dolores Mays
name to Dolores Ethel
Battle and having ap-
plied to the court for an
Order of Publication of
the notice required by
law in such cases; it is
by the Court this 25 day
of January 2011.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 28 day
of February 2011, why
the prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Afro-American
Newspapers.
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2008ADM951
Douglas Fairbanks
Johnson
Decedent
Nicholas D Ward
1212 New York Ave
NW Suite 1000
Washington DC 20005
Attorney
NOTICE OF
AFTER DISCOVERED
WILL AND NOTICE
OF APPOINTMENT
William E. Wade, whose
address is 3195 Stanley
Road, Fairlawn, OH
44333 was appointed
personal representative
of the estate of Douglas
Fairbanks Johnson, who
died on August 31, 2008
with a Will. Objections to
such appointment or to
the probate of de-
cedent's Will shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, District of Colum-
bia, 515 5th Street, NW
3rd Floor, Washington
DC 20001, on or before
August 4, 2011.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
William E. Wade
Personal
Representative
202-289-6440
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0041
Artis T. Wilson
Decedent
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Cheryl A. Calloway,
whose address is 1629
K Street NW, Suite 300,
Washington DC 20006
was appointed personal
representative of the
estate of Artis T. Wilson,
who died on November
23, 2010 without a will,
and will serve without
Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment
shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C.,
515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or be-
fore August 4, 2011.
Claims against the de-
cedent shall be pre-
sented to the under-
signed with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed
with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the under-
signed, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011, or be for-
ever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or
legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a
copy of this notice by
mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so
inform the Register of
Wills, including name,
address and relation-
ship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Cheryl A. Calloway
Personal
Representative
202-258-2663
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2010ADM174
Lora C. Paige
Decedent
DeAnna L. Jackson
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
DeAnna L. Jackson,
whose address is 4217
Foot e St r eet NE,
Washington DC 20019,
was appointed personal
representative of the
estate of Lora C. Paige,
who died on April 16,
2006 with a will, and will
serve without Court su-
pervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before February 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
DeAnna L. Jackson
Personal
Representative
517-435-3929
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2010ADM174
Lora C. Paige
Decedent
DeAnna L. Jackson
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
DeAnna L. Jackson,
whose address is 4217
Foot e St r eet NE,
Washington DC 20019,
was appointed personal
representative of the
estate of Lora C. Paige,
who died on April 16,
2006 with a will, and will
serve without Court su-
pervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before February 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
DeAnna L. Jackson
Personal
Representative
517-435-3929
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM53
Ozella Ruth Harvey
Decedent
Shanta Ramson Esq
4705 Sandy Spring Rd
Burtonsville, MD
20866
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Linda Harrison, whose
address is 13710 Town
Line Road, Silver Spring
Maryland 20906 was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
Ozella Ruth Harvey,
who died on December
23, 2010 without a will,
and will serve without
Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Linda A. Harrison
Personal
Representative
301-871-5244
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0052
Dorothy A Ratliff
Decedent
Jennifer E Loud Esq
7826 Eastern Avenue
NW Suite 410
Washington DC 20012
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Howard Gregory Camp-
bell, whose address is
4250 East Capital Street
NE #202 Washington
DC 20019, was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
Dorothy A Ratliff who
died on January 3, 2011
with a will, and will serve
without Court supervi-
sion. All unknown heirs
a n d h e i r s wh o s e
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Howard Gregory
Campbell
Personal
Representative
202-422-5213
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0052
Dorothy A Ratliff
Decedent
Jennifer E Loud Esq
7826 Eastern Avenue
NW Suite 410
Washington DC 20012
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Howard Gregory Camp-
bell, whose address is
4250 East Capital Street
NE #202 Washington
DC 20019, was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
Dorothy A Ratliff who
died on January 3, 2011
with a will, and will serve
without Court supervi-
sion. All unknown heirs
a n d h e i r s wh o s e
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Howard Gregory
Campbell
Personal
Representative
202-422-5213
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2004-36
Helen L Harris
Decedent
Kathy Brissette-Minus
Law Office of
Kathy Brissette-Minus
LLC
9900 Greenbelt Road
Suite E 215
Lanham MD 20706
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Brenda T Jarvis, whose
address is 8422 Carroll-
ton Parkway, New Car-
rollton MD 20784, was
appointed personal re-
present at i ve of t he
estate of Helen L. Har-
ris, who died on June
16, 2003 without a will,
and will serve without
Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment
shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C.,
515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or be-
fore August 4, 2011.
