Dundas West BIA

Urban Design Study
Dundas West Business Improvement Area
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. December, 2010
The development of this document was based on contributions
from a great many people. We would like to acknowledge
and thank all who contributed to this study, whether it
transpired in the form of technical support and expertise
or in the form of invaluable insight, ideas, thoughts and
feedback at the various stages of the engagement process.
Of particular importance to the execution of the process
was the coordination, direction and support provided by the
subcommittee of the Dundas West Business Improvement Area.
Consultant Team
Chris Hardwicke, Project Manager
Mia Hunt, Planner and Urban Designer
BIA Committee
Sylvia Draper-Fernandez
Lubo Brezina
Tracy Jenkins
Roger Silveira
Jose Ortega
John Merli
Marina Tavares
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects
468 Wellington Street West, Suite 200
Toronto, ON M5V 1E3
info@andco.com
www.andco.com
City of Toronto
Ron Nash
Jamaica Hewston
Acknowledgements
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

iii December 2010
The Dundas West Business Improvement Association (DWBIA)
Urban Design Study was developed to create a long-term
built-form vision for the area. Based on the vision, this study
is intended to assist the BIA in making informed decisions
and responses to future development opportunities within
the DWBIA area. The comprehensive Urban Design Study
formulates a clear, built-form vision that can inform future
planning decisions for the Dundas West (DuWest) area.
The Dundas West BIA’s goal is to make the area a better place
to work, shop, live and visit. The BIA vision is to cultivate a
place of global diversity where one can live and work locally.
The vision is supported by a streetscape plan to create a public
realm with a vibrant street life that attracts people to live and
shop on Dundas West. The urban design approach, described in
this document, aims to guide future development that supports
the public and commercial life of the street, as well as providing
more housing on Dundas West.
The DWBIA Urban Design Study is informed by the planning
context of the City of Toronto Offcial Plan, Zoning By-laws, the
draft Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study and the Provincial
Places to Grow policy. The study reviews and provides
recommendations based on these planning documents and
supporting studies as they apply to the specifc context of
the DuWest area. The study identifes priority areas in need
of revitalization or intensifcation, as well as investment
opportunities and recommendations for implementation. Built
form guidelines are supplemented with storefront design
guidelines.
The study was guided by a steering committee of the Dundas
West BIA and included stakeholder meetings, a workshop
and a public meeting. In addition, informal conversations and
interviews were held with local business owners, real estate
agents and developers.
The area of the Dundas West BIA is identifed in the Offcial
Plan as an “Avenue”. According to the Offcial Plan, Toronto’s
growth should occur along its major arterial roads. These
“Avenues” should be designed to accommodate more housing
and more jobs. Similarly the 2006 Provincial Places to Grow
policy supports intensifcation along transit corridors in the
form of development of vacant on under utilized lots within
previously developed areas, infll development, and expansion
or conversion of existing buildings.
Despite these policies, almost no intensifcation has occurred
in the area over the last twenty years. Buildings are
predominantly two and three storeys tall – lower than the
maximum heights permitted in municipal zoning. The lack of
development might be partially explained by economic factors
but there are several physical constraints within the area that
set it apart from the typical City of Toronto “Avenue”.
Dundas West is constrained by the railway line that defnes its
southern edge and reduces the size of the neighbourhood as it
runs diagonally west. The northern neighbourhood is limited
in size by the proximity of College Street that runs parallel to
Dundas West, leading people east-west.
At the scale of the block, Dundas West runs at a diagonal across
the regular Toronto grid. This diagonal pattern creates shallow
lots with few rear lanes. The typical narrow lots of Dundas West
give an intimate urban character but make land assembly and
redevelopment diffcult.
The Dundas West BIA agrees with the OP goal of intensifying
the Avenues and recognizes the unique character of the existing
main street. The challenge for the area is maintaining the
existing character while encouraging growth.
This study identifes key development areas within the Dundas
West BIA on larger sites that would allow for development
intensifcation. The study recommends that the City review the
current Zoning and Development Permit System to allow for
density and built form massing that exceed the previous and
in-place zoning by-laws. The system would allow exceptions
on identifed sites to allow for intensifcation while preserving
the character of the street. This study further recommends that
the City conduct a Growth and Re-urbanization Study to set
specifc growth targets for the area. Other recommendations
include that the City undertake an Active Transportation Study
and Character Area Study to address mobility and protect the
character of the neighbourhood.
Executive Summary
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

v December 2010
Contents
1. Study Objectives 1
2. Existing Conditions 7
3. Policy Context 25
4. Future Opportunities 49
5. Storefront Design Guidelines 63
6. Key Recommendations 69
7. Appendices 73
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. vi
Growth is inevitable, but the loss of community character is not. The question is not
whether Dundas West is going to change. The question is how.
Change is both desired and feared. Change brings diversity and increased economic
activity as well as an underlying concern that the community will change in ways that
may not be desirable.
Every community is defned by what it believes. The Dundas West BIA has set a clear
vision for its identity and has taken steps to ensure that its vision guides future trans-
formation. In this way, as the neighbourhood grows through new development, the
community becomes an even better version of itself.
The Business Improvement Area believes that a healthy main street is essential to
sustaining healthy neighbourhoods. The members of the BIA are predominantly land
owners and residents of the neighbourhood. They are invested in its future and are ready
for change.
This document represents the BIA’s vision for the future of Dundas West.
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

1 December 2010
1. Study Objectives
1.1. An Urban Design Study
for Dundas West
1.1.1 Purpose of this Study
In early 2008, the Dundas West BIA undertook an Urban Design
Study to create a long-term built-form vision consistent with the
completed BIA Branding and Streetscape Study. The study was
intended to assist the BIA in making informed decisions and
responses to future development opportunities within the area.
The Dundas West BIA’s goal is to make Dundas West a better
place to work, shop, live and visit. Their vision is to cultivate a
place of global diversity where one can live and work locally.
The urban design vision is to create a built-form realm that
supports the public and commercial life of the street, as well as
providing more housing on Dundas West. This is what Sweeny
Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects was appointed to do.
The analysis and recommendations that follow are a result of a
number of consultations with the BIA Board, its members, the
local community and the development community. Additionally
we relied on familiarity gained through the Branding Strategy
community exercises to create this study.
The study discussed the future of the main street and approach
to new development. The Urban Design Study produced a
framework that identifed character areas, focal areas, and
key sites for revitalization areas within the area. Like the
neighbourhood itself, this urban design study is meant to be a
living document. It is intended to guide change in Dundas West
over time.
The report contributes to the discussion on how revitalization
should occur. Rather than focusing solely on protecting the
physical impact of the main street on adjacent land uses, this
study takes a proactive approach to creating a healthy main
street that enhances the value of the neighbourhood.
1.1.2 What is Urban Design?
Urban design is the art of making places. Urban design involves
the design of buildings, groups of buildings, spaces and public
space and the establishment of frameworks and processes that
facilitate successful development. Urban design focuses on the
potential of physical design to create opportunities for place
making with tools that are unavailable to land use planning.
1.1.3 Urban Design Framework
This document provides an urban design framework that sets
out how development plan policies should be implemented
within the Dundas West Business Improvement Area. It provides
guidance on how development can be carried out in accordance
with the planning and design policies of the Province of
Ontario and the City of Toronto. The study looks closely at the
specifc urban context of the Dundas West area and provides
recommendations that address the character and vision for the
neighbourhood.
1.1.4 Scope
The Dundas West Urban Design Study identifes priority sites in
need of revitalization or intensifcation, as well as investment
opportunities and recommendations for implementation.
The study seeks to defne a vision for future built form while
establishing development parameters and certainty for local
stakeholders. A comprehensive engagement strategy identifed
opportunities for revitalization while protecting the area’s
character. Using urban design principles developed with the
BIA, urban design vision and guidelines were developed. The
vision was translated into a strategy that indicates where
intensifcation should occur within the area and in what form.
DUNDAS STREET W
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COLLEGE STREET WEST
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Dundas West BIA Area
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 2
1.1.5 Location
The Dundas West BIA is situated along Dundas Street West
within the former Village of Brockton. The area extends from the
CNR tracks just west of Lansdowne Avenue to Rusholme Road
in the east and consists primarily of small businesses. The BIA
is well positioned within the City of Toronto in close proximity
to downtown.
1881 York County Atlas
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

3 December 2010
1.1.6 History
Dundas Street was constructed as a colonial road under the
direction of John Graves Simcoe, frst lieutenant-governor of
Upper Canada. It connected Toronto (then known as York) to the
town of Dundas, then to settlements west, and also around Lake
Ontario to Niagara-on-the- Lake (Newark). Dundas Street is
named after its destination, the town of Dundas.
Dundas Street reportedly follows an Indian trail through what
was once trees and brush. As it was built as an early highway,
Dundas Street’s route traversed the countryside in the most
effcient manner, avoiding obstacles that would have been
expensive to cross in the 18th century, such as Grenadier Pond
in what is now High Park, and the highest point of the Humber
River Valley (Bloor Street to the south requires a high bridge to
cross the river at that point). The resulting alignment cuts across
Toronto’s regular street grid on a diagonal, west of Dufferin
Street.
The presnt-day Dundas West BIA is located in what was known
briefy as the Village of Brockton. The Village of Brockton was
named after Captain James Brock, cousin of Sir Isaac Brock, a
hero of the war of 1812. Captain James Brock owned substantial
land in this neighbourhood through a loyalist land claim.
Brockton was initially settled in the 1840’s by Irish immigrants.
These frst settlers found employment in Brockton’s two rope
making factories.
In the mid-19th century the area was settled by Portuguese and
Brazilians. It is now known as Little Portugal or Rua Açores,
after the large Portuguese community (most originally from the
Azores and Madeira Islands). Many local Portuguese-Canadian
businesses are located along Dundas Street West.
The 1876 birds-eye view of Toronto shows the area as primarily
farm land divided by major streets following the park lot
system. Patches of woodlots remain, and Garrison Creek can be
seen north of Dundas. By this time the Dundas bridge crosses
the railway lines that defne the southern limit of the area. The
bridge defned the outer limits of Brockton Village at that time.
1876 Birds-eye view of Toronto
Annexation Map: Toronto Sunday World 1914
1800’s The Toll Gate on Dundas West
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1881 Map
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 4
The 1851 map shows the area before the rail lines were built.
The alignment of Dundas Street follows the Garrison Creek
tributary to the north and tuns south at present day Ossington
Street to end at the Provincial Lunatic Asylum. Lansdowne and
Dufferin Streets have been partially constructed and early lot
divisions can be seen between the early estate lots.
By 1881, the area been further subdivided into a partial streets
and blocks. Main street lots have been set aside for future
development.
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

5 December 2010
The 1910 Goad’s Atlas shows the neighbourhood partially
developed. By 1910 most present-day streets are in place and
approximately half the buildings with a concentration of main
street buildings developed between Brock and Sheridan streets.
St. Helen’s and St. Anne’s Churches have been built as well
as Brockton Town Hall. College Street is shown but does not
yet connect to Dundas. Dundas West cuts across the regular
Toronto grid leaving a ragged edge of main street lots with a
variable range of property widths and depths.
1910 Goads Atlas with current BIA boundary
The resulting lot pattern, although predominantly fne-grained,
leaves some scattered larger sites that offer the opportunity
for different uses such as manufacturing. Many of these larger
lots remain today and offer the potential to accommodate larger
format uses.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 6
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

