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Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 1 “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie in theaters.” by age group. Age Under 30 SA 10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%) A 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) N 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) D 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) SD 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising.

1

Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since

2

79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 2 “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie in theaters.” by age group. Gender Under 30 SA 10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%) A 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) N 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) D 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) SD 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended

3

when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 3

4

“I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie in theaters.” by age group. Income Under 30 0-15,999 162625,999 35,999 05 (10%) 5 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) 3655,999 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) $56,000+ Totals 15 (30%) 50 (50%) 3 (6%) 50 (50%)

10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%)

18 (18%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that

5

shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was represented by Neilson Media Research.

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 4 “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie in theaters.” by age group. Education Some H.S. H.S. Diploma Some College College Grad PostGrad Totals

6

Under 30 30 and above Total

10 (20%) 20 (40%) 30 (30%)

05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%)

5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%)

15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%)

15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%)

50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with

7

seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Table 5 “I will arrive late or miss part of the movie to avoid advertisements before a movie.” by age group. Age Under 30 SA 10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%) A 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) N 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) D 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) SD 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they

8

expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 6

9

“I will arrive late or miss part of the movie to avoid advertisements before a movie.” by age group. Gender Under 30 SA 10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%) A 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) N 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) D 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) SD 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that

10

shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 7 “I will arrive late or miss part of the movie to avoid advertisements before a movie.” by age group. Income Under 30 0-15,999 10 (20%) 162625,999 35,999 05 (10%) 5 (10%) 3655,999 15 (30%) $56,000+ Totals 15 (30%) 50 (50%)

11

30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%)

20 (40%) 25 (25%)

2 (4%) 7 (7%)

5 (10%) 20 (20%)

3 (6%)

50 (50%)

18 (18%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was represented by

12

Neilson Media Research.

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 8 “I will arrive late or miss part of the movie to avoid advertisements before a movie.” by age group. Education Under 30 30 and above Total Some H.S. 10 (20%) 20 (40%) 30 (30%) H.S. Diploma 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) Some College 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) College Grad 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) PostGrad 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

13

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

14

Table 9 “Advertisements shown before the movies do not affect my movie attendance.” by age group. Age Under 30 SA 10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%) A 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) N 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) D 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) SD 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole.

15

Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie

16

at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table10 “Advertisements shown before the movies do not affect my movie attendance.” by age group. Gender Under 30 SA 10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%) A 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) N 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) D 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) SD 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%) Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent

17

viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

18

Table 11 “Advertisements shown before the movies do not affect my movie attendance.” by age group. Income Under 30 0-15,999 162625,999 35,999 05 (10%) 5 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%) 3655,999 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%) $56,000+ Totals 15 (30%) 50 (50%) 3 (6%) 50 (50%)

10 (20%) 30 and above 20 (40%) Total 30 (30%)

18 (18%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect

19

the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was represented by Neilson Media Research.

Data Analysis The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey instrument. The statement “I hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie at theaters.” was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since 79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 12 “Advertisements shown before the movies do not affect my movie attendance.” by age group.

20

Education Under 30 30 and above Total

Some H.S. 10 (20%) 20 (40%) 30 (30%)

H.S. Diploma 05 (10%) 20 (40%) 25 (25%)

Some College 5 (10%) 2 (4%) 7 (7%)

College Grad 15 (30%) 5 (10%) 20 (20%)

PostGrad 15 (30%) 3 (6%) 18 (18%)

Totals 50 (50%) 50 (50%) 100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole. Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising. Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are

21

male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

22

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