Claims against the de-
cedent shall be pre-
sented to the under-
signed with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed
with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the under-
signed, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011, or be for-
ever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or
legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a
copy of this notice by
mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so
inform the Register of
Wills, including name,
address and relation-
ship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Brenda T Jarvis
Personal
Representative
301-717-9884
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Foreign No.
2011FEP10
Date of Death
August 11, 2010
Geneva Shannon
Arnold
AKA
Geneva Shannon
Decedent
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT
OF FOREIGN
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
AND
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Marilyn B. Thompson
whose address is 4309
Broken Arrow Court,
Clinton MD 20735 was
appointed personal re-
present at i ve of t he
estate of Geneva Shan-
non Arnold aka Geneva
Shannon, deceased, by
the Orphans Court for
Prince Georges County,
State of Maryland, on
October 19, 2010.
Service of process may
be made upon Tiffany
Thompson 2914 12th
Street, NE Washington
DC 20017 whose des-
ignation as District of
Columbia agent has
been filed with the Reg-
ister of Wills, D.C.
The decedent owned
the following District of
Colombia real property:
2914 12th Street NE
Washington DC 20017
and 6701 Piney Branch
Road, NW Washington
DC 20012
Claims against the de-
cedent may be pre-
sented to the under-
signed and filed with the
Register of Wills for the
District of Columbia, 515
5th Street N.W. 3rd
Floor, Washington, D.C.
20001 within 6 months
from the date of first
publication of this notice.
(Strike preceding sen-
tence if no real estate.)
Marilyn B. Thompson
Personal
Representative(s)
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
Date of first publication:
February 4, 2011
301-297-9411
Name of newspapers
and/or periodical:
The Daily Washington
Law Reporter
The Afro-American
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Foreign No.
2011FEP10
Date of Death
August 11, 2010
Geneva Shannon
Arnold
AKA
Geneva Shannon
Decedent
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT
OF FOREIGN
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
AND
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Marilyn B. Thompson
whose address is 4309
Broken Arrow Court,
Clinton MD 20735 was
appointed personal re-
present at i ve of t he
estate of Geneva Shan-
non Arnold aka Geneva
Shannon, deceased, by
the Orphans Court for
Prince Georges County,
State of Maryland, on
October 19, 2010.
Service of process may
be made upon Tiffany
Thompson 2914 12th
Street, NE Washington
DC 20017 whose des-
ignation as District of
Columbia agent has
been filed with the Reg-
ister of Wills, D.C.
The decedent owned
the following District of
Colombia real property:
2914 12th Street NE
Washington DC 20017
and 6701 Piney Branch
Road, NW Washington
DC 20012
Claims against the de-
cedent may be pre-
sented to the under-
signed and filed with the
Register of Wills for the
District of Columbia, 515
5th Street N.W. 3rd
Floor, Washington, D.C.
20001 within 6 months
from the date of first
publication of this notice.
(Strike preceding sen-
tence if no real estate.)
Marilyn B. Thompson
Personal
Representative(s)
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
Date of first publication:
February 4, 2011
301-297-9411
Name of newspapers
and/or periodical:
The Daily Washington
Law Reporter
The Afro-American
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM40
MARILYN COLLEEN
JENKINS
Decedent
Bruce E Gardner Esq
The Gardner Law Firm
PC
1101 Pennsylvania Ave
NW
Suite 600
Washington DC 20004
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Rodney E Gill, whose
address is 2350 Hunter
Place SE, Washington
DC 20020 was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
Marilyn Colleen Jenkins,
who died on December
19, 2010 without a will,
and will serve without
Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment
shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C.,
515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or be-
fore August 4, 2011.
Claims against the de-
cedent shall be pre-
sented to the under-
signed with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed
with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the under-
signed, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011, or be for-
ever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or
legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a
copy of this notice by
mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so
inform the Register of
Wills, including name,
address and relation-
ship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Rodney E Gill
Personal
Representative
202-610-1921
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM40
MARILYN COLLEEN
JENKINS
Decedent
Bruce E Gardner Esq
The Gardner Law Firm
PC
1101 Pennsylvania Ave
NW
Suite 600
Washington DC 20004
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Rodney E Gill, whose
address is 2350 Hunter
Place SE, Washington
DC 20020 was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
Marilyn Colleen Jenkins,
who died on December
19, 2010 without a will,
and will serve without
Court supervision. All
unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment
shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C.,
515 5th Street, N.W.,
3rd Floor Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or be-
fore August 4, 2011.
