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House slogs through $1.2T spending bill, p4 T he D ELPHOS Wildcats finish NWC unbeaten, Lady

House slogs through $1.2T spending bill, p4

The

DELPHOS

Wildcats finish NWC unbeaten, Lady Jays lose in OT, p6-7

HERALD

House slogs through $1.2T spending bill, p4 T he D ELPHOS Wildcats finish NWC unbeaten, Lady

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

50¢ daily Friday, February 18, 2011 Delphos, Ohio
50¢ daily
Friday, February 18, 2011
Delphos, Ohio
Upfront
Upfront

FFA boosters set berry sale

Delphos FFA/Alumni Boosters is holding a Fresh Strawberry Sale. Grown in Dover, Fla., ber- ries are $20 per flat (12 1-pint containers) and $11 per half- flat (6 1-pint containers). Strawberries will be deliv- ered the week of March 21. Call 419-236-7883 to order. Orders must be placed before March 6.

Eagles to host blood drive

The Delphos Eagles Lodge will host a Red Cross blood drive from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 26. Donors must be at least 17 years old, weight at least 110 pounds based on height and be in good general health. Red Cross donor card or other ID required. Call 1-800-RED CROSS or go to redcrossblood. org to schedule a dona- tion appointment.

Sports
Sports

TODAY

Boys Basketball Columbus Grove at Jefferson (NWC), 6 p.m. Spencerville at Paulding (NWC), 6 p.m. Allen East at Lincolnview (NWC), 6 p.m. Defiance at Elida (WBL), 6 p.m. Kalida at Continental (PCL), 6 p.m. Ada at Crestview (NWC), 6 p.m. Ottawa-Glandorf at Van Wert (WBL), 6 p.m. Fort Recovery at St. John’s (MAC), 6:30 p.m. Girls Basketball Fort Jennings at Miller City (PCL), 6 p.m. Co-Ed Swimming and Diving District Swimming at BGSU, TBA Co-Ed Bowling Sectional: Van Wert girls at Minster, 5 p.m.

SATURDAY

Boys Basketball St. John’s at Bath, 6 p.m. Fort Jennings at Pandora- Gilboa (PCL), 6 p.m. Ottoville at Leipsic (PCL), 6 p.m. New Bremen at Spencerville, 6 p.m. Van Buren at Kalida, 6 p.m.? Miller City at Columbus Grove (PCL), 6 p.m. Girls Basketball St. John’s at New Bremen (MAC), noon (postponed from Feb. 3) Spencerville at Kalida, noon (from Feb. 1 and Feb. 7) Pandora-Gilboa at Columbus Grove (PCL), 1 p.m.

Wrestling Sectional at Shawnee Co-Ed Bowling Sectional: Van Wert boys at Minster, 1 p.m.

Forecast Partly cloudy Saturday; high in mid 40s. See page 2.
Forecast
Partly cloudy
Saturday; high
in mid 40s.
See page 2.

Index

Obituaries 2 State/Local 3 Politics 4 Community 5 Sports 6-7 Classifieds 8 TV 9 World News
Obituaries
2
State/Local
3
Politics
4
Community
5
Sports
6-7
Classifieds
8
TV
9
World News
10

Race to the Top

Federal cash helps fund state mandates

House slogs through $1.2T spending bill, p4 T he D ELPHOS Wildcats finish NWC unbeaten, Lady

Nancy Spencer photo

Ottoville Local Schools teachers Kevin Blake, left, Aaron Verhoff and Anthony Castronova learn their way around an iPad this morning. Tonya Koenig from the Northwest Ohio Education Technology Foundation brought teachers up to speed on how the iPad works and applications they can use in the classroom. The school purchased 20 iPads using Race to the Top funding.

BY MIKE FORD mford@delphosherald.com

Area educators often agree that state and federal bureau- cracy can make teaching more challenging. Unfunded mandates and various requirements connected to state assessments often com- plicate matters in administra- tion offices and classrooms. However, the burden is eased when one level of bureau- cracy helps meet standards

created by the one closer to home. President Barack Obama’s Race to the Top program was authorized in 2009, allocat- ing billions of dollars to the states as they competed for allotments. Not all Tri-county schools signed on to Ohio’s group participation but the minimum is $100,000 over four years. Better-performing schools get that amount, while others get more money. Area districts report using it

for professional development and technological devices to enhance standardized test performance. Delphos City, Ottoville Local and Jennings Local schools each get $100,000 over four years. Elida Local Schools is benefitting from $245,000 over the same period. Lincolnview Local Schools did not apply. The program requires approv - al from superintendents, board presidents and teac-

We’re also

... using the money to set up some short-cycle assess- ments so we can chart the progress of each child as we go along, rather than wait for the annual test results from the state. They’re not full- blown tests but

we’ll chart our students’ progress quarterly and this will also enable us to target our teaching strategies ”

to each

child. ...

— Jeff Price, Delphos City Schools superintendent

ers unions. According to Superintendent Doug Fries, the teachers union would not agree to participate in the program. Delphos City Schools Superintendent Jeff Price said Ohio was awarded $400 million but participating dis- tricts can only use the money in certain ways. “There were guidelines and specific categories where

you had to show how you would use the money. We have chosen to use it on the professional development of our teachers. That means getting them together within the district and sending some of them to conferences that look at how our curriculum is aligned with new state stan- dards,” he said. “We are going to implement some research- based teaching strategies; it’s about making sure each grade level does what it needs to do to move each child along. So, we’re working together so we don’t overlap within the curriculum. “We’re also using the money to set up some short- cycle assessments so we can chart the progress of each child as we go along, rath- er than wait for the annual test results from the state. They’re not full-blown tests but we’ll chart our students’ progress quarterly and this will also enable us to tar- get our teaching strategies to each child. We’ll know if they need intervention and if they do, we’ll know what interventions will be helpful to them.”

Jennings and Ottoville superintendents said they are using the funds for profes- sional development. Both are also using it for technology to be used in administering short-cycle assessments. Jennings will use the Apple iPod Touch, while Ottoville will use Apple iPads. “We have some now and want to expand what we’re

See RttT, page 2

Statehouse erupts in union overhaul protest

By JULIE CARR SMYTH The Associated Press

COLUMBUS — Union groups in Ohio brandished Republican-red T-shirts on Thursday as they sought to ease partisan divisions over a GOP-backed bill that would strip public employees of col- lective bargaining rights. The attempted show of solidarity by one of many unions plugging Statehouse hallways in protest of the bill came as a similarly momen- tous bill stirred a furor in Wisconsin, where Democratic senators fled that state to force Republicans to negotiate. It also took place on the same day tea party groups from around Ohio staged their first organized demonstration in favor of the bill. The Ohio proposal, spon- sored by Republican Sen. Shannon Jones, would abol- ish collective bargaining rights for state workers and restrict teachers, firefighters, police, university employees and local workers in their bargaining abilities. Unions would lose the ability to negotiate salary schedules and step increases in favor of merit-based raises. Unions would be barred from requir- ing non-members covered by their contracts to pay dues.

Cincinnati Councilman

Jeff Berding told the Senate

Insurance, Commerce and

Labor Committee during

the more than eight hours of testimony Thursday that the

current situation has become unworkable for cash-strapped cities. “City leaders, managers — elected to represent the taxpayers — need the ability to pay what we can afford, and not have it dictated by unions gaming the system and unelected third parties,” he said. “I must share with you my profound personal disappointment to realize that

union leaders and their mem- bers prioritize pay benefits over averting layoffs.” Ray Warrick, a member of the Ohio Liberty Council, a coalition of tea party groups, called the days of union pro- tests at the Statehouse “truly sad.” “It’s one of those occa- sions where certain power brokers pit citizens against one another to achieve their goals of self-preservation, retention of power and con- tinued access to the taxpay- ers’ money,” he said. “The message they are screaming is that the proponents of Senate Bill 5 somehow are against police officers, firefighters, teachers and other innocent public employee rank and file. That is both false and ridiculous.” Outside the hearing room, thousands of union members — teachers, firefighters, pris- on guards, police — got a sur- prise visit by former Gov. Ted Strickland, a union-friendly Democrat ousted in last fall’s election by Republican Gov. John Kasich. Strickland had no formal role in the day’s activities. Strickland said he wanted to show his support to union workers — who took a pay freeze and 10 furlough days each year under his adminis-

tration.

“This has little to do with

balancing this year’s budget,”

he said. “I think it’s a power

grab. It’s an attempt to dimin- ish the rights of working peo- ple. I think it’s an assault of the middle class of this state and it’s so unfair and out of balance.” Jones, the sponsor, said she anticipates changes to the bill following this week’s inten- sive hearings. Republicans control 23 seats in the Senate, where 17 votes are need for a bill to pass.

See UNION, page 2

Physical education pairs with lessons Mike Ford photos Christopher Burk, Anthony Bodine and Libby Baker count

Physical education pairs with lessons

Mike Ford photos

Christopher Burk, Anthony Bodine and Libby Baker count balls during a physical education class this morning at Franklin Elementary School. The first-grade students were assigned the task of counting colored balls from the center of the gym and group- ing them in certain ways by number and color. Below: Franklin first-grader Tyler Metzger helps Physical Education Coach Kyle Harmon count his team’s balls as Hunter Miller and Logan Jones look on.

Physical education pairs with lessons Mike Ford photos Christopher Burk, Anthony Bodine and Libby Baker count

2 – The Herald

Friday, February 18, 2011

www.delphosherald.com

2 – The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Bahrain security forces tear

For The Record

Bahrain security forces tear gas protestors

MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) — Soldiers fired tear gas and shot heavy weapons into the air as thousands of pro- test marchers defied a gov- ernment ban and streamed toward the landmark square that had been the symbolic center of the uprising against the Gulf nation’s leaders. Hospital officials said at least 20 people were injured, some seriously. Ambulance sirens were heard throughout central Manama a day after riot police swept through the protest encampment in Pearl Square, killing at least five people. An Associated Press cameraman saw army units shooting anti-aircraft weap- ons above the protesters in apparent warning shots and attempts to drive them back from security cordons about 200 yards (200 meters) from the square. The clash came just hours after funeral mourners and worshippers at Friday prayers

called for the toppling of the Western-allied monarchy in the tiny island nation that is home to the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet. The cries against the king and his inner circle — at a main Shiite mosque and at burials for those killed in Thursday’s crushing attack — reflect an important esca- lation of the political upris- ing, which began with calls to weaken the Sunni monarchy’s power and address claims of discrimination against the Shiite majority in the tiny island nation. The mood, howev - er, appears to have turned toward defiance of the entire ruling system after the bru- tal crackdown on a protest encampment in Bahrain’s capital, Manama, which left at least five dead, more than 230 injured and put the nation under emergency-style foot- ing with military forces in key areas and checkpoints on main roads.

RttT

“The regime has broken

something inside of

me.

...

All of these people gathered today have had something broken in them,” said Ahmed Makki Abu Taki at the funeral for his 23-year-old brother, Mahmoud, who was killed in the pre-dawn sweep through the protest camp in Manama’s Pearl Square. “We used to demand for the prime minister to step down, but now our demand is for the ruling family to get out.” The White House has expressed “strong displea - sure” about the rising ten- sions in Bahrain. The 5th Fleet is the centerpiece of the Pentagon’s efforts to con- front growing Iranian military ambitions in the region. At a Shiite mosque in the village of Diraz, an anti- government hotbed, imam Isa Qassim called the Pearl Square assault a “massacre” and thousands of worship- pers chanted: “The regime must go.”

