‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

International Think Tanks Resources  Issue 26 
Table of Content 
  Bahrain: 
• • Saudi Arabia's Fears for Bahrain……………………………………………………..…………….……….3 Crackdown in Bahrain..............................................................................................5

  Libya: 
• What If Libya Staged a Revolution and Nobody Came?.............................................7

  Egypt: 
• • • • • • • Think Again: Egypt.................................................................................................10 In post‐Mubarak Egypt, the rebirth of the Arab world............................................13 What's Next For Egypt?..........................................................................................15 Egypt's Transition…………………………………………………………………………………………………19 Can Egypt Become a True Democracy?...................................................................20 Egypt Should Take Its Time Building a Democracy…………………..………………….………..22 Winners and Losers of the Revolution....................................................................24

  Iran: 
• • • Iran hopes for Egypt in new orbit………………………………………………………………….……..27 Refocus on Iran: More Sanctions Needed……………………………………………..………………29 Politics Threaten Iran's Mediterranean Naval Ambitions……….………………..……………32

1   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Turkey: 
• Arab Revolt Makes Turkey a Regional Power……………………………………….……………….33

  Pakistan: 
• Pakistan’s Mubarak Moment.................................................................................35

  China: 
• • The Message for China from Tahrir Square……………………………………………………………37 How Russia and China See the Egyptian Revolution................................................38

  Revolution across the Midlle East: 
• The Ripple Effect....................................................................................................42

  Lebanon: 
• • Hizballah: Governing Faction in Lebanon, Criminal Group Abroad……..……….………..51 The Druze Factor………………………………………………………………….…………………………..……53

 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
2   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Saudi Arabia's Fears for Bahrain 
By: Simon Henderson.  Source: The Washington Institute.  Date: Feb 17, 2011   
Simon Henderson is the Baker fellow and director of the Gulf and Energy Policy Program at The Washington Institute. 

  On February 16, Bahraini security forces used brute force to clear democracy protestors from Manama's  Pearl Square, on orders from a regime seemingly undaunted by international media coverage and the  near‐instantaneous self‐reporting of Twitter‐generation demonstrators. Although the relatively small size  of the crowds (compared to recent protests in Egypt and Tunisia) facilitated the crackdown, the action is  best explained by the regime's long‐held mindset regarding dissent. Specifically, the Bahraini ruling elite  believe that any political challenge by the island's Shiite majority must be quickly suppressed ‐‐ a view  backed by the royal family in neighboring Saudi Arabia and violently enforced in Bahrain despite significant  Sunni participation in the protests. This Saudi factor, and the looming presence of Iran across the Persian  Gulf, elevates the Bahrain crisis to a U.S. policy challenge on par with events in Egypt.   Linked by History and a Causeway   Bahraini Arab Shiites consider themselves the true original inhabitants of Bahrain and surrounding smaller  islands. They have close ties to Shiites in Saudi Arabia, who form a local majority in that kingdom's  neighboring Eastern Province. Both groups face religious prejudice from their ruling elites, political  marginalization, and socioeconomic disadvantage, in part because the Saudi and Bahraini governments  have suspected their loyalty since the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. Yet despite the occasional discovery  of domestic plots with confirmed or suspected links to Tehran, Arabic‐speaking Saudi and Bahraini Shiites  have generally expressed cautious, even wary, attitudes toward their Persian‐speaking Iranian  coreligionists across the Gulf.   Saudi Arabia tends to adopt a benevolent, big‐brother approach to its much smaller neighbor. Although oil  was discovered in Bahrain even before Saudi Arabia, the island's reserves are now almost depleted. Today,  government revenue is mainly based on proceeds from an offshore Saudi oil field sold on Bahrain's behalf.  Culturally speaking, Riyadh tolerates the more liberal social mores permitted in Bahrain, which was joined  to the kingdom by a sixteen‐mile causeway in 1986. On weekends in particular, Saudi visitors (mostly men)  patronize the island's clubs and bars in large numbers.   In terms of political development, Riyadh seems to view Bahrain with near disdain. For example, when  current head of state Sheikh Hamad bin Isa al‐Khalifa announced a package of constitutional reforms in  2001 as a way of countering several years of simmering Shiite unrest, the Saudis were bemused that he  converted himself from ruler to king. Although the reforms reactivated the Bahraini parliament, they  essentially perpetuated the sense of Shiite exclusion by gerrymandering electoral districts to ensure that  Shiites could never establish a political majority.   So far, Riyadh does not appear to have intervened on the ground during Bahrain's current crisis.  Nevertheless, the main strategic purpose of the causeway linking the two countries has never been  commercial or diplomatic, but rather strategic: it was built so that the Saudi military could quickly  reinforce the Bahraini regime when necessary. Although plans to build the road were originally mooted in  the 1960s, when the shah of Iran had yet to give up the longstanding Persian claim to the island, 
3   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

construction did not actually begin until 1981, as Arab states became increasingly concerned that the  Khomeini regime sought to spread its revolution to other Shiite communities in the region. According to  anecdotes from Bahraini expatriates, prior to the causeway's completion the skies were seemingly full of  Saudi helicopters during Shiite religious processions on the island. In the mid‐1990s, however, Riyadh was  able to deploy national guard troop carriers to the island when bombs were planted in Manama's business  quarter.   Going forward, Riyadh's stance on Bahraini dissent can likely be inferred from its reported disappointment  with Washington for allowing Hosni Mubarak to be toppled in Egypt. Saudi support for the Mubarak  regime reportedly included promises to make up for any withholding of U.S. military and economic aid to  Cairo. Other Gulf Cooperation Council member states probably hold similar views (apart from Qatar, the  group's traditional maverick and headquarters of the Al‐Jazeera television network, which was perceived  as encouraging the Egyptian demonstrators).   But Saudi policy could be upset by the geriatric paralysis of top princes. King Abdullah is currently  convalescing in Morocco and has not been seen in public since January 22, raising more question marks  about his health. Prince Miteb ‐‐ one of Abdullah's sons and commander of the Saudi Arabian National  Guard, whose forces train for intervention in Bahrain ‐‐ is almost certainly with him in Morocco. In Riyadh,  then, decisions are nominally in the hands of Crown Prince Sultan, the defense minister, who reportedly  has dementia. The most crucial arbiter of policy is therefore Interior Minister Prince Nayef, who has a  reputation for toughness and controls strong paramilitary forces.   U.S. Policy Concerns   Washington currently faces a number of potential Bahraini‐Saudi policy challenges. First, the Eastern  Province is the center of Saudi Arabia's oil fields, from which 10 percent of the world's oil is produced  daily. Although security has improved, oil installations there have previously been targeted by Iranian and  al‐Qaeda sabotage. If the troubles in Bahrain have a contagion effect in the kingdom, the crisis would  quickly escalate from a regional to an international issue.   Second, Bahrain hosts the headquarters of the U.S. Fifth Fleet and the naval elements of Central  Command. Currently, American vessels visiting Bahrain are unobtrusively anchored out to sea, but the  regime is building jetties that would allow the ships to moor further inshore. More important, the  headquarters complex ‐‐ which directs operations in support of U.S. forces in the Gulf, Iraq, and  Afghanistan, as well as antipiracy efforts off Somalia ‐‐ is located next to a Shiite suburb on the island itself,  just a few minute's drive from Pearl Square. The Bahraini government has been anxious to maintain this  presence, and so far, U.S. withdrawal has not become part of the litany of demands from protestors.   More broadly, U.S. diplomacy has struggled to balance support for allied Arab rulers with popular  aspirations for democratic rights. Last year, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made comments in Bahrain  supportive of the regime, which has now bloodily suppressed unarmed demonstrators, including women  and children. Bahrain's Shiite majority and historical Iranian links make it a special case, but other  countries that host crucial low‐profile U.S. military facilities (e.g., Kuwait, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates,  and Oman) could also decide to reduce these connections under certain circumstance. For example, after  the September 11 attacks exposed the involvement of numerous Saudis, Riyadh forced the transfer of U.S.  military forces in an attempt to outflank growing domestic opposition.  
4   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Policy Recommendations   Bahraini activists have called for more large‐scale protests, while the regime has banned all such  demonstrations and deployed (U.S.‐made) tanks and armored vehicles to crucial intersections and  government buildings. Accordingly, Washington should press King Hamad to ensure that there is no  draconian use of force similar to yesterday's actions in Pearl Square.   In addition, Washington should encourage reform measures, which could offer hope to Bahrainis tired of  the paternalistic government that is so at odds with the open and progressive image Manama projects  internationally. This includes taking action against corruption, which has become rampant. At least one  departing U.S. ambassador told the late Sheikh Isa, King Hamad's father, that he should dismiss the  country's prime minister, Sheikh Khalifa (Hamad's uncle). Khalifa's name is synonymous with corruption,  and he has held the same title for forty years, making him the world's longest‐serving prime minister.   Progress or lack thereof in Bahrain could set the trend for the entire Gulf region. And in neighboring Saudi  Arabia, the consequences of political instability would be even greater because of the kingdom's growing  leadership vacuum. Washington should therefore press Riyadh to help de‐escalate the tension in Manama.  This is likely to run counter to the instinctive Saudi view on dealing with instability in Bahrain. In the end,  the most serious confrontation Washington faces in seeking a peaceful outcome to the Bahraini domestic  showdown may not be with its friends in Manama, but with its friends in Riyadh.   ******************** 

  Crackdown in Bahrain 
By: Jean‐François Seznec .  Source: Foreign Policy  Date: FEB 17, 2011   
Jean‐François Seznec is a visiting associate professor at Georgetown University's Center for Contemporary Arab Studies.  

  At 3 a.m. on Feb. 17, hundreds of Bahraini riot police surrounded the protesters sleeping in a makeshift  tent camp in Manama's Pearl Square. The security forces then stormed the camp, launching an attack that  killed at least five protesters, some of whom were reportedly shot in their sleep with shotgun rounds.  Thousands of Bahraini citizens gathered in the square on Feb. 15, in conscious emulation of the protesters  in Cairo's Tahrir Square, to push their demands for a more representative political system and an end to  official corruption.   The tanks and armored personnel carriers of Bahrain's military subsequently rolled into the square, and a  military spokesman announced that the army had taken important areas of the Bahraini capital "under  control."    Perhaps alarmed at the recent revolutions that toppled the regimes of Egypt and Tunisia, the Sunni ruling  family in Bahrain has been taking no chances against its young and mostly Shiite protest movement.  Bahrain's King Hamad bin Isa al‐Khalifa has been able to overcome past troubles by posing as an  enlightened autocrat, willing to show leniency. But divisions within the monarch's family, which he relies  on to maintain his authority, may be forcing the king into a harsher position. And that spells trouble for  Bahrain's stability, as well as the country's halting reform efforts.  
5   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

The United States has a considerable national security stake in what goes on in this tiny island kingdom.  Bahrain is home of the U.S. Navy's Fifth Fleet, which protects the vital oil supply lines that pass through the  Persian Gulf and the Strait of Hormuz ‐‐ an important asset for the United States in the event of a conflict  with Iran. Bahrain is also a key logistical hub and command center for U.S naval operations in Iraq,  Afghanistan, and the Indian Ocean.   For the past few years, quasi‐Salafist and arch‐conservative elements of the Khalifa family have been  gaining power over more liberal members of the family, who advocate widening the economic and  political involvement to all spheres of Bahraini society.   Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman al‐Khalifa, the oldest and richest member of main ruling clan, has  emerged as the leader of these conservatives, who seek to ensure the Khalifa family's continued  stranglehold over the politics and economy of the country. His resignation has become one of the  protesters' primary demands.   While the successful mass protests in Egypt and Tunisia clearly inspired the protesters in Manama, trouble  has been brewing in Bahrain ‐‐ which is divided between a Sunni ruling family and a majority Shia  population ‐‐ for years. Skirmishes broke out between young Shia Bahrainis and police forces last March,  and political dissidents were arrested in the run‐up to the Oct. 30 parliamentary elections.   The growing influence of the more extreme Khalifas was on full display during the Feb. 17 police  crackdown. The police force that raided the camp is legally under the control of the prime minister. The  brutality with which the raid was conducted may have been a bid to create a state of emergency on the  island, forcing the more liberal members of the family to side with them against the protesters.   It is not only the Sunni ruling family that is divided ‐‐ the Shia opposition parties are also split. The al‐ Wefaq party is the largest opposition party in Parliament, but its support among Shia has declined due to  its failure to win any concessions from the leadership on the issues of increased political power and  representation or economic opportunities. As a result, the more confrontational al‐Haq movement has  been taking to the streets to wrest leadership away from al‐Wefaq.    In the past year, reports that al‐Haq members were arrested and tortured by the security forces only  bolstered its popularity among the Shia youth and unemployed. According to some Shia leaders, al‐Haq  now is seen by a majority of Shia as the leading group of the community. The efforts of the demonstrators  to reject violence ‐‐ noble aspirations supported by the majority of Bahrainis ‐‐ may represent an attempt  by al‐Wefaq to take back leadership of the opposition from the more confrontational al‐Haq.   The October 2010 elections to the Majlis al‐Nawaf ‐‐ the lower house of Parliament ‐‐ were expected to  bring some stability to the country. Al‐Wefaq won 18 out of 40 total seats, and the election was relatively  free and fair (though some constituencies were gerrymandered to ensure that al‐Wefaq did not gain a  majority). What's more, the influence of some of the more extremist Sunni groups was undermined by  centrist Sunni‐Shia alliances.   However, these hopes were dashed by Parliament's inability to affect real change in the country. All its  decisions can be negated by the Majlis as‐Shura, whose members are nominated by King Hamad. And the  king can also veto any parliamentary decision. The sectarian divide that has emerged in parliament over  the past three elections has also meant that most issues, such as the public availability of alcohol, the 
6   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

segregation of sexes in schools, are framed in purely religious terms. This has led the public to see  parliamentary action as mostly irrelevant to their lives, increasing the pressure for citizens to take to the  streets.   These particularities of Bahraini politics aside, it is clear that the present mass demonstrations are trying to  follow the nonviolent example set by their counterparts in Egypt. The current wave of protests originated  from 14,000 young people on Facebook. They represent a new generation,  fed up with the impasse  between the al‐Khalifa clan and the older Shia leadership. The chant today on the street is: "No Sunni, No  Shia, just Bahraini!"   This is a message that the Khalifa family, and the U.S. government, would do well to take to heart. Anyone  who has traveled to or lived in Bahrain knows that Bahrainis ‐‐ both Sunnis and Shia ‐‐ see themselves as  Bahraini first, not stooges of Iran or Saudi Arabia. Some, of course, are influenced by Tehran or Riyadh ‐‐  but by and large citizens are influenced by what happens in Manama.   The Khalifa family has skillfully drawn on Western fears of the Shia as tools of Iran, which has so far  obtained unquestioned U.S. support for their continued rule. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's mealy‐ mouthed statement today, in which she called for the government to show "restraint," is further evidence  of this fact. Her remarks will not sway the prime minister and his cohorts, nor will they convince the  demonstrators that the United States is a defender of their rights.   In the absence of real reform, the Iran threat could become a self‐fulfilling prophecy. If the Khalifas are not  able to open up the state to their own citizens, the more extreme Shiite leaders could start to see Iran as a  protector, and a curb to U.S. and Saudi influence. And a turn towards Iran would likely bring Saudi  intervention in support of the monarchy. The Khalifa leadership is faced with the choice of truly liberalizing  or risking outside intervention ‐‐ which would mean a grave loss of their position, and a potential  catastrophe for the United States as well.   ********************   

What If Libya Staged a Revolution and Nobody Came? 
By: Najla Abdurrahman .  Source: Foreign Policy  Date: Feb 17, 2011 
  Najla Abdurrahman is a Libyan‐American dissident and doctoral student in the department of Middle Eastern, South Asian  and African Studies at Columbia University. 

  Protests erupted in Libya Tuesday evening in the eastern center of Benghazi, prompted by the arrest of  Libyan attorney and human rights activist Fathi Terbil early Tuesday morning ‐‐ two days ahead of  Thursday's highly anticipated Feb. 17 "Day of Rage" planned in cities across the country. Terbil represents  a group of families whose sons were massacred by Libyan authorities in 1996 in Tripoli's infamous Abu  Salim prison, where an estimated 1,200 prisoners, mostly opponents of the regime, were rounded up and  gunned down in the span of a few hours. The victims' bodies were reportedly removed from the prison  (eyewitness accounts cite the use of wheel barrows and refrigerated trucks) and buried in mass graves, the  whereabouts of which remain undisclosed by Libyan authorities to this day. Several years would pass  before the regime finally began to notify some of the victims' families of the deaths, and it wasn't until  2004 that Libyan leader Muammar al‐Qaddafi publicly admitted to the massacre at Abu Salim.  