7 December 2010
2. Existing Conditions
2.1. DuWest
The Dundas West Business Improvement Area (DuWest) is
a vibrant commercial and residential neighbourhood that
stretches along Dundas West from the CNR Tracks west of
Lansdowne to the east corner of Rusholme Road and Dundas
West within Ward 18 of the City of Toronto. It connects Little
Portugal and Roncesvalles Village and lies between College
Promenade and both Parkdale Village and the West Queen West
areas. Dundas West is the centre of surrounding residential
neighbourhoods.
Physically, Dundas West is an example of a 19th century Toronto
main street. It is a low rise, mixed-use corridor that supports its
neighbourhood with multiple public, private and institutional
uses and services. The narrow right-of-way accommodates
pedestrians on shallow sidewalks as well as cyclists,
automobiles and streetcars in mixed traffc. Over the last 20
years the corridor has experienced minimal growth pressures.
In fact, the area today looks much like it did in historical
photographs from the early century. The area is designated as
an “Avenue” in the City of Toronto’s Offcial Plan. The Offcial
Plan directs intensifcation towards the city centre and its
Avenues. In anticipation and support of change the BIA has
recognized the need to develop a vision for the Bloor Corridor to
ensure that revitalization adds to the value and character of the
neighbourhood.
Culturally, this area is in the process of gentrifcation, following
its surrounding neighbourhoods like West Queen West,
Ossington and Little Italy. Many of the longer established
Portuguese residents, as they become more affuent, are
moving to the suburbs or to more upscale areas of the city. The
demographic of the area is changing quickly with a higher than
city average of 20–34 year olds. The area has a large number
of Portuguese speaking people and a slightly higher than city
average Spanish and Vietnamese speaking people.
Much of the neighbourhoods’ working class roots still remain
with a large proportion of the population in the sales, service
and trades industry as well as transport and equipment
operators. There is a growing segment of arts and culture
workers in the neighbourhood.
The businesses along Dundas Street are slowly refecting these
changes, with sports bars and social clubs becoming trendy (if
tiny) restaurants, bars and brunch places. There is an intriguing
mix of intentionally down market shabby-chic and extensively
renovated high design shops.
DuWest is a diverse place. It is an independent and intimate
place, loved by its residents, visitors and business people. The
plans in this document are designed to foster a greater sense
of community while encouraging passers-by to linger a little
longer, attracting new visitors, and drawing new residents who
want to hear the music of Dundas West, feel the rhythm, and
sense of the spirit and culture of celebration.
2.2. The Dundas West BIA
The BIA, formed in 2006, is driven by a dedicated and active
steering committee consisting of retailers, artists and designers.
Following the direction of the Branding Study this group
quickly initiated area improvements, the most notable being
a revitalization of the Dundas-St. Clarens parkette and the
Samba on Dundas festival. Plans are underway for streetscape
improvements to develop the area into a more competitive and
vital business area in a way that acknowledges the historic
Village of Brockton and the more recent contribution of the
Portuguese community.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 8
2.3. Transportation Networks
The study area is well connected to the rest of the city and to
regional transit routes. Dundas West is within Ward 18 which
has a high level of transit use. Forty– one percent of residents
commute to work by transit, compared with a thirty percent
city average. For non– work trips area residents use transit for
thirty–one percent of all trips, compared to nineteen percent
city average. Streetcar lines run along Dundas West and College
streets; busses run north-south along Lansdowne, Dufferin and
Ossington streets; and, the Bloor subway line and a Go station
are a short distance to the north of the area.
Active transportation is higher than the city average as well:
twelve percent work and nineteen non-work trips are non–
motorized, compared with eight and ten percent city wide
respectively. Dundas West is not well served for cycling as
there are few bike lanes that connect to the street. College
and Lansdowne have sharrows and the Dundas bridge has
bike lanes to the west of the BIA area. The neighbourhood is
relatively convenient for automobile use with a close connection
to the Gardiner Expressway at Jameson Street.
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YORK UNIVERSITY YORK UNIVERSITY
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SYLVAN PARK
CUDIA PARK
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- FIELD HOUSE
DEAN PARK
ROUGE
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ROUGE PARK
ROUGE BEACH PARK
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ROUGE PARK
ROUGE PARK
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RENNIE
PARK
SMYTHE PARK
LAMBTON PARK
MAGWOOD PARK
TOM RILEY
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CORONATION
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GREENBELT
RAYMORE
PARK/
CANADIAN
UKRAINIAN
MEM.
SCARLETT
MILLS PARK
JAMES
GARDENS
JAMES
GARDENS
ALEX
MARCHETTI
PARK
CRUICKSHANK
PARK
QUEEN'S GREENBELT
LIONS PARK LIONS PARK
NORTH
PARK
CALEDONIA
PARK
DOWNSVIEW
DELLS PARK
HEATHROW
PARK
HEATHROW
PARK
EXBURY
PARK
EXBURY
PARK
NORTHWOOD
PARK
PARC
DOWNSVIEW
PARK
PARC
DOWNSVIEW
PARK
PARC
DOWNSVIEW
PARK
PARC
DOWNSVIEW
PARK
DERRYDOWNS PARK
TOPCLIFF PARK TOPCLIFF PARK
BLACK CREEK
PARKLAND
CHALKFARM
PARK
PELMO
PARK
PELMO
PARK
BLACK CREEK
PARKLAND
BLACK CREEK
PIONEER
VILLAGE
BLACK CREEK
PIONEER
VILLAGE
EDGELEY PARK
DRIFTWOOD PARK
ROWNTREE MILLS PARK
THACKERAY PARK
ST. LUCIE PARK
SUMMERLEA PARK
WEST HUMBER
PARKLAND
HUMBER
ARBORETUM
HUMBER
ARBORETUM
FLINDON
PARK
HUMBER VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
SCARLETT WOODS
GOLF COURSE
SCARLETT WOODS
GOLF COURSE
HUMBER VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
WOODBINE
RACETRACK
WOODBINE
RACETRACK
HUMBERWOODS
PARK
HUMBERWOODS
PARK
CLAIRVILLE
CONSERVATION
AREA
CLAIRVILLE
CONSERVATION
AREA
PINE POINT PARK
PINE POINT PARK PINE POINT PARK
WINCOTT PARK
WEST DEANE
PARK
RAVENSCREST PARK
CENTENNIAL
PARK
ECHO
VALLEY
PARK
HAMPSHIRE
HEIGHTS
PARK
HAMPSHIRE
HEIGHTS
PARK
BLOORDALE
PARK
NEILSON
PARK
BLOORDALE
PARK
ETOBICOKE
VALLEY
PARK
MARIE
CURTIS
PARK
COLONEL SAM
SMITH PARK
HUMBER BAY
PARK EAST
HUMBER BAY
PARK WEST
HUMBER BAY
PARK WEST
PRINCE OF WALES PARK PRINCE OF WALES PARK
CORONATION
PARK
MARILYN
BELL PARK
TORONTO ISLAND PARK
HARBOURFRONT
PARK
TOMMY THOMPSON PARK TOMMY THOMPSON PARK
TOMMY
THOMPSON
PARK
TOMMY
THOMPSON
PARK
CHERRY BEACH PARK
WOODBINE BEACH
BEACHES PARK BEACHES PARK
WOODBINE
PARK
WOODBINE
PARK
ASHBRIDGE'S BAY PARK ASHBRIDGE'S BAY PARK
KEW
GARDENS
SIR
WINSTON
CHURCHILL
PARK
CEDARVALE
RAVINE
LANDS
DON VALLEY
BRICK WORKS
DON VALLEY
BRICK WORKS
CHORLEY
PARK
MOORE
PARK
RAVINE
MOORE
PARK
RAVINE
ORIOLE
PARK
ORIOLE
PARK
LOWER
DON PARKLANDS
RIVERDALE
PARK EAST
RIVERDALE
FARM
RIVERDALE
FARM
WITHROW
PARK
LOWER DON
PARKLANDS
NORTH
TORONTO
SEWAGE
TREATMENT
PLANT
LOWER DON PARKLANDS
TAYLOR CREEK PARK
E. T. SETON PARK
SUNNYBROOK PARK
EDWARDS
GARDENS
EDWARDS
GARDENS
SUNNYBROOK PARK
SHERWOOD
PARK RAVINE
SHERWOOD
PARK RAVINE
ALEXANDER
MUIR MEMORIAL
GARDENS
ALEXANDER
MUIR MEMORIAL
GARDENS
RIPPLETON
PARK
BOND
PARK
WINDFIELDS
PARK
YORK MILLS
VALLEY PARK
YORK
MILLS
PARK
BETTY SUTHERLAND TRAIL
HAVENBROOK PARK
EAST DON
PARKLAND
ALAMOSA PARK
VILLAWAYS PARK VILLAWAYS PARK
EAST
DON
PARKLAND
NEWTONBROOK PARK
BAYVIEW
VILLAGE
PARK
WILLOWDALE
PARK
NEWTONBROOK PARK
BESTVIEW PARK
EAST
DON
PARKLAND
DUNCAN
CREEK PARK
HARRYETTA
GARDENS
G. ROSS LORD PARK
G. ROSS LORD PARK
G. ROSS
LORD PARK
HINDER
AREA
HINDER
AREA
EARL BALES PARK &
SKI CENTRE
EGLINTON
PARK
MEMORIAL
PARK
VIEWMOUNT
PARK
CEDARVALE PARK
DAVID A.
BALFOUR
PARK
BEAUMONT
PARKETTE
GLEN
STEWART
RAVINE
EAST TORONTO
ATHLETIC FIELD
TAYLOR CREEK
PARK
STAN
WADLOW
PARK
STAN
WADLOW
PARK
WARDEN WOODS
BYNG
PARK
BROOKBANKS
PARK
TERRY
FOX
PARK
FUNDY
BAY
PARK
SANWOOD
PARK
L'AMOREAUX
PARK
L'AMOREAUX
PARK
L'AMOREAUX
SPORTS COMPLEX
TIMBERBANK PARK
BRIDLETOWNE PARK
STEPHEN
LEACOCK
PARK
TAM O'SHANTER PARK
NORTH
AGINCOURT
PARK
AUDRELANE
PARK
BRIMLEY
WOODS
IROQUOIS PARK
BIRKDALE PARK
THOMSON
MEMORIAL
PARK
JACK
GOODLAD
ASHTONBEE
RESERVOIR
WEXFORD
PARK
LORD ROBERTS
WOODS
KNOB HILL PARK
ST. CLAIR
RAVINE
BLUFFER'S PARK
MCCOWAN PARK
CEDARBROOK
PARK
BENDALE
PARK
CONFEDERATION
PARK
CURRAN HALL
RAVINE
MILLIKEN PARK -
CONCESSION
BERNER TRAIL
PARK
WICKSON
TRAIL PARK
LITTLES
ROAD
ROUGE PARK
MORNINGSIDE PARK
COLONEL
DANFORTH
PARK
LOWER
HIGHLAND
CREEK
EAST POINT PARK
GUILDWOOD PARK
SOUTH MARINE
DRIVE PARK
ELIZABETH
SIMCOE PARK
SYLVAN PARK
CUDIA PARK
ADAMS PARK
- FIELD HOUSE
DEAN PARK
ROUGE
COMMUNITY
PARK
ROUGE PARK
ROUGE BEACH PARK
GLEN ROUGE CAMPGROUND
ROUGE PARK
ROUGE PARK
ROUGE PARK
ROUGE PARK
TORONTO ZOO TORONTO ZOO
NEILSON
PARK -
HOUSE
FIELD
HOUSE
ROSETTA MCCLAIN GARDENS ROSETTA MCCLAIN GARDENS
CHRISTIE
PITS
BICKFORD
PARK
HARBORD
PARK
FRED
HAMILTON
PARK
TRINITY
BELLWOODS
PARK
STANLEY
PARK
ROUNDHOUSE
PARK
BERCZY
PARK
SCULPTURE
GARDENS
ST. JAMES
PARK
MOSS
PARK
DEVONIAN
SQUARE
ALLAN
GARDENS
CAWTHRA
SQUARE
DUNDONALD
PARKETTE
QUEEN'S
PARK
CITY
HALL
ISABELLA
VALANCY
CRAWFORD
PARK
CHRISTIE
PITS
BICKFORD
PARK
HARBORD
PARK
FRED
HAMILTON
PARK
TRINITY
BELLWOODS
PARK
STANLEY
PARK
FORT YORK
LITTLE
NORWAY
PARK
LITTLE
NORWAY
PARK
MUSIC
GARDEN
MUSIC
GARDEN
BERCZY
PARK
SCULPTURE
GARDENS
ST. JAMES
PARK
MOSS
PARK
DEVONIAN
SQUARE
ALLAN
GARDENS
CAWTHRA
SQUARE
DUNDONALD
PARKETTE
QUEEN'S
PARK
CITY
HALL
ISABELLA
VALANCY
CRAWFORD
PARK
RODING
PARK
RODING
PARK
MOATFIELD
FARM PARK
MOATFIELD
FARM PARK
YORK
UNIVERSITY
YORK
UNIVERSITY
U OF T U OF T
RYERSON RYERSON
EXHIBITION
PLACE
EXHIBITION
PLACE
ONTARIO
SCIENCE
CENTRE
ONTARIO
SCIENCE
CENTRE
YORK
UNIVERSITY
(GLENDON)
YORK
UNIVERSITY
(GLENDON)
CASA
LOMA
CASA
LOMA
U OF T
SCARBOROUGH
U OF T
SCARBOROUGH
CENTENNIAL
COLLEGE
CENTENNIAL
COLLEGE
ETOBICOKE
CIVIC CENTRE
ETOBICOKE
CIVIC CENTRE
NORTH YORK
CIVIC
CENTRE
NORTH YORK
CIVIC
CENTRE
SCARBOROUGH
CIVIC CENTRE
SCARBOROUGH
CIVIC CENTRE
EAST
YORK
CIVIC
CENTRE
EAST
YORK
CIVIC
CENTRE
YORK
CIVIC
CENTRE
YORK
CIVIC
CENTRE
HUMBER
COLLEGE
HUMBER
COLLEGE
BILLY BISHOP
TORONTO
CITY AIRPORT
BILLY BISHOP
TORONTO
CITY AIRPORT
OAKDALE GOLF
AND COUNTRY
CLUB
OAKDALE GOLF
AND COUNTRY
CLUB
WESTON
GOLF COURSE
WESTON
GOLF COURSE
ROYAL
WOODBINE
GOLF
CLUB
ROYAL
WOODBINE
GOLF
CLUB
LAMBTON
GOLF COURSE
LAMBTON
GOLF COURSE
ISLINGTON
GOLF CLUB
ISLINGTON
GOLF CLUB
ST. GEORGE'S
GOLF & COUNTRY
CLUB
ST. GEORGE'S
GOLF & COUNTRY
CLUB
MARKLAND
WOOD
GOLF &
COUNTRY
CLUB
MARKLAND
WOOD
GOLF &
COUNTRY
CLUB
ROSEDALE
GOLF CLUB
ROSEDALE
GOLF CLUB
DONALDA GOLF
& COUNTRY
CLUB
DONALDA GOLF
& COUNTRY
CLUB
FLEMINGDON
PARK
GOLF
CLUB
FLEMINGDON
PARK
GOLF
CLUB
DENTONIA
PARK GOLF
COURSE
DENTONIA
PARK GOLF
COURSE
TORONTO
HUNT
CLUB
TORONTO
HUNT
CLUB
R.C. HARRIS
FILTRATION
PLANT
R.C. HARRIS
FILTRATION
PLANT
TAM O'SHANTER
GOLF COURSE
TAM O'SHANTER
GOLF COURSE
CEDARBRAE
GOLF & COUNTRY
CLUB
CEDARBRAE
GOLF & COUNTRY
CLUB
SCARBOROUGH GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB
SCARBOROUGH GOLF
& COUNTRY CLUB
DON VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
DON VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
DON VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
DON VALLEY
GOLF COURSE
CENTENNIAL
PARK GOLF
CENTRE
CENTENNIAL
PARK GOLF
CENTRE
BATHURST LAWN
MEMORIAL PARK
GLENDALE
MEMORIAL
GLENDALE
MEMORIAL
GOEL TZEDEC
MEMORIAL PARK
GOEL TZEDEC
MEMORIAL PARK
BATHURST LAWN
MEMORIAL PARK
YORK
CEMETERY
YORK
CEMETERY
WESTMINSTER
MEMORIAL
GARDENS
WESTMINSTER
MEMORIAL
GARDENS
HIGHLAND
MEMORY
GARDENS
HIGHLAND
MEMORY
GARDENS
ST. MARGARET'S
CEMETERY
ST. MARGARET'S
CEMETERY
MOUNT HOPE
CEMETERY
MOUNT HOPE
CEMETERY
MOUNT PLEASANT
CEMETERY
MOUNT PLEASANT
CEMETERY
PROSPECT
CEMETERY
PROSPECT
CEMETERY
RIVERSIDE
CEMETERY
RIVERSIDE
CEMETERY
SANCTUARY
CEMETERY
SANCTUARY
CEMETERY
PARK LAWN
CEMETERY
PARK LAWN
CEMETERY
ST. MICHAEL'S
CEMETERY
ST. MICHAEL'S
CEMETERY
ST. JAMES
CEMETERY
ST. JAMES
CEMETERY
PINE HILLS
CEMETERY
PINE HILLS
CEMETERY
HOLY
BLOSSOM
MEMORIAL
HOLY
BLOSSOM
MEMORIAL
RESTHAVEN
MEMORIAL
GARDENS
RESTHAVEN
MEMORIAL
GARDENS
DAWES RD
CEMETERY
DAWES RD
CEMETERY
NECROPOLIS
CEMETERY
NECROPOLIS
CEMETERY
ST. JOHN'S
CEMETERY
NORWAY
ST. JOHN'S
CEMETERY
NORWAY
Grange
Nassau
Oxford
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Bernice
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Doddington
Keywell
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A
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R
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D
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A
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R
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artdale
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Harlandale
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W
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Hounslow
Yorkview
Lurgan
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Santa Barbara
Holcolm
Lorraine
Elynhill
C
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B
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Charlton
Dallas
Transwell
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Caines
Marathon
Patricia
Homewood
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P
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C
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Lissom
Greenwin Village
Elise Regatta
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W
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aria
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Country Club
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Plymouth
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M
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M
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T
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R
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B
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Norton
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A
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B
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Station
E
m
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y
D
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Bulver
Stephanie
P
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M
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Wells
D
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R
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Passmore
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Lumsden
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M
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Strathmore Strathmore
W
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Rosehill
Balmoral
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Roselawn
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Broadway
Broadway
Clarendon
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F
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ill
Old Forest Hill
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Barton
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Glengrove
Glencairn
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R
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E
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L
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Guildwood
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Dupont
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R
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Coronation Dr.
Lawrence Av. E.
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R
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Eglinton Av. E. Eglinton Av. E.
Eglinton Av. E.
Eglinton Av. E.
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a
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a
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Sheppard Av. E.
Sheppard Av. E.
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P
a
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k