Union

(Continued from page 1)

doing to fit more kids. We’re using them as an aide in read- ing, as well as math and sci- ence,” said Jennings Local Schools Superintendent Nick Langhals. “They can read the screen but they can also hear it, so that helps students in our younger grades learn to read and we’re having success with it. Kids can also do some math and science exercises on them in the way of independent study; they can do the work on their own and the teachers can see if they’re learning the material or if they need to go over it again.” Ottoville is using the larg- er iPad for the same things. Superintendent Scott Mangus said the other benefit is imme- diate grading on tests that will expedite further instruction as needed when used for in-class quizzing. At Elida, No Child Left

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Behind Director Faith Cummings is coordinating the district’s use of RttT dollars. Again, professional develop- ment is the federally-set crite- ria specifying how the money is used. “We are working on using data to improve instruction and will work with a system the state will purchase called the Instructional Improvement System. It’s an electronic system that will use all the parts of what we do in school improvement from student data to teacher evaluations and professional development,” she said. “We’re also going to look at an area for revised stan- dards and assessments. We have revised standards in math and language arts that are federal and in science and social studies that are from the state. With Race to the Top money, we’re rolling out professional development and training. We’re also looking at Great Teachers and Great Leaders; we have a commit- tee that will work to meet and develop a teacher evaluation and principal evaluation sys- tem based on the state model that will include components of school improvement.” Cummings added that Race to the Top is a “mini revolu- tion” in education that is about reform, not funding practices already in place.

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(Continued from page 1)

Matthew Schliesman, a fire- fighter from Hamilton said he saw the similar bills in Ohio and Wisconsin as attempts to break a promise to public employees. “State budgets are tight everywhere, obviously. But they’ve also negotiated these contracts with us and to be able to say, ‘I have no money, we need to bail out,’ I mean, do the rest of us get those kinds of incentives?” he asked. “I mean, if I can’t pay my mortgage because I lose my job, is the bank going to bail me out and let me still keep my house? Every testimony I hear here is we have no money, we need to be able to weasel out of the deals that we already made.” Ted Lyons, an electronics executive and tea party leader from Miami County, saw the day differently. “Our state funding is going broke and every special inter- est has a good reason why they need to be given as much money as they have been given,“ he said. ”And we can’t afford it anymore.“ Ohio’s tea party move - ment is among the nation’s strongest — but tea party supporters were fewer by far than union protesters on Thursday. On the High Street side of the Statehouse — which sits on the heart of downtown Columbus — a passing fire engine answering a call drew loud cheers and screams of support from the union-heavy crowd. As the vehicle passed, city and school buses on the streets honked.

FUNERAL
FUNERAL

NAGEL, Richard Anthony, 55, of Byron, Ill., and for- merly of Delphos, memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday at St. Peter Lutheran Church, followed by a prayer service at 5:45 p.m. and mili- tary honors at 6 p.m.

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WEATHER

Delphos weather

The

high

temperature

Thursday

in

Delphos

was

  • 58 and the low was 44. A

year ago today, the high was

  • 33 and the low

was 23. The

record high for today is 60, set

in 1994 and the record low of -13 was set in 1936.

WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county Associated Press

TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 20s. West winds 10 to 15 mph. SATURDAY : Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid

40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph. SATURDAY NIGHT :

Partly cloudy in the evening becoming mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 30s. Northeast winds around 5 mph becoming southeast after midnight.

EXTENDED FORECAST

SUNDAY: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain in the after- noon. Highs in the mid 40s. Chance of rain 30 percent. SUNDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain in the evening and a chance of snow and rain after midnight.

Breezy with lows in the upper 20s. Chance of precipitation

  • 40 percent.

MONDAY : Cloudy. A chance of snow in the morn-

ing and a chance of rain and snow in the afternoon. Highs in the mid 30s. Chance of pre- cipitation 50 percent. MONDAY NIGHT :

Mostly cloudy. A chance of snow and rain in the evening and a chance of snow after midnight. Lows in the lower 20s. Chance of precipitation

  • 50 percent.

POLICE REPORT
POLICE
REPORT

Car strikes parked vehicle

At 12:03 p.m on Thursday, a collision occurred when the driver of one vehicle backed into another vehicle. The vehicle of Quinton Thornton was parked along East Second Street when Lindsay Reynolds, 22, of Delphos, began backing up from a parking space. Reynolds failed to see Thornton’s vehi- cle and struck it in the center front with the center rear of her vehicle. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehicles.

Driver cited for OVI after strik- ing utility pole

At 11:02 p.m. on Wednesday, a collision occurred when a driver sus- pected of being under the influence of alcohol struck a telephone pole. Richelle Ravlerson, 23, of

Spencerville, was traveling

southbound on Spencerville Road when she failed to main-

tain control of her vehicle and struck a Sprint utility pole. There were no injuries and severe damage to Ravlerson’s vehicle. Ravlerson was cited for operating a vehicle under the influence and failure to main- tain reasonable control.

OBITUARY

2 – The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Bahrain security forces tear

Jeffrey L. Davis

Feb. 1, 1956-Feb. 17, 2011

Jeffery L. “Jeff” Davis, 55, of Venedocia, died at 11:08 a.m. Thursday at Van Wert Inpatient Hospice Center, sur- rounded by his loving family. He was born Feb. 1, 1956, in Van Wert to Walter and Jessie (Carnahan) Davis, who preceded him in death. On Nov. 17, 1978, he mar- ried Cindy Kiracofe, who sur- vives in Venedocia. Survivors also include son Brett Davis of Fort Wayne; daughter Renae (Scott) Eversole of Delphos; broth- ers Jim (Denise) Davis of

Venedocia and Jerry (Victoria) Davis of Buckland; and grand-

daughter Gabrielle Eversole. He was preceded in death by a brother, Johnny Davis. Mr. Davis worked at Ridge Stone Quarry. He was a mem- ber of the United Kennel Club. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, playing softball and truly loved the outdoors. Services will begin at 2 p.m. Sunday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, the Rev. John Medaugh officiating.

Burial will be in Venedocia

Cemetery.

Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Saturday and one hour prior to services Sunday at the

funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to Van Wert Inpatient Hospice Center.

The Delphos

Herald

Vol. 141 No. 210

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

The Daily Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $2.09 per

week. By mail in Allen, Van

Wert, or Putnam County, $105 per year. Outside these counties $119 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $2.09 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

TODAY IN HISTORY

By The Associated Press

Today is Friday, Feb. 18, the 49th day of 2011. There

are 316 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On Feb. 18, 1911, the

world’s first officially-sanc- tioned airmail flights were completed as Fred Wiseman,

carrying three letters, arrived in Santa Rosa, Calif., in his biplane a day after leaving Petaluma (engine trouble hav- ing forced an overnight stop) while in India, French pilot Henri Pequet carried some 6,500 letters and postcards from Allahabad (AH’-lah-

hah-BAHD’) to Naini (NAN’-

 

ee) in 13 minutes.

On this date:

In 1564, artist Michelangelo

Corn:

$6.98

died in Rome.

Wheat:

$7.66

In 1861, Jefferson Davis

Beans:

$13.75

was sworn in as provisional

 

president of the Confederate States of America in

Montgomery, Ala.

CLEVELAND (AP) —

In 1885, Mark Twain’s

These Ohio lotteries were drawn Thursday:

“Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was published in the

Mega Millions

U.S. for the first time.

Estimated jackpot: $52 million

In 1930, photographic evi- dence of Pluto (now designated

Midday 3

a “dwarf planet”) was discovered

5-7-8

by Clyde W. Tombaugh at Lowell

Midday 4

Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz.

7-2-4-6

In 1960, the 8th Winter

Pick 3

Olympic Games were formal-

1-2-3

ly opened in Squaw Valley,

Pick 4

Calif., by Vice President

8-1-1-0

Richard M. Nixon.

Powerball

In 1970, the “Chicago

Estimated jackpot: $126 million

Seven” defendants were found not guilty of conspir-

Rolling Cash 5

ing to incite riots at the 1968

02-10-16-20-35

Democratic national conven-

Estimated jackpot:

tion; five were convicted of

$120,000

violating the Anti-Riot Act of

Ten OH

1968 (those convictions were

06-11-14-16-18-24-26-30-

later reversed).

33-45-47-50-54-59-61-62-64-

In 1977, the space shut-

67-73-77

tle Enterprise, sitting atop a

Ten OH Midday

Boeing 747, went on its maid-

  • 03-12-17-22-23-27-34-38- en “flight” above the Mojave

  • 39-40-42-48-52-63-66-76-77- (moh-HAH’-vee) Desert. In 1984, Italy and the

78-79-80

In

1956, Elvis Presley

appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show for the first time.

Vatican signed an accord under which Roman Catholicism ceased to be the state religion of Italy.

 

St. John’s Preschool Open House and

 

Registration

 

for the 2011-2012 School Year

for the 2011-2012 School Year
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 23

6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 23

St. John’s Annex 722 S. Jefferson St., Delphos

• We welcome children 3 to 5 years old • Pre-K classes and Latchkey available • Registration fee $25

Give your child the opportunity to begin their school experience in a comfortable environment with caringteachers who utilize innovative teaching tools to prepare students for kindergarten while emphasizing Christian values.

For information, call 419-692-9806

 

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SEE US ON FACEBOOK

www.delphosherald.com

Friday, February 18, 2011

The Herald –3

www.delphosherald.com Friday, February 18, 2011 The Herald –3

STATE/LOCAL

Briefs
Briefs

Missing woman believed to be found dead

BELLEFONTAINE (AP) — Investigators found a body believed to be a missing Ohio woman hidden in the base- ment of her mother’s house, and they were searching for the mother’s live-in boyfriend, police said Thursday. Officers discovered the body Wednesday night in the Bellefontaine home after they noticed clothing that appeared to be blood-stained while they were talking with the mother, police said. Tiffany Brown, 26, went missing nearly a week ago. Her mother told police on Saturday that Brown left her two children with a neighbor a day earlier so that she could run a few errands. Police were waiting for an autopsy to confirm the iden- tity of the body. But a news release from police Thursday night referred to the case as the Tiffany L. Brown homi- cide. A police dispatcher did not know if investigators had received the autopsy results. As part of their search for the 37-year-old boyfriend, authorities also were looking for an elderly Logan County couple and their green Mercury Gran Marquis. Police said they wanted to make sure Richard and Gladis Russell were OK. The FBI have joined in the search for the Russells. The Bellefontaine Examiner said the couple once owned the residence where investiga- tors found the body and sold the home to the boyfriend and Brown’s mother. The paper also reported that the Russells live about three miles from where the boyfriend’s truck was found. Authorities said that the bloody clothing they found belonged to the boyfriend and that his pickup truck was found Wednesday night in a small town just outside Bellefontaine. Police found Brown’s car at an apartment complex in Bellefontaine on Monday. Authorities said Brown’s mother is not a suspect. No charges have been filed, and police described the boyfriend as a person of interest. The father of Brown’s two children lives in Cincinnati and earlier told police he did not know anything about her disappearance.

DeWine sues private school

CLEVELAND

(AP)

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has sued a Cleveland school, challenging a claim that its diplomas will lead to community college accep - tance. In the lawsuit filed Thursday in the Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court, DeWine says the Community of Faith Christian School misrepresented the degrees it offered to students. He said the state has received 30 com- plaints since 2008. The lawsuit against the school and owner Jeffrey Sanders asks the court to prohibit such claims that the diplomas would get the stu- dents into local colleges and impose fines for any viola- tion. Sanders could not be reached for comment. There is no phone listing for him or the school at the address listed in the lawsuit and no attorney was listed in court records.

From the Vantage Point
From the Vantage Point
From the Vantage Point

From the Vantage Point

Vantage BPA students qualify for state

Vantage Career Center Business students recently competed in the first round of Region 16 Business Professionals of America skills contests at Celina High School. Fifty-five students from the Vantage business programs - Interactive Media, Medical Office Management and Network Systems - com- peted in a variety of dif- ferent contests includ - ing Computer Security, VB.NET Programming, Fundamental Accounting, Medical Office Procedures, Web Site Design, Computer Animation, Network Design, Advanced Office Systems and Procedures and Administrative Support. In all, 22 students earned the right to advance to the state competition held in Columbus in the spring. Network Systems: Adam Smazenko (Antwerp) placed second in VB.NET Programming. The team of Patrick Jackson (Parkway), Justin Van Horn (Delphos Jefferson), Phillip Stemen (Fort Jennings), and Storm Dunakin (Paulding) quali- fied for state competi - tion by placing first in the Parliamentary Procedure Team contest. The Network Design Team — Michael Hoersten (Crestview), Bart Barthels (Van Wert), Kris King (Van Wert) and Shawn Guelde (Paulding) — gar- nered first place honors. Thomas Moore (Paulding) placed first in Computer

From the Vantage Point Vantage BPA students qualify for state Vantage Career Center Business students recently

The following are Vantage Business Professional of America (BPA) 2011 state qualifiers: front from left, Alyssa Black, Krystal Gamble, Shawn Guelde, Bianca Salisbury, Bart Barthels, Caleb Lawrence, Megan Stutz, Courtney Temple, Aryn Denny, Dakota Talbott, Kody McCague and Natalie Kindell; and back, Daniel Perkins, Thomas Moore, Kris King, Michael Hoersten, Patrick Jackson, Phillip Stemen, Justin Van Horn, Storm Dunakin, Brandon Jarrell and Nathan Theis. Absent is Jasmine Price.