7   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Terbil had been working closely with the victims' families, who in recent years have asked that authorities  make public the circumstances surrounding the killings, as well as the location of the victims' graves. After  Terbil's arrest Tuesday morning, several of the families gathered in front of police headquarters in the city  of Benghazi to demand his release. According to sources inside the country, other Benghazi residents  gradually began to join them, and by evening the crowd had swelled, with unconfirmed estimates ranging  from several hundred to 2,000 protesters.   Although Terbil was eventually released, the crowd refused to disperse, and the protest soon transformed  into an anti‐government demonstration; video showing protesters calling for Benghazi residents to rise up  began to circulate on the Internet. Among the chants heard were "Rise up oh Benghazi, the day you have  been waiting for has come," "There is no god but God, and Muammar [al‐Qaddafi] is the enemy of God,"  and "The people want the regime to fall." At one point in the evening, Al Jazeera Arabic managed to get  Libyan writer and novelist Idris al‐Mesmari on the phone during the protests in Benghazi; a breathless and  agitated Mesmari confirmed that police were attacking the protesters before the connection was lost.  Shortly thereafter, news surfaced of Mesmari's arrest by Libyan authorities, no doubt an unequivocal  warning from the regime to those who dared communicate with the outside world.   In the meantime, Libyans residing abroad were receiving constant unconfirmed reports throughout the  evening and into the early hours of the morning from contacts in Libya, which they circulated on Facebook  and Twitter and tweeted to various news outlets, including BBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, and the Associated Press.  Ironically, as hundreds of Libyans inside the country protested against the Qaddafi regime, Libyans outside  the country were protesting the media's coverage of events. A group of Libyan activists and observers  bombarded various news outlets with frustrated emails and tweets about both the lack of coverage and  the inaccuracy of the little coverage that was given. Although multiple videos of the protests in Benghazi  were circulated, Al Jazeera English posted a video that included footage of protests that were more than a  year old, in addition to the more recent footage. It also initially cited the number of people killed in the  Abu Salim prison massacre as 14 ‐‐ as opposed to 1,200 ‐‐ prompting exasperated tweets demanding that  the news outlet check its facts and directing it to the Human Rights Watch report on the Abu Salim prison  massacre.   For its part, the Associated Press initially circulated a report that induced a collective groan among Libyan  observers; the report claimed that the protests had been directed not against Qaddafi, but against the  current Libyan prime minister, Baghdadi al‐Mahmoudi. Again, Libyan activists immediately blasted the AP  on Facebook and Twitter for its irresponsible reporting, which contradicted video and eyewitness accounts  coming from the country. Rather than actually listening to what protesters were chanting in the videos, it  seems that the AP had drawn its information directly from Libyan state sources, albeit channeled through  Quryna, a "private" newspaper effectively controlled by Saif al‐Islam Qaddafi, the leader's son.   Although both Al Jazeera English and the Associated Press amended their reports after pressure from  Libyan activists, the reporting on Tuesday's impromptu protests in Benghazi and the lack of information  available to international media outlets are indicative of a much larger problem that Libyans have  struggled with for decades: the creation of a virtual vacuum of information by the Qaddafi regime's strict  censorship policies, highly restrictive press laws, and uncompromising repression of even the slightest  expression of dissent. This has created considerable obstacles for Libyans both inside and outside the  country attempting to communicate their struggles to the world.   Libyans are painfully aware of the fact that their country does not attract nearly the same level of interest  as Egypt or Iran, except perhaps when it comes to the eccentricities of their notoriously flamboyant  dictator. This, despite the fact that the Qaddafi regime has been in power significantly longer than nearly  any other autocratic system, during which time it has proved itself among the world's most brutal and 
8   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

incompetent. Thus, from the moment a group of Libyans inside Libya ‐‐ taking a cue from their Tunisian  and Egyptian neighbors ‐‐ announced plans for their own day of protest on Feb. 17, Libyan activists outside  the country have been working tirelessly to get the word out, circulate audio and video, and pressure  media outlets to report on Libya. If the Libyan protesters are ignored, the fear is that Qaddafi ‐‐ a man who  appears to care little what the rest of the world thinks of him ‐‐ will be able to seal the country off from  foreign observers, and ruthlessly crush any uprising before it even has a chance to begin. Eyewitness  reports to this effect are already trickling in from Libya, and the death toll appears to be slowly mounting.  Regrettably, international attention has thus far been minimal.   Another problem Libyans face is a lack of organization among potential demonstrators. Even for those who  have followed events in Libya closely and are in contact with people inside the country it's difficult to  gauge from the outside how organized the protesters are or how many people actually came out  Thursday. For many, the outlook is a pessimistic one. Libya is a very large country with a relatively tiny  population of 6.4 million scattered throughout its vast expanse, and the distance between its two most  populous cities, Tripoli and Benghazi, is roughly 1,000 miles. In addition, unlike in Tunisia and Egypt, there  exists not a single organized opposition group or political party in Libya capable of mobilizing people to  come out and protest.   Furthermore, frustration with the regime is by many accounts much higher in the long neglected eastern  regions of the country, leading to fears that protests will not extend to the west, and particularly to the  country's major center, Tripoli (although discontent is high there as well).   A handful of Libyans residing inside the country have released video and audio calling on people to get out  and protest, including a Tripolitanian woman who made an emotionally charged appeal to other Libyan  women, "Rise up Libyan women! You are half of the society. Bring your husbands and your sons out!" Only  a small percentage of Libyans have Internet access, but sources inside the country tell me that while most  people were aware of Feb. 17, the atmosphere in Libya has grown increasingly tense over the past days  and weeks, with very few people willing to discuss the event openly.   In the coming days, the Qaddafi regime will no doubt continue to employ tactics meant to control the  production of information coming into or out of Libya and to obscure as much as possible the realities on  the ground ‐‐ this has long been the regime's modus operandi. As news of the Libyan regime's violent  attempts to suppress peaceful protests continues to leak out of the country, it is the responsibility of the  international media to be vigilant in reporting the story, and to report it accurately. Above all, they must  not rely on Libyan state media for information and must make every effort to reach out to Libyan netizens,  activists, and opposition groups, as well as to protesters inside the country, who are working tirelessly to  communicate the details as they unfold. Moreover, it is the responsibility of the international community,  including the United States government, to forcefully and unequivocally condemn the Libyan regime's  attacks on peaceful protesters and to affirm their right to organize and express their grievances just as it  has affirmed the rights of Egyptians and Iranians to do so. In the coming days, Qaddafi will likely try to take  advantage of Libya's information vacuum to put down any uprising. If the international media and the  world don't pay more attention, he will almost certainly succeed.   ********************   

         
9   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Think Again: Egypt 
By: Blake Hounshell.   Source: Foreign Policy.                                                                                                                                                      Date: Feb 14, 2011  
  Blake Hounshell is managing editor of Foreign Policy. 

  "Facebook Defeated Mubarak."  No. There's a joke that has been making the rounds in Egypt in recent weeks, and it goes something like  this: Hosni Mubarak meets Anwar Sadat and Gamal Abdel Nasser, two fellow Egyptian presidents, in the  afterlife. Mubarak asks Nasser how he ended up there. "Poison," Nasser says. Mubarak then turns to  Sadat. "How did you end up here?" he asks. "An assassin's bullet," Sadat says. "What about you?" To which  Mubarak replies: "Facebook."   There's no question that social networking was a critical factor in Mubarak's overthrow. Groups like the  April 6 Youth Movement and the We Are All Khaled Said Facebook page, which first called for the Jan. 25  protests that sparked the uprising, played a daring, important role in breaking the barrier of fear that had  kept Egyptians in their homes.   But the popular explosion that led to Mubarak's overthrow was not simply a matter of calling for protests  on Facebook; it was the product of years of pent‐up rage and frustration at the corruption and abuse of  power that had become the hallmarks of the Egyptian regime. The organizers carefully calibrated their  messaging for mass appeal and chose a date ‐‐ a state holiday meant to celebrate the widely hated police ‐ ‐ that would resonate widely. Offline, they tapped into existing grassroots networks and built their own,  such as the million strong who signed a petition calling for fundamental political change. Once the police  fled the scene, the protesters were careful to show their respect for the military, forming human chains  around Army vehicles to prevent any incident from undermining their refrain that "the Army and the  people are one hand." And, as one key protest leader, Wael Ghonim, told 60 Minutes on Sunday, Feb. 13,  they benefited greatly from the regime's own "stupid[ity]" ‐‐ its panic‐driven shut‐off of the Internet, its  resort to tried‐and‐true tactics like hiring thugs to do its dirty work, and its failure to offer any meaningful  alternative path to change.  "Obama Deserves Credit for the Revolution."   Yes, but only a little bit.   It's true that in the early days of the revolution, the Obama team was slow to side fully with the protesters  ‐‐ beginning with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's assessment that Egypt was "stable" and  continuing through Vice President Joseph Biden's refusal to call Mubarak a "dictator" and the statements  of Frank Wisner, the White House envoy ‐‐ later disavowed ‐‐ who said it was "critical" that the Egyptian  leader stay in power.   When the Obama folks weren't garbling their talking points, they were offering bad advice, such as when  the State Department undercut the protesters by urging them to engage in "dialogue" with Mubarak's  newly installed vice president, Omar Suleiman. But Suleiman, a Mubarak hatchet man whom Clinton  embraced as the improbable agent of democratic transformation, of course had no intention of carrying  out genuine negotiations or dialogue. Instead, Suleiman hosted a one‐way discussion with the loyal  opposition ‐‐ a collection of hapless parties with little to no support on the street ‐‐ while refusing to deal  with representatives of the youth movements in Tahrir Square. He then released a deeply disingenuous 
10   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

statement offering only token reforms and blaming "foreign elements" for the uprising; later, he said  Egyptians lacked a "culture of democracy."   On the other hand, U.S. officials consistently, and with increasing impatience, condemned the use of force  against protesters and urged the Egyptian military to do everything in its power to avoid bloodshed. At one  point, the White House even intimated that the United States was reviewing its $1.3 billion military aid  package. President Barack Obama, meanwhile, resisted heavy pressure from allies such as Israel and Saudi  Arabia, which urged him to back Mubarak to the bitter end, while rejecting the advice of pundits who  demanded that he call publicly and clearly for the dictator to step down ‐‐ a move that would have played  into the regime's strategy of painting the protesters as foreign agents.   On the whole, the best we can say for the Obama team is that it didn't screw up too badly. Until it became  obvious to all that Mubarak was going down, the United States looked as if it was still trying to thread the  needle, balancing its strategic ties to the regime with its genuine desire to see the Egyptian people's  aspirations fulfilled. In the end, those positions proved impossible to reconcile.  "The Muslim Brotherhood Will Rule Egypt."   No. While the Islamist movement is without question Egypt's most organized opposition movement at the  moment, it has said explicitly and repeatedly that it does not seek the presidency. For now, the Muslim  Brotherhood has swung its support behind retired International Atomic Energy Agency chief Mohamed  ElBaradei, a secular liberal who played a key role in catalyzing the protests. It's not clear whether ElBaradei  seeks the presidency himself, though he has said he will run if asked.   As for the Muslim Brotherhood itself, it probably represents no more than 20 percent of the Egyptian  population. And now that the mass public has been mobilized and energized by calls for freedom and good  governance ‐‐ not Islam ‐‐ the movement is in danger of being pushed to the margins of political life.  Egyptians are a religious people, but most evince little desire to be ruled by Quranic diktats.   To be sure, the Muslim Brotherhood can put a lot of bodies on the streets, especially in strongholds like  Alexandria or in cities in the Nile Delta. But it's worth noting that the group did not officially endorse the  initial round of protests. (One Brotherhood leader, Essam el‐Erian, even said, "On that day we should all be  celebrating together" instead of protesting against the police.) Yes, its youth wing later played an  important role in defending the barricades in Tahrir Square, while its networks outside the square were  critical in bringing in supplies to sustain the protests. But it's not clear how loyal they are to an older  leadership that failed to squarely confront Mubarak for decades. A broad, secular youth coalition,  branding itself as the true custodians of the revolution, would have enormous appeal at the ballot box,  even for young Brotherhood supporters, many Egyptians told me.  "The Revolution Is Over."   Maybe. Most of the revolutionaries who occupied Tahrir Square for the last three weeks have gone home,  and key political leaders ‐‐ such as the liberal politician Ayman Nour ‐‐ say their main demands have been  met. Mubarak, his rigged parliament, and his anti‐democratic constitution are gone, and Egypt seems to be  blossoming under transitional military rule, as state media embraces the revolution and ordinary Egyptians  begin discussing politics for the first time. The military has promised to hand over power to an elected,  civilian government in six months' time.   Yet the fall of Mubarak represents only the partial collapse of his regime. Many top figures have left the  hated National Democratic Party, which saw its headquarters burned on Jan. 28, but its vast electoral  machine still exists. Hundreds of mini‐Mubaraks ‐‐ heavy‐handed provincial governors and corrupt local  officials ‐‐ control the provinces. The Interior Ministry, though much diminished, still operates, as does 
11   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Mubarak's feared state security apparatus. His final cabinet, led by a former Air Force general with close  ties to Mubarak, has not been replaced, and it's not clear what role Suleiman will play going forward.   So far, there are no guarantees that "Mubarakism without Mubarak" won't make a comeback ‐‐ all we  have is the word of an unelected junta led by generals installed by Mubarak himself. The Egyptian military  has moved to outlaw labor strikes, which have spread across the country in recent days as thousands of  state workers ‐‐ including, incredibly, police officers seeking higher wages ‐‐ have seized the moment to  press their own demands. If the strikes escalate, watch out: Egypt could be headed for a period of  extended instability rather than democratic consolidation. What's happening in Tunisia, where wave after  wave of protests has led to a revolving door of high‐level resignations and recriminations, might well  follow in Egypt.   Another danger is that a failure to quickly improve the lives of Egypt's poorest, some 40 percent of whom  reportedly live on less than $2 a day, could lead to a backlash. The revolution may have succeeded, but it  has deeply wounded Egypt's economy, which relies heavily on tourism and is vulnerable to fluctuations in  the price of basic commodities, such as wheat.   And let's not forget that the protest organizers have called for weekly Friday rallies until all their demands ‐ ‐ including the release of all political detainees and the installation of an interim government of national  unity ‐‐ are met. As one of them put it to me, "We know how to find Tahrir Square."  "Country X Is Next."   It's too early to tell.   As demonstrations break out in Algeria, Bahrain, Jordan, Libya, and Yemen, it's easy to imagine popular  protests sweeping across the region and expelling autocrats from Rabat to Riyadh. Clearly what happened  in Egypt, the beating heart of the Arab world, won't stay in Egypt.   Yet the revolutionaries in Cairo had a few unique advantages. Alongside its massive state media apparatus,  among the world's largest, Egypt boasted independent newspapers and a robust, if embattled civil society  that had learned much in its years of working against the regime (several key protest organizers, such as  Ahmed Maher and Zyad el‐Elaimy, were veterans of Kefaya, an early anti‐government movement).  Egyptian reporters and pundits were often hassled, but they could write what they wanted as long as they  didn't cross certain red lines, such as discussing the president's health or delving too deeply into corrupt  business deals. The Internet was monitored, but not censored outright. Hundreds of foreign reporters had  experience and contacts in Egypt and could get the word out. And given the close ties between the  Pentagon and the Egyptian military, the United States had leverage that may have helped prevent a far  nastier crackdown. Other protest movements won't be so lucky.   Opposition leaders in other Arab countries will have to find their own, locally rooted paths to victory;  simply setting a date and calling for people to go to the streets won't work. And they now face terrified  rulers who see clearly that they need to adapt, though none will give up an iota of any real power. Some,  like the monarchs in Bahrain and Kuwait, will attempt to defuse any "Tunisia effect" by doling out piles of  cash, while others, such as Jordan's King Abdullah II, are sacking their governments and once again vowing  political reform. The worst of the bunch, like Libya's Muammar al‐Qaddafi and Syria's Bashar Assad, will  opt for deeper repression.   Change is finally coming to the Arab world. The only question is: How fast and how painful will it be?   ********************     
12   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

In post‐Mubarak Egypt, the rebirth of the Arab world 
By: Hussein Agha.  Source: International Crisis Group  Date: Feb11, 2011   
Hussein Agha, a senior associate member of St. Antony's College, Oxford University, is a co‐author of "A Framework for a  Palestinian National Security Doctrine." Robert Malley is the Middle East program director at the International Crisis Group  and was special assistant to President Bill Clinton for Arab‐Israeli affairs   

The protesters on the streets of Cairo who, in just 18 days, ended the three‐decade rule of Hosni Mubarak  were not merely demanding the end of an unjust, corrupt and oppressive regime. They did not merely  decry privation, unemployment or the disdain with which their leaders treated them. They had long  suffered such indignities. What they fought for was something more elusive and more visceral.  The Arab world is dead. Egypt's revolution is trying to revive it.  From the 1950s onward, Arabs took pride in their anti‐colonial struggle, in their leaders' standing and in  the sense that the Arab world stood for something, that it had a mission: to build independent nation‐ states and resist foreign domination.  In Egypt, Gamal Abdel Nasser presided over a ruinous economy and endured a humiliating defeat against  Israel in 1967. Still, Cairo remained the heart of the larger Arab nation ‐ the Arab public watched as Nasser  railed against the West, defied his country's former masters, nationalized the Suez Canal and taunted  Israel. Meanwhile, Algeria wrested its independence from France and became the refuge of  revolutionaries; Saudi Arabia led an oil embargo that shook the world economy; and Yasser Arafat gave  Palestinians a voice and put their cause on the map.  Throughout, the Arab world suffered ignominious military and political setbacks, but it resisted. Some  around the world may not have liked the sounds coming from Cairo, Algiers, Baghdad and Tripoli, but they  took notice. There were defeats for the Arab world, but no surrender.  But that world passed, and Arab politics fell silent. Other than to wait and see what others might do, Arab  regimes have no clear and effective approach toward any of the issues vital to their collective future, and  what policies they do have contradict popular feeling. It is that indifference that condemned the leaders of  Tunisia and Egypt to irrelevance.  Most governments in the region were resigned to or enabled the invasion of Iraq; since then, the Arab  world has had virtually no impact on Iraq's course. It has done little to achieve Palestinian aspirations  besides backing a peace process in which it no longer believes. When Israel went to war with Hezbollah in  2006 and then with Hamas two years later, most Arab leaders privately cheered the Jewish state. And their  position on Iran is unintelligible; they have delegated ultimate decision‐making to the United States, which  they encourage to toughen its stance but then warn about the consequences of such action.  Egypt and Saudi Arabia, pillars of the Arab order, are exhausted, bereft of a cause other than preventing  their own decline. For Egypt, which stood tallest, the fall has been steepest. But long before Tahrir Square,  Egypt forfeited any claim to Arab leadership. It has gone missing in Iraq, and its policy toward Iran remains  restricted to protestations, accusations and insults. It has not prevailed in its rivalry with Syria and has lost  its battle for influence in Lebanon. It has had no genuine impact on the Arab‐Israeli peace process, was 
13   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

unable to reunify the Palestinian movement and was widely seen in the region as complicit in Israel's siege  on Hamas‐controlled Gaza.  Riyadh has helplessly witnessed the gradual ascendancy of Iranian influence in Iraq and the wider region. It  was humiliated in 2009 when it failed to crush rebels in Yemen despite formidable advantages in resources  and military hardware. Its mediation attempts among Palestinians in 2007, and more recently in Lebanon,  were brushed aside by local parties over which it once held considerable sway.  The Arab leadership has proved passive and, when active, powerless. Where it once championed a string  of lost causes ‐ pan‐Arab unity, defiance of the West, resistance to Israel ‐ it now fights for nothing. There  was more popular pride in yesterday's setbacks than in today's stupor.  Arab states suffer from a curse more debilitating than poverty or autocracy. They have become  counterfeit, perceived by their own people as alien, pursuing policies hatched from afar. One cannot fully  comprehend the actions of Egyptians, Tunisians, Jordanians and others without considering this deep‐ seated feeling that they have not been allowed to be themselves, that they have been robbed of their  identities.  Taking to the streets is not a mere act of protest. It is an act of self‐determination.  Where the United States and Europe have seen moderation and cooperation, the Arab public has sensed a  loss of dignity and of the ability to make free decisions. True independence was traded in for Western  military, financial and political support. That intimate relationship distorted Arab politics. Reliant on  foreign nations' largesse and accountable to their judgment, the narrow ruling class became more  responsive to external demands than to domestic aspirations.  Alienated from their states, the people have in some cases searched elsewhere for guidance. Some have  been drawn to groups such as Hamas, Hezbollah and the Muslim Brotherhood, which have resisted and  challenged the established order. Others look to non‐Arab states, such as Turkey, which under its Islamist  government has carved out a dynamic, independent role, or Iran, which flouts Western threats and edicts.  The breakdown of the Arab order has upended natural power relations. Traditional powers punch below  their weight, and emerging ones, such as Qatar, punch above theirs. Al‐Jazeera has emerged as a full‐ fledged political actor because it reflects and articulates popular sentiment. It has become the new Nasser.  The leader of the Arab world is a television network.  Popular uprisings are the latest step in this process. They have been facilitated by a newfound fearlessness  and feeling of empowerment ‐ watching the U.S. military's struggles in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as  Israel's inability to subdue Hezbollah and Hamas, Arab peoples are no longer afraid to confront their own  regimes.  For the United States, the popular upheaval lays bare the fallacy of an approach that relies on Arab leaders  who mimic the West's deeds and parrot its words, and that only succeeds in discrediting the regimes  without helping Washington. The more the United States gave to the Mubarak regime, the more it lost  Egypt. Arab leaders have been put on notice: A warm relationship with the United States and a peace deal  with Israel will not save you in your hour of need. 