R
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Brimorton Dr.
Lawrence Av. E.
Lawrence Av. E.
Lawrence Av. E.
Ellesmere Rd.
Ellesmere Rd.
Ellesmere Rd.
Ellesmere Rd.
Progress Av . M
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R
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Steeles Av. E.
Steeles Av. E.
Finch Av. E.
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Old Finch Av.
Old Finch Av.
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Passmore Av.
M
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R
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.

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R
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McNicoll Av.
McNicoll Av.
McNicoll Av.
Finch Av. E.
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R
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Huntingwood Dr.
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Steeles Av. E.
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Finch Av. E.
Finch Av. E.
Finch Av. E.
Sheppard Av. E.
Sheppard Av. E.
Sheppard Av. E.
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M
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Cummer Av.
Sheppard Av. W.
Finch Av. W.
Steeles Av. W.
Steeles Av. W.
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Wilson Av.
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Wilson Av.
Wilson Av.
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Sheppard Av. W.
Sheppard Av. W.
Finch Av. W.
Steeles Av. W.
Steeles Av. W.
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2
7
Finch Av. W.
Rogers Rd.
Eglinton Av. W.
Lawrence Av. W. Lawrence Av. W.
Lawrence Av. E.
Lawrence Av. W.
St. Clair Av. W.
D
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t. W
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Rathburn Rd.
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Eglinton Av. W.
Eglinton Av. W.
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. W
.
The Westway
Dixon Rd. Dixon Rd.
S
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St. Clair Av. W.
St. Clair Av. W.
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illw
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Moore Av.
Millwood Rd.
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This map is produced by City of Toronto, Transportation Services, Cycling
Infrastructure and Programs. Designed by: City Planning, Graphics and
Visualization. Cover illustration by City Clerk’s Offce, Records and
Information Management.
April 2010
The 2010 Toronto Cycling Map is printed on 10% total recovered, all
post-consumer fbre. Printed with vegetable based inks.
Cycling Resources
Visit toronto.ca/cycling for all your cycling needs:

• Bicycle Parking – Bicycle Station, Bicycle Lockers and
Post-and-Rings
• CAN-BIKE Courses
• Bike Month & Bike Winter Events
• Bicycle Friendly Business Awards
• Cyclometer E-news
• And much more!
City of Toronto Service Hotline 3-1-1
Phone outside city limits: 416-392-CITY (2489)
TTY customers: 416-338-0TTY (0889)
Toronto Police
Online Bicycle Registration ....................... torontopolice.on.ca/bike
Parking Enforcement
(report a vehicle in bike lane) .................................... 416-808-6600
Report a collision or theft
(non-emergency) ....................................................... 416-808-2222

Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) .................. 416-393-INFO (4636)
GO Transit
(Regional buses and trains) ....................................... 416-869-3200
Community Cycling Organizations
Toronto Cyclists Union www.bikeunion.to
Toronto Coalition for Active Transportation www.torontocat.ca
Advocacy for Respect for Cyclists www.respect.to
Community Bicycle Network www.communitybicyclenetwork.org
Toronto Bicycling Network www.tbn.ca
High Park Bicycle Club www.hpbc.ca
Users of this map bear full responsibility for their
own safety.
This map has been developed to assist in planning bicycle
trips throughout the City. The designation of a street on
the map as a bicycle lane, route or pathway does not
necessarily guarantee any minimum lane width. Cyclists
must use these streets with the same caution they would
use when riding on similar streets that have not been so
designated. All routes should be evaluated by each individual
cyclists based on their level of experience, comfort level in
cycling in traffc, weather conditions, time of day, and any
road obstacles, whether temporary or permanent, such as
construction or pot holes. This map is not intended as a
guide for children. The City is not responsible for any
unforeseeable offences committed by third parties, which
may cause hazard to cyclists.
Tommy Thompson Park is open to the public on weekends
and holidays year-round, from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
For more information call 416-661-6600 ext. 5366
The Toronto Cycling Map is a great resource for planning
your route to work, school, shopping, or simply to explore.
The Map shows on and off-street bikeways, suggested
routes and connections, and other important information
about cycling in Toronto. Use the map’s reference grid to
identify bicycle locker, CAN-BIKE, bicycle shop and rental
locations.
Welcome to the 2010
Toronto Cycling Map
.
Bike Lanes
Park Roads
Contra-Flow Bike Lanes
Shared Roadways
– Signed, on-street routes
Suggested On-Street Routes – Quiet
residential streets
Major Multi-use Pathway
Minor Multi-use Pathway
Connections – Suggested links between
off-road paths and other bikeways, or
across major barriers, such as 400 series
highways. May entail travel on busy,
major roads
Bicycle Specialty Shops
Bicycle Rental Location
Bicycle Locker Locations
Highways (Bikes Prohibited)
CAN-BIKE Course Locations
Public Washrooms
Police Stations
GO Stations with Bike Parking
GO Stations
TTC Stations
TTC Stations with Elevators
Path/Road Intersections
Stairway to Pathway
(Number of Steps)
Stairway with Bike Gutters
Roadway Bridge
Connecting Bikeways
Numbered Bikeways
Sharrows
Pedestrian / Bicycle Bridge
Bicycle Station
Public Parking
Need more maps? Call:311
Keele Street and Highway 401 G 13
Floral Pkwy.
K
e
e
l
e