Claims against the de-
cedent shall be pre-
sented to the under-
signed with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed
with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the under-
signed, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011, or be for-
ever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or
legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a
copy of this notice by
mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so
inform the Register of
Wills, including name,
address and relation-
ship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Rodney E Gill
Personal
Representative
202-610-1921
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0049
Thelma Pitts Campbell
Decedent
Thomas H. Queen
530 Eighth Street SE
Washington DC 20003
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Marteal H. Pitts, Max-
well A. Pitts, and Noah
M. Webb whose ad-
dress(es) are 4705 8th
Street NW, Washington
DC 20017, 423 Peabody
Street NW, Washington
DC 20011, and 6104
East 98th Street Kansas
City MO 64134 were ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative(s) of the estate
of Thelma Pitts Camp-
bell, who died on August
17, 2007 with a will, and
will serve without Court
supervi si on. Al l un-
known heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Marteal H. Pitts
Maxwell A. Pitts
Noah M. Webb
Personal
Representative
202-832-6757
202--212-9091
876-838-3486
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0049
Thelma Pitts Campbell
Decedent
Thomas H. Queen
530 Eighth Street SE
Washington DC 20003
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Marteal H. Pitts, Max-
well A. Pitts, and Noah
M. Webb whose ad-
dress(es) are 4705 8th
Street NW, Washington
DC 20017, 423 Peabody
Street NW, Washington
DC 20011, and 6104
East 98th Street Kansas
City MO 64134 were ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative(s) of the estate
of Thelma Pitts Camp-
bell, who died on August
17, 2007 with a will, and
will serve without Court
supervi si on. Al l un-
known heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 4, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 4, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 4, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Marteal H. Pitts
Maxwell A. Pitts
Noah M. Webb
Personal
Representative
202-832-6757
202--212-9091
876-838-3486
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/4, 2/11, 2/18
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 0000786-11
IN RE:
Clarence Fitzgerald
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Clarence Fitzgerald hav-
ing filed a complaint for
judgment changing his
name to James Isiah
Fitzgerald and having
applied to the court for
an Order of Publication
of the notice required by
law in such cases; it is
by the Court this 1st day
of Febr uar y 2011
hereby.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 8th day
of March 2011, why the
prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Afro-American.
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 0000786-11
IN RE:
Clarence Fitzgerald
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Clarence Fitzgerald hav-
ing filed a complaint for
judgment changing his
name to James Isiah
Fitzgerald and having
applied to the court for
an Order of Publication
of the notice required by
law in such cases; it is
by the Court this 1st day
of Febr uar y 2011
hereby.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 8th day
of March 2011, why the
prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Afro-American.
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
SUPERIOR COURT OF
THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
FAMILY COURT
DOMESTIC
RELATIONS
BRANCH
Jacket Number.
2010DRB1564
Joseph Kabore.
Plaintiff.
vs.
Josephine Ndote
Defendant.
The object of this suit is
to obtain divorce.
on motion of the plaintiff,
it is this xxx day of
November 2010, or-
dered that the defendant
Josephine Ndote cause
her appearance to be
entered herein on or be-
fore the fortieth day,
exclusive of Sundays
and l egal hol i days,
occurring after the day
of the first publication of
this order; otherwise the
cause will be proceeded
with as in case of de-
fault. Provide, a copy of
this order is published
once a week for three
successive weeks in the
Washington Law Re-
porter, and The Afro
American Newspapers
before said day.
Attest:
JUDGE BAYLY
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
cedent’s will) shall be
cedent’s will) shall be
cedent’s will) shall be
cedent’s will) shall be
LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES
CAREER CORNER
February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011, The Afro-American B9
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LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES
Regional Recruitment Specialist
(located in Northern Virginia)
Offce of Undergraduate Admissions
Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment
Services
Transfer Counselor
(located in Northern Virginia)
Offce of Undergraduate Admissions
Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment
Services
http://www.pubinfo.vcu.edu/facjobs
Virginia Commonwealth University is
an equal opportunity / affrmative action
employer. Women, minorities, and persons
with disabilities are encouraged to apply.
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 9115-2011
IN RE:
Thomas WilliamMartin
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Thomas William Martin
having filed a complaint
for judgment changing
Thomas William Martin
name to Olokun Salamu
and having applied to
the court for an Order of
Publication of the notice
required by law in such
cases; it is by the Court
this 1st day of February
2011.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 8th day
of March 2011, why the
prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Washington Afro-
American.