14   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Injecting economic assistance into faltering regimes will not work. The grievance Arab peoples feel is not  principally material, and one of its main targets is over‐reliance on the outside. U.S. calls for reform will  likewise fall flat. A messenger who has backed the status quo for decades is a poor voice for change.  Attempts to pressure regimes can backfire, allowing rulers to depict protests as Western‐inspired and  opposition leaders as foreign stooges.  Some policymakers in Western capitals have convinced themselves that seizing the moment to promote  the Israeli‐Palestinian peace process will placate public opinion. This is to engage in both denial and  wishful thinking. It ignores that Arabs have become estranged from current peace efforts; they believe  that such endeavors reflect a foreign rather than a national agenda. And it presumes that a peace  agreement acceptable to the West and to Arab leaders will be acceptable to the Arab public, when in  truth, it is more likely to be seen as an unjust imposition and denounced as the liquidation of a cherished  cause. A peace effort intended to salvage order will accelerate its demise.  The Arab world's transition from old to new is rife with uncertainty about its pace and endpoint. When and  where transitions take place, they will express a yearning for more assertiveness. Governments will have  to change their spots; their publics will wish them to be more like Turkey and less like Egypt.  For decades, the Arab world has been drained of its sovereignty, its freedom, its pride. It has been drained  of politics. Today marks politics' revenge.  ******************** 

  What's Next For Egypt? 
By: Marwan Muasher .  Source: Carnegie Endowment  By: Feb 14, 2011   
Marwan Muasher is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment, where he oversees the Endowment’s research in  Washington and Beirut on the Middle East. 

  MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.    But first, to Egypt where the military presides over martial law. The parliament has been dissolved. But the  supreme council of the military set a timetable for transition to a new government without former  President Hosni Mubarak. Portraits of Mubarak were removed from at least one highly visible government  building. But big questions remain about what comes next, including how the new Egyptian government  will respond to the U.S. and Israel.     Back with us to answer some of these questions is Marwan Muasher. He is the former deputy prime  minister of Jordan. He also held post as Jordan's foreign minister and ambassador to the United States.  He's now vice president for Middle East studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He's  with us from there. Thank you so much for joining us once again.     Mr. MARWAN MUASHER: It's nice to be with you.    

15   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

MARTIN: Now, before we talk more broadly about trends in the region, we want to talk about Egypt  specifically. The people there seem very optimistic that the leaders of the military will, in fact, cede power  on schedule in time for elections in the fall. What is the basis for that optimism?     Mr. MUASHER: The military is a very established and trusted institution in Egyptian politics. The irony, of  course, is that, you know, the ex‐regime of Mubarak did not allow any political space for political parties to  emerge. And so you are seeing a vacuum of leadership that the military in Egypt is trying to fill.     It is ironic the military is not an institution that is known for democratic values usually. So, it remains to be  seen whether the military will indeed, you know, supervise a serious process of giving back ‐ not just giving  back power to the civilians, but also putting together a process that will result in a new election law, in a  new presidential law that will allow people to stand for elections free of interference and support of, you  know, of the national ruling party before.     MARTIN: Now, what I heard you say is that, in part, the military is the only institution that seems to have  the capacity for this because so many other, you know, sectors in civil society were suppressed and  underdeveloped over the last 30 years. But can I just ask you to describe, what are the strengths of the  military? We know, for example, that there are extensive contacts between military leaders in the United  States and Egyptian military leaders. What else gives them the capacity?     Mr. MUASHER: Well, it's been an old institution in the country. A lot of money has been channeled to the  military to provide for training of (unintelligible). And so you have a relatively well‐functioning, well‐ trained establishment. That, once again, does not mean that it is an ideal institution for the instituting of  democracy.     But in the absence of any other institutions, it seems to be the only one capable of doing so. The other  institution, that of the ruling party in Egypt, of course, is an institution that is not trusted today by  Egyptians.     MARTIN: What about some of the emerging leadership we see? We see that sort of some of the youth  groups ‐ youth leaders who were active in the demonstrations are now trying to, you know, organize  themselves to be a part of the process. What is your sense of the prospects for this new generation  showing leadership here?     Mr. MUASHER: Well, this is still a process in flux, frankly. We don't yet see any sort of emerging  personalities, if you will. There is a feeling in the country that this revolution was indeed brought about by  the young. But that does not mean, of course, that the young are going necessarily to rule the country.     We've heard a lot of names mentioned in the West. These might or might not, in fact, have the support of  the Egyptian people. The name of Mohamed ElBaradei comes to mind. One poll that was conducted a few  days ago gave him 3 percent support among the Egyptian public. Amr Moussa, the secretary general of the  Arab League and an Egyptian foreign, ex‐foreign minister has so far 25 percent.     So, really, I don't think that there is any clear leadership that has emerged from this. And I don't expect the  process to be necessarily a very, you know, smooth one. We might be seeing more of collective system,  maybe, where several leaders will get together and try to help until the institutions in the country can be  strengthened in one way or the other. 
16   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

   Certainly, before the presidential elections, we are not going to see any one personality emerging until I  think the Egyptian people will be able to decide by themselves in the voting booth who the next president  of Egypt will be.     MARTIN: If you're just joining us, you're listening to TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We've called, once  again, upon Marwan Muasher. He's the vice president for Middle East studies at the Carnegie Endowment  of International Peace. He's also a former deputy prime minister for Jordan. And we're talking about  what's next for Egypt and the rest of the region now that Mubarak has stepped down.     And Egypt, of course, was a crucial ally for the United States and for Israel. Israel's most significant  relationship in the Arab world, I think it's fair to say. And I think it's noticeable now that there is a great  deal of nervousness in Egypt. And to some ‐ I'm sorry ‐ in Israel ‐ and to some degree in the United States  about the power vacuum and how these relationships with Israel and the United States will be affected by  what's happening there. Are there any clues about external relationships at this point?     Mr. MUASHER: Again, the military has already declared that all its international obligations will be  respected. So I do not expect that the peace treaty with Israel would be affected. Relations with Israel will  certainly be affected. That is to be expected. I think one of the sort of policies that will need to be revisited  is not just the policy of the U.S. with its Arab allies, but also with Israel.     It is, you know, interesting to know that Israel for the longest time has presented itself as the only  democracy in the Middle East. And then when a democracy was trying to be established in Egypt, in fact,  the Israelis counseled the U.S. government to stick by Mubarak and not to support the protesters. That is  not a sustainable policy and that will need to change.     Israel's Natan Sharansky, a member of the Israeli government, had a statement yesterday saying that the  revolution in Egypt shows that you cannot keep people, you know, who are yearning for freedom, you  cannot keep them under your control. Well, his own government is controlling Palestinians under  occupation and therefore this whole business of making peace, of standing against people's yearning for  freedom, I think is one that only out of government we have to look at and revisit, but Israel as well.     MARTIN: And what about Iran? You know, initially after celebrating Mubarak's demise, because he was  perceived as too close to the West, now the Iranian government is warning those wanting to march there  in honor of the Egyptian uprising that such a march would be handled severely.     Mr. MUASHER: You know, Iran's position, frankly, cannot be seen except as hypocritical on all these  events. On, you know, one day the Iranian government and the president cheer and hailed the Egyptian  people for standing up to their government and the very next day it clamps down on its own people who  are also standing against the government.     This is, you know, this is not, again, a sustainable position, nor one that anybody can be fooled for. I think  that this wave that we are witnessing in the Middle East will also, in one way or the other, affect Iran.  Some will say that in fact it was Iran who started this in 2009.     MARTIN: And, finally, would you just tell us about, in other countries in the region, Yemen, Algeria and  Jordan have also seen protests to one degree or another in the days in the last couple of weeks as the 
17   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Egypt uprising was continuing. Could you just talk a little bit more in the two minutes that we have left  about what you see next in other countries? What is the next country to which we should turn our  attention, in your view?     Mr. MUASHER: I don't think that one can predict, you know, which is the next country. I think what we can  safely say is that the Middle East today, after Tunisia and Egypt, is not what it used to be before Tunisia  and Egypt. There are so many myths, conventional wisdoms that have been shattered by the events of the  last few weeks.     One of them is that the Arab public does not go out to the street and does not protest and therefore the  process of reform can be done at the very slow pace. That, of course, argument has been shattered. And I  think there is a lot of thinking going on in the region and a lot ‐ and a need to start not just ad hoc  programs here and there, but a sustained and a seriously formed process.     Those countries that are able to do so will basically be able to, you know, have a smooth transition to a  pluralistic culture. Those countries who are not able to do so will still engage in cosmetic changes or ad hoc  programs without a sustained process, will do so at their own peril.     MARTIN: And, finally, we only have about a minute left. Do you mind if I ask you if there's any way in which  your, I mean, you have a deep knowledge of the region. As we mentioned, you've had many diplomatic  posts. Is there any way in which your expectations and sense of the region has been challenged by recent  events?     Mr. MUASHER: I wrote a book two years ago, "The Arab Center," in which I argued that Arabs and Arab  governments cannot remain focused on one issue and one issue only, which is the peace process and that  the issue of reform is another issue that they will have to address if they are to remain credible in their  people's eyes.     So I can claim that I did predict what is going to happen even if I did not know when it was going to  happen. I firmly believe that these two, Israel's peace and reform, must be addressed simultaneously by  Arab governments if they are to be credible in their people's eyes.     MARTIN: Marwan Muasher is the former deputy prime minister of Jordan. He also held post as Jordan's  foreign minister, ambassador to the United States. He now overseas the work of the Middle East programs  in Washington and Beirut for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. And he spoke with us from  the offices in Washington there. Thank you so much for joining us once again.     Mr. MUASHER: Thank you.  ********************   

         
18   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Egypt's Transition 
By: Steven Heydemann.  Source: United States Institute Of Peace  Date: Feb 14, 2011   
Steven Heydemann serves as vice president of the Grants and Fellowships program and as special adviser to the Muslim  World Initiative. 

  The departure of Hosni Mubarak on Friday opens up new possibilities for a transition to real democracy in  Egypt. Whether these possibilities will be realized remains uncertain. How such a transition will affect  peace and security in Egypt and the region is also uncertain; much hinges on whether a transition proceeds  smoothly, unfolds with significant but manageable frictions, or collapses under the weight of the many  obstacles that lie in its path. Steven Heydemann explores the new and evolving situation.    What will be the Military's role?  A smooth transition to real democracy offers reasons to hope that Egypt will emerge as a source of  regional stability. Democracy is likely to mitigate a number of drivers of conflict within Egypt, including the  alienation and frustration that drove young Egyptians to join extremist movements. A democratic  parliament that reflects Egypt's political diversity is likely to honor Egypt's international treaties, including  the 1979 treaty with Israel.  Under democracy, the Egyptian army will not be involved in politics, but will continue to provide for  Egypt's national defense and will remain an important and respected institutional presence in Egyptian  society. The military is unlikely to support dramatic shifts in Egypt's regional policies, or its orientation  toward the U.S. Under Mubarak, especially during the last decade, Egypt lost much of the regional  influence it exercised in previous years. A newly democratic Egypt is likely to regain regional influence, and  could serve as a potential model for peaceful political transitions in other countries in the region.  How will this impact U.S. relations?  America's relationship with Egypt will change, and it would not be surprising to see new frictions and  tensions arise as the longstanding U.S.‐Egyptian partnership is redefined. The close bonds between the  United States and Hosni Mubarak angered many Egyptians. The legacies of this relationship, however, are  not an insurmountable barrier to a revitalized U.S.‐Egyptian relationship, one in which two democracies  engage one another as equals with respect, and with recognition that the U.S. and Egypt have many  shared interests‐‐including concerns about the regional influence of Iran and its proxies, and of Iran's  nuclear program. What will be especially important in determining how the relationship unfolds is the  conduct of the U.S. during this delicate transitional period. American support for democratic change in  Egypt offers a strong foundation for further efforts to assist Egyptians‐‐on terms defined by Egyptians  themselves‐‐in consolidating their gains and moving their country toward a democratic political order.  How will this impact Egypt's relationship with Israel?  Egypt's relationship with Israel will also change, and Israelis are understandably nervous about the  direction such changes will take. There is fear that a democratic Egypt will fall under the influence of  religious extremists, though conditions on the ground provide little evidence that this will happen. There is  fear that the already cold peace between Egypt and Israel will become even more difficult, or that the  peace treaty itself might be abrogated. Statements from Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood reinforce these  concerns. Brotherhood spokesmen have not been willing to state unequivocally their movement's support  for the peace treaty with Israel. 

19   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

At present, however, it is far too soon to predict that the Brotherhood will emerge as the dominant  political force in a newly democratic Egypt. The movement has indicated that it does not intend to seek  the presidency when elections are eventually held. It has long affirmed its commitment to nonviolence. Its  popularity in truly democratic elections has never been tested. Analysts suspect that under democracy, the  Brotherhood's share of parliamentary seats will be significant‐‐perhaps 20‐30 percent‐‐but not more.  Indeed, the Brotherhood will face intense competition for parliamentary seats, including, perhaps, from  new religious parties that might emerge in the months ahead. What fears of extremism underscore,  however, is the importance of helping the transition that Egypt is now beginning to succeed, and of  continuing U.S. support for efforts to ensure that the transition is both conducted in a democratic fashion,  and leads to a democratic outcome. What questions and issues will the U.S. and the international  community be facing in the days and months ahead as the political transition unfolds in Egypt?  The critical issues confronting the U.S. and the International Community in the days ahead concern the  procedures and timetable that will define Egypt's political transition, restoring the Egyptian economy, and  clarifying Egypt's commitment to existing treaties and international obligations. Of these concerns, the first  two loom largest, and the first is by far the most urgent. Initial indications are that Egyptians have already  made one critical decision about the structure of a transition: it will not be guided by the existing Egyptian  constitution, an instrument that provided a veneer of legitimacy to the authoritarian regime of Hosni  Mubarak. This move has strong international support, including from the U.S., but raises questions about  how to ensure that the forthcoming negotiations between the regime and the opposition are credible,  legitimate, and inclusive, including of the youth who played such an important role in the protests that  overthrew Mubarak. Addressing these issues will pre‐occupy Egyptians over the days and weeks ahead,  and are the subject of significant attention within the U.S. government.  An initial priority, many believe, is to create a level playing field on which transition talks can be  conducted. This would include abrogating emergency laws and other legal provisions that obstruct political  participation, creating frameworks for negotiations in which regime and opposition participate as equals,  and securing the explicit agreement of the military that it will withdraw from political life as a critical step  in Egypt's transition to democracy. Providing support for the emergence of a level playing field‐‐creating an  enabling environment that reinforces the likelihood of a successful transition‐‐is one way that the U.S. and  the International Community can contribute to a process that will be, and should be, the responsibility of  Egyptians to manage.  ********************   

Can Egypt Become a True Democracy? 
By: Michael Mandelbaum.  Source: Project Syndicate  Date: Feb14, 2011   
Michael Mandelbaum is Professor of American Foreign Policy at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies  (SAIS) in Washington D.C.. 

  WASHINGTON,  DC  –  Hosni  Mubarak’s  resignation  as  President  of  Egypt  marks  the  beginning  of  an  important  stage  in  that  country’s  transition  to  a  new  political  system.  But  will  the  political  transition  ultimately lead to democracy? 
20   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

We cannot know with certainty, but, based on the history of democratic government, and the experiences  of other countries – the subject of my book, Democracy’s Good Name: The Rise and Risks of the World’s  Most  Popular  Form  of  Government  –  we  can  identify  the  obstacles  that  Egypt  faces,  as  well  as  the  advantages it enjoys, in building political democracy.  Understanding any country’s democratic prospects must begin with a definition of democracy, which is a  hybrid form of government, a fusion of two different political traditions. The first is popular sovereignty,  the rule of the people, which is exercised through elections. The second, older and equally important, is  liberty – that is, freedom.  Freedom comes in three varieties: political liberty, which takes the form of individual rights to free speech  and  association;  religious  liberty,  which  implies  freedom  of  worship  for  all  faiths;  and  economic  liberty,  which is embodied in the right to own property.  Elections without liberty do not constitute genuine democracy, and here Egypt faces a serious challenge:  its best‐organized group, the Muslim Brotherhood, rejects religious liberty and individual rights, especially  the rights of women. The Brotherhood’s offshoot, the Palestinian movement Hamas, has established in the  Gaza Strip a brutal, intolerant dictatorship.  In  conditions  of  chaos,  which  Egypt  could  face,  the  best‐organized  and  most  ruthless  group  often  gets  control  of  the  government.  This  was  Russia’s  fate  after  its  1917  revolution,  which  brought  Lenin’s  Bolsheviks  to  power  and  condemned  the  country  to  75  years  of  totalitarian  rule.  In  the  same  way,  the  Muslim Brotherhood could seize power in Egypt and impose a far more oppressive regime than Mubarak’s  ever was.  Even  if  Egypt  avoids  control  by  religious  extremists,  democracy’s  two‐part  anatomy  makes  swift  and  smooth progress to a democratic system problematic. While elections are relatively easy to stage, liberty is  far more difficult to establish and sustain, for it requires institutions – such as a legal system with impartial  courts – that Egypt lacks, and that take years to build.  In  other  countries  that  have  become  democracies,  the  institutions  and  practices  of  liberty  have  often  emerged  from  the  working  of  a  free‐market  economy.  Commerce  fosters  the  habits  of  trust  and  cooperation on which stable democracy depends. It is no accident that a free‐market economy preceded  democratic  politics  in  many  countries  in  Latin  America  and  Asia  in  the  second  half  of  the  twentieth  century.  Here,  too,  Egypt  is  at  a  disadvantage.  Its  economy  is  a  variant  of  crony  capitalism,  in  which  economic  success depends on one’s political connections, rather than on the meritocratic free‐market competition  from which liberty grows.  Egypt suffers from another political handicap: it is an Arab country, and there are no Arab democracies.  This matters, because countries, like individuals, tend to emulate others that they resemble and admire.  After they overthrew communism in 1989, the peoples of Central Europe gravitated to democracy because  that was the prevailing form of government in the countries of Western Europe, with which they strongly  identified. Egypt has no such democratic model. 

21   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Egypt  is,  however,  better  placed  to  embrace  democracy  than  the  other  Arab  countries,  because  the  obstacles  to  democracy  in  the  Arab  world  are  less  formidable  in  Egypt  than  elsewhere.  Other  Arab  countries – Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, for example – are sharply divided along tribal, ethnic, and religious  lines.  In divided societies, the most powerful group is often unwilling to share power with the others, resulting in  dictatorship.  Egypt,  by  contrast,  is  relatively  homogeneous.  Christians,  who  make  up  10%  of  the  population, are the only sizable minority.  The oil that the Arab countries of the Persian Gulf have in abundance also works against democracy, for it  creates  an  incentive  for  the  rulers  to  retain  power  indefinitely.  Oil  revenues  enable  them  to  bribe  the  population to remain politically passive, while discouraging the creation of the kind of free‐market system  that breeds democracy. Fortunately for its democratic prospects, Egypt has only very modest reserves of  natural gas and oil.  The fact that the large protest movement that suddenly materialized has, until now, been a peaceful one  also counts as an advantage for building democracy. When a government falls violently, the new regime  usually rules by force, not by democratic procedures, if only to keep at bay those it has defeated.  The cause of democracy in Egypt has one other asset, the most important one of all. Democracy requires  democrats  –  citizens  convinced  of  the  value  of  liberty  and  popular  sovereignty  and  committed  to  establishing  and  preserving  them.  The  political  sentiments  of  many  of  the  hundreds  of  thousands  of  people  who  gathered  in  Cairo’s  Tahrir  Square  over  the  last  three  weeks  leave  little  doubt  that  they  do  want democracy, and are willing to work and even to sacrifice for it.  Whether they are numerous enough,  resourceful  enough,  patient  enough,  wise  enough,  and  brave  enough  –  and  whether  they  will  be  lucky  enough – to achieve it is a question that only the people of Egypt can answer.  ********************   

Egypt Should Take Its Time Building a Democracy 
By: David Makovsky.  Source: Washington Institute  Date: Feb 13, 2011 
  David Makovsky is the Ziegler distinguished fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. 