Security while Shawn Guelde placed second. Kody McCague (Paulding), placed first in PC Servicing and Troubleshooting. The team of Dakota Talbott, Nathan Theis, Brandon Jarrell, and Dylan Ankney, all from Paulding, took first place in the Web Application Team event. Junior Daniel Perkins (Van Wert) placed first in VB.NET Programming, while senior Michael Hoersten (Crestview) placed

first in Computer Network Technology. Aryn Denny (Wayne Trace), a senior in the Medical Office Management program, placed first in the Integrated Office Applications. Krystal Gamble (Lincolnview) placed first in Medical Office Procedures contest and Caleb Lawrence (Wayne Trace) took first place in Interview Skills. Alyssa Black (Parkway), placed

second in the Medical Office Procedures. Bianca Salisbury (Parkway), took second place in Advanced Office Systems and Procedures. Jasmine Price (Antwerp), placed sec- ond in Fundamental Workd Processing Skills and Ciera Zeigler (Van Wert) placed second in Advanced Interview Skills. Four stu- dents, Aryn Denny (Wayne Trace), Natalie Kindell (Crestview), Megan Stutz (Parkway) and Courtney

Temple (Wayne Trace), joined forces to take first place in the Administrative Support Team contest while four other Vantage students, Olivia Hook (Wayne Trace), Caleb Lawrence (Wayne Trace), Emily Shuherk (Paulding), and Cierra Zeigler (Van Wert), placed second in the same contest. Students who quali - fied for the state contest will compete in March in Columbus.

Ohio to execute neo-Nazi with suicide drug in March

By ANDREW WELSH- HUGGINS Associated Press

LUCASVILLE — Ohio’s execution of neo-Nazi Frank Spisak will likely be the last time the state uses sodium thiopental, a drug in short supply nationally, as the state looks ahead to its next sched- uled execution and plans to use an anesthetic used in assisted suicides in Oregon and Washington. Spisak was executed Thursday at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville. The 59-year-old was convicted of killing three people on a Cleveland college campus in 1982 in a shooting spree that targeted blacks. The condemned killer’s final words were Bible verses read in halting German. The reading drew snickers from witnesses, including two brothers of one victim and the daughter of another. The U.S. manufacturer of sodium thiopental stopped making the drug, creating a shortage for the more than 30 states that used it. Ohio plans to use pen- tobarbital for the first time in March for the scheduled execution of Johnnie Baston. The anesthetic has never been

used by itself in a U.S. execu- tion. Oklahoma uses pento- barbital, but in combination with other drugs that paralyze inmates and stop their hearts. Baston, 37, is scheduled to die March 10 for the death of Toledo storekeeper Chong Mah. The 53-year-old man was shot in the back of the head. Baston’s requested clemency but the Ohio Parole Board has recommended against it. A decision from Gov. John Kasich is pending. Drugs used in lethal injec- tion have become an issue since a legal challenge by condemned killers made it to the U.S. Supreme Court. The court in 2008 ruled constitu- tional a three-drug method used in Kentucky. The following year, Ohio became the first state to switch to a single dose of sodium thiopental. The state made the switch to end lawsuits over the three-drug system it previ- ously used. Once Ohio switched to sodium thiopental, other states followed suit and now are looking again at Ohio and the use of pentobarbital. Spisak was Ohio’s longest- serving death row inmate before execution — more than 27 years. Spisak blamed the 1982 crimes on a hatred

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of gays, blacks and Jews and on mental illness related to sexual identity confusion. Defense attorneys watched the execution, and issued a statement saying their client committed the crimes because of severe mental illness, not out of hate. “We have the ability to provide treatment and pro- tect the public without kill- ing mentally ill people who commit crimes,” said Alan Rossman and Michael Benz. Cora Warford, whose son was among those killed, said in a statement afterward that “justice has been served.” Spisak identified him -

self as a woman and went by Frances Spisak in corre- spondence, a name defense attorneys also used. They claimed their client suffered from a severe bipolar disorder that was not diagnosed until years after the conviction. The parole board and Kasich rejected their argument in rul- ing against clemency. The 1982 shootings occurred over several months, from February to August. Brian Warford, 17, was taking classes at Cleveland State University as an alterna- tive education student earning his high school degree when he was shot and killed. The

Rev. Horace Rickerson, 57, was killed in a campus bath- room where he had rebuffed Spisak’s sexual advances. Timothy Sheehan, 50, who worked in Cleveland State’s maintenance department, was killed because Spisak believed Sheehan might have witnessed Rickerson’s shooting. John Hardaway was shot seven times as he waited for a commuter train by some- one later identified as Spisak. He survived and was present at the execution Thursday. Coletta Dartt, a university employee, was shot at as she exited a bathroom stall. She pushed Spisak away and ran.

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4 — The Herald
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Friday, February 18, 2011

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4 — The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com

POLITICS

“Temperament is temper that is too old to spank.”

— Charlotte Greenwood, American actress-comedian (1893-1978)

4 — The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “Temperament is temper that is

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

DEAR EDITOR:

While in the process of seeking the I-gym Pepsi Grant, the I-gym received quality feedback and questions about what happens in that gym. As a result of our experience, the I-gym staff decided to provide free play time to our school service groups. WOW. Was that an eye opener. We came up with more than 20 groups of students who go above and beyond the call of expected aca- demia or sports. This was amazing to me. People always ask “What makes Delphos so special?” Well, here you have it. We are a community of people who do more than is expected and most of it goes without public notice. Our children have learned from the adults and together we collectively make this a great community. I have lived in sev- eral other areas — large and small — but never have seen com- munity support like we have here. What we teach our children does carry with them long after they leave here. As long as we do it right Delphos will continue to make the world a better place.

DEAR EDITOR:

Maggie Wannemacher

It’s the cats, not the dogs. I just read the article about barking dogs in Fort Jennings. I would like to give the police chief some suggestions:

  • 1. Tell the council to pass an ordinance that all cats would

have to have permits and be confined to the owner’s prop- erty.

  • 2. Make it a law that all dog owners would have to have

their females spayed and males neutered. The scent a female

dog puts out can be smelled for miles by a male dog. If the male dog is not neutered, he would do anything to find this female.

  • 3. Most dogs will bark at other dogs and strangers. That is

their job.

  • 4. Urge the newspapers to stop running free ads for those

cute, adorable, beautiful cats and kittens. If they don’t want them, have them spayed or taken to the pound. I get sick and tired of having cats on my property, walking on my cars and causing my dog to bark, which is in my house at all times except for potty calls. There are so many cats loose now that I will start setting my live traps again and all I catch go to the pound. If you want your cats, then keep them on your property at all times — day and night. Oh, by the way, to the Fort Jennings police chief — How many of those people making complaints against the dogs have cats? Take those complaints to the cat owners and then make sure all female dog owners have them spayed.

Paul H. Feathers Sr. Delphos

High court asked to end non-unanimous convictions

WASHINGTON (AP) — Almost anywhere in the United States, two holdouts among 12 jurors would prevent a convic- tion. Unfortunately for Troy Barbour, his trial for attempted murder took place in Louisiana, where he got 48 years in prison after a jury convicted him on a 10-2 vote. Now Barbour is asking the Supreme Court to end the prac- tice — used only in Louisiana and Oregon — that allows defendants to be convicted of some crimes despite disagree- ment among jurors. The justices meet privately today after a three-week break. Barbour’s case is among hun- dreds they are expected to decide whether to hear or stay out of. The next list of cases the court has agreed to hear is expected Tuesday. Nearly 40 years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that noth- ing in the Constitution bars states from allowing some convictions by non-unanimous verdicts. But even in these two states, first-degree murder, which could bring the death penalty, requires a unanimous verdict. The court has held that the Sixth Amendment requires unanimous verdicts in federal criminal cases. But in a 1972 case that turned on the vote of Justice Lewis Powell, the court said states were not compelled to follow suit and require unan- imous juries in all criminal cases. Jeffrey Fisher, Barbour’s Supreme Court lawyer, said the court’s recent decision to apply Second Amendment gun rights to state and federal law undermines the rationale for Powell’s approach.

IT WAS NEWS THEN

One Year Ago

• The Delphos Police Department has

added an auxiliary officer to its ranks. Joe Glaze, a police officer since 1998, will fill the position of auxiliary officer. Nathan Garlock,

who has accepted a full-time position with the Lima Police will leave near the end of this month.

  • 25 Years Ago — 1986

• Delphos native, Carl J. Weber, 23, will

be joining the staff of the Delphos and Ottoville chapels of Kolkmeyer Helmkamp Siferd Funeral Homes this week. Weber, son of Bob and Rita Weber, is a graduate of St. John’s High School, where he was active in the student council, student government and was vice president of the senior class. He was also a captain of the Blue Jay football team. • Fort Jennings High School recently cele- brated its 1985-1986 Homecoming. Hundreds of parents, students, and staff attended the crowning of Amy Schroeder as Queen and Scott Vetter as King. This year’s attendants included: seniors, Amy Kehres and Dale Neidert; juniors, Denise McNamara and Gary Menke; sophomores, Michele Gasser and Dave Schuerman; freshmen, Regina Bardo and Dan Good; and miniature attendants, Emily Gasser and John Maenle. • The second half proved to be the differ- ence, as St. John’s shook off Ottoville 57-31 in the opening game of the Van Wert Class A girls’ sectional Monday night. Traci Gorman led St. John’s with 24 points and Sheila Gossard scored seven points for the Blue Jays, now 16-5.

  • 50 Years Ago — 1961

• Mrs. George Horine was honored by

the Delphos Chapter, No. 26, Order of the Eastern Star Thursday during the meeting of the Chapter held in the Masonic Temple. A fifty-year pin was presented to Mrs. Horine by the Deputy Grand Matron, Dorothy Riddie

of Lima. Mrs. Horine is a Past Patron of the Delphos Chapter.

• Parents Night will be observed at the

basketball game Friday night in St. John’s gymnasium. Parents of senior students on the

Blue Jay roster will be honored before the start of the reserve game. Senior students on the Blue Jay roster are Dan Rupert, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Rupert; John Grone, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Grone; Jerry Osting, son of Mr. and Mrs. Moletus Osting and Eugene Renner, son of Mr. and Mrs.

Virgil Renner.

• Ottoville’s Big Green cagers started

the Putnam County tournament off with a bang Thursday night when they defeated the county co-champs, Miller City, 64-61, in a double-overtime sudden death game played at Ottoville. Larry Heitmeyer was credited with 6 of the 8 points that tied the game up at the end of the regulation time, and was responsible for 27 of the Ottoville 64 points.

75 Years Ago — 1936

• A group of members of the Delphos

chapter of the Order of Eastern Star were in Spencerville Tuesday to attend the annual meeting of District No. Eight, Order of Eastern Star. Those present from the Delphos chapter were Mrs. Harold Heitzman, Anne

Roberts Davies, Mrs. Herman Rauschart, Mrs. J. V. DeWeese, Mrs. C. F. Miller, Mrs. Blaine Metcalfe, Mrs. Dane Ridenour, Mrs. Russell Critchett, Mildred Howe and Mrs. Gilbert Miller.

• The Tri-county Sportsmen and Farmers

Protective Association will be represented at the seventh annual convention of the League of Ohio Sportsmen which is called for Feb. 20-21 and is to be held at the Deshler-Wallick Hotel in Columbus. Al Gilden, president of

the Tri-County Association, James Counsellor

and Dr. R. N. Stippich will represent the local organization at the big meeting.