0
that pursuant to SCR
205(b) notice be sent to
applicants creditors by
registered or certified
mail and that proof of
mailing be made in the
manner provided in SCR
Probate Rule(b).
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 00009006-11
IN RE:
Mary Fears King
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Mary Fears King having
filed a complaint for
j udgment changi ng
Mary Fears King name
to Mariam Aman and
having applied to the
court for an Order of
Publication of the notice
required by law in such
cases; it is by the Court
this 3 day of February
2011 hereby.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be,
on or before the 19th
day of March 2011, why
the prayers of said com-
plaint should not be
granted; provided that a
copy of this order be
published once a week
for three consecutive
weeks before said day
in the Afro-American
newspaper.
0
that pursuant to SCR
205(b) notice be sent to
the applicant's creditors
by registered or certified
mail and that proof of
service of mailing be
made in the manner pro-
vided in SCR Probate
Rule 19(b).
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0069
William L. Rush Jr.
Decedent
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Alfred R. May, whose
address is 3905-17th
Street, NE Washington
DC 20018 was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
William L. Rush Jr, who
died on October 28,
2010 with a will, and will
serve without Court su-
pervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 11, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 11, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 2, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Alfred R. May
Personal
Representative
202-669-5698
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0068
William H. Jordan, Sr
Decedent
Pamela Copeland, Esq
1050 17th Street NW
Suite 600
Washington DC 20036
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Joyce Jordan, whose
address is 4841 Car-
mella Drive, Baltimore
MD 21227 was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
William H. Jordan, Sr
who died on December
3, 2009 with a will, and
will serve without Court
supervi si on. Al l un-
known heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 11, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 11, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 11, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Joyce Jordan
Personal
Representative
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0068
William H. Jordan, Sr
Decedent
Pamela Copeland, Esq
1050 17th Street NW
Suite 600
Washington DC 20036
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Joyce Jordan, whose
address is 4841 Car-
mella Drive, Baltimore
MD 21227 was ap-
pointed personal repre-
sentative of the estate of
William H. Jordan, Sr
who died on December
3, 2009 with a will, and
will serve without Court
supervi si on. Al l un-
known heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 11, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 11, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 11, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Joyce Jordan
Personal
Representative
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0067
Lula M. Towles
Decedent
Donald L. Wilson Esq
805 15th Street NW
Suite 100
Washington DC 20005
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Jacques P Wal ker,
whose address is 2750
14th Street, NW Unit
304, Washington DC
20009 was appointed
personal representative
of the estate of Lula M.
Towles, who died on
January 19, 2011 with a
will, and will serve with-
out Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and
h e i r s w h o s e
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 11, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 11, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 11, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Jacques P. Walker
Personal
Representative
202-297-0498
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/11, 2/18, 2/25
TYPESET: Wed Feb 16 09:04:27 EST 2011
Superior Court of
the District of
Columbia
Civil Division
Case No. 2011CA733
IN RE:
Ineice R. Mease
Applicant
ORDER OF
PUBLICATION
CHANGE OF NAME
Ineice R. Mease having
filed a complaint for judg-
ment changing Geonii
Dillan-Joel Mease name
to Geonii Dillan-Joel But-
ler and having applied to
the court for an Order of
Publication of the notice
required by law in such
cases; it is by the Court
this 8th day of February
2011.
ORDERED, that all per-
sons concerned show
cause, if any there be, on
or before the 13 day of
March 2011, why the
prayers of said complaint
should not be granted;
provided that a copy of
this order be published
once a week for three
consecutive weeks be-
fore said day in the Afro-
American.
JUDGE
A TRUE COPY TEST:
2/18, 2/25, 3/4
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0090
Ashley Turton
Decedent
Alan B. Frankle Esq
751 Rockville Pike
Suite 7
Rockville, MD 20852
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Daniel Turton, whose
address is 800 A Street
SE Washington DC
20003, was appointed
personal representative
of the estate of Ashley
Turton, who died on
January 10, 2011 with a
will, and will serve with-
out Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and
h e i r s w h o s e
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 18, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 18, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 18, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Daniel Turton
Personal
Representative
301-217-0505 (Attorney)
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/18, 2/25, 3/4
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0090
Ashley Turton
Decedent
Alan B. Frankle Esq
751 Rockville Pike
Suite 7
Rockville, MD 20852
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Daniel Turton, whose
address is 800 A Street
SE Washington DC
20003, was appointed
personal representative
of the estate of Ashley
Turton, who died on
January 10, 2011 with a
will, and will serve with-
out Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and
h e i r s w h o s e
whereabouts are un-
known shall enter their
appearance i n thi s
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 18, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 18, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 18, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Daniel Turton
Personal
Representative
301-217-0505 (Attorney)
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/18, 2/25, 3/4
Superior Court of
the District of
District of Columbia
PROBATE DIVISION
Washington, D.C.