S
t
r
e
e
t
Humber Bay Park and Park Lawn Road T 9,10
Lovilla Blvd.
V
ic
t
o
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ia
S
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t
L
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io
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R
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. W
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M
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D
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to The Queensway
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.
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M
i
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C
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k
HUMBER BAY
PARK EAST
HUMBER BAY
PARK EAST
P
P
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.
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South Kingsway and The Queensway S 10,11
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K
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. G
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. W
.
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n
s
w
a
y
Lake
S
hore
HUMBER MARHES HUMBER MARHES
T
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a
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w
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M
ills
R
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Don Mills Road and Don Valley Parkway N 23
P
P
P
P
ERNEST THOMPSON
SETON PARK
ERNEST THOMPSON
SETON PARK
P
P
Reuben Av.
Omagh Av.
Lovilla Blvd.
Y
o
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d
a
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C
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s
.
H
a
d
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i
a
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D
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.
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m
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C
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.
Allenby Av.
Wallasey Av.
K
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i
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l


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.
Crossroads Pl.
W
i
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A
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.
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Maple Bush Av.
Cardell Av.
Fairglen Cr.
Oak St.
W
a
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h

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a
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River
A
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R
o
a
d
PINE POINT PARK
PINE POINT PARK
PINE POINT PARK
PINE POINT PARK
Weston Road and Highway 401 G 8
Mill Street
C
h
e
r
r
y

S
t
r
e
e
t
D
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R
o
a
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w
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Q
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E
.
P
a
r
l
i
a
m
e
n
t


S
t
r
e
e
t
Longboat Ave
Villiers Street
M
u
n
i
t
i
o
n

S
t
Com
m
issioners Street
S
m
a
l
l

S
t
gravel road
G
a
r
d
in
e
r
E
xp
w
y.
Lake Shore
(above)
Blvd. E.
D
o
n

Keating Channel

R
i
v
e
r
Lower Don/Waterfront Trail T 20, 21
6
41
T
O
R
O
N
T
O
CYCLING MAP
2
0
1
0
.
Bike Lanes
Park Roads
Contra-Flow Bike Lanes
Shared Roadways
– Signed, on-street routes
Suggested On-Street Routes – Quiet
residential streets
Major Multi-use Pathway
Minor Multi-use Pathway
Connections – Suggested links between
off-road paths and other bikeways, or
across major barriers, such as 400 series
highways. May entail travel on busy,
major roads
Bicycle Specialty Shops
Bicycle Rental Location
Bicycle Locker Locations
Highways (Bikes Prohibited)
CAN-BIKE Course Locations
Public Washrooms
Police Stations
GO Stations with Bike Parking
GO Stations
TTC Stations
TTC Stations with Elevators
Path/Road Intersections
Stairway to Pathway
(Number of Steps)
Stairway with Bike Gutters
Roadway Bridge
Connecting Bikeways
Numbered Bikeways
Sharrows
Pedestrian / Bicycle Bridge
Bicycle Station
Public Parking
2010 Cycling Map - Legend
To view the full map, visit http://www.toronto.ca/cycling/map
.
Bike Lanes
Park Roads
Contra-Flow Bike Lanes
Shared Roadways
– Signed, on-street routes
Suggested On-Street Routes – Quiet
residential streets
Major Multi-use Pathway
Minor Multi-use Pathway
Connections – Suggested links between
off-road paths and other bikeways, or
across major barriers, such as 400 series
highways. May entail travel on busy,
major roads
Bicycle Specialty Shops
Bicycle Rental Location
Bicycle Locker Locations
Highways (Bikes Prohibited)
CAN-BIKE Course Locations
Public Washrooms
Police Stations
GO Stations with Bike Parking
GO Stations
TTC Stations
TTC Stations with Elevators
Path/Road Intersections
Stairway to Pathway
(Number of Steps)
Stairway with Bike Gutters
Roadway Bridge
Connecting Bikeways
Numbered Bikeways
Sharrows
Pedestrian / Bicycle Bridge
Bicycle Station
Public Parking
2010 Cycling Map - Legend
To view the full map, visit http://www.toronto.ca/cycling/map
TRAVEL CHARACTERISTICS
No. % No. %
Vehicles per Household 0.8 Vehicles per Household 1.1
Licensed Drivers per Household 1.3 Licensed Drivers per Household 1.5
Daily Trips per Capita 1.7 Daily Trips per Capita 2.0
Daily Work Trips 38,412 Daily Work Trips 1,915,584
Percentage of Work Trips by Auto 47% Percentage of Work Trips by Auto 62%
Percentage of Work Trips by Transit 41% Percentage of Work Trips by Transit 30%
Daily Non-Work Trips 43,888 Daily Non-Work Trips 2,870,656
Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Auto 50% Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Auto 71%
Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Transit 31% Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Transit 19%
Percentage of Work Trips Within Ward 7% Percentage of Work Trips Within Ward
Percentage of Work Trips Within Toronto 85% Percentage of Work Trips Within Toronto 78%
Source: 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey
Work Trips
Non-Work Trips
Note - Estimates of trips in the City and in each ward are based on the TTS sample and the population counted by the Census. The
caveats regarding the population undercount that are noted on the "POPULATION" page of the profile will also apply to the estimates of
trips.
Ward 18 City of Toronto
Ward 18 - 2006
Auto
47%
Transit
41%
Others
12%
City of Toronto - 2006
Auto
62%
Transit
30%
Others
8%
Ward 18 - 2006
Auto
50%
Transit
31%
Others
19%
City of Toronto - 2006
Auto
71%
Transit
19%
Others
10%
TRAVEL CHARACTERISTICS
No. % No. %
Vehicles per Household 0.8 Vehicles per Household 1.1
Licensed Drivers per Household 1.3 Licensed Drivers per Household 1.5
Daily Trips per Capita 1.7 Daily Trips per Capita 2.0
Daily Work Trips 38,412 Daily Work Trips 1,915,584
Percentage of Work Trips by Auto 47% Percentage of Work Trips by Auto 62%
Percentage of Work Trips by Transit 41% Percentage of Work Trips by Transit 30%
Daily Non-Work Trips 43,888 Daily Non-Work Trips 2,870,656
Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Auto 50% Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Auto 71%
Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Transit 31% Percentage of Non-Work Trips by Transit 19%
Percentage of Work Trips Within Ward 7% Percentage of Work Trips Within Ward
Percentage of Work Trips Within Toronto 85% Percentage of Work Trips Within Toronto 78%
Source: 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey
Work Trips
Non-Work Trips
Note - Estimates of trips in the City and in each ward are based on the TTS sample and the population counted by the Census. The
caveats regarding the population undercount that are noted on the "POPULATION" page of the profile will also apply to the estimates of
trips.
Ward 18 City of Toronto
Ward 18 - 2006
Auto
47%
Transit
41%
Others
12%
City of Toronto - 2006
Auto
62%
Transit
30%
Others
8%
Ward 18 - 2006
Auto
50%
Transit
31%
Others
19%
City of Toronto - 2006
Auto
71%
Transit
19%
Others
10%
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

9 December 2010
2.4. Connections to Other
BIAs and Avenues
DuWest is part of a web of main streets linked by public transit.
The grey areas on the adjacent map represent other BIAs. These
BIAs are investing in their neighbourhoods and are developing
local road maps to address future intensifcation. These retail
areas support their neighbourhood by providing services, jobs
and economic growth. Like DuWest, these places have a main
street character. As suggested in the Streetscape Study, the BIA
can beneft from physical and organizational connections with
these other BIAs.
Little Portugal
Dundas WestCollege Promenade
Bloordale Village Bloor Street
Liberty Village
Parkdale Village West Queen West
Roncesvalles Village
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 10
2.5. Population
Despite Offcial Plan policies that encourage the re-urbanization
of the area, Dundas West has seen little or no redevelopment,
or increase in population over the last 15 years. In fact, the
population of Ward 18 fell by 7.2 percent between 2001 and
2006. The dwelling unit change between 1996 and 2001 was
less than 145 units within general the study area.
p
r
o
file
T
O
R
O
N
T
O

5
145 to 595
Dwelling Unit Change by Census Tract*
640 to 2,315
-85 to -175
5 to 145
No change (blank)
* Data – Statistics Canada, 2001 Census
Census Tract boundaries are suppressed.
Centres / Downtown / Central Waterfront
Non-Residential Areas
(Employment Areas / Utility Corridors / Parks & Open Space)
(14)
(50)
(294)
(8)
(36)
Number of census tracts in each range.
Each range represents 33.3% of total (+/-) unit change.
(#)
-5 to -40
-45 to -80
(63)
(17)
Toronto City Planning, Research and Information - December 2003
Map 2: Change in Dwelling Units, Toronto 1996 - 2001
1,500 to 2,999
Population Change by Census Tract
3,000 to 14,472
-1 to -1,559
1 to 1,499
No change (blank)
Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census.
Change in Population, Toronto 2001 - 2006
Data distributed by 2006 Census Tract.
(5)
(10)
(182)
(331)
(3)
Produced by Toronto City Planning, Research & Information, March 2007
Map 2
Source: City of Toronto Population and Dwelling Counts Backgrounder 2006
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

11 December 2010
profile TORONTO – 11
Map 8: Avenues - Major Residential Development Activity (>= 6 units) by Height
Storeys
1 to 4
5 to 12
13 to 29
>= 30
Gross Floor Area (m²)
10,000
5,000
1,000
Map 9: Avenues - Major Non-Residential Development Activity (>= 1,000 m
2
of G.F.A.)
2.6. Recent Development Patterns
Very little redevelopment or investment in the area has occurred
over the last decade. No new development applications have
been made in the study area since 2002, with the exception of
one midrise and townhouse project that was approved by the
OMB in 2006. Azul Condo Towns & Lofts at 1636 Dundas St.
W. is a six-storey mixed use building, containing 14 residential
units above ground foor retail and a three-storey stacked
townhouse structure containing 12 residential units behind the
main street building.
Source: City of Toronto, How Does The City Grow? 2007
Air Photo of the Neighbourhood
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 12
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

13 December 2010
West BIA Area
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 14
2.7. West BIA Area
In the West BIA Area we fnd the conjunction of College Streets
and Dundas West at the bridge over the railway corridor. West
Toronto High School can be seen north on lansdowne. The
corner of Lansdowne, Dundas and College is a complex urban
mix of land uses including the No Frills complex in the South
West, a variety of marginal retail stores in the triangle, a used
car lot and loft conversion to rental and the edge of a residential
neighbourhood along Lansdowne Avenue.
Central BIA Area
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