• The play, “Bad Companions,” which was

presented at the C.K. of O. hall in Landeck

Sunday and Monday, made a distinct hit on each occasion. Pleasing specialties were given between the acts. These included a vocal solo by Velma Wegesin, a vocal duet by Miss Wegesin and Gene Wagner and instrumental music by the Sever brothers.

House slogs through $1.2T spending bill

By ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Having turned its focus from spending cuts to social issues and an assault on the Obama administration’s regulatory agenda, a battle-weary House reconvenes today in hopes of wrapping up action on a big Republican spending bill that would impose sweeping cuts across domestic programs. The measure is but the first step in an increasingly bitter struggle between Democrats and Republicans over how much to cut agency operating budgets over the second half of the budget year ending Sept. 30. Current funding runs out March 4 and a temporary spending bill will be needed to avoid a government shut- down. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, inflamed the situation Thursday by insisting that the GOP- controlled House would refuse to approve even a short-term measure at current spending levels. Action today includes votes on a proposal to block federal aid to Planned Parenthood, bar the Pentagon from spending taxpayer money to sponsor NASCAR race teams, and reverse a proposed Obama administra-

tion rule that seeks to crack down of for-profit colleges and vocational schools. The GOP would reduce spending about $60 billion below last year’s levels, mix- ing an increase of less than 2 percent for the Pentagon with slashing cuts averag- ing about 12 percent from non-Pentagon accounts. Such cuts would feel almost twice as deep since they would be spread over the final seven months of the budget year. The Environmental Protection Agency and for- eign aid accounts would be especially hard hit, while GOP leaders orchestrated just a modest cut to Congress’ own budget. Some of the most politi- cally difficult cuts, to grants to local police and fire departments, special educa- tion and economic develop- ment grants, were reversed. Amtrak supporters easily withstood an attempt to slash its budget. But with the fiscal frame- work of the measure already saddled with a veto threat, Republicans mounted an assault on the administra - tion’s regulatory agenda. By a 244-181 tally Thursday, Republicans voted to block the Federal Communications Commission from enforcing new rules that prohibit broad-

band providers from inter- fering with Internet traffic on their networks. The new “network neutrality” rules are opposed by large Internet providers. Republicans then moved, on a 250-177 vote, to stop the Environmental Protection Agency from imposing limits on mercury pollution from cement factories. Supporters said the new rules would send American jobs overseas, where air quality standards are more lax or non-existent. Republicans also turned back Democratic attempts to boost funding for the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, whose budgets would be cut sharply under the measure, to pay for responsibilities added in last year’s overhaul of federal financial regulations. Social issues also came into play. Thursday night’s action was dominated by a lengthy debate on an amendment by Rep. Mike Pence, R-Ind., a strong foe of abortion, to block Planned Parenthood from receiving any federal monies. The organization provides a variety of wom- en’s health services, and its website says abortion is a “safe and legal way to end pregnancy.”

US urges restraint in Bahrain amid unrest

By MATTHEW LEE and PAULINE JELINEK Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration expressed alarm over a vio- lent crackdown on anti-gov- ernment protesters in key U.S. ally Bahrain on Thursday as a wave of political upheav- al moved across the Middle East. And Defense Secretary Robert Gates urged govern- ments in the region to move quickly on long-needed polit- ical and economic reforms. Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke with their counterparts in Bahrain, the longtime home to the U.S. Navy’s 5th Fleet and an anchor of U.S. defense strategy in the Mideast. The outreach came as polit- ical unrest that toppled U.S.- backed leaders in Tunisia and Egypt spread to the Persoian Gulf and beyond. Clinton, speaking to reporters after a closed-door briefing with senators, said she was redirecting $150 mil- lion in aid money to Egypt “to put ourselves in a position to support the transition there and assist with their economic recovery.” She said senior State Department and White house officials would travel to Egypt next week “to consult on how we can most effectively

deploy our assistance.” On Bahrain, Clinton spoke with Foreign Minister Sheik Khalid bin Ahmed Al Khalifa, to register Washington’s shock and concern about the brutal crackdown over- night. Army patrols and tanks locked down the capital of the tiny Gulf kingdom after riot police fired tear gas and beat demonstrators demand- ing political reforms. At least four people were killed. Clinton told reporters she “directly conveyed our deep concerns about the actions of the security forces” there. She noted that there would be funerals and prayer meet- ings today and said she had expressed hope they “not be marred by violence.” She said Bahrain had long been a friend and ally and “we call on restraint from the government to keep its commitment to hold account- able those who have utilized excessive force against peace- ful demonstrators and we urge a return to a process that will result in real meaning- ful changes for the people there.” Gates spoke by phone Thursday morning with Crown Prince Salman of Bahrain, deputy commander of Bahraini defense forces, said Pentagon press secretary Geoff Morrell. Morrell gave no details about what Gates said, except

that he “discussed the current security situation” with the prince. Later in the day, Gates said the U.S. has been encourag- ing reforms in the region for some time. “The truth is I think the U.S. has consistently — pri- marily privately, but also publicly — encouraged these regimes for years to under- take political and economic reforms because the pres- sures were building,” Gates told a budget hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee. “And now they need to move on with it and there is an urgency to this.” Navy officials in the Pentagon and in 5th Fleet headquarters in Bahrain have said they are monitoring developments in Bahrain and that sailors, civilian staff and family members there have been advised to avoid pro- test sites. Officials have not reported any effects on their operations from to the unrest. The 5th Fleet operates at least one aircraft carrier in the Gulf region at all times, along with an “amphibious ready group” of ships with Marines aboard. Their presence is cen- tral to a longstanding U.S. commitment to ensure the free flow of oil through the Gulf, while keeping an eye on a hostile Iran and seeking to deter piracy in the region.

US, Russia at odds over missile defense

By DOUGLAS BIRCH Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Talks between the U.S. and Russia over a new anti-ballistic mis- sile system for Europe are stuck on a key point, with Moscow demanding to jointly run the system and the U.S. refusing to yield. Russia is insisting on shared control of the mis- sile defense program with the U.S. and NATO, which President Barack Obama has flatly opposed because it would essentially give Russia responsibility for protecting NATO from nuclear missile threats. The U.S. is offering Moscow a more limited role. After years of opposition, Russia agreed last fall at least to talk about cooperating on the anti-ballistic missile plan for Europe, which the U.S. says may one day be need- ed if Iran develops nuclear weapons. Experts from both sides are scheduled to report on details of the proposal to defense ministers in July. But Moscow has refused so far to budge from its demand for joint control, and has been keeping up the rhetorical pressure. In late November, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said if the U.S.

and NATO can’t reach an agreement on missile defense Russia may deploy new offen- sive weapons, triggering a new arms race. Early this month, a Russian deputy foreign minister warned anything less than a “joint system” could lead Russia to withdraw from the recently- ratified New START treaty and to “take other measures, including military-technical measures.” Russia’s U.S. Ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, told an indus- try-sponsored conference here this week that the two sides still haven’t come up with a good understanding of how a joint program works, warning that his country wasn’t inter- ested in “cloning” decisions already made by the U.S. Referring to Russian fears that the missile defense sys- tem could target Russian war- heads, Kislyak said Moscow is determined to maintain a strategic nuclear balance with the West. “We want to be reassured that whatever you do there doesn’t undermine the sta- bility of deterrence, because deterrence is still with us,” Kislyak said Wednesday at the Nuclear Weapons Monitor Nuclear Deterrence Summit in Washington. “We haven’t

reached

between

... our two countries that would allow us to abolish it. We would like to see it happen. But that’s going to be a long way (off).” The U.S. and NATO have proposed sharing radar and other early warning data, but Assistant U.S. Secretary of State Rose Gottemoeller, the top U.S. arms control negotia- tor, told the industry summit that Obama has decided that “NATO will protect NATO, and that’s the bottom line as far as we’re concerned.” The issue could make or break the deal. “The hardest question on missile defense in the end is who pulls the trigger,” said Steven Pifer of the Brookings Institution, a veteran of U.S. arms control negotiations and former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine. He nevertheless thinks that an agreement can be reached. The White House had hoped that the New START treaty limiting U.S. and Russian strategic weapons, which took effect Feb. 5, would be a springboard to further arms deals, including deeper cuts in strategic forces as well as reductions in short- range nuclear weapons and non-deployed warheads.

a

state

www.delphosherald.com

Friday, February 18, 2011

The Herald – 5

www.delphosherald.com Friday, February 18, 2011 The Herald – 5

COMMUNITY

LANDMARK

www.delphosherald.com Friday, February 18, 2011 The Herald – 5 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Allen County Courthouse

Allen County Courthouse

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1-4

TODAY

p.m.

Interfaith

Thrift Store is open for shop- ping.

SATURDAY 9-11:30 a.m.— Delphos Project Recycle at Delphos Fuel and Wash.

  • 9 a.m. to noon — Interfaith

Thrift Store is open for shop- ping. St. Vincent DePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School park-

ing lot, is open. 10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal Commission Museum is open.

  • 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre.

SUNDAY 8-11:30 a.m. — Knights

of Columbus benefit for St.

John’s

School

at

the

hall,

Elida Ave. 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., will be open.

MONDAY 11:30 a.m. — The Green Thumb Garden Club will meet at the Delphos Public Library for luncheon and program. Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street.

  • 7 p.m. — Washington

Township Trustees meet at the township house. 7:30 p.m. — Jefferson Athletic Boosters meet at the high school library. Spencerville village coun- cil meets at the mayor’s office. Delphos Eagles Auxiliary meets at the Eagles Lodge, 1600 Fifth St.

TUESDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite

at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street.

  • 6 p.m. — Weight Watchers

meets at Trinity United Methodist Church, 211 E. Third St.

  • 7 p.m. — Delphos Area

Simply Quilters meets at the Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce, 306 N. Main St. Delphos City Council meets at the municipal build- ing, 608 N. Canal St. 7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics Anonymous, First Presbyterian Church, 310 W. Second St. 8:30 p.m. — Elida vil- lage council meets at the town hall.

WEDNESDAY

  • 9 a.m. - noon — Putnam

County Museum is open, 202

E. Main St. Kalida.

Please notify the Delphos Herald at 419-695-0015 if there are any corrections or additions to the Coming Events column.

Dena Martz photo Scherger’s kindergarten class at St. John’s Elementary Students in Miriam Scherger’s kindergarten class

Dena Martz photo

Scherger’s kindergarten class at St. John’s Elementary

Students in Miriam Scherger’s kindergarten class at St. John’s Elementary School include, front from left, Tori B., Morgan T., Andrew M., Myah B., Colin S.; and back, Peyton S., Curtis S., Riley T., Tony F., Hopelyn F. and Clay P. Kayla G. was absent.

CAMPUS NOTE

UNOH releases dean’s list

The

University

of

Northwestern Ohio has announced its Dean’s List for January Session 2011 for

students in the College of Technologies.