20001-2131
Administration No.
2011ADM0075
Pearl M Butler
Decedent
Attorney
NOTICE OF
APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
AND NOTICE TO
UNKNOWN HEIRS
Maurice A. Butler and
Joan D. Stanard, whose
address(es) are 1228
Qui ncy St reet , NW
Washington DC 20011 &
14105 Huckleberry Ln,
Silver Spring MD 20906
were appointed per-
sonal representative(s)
of the estate of Pearl M.
Butler, who died on June
6, 2003 with a will, and
will serve without Court
supervi si on. Al l un-
known heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are
unknown shall enter
their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections
to such appointment (or
to the probate of de-
cedent¬s will) shall be
filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
Washi ngt on, D. C.
20001, on or before Au-
gust 18, 2011. Claims
against the decedent
shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy
to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to
the undersigned, on or
before August 18, 2011,
or be forever barred.
Persons believed to be
heirs or legatees of the
decedent who do not re-
ceive a copy of this no-
tice by mail within 25
days of its first publica-
tion shall so inform the
Register of Wills, includ-
ing name, address and
relationship.
Date of Publication:
February 18, 2011
Name of newspaper:
Afro-American
Washington Law
Reporter
Maurice A. Butler
Joan D. Stanard
Personal
Representative
202-726-5982
301-871-9409
TRUE TEST COPY
REGISTER OF WILLS
2/18, 2/25, 3/4
Johnston Construction requests M/W/DBE quotes
for civil,site,mechanical & electrical work as well
as the supply of related materials for two WWTPs
in Snow Hill & La Plata, MD and a Pump Station
in Riva, MD. Quotes & scopes required by 2/25.
Contact: 717 292-3606 or ga@jcc-ri.com
St. Mary's County Metropolitan Commission
Invitation for Bids
Oliver Drive Grinder Pump and Force Main Project
Contract No. 5081FM
The St. Mary's County Metropolitan Commission is currently soliciting Bids on
the Oliver Drive Grinder Pump and Force Main. Installation generally consists of
the construction of 5,886 linear feet of 2-inch and 553 linear feet of 1
1
⁄2 inch
HDPE pipe by means of directionally drilling,service, in-line, and terminal service
connections, the installation of six (6) simplex grinder pumps complete with control
panels, and all restorations.
One (1) original and one (1) copy of the sealed Bid should be addressed to Joy
Hamlet,Purchasing Agent, and marked ∫SEALED BID FOR OLIVER DRIVE
GRINDER PUMP AND FORCE MAIN PROJECT, CONTRACT NO. 5081FM∫.
The Bids will be received at the main office of the Commission, at 43990
Commerce Avenue, Hollywood, Maryland 20636, until 2 p.m. Eastern Standard
Time on March 31, 2011 and then and there the Bids will be publicly opened
and read.
A Pre-Bid conference will be held on March 2, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. Eastern
Standard Time at the main office of the Commission to answer any questions
concerning the Bid Documents. A site visit will follow immediately after the Pre-Bid
conference. All potential Bidders are encouraged, but not required to attend.
Attendance is strongly recommended due to the nature of the project.
Funding for this project is provided by the Maryland Department of the
Environment. Bidders must perform and document their performance of all
affirmative steps required by the Maryland Department of the Environment
Minority and Women's Business Enterprise Program to be considered for the
Contract. Bidders are encouraged to break down the work into smaller segments
and tasks in order to increase minority subcontractor participation. Documentation
must be included in the proposal package and submitted on the date provided
herein.