  The jubilation in Cairo has riveted the world. The sea of this non‐violent protest movement is both  inspiring self‐empowerment and providing hope that a democratic revolution need not bypass the Middle  East. It is a historic moment to savor.   Even as it looks as though the hardest part has been accomplished with Hosni Mubarak's departure, surely  the toughest part is ahead. President Obama wasted no time in insisting that the Egyptian transition retain  its momentum. Yet, a democratic transition should not be confused with an instant election. One cannot  have democracy without an election, but this is only part of the story. Timing is key.   Apart from an election, democracy is about building the institutions that ensure there are safeguards for  individuals. This means going beyond the obvious of lifting the existing emergency law and amending the 
22   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Egyptian Constitution. It also requires an independent judiciary, a free press, minority rights, and a security  apparatus that maintains the monopoly on the use of force. These institutions provide the opportunity for  the creation of a civic culture where parties can negotiate their demands in a peaceful framework.  Otherwise, the hope for democracy can be easily thwarted.   Daunting Challenges   As democracy theorists say, the combination of low levels of economic development, concentrated  sources of national wealth (crony capitalism), little historical experience with political pluralism (Egypt has  lived under military government since 1952), a non‐democratic region and identity‐based divisions  (particularly over religion) all combine for a daunting challenge for Egypt.   Sequencing is important, and the Palestinian example is instructive. In 2006, the Palestinians held  parliamentary elections before they focused on creating the foundations of solid institutions. This is a key  reason, albeit not the only one, for the success of the militant government of Hamas. Subsequently, Hamas  used its militia to expel the Palestinian Authority security forces from Gaza in 2007.   The West Bank has taken the opposite course. Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad, an economist by  training, stands for the idea that the quality of governance is a prerequisite for a 21st century modern Arab  state in the Middle East. Fayyad has focused on building institutions, supporting the rule of law and  improving the quality of life for Palestinians. A high level of economic growth has followed. Fayyad is  hoping that four years of institution‐building will culminate in a state and a fresh election in the fall.   Such a bottom‐up approach should be a sign that democracy in Egypt can occur amid improving conditions  for the people. Functioning institutions are key prerequisites for a democratic election. There should be a  clear timetable to Egyptian elections, but a hasty vote without institutional safeguards could mean a  return to authoritarianism or chaos that can be exploited by the Islamist militants.   A look at the Middle East in recent years proves the danger is not theoretical. For example, it is critical that  the state retains the monopoly on the use of force, or else we will be seeing political parties seeking to use  liberal means to illiberal ends. In 2005, the Cedar Revolution in Lebanon evoked great hope yet ultimately  came apart because a determined minority with its own militia, Hezbollah, used brute force to get its way.  Bullets and ballots do not go together. The Egyptian security apparatus seems strong, but this might not  always be the case.   Toward a Functioning Democracy   A functioning democracy also must honor and uphold the rights of minorities. This could be alien thinking  to the Muslim Brotherhood, whose statements belittle women and gays. While Egypt's military leaders  have said that the country will be bound by past international agreements, the Brotherhood seems to  think otherwise, deriding the legality of the 1979 Egypt‐Israel peace treaty.   The world can be of help to Egypt during this interim period, given the country's strong ties to the U.S. as  well as being the center of political gravity in the region. Despite U.S. budget constraints, it is important  that American assistance to Cairo reflect our commitment to political reform and institutional  infrastructure for democracy. As it is now, the $1.3 billion in U.S. aid to Egypt is purely military.  
23   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Democratic transition is hard enough without pressure demanding that it be rapid. The objective is to  ensure that the Egyptian revolution is sustainable. The test is not a first election, but rather whether there  is a second one.   ********************   

Winners and Losers of the Revolution 
By: Stephen M. Walt.  Source:  Foreign Policy  Date: Feb 14, 2011    
Stephen M. Walt, the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international affairs at Harvard University's Kennedy School of  Government and a contributing editor at Foreign Policy. 

  When Zhou Enlai was asked in the 1970s about the historical significance of the French Revolution, he  famously responded that it was "too soon to tell." Given that wise caution, it is undoubtedly foolhardy for  me to try to pick the winners and losers of the upheaval whose ultimate implications remain uncertain. But  at the risk of looking silly in a few days (or weeks or months or years), I'm going to ignore the obvious  pitfalls and forge ahead. Here's my current list of winners and losers, plus a third category: those for whom  I have no idea.    THE WINNERS:  1. The Demonstrators  The obvious winners are the thousands of ordinary Egyptians who poured into the streets to demand  Hosni Mubarak's ouster and insist on the credible prospect of genuine reform. For this reason, Mubarak's  designated deputy, Omar Suleiman, had to go too. Some of the demonstrators' activities were planned  and coordinated (and we'll probably know a lot more about it over time), but a lot of it was the  spontaneous expression of long‐simmering frustration. By relying on nonviolent methods, maintaining  morale and discipline, and insisting that Mubarak had to go, the anti‐government uprising succeeded  where prior protest campaigns had failed. "People power" with an Arab face. And, oh yes: Google got a  great product placement too.   2. Al Jazeera  With round‐the‐clock coverage that put a lot of Western media to shame, Al Jazeera comes out with its  reputation enhanced. Its ability to transmit these images throughout the Arab world may have given  events in Tunisia and Egypt far greater regional resonance. If Radio Cairo was the great revolutionary  amplifier of the Nasser era, Al Jazeera may have emerged as an even more potent revolutionary force, as a  medium that is shared by Arab publics and accessible to outsiders too. And I'll bet that is what Mubarak  now thinks.   3. Democratic reformers elsewhere in the Middle East  The past two weeks have also seen authoritarian governments in several other countries take concrete  steps to try to defuse potential upheavals and accommodate some reformist demands. It's early days, of  course, but democratic reformers throughout the region have the wind at their backs. Which goes to show  that those who supported nonmilitary efforts to encourage more participatory forms of government were  right (and those who sought to spread democracy at the end of a rifle barrel were not).  

24   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

4. The Egyptian military  Paradoxically, the Egyptian armed forces emerged from the crisis with their political power enhanced even  further. The United States is now betting that the Army will oversee a peaceful transition, and the early  statements from military authorities are reassuring. The big question: Will the military commit itself to  genuine reform, or will it try to safeguard its own prerogatives and privileges in a post‐Mubarak Egypt?   5. China  Why is Beijing a winner here? Simple. Whatever subsequently happens in Egypt, the U.S. government is  going to spend a lot of time and attention to trying to manage its local and regional impact. That's good  news for China because it means Washington will have less time to spend on both its relations with Beijing  and its other strategic partnerships in Asia. I suspect Chinese officials would dearly love for the United  States to remain preoccupied by events in the Middle East, and the upheaval in Egypt makes that much  more likely. But this advantage is not without an obvious downside: Given its own concerns for domestic  legitimacy and internal stability, the Chinese Communist Party leadership cannot be too happy to see an  authoritarian leader swept from power by a popular uprising, even if the country in question is far away  and very different.    1. The Mubarak Family  Well, duh. Not only is Hosni Mubarak likely to be denied the sort of legacy that he undoubtedly thought he  deserved, but his son Gamal is badly in need of a good career counselor. And there's the growing  possibility that Egypt's new leaders might start trying to track down the Mubarak's family's wealth, which  is estimated to be on the order of $2 billion to $3 billion. I won't be weeping for any of them, but there can  be no doubt that they are the "biggest losers" in the events of the last three weeks.   2. Al Qaeda  One of al Qaeda's standard talking points is its insistence that terrorist violence is the only way to bring  about change in the Arab world. It also likes to rail against U.S. support for authoritarian regimes in the  Islamic world. By driving Mubarak from office through largely peaceful demonstrations, the Egyptian  people have demolished the first claim. And despite some occasional wobbles, Barack Obama's  administration ultimately came down on the side of the demonstrators. By helping nudge Mubarak from  power and declaring its general support for the reform movement, the Obama administration has  undercut al Qaeda's second line of argument too. And in the best case ‐‐ a genuine democratic reform  movement that leads to significant improvements in Egyptian society ‐‐ al Qaeda's appeal will be reduced  even further. All in all, this was not a good month for Osama bin Laden, wherever he is.   3. The "Pax Americana" in the Middle East  The Obama administration's measured response to these events cannot disguise the fact that one of the  key pillars of the past four decades of Washington's Middle East policy has crumbled. Despite some  encouraging early signs, it is not yet clear how a post‐Mubarak government will deal with Israel, the Gaza  siege, extraordinary rendition, etc. A more representative Egyptian government is virtually certain to be  less subservient than the old regime was, which means that U.S. diplomacy toward Egypt and the region  will have to be more flexible and nuanced than it has been for some time. More than ever before, the  United States will want to put Middle East policymaking in the hands of people who are imaginative,  principled, evenhanded, deeply knowledgeable about Arab societies, and willing to rethink the failed  policies of the past. Do I think we will? No.  

25   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

 4. The Muslim Brotherhood  Despite all the attention the Muslim Brotherhood has recently received, I think it's more than likely that  Mubarak's departure will ultimately undercut its position in Egypt. It got 20 percent of the vote in the 2005  elections, but that total was inflated by the fact that it was the only real alternative to Mubarak's party.  Once you let other political parties form and compete for popularity, electoral support for the MB is likely  to decline, unless it can repackage itself in a way that appeals to younger Egyptians. Ironically, both  Mubarak and the MB may be more a part of Egypt's past than an influential part of its future.   5. The Palestinians  In the short term, the Egyptian upheaval is bad news for the Palestinians. Why? Because other countries  will pay even less attention to their plight than they usually do. Israel will be even less interested in the  sort of concessions that could bring an end to the conflict ‐‐ though a good case can be made that it should  seize this opportunity to chart a new course ‐‐ and the United States will be even less likely to put real  pressure on them to do so.   In the long term, Mubarak's departure may be beneficial, however, especially if the new government takes  a more active stance against the occupation. And if the Palestinian Authority uses the Egyptian example as  an occasion to reconcile with Hamas and hold new elections, we might even see a more legitimate  Palestinian national movement emerge as well. But don't hold your breath.   TO SOON TO TELL:  1. Arab Authoritarians  If I were an Arab monarch or a dictator like Bashar Assad of Syria, I'd certainly wouldn't be happy about  what I've been watching in Cairo. But in the short term, their futures depend both on how matters evolve  in Egypt and on how the remaining authoritarians respond to the Tunisian and Egyptian examples. If  conditions subsequently deteriorate in Egypt or if the revolution gets hijacked by incompetent, corrupt, or  extremist forces, then other Arab populations may be less inclined to follow suit. And the rest depends on  how skillfully the current rulers can appease, deflect, or adapt to a new environment. You can hardly call  them winners, of course, but it's not yet certain just how much they may have lost.   2. Israel  It's hardly surprising that many Israelis were alarmed by Mubarak's departure, because he collaborated  with them on a number of matters and never did more than complain verbally about the Palestinian issue.  But as I noted last week, his ouster could also be a wake‐up call: reminding Israelis that the regional  environment is subtly shifting against them, that military superiority is no guarantee against civil unrest  and global opprobrium, and that a fair deal with the Palestinians is the best way to secure their long‐term  future. And as Kai Bird notes here, it might even be a genuine opportunity. In short, whether Israel wins or  loses from this episode depends in part on how Israel chooses to respond to it.     3. President Barack Obama  The administration has walked a rather narrow tightrope for the past two weeks ‐‐ not always very  skillfully ‐‐ seeking an outcome neither "too hot" (widespread violence, extremists in power, etc.) nor "too  cold" (stability without reform). As I noted earlier, if these extremes are avoided, Obama and his team will  deserve (and probably receive) kudos from most fair‐minded observers, and his "no drama" approach to  foreign policy will get some much‐needed vindication. But if that Goldilocks "just right" outcome isn't  sustained, he'll face a firestorm of criticism either for "losing Egypt" or for turning a deaf ear to demands  for justice and democracy. Such accusations won't be entirely fair, insofar as no president can control 
26   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

events in a faraway country of 85 million people. But who ever said that political discourse in the United  States was fair?  So that's my list. But here's the obvious caution: We are in the early stages of this process, and  international affairs have a way of producing sudden and unexpected reversals of fortune. Some of today's  winners might look like losers tomorrow, and vice versa. And that goes for bloggers too.   ********************   

Iran hopes for Egypt in new orbit 
By: Sami Moubayed.  Source: Asia Times  Date: Feb 18, 2011 
  Sami Moubayed is editor‐in‐chief of Forward Magazine in Syria. 

  DAMASCUS ‐ Different players are watching Egypt for very different reasons. Arab youth see it as a brilliant  success story, and are striving to copy it in countries like Bahrain, Yemen and Libya.     The United States is obsessed with Egypt, worried about the loss of president Hosni Mubarak, a traditional  American ally in the Arab world. Israel is very worried ‐ if not frantic ‐ given the numerous favors Mubarak  had provided vis‐a‐vis the Palestinians in Gaza and in upholding and protecting the Camp David Accords of  1978.     Iran, however, and Hezbollah in Lebanon are thrilled to see the end of Mubarak, a man who aggressively  challenged their policies, often against the will of his own people, and all were quick in celebrating his  thundering collapse on February 11.     Mubarak to Iran is what Cuban leader Fidel Castro was to the United States ‐ a long‐standing and aging  opponent who did not leave behind a single good deed for which to be remembered. With him gone, they  are hoping that Egypt will shift into a new orbit, next to countries like Syria and Turkey, relieved that for  the next six months at least until possible elections, there will be no Mubarak to meddle in the affairs of  Lebanon or those of Hamas in the Gaza Strip.     At one point, when both countries were governed by pro‐Western monarchies, relations had been very  warm between Tehran and Cairo, resulting in a brief 1939 marriage between the sister of the king of Egypt  and the Shah of Iran.     In the 1950s, however, then‐Egyptian president Gamal Abdul Nasser accused the shah of being an agent of  "American imperialism" while the shah blasted him as a "puppet of the Soviet Union". Nasser threatened  to conquer Iran's Khuzestan province ‐ which he called Arabistan ‐ and popularized the term "Arab Gulf"  instead of "Persian Gulf".     Relations improved, however, in terms of bilateral trade and political coordination under Anwar Sadat,  only to come to an abrupt end after the Iranian revolution of 1979. The Iranians were furious with Sadat,  who hosted the toppled Shah Reza Pahlavi, severing relations with Cairo in 1980. They named a street in  honor of Sadat’s assassin in Tehran in 1981.    
27   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

All of that history combined to weigh heavily over the past 10 years on Egyptian‐Iranian relations,  explaining why the Iranians are thrilled to see the end of Mubarak, who carried nothing but contempt for  the Iranians until curtain fall.     All Iranian attempts at improving relations with Mubarak drastically failed, notably the 2003 high‐profile  meeting between him and then‐Iranian president Mohammad Khatami. The Iranian leader invited  Mubarak to Tehran but the Egyptians said that they would not make the trip and normalize relations with  Iran until all public tributes to Sadat’s assassin were "erased".     To please the Egyptians, Iran even changed the name of Khaled Islambouli Street, renaming it after the  uprising that erupted in Palestine in 2000, Intifada Street. In 2007, senior Iranian leader Ali Larijani visited  Cairo, meeting with foreign minister Ahmad Abu al‐Gheit, ex‐vice president and former intelligence chief  Omar Suleiman and Mohammad Said Tintawi, the grand sheikh of al‐Azhar, the highest authority in the  Muslim Sunni community.     In January 2008, a groundbreaking meeting took place between Mubarak and Gholam Ali Hada, the then‐ speaker of the Iranian parliament. This was followed by a phone call between Mubarak and Iranian  President Mahmud Ahmadinejad and a meeting between the Egyptian president and Iranian foreign  minister Manouchehr Mottaki. Mubarak called bilateral relations "positive and appropriate", while  Mottaki said Egypt supported Iran's right to develop peaceful nuclear technology.     A breakthrough, however, never really saw the light, given Egypt’s hostile position towards Hamas and  Hezbollah, which it saw as Iranian proxies in the Arab world. One of the driving reasons behind Mubarak’s  very aggressive attitude towards Hamas, for example, during the 2008 war on Gaza was because he simply  could not see the conflict through the broader Arab‐Israeli conflict.   As far as he was concerned, given Iran’s alliance with Hamas, if the Palestinian group was not crushed, he  would eventually have Egyptian borders not with Gaza, but with the Islamic Republic of Iran. That is why  he struck with an iron fist, sealing the Rafah crossing into Gaza, preventing pro‐Hamas demonstrations in  Egypt, and urging Israel ‐ behind closed doors ‐ to continue in its war, hoping that they could crush the  Islamic resistance in Palestine.     In 2006, during the Israeli war on Lebanon, Mubarak argued that Hezbollah leader Hasan Nasrallah was an  adventurer who had done Lebanon a great disservice by going to war against Israel ‐ words that echoed  what had been said in Riyadh. Mubarak sent shockwaves throughout Iran when he appeared on al‐ Arabiyya TV in 2006 and said that Shi'ites of the Arab world were more loyal to Iran than they were to their  own countries, echoing what King Abdullah of Jordan had earlier described as a "Shi'ite crescent".     In 2008, Nasrallah came close to calling for a popular uprising against Mubarak, and a revolt in the  Egyptian army, given that he had repeatedly refused to open the Rafah crossing. Mubarak responded by  arresting Hezbollah members in Egypt, accused of illegally transporting arms to the Palestinians in Gaza.     The Iranians needless to say were furious. They were equally very angry with Mubarak’s strong backing for  Palestinian President Mahmud Abbas' pro‐Western Fatah movement and his blind support for Lebanon’s  ex‐prime minister Saad al‐Hariri, who since 2005 has aggressively tried challenging Hezbollah’s power in  Lebanon.     By the time the Egyptian revolt broke out in January, all room for dialogue between Mubarak and the 
28   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Iranians had come to a grinding halt. They are now closely watching who will come next to the Presidential  Palace in Cairo next September.     The Iranians have no illusions; they realize that even if he so wishes, the next president of Egypt cannot  back out on Camp David, even if he wished. That after all would put him on a collision course with the US.  Although uncertain what kind of leader he will be, what is certain is that the next president will be a  complete contradiction to Mubarak.     Mubarak, for example, was in his early 80s while the new president will be much younger ‐ hopefully in his  40s. Mubarak was a dictator while the new president will certainly be elected to office through a  parliamentary democracy and not stay in power for more than two terms.     The ex‐president was hostile to Hamas and Hezbollah and was radically pro‐American and pro‐Israeli. The  new president will probably be way less pro‐American or pro‐Israeli than his predecessor, which makes  him by default, closer to resistance groups like Hamas and Hezbollah.  ******************** 

  Refocus on Iran: More Sanctions Needed 
By: James Phillips.  Source: The Heritage Foundation  Date: Feb 14, 2011   
James Phillips is Senior Research Fellow for Middle Eastern Affairs in the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy  Studies, a division of the Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Institute for International Studies, at The Heritage Foundation. 