The

following

full-time

students received a grade point

average of 3.5 or better:

Cloverdale

Brian Hill

Matthew Tucker

Delphos

Josh Berg

Zachary Elwer

Kory Mullenhour

Kayla Reed

Elida

Craig Buckett

Jonah Dreps

Chelsea Forman

Andrew Neidhardt

Fort Jennings

Craig Elwer

Michael Hoersten

Joshua Kuhlman

Middle Point

Isaac Kistler

Spencerville

Cory Counts

Collin Etzkorn

Aaron Regedanz

Jeff Wellbaum

At the movies . . . Van Wert Cinemas 10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert Just Go
At the movies
. .
.
Van Wert Cinemas
10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert
Just Go With It (PG-13) Fri.: 4:30/6:45/9:00;
Sat.: 2:00/4:15/6:30/8:45; Sun.: 2:00/4:30/7:00;
Mon.-Thurs.: 4:30/7:00
Unknown (PG-13) 2:15/4:45/7:45/10:15
The Eagle (PG-13) 1:50/4:25/6:55/9:35
Gnomeo and Juliet 3D (G) 2:25/4:40/7:20/9:20
Just Go With It (PG-13) 1:40/2:10/4:20/4:50/7:10/
7:40/9:50/10:20

Justin Bieber: Never Say Never (G) Fri.:

4:30/6:30/8:30; Sat.: 2:00/4:00/6:15/8:30; Sun.:

2:00/4:30/7:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 4:30/7:00

  • I Am Number Four (PG-13) Fri.: 4:30/6:45/9:00;

Sat.: 2:00/4:15/6:30/8:45; Sun.: 2:00/4:30/7:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 4:30/7:00 Big Mommas: Life Father, Like Son (PG- 13) Fri.: 4:30/6:45/9:00; Sat.: 2:00/4:15/6:30/8:45; Sun.: 2:00/4:30/7:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 4:30/7:00 Gnomeo and Juliet (G) Fri.: 4:30/6:15/8:00; Sat.: 2:00/4:00/6:00/8:00; Sun.: 2:00/4:30/7:00; Mon.-Thurs.: 4:30/7:00

American Mall Stadium 12 2830 W. Elm St., Lima Saturday and Sunday

Big Mommas: Life Father, Life Son (PG-13)

1:45/4:35/7:25/9:55

  • I Am Number Four (PG-13) 1:35/4:10/7:15/9:45

www.delphosherald.com Friday, February 18, 2011 The Herald – 5 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Allen County Courthouse

Justin Bieber: Never Say Never (G) 2:00/4:30/

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6 – The Herald

Friday, February 18, 2011

www.delphosherald.com

6 – The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

Bearcats hold off Panthers in 52-50 barn-burner

By Drew Bittner

Times Bulletin Correspondent sports@timesbulletin.com

SPENCERVILLE – The Spencerville Lady Bearcats sent their seniors off in style Thursday night on their home court, holding off a furious fourth-quarter Paulding rally and capturing a Northwest Conference victory, 52-50. S p e n c e r v i l l e improves to 7-12 on the season and 5-4 in the NWC. The Lady Panthers fall to 8-12 and 4-5 in league play. Intent on playing spoil- er in the conference finale, the Lady Panthers came out on fire from the field early. Abbey Edwards knocked down a 3-pointer to open the game and shortly afterward, a bucket by Jessica Farr and another triple from Edwards put Paulding up quickly, 8-0. The Lady Bearcats didn’t back down, however, and clawed their way back into the contest. Led by Alyssa Mulholland, who had seven first-quarter points, Spencerville was able to tie the game at 9-9 with just under three minutes left in the quarter and then move ahead by the end of the first, 13-10. The biggest storyline of the opening stanza wasn’t the early comeback by Spencerville, however, but the early foul trouble that Farr found herself in. The 6-0 post player was forced to sit for the entire second quarter due to two quick fouls and the Lady Bearcats took complete advantage of her absence. Spurred by seven more points from Mulholland, six from Rachael Kahle and two key treys from Brittany Kill – as well as the rebounding advantage with Farr on the bench – Spencerville turned its slim first-quarter lead into a double-digit lead by half- time, 34-21. “She is what makes our offense go,” said Paulding head coach Lyndsi Shininger of Farr. “She doesn’t have to score but she needs to touch it. When she’s not in, we prefer to shoot from the outside but we don’t have strong rebounders. She really affects our rebounding. They play three on her defensively and it opens up everything else. When she’s not in, we struggle.” Even as Farr returned for a stretch in the third quarter – before she sat again midway through with her third foul — Paulding struggled to get back into the game. Spencerville’s balanced scoring attack found holes in the Lady Panther defense more often than not and every Paulding push was countered by the Lady Bearcats. At the end of three, the game stood at 45-35 in favor of Spencerville. But Paulding wasn’t about to go down without a fight. With Farr back in the lineup and Ashley Myers continu- ing a great performance on the night, the Lady Panthers roared back. Both combined to score the quarter’s first six points and pull Paulding within four points, 45-41. After a Kill free throw, Myers knocked down a triple from

the left corner and made it a 2-point contest, 46-44. Myers scored 17 points in the con- test. “She played really well tonight,” praised Shininger. “That’s the longest she’s played without a break. I was really happy with her per- formance. She worked through a lot, strug- gled in the first half, but really came out in the second. She had a great game.” As Myers continued her strong night, the return of Farr in the quarter was equally important. The junior pulled down several rebounds in the quarter and scored to tie the game at 46-46 with 2:26 to play and then, a minute later, dropped in another two for a Paulding lead, 48-46.

“We should have been able to bury them in the third quarter but we went through one of those spurts where our defense broke down,” said Spencerville head coach Katie Fisher. “[Farr] came back in and she really hurt us. We thrived when she was out of the game but when she came back in, we fell apart. It defi- nitely was interesting.” However, Spencerville’s answer to Farr and Myers came in the form of Mulholland, who countered Farr’s last bucket with a triple at the 1:06 mark and gave the Lady Bearcats the lead back, 49-48. The sophomore tallied

  • 19 points in the contest.

“She did really well tonight,” praised Fisher. “In the past couple games, she hasn’t really scored for us. So she got back in the groove tonight and really came through.” Paulding’s Kass Hammon came up with a clutch buck- et to put the visitors back up, 50-49, with just 50 sec- onds left, but Spencerville’s Mackenzie Miller answered with a score 20 seconds later and added a free throw before the end of the game to account for the 52-50 final. Fisher was pleased to come away with the win but pointed out a few key points in this contest that her team will need to fix come tourney time. “Our main focuses going into tournament is staying out of foul trouble and rebound- ing,” noted the first-year head coach. “Those are the

things that kill us. We get into foul trouble and then don’t rebound and things fall apart. That’s what we are going to focus on.” Mulholland led all scor- ers with 19 points and added seven rebounds. Kill also was in double digits for Spencerville with 12 points and she contributed seven boards as well. For Paulding, Myers’ 17 points (along with eight rebounds) set the pace and Farr added 11 points and

  • 10 boards.

PAULDING: Edwards 3-1-9, Clellan 2-1-6, Kass Hammon 1-1-3, Ashley Myers 3-10-17, Jessica Farr 5-1-11, Shuherk 0-1-1, Owens 0-3-3. Totals 15-18-50. SPENCERVILLE: Alyssa Mulholland 7-2-19, Cortney Miller 2-0-4, Brittany Kill 4-1-12, Claire McConnell 2-0-4, Abby Freewalt 1-0-2, Mackenzie Miller 2-1-5, Rachael Kahle 3-0-6. Totals 21-4-52.

Score by Quarters:

Paulding 10 11 14 15 - 50

Spencerville 13 21 11 7 - 52

Three-point goals: Paulding 4 (Edwards 2, Clellan, Myers); Spencerville 6 (Mulholland 3, Kill 3).

6 – The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Bearcats hold off Panthers in

Van Wert rallies - again - for WBL victory

By Charlie Warnimont

Times Bulletin Correspondent sports@timesbulletin.com

OTTAWA — Van Wert was in danger of losing sight of Ottawa-Glandorf during the third quarter of their Western Buckeye League game. The Titans pulled out to an 8-point lead in the quarter as the Cougars were struggling offensively. All of a sudden, Van Wert found its stroke and it was the Titans that were in trouble. After scoring just 13 points in the first 20 minutes of the game, the Cougars finished strong as they overcame O-G for a 42-29 win at the Robert J. Hermiller Gymnasium. The win allowed the Cougars to finish 2-7 in the WBL and 7-13 overall, while O-G dropped to 4-5 in the league and 6-13 overall. Neither team could find its offense in the opening half as Van Wert scored the first five points of the game before the

Titans scored eight points to close the opening quarter and take an 8-5 lead to the second quarter. The second quarter wasn’t much better offensively as Van Wert posted a slim 6-5 scoring advantage. The Titans took a 13-11 lead at the half as Kristen Miller hit a 3-pointer late in the quarter. Ottawa-Glandorf found an offensive spark early in the third quarter as senior Kari Schroeder scored six of the teams first eight points. Schroeder had missed most of the opening half after pick- ing up her second foul just over three minutes into the game. Behind Schroeder’s strong moves to the basket and two free throws from Melissa Verhoff, O-G opened up a 21-13 lead as Ashley Mohr hit two free throws for Van Wert. After Schroeder’s third bas- ket of the quarter, the Cougars hit their first field goal of the second half when junior Alex Morrow dropped in a 3-point-

See VAN WERT, page 7

Boggs leads Wildcats to sweep NWC girls

By Dar Nevergall Staff Writer

COLUMBUS GROVE — Kennedy Boggs led a slew of Jefferson scorers and the Lady

Wildcats used a smother- ing defense to get by C o l u m b u
Wildcats
used
a
smother-
ing defense
to
get
by
C o l u m b u s
Grove 68-48
in Northwest
Conference
o
T h u r s d a y
a
c
t
i
n
night.
B o g g s
finished with
18
points
Klausing

as the Lady Wildcats placed eight players in the scoring column. “We moved the ball pretty well tonight,” said Jefferson coach David Hoffman. “We

got some outside shots from

a variety

of

people and not

just Kristin (Klausing), which is what we need heading into tournament time.” Klausing (who finished with 16 points) put Jefferson

up for good at 4-3 early in

the

opening period and the

Wildcats pulled away from

the Lady Bulldogs from there.

A 3-pointer by Boggs and back-to-back buckets by Courtney Lewis put Delphos up 13-4 before the Bulldogs’ Anna Ricker knocked down the first of her three 3-point- ers.

“They

are

a

real good

team,” said Columbus Grove

coach Chad Ricker. “They are all very athletic and we gave up too many points off their press in the first half. There half-court trap gave us some

R i c k e r

R i c k e r fits in the

fits in the

 

f i n i s h e d

third

 

and

f i n i s h e d third and

with

a

fourth quar-

team-high

ter.

 

Ball-

12 points

h a n d l i n g

for Grove, backed by

has been our weakness.”

B r o o k e

 

B

o

t

h

B r u b a k e r

t

e

a

m

s

with 8.

cranked

it

Leading

up a notch

Fought

offensively

Ricker

17-10 enter- ing the sec-

ond period, the Wildcats con- tinued to force the Bulldogs into turnovers as Klausing hit a short jumper and then stole the ball for two more to make

in the third as Jefferson won the quarter 22-16 to expand their margin

to 55-33 going into the final period. With a comfortable lead,

it 25-10.

the

Wildcats backed off of

“The press was pretty

their

 

press in the final two

effective for us most of the

frames but still maintained

time,” added Hoffman. “It was a typical kind of game

their 20-point margin. Other scorers for Jefferson

for us.”

(17-2, 8-0 NWC) were Lewis

Three-pointers by Emily

with

 

13, Bridget Culp 11,

Fought and Lewis pushed the

Fought and Amanda Hamilton

difference to 31-14 before a

three

 

each

and Morgan

trey by Brubaker and a break-

Fischbach

 

and

Chelsey

away layup by Boggs closed

Fischer with two each.

out the first half.

 

Behind Ricker and

Brubaker for Columbus Grove (5-14, 3-6 NWC) were Nikki Stechschulte with seven, Katelyn Scott and Kelsey Fruchey six each and Breanne Halker, Megan Verhoff and Sammi Stechschulte two

each.

 

Jefferson

(68)

n

n
 

K

r

i

s

t

i

Klausing 7-2—

16,

Kennedy

Boggs

 

7-2—

18,

Bridget

Culp

5-1—11,

C o

u r

t n e y

Lewis

 

5-2—

13,

Morgan

F i s c h b a c h

1-0—2,

 

Emily

Fought 1-0—3,

Chelsey Fischer

 

Brubaker

1-0—2, Amanda

Hamilton

0-3—

 

3. Totals 27-60 10-12 68.

 
 

Columbus Grove (48)

Anna

 

Ricker

4-1—12,

Brooke

Brubaker 3-0—8, Nikki Stechschulte

3-1—7,

 

Kelsey Fruchey 2-0—6,

Megan Verhoff 0-3—3, Katelyn Scott

2-2—6,

 

Breanne Halker 1-0—3,

Sammi Stechschulte 1-0—3. Totals

16-49 7-9 48.