15 December 2010
2.8. Central BIA Area
Within the Central BIA Area we fnd a typical Toronto streetcar
main street. St. Helen’s Church is a landmark in the area. A
regular grid of residential streets connect the neighbourhood
to Dundas West. Shirly Street School lies just south of the
neighbourhood. This view shows College Street to the north and
the railway corridor to the south constraining the depth of the
neighbourhood. The area is predominantly low-rise with the
exception of two taller residential buildings north of Dundas. A
few single family homes front or fank the main street.
East BIA Area
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 16
2.9. East BIA Area
The East BIA area continues the urban pattern from the west.
Dufferin is a major north-south connector. St. Anne’s Church
and the Cadbury factory are signifcant landmarks just north
of the area. A few taller buildings can be seen off the main
street.: The TCHC McCormick Park housing complex in the South
West, an apartment tower beside St. Anne’s and some low-rise
apartments in the North East. The main street is predominantly
mixed use with a few single family residential properties
fronting Dundas at the East end.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
Light Industrial
One-sided Mixed-use
Residental Anomalies
Two-sided Mixed-use
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

17 December 2010
2.10. Character Precincts
As identifed in the Streetscape Study, Dundas West is composed
of four different character precincts. These precincts are defned
by building types and land use.
The purple precincts house single-family homes that are
anomalies within the otherwise consistent main street. The
orange area has commercial/residential on the south side and a
mix of single-family residential and institutional church use on
the north.
The two-sided mixed use, which represents the majority of
DuWest, is represented in blue. These areas are predominantly
main street mixed use with commercial on the ground foor and
residential above.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
built form built form
Built Form
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 18
2.11. Built Form
The map below shows the orientation of the buildings in
DuWest in relation to the street and in relation to the lot.
Buildings are generally positioned at the front lot line, up
against the public right of way. This provides enclosure and
defnes the public space of the street.
The orientations of the buildings and lots lay either
perpendicular to Dundas West or to the surrounding streets.
For example, the buildings and lots on block hit the street at
a right angle. One block west, the buildings and lots are at a
right angle to the streets north and south. The angle of these
buildings creates interesting conditions along the street and
challenging lot shapes at corners.
With the exception of the TCHC McCormick Park housing
complex and a few small parking lots, Dundas West has a strong
continuous street edge.
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

19 December 2010
2.12. Development History
The housing stock in the neighbourhood is much older than the
city average. Over ffty percent of the private dwellings in the
area were built before 1946 which is a signifcant fgure when
compared to the city average of 18 percent pre-1946 dwellings.
Although there are only four structures with heritage
designation, as indicated in the Streetscape Study, much of the
area retains an older main street character. The architectural
quality and condition of the older buildings varies greatly along
its length.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
pre-1901
1916-1930
1901-1915
1931-1945
1946-1960
1976-2008
1961-1975
heritage
Era of Development
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 20
2.13. Building Heights
As seen below, buildings are predominantly two and three
storeys tall – minimally lower than the maximum heights
outlined in municipal zoning. A few under-utilized, one-storey
buildings are located on corners and house auto-oriented
services.
Five taller (six–seven storey) residential buildings are located
on either side of Dundas west within the neighbourhood. There
is presently only one midrise building within the study area
along Dundas Street West: the TCHC McCormick Park housing
complex. A six storey housing slab near Dundas and Dufferin
Streets.
The context area has a low proportion of apartment buildings
over fve storeys when compared with the city average. Only
seventeen percent of the private dwellings are in buildings over
fve storeys compared with a city average of thirty eight percent.
The area has a slightly higher than average rental tenure: ffty
three percent of dwellings are rented, compared with a forty fve
percent city average.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
6
14
6
8
7
16
6
6
one storey
three storeys
six + storeys
two storeys
four storeys
Building Heights
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

21 December 2010
16 m
10 m
6.5 m
ground
16 m
10 m
6.5 m
ground
Difference between Current Heights and Maximum Heights Permitted by Current Zoning
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
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S
T
R
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E
T
R
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H
H
O
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M
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R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
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S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
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F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
Surface Parking
Lanes
Surface Parking & Rear Lanes
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 22
2.14. Surface Parking &Rear Lanes
The number of surface parking lots in the area is not excessive.
All of the surface lots in the area are privately controlled. Future
development should be considered on existing surface lots,
particularly the ones with long frontages along Dundas West.
Underground parking should be encouraged.
Approximately half of the blocks within the study area are
serviced by rear lanes. These lanes provide service access and
parking in some cases. Lanes creates an additional buffer
between the commercial/mixed buildings on the main street
and the surrounding residential areas. Due to the irregular and
shallow lot confguration and jagged rear property lines along
Dundas W., creating new rear lanes would be diffcult.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
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Actual Land Use
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

23 December 2010
2.15. Actual Land Use
The actual land uses of the Dundas West BIA area were
gathered in a walking survey of the site. The map below shows
a variety of uses intermixed along the corridor. The majority
of uses are mixed vertically within the same building, although
there are pockets of primarily residential uses.
The commercial on Dundas is at times on the long end of the
block and on the short side at others. In general, the distance
between intersections on Dundas is small enough to provide
good permeability to the neighbourhood. The existing mix of
uses is diverse and closely matches the Offcial Plan’s vision
of an Avenue with the exception of achieving denser midrise
building types.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 24
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

25 December 2010
3. Policy Context
3.1. Planning Context
The previous section described, a comprehensive assessment of
the local conditions, including: the detailed pattern of land use
and urban design; built densities; transit; roads; parking; public
utilities; character and viability of commercial activities; local
heritage resources; unique local natural or built features; and
the physical character of the adjacent neighbourhood.
This section describes and builds on the directions of the City’s
Offcial Plan policies by reviewing previous City initiatives
including the Provincial Policy Statement,Growth Plan for
the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Offcial Plan, In Place Zoning
By-laws, New Draft Harmonized Zoning By-Law, Avenues and
Mid-Rise Buildings Study, Main Streets Initiative, Mid-Rise
Symposium, completed Avenue Studies, Heritage Conservation
Districts, Transit City, Living Downtown—Tall Buildings Study,
Toronto Green Standards, Green Roof By-law, and Vibrant Street
Manual.
This Urban Design Study connects the dots between the BIA
Branding Study completed by &Co and the Streetscape Strategy
completed by PMA Landscape Architects Ltd. It should be read
in conjunction with these documents.
The Branding Study formalized DuWest identity. Urban design
contributes to the identity of place and is supported by graphic
identity such as logos, banners, murals and urban activity
and local stories which all contribute to a local brand. This
Study respects the brand outlined in the Branding Strategy by
emphasizing the diversity and spirit of the neighbourhood in
the larger physical environment.
The Streetscape study examined the quality of the public realm
in DuWest and presented a strategy for lighting, sidewalks, and
planting. This study extends this analysis from the sidewalks
into the scale of the lots and blocks and looks at development
potential that works with the upcoming streetscape redesign.
Summarized below are the provincial, municipal and local
policies that affect the future built realm of the Dundas West
BIA.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 26
3.2. Province of Ontario
3.2.1 The Planning Act
The Province of Ontario provides rules and regulations in the
Planning Act which describe how planning processes should
be dealt with, how land uses may be controlled and by whom.
The Planning Act grants the City the power to create Offcial
Plans and Zoning By-laws which in turn provide direction to the
various offcials, staff members and other authorities involved
in the planning and development decision making process. The
Planning Act sets out approval processes for land development
and the minimum requirements for public consultation, and sets
out appeal rights to the Ontario Municipal Board.
Planning for Growth
Understanding the Growth Plan
for the Greater Golden Horseshoe
Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal
For a copy of the Growth Plan and
for more information visit the website:
www.ontario.ca/placestogrow
Or contact:
Ontario Growth Secretariat
Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal
777 Bay Street, 4th Floor
Toronto, ON M5G 2E5
PHONE: 1-866-479-9781
TORONTO RESIDENTS: 416-325-1210
EMAIL: placestogrow@pir.gov.on.ca
Downtown Barrie
Downtown Brantford
Downtown Cambridge
Downtown Guelph
Downtown Peterborough
Downtown St.Catharines
Downtown Brampton
Downtown Burlington
Downtown Hamilton
Downtown Kitchener
Uptown Waterloo
Markham Centre
Downtown Milton
Mississauga City Centre
Newmarket Centre
Midtown Oakville
Downtown Oshawa
Downtown Pickering
Richmond Hill/
Langstaff Gateway
Vaughan Corporate Centre
Downtown Toronto
Etobicoke Centre
North York Centre
Scarborough Centre
Yonge-Eglinton Centre
GGH Urban Growth Centres
Note: Some information used to produce this map was sourced from various municipal official plans. The
information displayed on this map is not to scale, does not accurately reflect approved land-use and
planning boundaries, and may be out of date. For more information on precise boundaries, the appropriate
municipality should be consulted. For more information on Greenbelt Area boundaries, the Greenbelt Plan
2005 should be consulted. The Province of Ontario assumes no responsibility or liability for any
consequences of any use made of this map.
The Government of Ontario has a vision for the
Greater Golden Horseshoe.
More than anything, the Greater Golden Horseshoe
will continue to be a great place to live. Its
communities will be based on the pillars of a strong
economy, a clean and healthy environment and social
equity. It will offer a wide variety of choices for living,
working and enjoying culture. Getting around will
be easy. Clean air, land and water will characterize
the region. Farming will be productive, diverse and
sustainable. The Greater Golden Horseshoe will be
a place where residents enjoy a high standard of
living and an exceptional quality of life.
The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe
is a major step toward making this vision a reality.

3.2.2 Provincial Policy Statement (PPS)
The Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) directs a signifcant
portion of new growth to the built-up areas of the community
through intensifcation. Intensifcation is defned as the
development of a property, site or area within existing built-up
areas at a higher density than currently exists. This approach
directs growth to where the capacity exists to accommodate it,
making effcient use of existing infrastructure.
The PPS similarly directs that a land use pattern, density and
mix of uses should be promoted that minimizes vehicle trips,
and that supports the development of viable choices and plans
for public transit and other transportation modes.
According to the Provincial Policy Statement effcient
development patterns optimize the use of land, resources and
public investment in infrastructure and public service facilities.
According to policy 1.1.1, healthy, liveable and safe communities
are sustained by, among other matters
* Promoting effcient development and land use patterns
which sustain the fnancial well being of the Province and
municipalities over the long term;
* Accommodating an appropriate range and mix of
residential, employment (including industrial, commercial
and institutional uses), recreational and open space uses
to meet long term needs; and,
* Promoting cost-effective development standards to
minimize land consumption and servicing costs.
Provincial Policy Statement
Growth Plan
Draft Regional Transportation Plan
Offcial Plan
Transit City
Avenues & Midrise Building Study
Dundas West BIA Branding Study
Dundas West BIA Streetscape Study
Dundas West BIA Urban Design Study
PROVINCIAL
MUNICIPAL
AREA SPECIFIC
Source: Province of Ontario, Places to Grow
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