  Iran’s hostile regime has been one of the chief beneficiaries of the political turmoil that has convulsed  Egypt and Tunisia, which distracted the United States and other countries from the ongoing standoff over  Iran’s nuclear program. The dramatic events diverted international attention from Tehran’s stubborn  refusal to negotiate an acceptable resolution of the nuclear issue at the failed Istanbul talks last month.  There is a distinct danger that Tehran will conclude that growing regional instability is tilting the balance of  power in its favor and give it greater latitude to withstand international pressure to rein in its nuclear  weapons program.   The Obama Administration should vigilantly refocus international attention on Iran’s nuclear defiance,  support for terrorism, and human rights abuses and ratchet up pressure on Iran’s radical regime.   Failed Nuclear Talks in Istanbul   Tehran demonstrated that it is not serious about a diplomatic resolution of the nuclear issue by rejecting  negotiations with the U.S., four other permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, and Germany at  the January 21–22 talks in Istanbul. Tehran refused to discuss “Iran’s nuclear rights,” including its  expanding uranium enrichment program, despite four rounds of Security Council sanctions requiring Iran  to comply with its nuclear safeguard obligations. Iran spurned Western efforts to revive a 2009 proposal  for a nuclear fuel swap that would have traded some of Iran’s growing stockpile of low‐enriched uranium 
29   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

for fuel for its Tehran research reactor ostensibly needed to produce medical isotopes. Tehran also  demanded that sanctions be lifted as a precondition for any future talks.   Rather than ease sanctions in a myopic effort to salvage vapid talks, the Obama Administration should  redouble efforts to escalate international sanctions on Iran’s recalcitrant regime. Although Iran’s uranium  enrichment program has suffered technical delays, including some caused by the mysterious Stuxnet  computer virus, Washington must not grow complacent about the amount of time remaining to dissuade  Tehran from continuing its nuclear efforts.   Iran is estimated to already possess enough low‐enriched uranium to arm at least two nuclear weapons if  it is further enriched. Despite a drop in the number of centrifuges operating at Iran’s uranium enrichment  facility at Natanz, the Federation of American Scientists released a study on January 21 that warned that  Iran’s enrichment capacity has steadily increased and become more efficient.  Washington should relentlessly ratchet up sanctions on Tehran also because rising oil prices have  cushioned some of the impact of previous sanctions on Iran, which exports about 2.2 million barrels of  crude per day. Iran earned about $64 billion from oil exports from January to November 2010, which was  approximately $11 billion more than it earned over the entire year of 2009. Iran’s regime, which has  gorged itself on state‐controlled oil revenues, is heavily dependent on oil profits to finance its military  buildup and expensive nuclear program and minimize its need for popular support.   Sanctions can be helpful to the extent that they drive up the economic, diplomatic, and political costs that  the regime must pay to continue on its present nuclear path. Although the regime is unlikely to halt its  nuclear weapons program unless it is convinced that the consequences of continuing will threaten its hold  on power, sanctions can also help fuel popular dissatisfaction with the regime that could eventually lead to  a change of regime. Such a change would be the best possible outcome not only for American counter‐ proliferation, counter‐terrorism, and human rights goals but also for the Iranian people.  What the Administration Should Do   To keep the pressure on Tehran, the Obama Administration should: 

Push for more U.N. sanctions. Washington should reject Tehran’s claim, backed by Russian Foreign  Minister Sergey Lavrov before the Istanbul talks, that sanctions inhibit negotiations on an  acceptable agreement with Iran. Sanctions clearly enhance international leverage over Tehran and  give it strong incentives to negotiate a deal. Easing sanctions before Iran has complied with the  U.N. Security Council resolutions would send a message of weakness and ambivalence that Tehran  would exploit to buy more time for advancing its nuclear efforts. The U.S. should cite Iran’s  contemptuous stonewalling at the Istanbul talks as a clear indication that another round of U.N.  sanctions is required. The new resolution should target Iranian officials responsible for human  rights violations and restrict foreign investment, technology transfers, and technical assistance for  Iran’s energy sector—the regime’s milk cow.   Ratchet up unilateral sanctions regimes against Iran. While Russia and China are likely to dilute  sanctions at the U.N. Security Council, much more can be done to increase pressure on Tehran  outside the U.N. framework. Washington should press India, Pakistan, Turkey, and Persian Gulf  states to ban foreign investment and technology transfers to Iran’s energy sector as the U.S.,  Australia, Canada, the EU, Japan, and South Korea have already done to varying degrees. The U.S. 
30   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

should also press other countries to join in sanctioning foreign firms that export gasoline or refinery  equipment to Iran, as the executive branch is authorized to do by the Comprehensive Iran  Sanctions, Accountability and Divestment Act (CISADA) of 2010.  

Strictly enforce U.S. sanctions. Despite congressional authorization, the executive branch has  failed to fully use its power to penalize foreign companies involved in Iran’s energy sector, in part  to avoid friction with allies. The Obama Administration, which has sanctioned only one foreign  company for violations of CISADA, needs to be more forward‐leaning to enforce the sanctions. The  Foundation for Defense of Democracies has identified more than 20 foreign companies involved in  ongoing energy projects in Iran. Congress should exercise its oversight powers to ensure that  existing sanctions laws are fully utilized to penalize Iran’s dictatorship and its foreign enablers.  Congress should also examine loopholes that previous Administrations have created to allow  humanitarian aid, food, and medical supplies to be exported to Iran to ensure that such permitted  exports are not funneled through companies controlled by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard  Corps.   Ensure that Chinese companies do not undercut sanctions. In recent years, Chinese companies  have developed extensive commercial ties with Iran. In particular, Chinese oil companies have  assumed a growing share of foreign investment in Iran’s energy sector, signing agreements to  invest more than $100 billion there. The Obama Administration should press Beijing to rein in these  companies and warn that Washington will impose sanctions on these companies if they follow  through on those commitments with actual investments. Washington should also take action  against any Chinese firms that seek to replace Japanese, South Korean, or Western firms that are  pulling out of Iran.  

Two Revolutions on February 11   Egypt’s President Hosni Mubarak was forced out of power on the same day that Iran commemorates its  1979 revolution. But the two revolutions have important differences despite the cynical claims by Iran’s  tyrannical regime that Egyptians were inspired by Iran’s Islamist revolution. In fact, Iran’s opposition Green  Movement has much more in common with Egypt’s young protesters than the thuggish leaders of the  regime, who have clamped down even harder on the leaders of the Green Movement to prevent them  from demonstrating today in support of Egyptians, as they had planned.   Although the Obama Administration missed the opportunity to clearly state its support for Iran’s  opposition after it was galvanized by the stolen election of June 2009, it should now give at least as much  rhetorical support to Iran’s struggle for freedom as it did to Egypt’s. Tehran’s systematic repression of the  political freedom and human rights of Iranian citizens deserves condemnation backed by international  sanctions as much as Iran’s nuclear defiance and support for terrorism.   ********************                 
31   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Politics Threaten Iran's Mediterranean Naval Ambitions 
By: Michael Eisenstadt .  Source: The Washington Institute  Date: Feb17, 2011   
Michael Eisenstadt is a senior fellow and director of The Washington Institute's Military and Security Studies Program   

The attempted passage through the Suez Canal of two Iranian warships en route to an unprecedented  Mediterranean deployment ‐‐ a controversial move that Israeli foreign minister Avigdor Lieberman called a  "provocation" and which has led to a spike in oil prices ‐‐ demonstrates the potential constraints on Iranian  efforts to realize its Great Power ambitions. Although this would be the first visit of Iranian warships to the  Mediterranean since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, it remains unclear whether the Iranian ships will  ultimately be permitted to transit the canal.   The two Iranian warships ‐‐ the aging frigate Alvand and the replenishment ship Kharq (a large fleet oiler) ‐ ‐ are former British warships that were sold to Iran under the Shah.   The Mediterranean deployment, first announced by Iran on January 23, is part of a broader effort by an  increasingly assertive Iran to play a greater role in the region and to project Iranian influence through  more active naval diplomacy.   To this end, Iranian naval vessels have made a series of port calls in the Indian Ocean and Red Sea region  since October 2010 in order to "show the flag," including visits to Oman, Sri Lanka, Qatar, and Saudi  Arabia.   Iran has also been conducting more frequent "out of area" deployments in recent years as part of its  efforts to create a viable "blue water" navy. It has been operating in the Gulf of Aden since November  2008, when it first sent warships to conduct antipiracy patrols in response to the seizure of an Iranian  cargo ship by Somali pirates. And in January 2011, Iranian navy commander Rear Admiral Habibollah  Sayyari urged the Islamic Republic to initiate a continuous presence in the northern parts of the Indian  Ocean as well. The deployment to the Mediterranean would further extend the Iranian navy's area of  operations.   According to Lieberman, the Iranian flotilla was expected to make a port call in Syria, and perhaps base  there during its stay in the Mediterranean. The planned deployment is likely intended to achieve several  objectives:   • Propaganda: to show the flag, to display Iran's military prowess, and ‐‐ as senior navy officers have  repeatedly emphasized ‐‐ to demonstrate the futility of efforts to isolate and contain Iran;   • Power projection: to intimidate Israel and to respond to the reported deployment of Israeli naval  vessels to the Persian Gulf region;  • Intelligence gathering: to gather information about operational conditions in the eastern  Mediterranean as well as Israeli and U.S. military activities in that area ‐‐ perhaps to include the  activities of U.S. Aegis ships deployed as part of NATO defenses against Iranian missiles (though this  information could perhaps be obtained more effectively by other means);  • Training: to gain experience operating for extended periods far from Iranian waters. 

32   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

The Iranian warships would, however, have little operational value in the event of a conflict. Operating  alone, without the possibility of rapid reinforcement, they would be quickly dispatched to the bottom of  the Mediterranean by the U.S. or Israeli navies.   By and large, although the intended significance of the deployment is largely symbolic ‐‐ an expression of  Iranian power and reach ‐‐ the jeopardized deployment demonstrates the degree to which Iranian  ambitions are potentially put at risk by the Islamic Republic's isolation and policies.   Iran's planned Mediterranean naval sortie, however, should be seen as a sign of things to come ‐‐ a  foretaste of the kind of more active and assertive role that a "nuclear" Iran will attempt to play in the  Middle East and beyond in the coming years.   ********************* 

  Arab Revolt Makes Turkey a Regional Power 
By: Soner Cagaptay.  Source: The Washington Institute  Date: Feb 16, 2011   
Soner Cagaptay is director of the Turkish Research Program at The Washington Institute.  One of the unexpected consequences of the unrest in the Middle East is the elevation of Turkey's role in the Middle East,  making Ankara a potential regional power.    

On Feb. 8, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood of Egypt, Ashraf Abdel Ghaffar, said in Istanbul that he was  taking refuge in Turkey, where he will remain until the demonstrations to remove Mubarak from power  succeed. Mr. Abdel Ghaffar then praised Turkey, referring to the governing Justice and Development Party,  or AKP's, political role, and said that his movement considers the AKP to be a model for Egypt after  Mubarak. And on Feb. 10, Turkish media quoted Abdel Ghaffar as saying that "there might be dialogue"  between the Muslim Brotherhood and the AKP.   These developments and the AKP's recent comments against Mubarak make Ankara a de facto protector  of the Muslim Brotherhood, a potential powerbroker in post‐Mubarak Cairo. More importantly, it provides  Turkey with access to hitherto unimaginable power in the Egyptian capital.   Since the AKP came to power in Turkey in 2002, a debate has formed over whether the party's Middle  East‐focused foreign policy has made Turkey a regional power with influence in Middle East capitals. Until  the upheavals in Tunisia and Egypt, this did not seem to be the case. The AKP's foreign policy line, for  instance, which defends Hamas and Iran's nuclear program, fell on deaf ears in most Arab capitals where  regimes were worried about Hamas‐related instability and Iran's growing influence in the Middle East.   Now, while the Muslim Brotherhood is emerging as a key player in Egyptian politics, the AKP, as an  advocate for this movement, has found an ally and voice in Cairo. The same also applies to Tunis, where  the local Muslim Brotherhood has emerged from the shadows since the fall of Tunisia's dictator.  Moreover, if unrest in other Arab countries were to topple more dictatorships a la Tunis, or force them to  recognize the opposition a la Egypt, the AKP would gain additional allies in more Arab capitals.   The Arab Winter of 2011 has created a new Middle East landscape in which the AKP's Turkey, which has  positioned itself as the defender of the Muslim Brotherhood and popular uprisings ‐‐ Ankara has voiced 
33   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

the strongest support for the Egyptian demonstrators, calling for Mubarak's departure before any country  did so ‐‐ is a regional power to be reckoned with.   The proximity between the AKP and the Muslim Brotherhood goes beyond contemporary political support.  In past years, leading AKP politicians, including Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, broke their  political teeth in the Muslim Brotherhood's Turkish versions. This included the Islamist Welfare Party, or  RP, in the 1990s, its predecessor and even more radically, the Islamist, National Salvation Party, or MSP, in  the 1970s. The Muslim Brotherhood, RP and MSP shared political goals, such as a desire to make a  narrowly defined conservative brand of religion the moral compass of their respective societies, as well as  a strong dislike of secular democracy and the United States.   Such political hobnobbing, akin to the socialists' networking for a common cause in the Socialist  International during the 20th century, lasted for decades, bringing together AKP and Muslim Brotherhood  members and allowing for the development of mutually supportive political and personal friendships. This  history affords the AKP power in the Arab capitals in the new Middle East.   For example, whether or not the Egyptian regime falls, the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is, for all  practical purposes, a force in politics in that country. It is likely to take part in the transition process after  Mubarak and perhaps join the government. Throughout this process, the AKP will defend the Muslim  Brotherhood as an ally and strive to maximize its role in Egyptian politics. The Muslim Brotherhood will, in  return, seek to provide its foreign policy vision, shared by the AKP, with leverage in Cairo.   This is the effective end of Turkey's decades‐long policy of strategic isolation from the Middle East. The  secular parties that ran Turkey until 2002 chose to coordinate Middle East policy with the West. After  2002, AKP supporters argued that the party's new Middle East‐focused foreign policy would make Turkey a  regional power, especially since the party did not seek concert with the West. Until the Arab Winter of  2011, this approach did not produce results. Not only did the AKP fail to wield influence in Arab capitals,  but it also alienated the country's traditional Western partners, for it often broke ranks with the West on  Middle East issues. In other words, the AKP could neither have its cake, nor eat it.   Now, the AKP can at least eat its cake. The party will not only continue to break rank with the West on  issues such as Sudan and Hamas, but it will also have the benefit of a receptive audience and powers to  support such policies in Cairo and elsewhere. After nearly a decade of disappointments, the AKP's Turkey is  now emerging as a regional power, thanks to the Arab Winter of 2011.   ********************               
34   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Pakistan’s Mubarak Moment 
By: Shahid Javed Burki.  Source: Project Syndicate  Date: Feb 02, 2011   
Shahid Javed Burki, former Finance Minister of Pakistan and Vice President of the World Bank, is currently Chairman of the  Institute of Public Policy, Lahore.  

  ISLAMABAD – Pakistan’s domestic situation is becoming increasingly precarious. Indeed, serious questions  are now being raised as to whether the country can survive in its present form.  Such  questions  stem  from  a  growing  fear  that  Islamist  groups  might  once  again  make  a  serious  bid  to  capture the levers of power in the country. If that is not possible because of the presence of a large and  disciplined  military,  the  Islamists  might  attempt  to  carve  out  some  space  for  themselves  in  which  to  establish  a  separate  system  of  governance  more  fully  aligned  with  what  they  view  as  the  principles  of  Islam.  Islamist  groups’  previous  attempt  to  create  such  a  space  was  successfully  countered  by  the  military  in  2009,  when  it  drove  insurgent  forces  from  the  sensitive  district  of  Swat  and  the  tribal  agency  of  South  Waziristan.  Today, however, Pakistan’s military may not be prepared to act with the force and conviction it showed  last time. Its resolve to counter the Islamists’ growing influence has been weakened by two unfortunate  events:  the  recent  assassination  of  Salman  Tasser,  the  governor  of  Punjab,  Pakistan’s  most  populous  province,  and  the  deaths  last  month  of  two  young  men  allegedly  at  the  hands  of  an  American  official  named Raymond Davis.  Taseer’s murder led to large public displays of support for the alleged assassin on the grounds that he had  taken  the  life  of  a  politician  who  had  questioned  the  content  of  the  “Hudood  ordinances.”  These  laws,  originally  promulgated  by  the  British  in  colonial  India  and  made  more  draconian  by  a  succession  of  Pakistani administrations, make any comment considered to be disrespectful toward Islam or the Prophet  Muhammad an offense punishable by death.  A Christian woman who was alleged to have made such a disparaging comment was the latest target of the  ordinances. Taseer had given his word that he would not allow the woman’s death sentence to be carried  out.  The  Davis  case  further  complicated  Pakistan’s  relations  with  the  United  States,  which  were  already  strained because of the military’s reluctance to move into North Waziristan – a mini‐state within Pakistan  from  which  the  Taliban  have  launched  operations  in  Afghanistan  against  US  forces.  With  the  Pakistani  street now demanding action against the “murderer” of two young men in Lahore, it was unlikely that the  military  would  move  in  any  way  that  could  be  seen  as  a  response  to  pressure  from  the  Obama  administration.  Even before Pakistan’s ruling elite was shaken by the killings in Pakistan’s streets and the turmoil in Tunisia  and Egypt, it had begun to plan measures aimed at mollifying an increasingly restive citizenry. Moreover, 
35   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

several senior members of President Asif Ali Zardari’s government have concluded that the developments  in Tunisia and Egypt could not be replicated in Pakistan.  “Our  institutions  are  working  and  democracy  is  functional,”  Prime  Minister  Yousuf  Raza  Gilani  told  members of the Western press. He could have added that the main opposition party, the Pakistan Muslim  League, was content to let him govern until the country went back to the polls sometime in late 2012 or  early 2013. There were also clear indications that the military was not inclined to venture into politics once  again, as it has done many times in the past.  But Gilani was not entirely unruffled. As Hosni Mubarak’s Egyptian regime unraveled, Gilani decided to call  for the resignation of his entire cabinet. Led by Senior Minister Amin Fahim from the province of Sindh, all  cabinet members submitted their resignations to the prime minister on February 4.  On the same day, the Central Executive Committee of the Pakistan People’s Party “authorized the prime  minister to reappoint a smaller cabinet with fewer ministers enjoying reputation of integrity, competence,  and efficiency.” The final move in that direction came on February 9, when, at a farewell lunch for his large  cabinet, Gilani sent his ministers packing. A new, smaller cabinet was sworn in two days later.   Gilani’s  step  was  taken  in  response  not  only  to  the  developments  in  the  Middle  East,  but  also  in  recognition of how little the return to democracy has done for Pakistan’s citizens. Officials are also aware  that  a  change  in  the  cabinet  will  be  seen  as  mere  window  dressing  unless  people  are  shown  that  the  government has a plan to rescue the economy from collapse and alleviate the burdens faced by ordinary  people.  Indeed, Pakistan’s rate of economic growth is the slowest on the South Asian mainland – one‐half that of  Bangladesh and one‐third that of India. A sharp increase in the prices of essential commodities means that  the real income of the bottom 60% of the population has declined.  Sluggish  economic  activity  has  increased  the  rate  of  urban  unemployment  to  an  estimated  34%  of  the  labor  force.  While  a  functioning  democratic  system  and  a  vibrant  media  may  have  provided  outlets  for  people to vent their frustration with the state of the economy and the quality of governance, the political  elite now recognizes that many ingredients in the Pakistani situation were present in those Middle Eastern  countries where street politics have reached the boiling point.  The message is clear: democracy that does not deliver tangible benefits will not prevent Pakistan’s people  from demanding radical change. The question now is whether the political class has the wherewithal to act  accordingly.  ******************** 

             
36   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

The Message for China from Tahrir Square 
By: Minxin Pei.  Source: Carnegie Endowment  Date: Feb 12, 2011   
Minxin Pei is an adjunct senior associate in the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment. 