 

Score by Quarters:

 

Jefferson

 

17

16

22

13 - 68

Col. Grove 10

 

7

16

15 - 48

Three-pointers: Jefferson 4 (Boggs 2, Lewis, Fought); Columbus Grove 9 (Ricker 3, Fruchey 2, Brubaker 2, Halker, S. Stechschulte). Turnovers: Columbus Grove 22, Jefferson 10. Rebounds: Columbus Grove 20, Jefferson 19. Junior Varsity: Columbus Grove

33-30.

Lady Lancers wrangle Mustangs in league contest

By Virginia Bandy Times Bulletin Correspondent sports@timesbulletin.com

HARROD - Everything seemed to click into place for the Lincolnview Lady Lancers Thursday night. The girls were shoot- ing better, hitting their free throws, and mak- ing key moves when it mattered most. As a result, Lincolnview was able to hold off the charging Lady Mustangs of Allen East and win the Northwest Conference con- test 57-50. The Lady Lancers, who sat at the bottom of the NWC, now increase their record to 6-13 (2-7), while AE slips to 7-13 (4-5). Lincolnview head coach Dan Williamson was pleased that his girls responded well in the first quarter even after a surge by Allen East. Lincolnview had earned the first nine points of the game before AE could connect one free throw. At 3:11 to go, the Lady Lancers were up 15-6. Then, according to Coach Williamson, Allen East “cranked up their inten- sity” and it briefly stalled the visiting team. “They threw some things

at us and we didn’t handle it well at first,” he said. AE scored three times before the buzzer to end the first stanza down 17-12. Allen East continued to fight back in the second quar- ter, with the help of several steals by Morgan Truex and Kaycee Rowe. Allen East’s Eliza Laing nailed a triple to tie the game at 17 but the Lancers crept back up to a 4-point lead after buckets by Carley Springer and Audrey Bowen. Then Katie Dye stole one of her own and took it straight to the hole for two more. The Lady Mustangs answered with six consecu- tive markers to tie the game again at 23. The remainder of the first half continued to see-saw and Lincolnview kept the edge going into the locker room, 30-27. The third quarter turned out to be a low-scoring stanza for both teams. Allen East proved to be aggressive in its defense but their ball- handling wasn’t up to par. Lincolnview had a 7-point lead at 2:15 but AE cut the lead to five points before the buzzer. AE’s Rowe opened the final quarter with a triple, cutting the lead to two, but

6 – The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Bearcats hold off Panthers in

the Lincolnview ladies didn’t lose their cool. With every Mustang basket, the Lancers responded with their own. Heavy pressure on Dye also gave the Lancers more free throw points in the final min- utes. The Lincolnview lead steadily climbed in the last two minutes of the game to clinch the win for the team. Coach Williamson gave all the credit to his girls, say- ing they adjusted well to the Allen East defense in the sec- ond half. “They played well in the fourth quarter, which is something we haven’t done,” Williamson noted. “I think it was probably the best fourth quarter we’ve played all season. We’ve definitely had some girls step up — defensively and offensively. I think the biggest thing is we’ve finally been making free throws.” Leading the Lady Lancers in scoring was Dye with 13. Springer followed with 12 and Abbi Alvarez earned 11. The Lincolnview squad was 13-of-22 at the free-throw line. Mustang senior Kayla Crow led AE scorers with 16 and the freshman Rowe net- ted 15. The Lady Mustangs were 11-of-23 at the line. The Lincolnview reserves

hit the bucket with under two seconds remaining to edge Allen East 33-32. Williamson noted that the Lancers will face Crestview in the first girls sectional game on Tuesday. In their previous meeting this sea - son, Crestview took the game with only a 4-point lead. Williamson is hopeful that the momentum from the Allen East win will carry over to sectionals. “We definitely want to be playing our best,” he added. “We have a fair shot against them.” The winner of the Lincolnview-Crestview game will then face St. Johns in the sectional final. Allen East received a first- round bye in the Bath section- als and will face the winner of the Waynesfield-Goshen vs. Perry game on Feb. 26.

Lincolnview (57)

Abbi Alvarez 3 5-5 11, Kaylee

Thatcher 1 1-2 3, Claire Dye 1 0-0 2,

Katie

Dye

4

5-9

13, Audrey

Bowen

4

1-2

9,

Carley Springer 6 0-2 12,

Morgan Peel 0 1-2 1, Kaitlyn Brant 3

0-0 6. Totals 22 13-22 57.

Allen East (50)

Kaycee Rowe 4 5-10 15, Mallie Kirkendall 2 0-0 4, Kayla Crow 6 4-7

16, Eliza Laing 1 0-0 3, Morgan Truex 3 2-4 8, Haley Schafer 1 0-0 2, Katrina Wireman 0 0-2 0, Lutes 1 0-0 2. Totals 18 11-23 50.

Score by Quarters:

Lincolnview 17

13

9

18 - 57

Allen East 12

15

7

16 - 50

Three-pointers: Lincolnview, none; Allen East, Rowe 2, Laing.

LadyCats secure PCL triumph 53-34 vs. Pirates

By DAVE BONINSEGNA The Delphos Herald zsportslive@yahoo.com

KALIDA

The

Lady

Wildcats of Kalida and Lady

Pirates of Continental hooked up in Putnam

C

o

u

n

t

y

L

e

a

g

u

e

regular-sea -

action T h u r s d a y

son

night

at

the

W i l d c a t Den. This was

just

five

days

before

6 – The Herald Friday, February 18, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Bearcats hold off Panthers in

Kaufman

they face off again, this time in a win- or-go-home situation as they meet in tournament play Tuesday night at Paulding. In this contest, Kalida out- scored the Lady Pirates 30-15 in the second half to emerge with a 53-34 victory.

The Wildcats trailed by one after the first using a 3-point- er by Julia Vandermark (10 markers) to draw to within one at 10-9. The game volleyed back and forth in the second stanza.

Haley McIntyre hit a shot from

the paint to make it 16-14 but

Mady Recker answered back with a triple for the guests to give the Pirates a 17-16 advantage with 4:23 to go in the first half. There were two ties and four lead changes in the peri- od, the last being by the hosts

on an Amy Smith (5 points)

basket to give Kalida a 20-18 lead. Kalida never trailed again the rest of the contest. Vandermark and Nicole Kaufman had 10 points each for the Wildcats; Leva Weller led all scorers with 14 for Continental. From the second and into

the third stanza, the Wildcats

went on a 10-0 spurt, creating

  • 10 Pirate turnovers along the

way. The home team took the ball away the first three times Continental had the offen - sive possession in the third

period and stretched its lead

to 27-19 on a give-and-go to Macintyre. The Pirates climbed back to with in five on a Erin Weisenburger (held to 5 points by the LadyCat defense) basket but Chelsea Verhoff drained a 3-pointer from the right elbow to extend

the Kalida lead back to 33-24

with 2:04 left in the third. The ’Cats extended their

lead to 20 in the fourth as Verhoff stepped up again with a long-range basket. The Wildcats shot 21-of-

  • 41 from the field and turned

the ball over just five times in the second half and 13 for the game.

Continental was 14-of-33 and gave the ball up 17 times,

10 in the second half. Kalida hosts Spencerville at high noon Saturday in a makeup game.

Continental (34)

Krystal Prowant 0-0-0, Taylor Bidlack 0-1-1, Mady Recker 2-0-5, Alli Prowant 0-0-0, Taylor Williamson 2-0-5, Vanessa Koppenhofer 0-0-0, Paige Ordway 0-0-0, Sara Deken 1-0-2, Stephanie Coble 1-0-2, Erin

Weisenburger 2-1-5, Leva Weller 6-2-

14.

Totals 12-29 2-4 4-8 34.

 

Kalida (53)

Sam Edwards 1-0-3, Nicole Kaufman 4-0-10, Christy Ellerbrock 0-0-0, Brandi Merschman 2-1-5, Chelsea Verhoff 2-0-6, Alexis Wurth 2-1-5, Haley McIntyre 2-0-4, Julia Vandemark 4-1-10, Amy Smith 2-1-5, Summer Holtkamp 2-0-4, Katie Schmitz 0-1-1, Kaylyn Verhoff 0-0-0, Elizabeth Turnwald 0-0-0, Kristi Honigfort 0-0-0. Totals 15-27 6-14 5-12 53. Score by Quarters:

Continental 10 9 7 8 - 34

Kalida

9

14

16

14 – 53

Three-point goals: Continental, Recker, Williamson; Kalida, Kaufman

2, Verhoff 2, Edwards, Vandemark. Rebounds: Continental 16 (6 offensive), Kalida 23 (9 offensive). Turnovers: Continental 17, Kalida

13.

JV SCORE: Kalida, 22-8.

Big second half leads Crestview over Ada

By Cort Reynolds

Times Bulletin Correspondent sports@timesbulletin.com

ADA – For almost three quarters, short-handed Ada gave visiting Crestview a surprisingly tough test in the Northwest Conference girls basketball season finale Thursday night. The Lady Knights then clamped down on the Bulldogs, holding them with- out a basket over the final

9:47 while scoring the game’s last 16 points to run away to a 44-22 victory. Senior center Madison Preston powered her way to 18 points inside and class- mate guard Jessica Burger added 10 big markers to stave off the feisty Bulldogs. Crestview improved to 12-8 overall with the win and finished second in the league behind Jefferson at 7-2. Ada, which played without two injured starters including

its top scorer, dropped to 4-16 and ended up 2-7 in NWC play (eighth place) with the loss. “We put together two good quarters in the second half,” said Crestview head coach Greg Rickard. “We are still trying to get more consis- tency.” “Our kids busted their tails, especially with us being that banged up,” said Ada coach Neal Dumbaugh. “It’s too damn bad we don’t shoot

the ball well. I thought we executed pretty well and got some shots.” The Bulldogs connected on just 6-of-28 shots from the field and were outrebounded

33-19.

Crestview pulled ahead 28-18 late in the third peri- od on a pair of MacKenzie Richard free throws but Ada rallied back into contention on a 12-footer by Kenzie Fell

See CRESTVIEW, page 7

www.delphosherald.com

 

Friday, February 18, 2011

The Herald —

7

 
 

Brunswick’s late basket sinks Jays in OT

   

By JIM METCALFE

jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

FORT RECOVERY — St.

call timeout with 2.6 ticks on

her game-high 15 in the peri-

Tribe still having a foul to give

By JIM METCALFE jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com FORT RECOVERY — St. call timeout with 2.6 ticks on her game-high

but Tribe senior Holly

Saine

at the basket in

overtime but

go

down,”

Grothouse con-

tinued. “You

plays

in

those

situations; we

done and they

did.

They are

state-ranked in

By JIM METCALFE jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com FORT RECOVERY — St. call timeout with 2.6 ticks on her game-high

Recker

neither team could get a

foothold with a real lead

in the canto.

“Not many people

thought we could come

 

Indians 32-28 (8-of-5 offensive)

The Associated Press

L

Pct

Dallas

New Orleans

GB

Memphis

Houston

40

16

.714

6

the clock. Having to go the

od, while Olivia Schwieterman

as Vorst added eight, while

EASTERN CONFERENCE

33

25

.569

14

length of the floor — with the

dropped in a pair of treys for the home team. When Saine hit

Thien had eight and Kahlig six for the hosts. The Jays were

Atlantic Division W

31

26

26

31

.544

.456

15 1/2

20 1/2

John’s went into Thursday

— they threw the ball to half-

a spinner in the lane with 2.2

3-of-6 from the stripe (50%)

 

Boston

40

14

.741

Northwest Division

 

New York

28

26

.519

12

W

L

Pct

GB

night’s girls basketball

court, where in a scramble,

ticks on the board, the score was

versus 8-of-11 for the Indians

Philadelphia

27

29

.482

14

Oklahoma City

35

19

.648

Midwest Athletic Conference

they could not get possession

tied at 26.

(72.7%) and toted up 14 fouls

New Jersey

17

40

.298

24 1/2

Portland

32

24

.571

4

showdown versus Fort

enough to throw up a prayer or

Junior Courtney Grothouse

to 10 for the hosts.