27 December 2010
3.2.3 The Growth Plan for the Greater Golden
Horseshoe
The Growth Plan requires municipalities to accommodate a
signifcant portion of future growth through intensifcation to
create more compact, vibrant and complete communities.
Complete communities meet people’s needs for daily living
throughout an entire lifetime by providing convenient access
to an appropriate mix of jobs, local services, a full range of
housing and community infrastructure including affordable
housing, schools, recreation and open space for their residents.
Convenient access to public transportation and options for safe,
non-motorized travel is also provided.
The Growth Plan provides policy directions that promote
transit supportive densities and a healthy mix of land uses.
It encourages reduced automobile dependence through the
development of mixed-use, transit-supportive, pedestrian-
friendly environments.
The 2006 Places to Grow Growth Plan, published by the
Province’s Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal,
stresses the need to develop compact, vibrant, and complete
communities. Intensifcation should occur in the areas that
are already built. The Plan also proposes more density along
transport routes.
The Plan defnes intensifcation as the development of vacant
of under-utilized lots within previously developed areas, infll
development, and expansion or conversion of existing buildings.
Because DuWest is well-serviced by streetcars, it is a prime
strip for intensifcation. According to the Growth Plan, areas
such as Dundas West should also work to increase sustainable
transport, increase residential density and options, and
employment opportunities.
3.3. City of Toronto
3.3.1 Offcial Plan (OP) 2007
The Offcial Plan is a legal document approved by City Council
that describes policies and objectives for future land uses. The
Offcial Plan is prepared in consultation with city residents and
refects a community vision for future change and development.
The Offcial Plan is a blueprint for how the city will grow over
the next 30 years. It describes the location for new housing,
industry, parks, offce and retail areas, community services
and other land uses. The Offcial Plan also establishes policies
for the built environment, for improvements to the city’s
hard services (such as transit, roads, sewers, etc.) and for the
protection of the City’s natural environment.
The Toronto Offcial Plan identifes that the Downtown, Centres,
Avenues and Employment Districts can best accommodate
growth. The City of Toronto’s 2007 Offcial Plan (OP) creates a
big picture vision for the future of the city’s social, economic,
and physical development.
The Urban Structure Map of the Offcial Plan (Map 2 next page)
identifes the Dundas West BIA area as an Avenue.
Avenues
According to the OP, Toronto’s growth should occur along its
major arterial roads. These “Avenues” are where reurbanization
is anticipated to accommodate more housing and more jobs.
From Toronto’s OP we read that the “Avenues should perform
‘main street’ role and become meeting places for local
neighbourhoods and the wider community”. These Avenues
are identifed in the OP as reinvestment areas and are slated
to redevelop building-by-building to accommodate increased
densities. Dundas Street West is identifed as an Avenue.
The main street qualities of the Avenues – bustling sidewalks,
public transit, mixed-use, diverse housing and abundant
commercial activity – not only represent principles of good
planning, but also align with how the DuWest community
envisions their main street. While the OP outlines
intensifcation on the Avenues, it recognizes the value of
community character.
The OP recognizes that each Avenue is different and that there
is no “one size fts all” program for reurbanizing the Avenues.
The OP acknowledges that the avenues will be transformed
incrementally. New development on the Avenues will be guided
by a new zoning by-law and design guidelines created in
consultation with the local community.
The OP Policy 2.2.3.1 states: reurbanizing the Avenues will
be achieved through the preparation of Avenue Studies for
strategic mixed use segments of the corridors. The OP futher
states that “Avenues that are characterized by one or two storey
commercial buildings, vacant and under utilized lands and large
areas of surface parking will be priorities for future Avenues
Studies.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 28
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
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Green Space System
Official Plan - Urban Structure Map 2
Not to Scale
Source: City of Toronto, Offcial Plan - Urban Structure Map 2
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

29 December 2010
Toronto’s Housing on Main Streets (1990)
Dundas West was identifed as a Main Street with the
potential for growth since the early 1990’s. Toronto’s
Housing on Main Streets Offce initiated a design
competition to explore the potential for growth along
Toronto’s Main Streets. The Main Streets initiative
focused on how to achieve housing along the avenues
with fne grained retail at grade without advocating
wholesale redevelopment of the corridors. At the time
many of the main streets had zoning that limited build-
ing heights to 45 feet or 4.5 storeys and often had large
set-backs that prohibited new development.
The judges of the competition provided a series of
recommendations to revitalize the main streets that are
still relevant today: Jane Jacobs emphasized encourag-
ing commercial opportunities; Anne Vernez Moudon
acknowledged that towers might be appropriate in spe-
cial locations; Kees Christiaanse emphasized fexible
built form guidelines that would encourage a diversity
of forms and housing types. None of these recommen-
dations were advanced.
Neighbourhoods
The residential areas on either side of Dundas West
are considered neighbourhoods in the Offcial Plan.
Neighbourhoods are defned as physically stable areas made up
of residential uses in lower scale buildings.
The Toronto Offcial Plan provides a policy framework to
ensure that planned intensifcation is sensitive to existing
Neighbourhoods.
* Development in Mixed Use Areas adjacent or close to
Neighbourhoods will:
* Be compatible with those Neighbourhoods;
* Provide a gradual transition of scale and density through
stepping down and setbacks;
* Maintain adequate light and privacy for Neighbourhood
residents; and,
* Attenuate traffc and parking impacts on adjacent
Neighbourhood streets.
The City will undertake Avenue Studies to establish a framework
for change tailored to each Avenue context. For development
in Mixed use Areas along Avenues prior to an Avenue Study,
the proponent must undertake a Segment Study that will
assess impacts of development, including impacts related to
neighbourhoods and on infrastructure.
The OP recognizes that neighbourhoods will not be frozen in
time and will beneft from directing growth to the Avenues
by enjoying better transit service, greater housing choices,
increased shopping opportunities, an improved pedestrian
environment and other advantages. (Section 2.3.1) The OP also
states that “In growth areas, such as Centres and Avenues, the
planned context generally anticipates change” (Section 3.1.2)
Growth
City Council recently adopted Offcial Plan Amendment 72 which
is intended to bring the Offcial Plan into conformity with the
provincial Growth Plan. Among the new policies added is that
Toronto will accommodate 3.08 million residents by 2031.
Although the Offcial Plan acknowledges growth and identifes
the Avenues as one of the growth areas. It does not specify
specifc targets for growth. In the case of the Dundas West area
or even Ward 18, where there has been little to no growth, the
Offcial Plan does not specify the anticipated growth or even the
capacity for growth in these areas.
Housing
The OP states that adequate and affordable housing is a basic
requirement for everyone.
The Housing (Section 3.2.1) of the OP states:
1. A full range of housing, in terms of form, tenure and
affordability, across the city and within neighbourhoods, will be
provided and maintained to meet the current and future needs
of residents.
2. The existing stock of housing will be maintained and
replenished. New housing supply will be encouraged through
intensifcation and infll that is consistent with this Plan.
The Offcial Plan does not make any recommendations for how,
an area like Dundas West, could encourage new housing, a
wider diversity of housing types and tenures, or how to create
affordable housing.
Toronto’s Main Streets (1990)
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 30
Economics
Section 3.5.1,1, Supporting the Foundations of Competitiveness,
of the OP states: Economic opportunities will grow with the
success of this Plan’s strategy to manage growth and change in
ways that guide development to parts of the City where it will
be most suitable and facilitate this development through clear,
easily understood rules.
The OP envisions new shopping streets emerging as the
Avenues develop and mature. These shopping streets are
centers of community activity and support community life and
everyday essentials. The OP states that it reinforces the role of
traditional shopping streets in communities as the retail fabric
of the City continues to evolve.
The Offcial Plan does not specify how these economic goals
relate to built form, housing supply or density. On issues such
as commercial taxes, which limit much of the retail activity on
main streets, the Offcial Plan is silent.
Two deterrents to main street revitalization on the Avenues are
high property taxes and capital gains tax. The City of Toronto
is heavily dependent on property tax for revenue. In Toronto,
the current commercial property tax rate is fve times higher
than the residential rate. In addition, capital gains tax can
deter revitalization due to the back taxes owed on property
depreciation.
Mixed Use
The Toronto Offcial Plan describes Mixed Use Areas as areas
that combine residential uses, offces, retail and services,
institutions, entertainment, recreation and parks;
* Such a mix of uses allows people to live, work, shop and
play in the same area;
* Mixed Use Areas will absorb much of the anticipated new
housing growth, particularly along Avenues.
The OP directs that development in Mixed Use Areas will:
* Create a balance of uses that meets the needs of the local
community;
* Locate and mass new buildings appropriately to provide a
transition between areas of different intensity and scale;
to adequately limit shadow impacts; and to frame the
edges of streets and parks;
* Provide an attractive, comfortable and safe pedestrian
environment;
* Take advantage of nearby transit services;
* Provide good site access and adequate parking.
The Dundas West BIA area is identifed in the Offcial Plan as a
Mixed Use Area as well as an Avenue. The BIA area generally
conforms with the mixed use aspirations of the OP.
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

31 December 2010
3.3.2 Zoning By-law
Zoning By-laws regulate use of land and construction of
buildings and apply the Offcial Plan on a “site-specifc” basis.
Zoning by-laws defne what can be built on a property, for
example: permitted uses of the site; density of development;
building heights and setbacks; parking and open space
requirements.
At its meeting of August 25 - 27 2010, Toronto City Council
enacted a new, single, city-wide zoning by-law. This zoning
project has been underway for fve years. The Harmonized
Zoning By-Law consolidates the existing 43 zoning by-laws
from across the amalgamated city.
The zoning by-law and height overlay maps for the Dundas
West area are included in the next four pages of this document.
The previous 438-86 by-law is shown next to the amended
438-86 by-law for comparison purposes. Although the amended
438-86 by-law is now the “in-place” by-law there are areas
within the study are that are not yet included in the amended
by-law and continue to be governed by the previous 438-86
zoning by-law.
http://www.toronto.ca/zoning/
Reading the Zoning By-law
The zoning maps are coloured by their general landuse
categories such as Residential, Industrial or Mixed Use as
shown in the legends. The zoning categories are labelled for
each area. The table below describes the previous and amended
zoning codes for the Dundas West BIA area:
By-law Zone
(Land Use)
Density
(FAR)
Density Split
(FAR)
Standard
Set
Previous MCR T2.5 C1.0 R2.0 —
Amended CR 2.5 (c1.0; r2.0) SS2
The previous MCR (now CR) zone symbol on the Zoning By-
law Maps represent (mixed) commercial-residential zones
indicating the primary land uses permitted. The zone symbol
is followed by a numerical value representing the maximum
permitted foor area ratio (FAR) of all land uses on a lot. In the
case of a mixed land use designation like CR the maximum FAR
is followed by one or both of the following in brackets:
* The letter ‘c’ followed by a numerical value indicating the
maximum foor space index permitted for non-residential
uses on a lot; and
* The letter ‘r’ followed by a numerical value indicating the
maximum foor space index permitted for residential uses
on a lot.
In the amended by-law, the fnal density split is followed by a
Development Standard Set symbol (SS), followed by a number
indicating the set of development standards that applies to
the lot. The Development Standard Set symbol (SS) on the
Zoning By-law Map for commercial residential zones identifes
the Development Standard Set with a numerical value that
corresponds to a specifc set of development standards that
describe detailed development standards including setbacks
and step backs.
Understanding Floor Area Ratio (FAR)
Floor Area Ratio is a measurement of built-form density that is
expressed as the gross foor area of a building divided by the
net area of its site. Thus a one-storey building that entirely
covers its site has a FAR of 1:1, or 1x, or 1, whereas a two-storey
building on the same site would have a FAR of 2:1 or 2x or 2.
The zoning height overlay maps are simply describe the
maximum permitted height limits for the different areas of the
plan.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
Residental
Industrial
Mixed-use
Green space
I1 D2
I1 D2
I1 D2
UT
I1 D2
R2 Z0.6
R4 Z1.0
R2 Z0.6
R4 72.0
G
G
G
R4 Z1.0
MCR T2.5 C1.0 R2.0
MCR T2.5 C1.0 R2.0
MCR
T3.0
C1.0
R2.5
R4
Z1.0
Municipal Land Use Zoning Existing
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 32
3.3.3 Previous Zoning By-law: Land Use
The previous by-law Zoning and Land Use Map below describes
the land use and density regulations for the Dundas West Area.
The BIA area is almost completely within the MCR zone . The
area has a maximum FAR of 2.5 with a maximum of 1.0 FAR
commercial uses and 2.0 FAR residential uses.
Most of the surrounded area is zoned for residential use with a
relatively low density of 1.0 FAR. The study area also includes
Industrial Land Use Areas in the west end surrounding the rail
line, Park Uses and other Mixed Use Areas along College Street.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
EL2.0
UT
EL2.0
R (d0.6)
R (d0.6)
R
(d2.0)
R (d1.0)
R (d1.0)
O
O
O
R (d1.0)
CR 2.5 (c1.0; r2.0) SS2
CR 2.5 (c1.0; r2.0) SS2
CR 3.0
(c1.0; r2.5)
SS2
Residental
Industrial
Mixed-use
Open Space
Not part of This Bylaw
Municipal Land Use Zoning Proposed
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