  The uprising in Egypt must have stunned Chinese leaders. Beijing has heavily censored news of the  uprising, strongly indicating that the Chinese Communist party (CCP), which narrowly avoided collapse  during a similar popular revolt in 1989, is gripped by the fear that it could encounter the same fate as  befell Hosni Mubarak.  The insecurity displayed by China’s ruling elites may seem extreme. After all, unlike the Mubarak regime,  the CCP has consistently delivered increasing standards of living and currently faces few threats to its  authority at home. The conventional wisdom says China has a self‐confident leadership that sees itself as a  contender for global supremacy.  But look a little deeper and this ostensibly resilient regime is afflicted by many of the same pathologies as  Egypt: repression, corruption, low accountability, a surprisingly narrow base of support and fast‐rising  inequality. Yes, growth and prosperity help the CCP maintain its legitimacy. But the regime knows that  performance‐based legitimacy is unreliable, at best. The same frustrations that drove Egyptians into the  streets could be unleashed in China when its economy inevitably hits a speed bump.  With mounting developmental challenges, China’s continued economic prosperity is by no means  guaranteed, while rising food price inflation is a particular cause of concern for the regime. For the CCP,  meeting such challenges requires not only technocratic policy solutions but also ought to include political  reforms that will open up participation, make the CCP more accountable, and create a new basis of  legitimacy.  That said, it is likely that the CCP will conclude that Mr Mubarak’s regime should have practised even  harsher repression, and nipped the revolt in the bud. Chinese leaders probably also blame western  influence and conspiracy, as they did when the colour revolutions toppled unpopular regimes in Ukraine,  Georgia and Kyrgyzstan a few years ago.  China’s leadership may also attribute Mr Mubarak’s fall to his mediocre economic record – particularly his  failure to create jobs for college graduates. Rising unemployment of college graduates is a problem China  shares with Egypt.  It is far from clear, however, that these are right lessons for Beijing to draw. Starting long‐delayed  democratic reforms from a position of relative political strength could actually be in the CCP’s self‐interest.  The peaceful and smooth democratic transitions in Taiwan, Mexico and Brazil show that authoritarian  regimes that initiate political opening could fare better than those that do not.  Even so, the CCP is more likely to continue to rely on the survival strategy it has adopted when its solders  crushed the Tiananmen pro‐democracy movement in June 1989. But the sustainability of this strategy  seems increasingly in doubt. In China today social frustrations rise almost as fast as economic growth. 
37   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

If the Egyptian crisis teaches us anything, it is that the legitimacy of autocrats vanishes quickly when  circumstances change, and such regimes’ flaws are laid bare. The durability of the CCP’s rule, rather than  just China’s economic trajectory, should now again be a hot topic of speculation.  Such a conversation is certainly one Chinese leaders, long accustomed to basking in the international glow  of their economic miracle, would prefer not to have. They may have no choice. Like financial contagion,  the political contagion that originated in Tunisia and spread to Egypt has refocused the attention of the  international community on the underlying political frailties of autocratic regimes. The more such regimes  get scrutinised, the less attractive they look.  Here China’s recent history provides an apt lesson. Without Deng Xiaoping’s economic reforms, the CCP  would certainly have not survived the devastation of the Cultural Revolution. But Deng’s reforms can take  a fundamentally flawed political regime only so far. The more difficult of gradual democratisation still lies  ahead. The unfolding Egyptian revolution of 2011 should remind Beijing that it is high time to confront this  task.  ********************   

How Russia and China See the Egyptian Revolution 
By: Fiona Hill.  Source: foreign policy  Date: Feb 15, 2011 
  Fiona Hill is director of the Brookings Institution's Center on the United States and Europe and senior fellow in its foreign‐ policy program. 

  One of the principal bases of U.S. foreign policy under President Barack Obama has been to create as  constructive relations as possible with Russia, China, and other great powers. The administration had some  degree of success in 2010: notably the Russia "reset" policy and managing inevitable trade and other  tensions with rising China. But 2011 looks set to be more challenging as events continue to unfold in Egypt  after the mass demonstrations that ousted President Hosni Mubarak and as the United States, Russia, and  China all prepare for elections in 2012.   In moving forward on a strategy for Egypt, Washington will have to factor in how to deal with reactions  and perceptions in Moscow and Beijing, and what implications the still evolving outcomes in Cairo will  have for the complex algorithm of bilateral relations between the United States, Russia, and China. The  demonstrations in Tahrir Square will have global ripple effects, and Washington must be very careful to  avoid falling into the usual stovepipes in thinking through and crafting a comprehensive response. This is  not simply an issue for the Arabists or Middle East hands in the administration.   Although China and Russia are clearly very different from Egypt, the implosion of Mubarak's regime is a  stark warning of the difficulties all authoritarian governments face in dealing with the modern world.  Mubarak's fate was shaped by a faltering economy, high unemployment, glaring income disparities,  mounting popular frustration, and the unpredictable dynamics created by new forms of public and social  media. Although China may be rising economically and politically, the one‐party regime perceives serious  challenges to its legitimacy, and crisis management is complicated by its collective leadership. Russia is  particularly vulnerable given the tight correlation between its economic growth and global oil prices and 
38   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

the fact that, as in Egypt, one man ‐‐ Vladimir Putin ‐‐ dominates the political scene and his personal  popularity underpins the government's legitimacy. China and Russia will now be very cautious about  opening their domestic political space for more popular participation in their respective leadership  transition and presidential elections in 2012 in case this casts increased media spotlight on their  shortcomings and brings opposition groups and their supporters onto the streets. They will also watch  Washington's policies in Egypt very closely for any hint that the United States will move to support their  domestic opposition groups now that the political winds in Washington seem to have changed in favor of  democracy promotion again. For Beijing and Moscow, internal stability will be even more the imperative.   China and Russia should also be concerned about where unrest might emerge next. Most of the focus in  recent days has been on the Middle East, on the consequences for Israel and Iran, and on the potential  contagion or inspiration for political change across the Arab world, given that the uprising in Egypt was  preceded and spurred by the January overthrow of President Zine el‐Abidine Ben Ali in Tunisia. The list of  Arab regimes next in line for a popular backlash variously includes Algeria, Jordan, Syria, Yemen, and also  potentially the Palestinian Authority. But none of these states is of monumental strategic significance to  Moscow or Beijing. However, there are states outside the Arab world and the Middle East where family  dynasties or autocratic regimes have entrenched themselves, emasculated opposition parties and  democratic institutions, and denied their populations any meaningful say in leadership succession. Many  of these are in Russia and China's neighborhood, including Azerbaijan; Belarus; the Central Asian states of  Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan; and North Korea. They all face the risk of their own  Mubarak moment. And Russia, in particular, is right to be worried. A host of states on its periphery had  their political convulsions in the so‐called color revolutions of 2003 to 2005.  Succession maneuverings by the ruling elites are under way behind the scenes in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan,  and Uzbekistan to decide who will eventually replace their aging presidents. Kazakhstan's leadership has  had the benefit of a growing economy and swelling state revenues to blunt the attraction of potential  opposition parties and has been quick to close borders and batten down the hatches when its neighbors  have convulsed. Uzbekistan's president, Islam Karimov, embarked on a massive crackdown against political  opposition after an insurgency and protests in the city of Andijan in May 2005 and continues to maintain  an iron grip on domestic politics. In the past year, Tajikistan has been plagued by regional insurgencies and  factionalism with the unraveling of the domestic peace accords that brought an end to its ruinous civil war  in 1997. And Kyrgyzstan has already undergone two uprisings against unpopular presidents since 2005 and  is now embarked on a shaky experiment in coalition government.   Meanwhile, to Russia's south and west, Georgia and Ukraine had their Rose and Orange revolutions in  November 2003 and November 2004, respectively. Georgian opposition groups calling for early elections  clashed with police during protests in November 2007; and Ukraine's politics have at times been brought  to a complete standstill by fierce rivalries among the leaders of the Orange Revolution in the last six years.  Mass protests also marked the transition from Heydar to Ilham Aliyev (father to son) in Azerbaijan in  October 2003, and smaller protests have been a feature of subsequent elections. Moldova was racked by  election‐related protests in its so‐called "Twitter Revolution" in April 2009; and President Aleksandr  Lukashenko in Belarus recently cracked down hard on demonstrations after December 2010's flawed  presidential election. All the while, to the east in North Korea, Kim Jong Il is in the process of trying to  saber‐rattle his way through a handover of power to his son, Kim Jong Un. How the United States now  reacts to and handles developments in Egypt will have ramifications for future developments in other  states. It will also have an impact on how Russia and China expect the United States to react to future  cases.  
39   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Russia and China have hardly been immune to revolutions and uprisings in their own long histories. The  scenes in Tahrir Square have evoked memories of events leading to Mikhail Gorbachev's resignation and  the December 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, and of the June 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. The  two countries' governments have had some recent scares with clashes on Moscow's Manezh Square in  December 2010, between Russian ultranationalist protesters and police, and massive ethnic skirmishes in  China's Xinjiang autonomous region in July 2009. Russian and Chinese leaders are well aware ‐‐ and have  frequent reminders ‐‐ of the dangers of demonstrators taking to the streets and squares of major cities,  and of the role new social media can play in helping even the smallest demonstration take an  unpredictable turn and get out of hand. They pay close attention to opposition activities and protests, as  well as to activity on the Internet. China banned web searches of "Egypt," and Russia's state media has  tended to play up the idea of U.S. and other outside orchestration of the events in Cairo.   The domestic concerns may be somewhat greater for Russia than China. Mubarak's ouster underscores the  dangers associated with a highly personalized political system. While China still has the Communist Party,  Russia only has Vladimir Putin (even if he is currently part of a tandem with Dmitry Medvedev). Putin has  yet to give his unqualified endorsement of a second term for Medvedev in the presidential election cycle  that has already begun this year ‐‐ leading to speculation that Putin might return to the presidency in 2012.  If he does, he could theoretically remain for two consecutive six‐year terms until 2024, when he will be 72  ‐‐ still 10 years younger than Mubarak was when he was summarily dumped. This would put Putin at the  helm of Russia, one way or another, for almost a quarter‐century.   The Russian regime's legitimacy is derived in large part from Putin's personal popularity and from the past  decade of unprecedented economic gains. Putin is given considerable popular credit for having restored  the country's domestic order, economic prosperity, and international standing while he was president, and  most recently for having guided the country through the worst of the global economic crisis with a  substantial and effective package of bailouts and stimulus measures as prime minister. Although there is  currently no serious organized political opposition to Putin and the regime inside Russia, there are many  public signs of popular and also elite impatience for more fundamental change in the economy and the  workings of government, most notably among the younger generation. Russian society is evolving faster  than the political system. The Internet and popular social networking sites, including Russia's own versions,  have taken off over the last several years. They are increasingly being used to organize grassroots  responses to events, including during last year's debilitating peat‐bog fires when a series of activist  websites mobilized volunteers to fight fires and assist residents of devastated villages after local and  central authorities failed to respond. As president, Medvedev has made efforts to address this change with  a range of initiatives from maintaining his own Twitter account to a high‐profile modernization campaign ‐‐  but not with much success. The Russian government has been greatly alarmed by the continued brain  drain of some of its best and brightest to Europe ‐‐ most notably last year's two Nobel Prize‐winning  physicists ‐‐ and polling indicating that around 70 percent of respondents, especially young professionals,  would live abroad if given the opportunity.  The events in Egypt over the last several weeks have shown that no serious organized political opposition  is actually necessary to get people out onto the streets if they are angry enough. This was also, in fact, the  pattern in Ukraine and Georgia, where demonstrations took the opposition parties somewhat by surprise ‐ ‐ and especially in Kyrgyzstan, where the opposition was dragged along by events and is still playing catch‐ up.  

40   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

For Russia, the world price of oil is the single‐most important factor for the future of its economy. In the  short term, the price of oil dictates overall growth rates. If the current upward trend in oil prices holds, the  Russian economy ought to be able to continue growing at about 4 percent annually. If prices are flat, then  growth of 1 to 2 percent a year will be more likely. But even in the most optimistic case, the Russian  economy will grow at a considerably slower pace than in the previous decade, when it grew on average  around 7 percent a year. Over time, such sluggish growth may not suffice to meet expectations of the  Russian population, and it certainly will not be enough to deal with some of the Russian economy's more  serious and deep‐seated problems ‐‐ inadequate and deteriorating infrastructure, outmoded physical  capital, and Russia's demographic and health crisis. The Russian government has sought to gloss over these  inadequacies with some popular showcase bids, including securing the 2014 Winter Olympics for Putin's  favorite vacation spot of Sochi and the 2018 soccer World Cup, but a poorly performing economy and high  unemployment after 2012 would eventually undermine the popular base of support for Putin (if he is still  in place).   Internationally, the most sensitive issue in the wake of Egypt for both Russia and China is North Korea,  which both states border. While Russia may not play any determining role in North Korean politics, it has  long had aspirations for creating a free economic zone in the Tumen River border region to stimulate the  ailing economy of the Russian Far East. It wants a friendly divided or unified set of Koreas on its doorstep.  Russia is set to host the 2012 Asia‐Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Vladivostok, not far  from the North Korean border, where it hopes to emphasize its own status as an Asian‐Pacific power and  bask in the reflected dynamism of the region. Moscow's nightmare scenario would be one where it stands  haplessly by as China and the United States either sort out or fight over which gets to pick up all the pieces  from a North Korean succession‐related implosion.   Apart from their concerns about the domestic implications of Egyptian developments or contagion, Russia  and China have their own sets of interests and relations in the Middle East to consider. Mubarak's personal  relations with Russia, for example, extend back into the Soviet past to the early 1960s when he received  fighter‐pilot training at Soviet bases and studied at Moscow's Frunze Military Academy. The regime  Mubarak created in Egypt after 1981 had many similarities with Central Asian and other post‐Soviet states,  where real political power is highly concentrated, a small number of people at the top make all key  decisions outside the formal political institutions of the state, there is heavy reliance on the security  services and a bloated government bureaucracy for support, and stability at all costs is the watchword of  the regime.   Chinese and Russian leaders and elites vastly inflate the U.S. capacity to shape events, even under the best  of circumstances. Based on past precedent, including Chinese perceptions about U.S. support for those  who sought to overthrow the regime during the Tiananmen protests and firmly held Russian convictions  that the United States orchestrated the color revolutions, Beijing and Moscow will tend to see active U.S.  efforts to manipulate future outcomes in Egypt. Some of this is certainly tied to George W. Bush's  administration, whose intentions to promote democratization internationally aroused Russian and Chinese  suspicions. Russia and China saw Bush's "Freedom Agenda" as nothing more than a cynical tool to spread  and exert U.S. influence. In this case, though, it is clear that the United States is also playing catch‐up with  events in Egypt. No matter how the situation in Egypt evolves, it will effect Chinese and Russian  perceptions of the United States as an interlocutor and partner on issues unrelated to Egypt and the  Middle East.  

41   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Before Mubarak's ouster, Russia, China, and the United States shared the same preference for a soft  transition rather than an abrupt regime change in Egypt. The course of events will now likely force the  United States to push for the rapid installation of a transitional government that is as representative of as  many of the newly emerging political forces as possible. Russia and China are more likely to want to keep  the transitional government as the new government ‐‐ a new face for the old regime ‐‐ for as long as  possible. Although it will not be easy, it is now in the U.S. interest to talk to Beijing and Moscow on an  ongoing basis to elicit their thinking and, perhaps most importantly, to defuse their concerns and anxieties.  The constructive rather than obstructive involvement of China and Russia in the process ahead in Egypt  should be a goal of U.S. policy moving forward.   *********************   

The Ripple Effect 
Source: Foreign Policy  Date: Feb 15, 2011    When Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in Tunisia on Dec. 17 after a municipal worker confiscated his  wares, it appeared to be simply another sad story in a region plagued by corruption, brutal state security  services, and lack of accountability. But against all odds, his act of desperation has spurred a wave of  reform that has engulfed the entire region, toppling the autocratic regimes in Tunisia and Egypt and  threatening to engulf other countries across the Middle East.   But the uprising has not followed the same course in every country. In Jordan, protests have forced the  government to abandon liberal reforms in favor of an unsustainable economic status quo. In Algeria, they  have highlighted the public's disaffection with the political process. In other countries, the reverberations  from the popular upheaval are still unclear. In the West Bank, for example, opinions remain divided about  whether the events represent an opportunity for the Palestinian Authority, or its death knell.   Read on for dispatches and observations from the countries most affected by the Middle East's  revolutionary moment.    Yemen: The Revolution Turns Bloody  
By Laura Kasinof  is a freelance journalist based in Sanaa, Yemen. 

In the impoverished south Arabian country of Yemen, there has been an important shift in the anti‐regime  movement since Hosni Mubarak relinquished power in Egypt on Feb. 11. The old‐guard leaders of Yemen's  political opposition who had led anti‐regime rallies in the past few weeks have taken a step back.  Meanwhile, more energized and angrier younger activists have taken the lead, as protests, which have  grown notably more violent, have erupted in major cities across the country.    In Yemen's capital of Sanaa, hundreds of students have been coming out daily since Friday night calling for  an end to the regime of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. There has been a notable shift in the intensity of  rhetoric used in demonstrations in past weeks. Many of the protesters are unemployed college graduates  who say they are tired of how their society's endemic corruption prohibits them from obtaining work. "I  can't afford my studies because there is corruption," one visibly upset young Yemeni protester told me.  "There is no real justice in Yemeni society. Some people get everything and others are starving."   They shout the same chants heard during Egypt's revolution and carry signs that say simply in Arabic:  "Leave." And, as in Cairo, the demonstrators have been routinely attacked by pro‐government thugs using  sticks and throwing rocks. Sunday marked the first time official security forces used violence against 
42   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

opposition protesters, when riot police used tasers to disperse a crowd of about 100 staging a sit‐in at one  of Sanaa's main squares.   But it's important to note that the number of protesters on the streets in Yemen remains fairly small. On  Sunday, about 1,000 anti‐government protesters took part in what were the largest rallies to date. The  country has yet to see the sort of mass mobilization that came together to topple the regimes in Egypt and  Tunisia.   Furthermore, there are also competing pro‐government rallies taking place. Tribesmen, mostly heralding  from staunchly pro‐Saleh areas outside the capital, have set up tents in the main square of Sanaa since  Friday night. "We are here to protect our country," declared Mahyoub Dahan, one pro‐Saleh supporter  from Beni Hushaish, who on Tuesday was affixing two pins to his suit coat, one with a photo of Saleh and  another that read: A united Yemen. "Maybe we'll stay [in the square] one month. Maybe more."   Saleh badly wants to stave off a mass uprising in Yemen ‐‐ a scenario that Washington also wants to avoid  because of the strong al Qaeda presence in Yemen. In a Feb. 2 speech before an emergency session of  parliament, Saleh announced that he would not run for president again ‐‐ nor would his son succeed him.  He also proposed a number of economic reforms. On Monday night, he said that he would open the  presidential office to civil society organizations in order to discuss "issues concerned by the public." But  these concessions have not appeased the political opposition, which says that Saleh has not dealt with any  of the issues that truly need to be addressed, such as calls for secession in south Yemen.   This is why Yemen's coalition of formal opposition parties, the Joint Meetings Parties, is pushing for more.  Yet even while gaining a lift from the anti‐regime energy of Tunisia's and Egypt's revolutions, the  opposition in Yemen suffers from disorganization and a fractured leadership. Its leaders have not been  clear about what their response will be if the president refuses to meet their demands. They know what  they don't want ‐‐ but what they're in fact advocating for remains even less clear.   Iran: The Green Movement Lives On  
By Kelly Golnoush Niknejad  the founder and chief editor of Tehran Bureau, now in partnership with PBS's Frontline.   