Toronto

15

41

.268

26

Denver

32

25

.561

4 1/2

Recovery with a chance at a

call another stoppage, ending

(10 markers) dropped a triple to

St. John’s visits New

 

Southeast Division

Utah

31

26

.544

5 1/2

W

L

Pct

GB

Minnesota

13

43

.232

23

tie for the league crown.

the game.

start the third period just eight

Bremen at high noon Saturday

Miami

41

15

.732

Pacific Division

 

However, they also went

“We’re offering no excus-

seconds in but Tribe senior

in a makeup game from Feb. 3.

 

Orlando

36

21

.632

5 1/2

W

L

Pct

GB

in down a pair of players —

es; we had our chances. We

Kendra Brunswick answered

Atlanta

34

21

.618

6 1/2

L.A. Lakers

38

19

.667

junior Shelby Reindel and senior Samantha Stant — for various reasons and were facing a team say- ing good-bye to five seniors playing their final home game at juiced-up FortSite Fieldhouse. The Lady Blue Jays battled through

had a couple of great looks

just 12 ticks later. Once again,

they just didn’t

have to make

just didn’t get it

— the hosts had the larg- est at 33-29 — as there were a total of two ties. When Saine got another spinner in the paint with 1:38 left, the score stood at 37-37 as both teams finished with 11 counters

Fort Recovery will play 6:15 p.m. Feb. 26 in the Division

III sectional at Van Wert.

In the junior varsity match- up, Fort Recovery took advan- tage of the absence of Bonifas to grab a 38-23 win and fin- ished 18-2 (8-1 MAC). Chelsea Pottkotter netted 14 and Melissa Lochtefeld added 10. Mallory MacLennan coun-

tered with six for the Lady

Charlotte

Washington

24

15

Central Division

Chicago

Indiana

Milwaukee

Detroit

Cleveland

W

38

24

21

21

10

32

39

.429

.278

17

25

L

16

30

34

36

46

Pct

.704

.444

.382

.368

.179

GB

14

17 1/2

18 1/2

29

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Southwest Division

San Antonio

W

46

L

10

Pct

.821

GB

Phoenix

Golden State

L.A. Clippers

Sacramento

----

27

26

21

13

27

29

35

40

.500

.473

.375

.245

Thursday’s Results

9 1/2

11

16 1/2

23

Chicago 109, San Antonio 99

Dallas 112, Phoenix 106

Today’s Games

No games scheduled

Saturday’s Games

No games scheduled

Sunday’s Game

All-Star Game from Staples Center, 7 p.m.

and forced overtime

Brunswick drove the lane for a

Division III (12th) and

in here and get a win

Jays (11-7, 4-4 MAC).

VARSITY ST. JOHN’S (44)

NHL

Courtney Grothouse 4-0-10, Becca

Edmonton

58

18

32

8

44

145

195

layup with 4.0 ticks on the clock and the Jays could not get a shot

they are a very good team. Credit them for the win.”

with our circumstances. We had a lot of girls play bigger

Saine 6-2-15, Katie Vorst 1-0-2, Jessica Recker 5-0-14, Kim Schnipke 0-0-0,

The Associated Press

Pacific Division

 

Tiffany Geise 1-1-3, Julie Bonifas 0-0-

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

GP

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

off as the Lady Indians secured

The first half was more of

minutes than usual and play

0. Totals 17-3-44.

GP

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Phoenix

59

31

19

9

71

169

165

a 46-44 victory.

a faster pace, with the Indians

very well overall,” Grothouse

FORT RECOVERY (46)

Philadelphia

57

38

14

5

81

190

144

San Jose

59

32

21

6

70

163

154

Minster ended Recovery’s

using their full-court man-to-

added. “We had a couple of

Olivia Thien 2-0-5, Olivia

2-3-7, Kelly Nietfeld 1-2-4, Chelsea

Pittsburgh

59

36

19

4

76

176

143

Anaheim

58

32

22

4

68

165

164

hopes to salvage a title tie

man pressure to try and speed

times where I thought we took

Schwieterman 2-0-6, Holly Brunswick

N.Y. Rangers 59

31

24

4

66

166

147

Los Angeles

58

32

22

4

68

163

139

3-4-10, Kylie Kahlig 2-0-4, Abby

New Jersey

57

23

30

4

50

123

160

Dallas

58

31

21

6

68

162

166

when they beat St. Henry. Sophomore Katie Vorst

the game up more to their pre- ferred hectic pace. They scored

some ill-advised shots but that will happen in the emotions

Huelskamp 0-0-0, Nicole Dilworth

Pottkotter 0-0-0, Kendra Brunswick

N.Y. Islanders 58

21

Northeast Division

GP

W

30

7

49

158

195

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for

made her first varsity start in

the first eight points, causing

of a game. I am proud of how

4-0-10. Totals 16-9-46.

overtime loss.

place of the injured Reindel

Coach Grothouse to call a tim-

we battled and fought in a

Score by Quarters:

Boston

58

32

19

7

71

181

142

Thursday’s Results

 

St. John’s

11

15

Ft. Recovery 12 14

11

11

4

4

(3) - 44

Montreal

59

31

21

7

69

154

150

N.Y. Rangers 4, Los Angeles 3, SO

 

(week-to-week status), with

eout. It worked as the Blue

tournament-type atmosphere

(5) - 46

Buffalo

Toronto

Ottawa

56

58

57

27

25

18

Southeast Division

Tampa Bay

GP

58

W

34

23

27

30

6

6

9

60

56

45

165

150

129

166

178

190

L

18

OT

6

Pts

74

GF

177

GA

182

Boston 6, N.Y. Islanders 3

 

junior Julie Bonifas getting

Jays ran off an 11-2 spurt to

on the road.”

Three-point goals: St. John’s,

-----

Detroit 6, Tampa Bay 2

more playing time in place of

take the lead at 11-10 on a

Bihn even employed a

Recker 4, Grothouse 2, Saine; Fort

Nashville 3, Vancouver 1

Recovery, O. Schwieterman 2, K.

Edmonton 4, Montreal 1

Stant. “That’s a tough situation to

transition 14-footer from senior Becca Saine at 2:54. Tribe

triangle-and-2 on Saine and Grothouse to force other Blue

Brunswick 2, Thien.

Phoenix 4, Atlanta 3

JUNIOR VARSITY

San Jose 3, Washington 2

get your first start — playing a

coach Doug Bihn called time

Jays to score, with Recker

ST. JOHN’S (23)

Washington

59

30

19

10

70

162

152

Today’s Games

 

team like Fort Recovery. She,

to halt that bleeding, which also

dropping in a pair of trios.

Madison Zuber 2-0-4, Emily

Carolina

58

27

23

8

62

170

178

N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.

 

along with Julie, did a very

worked as they held the Jays

The pace really slowed in

Fischbach 1-0-2, Brooke Zuber 1-0-

8-7/10-23.

Atlanta

Florida

59

56

25

24

24

25

10

7

60

55

170

148

192

152

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Central Division

Detroit

GP

57

W

35

L

16

OT

6

Pts

76

GF

193

GA

165

St. Louis at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.

2, Christie Carder 0-1-1, Erica Saine

Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.

good job in a tough circum-

scoreless the rest of the period

the fourth period. K. Brunswick

0-0-0, Madison Kreeger 1-2-4, Casey

Detroit at Florida, 7:30 p.m.

stance; their Senior Night,”

and took a 12-11 advantage on

broke the tie on a drive at 6:34

Schnipke 0-0-0, Mallory MacLennan

Philadelphia at Carolina, 8 p.m.

Jays coach Dan Grothouse

a baseline drive by Kahlig with

but it was five minutes before

2-2-6, Amanda Boberg 1-2-4. Totals

Anaheim at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

began.

54 ticks on the board.

Recovery scored again. The

FORT RECOVERY (38)

Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

Sierra Pugh 0-0-0, Kelsey Fiely

Nashville

58

31

19

8

70

154

136

Saturday’s Games

 

Tied at 41 entering the extra

The first period showed how close these teams were:

Jays took the lead on a Saine

2-0-4, Sam Tobe 0-0-0, Amy Link

Chicago

Columbus

St. Louis

57

57

55

29

28

25

Northwest Division

Vancouver

Calgary

Minnesota

Colorado

GP

59

60

57

58

W

37

30

30

25

22

23

21

6

6

9

64

62

59

180

155

148

159

172

164

L

13

22

22

26

OT

9

8

5

7

Pts

83

68

65

57

GF

197

181

148

173

GA

140

175

152

198

Atlanta at Edmonton, 3:30 p.m.

 
   

1-1-3, Janelle Schwieterman 2-2-7,

Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m.

four minutes, the Indians (18- 2, 8-1 MAC) drew first blood

both shot 5-of-12, with the

bomb at 5:30 but it wasn’t until 1:45 that they scored again —

Abby May 0-0-0, Breanna Jutte 0-0-

Los Angeles at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.

on a 3-ball by senior Olivia

Jays finishing 17-of-47 (7-of-

1-of-2 singles by senior Tiffany

0, Melissa Lochtefeld 5-0-10, Chelsea Pottkotter 4-6-14, Lexi Schmitz 0-0-0.

New Jersey at Carolina, 7 p.m.

Thien at 2:14, only to see the

22 downtown) for 36.2 per-

Geise (11 boards) — for a 41-39

Totals 14-9/13-38.

Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.

Jays (14-5, 7-2 MAC) coun-

cent, the Tribe 16-of-44 (5-of-

edge. H. Brunswick drove for a

Score by Quarters:

Anaheim at St. Louis, 8 p.m.

St. John’s

2

5

4

12 - 23

Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m.

ter with an NBA 3-ball from sophomore Jessica Recker (14 points, 4 treys) at 1:55 to tie

21 from 3-land) for 36.7 per- cent. As well, the Jays had 14

deuce at 1:34 to notch a 41-all tie. The Jays committed a turn- over at 1:15 and the Indians

Ft. Recovery 4 16 9 9 - 38

Three-point goals: St. John’s, none; Fort Recovery, J. Schwieterman.

Dallas at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

it at 44. Both teams had one shot to take the lead but mis- fired and the Indians took a

turnovers for the night, the Indians 13. That only set a trend for

wore down the clock, much as they did in overtime. This time, Kahlig was fouled for a

 

timeout at 1:16. They ran it

the rest of the night — neither

1-and-1 with 4.5 ticks to go but

The Associated Press Girls Basketball

New London 61, Monroeville 43

Zanesville 46, McConnelsville Morgan 38

down to the 12-second mark

team was going to have much

after Grothouse called time, she

Akr. Manchester 78, Rittman 33

New Madison Tri-Village 59, Union

Division III

to call another timeout. Their

of a lead.

missed the front end and Vorst

Akr. Firestone 64, Youngs.

City Mississinawa Val.34 Norwalk 54, Huron 39

Beverly Ft. Frye 74, Bellaire 37

Bloom-Carroll 44, W. Jefferson 35

Barnesville 43

set play was to get the ball to Brunswick (10 counters)

In the second canto, there were three ties and four lead

grabbed the rebound. However, after Recovery committed their

Boardman 41 Antwerp 46, Hicksville 16

Norwalk St. Paul 51, Ashland Crestview 36

Cadiz Harrison Cent. 48,

on the left wing; she put the ball on the deck and got to the basket for a lefty layin to take the lead, forcing the Jays to

changes, with the biggest mar- gin being three. Every time one team scored, the other had the answer. Saine scored nine of

fifth foul of the half, the Jays could not get a shot off as time ran out in regulation. The Jays outboarded the

Arcanum 41, Troy Christian 27 Attica Seneca E. 63, Fremont St. Joseph 44 Bellevue 66, Galion 36 Canal Fulton Northwest 67, Doylestown Chippewa 29

Oak Harbor 56, Tol. Whitmer 39 Ottoville 66, McComb 47 Smithville 52, Massillon Tus. 45 Spencerville 52, Paulding 50 Stryker 45, Pettisville 40 Tiffin Columbian 47, Shelby 43

Cin. Deer Park 43, St. Bernard Roger Bacon 40 Cols. Ready 55, Centerburg 49 Cols. School for Girls 41, Amanda- Clearcreek 29

Van Wert

 

Casstown Miami E. 58, W.

Cle. VASJ 50, Garfield Hts. Trinity

 

Alexandria Twin Valley S. 39

Tol. Ottawa Hills 65, Lakeside

New Paris National Trail 59, Day.