Cost of the Bid package is $ 40.00 each. Bid packages will be available for
purchase and review at the main office beginning February 16, 2011 between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Bid Packages may be purchased by check,
money order, Visa or MasterCard. Checks should be made payable to ∫St. Mary's
County Metropolitan Commission∫. Bid packages may also be mailed upon receipt
of payment plus an additional mailing fee of $30.00, or by providing their
company's UPS or Federal Express account number. Inquiries concerning
Contract Documents should be directed to Joy Hamlet, Purchasing Agent at
301-373-4733, Extension 222 or at jhamlet@metcom.org or Tammy O'Dell,
Purchasing Assistant at Extension 226 or at todell@metcom.org.
The St. Mary's Metropolitan Commission reserves the right to reject any or all
proposals and to waive any informality in the proposals submitted when such
waiver is in the best interest of the Owner.
The St. Mary's County Metropolitan Commission
does not discriminate on the basis of race, marital status, color, religion, sex,
age, national origin, physical or mental handicap, political affiliation,
or other non-merit factors.
CareFirst.
Your future
is bright at
Requirements include:
• A Bachelor’s degree and 3-5 years of diverse health care experience
ideally in Case Management, Home Health or Disease Management.
• Strong working knowledge of the continuum of managed care including
delivery guidelines and systems and the dynamics of access, cost and
quality.
• Current RN licensure in DC, MD or VA with proven management
experience.
• BSN, MSN or CCM and familiarity with web-based software applications
preferred.
We offer excellent benefts and a competitive salary. For more information
regarding the program, we encourage you to visit www.carefrst.com/
providers/pcmh. To learn more about the position, please send your
resume to heather.hahn@carefrst.com referencing req. #003744 in the
subject line. EOE, M/F/D/V
www.CareFirst.com
Sr. Regional Care Coordinators
CareFirst Medical Management Division seeks proven Registered Nurse
leaders to become part of its groundbreaking Primary Care Medical
Homes Initiative. In this vital role, you will develop and manage
relationships with primary care physician practices focused on patients
with multiple chronic conditions that require extensive and high-cost care.
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is an independent licensee of the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
® Registered trademark of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.
® Registered trademark of CareFirst of Maryland, Inc.
Project ID: B009722503
clIent: carefIrst
PuBs: afro amerIcan Dc
sIze: 3.58 X 6
Date: 02-09-2011
artIst: Kr
comP: Xserve
rev: 1
Check the WSSC website to confirm times and dates,
www.wsscwater.com
To be placed on the speaker list individuals can email mbepolicy@wsscwater.com or contact the
SLMBE Office at 301-206-8800. Written comments may be submitted for inclusion in the record
by emailing mbepolicy@wsscwater.com or mailing Ms. Towanda R. Livingston, Director, Small,
Local and Minority Business Enterprise Office, WSSC, Attention: MBE Program, 14501 Sweitzer
Lane, Laurel MD 20707. The public hearing record will remain open until March 7, 2011. WSSC
offers ADA accommodation for the hearing impaired.
WSSC will consider the comments when drafting a final MBE Policy program to be presented to
the Commissioners for a vote. The new Program policy would take effect May 1, 2011. The current
interim MBE Policy expires April 30, 2011. For more information go to www.wsscwater.com.
W88C 8eeks Public Comment
The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission has scheduIed
two PubIic Hearings to soIicit comments about a draft MBE PoIicy.
The PubIic Hearings wiII be heId:
NOT¡CE OF PROPO8ED
NEW MBE POL¡CY
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
Wednesday, February 23, 2011
7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
County Administration Building
14741 Governor Oden Bowie Drive
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772-3050
MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Thursday, February 24, 2011
7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Stella B. Warner Building
100 Maryland Avenue
Rockville, MD 20850
cedent’s will) shall be
cedent’s will) shall be
cedent’s will) shall be
cedent’s will) shall be
Hamlet, Purchasing Agent, and marked (SEALED BID FOR OLIVER DRIVE GRINDER
PUMP AND FORCE MAIN PROJECT, CONTRACT NO. 5081FM).
money order, Visa or MasterCard. Checks should be made payable to (St. Mary’s
County Metropolitan Commission). Bid packages may also be mailed upon receipt
cedent’s will) shall be
B10 The Afro-American, February 19, 2011 - February 25, 2011
11-ATTW-012_TAD AFRO AMERICAN WASHINGTON/Size 11”x20”/INSERTION DATE: 02/12/11
©2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or affiliated companies.
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The AT&T 28 Days Speaker Series is coming to Washington, DC — hosted by Common, and featuring
fashion and beauty correspondent Tai Beauchamp as guest speaker. It’s happening at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday, February 22nd at Howard University. Find out how to get your free tickets to this inspiring
event at att.com/thebridge.