It seemed like a peculiar time for Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi, prominent leaders of Iran's  Green Movement, to call for protests. After all, it wasn't just Iran's venomous hard‐line press that had long  declared the democratic movement dead. In the absence of street protests for more than a year, the  Western mainstream media had ruefully pronounced that the Islamic Republic had succeeded in violently  repressing the nascent reform movement. But the two leaders, despite being placed under house arrest by  the regime, urged their followers to take to the streets on Feb. 14 for the largest protests since the  muzzling of the Green Movement in December 2009.   True, the recent uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt sent ripples throughout the region. But the Islamic Republic  is its own peculiar animal, and the odds were stacked against a significant turnout by the opposition.  Despite Iranian officials' grandstanding about the events in Egypt, contending that they were inspired by  Iran's own 1979 revolution, they refused to grant opposition leaders a permit to demonstrate in solidarity  with the brave people of Egypt.   The stakes were high ‐‐ in a word, death. If you didn't get shot on the street, there was the distinct  possibility of falling prey to Iran's version of swift justice. The rate of executions has increased ‐‐ in mid‐
43   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

January, the New York‐based International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran put it at one every eight  hours.   That punishment has now been extended to a Dutch woman of Iranian descent arrested during the 2009  post‐election protests and a web developer facing execution for allegedly building an adult website.   The death sentences sent chills beyond the sphere of political activists. "Now we don't know exactly what  he has done," a musician in Tehran wrote me a few days ago, "but if it is only designing a website that is  considered immoral by the government and getting a death penalty for it, then it is truly terrifying."   But despite the enormous risks, tens of thousands of Iranians streamed into the streets of Tehran and  other cities for the Valentine's Day protests. "It was beyond anything we had expected," a Tehran Bureau  correspondent in the capital told me. "I was all over on foot and on the rapid transit buses. The crowds  were EVERYWHERE."   There were reports of scuffles, confrontations, and even severe beatings throughout the city. At least one  protester was killed. But on the whole, the security forces were restrained. "It seemed like the Basij were  ordered not to act until ordered," our correspondent added. "They just stood around looking bewildered.  When the riot police would drive by on their bikes, they just put the fires out."   And perhaps most significantly, it appeared that Iranians from working‐class neighborhoods were involved  in the protests for the first time.   "I see the frustration over higher prices for fuel and basic food stuff and the jadedness of people toward  the laws and regulations attacking their very foundation," a friend from affluent north Tehran wrote me in  an email. "And I see the strength of the moneyed ‐‐ the privileged importers (ghachaghchis), the big  developers, the quasi‐government businesses ‐‐ keeping their grip on the economy by enriching the  ruthless to rule the innocent. The tragedy is beyond description."   Iranian state media did its best to demonize the protest movement. The Islamic Republic of Iran  Broadcasting repeatedly showed a clip of the former shah's son Reza Pahlavi praising Monday's protests  and Voice of America and BBC Farsi analysts supporting the demonstrations. "In between the clips, [Iranian  media featured] pictures of Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi [with] a backdrop of a Star of David  and U.S. flag," reported a Tehran Bureau intern who watched state TV coverage of the protests.   The protests raged into the night, but few expect them to spill over into successive days. Conditions in Iran  are far more repressive than under the autocrats in Tunisia and Egypt, and Iran is far less susceptible to  international pressure. The question on everyone's mind was whether anybody would show up in the first  place. In that sense, the Feb. 14 protests opened a window of opportunity for the Green Movement and  showed that its leaders can still bring their followers to the streets.   Jordan: A Step Backward  
By Alice Fordham is a Middle East correspondent who has reported from Iraq, Yemen, Lebanon, and Egypt.   

Blink, and you'll miss the tiny shift toward change in Jordan. In the capital of Amman, where pictures of  King Abdullah and his gorgeous consort Queen Rania deck public buildings, dissent is unusual. But lately,  protesters have marched through its rain‐washed streets.  

44   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Jordan has not been immune to the wave of unrest sweeping the region. As the Egyptian government  tottered, protesters took to the streets in the thousands to protest rising commodity prices and rampant  unemployment. They rallied outside the Egyptian Embassy in downtown Amman, the Islamists waving  elaborate green banners and yelling "Allahu akbar" into megaphones. Stern women marched with small  children, declaring that they, too, were demonstrating for their country's future.   But the bloggers and tweeters ‐‐ the young, secular, and liberal citizens who caught the imagination of  Western audiences in Egypt and Tunisia ‐‐ have mostly stayed at home. In this poor, sparsely populated  kingdom, the protests have come from tribal elders and religious conservatives. The populist concessions  the king has made to his noisy critics have marked a significant step backward for the country.   In a bid to contain the simmering discontent, the king fired Prime Minister Samir Rifai, reversed a  government hiring freeze, and raised wages for civil servants. In the place of Rifai, the king appointed  Marouf Bakhit as prime minister, a more conservative figure who used to be the head of national security.  King Abdullah also held talks with the Muslim Brotherhood and listened sympathetically to tribal leaders,  who argued for greater representation in parliament.   While sold as reforms, critics said that giving more political power to tribes and Islamists, and more money  to government employees, were in fact regressions to business as usual. The tribal segments of Jordanian  society ‐‐ or "East Bankers" ‐‐ the inhabitants of the area who predate the arrival of the Palestinian  population, are the bedrock of support for the king, and they demand civil‐ and security‐service jobs in  exchange for loyalty. However, critics worry that the economy cannot sustain this bloated mass of  government workers for long.   The regime has rigged electoral districts and election laws to make sure that loyalists and tribal figures are  disproportionately represented in the country's parliament. Reformist MPs were stymied in their effort to  push through a new election law before the most recent parliamentary elections last November, and the  elections went forward as they had previously ‐‐ with low turnout and predictable winners. The biggest  loser in this dynamic has been the Muslim Brotherhood, the most organized party in Jordan. It boycotted  the most recent election but would likely do well in another, fairer contest.   Abdelatif Arabiyat, a member of the Brotherhood's shura council, said that its main demand was simply for  real polls, but indicated a desire to distance Jordan from the United States as well. "The West has  implanted Western terminology about liberal democracy," he said. "Why is democracy only for liberals?…  All U.S. policy is to stop Islamists. This is bad and will fail."   This order has been shaken lately by a sagging economy and soaring population. Jordan has few resources,  and the money coming in from aid, tourism, and knowledge industries like technology and medicine is not  enough to support its growing population.   The previous government attempted to implement painful measures to remedy the situation, instituting a  hiring freeze in the civil service and pay cuts, which hit East Bankers hard, because they make up the bulk  of government jobs. Rifai also carried out World Bank‐supported liberalization programs of state assets,  continuing the privatization of the telecommunications network and large parts of the Aqaba port  operation.  

45   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

In a departure from previous examples of dissent, some Jordanians have boldly escalated their critiques to  explicit attacks on the royals during the current wave of protests. An open letter to the monarchy issued  by 36 tribal leaders included some snide invective about Queen Rania, comparing her to Tunisia's famously  profligate former first lady, Leila Trabelsi. The monarchy responded harshly, threatening the Agence  France‐Press journalist who reported on the letter with legal action and demanding that the AFP remove  her from her post.   But while the monarchy tries to quell dissent, its concessions on its program to reform the economy mean  that it has already lost the larger battle. The Jordanian economy cannot survive the country's backward  politics much longer. As life for Jordanians gets harder, the protests on the streets of Amman will only get  louder.   Tunisia: Ben Ali Is Gone ‐‐ But Economic Hardships Remain  
By Eric Goldstein is deputy Middle East and North Africa director for Human Rights Watch.   

Since Tunisians ousted President Zine el‐Abidine Ben Ali four weeks ago, many refugees have returned to  emotional homecomings, while other émigrés have said they will head home soon to help build a new  Tunisia.   But the surprise arrival over the last few days of 4,000 Tunisian "boat people" to the small Italian island of  Lampedusa, off the Sicilian coast, is a stark reminder that, "Jasmine Revolution" or no, many Tunisians see  their best chance for a better life in Europe rather than at home.   Tunisia may commonly be labeled a middle‐class Arab nation, but it still has a large underclass, and even  for the moderately well‐off, the standard of living remains far below that of Europe. Little surprise, then,  that many Tunisian youth are ready to risk their lives crossing the Mediterranean in rickety boats. Some  who reached Lampedusa say they also fear continuing instability at home. While their status has yet to be  determined, most will likely be repatriated to Tunisia if they cannot make a viable case for asylum.   Tunisia's transitional government is now faced with the difficult task of responding to the economic  demands of an impatient public. The government is headed by Prime Minister Mohammed Ghannouchi ‐‐  the only holdover from Ben Ali's last council of ministers following a cabinet shake‐up on Jan 27. The  government includes many respected independent figures and leaders of two small opposition parties. On  Feb. 9, parliament voted to give acting President Fouad Mebazaa, the speaker of the assembly, the  authority to rule by decree.   Labor unrest has mounted following Ben Ali's departure, which lifted the lid on the population's long‐ suppressed demands. Elementary school teachers went on strike on Jan. 24, the day schools were to  reopen, keeping many parents home from work. Baggage handlers at Tunis's airport walked off the job on  Jan. 31, forcing at least one arriving jet to turn back mid‐voyage. Last week, it was sanitation workers in  Tunis seeking better working conditions and benefits. And unemployed university graduates have held  frequent rallies in front of government ministries, demanding state jobs.   These strikes have clouded the country's short‐term economic outlook, while sustained street protests  have tested the police force, which is ill‐trained in nonviolent crowd control techniques. Adding to this  combustible mix is the pervasive suspicion that militias and provocateurs from the deposed regime are  provoking crowds and instigating violence, calculating that fear and instability benefits them and whoever  is giving them their orders.  
46   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

The transitional government, led by Mebazaa, has moved ahead boldly on human rights issues,  communicating a determination to break with the repressive past. The government has conditionally freed  most of the 500‐plus political prisoners held at the end of Ben Ali's presidency, pending a promised general  amnesty. It also has promised that Tunisia will join the International Criminal Court, making it the first  North African state to do so, and become a signatory to other international human rights treaties.   The transitional government also has taken steps to dismantle the infrastructure that enabled Ben Ali's  repressive rule. It has formed a commission to recommend legal revisions that will ensure the general  elections promised for later this year are free and fair. The reformist interior minister announced he would  sack 42 high officials associated with the old leadership. Judges renowned for their high conviction rates in  political cases have been reassigned to desk jobs. But there has been no indiscriminate de‐Baathification‐ style purges so far; the new ministers have retained most of the high‐level bureaucracy they inherited, at  least for now.   One dramatic change is in the state‐run and state‐influenced media. Now, the national media is giving  voice to the grievances of ordinary Tunisians, putting thinkers and activists blacklisted until one month ago  on camera. Tunisia has become the only North African country where people seem to be tuning in to their  own television stations as much as Al Jazeera.   These are positive steps ‐‐ but the challenge, exemplified by the arrival of thousands of Tunisian refugees  on the shores of Italy and the need to reassure foreign investors and tourists, still looms large. One can  only hope that the tangible gains Tunisians have achieved since ousting Ben Ali will strengthen their  resolve to get through the tough economic and political challenges that lie ahead.   Algeria: A Recipe for Repression  
By Kal writes The Moor Next Door, a blog on politics in North Africa and the Middle East.   

Algeria, where social and economic unrest have produced frequent mass protests over the last 10 years,  has long been at the top of everyone's list of countries poised to be swept up in the wave of unrest that  has engulfed Egypt and Tunisia. However, the riots and demonstrations in the country have so far failed to  coalesce into a mass political movement that could threaten aging President Abdelaziz Bouteflika and the  tight clique of military elites surrounding him.   Activists opposed to Bouteflika's regime have attempted to ride the wave of unrest currently sweeping the  Middle East. The Coalition for the Coordination of National Change (CNCD), an umbrella coalition of  opposition parties and human rights groups, demonstrated against the government on Jan. 22 and again  on Feb. 12. The CNCD's demand for political reforms include the repeal of the country's 19‐year‐old  emergency law, which bans public demonstrations. The organization also vowed to hold protests every  Friday, beginning on Feb. 18, until the government meets their demands.   So far, however, protesters have been badly outnumbered by the Algerian security services. Police quickly  dispersed the demonstrators on both occasions. The government deployed 30,000 riot police in  anticipation of the Feb. 12 march, who made quick work of the 2,000 to 5,000 protesters.   But while the government has reacted harshly to any signs of unrest, Bouteflika has also signaled that he  has heard Algerians' desire for political reform. On Feb. 3, the president released a communiqué  announcing the government's plans to lift the emergency law "very soon." There have also been rumors of  a cabinet reshuffle, which could replace as many as 15 long‐serving and unpopular government ministers.   Bouteflika has spent the better part of the last decade trying to re‐establish a sense of normalcy in a  country traumatized by the civil war of the 1990s. The repeal of the emergency law fits this narrative well. 
47   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

The president coupled his announcement about lifting the emergency law with a declaration that he would  introduce two new antiterrorism laws. But Algeria's oldest opposition party, the Front of Socialist Forces  (FFS), dismissed the measure as a "scam," claiming that the legislation would simply institutionalize the  emergency law's restrictive provisions.   Algeria's protests have also been shunned by the major opposition parties, which has hindered their  effectiveness. The head of the left‐wing Workers Party criticized the protesters, saying, "Half of them were  journalists assigned to cover it, and there was no public involvement in the process." Religious leaders also  told followers to keep away from the demonstrations, leaving only a small Islamist presence featuring Ali  Belhadj, former head of the banned Islamic Salvation Front (FIS).   As in Egypt, the legal opposition has been co‐opted by the regime and reluctant to engage in anything but  the most timid criticism. Algeria's opposition leaders are hardly popular; many ordinary citizens are as  suspicious of the professional opposition ‐‐ which they see as legitimizing a fraudulent political system ‐‐ as  they are of the government. This view is shared by the Rally for Culture and Democracy, a small political  party that has emerged as a vocal faction within the CNCD and that supported the military junta during the  civil war in the 1990s.   The political elites in Algiers have responded cautiously to the crisis of stability in the Arab world, but have  been able to call on more tools than their counterparts in Egypt and Tunisia. Common Algerians' alienation  from the political class has made it exceedingly difficult for opposition parties to mobilize a mass  movement. And the regime has also gained experience managing similar waves of protest and discontent  over the last 12 years through symbolic reforms, a strong security service, and liberal allocations of oil  money. For now, this recipe for maintaining stability seems to be doing the trick.     Palestine: This Revolutionary Moment Will Re‐Energize the Palestinian Leadership  
By Nour Odeh was Al Jazeera English's senior correspondent for the West Bank from 2006 to 2011.   

Palestinians are in a revolutionary and festive mood following the overthrow of the Mubarak regime in  Egypt.   But while ordinary Palestinians have been most forward in expressing their solidarity with the protesters,  the Palestinian Authority (PA) was far more cautious. Mubarak's regime was a source of political backing  for Palestinians in the international arena, and it would have seemed ungrateful for the PA to jump on the  revolutionary bandwagon early on. "Our position has been very circumspect ‐‐ we are very much aware of  the difficulties Egypt is going through and we cannot take sides," said Nabil Shaath, a senior Fatah official,  as the uprising unfolded.   But behind closed doors in Ramallah, many Palestinian politicians admired the revolution in silence. "These  young students remind me of myself when I was a college student in 1967," a senior Palestinian official  told me.  A silent split emerged in the Palestinian leadership between these figures, who lobbied for the  right of Egyptians to express their demands for more freedom, and other more traditional and regime‐ allied figures, who fought back.   This fact explains the PA's shifting response to demonstrations in the West Bank supporting the Egyptian  uprising. The first such demonstration was organized by young Palestinians on Facebook on Feb. 2. Held in  the center of Ramallah and attended by young Palestinians, it was quickly and violently crushed by the  Palestinian police.  
48   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Three days later, a much larger pro‐revolution rally was held in Ramallah and attended by senior  Palestinian officials like Hanan Ashrawi, an independent member of the PLO Executive Committee, and  Bassam al‐Salhi, the secretary general of the left‐leaning People's Party. And on Feb. 11, the day Mubarak  stepped down, hundreds of Palestinians from all walks of life and different political persuasions poured  into Ramallah to celebrate the revolution's victory, chanting the Egyptian national anthem and calling for  Palestinian unity. The celebrations lasted for hours.   In response to the events in Cairo, the Palestinian Authority is going back to basics. It is paying more  attention to the Palestinian public's demands and reconnecting with its role as the leadership of an  occupied people. For example, the reshuffling of the Palestinian cabinet led by Prime Minister Salam  Fayyad, while not directly caused by the Egyptian uprising, is meant to respond to growing public  discontent with the performance of certain ministries.   Sources close to Fayyad have confirmed that consultations to fill the cabinet slots will include civil society  and academics, including prominent figures in the Gaza Strip, which is controlled by Hamas. This break in  the traditional political factions' monopoly over political discourse is one of the positive lessons drawn  from Egypt's revolt.   The Palestinian leadership has also taken steps to increase official accountability. The resignation of the  PLO's chief negotiator, Saeb Erekat, following Al Jazeera's publication of thousands of official documents  leaked from his office, the Negotiations Support Unit (NSU), marked the first time that a Palestinian  politician took responsibility for a scandal he was involved in.   The Palestinian leadership even went a step further, dissolving the NSU ‐‐ a popular move, given that there  are no negotiations with Israel at this stage. The main message here is that it is not business as usual and  that the Palestinian leadership is reforming the way it conducts its business.   Palestinians are perhaps most thankful to Egyptians for the new sense of optimism and activism that the  revolution has brought to the region. For decades, international support for the universal rights of peoples,  freedom, and democracy seemed to stop at the gates of the Middle East. Egypt changed that. Now,  Palestinians are hoping those that embraced the Egyptian revolt will also extend support for their struggle  for national unity and liberation. That makes these events an opportunity for the PA to rally wide public  support ‐‐ and a test of the world's commitment to a just solution in Palestine.     Palestine: ...Actually, It Just Highlights Their Bankruptcy  
By Jared Malsin is the former chief English editor of the Palestinian news agency Ma'an.  His website is  jaredmalsin.wordpress.com.   