(Continued from Page 6)

er. Taylor Doidge followed that

basket for the Cougars that

defense we played all season,”

25-21.

Van Wert 13 15-22 42: K. Hall 0-0-

0; B. Keber 0-5-5; L. Butler 0-0-0; Doidge

Ottawa-Glandorf 11 3-7

29: S.

Basinger 1-0-2; H. Warnecke 0-0-0; K.

 

Chagrin Falls Kens. 46, Bedford 21 Cle. Hts. Beaumont 63, Rocky

Danbury 24 Van Wert 42, Ottawa-Glandorf 29 Van Wert Lincolnview 57, Lafayette

Christian 52 Newark Cath. 40, Gahanna Cols. Academy 39

with a basket cutting the O-G

was answered by Schroeder for O-G. The Titans then went into

Long said. “I couldn’t be more proud than what we are right

River Lutheran W. 32

Allen E. 50 Vanlue 50, Lima Perry 38

Sugarcreek Garaway 49, Gnadenhutten Indian Valley 22

lead to three at 21-18 with 2:36

another dry spell as Van Wert

now. We talk free throws win-

Division IV

 

left in the quarter. Both teams struggled to score the rest of the quarter as O-G pushed the lead back to six on a Pothast 3-point- er before Van Wert’s Molly Gamble closed the quarter with

ran off 10 straight points, eight of them at the line. Gamble opened the run with two free throws followed by one from Mohr and 3-of-4 from Brooke Keber. A putback by Mohr

ning games and either when we don’t get to shoot them or shoot and miss, we got to the line and we put them in. That was the difference in the game for us. “Three of our last four

  • 42 W. Unity Hilltop 44, Gorham Fayette 24 Warren Harding 54, Jefferson Area 30 Warrensville Hts. 56, Berea 36 Waynesfield-Goshen 78, Cory- Rawson 37 Willard 69, Fostoria 60

Collins Western Reserve 44, Plymouth 43 Convoy Crestview 44, Ada 22 Cortland Maplewood 36, Warren Lordstown 30 Day. Northridge 56, Milton-Un. 32 Defiance Tinora 35, Holgate 34

Wooster 51, Bell. Clear Fork 37

Bainbridge Paint Valley 59, New

Boston Glenwood 48 Beaver East. 54, S. Webster 38 Belpre 51, Crown CityS. Gallia 45 Berlin Hiland 76, Toronto 7 Bowerston Conotton Valley 47, Steubenville Cath. Cent. 27

a basket trimming the Titan lead

and two more free throws from

games have been this way.

Delphos Jefferson 69, Columbus Grove 48

Division I

Cin. McAuley 59, Cin. Wal. Hills 36

Cin. Win. Woods 45, Hamilton 27

Caldwell 58, New Matamoras Frontier 37

Boys Basketball

Caledonia River Valley 60, Marion

Division II

Bethel-Tate 60, Ham. Ross 26

back to four.

Keber had the Cougars in con-

We’ve been down and just

Edgerton 56, Defiance Ayers. 51

Canal Winchester Harvest Prep

Just as Schroeder had ignit- ed an O-G rally to start the third quarter, Gamble did the same for Van Wert to start the fourth quarter. Gamble scored the Cougars first six points, two baskets and two free throws, of the final quarter that gave them

trol at 40-27. “I give them all the credit in the world. They outplayed us the entire game,” a dejected O-G coach Lori Smith said. “We weren’t here from the begin- ning. I don’t know where our heads were at. I don’t know if all

when you start to think make that turn the girls wake up and give it their all. It like some- thing clicks with them and they get that sense of urgency and it’s starting to show through right now. We are playing very well to end the season.”

Edon 49, Pioneer N. Central 33 Elida 50, Defiance 40 Findlay 58, Marion Harding 41 Franklin 42, Brookville 37 Ft. Recovery 46, Delphos St. John’s 44, OT Greenwich S. Cent. 42, Ashland Mapleton 34 Haviland Wayne Trace 76, Sherwood Fairview 39

Cols. Upper Arlington 67, Grove City 37 Dublin Scioto 57, Dresden Tri- Valley 45 Fairborn 66, Springfield 23 Grove City Cent. Crossing 60, Cols. Independence 35 Kettering Fairmont 67, W. Carrollton 15

86, Millersport 15 Delaware Christian 54, Groveport Madison Christian 27 Gahanna Christian 43, Powell Village Academy 31 Lancaster Fisher Cath. 39, Fairfield Christian 29 Zanesville Rosecrans 85, Beallsville 40

a 26-24 lead with 6:00 left to play. It was the Cougars first lead since midway through the first quarter. “That’s what we have been asking from her (Molly) all season,” Van Wert coach Destri Bockey said. “If you look at our better games its been when we’ve had more than just Alex scoring. We’ve had contributors across the

the senior stuff beforehand took us out of what we were doing. This was not the Titan team I have seen play for 19 games. I’m searching for answers, this was not the team I’ve coached. We had a good run to start the third quarter, then we stopped attacking. Kari Schroeder had three quick baskets and we were attacking, setting screens, then everyone just kind of went into

Morrow led the Cougars with 15 points and Gamble finished with 12. Schroeder led the Titans with eight points and Verhoff added seven points. O-G Ottawa-Glandorf won a low scoring junior varsity game

1-0-2; A. Morrow 6-2-15; Mohr 1-4-6; Aquaviva 1-0-2; M. Gamble 4-4-12.

Kalida 53, Continental 34 Kenton 52, Wapakoneta 46 Kidron Cent. Christian 58, Mansfield Temple Christian 54 Kingsway Christian 37, Mansfield Christian 33 Leavittsburg LaBrae 76, Youngs. Liberty 58 Lexington 46, Mans. St. Peter’s 42 Lima Bath 48, Celina 35 Lima Shawnee 58, St. Marys Memorial 45 Lima Sr. 59, Sandusky 53 Loudonville 58, Apple Creek

Lewis Center Olentangy Orange 75, Galloway Westland 16 New Carlisle Tecumseh 44, Miamisburg 39 Pickerington N. 82, Cols. Franklin Hts. 17 Powell Olentangy Liberty 39, Worthington Kilbourne 26 Troy 48, Trotwood-Madison 45 Ursuline Academy 68, W. Chester Lakota W. 45

Byesville Meadowbrook 52,

Pleasant 57 Cle. MLK 81, Grafton North Eaton Christian Community School 46 Delaware Buckeye Valley 74, Morral Ridgedale 18 Delaware Christian 72, Northside Christian 49 Hudson WRA 55, Cle. John Adams 46 Ironton 59, Raceland, Ky. 43 Lima Cent. Cath. 63, Bluffton 46 Maple Hts. 71, Medina Buck.50

board where we’ve had a big

their little lull again We need

Waynedale 57

Carrollton 40

Marion Elgin 46, Cardington-

night from Molly as well, a big night from Ashley Mohr.

to have other people pick up the slack when someone is not

Ruhe 0-0-0; K. Miller 1-0-3; C. Maag 1-0-3; L. Recker 0-0-0; K. Pothast 2-0-6; M. Closson 0-0-0; M. Verhoff 2-3-7; A. Ebbeskotte 0-0-0; K. Schroeder 4-0-8.

Mansfield Sr. 37, Mansfield Madison 29 Maria Stein Marion Local 63, Coldwater 45

Chillicothe Un. 79, Circleville 42 Greenville 59, Spring. NW 49 Jackson 48, Washington C.H. 28 Thornville Sher. 53, Athens 43

Lincoln 43 N. Royalton 77, Parma Hts. Valley Forge 36 Richwood N. Union 70, Galion

It just depends on whose shots

scoring and everyone was look-

Score by Quarters:

 

McGuffey Upper Scioto Valley 60,

Vincent Warren 46, Lancaster

Northmor 48

are falling. They just put it

ing for someone to do it and no

Van Wert

5

6

9

22 - 42

 

Ridgeway Ridgemont 21

Fairfield Union 39

RidgewayRidg. 76, Gilead Chris. 54

together tonight.” Morrow followed Gamble’s

one did it.” In the final quarter the

Ottawa-Glan. 8 5 11 5 - 29

Three-point goals: Van Wert 1 (A.

Minster 51, St. Henry 37

streak with a basket before

Cougars were 12-of-16 at the

Morrow 1); Ottawa-Glandorf 4 (Miller 1, Maag 1, Pothast 2).

Montpelier 57, Monclova Chris. 25 N. Baltimore 42, Old Fort 28 Napoleon 46, Fremont Ross 13

   

Verhoff ended the run for

line as they were 15-of-22 at

Turnovers:

Ottawa-Glandorf

18,

O-G with a free throw. Toni Acquaviva came back with a

the stripe for the game. “This was probably the best

Van Wert 16. JV: Ottawa-Glandorf 25-21.

New Bremen 51, Rockford Parkway 42

Crestview

 
 

(Continued from Page 6)

and two foul shots by Taylor

“Preston is a pretty good

overs in half and tripled them in

 

four assists, while Simmons

Crestview 44 (12-8, 7-2 NWC)

Willeke in the final 30 sec- onds. Preston then came up with a big offensive rebound basket just three seconds before the buzzer to give the Knights a

rebounder,” said Rickard. “Ada did a good job doubling her but she got some big offensive rebound baskets.” Early on the teams battled to a 9-9 tie before Crestview scored six unanswered points,

rebounds. They kept the ball in front of them better and did not let Ada get to the rim.” In the third quarter, Ada did not make a field goal until the 1:47 mark as Crestview put on a 10-2 run to take control.

added seven markers. Crestview also won the reserve contest 35-25. Mekale Clifton led all scorers with 19 points. Sam Wildman topped Ada with nine.

Burger 4 0-0 10, Gamble 0,

little breathing room up 30-22

the last four on two short

Burger hit some big shots in

Preston 9 0-1 18, Etzler 0 1-2 1, Hicks

heading into the final stanza.

Preston bank shots. Ada guard

the game, including a triple to

  • 2 1-2 5, Richard 2 2-2 6, Hicks 2 0-0 4. Totals 19-4/7-44.

Danica Hicks began the fourth period with a stickback, followed by a Preston banker in

Lindsay Simmons hit two free throws and then made a break- away layup off a nice steal to

open each half. “She has been shooting the ball much better lately,” added

Ada 22 (4-16, 2-7 NWC) Fell 2 0-0 4, Willeke 1 6-6 8, Mh. Rouch 0, Mg. Rouch 0 0-1 0, Simmons

the lane at the 6:30 mark.

get the scrappy hosts within

Rickard. “Jessica has been

  • 2 2-2 7, Vermillion 0 1-2 1, Long 1 0-0 2. Totals 6-9/11-22.

Burger then canned a foul

16-13 with 2:13 left before

playing a nice point guard for

Score by Quarters:

line jumper and added a tough

intermission.

us and we need her to score

C’view

Ada

13

9

5

7

12

6

14 - 44

0 - 22

pull-up shot for a 38-22 bulge with 4:40 to go. Preston’s third

Hicks splashed an 18-footer but the Bulldogs nailed three of

those points.” Sophomore Taylor Willeke led Ada with eight points and

Three-pointers: Crestview, Burger 2; Ada, Simmons. JV score: Crestview 35, Ada 25.

putback bucket of the half built the margin to 18. Less than a minute later, she muscled inside for a post-up layin and a 42-22 cushion at the 3:06 juncture. At the other end, the Knights played tough defense to keep cold-shooting Ada off the scoreboard for the entire period. Preston fittingly finished the scoring on her fourth offen- sive rebound goal with 30 ticks remaining as Crestview out- scored the weary hosts 14-0 in the final quarter.

four free tosses in the final 16 seconds to slice the deficit to just 18-16 at halftime. “I was very pleased with our first half,” said Dumbaugh. The Lady Knights buckled down and limited Ada to just six second half points while tallying 26 themselves. “We kind of challenged the girls at the half,” Rickard admit- ted. “Our effort wasn’t quite there the first half; they wanted the ball more than we did. “We made some second half adjustments, cut our turn-

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8 – The Herald

Friday, February 18, 2011

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source and Referral at:
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check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Statewide
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IS IT A SCAM? The
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urges
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FULL REMODEL
(41