33 December 2010
3.3.4 Amended Zoning By-Law: Land Use
The map below shows the land use designations in the
amended Zoning By-Law. Although the symbol for MCR has
been changed to CR the zoning category and maximum density
has remained the same.
Density zoning in the BIA area allows buildings with a foor
area of up to 2.5 times the total area of the lot. This can
include commercial foor space equal to the area of the lot
and residential foor area equal to twice the lot area. The
Development Standard Set for the area is SS2. The SS2
designation defnes setbacks and specifc built form regulations.
The land uses and density of the surrounding area have
remained largely the same in the amended by-law. The grey
areas in the map below indicate areas that have not yet been
included in the amended by-law.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
14m
16m
16m
16m
10m
10m
0 metres
14 metres max (about 4 floors)
10 metres max (about 3 floors)
16 metres max (about 5 floors)
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 34
Municipal Height Zoning Existing
3.3.5 Existing Zoning: Height
The majority of properties along Dundas West are currently
zoned for a maximum height of sixteen meters which is
approximately fve storeys tall. The surrounding residential
neighbourhoods are zoned for a height of ten metres or about
three storeys. The residential areas are thus envisioned to be
physically stable leaving no capacity for growth.
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
RU
SH
O
LM
E
D
R
IV
E
COLLAHIE STREET
MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
FRANKISH AVENUE
MARSHALL STREET
SHIRLEY STREET
HICKSON STREET
S
T
H
E
L
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
T
C
L
A
R
E
N
S
A
V
E
N
U
E
M
A
R
G
U
E
R
E
T
T
A
S
T
R
E
E
T
B
R
O
C
K
A
V
E
N
U
E
S
H
E
R
ID
A
N
A
V
E
N
U
E
D
U
F
F
E
R
IN
S
T
R
E
E
T
G
L
A
D
S
T
O
N
E
S
T
R
E
E
T
R
U
S
H
H
O
L
M
E
R
O
A
D
L
IS
G
A
R
S
T
R
E
E
T
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
WYNDHAM STREET
H
A
V
E
L
O
C
K
S
T
R
E
E
T
MIDDLETON STREET
DELANEY CRESCENT
N
O
R
T
H
E
R
N
P
L
A
C
E
GORDON STREET
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
L
A
N
S
D
O
W
N
E
A
V
E
N
U
E
RIDEAU AVENUE
M
A
C
D
O
N
N
E
L
A
V
E
N
U
E
14.0m
16.0m
16.0m
16.0m
10.0m
10.0m
10.0m
0 metres
14 metres max (about 4 floors)
10 metres max (about 3 floors)
16 metres max (about 5 floors)
Not part of This Bylaw
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

35 December 2010
Municipal Height Zoning - Proposed
3.3.6 Amended Zoning By-Law: Height
The amended zoning by-law carries forward the height regime
of the previous by-law.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 36
3.3.7 Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study
2010
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study was initiated to help
implement the Offcial Plan objective of reurbanizing Toronto’s
arterial corridors. The main objective of this city-wide study
was to encourage future intensifcation along Toronto’s Avenues
that is compatible with the adjacent neighbourhoods through
appropriately scaled and designed mid-rise buildings.
The Study categorized the Avenues based on historic, cultural
and built form characteristics, established a set of performance
standards for new mid-rise buildings and identifed areas where
the performance standards should be applied. The Dundas West
BIA is identifed in the study as one of the areas that these mid-
rise buildings guidelines should apply.
The Study describes Toronto’s Avenues as an integral part
of the urban fabric. Avenues serve as social and commercial
centres and are intimately linked to the identity and vitality
of the neighbourhoods that surround them. They are also part
of Toronto’s Offcial Plan growth management strategy and
therefore it is important to anticipate and set the stage for an
appropriate, typically mid-rise, form of development. In the
City of Toronto, mid-rise buildings are defned in relation to the
adjacent street or Avenue and can rise no taller than the street
‘right-of-way’, which is generally between four and eleven
storeys.
The Offcial Plan vision for Toronto’s Avenues is one of vibrant,
tree-lined streets, wide sun-lit sidewalks, framed by well
designed and contextually sensitive mid-rise buildings that
support an active street life by providing a variety of retail and
community uses at the ground foor level.
The implementation of the Avenues’ vision has been dependant
on individual Avenues Studies, sixteen of which have been
completed across the city to date. Even with new as-of-right
zoning in those areas, there has been a slow response from the
development community. The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings
Study is intended to be a faster and more pro-active Action Plan.
The report recommends that city staff use the Mid-Rise
Performance Standards in reviewing proposals for a two
year monitoring period. During the monitoring period, an
implementation strategy will be developed which will include
a review of existing zoning, the statutory fve year review of the
Offcial Plan, and a new Urban Design Handbook, in order to
incorporate the Performance Standards in guidelines, policies or
new as-of-right zoning.
By the end of the two year monitoring period, staff will report
back to the Planning and Growth Management Committee on
the effectiveness of the Performance Standards and potential
implementation measures as appropriate and necessary.
http://www.toronto.ca/planning/midrisestudy.htm
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

37 December 2010
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
Avenues included in this Study
Not to Scale
Etobicoke/York
North York
Scarborough
Toronto &
East York
Avenues (as per Official Plan Structure Map 2)
Avenue Study Areas (excluded from the Performance Standards)
Secondary Plan Areas (excluded from the Performance Standards)
Other City Initiated Studies (excluded from the Performance Standards)
City of Toronto District Boundaries
3.3.8 Avenues Included in the Avenues and Mid-
Rise Buildings Study
Dundas West BIA is included in the Avenues and Mid-Rise
Buildings Study and is subject to the recommended guidelines.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 38
3.3.9 Character Areas in the Avenues
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study outlines areas
that are currently identifed as Heritage Conservation
Districts (HCDs), HCDs Under Study, or Areas that Warrant
Further Heritage Analysis, as well as creating an additional
consideration, identifed as “Character Areas”.
Character Areas in the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings
Study were identifed primarily through visual analysis and
mapping areas that subjectively were assessed as having an
existing character that should be considered in the design of
redevelopment projects on the Avenues.
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
Performance Standards
Character Areas
Avenues identified as having built form or cultural significance to the neighbourhood have generally been identified as
Character Areas. New buildings within Character Areas will relate to the existing street and built form context.
Vertical Additions
Additions to existing buildings provide an
alternative to redevelopment. They are
permitted provided that the addition:
• Does not exceed the overall maximum
height for the site; and
• Meets all angular plane requirements.
Fine Grain Façades
New buildings within Character Areas will
maintain a fine grain fabric that is consistent
with the rhythm of adjacent buildings.
Consistent Cornice Lines
New buildings will require a 1.5 metre front
step-back that references the height of
adjacent cornice lines.
5.5m
Existing buildings in a
Character Area
New Mid-Rise
Building
s
id
e
p
ro
p
e
rty
lin
e
Street Elevation
New Mid-Rise
Building
Street Section
1.5m
min.
fro
n
t p
ro
p
e
rty
lin
e
The Study identifes the location and provides a description of
the Character Area but does not provide area specifc analysis
and recommendations.
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study includes a range
of Performances Standards which may be applied to these
Character Areas. The intent was not to prohibit redevelopment
but to highlight the role that the existing context can play in
shaping the form and function of new mid-rise buildings on the
Avenues.
Sections of Avenues may include signifcant built, cultural
and natural resources. These can be designated, listed or
simply identifed as signifcant. Character Areas are typically
on a much larger scale than individual heritage sites or even
heritage conservation districts.
A Character Area will be of signifcance for the Avenues if it
demonstrates identifable architectural, historic or cultural
themes associated with the underlying historical development
of the specifc Avenue.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

39 December 2010
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
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1rlnltv 3ellwooos / Llttle ltalv
(*/,1721OHIW WR ULJKW
Lollnton Creenwav
Lollnton llats
8llverthorn
lalrbank / Oakwooo
Ceoarvale
lorest Hlll / upper vlllaoe
Lollnton wav
/onoe Lollnton
Coloen Vlle
Kenneov lark
8carborouoh vlllaoe
),1&+OHIW WR ULJKW
[ane llnch / unlversltv Helohts
wlllowoale
3avvlewvlllaoe

-$1(WRS WR ERWWRP
[ane llnch
[ane Lawrence
.((/(
Lownsvlew
.,1*/HIW WR ULJKW
1rlnltv Nlaoara

.,1*6721WRS WR ERWWRP
west Hlll
8carborouoh vlllaoe
Klnoston 8t. Clalr
Cllllcrest
Cllllsloe retall strlp
Cllllsloe
Klnoston larkwav
3lrchclllle
Klnoston waroen
upper 3each

/$.( 6+25(OHIW WR ULJKW
Lono 3ranch
New1oronto
Vlmlco
Vlmlco bv the Lake
Humber 3av
/$:5(1&( OHIW WR ULJKW
weston
Clen lark / Lawrence Helohts
3athurst Lawrence
/onoe Lawrence
west Hlll / Olo Klnoston loao
073/($6$17
Lavlsvllle
2·&21125WRS WR ERWWRP
Clenwooo
1ophamlark
3$3(
lape vlllaoe
48((1 OHIW WR ULJKW
1he Oueenswav
larkoale / Oueen west
3eaconsllelo vlllaoe
west Oueen west
1rlnltv 3ellwooos
Corktown
llveroale
Lesllevllle
1he 3each
521&(69$//(6
loncesvalles