If Palestinians were to stage an uprising against their own authoritarian leaders, Ramallah's al‐Manara  Square might be their equivalent of Cairo's Tahrir Square.   Palestinians celebrated news of the overthrow of Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak in al‐Manara on Friday  night, Feb. 11 ‐‐ a brave decision, given that their protest was in violation of an explicit order by the  Palestinian Authority (PA) banning demonstrations in solidarity with the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia.   In Ramallah that night, Palestinians showed a willingness to defy the PA rarely seen in the areas of the  West Bank it controls. Civil society activist Omar Barghouti was one of those who joined the Ramallah 
49   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

gathering, which he called a "wonderful celebration." He held a sign reading "Freedom Wins! 2 Down, 20  to go!" Fireworks could be seen over several West Bank towns.   As publics throughout the Middle East follow Egypt's lead in demanding accountability from their  governments, the PA figureheads in Ramallah ‐‐ President Mahmoud Abbas and Prime Minister Salam  Fayyad ‐‐ have good reason to be alarmed. Long before the Egyptian revolution, the PA faced serious  questions about its legitimacy from Palestinians who increasingly view it as complicit in Israel's occupation  of their land.   The PA initially sided with the Mubarak regime when the Tahrir uprising broke out, sending security forces  to crush pro‐democracy protests in the West Bank. Senior PA officials vilified the Egyptian demonstrators,  with Abbas aide Tayeb Abdel‐Rahim making dark allusions to the protesters' "suspicious allegiances" to  "international and regional forces," a reference to the laughable theory that the uprising was a foreign or  Islamist conspiracy.   Since then, the PA and PLO have adopted a more moderate, more conciliatory tone, responding to the  present demands for accountability with three measures: the resignation of chief negotiator Saeb Erekat,  the dissolution of the cabinet, and a call for local elections in July and parliamentary and presidential  elections by September, though no dates have been set.   In the long run, none of these measures is likely to rescue Abbas and Fayyad. A similar cabinet reshuffle in  May 2009 resulted in little substantive change. Any new cabinet would also continue to face questions in  terms of legality: Fayyad's unelected government derives its mandate from a 2007 presidential emergency  order of doubtful constitutionality.   Erekat's resignation, coming in response to Al Jazeera and the Guardian's release of peace process  documents known as the "Palestine Papers," was more significant because of his seniority in the PLO. But  this move, and the subsequent closure of his Negotiations Support Unit, could prove problematic. If direct  control over negotiations reverts to Abbas, as some Palestinian officials privately predict it will, this would  further centralize power with the president. It would also further blur the lines between the PA, whose  authority is limited to the West Bank and Gaza, and the PLO, an organization intended to represent all 10  million Palestinians ‐‐ including refugees across the Middle East and the world.   The PA's call for elections is also not viable because the PA never stood a chance of convincing Hamas,  which governs Gaza, to accept it. Since 2007, the group has argued that political and administrative  reconciliation must precede elections. In the new reality following events in Egypt, Hamas is even less  likely to compromise on this point, viewing the PA's position as weakened. To be fair, Abbas's Fatah  movement and the PA are hamstrung from striking a new unity deal with Hamas due, it is widely believed,  to opposition from the United States and its other international backers. Any deal with Hamas would risk  Western donors canceling the funding the PA needs to survive.   This lack of diplomatic independence is another of the sad truths that alienate the PA from its own people.  In the wake of Egypt's revolution, Abbas and Fayyad will face calls for deep and radical reforms ‐‐ including  their own resignations ‐‐ and demands for a viable liberation strategy vis‐à‐vis Israel. If they do not heed  these calls, they could soon face their own Mubarak moment in al‐Manara Square.   *********************   

     
50   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Hizballah: Governing Faction in Lebanon, Criminal Group Abroad 
By: Matthew Levitt.  Source: The Washington Institute  Date: Feb 16, 2011   
Matthew Levitt is director of The Washington Institute's Stein Program on Counterterrorism and Intelligence   

This week marked the sixth anniversary of the assassination of former Lebanese prime minister Rafiq  Hariri, killed in a Beirut bombing on February 14, 2005. Noting the solemn occasion, UN secretary‐general  Ban Ki‐moon issued a statement paying tribute to Hariri and the other twenty‐two people killed that day  and reaffirming the UN's "commitment to the efforts of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon to uncover the  truth so as to bring those responsible to justice and send a message that impunity will not be tolerated."  Meanwhile, outgoing prime minister Saad Hariri, Rafiq's son, pledged to abstain from the coalition  government led by Hizballah, whose members include several of the Special Tribunal's primary suspects.  Joining the political opposition, Saad called for mass protests on March 14 ‐‐ the date of the 2005 Cedar  Revolution and the name of his own coalition ‐‐ and accused Hizballah and its allies of "lies, betrayal, and  lack of loyalty."   Even as the Hizballah‐led coalition prepares to take the reins of power, crowning the group as the  dominant political force in Lebanon, a series of international criminal investigations have highlighted the  organization's illicit activities at home and abroad. From money laundering and narcotrafficking to the  Hariri assassination, Hizballah's track record of worldwide criminal activity may soon catch up with its  political ambitions at home.   Conspiracy to Support the Taliban   The latest charges against Hizballah, released February 15, are the product of an international sting  operation led by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), targeting seven suspects who allegedly  conspired to provide support to DEA sources posing as Taliban representatives. Beginning in summer 2010,  meetings in Benin, Ghana, Ukraine, and Romania were caught on audio and videotape.   Some of the suspects agreed to receive, store, and move tons of Taliban heroin, while others were wiling  to sell the Taliban representatives substantial quantities of cocaine that could then be sold at a profit in  United States. Still others ‐‐ including an Israeli national, Oded Orbach, and Alwar Pouryan, an Iranian  national described by one of his fellow conspirators as "a weapons trafficker affiliated with Hizballah,"  both U.S. citizens ‐‐ allegedly held a series of meetings in Ghana, Ukraine, and Romania to discuss the  weapons they planned to sell to Taliban representatives. These reportedly included surface‐to‐air missiles,  antitank missiles, grenade launchers, and AK‐47 and M‐16 rifles.   Trafficking Drugs and Laundering Money   Last month, the U.S. Treasury Department blacklisted Lebanese drug trafficker and money launderer  Ayman Joumaa, along with nine other people and nineteen businesses involved in his enterprise.  According to Treasury, an extensive DEA investigation revealed that Joumaa laundered as much as $200  million per month from the sale of cocaine in Europe and the Middle East via operations in Lebanon, West  Africa, Panama, and Colombia, using money exchange houses, bulk cash smuggling, and other schemes. In  addition, several Lebanese entities were designated under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act, 
51   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

including the landmark Caesar's Park Hotel, a shipping company, several money exchanges, and a holding  company. Two weeks after this drug‐related action, authorities targeting a Hizballah‐affiliated Lebanese  bank revealed that the group "derived financial support from the criminal activities of Joumaa's network."   On February 10, the Treasury Department identified the Lebanese Canadian Bank (LCB) and its subsidiaries  as "a financial institution of primary money laundering concern" under section 311 of the USA PATRIOT  Act. Aided by key bank managers, including some with family ties to members of his network, Joumaa used  LCB accounts to execute sophisticated trade‐based money laundering schemes. For example, LCB used U.S.  correspondent banking relationships to send suspiciously structured electronic wire transfers to American  used car dealerships, some of which have come up separately in other drug‐related investigations. The  funds were used to purchase cars in the United States, which were then shipped to West Africa or  elsewhere and sold. Ultimately, the proceeds were repatriated to Joumaa's network in Lebanon. Based on  information from "law enforcement and other sources," Treasury reported that LCB was complicit in  international drug trafficking and money laundering.   LCB is the eighth‐largest Lebanese bank by assets, worth more than $5 billion in 2009, with thirty‐five  branches in Lebanon and a representative office in Montreal. Treasury linked LCB managers to Hizballah  officials based outside Lebanon, including Abdallah Safieddine, the group's Tehran‐based envoy. The bank  was also tied to Hizballah through one of its subsidiaries, the Gambia‐based Prime Bank, which Treasury  revealed is partly owned by a Hizballah supporter in Lebanon.   Prime Suspects in Hariri Assassination   Hizballah is greatly concerned about the prospect of public indictments in the Hariri case, in large part  because some of the group's senior members have already been named in the media as potential  suspects. These include Qassem Suleiman, Hajj Salim, Abdul Majid Ghamloush, brothers Hussein and  Mouin Khreis, and, most significantly, Mustafa Badreddine. The latter is the brother‐in‐law of Imad  Mughniyah ‐‐ the assassinated chief of Hizballah's external operations, known as the "Islamic Jihad  Organization" (IJO) ‐‐ and himself a senior IJO official.   Hizballah's acute anxiety over the forthcoming indictments can be seen most prominently in its public  denunciations of the tribunal as an American project based on false communications data fabricated by  Israeli spies embedded in Lebanon's telecommunications industry. Similarly, Hizballah chief Hassan  Nasrallah has blamed "false witnesses." The group's public relations campaign against the tribunal began  in earnest after a May 2009 Der Spiegel story reported new evidence implicating Hizballah as the primary  suspect. That report also named Ghamloush as an Iranian‐trained Hizballah operative who made the  critical error of calling his girlfriend from an operational cellphone tied to the group. Following a February  2010 Le Monde report underscoring the Hizballah angle and requests by tribunal investigators to interview  group members, Nasrallah took to the airwaves to condemn the prosecution as a U.S.‐Israeli political tool.  Exhorting the Lebanese people against cooperating with investigators, he went so far as to claim that Israel  was behind Hariri's assassination.   Moreover, long before taking this public stance, Hizballah conducted quiet surveillance of the tribunal's  headquarters in the Hague. The Netherlands considers Hizballah a terrorist group, and Dutch intelligence  has been conducting bimonthly assessments of any potential threat to the tribunal. So far, they have  found no active plots. What they have noted, however, is periodic surveillance of tribunal headquarters. In 
52   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

particular, before the tribunal occupied its newly refurbished building, a Lebanese camera crew was  caught taking suspicious pictures and video of the unfinished facility.   Meanwhile, Hizballah regularly follows tribunal investigators on the ground in Lebanon and uses  intimidation tactics against them. The group reportedly collects information on tribunal officials entering  and leaving the country through airport surveillance, creating an environment in which investigators do  not feel safe. The January 25, 2008, assassination of Lebanese Internal Security Forces captain Wissam Eid,  who was detailed to the Hariri investigation, underscored those fears. According to a Canadian  Broadcasting Corporation report, the investigation of Eid's murder ‐‐ which also falls under the tribunal's  jurisdiction ‐‐ implicated two more senior Hizballah officials, Hussein Khalil and Wafiq Safa.   Conclusion   Many factors undermine Hizballah's self‐promoted image as the incorruptible defender of the oppressed,  but none as powerfully as the Hariri investigation. Charges of engaging in terrorism against fellow  Lebanese (particularly a Sunni leader such as the late Hariri) are completely at odds with the group's  longstanding position that it is first and foremost part of the fabric of Lebanese society, and only  secondarily a pan‐Shiite or pro‐Iranian movement. Hizballah was widely criticized for occupying downtown  Beirut in March 2008, when the government tried to rein in the group's airport surveillance activities and  its maintenance of a private telecommunications system. At the time, many Lebanese viewed Hizballah as  putting its own interests ahead of the country's. Yet that incident would pale in comparison to the charges  the tribunal appears set to release within the next few weeks. In the meantime, Saad Hariri's calls for  massive protests in Beirut on March 14, coming on the heels of events in Egypt and Tunisia, could pose a  more immediate political challenge to Hizballah ‐‐ especially when it is already under the spotlight for  operating less like a "resistance group" and more like a global criminal organization.   ********************   

The Druze Factor                                                                                                               
By: MARA E. KARLIN.  Source: Foreign Affairs  Date: Feb16, 2011 
MARA E. KARLIN was Levant Director at the Pentagon in 2006‐7 and Special Assistant to the Undersecretary of Defense for  Policy in 2007‐9. 

  The world has been riveted by Egypt in recent weeks, captivated by the fall of former Egyptian President  Hosni Mubarak. Yet just prior to the beginning of Egypt's revolution, events in Lebanon dominated  international headlines. In mid‐January, the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah withdrew from Lebanon's  government, forcing the collapse of former Prime Minister Saad Hariri's coalition. Hezbollah targeted Hariri  for his support of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, the UN investigation into the February 14, 2005,  assassination of his father, former Lebanese Prime Minster Rafiq Hariri. By toppling the government,  Hezbollah hoped to end Lebanon's endorsement for the tribunal, whose indictments ‐‐ to be publicly  released soon ‐‐ are widely expected to implicate high‐level members of the organization.  At the center of the battle between Hariri and Hezbollah stands Walid Jumblatt, the leader of Lebanon's  Druze community. Once a prime supporter of Saad Hariri and the anti‐Syria, anti‐Hezbollah March 14 
53   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

alliance formed after Rafiq Hariri's death, Jumblatt has since abandoned the March 14 camp and joined  Hezbollah's orbit, helping it to form a new goverment led by the Lebanese billionaire Najib Mikati,  Lebanon's current prime minister. Jumblatt's role in Lebanon's recent turmoil serves as a palpable  reminder that amidst the conventional discussions of Sunni‐Shiite divides and regional proxy wars in  Lebanon, the Druze tend to be overlooked. Jumblatt and his community, however, are likely to play a vital  role in determining the outcome of the tribunal process.  Jumblatt's ability to determine the direction of Lebanese politics is unique for a minority leader in the  Middle East. Minorities, both religious and ethnic, exist in fair numbers across the region and often play a  quiet role in the domestic politics of their respective nations (notable exceptions include the Alawites in  Syria, who have ruled the country for decades, and more recently, the Kurds in northern Iraq, who enjoy  political influence under Iraq's democratic regime). The outsized influence of the Druze community in  Lebanon is thus nearly unparalleled. Yet in managing his role as a kingmaker, Jumblatt is simply  perpetuating the part played by the Druze community in Lebanon since time immemorial.   Comprising about five percent of Lebanon's population, the Druze community is an Islamic sect that  emerged in the eleventh century. It is often considered heretical by Sunni and Shiite Muslims, because  some Druze traditions and beliefs differ from their respective interpretations of Islam. Based primarily in  the strategically significant Chouf mountains of southern Lebanon, the Druze have survived by relying on a  strong military tradition. At one time, they were a leading force in Lebanese politics. In the sixteenth  century, for example, the Druze leader Fakhr‐al‐Din II played a critical role in establishing the borders of a  self‐governing Lebanese state. But later, in 1860, the Druze community's military success in a war with  Lebanon's Maronite Christians facilitated the entry of Western powers ‐‐ notably France ‐‐ into Lebanese  territory to protect the Maronites. Although its relationships with Lebanon's Sunni, Shiite, and Maronite  populations have ebbed and flowed over the last century and a half, the Druze have established their place  in Lebanese political affairs.   The Jumblatt family has dominated Druze politics for hundreds of years and is known in Lebanon as the  "lords of the Chouf." Given that its reign in the Druze community enjoys substantial support, the Jumblatt  leadership has few significant concerns about intra‐Druze politics. This dynamic has traditionally permitted  the Jumblatts to focus on areas of concern beyond their community. In modern times, they have  concentrated on navigating the complex political reality of modern Lebanon by moving among their  various communities as well as regional and international actors, often changing the balance of power in  the country through their shifting alliances.   The role of the Druze as kingmakers in Lebanon solidified itself under the leadership of Kamal Jumblatt,  Walid's father. Propagating a program rooted in socialism and secularism, Jumblatt senior founded the  Progressive Socialist Party in 1949 and sought to appeal to Lebanese beyond his Druze power base. He  quickly demonstrated his ability to steer Lebanese politics as the Druze leader when the modern state of  Lebanon was founded in 1943. He helped propel the resignation of Lebanon's first president, Bechara el‐ Khoury, in 1952 and then Camille Chamoun in 1958 ‐‐ both times due to his discomfort with what he saw  as their attempts to expand the importance of the presidency in Lebanon ‐‐ with the latter incident  provoking U.S. military intervention to preserve Chamoun's rule. As a powerful parliamentarian, Jumblatt  (and his bloc) also served as the swing vote in 1970, enabling Suleiman Franjieh to win the presidency over  the favored candidate, Elias Sarkis. 

54   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Coupled with his emphasis on pan‐Arabism and support for leftist causes, the charismatic Jumblatt  managed to become an influential force both within Lebanon and abroad. Yet as the Druze became  embroiled in Lebanon's civil war soon after it erupted in 1975, Jumblatt's collaboration with the Palestine  Liberation Organization (PLO), then Syria's enemy, epitomized his unwillingness to follow the Syrian  regime's desires ‐‐ a reluctance soon to be his undoing. In the war's first phase, Damascus supported  Lebanon's Maronite Christians as they sought to counter Palestinian forces, but the Druze hampered  Syria's plans. Assasinated in 1977, Jumblatt is commonly thought to have been killed at the behest of  Syria's leadership.  To date, Walid Jumblatt has managed to avoid the fate of his father (and several other relatives who were  also killed for their political positions). Coming to power during his twenties in the midst of Lebanon's civil  war, Jumblatt quickly established a reputation as a pragmatic confessional chieftain. Soon after his  ascension, he traveled to Damascus to meet with the Syrian leader Hafez al‐Assad, the man suspected of  orchestrating his father's untimely death. Jumblatt pledged allegiance to the Syrians in an effort to protect  himself and his community. With the aid of Syria and other Middle Eastern regimes such as Libya, Jumblatt  and his Druze militia became a feared fighting force during the Lebanese civil war. They played a pivotal  role in opposing U.S. efforts by targeting the Lebanese government and military, institutions the United  States sought to strengthen by deploying marines to the country. When Israeli soldiers, who had first  invaded Lebanon in 1978 and then again in 1982, withdrew from the Chouf mountains the following  autumn, Jumblatt and his followers attempted to fill the vacuum by attacking Lebanese forces in the area  and establishing a presence in the Druze stronghold. The Druze proved their military prowess early on,  capturing more than 50 soldiers from the Lebanese military in battle. Their success contributed to the fall  of the Lebanese government six months later. Although some elements of Jumblatt's militia were  integrated into the Lebanese Armed Forces and much of its weaponry passed to Syria at the end of  Lebanon's civil war, it has maintained some capabilities and structure should they be needed again.  Rafiq Hariri's assassination in 2005 once again placed Jumblatt and the Druze at the center of Lebanese  politics. As word spread that Syria was responsible for Hariri's death, Jumblatt built on his burgeoning  criticism of Damascus and publicly broke his alliance with his former allies. He sided with the nascent  March 14 movement, an amalgamation of Lebanese parties and leaders that had begun coalescing in the  wake of Hariri's assassination to protest Syria's ongoing occupation. Jumblatt gave March 14 much‐needed  backing and legitimacy, facilitating international efforts to support the expulsion of thousands of Syrian  troops who had maintained a presence in Lebanon since 1976. Jumblatt's tour of foreign capitals as a  representative of the revolution spoke to his uncanny ability to shift positions and alliances without a  second thought. In one telling example, he met with U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld in late  2006 ‐‐ the Rumsfeld who survived a failed attempt by Jumblatt's militia to shell his convoy during a visit to  Beirut in the early 1980s as U.S. President Ronald Reagan's Middle East envoy.   Jumblatt remained an important face of March 14 for several years. Yet he would soon recalibrate his  community's support for the bloc. In early 2008, Jumblatt pushed the Lebanese government to target two  critical aspects of Hezbollah's capabilities: its independent telecommunications network and its special  access at Beirut International Airport. Hezbollah viewed Jumblatt's pressure as a strategic threat and  decided to take measures into its own hands by turning its guns on Lebanon itself and occupying large  swaths of Beirut. Trapped inside his residence during the takeover, Jumblatt witnessed the inability of the  Sunni leader Saad Hariri to respond to Hezbollah's intimidation. Jumblatt understood that he would  endanger his community by opposing Hezbollah any further.  
55   

                                                                                                                                         

  ‫                  ﻟــﺒـﻨــﺎن‬

 

   

Aware that his survival, as well as that of the Druze, depended on accepting the reality of Hezbollah's rise,  Jumblatt began to extricate himself from his erstwhile March 14 allies. With the United States unable to  intervene and provide political cover from Hezbollah and Syrian re‐encroachment, he lowered his anti‐ Syria rhetoric and even met with Syrian President Bashar al‐Assad in March 2010 to reestablish the Druze‐ Syrian partnership. More recently, Jumblatt revealed the extent of his concern in the days before entering  his new alliance with Hezbollah, allegedly telling his compatriots that he was under severe pressure to  back Hezbollah's coalition and that should he choose to support Hariri, the Lebanese Druze would be in  grave danger. When danger approached, Jumblatt's responsibilities as protector of his community  outweighed his post‐2005 role as a national leader.   Indeed, operating under the perpetual dual fears of assassination and community destruction, Lebanon's  Druze community has remained loyal only to itself, striving for survival in a fragile state plagued by a weak  government whose diversity is ceaselessly manipulated by external actors. Druze support for Jumblatt has  yet to waver seriously despite the leader's many twists and turns. It is this dominance over the Druze  population that enables him to play such a commanding role in Lebanese politics. Underestimating  Jumblatt or the influence of his tiny community, which he ruefully refers to as "last of the Mohicans,"  would be shortsighted. Whether or not one agrees with the direction of Jumblatt's support, it is clear that  he and the Lebanese Druze community will continue to play a significant role in determining Lebanon's  political future.   ******************** 
 

56   

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.