6+(33$5'OHIW WR ULJKW
Lanslno
wlllowoale
3avvlewvlllaoe
1he leanut / lark lorest
^olncourt
67&/$,5OHIW WR ULJKW
lunnvmeoe
8t. Clalr Caroens
8t. Clalr west
Hlllcrest
/onoe 8t. Clalr
:(6721OHIW WR ULJKW
weston
weston ^rea lhase )
weston 8outh
Vount Lennls
:,/621OHIW WR ULJKW
North /ork 8herloan mall
west Lownsvlew
Lownsvlew
3athurst wllson
<21*(WRS WR ERWWRP
3eoloro lark
Lawrence lark
/onoe Lollnton / uptown
/onoe
Lavlsvllle / Lavlsvllle vlllaoe
Leer lark / /onoe 8t. Clalr
8ummerhlll
loseoale
/(*(1'
Leslonateo Herltaoe Conservatlon Llstrlcts
lotentlal Herltaoe Conservatlon Llstrlcts
Character ^reas
^venues (as per Olllclal llan urban 8tructure Vap)
Avenues & Character Areas
Not to Scale
Designated Heritage Conservation Districts
Potential Heritage Conservation Districts
Character Areas
Avenues (as per Official Plan Urban Structure Map)
Character Areas
Character Areas typically consist of a healthy, mixed use fabric.
They have been identifed as sections of an Avenue that contain
potential built, natural, and/or cultural heritage resources that
are not listed or designated. These are not intended to become
Heritage Conservation Districts, but have a character that will be
important to consider as redevelopment occurs.
According to the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study new
mid-rise development in these Character Areas should:
* Mitigate impacts of new development that may destabilize
the function and character of the area.
* Be developed through alterations and infll development
that are sensitive to, and where appropriate, strengthen
the character of the area.
Brockton Village has been identifed in the Avenues and
Mid-Rise Buildings Study as a Potential Heritage Conservation
District due its legacy as a 19th century village and the diverse
range of late 19th century and early 20th-century housing types.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 40
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
Avenues & Retail At-Grade
Avenues (as per Official Plan Structure Map 2)
Neighbourhoods
Apartment Neighbourhoods
Natural Areas
Parks
Other Open Spaces
Areas Recommended for
Further Consideration for Retail-
Commercial
Not to Scale
‘Areas Recommended for Further Consideration for Retail-Commercial’ have been identified by the study consultants
as areas where further analysis is warranted to determine if mid-rise buildings should be required to include retail-
commercial space on the ground floor, based on factors such as the existing commercial character of the area and
future prospects for successful pedestrian-oriented commercial development. It should be noted that the Commercial
Residential (CR) Zone that will apply to all Mixed Use Areas will permit retail/commercial uses.
Avenue Study, Secondary
Plans, and other City Initiated
Study Areas (excluded from the
Performance Standards)
3.3.10 Avenues and Retail at Grade
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study states that
consistent at-grade retail uses lining the edges of the
streetscape is a fundamental component in the community role
and design character of the Avenues.
The study identifes the importance of grade-related retail as it:
* Enhances community amenity;
* Supports pedestrian amenity, comfort, and safety;
* Supports the health and vibrancy of the shopping area;
* Provides services for the neighbourhood;
* Provides space for new businesses; and,
* Supports adjacent transit.
There are three categories for retail at-grade within Mixed Use
Areas on the Avenues: Required, Encouraged and Permitted.
The map below illustrates those areas where retail at-grade is
required. The Dundas West BIA is identifed as an established
district where retail at-grade is required.
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study identifes these
established districts as communities that are supported
by stable main-street type retail corridors, with a sizeable
residential base that supports local shopping such as grocery
stores, drug stores, banks, and other local-serving businesses.
Primarily, these areas provide opportunities for mixed-use retail
infll to strengthen the continuity of these corridors.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

41 December 2010
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
Minimum & Maximum Building Heights
20m R.O.W.
2
0
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
27m R.O.W.
2
7
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
30m R.O.W.
3
0
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
36m R.O.W.
3
6
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
The maximum allowable height of new buildings will be no taller than the width of the
adjacent right-of-way (public street and sidewalk), up to a maximum mid-rise height of
36 metres (11 or 12 storeys). The maximum heights may only be achieved:
• If the building complies with all applicable Performance Standards.
• If the property contains sufficient lot depth to accommodate angular plane requirements.
New buildings on the Avenues must achieve a minimum height of 10.5 metres and
3 storeys at the street frontage. For mid-rise buildings taller than 6-storeys, the first
step-back should not be below the top of the third storey.
m
i
n
.

1
0
.
5
m
s
t
r
e
e
t

w
a
l
l
m
in
.

1
0
.
5
m

b
u
ild
in
g

h
e
ig
h
t
Performance Standards
Approximately 6 storeys Approximately 8 storeys Approximately 9 storeys Approximately 11 storeys
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
Minimum & Maximum Building Heights
20m R.O.W.
2
0
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
27m R.O.W.
2
7
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
30m R.O.W.
3
0
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
36m R.O.W.
3
6
m

h
e
i
g
h
t
The maximum allowable height of new buildings will be no taller than the width of the
adjacent right-of-way (public street and sidewalk), up to a maximum mid-rise height of
36 metres (11 or 12 storeys). The maximum heights may only be achieved:
• If the building complies with all applicable Performance Standards.
• If the property contains sufficient lot depth to accommodate angular plane requirements.
New buildings on the Avenues must achieve a minimum height of 10.5 metres and
3 storeys at the street frontage. For mid-rise buildings taller than 6-storeys, the first
step-back should not be below the top of the third storey.
m
in
.

1
0
.
5
m
s
t
r
e
e
t

w
a
ll
m
in
.

1
0
.
5
m

b
u
ild
in
g

h
e
ig
h
t
Performance Standards
Approximately 6 storeys Approximately 8 storeys Approximately 9 storeys Approximately 11 storeys
3.3.11 Minimum and Maximum Building Heights
on the Avenues
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study stipulates that new
buildings on the Avenues must achieve a minimum height of
10.5 metres and 3 storeys at the street frontage. For mid-rise
buildings taller than 6 storeys, the frst step-back should not be
below the top of the third storey.
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study recommends that
the maximum allowable height of new buildings will be no
taller than the width of the adjacent right-of-way, up to a
maximum mid-rise height of 36 metres. The maximum building
height may only be achieved if the building complies with
all the applicable performance standards and the property
is of suffcient depth to accommodate the angular plane
requirements.
Dundas West throughout the study area is approximately 20m
wide. According to the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study
the maximum allowable height for the area should be 19.5
meters for a Mixed-Use building along the 20 meter R.O.W.
width of Dundas Street W. The study suggests that the ideal
minimum lot depth for a 20 meter R.O.W. is 32.6 meters. For
example, to achieve a minimum top foor depth of 11.6 metres
(required for a double-loaded corridor) on a 6-storey building,
a depth of 32.6 metres is required (see the section diagrams on
this page).The study also expects new buildings to include the
potential for typical below-grade parking layouts, including
ramps and access.
In order to protect for pedestrian comfort and allow adequate
sunlight access on the sidewalk on the opposite side of the
street, the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study indicates
that a front angular plane of 45 degrees should be taken
from a height of 80% of the R.O.W. at the front property line.
The height of the streetwall should be designed to provide a
“human-scale” and minimize the perception of height from the
street level and the overall mass of buildings.
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
The above illustrates a range of alternative Pedestrian Perception step-back locations applied to a 9-storey building.
36m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 28.5m
45
o
30m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 24m
45
o
27m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 21.5m
45
o
20m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 16m
45
o
Pedestrian Comfort & Human Scale
To allow adequate sunlight access on the sidewalk on the opposite side of the street, a front angular plane of 45
o

should be taken from a height of 80% of the R.O.W. at the front property line.
The height of the streetwall should be designed to provide a “human-scale” and minimize the perception of height
from the street level and the overall mass of buildings.
4th storey
3rd storey
5th storey
6th storey
Performance Standards
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
The above illustrates a range of alternative Pedestrian Perception step-back locations applied to a 9-storey building.
36m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 28.5m
45
o
30m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 24m
45
o
27m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 21.5m
45
o
20m R.O.W.
80% of R.O.W.
width = 16m
45
o
Pedestrian Comfort & Human Scale
To allow adequate sunlight access on the sidewalk on the opposite side of the street, a front angular plane of 45
o

should be taken from a height of 80% of the R.O.W. at the front property line.
The height of the streetwall should be designed to provide a “human-scale” and minimize the perception of height
from the street level and the overall mass of buildings.
4th storey
3rd storey
5th storey
6th storey
Performance Standards
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 42
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
• Shallow Properties adjacent to
Neighbourhoods and Open Spaces will
include a minimum setback of 7.5 metres
and a 45
o
angular plane measured from a
height of 10 metres.
• Where a public laneway abuts a site, the
laneway may be included for the purposes of
establishing the setback and angular plane.
• In order to minimize overlook, principal
windows should not be located closer than
10 metres from the rear property line and
balconies should not be below 10 metres at
the rear.
Illustrating the alternative transition for shallow properties abutting a Neighbourhood (example shown is a property
shallower than 46.5 metres on a 30 metre R.O.W.).
Illustrating the rear transition for deep properties abutting a Neighbourhood or Open Space (example shown is a property greater than
46.5 metres on a 30 metre R.O.W.).
Rear Transition
Rear yard setbacks and angular planes are required to provide appropriate transition to Neighbourhoods and Open Spaces:
R.O.W. Width Definition of Deep Lot is
greater than or equal to
20m 37.5m
27m 42.5m
30m 46.5m
36m 52.5m
R.O.W. Width Definition of Shallow Lot is
less than
20m 37.5m
27m 42.5m
30m 46.5m
36m 52.5m
1
0
m
re
a
r p
ro
p
e
rty
lin
e
Neighbourhood
or Open Space
Avenue
45
o
7.5m
fro
n
t p
ro
p
e
rty
lin
e
S
a
m
p
le
3
0
m
R
.O
.W
.
fro
n
t p
ro
p
e
rty
lin
e
S
a
m
p
le
3
0
m
R
.O
.W
.
• Deep Properties adjacent to
Neighbourhoods and Open Spaces will
include a minimum setback of 7.5 metres
and a 45
o
angular plane measured from the
rear property line.
• Where a public laneway abuts a site, the
laneway may be included for the purposes of
establishing the setback and angular plane.
• In order to minimize overlook, principal
windows should not be located closer than
10 metres from the rear property line and
balconies should not be below 10 metres at
the rear.
Performance Standards
7.5m
45
o
7
.5
m
re
a
r p
ro
p
e
rty
lin
e
Neighbourhood
or Open Space
Avenue
3.3.12 Rear Transition on the Avenues
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study requires rear yard
setbacks and angular planes are required to provide appropriate
transition to neighbourhoods and open spaces.
Deep properties adjacent to neighbourhoods and open spaces
will include a minimum setback of 7.5 metres and a 45 degree
angular plane measured from the rear property line.
* Where a public laneway abuts a site, the laneway may be
included for the purposes of establishing the setback and
angular plane.
* In order to minimize overlook, principal windows should
not be located closer than 10 metres from the rear
property line and balconies should not be below 10 metres
at the rear.
Shallow properties adjacent to neighbourhoods and open
spaces will include a minimum setback of 7.5 metres and a 45
degree angular plane measured from a height of 10 metres.
* Where a public laneway abuts a site, the laneway may be
included for the purposes of establishing the setback and
angular plane.
* In order to minimize overlook, principal windows should
not be located closer than 10 metres from the rear
property line and balconies should not be below 10 metres
at the rear.
Vehicular Access
To establish an uninterrupted public realm, vehicular access
should be provided via side streets and rear lanes, not the
Avenues. This may require new buildings to be setback at-grade.
As illustrated in the map in Section 4.41 of this report, eighty
percent of the lots within the Dundas West BIA Avenue are
defned as shallow lots using the Avenues and Mid-Rise
Buildings criteria.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

43 December 2010
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
For mid-block sites without rear lane access, vehicular
access from the Avenue may be permitted, if:
• The driveway is located as far from the adjacent intersection as
possible;
• Appropriate spacing between adjacent driveways is maintained;
• A 7.0 metre public lane is provided at the rear of the property
which will form part of a continuous laneway system within the
block as adjacent properties redevelop; and
• As redevelopment occurs, approved mid-block driveways to the
Avenue should be designated for shared access to serve adjacent
properties in lieu of, and until a rear public laneway is established.
Vehicular access points should be located off of laneways or side streets wherever possible. Vehicular access points should be consolidated and/or shared wherever possible.
Vehicular Access
To establish an uninterrupted public realm, vehicular
access should be provided via side streets and rear lanes,
not the Avenues. This may require new buildings to be
setback at-grade.
Mid-block Vehicular Access
public lane
side street
entrance
lane entrance
mid-block site for
mid-rise building
corner site for
mid-rise building
existing
buildings
existing buildings
min. distance from intersection
creation of new
public lane
existing
buildings
existing
buildings
future lane
new mid-block
mid-rise building
new driveway
Performance Standards
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
For mid-block sites without rear lane access, vehicular
access from the Avenue may be permitted, if:
• The driveway is located as far from the adjacent intersection as
possible;
• Appropriate spacing between adjacent driveways is maintained;
• A 7.0 metre public lane is provided at the rear of the property
which will form part of a continuous laneway system within the
block as adjacent properties redevelop; and
• As redevelopment occurs, approved mid-block driveways to the
Avenue should be designated for shared access to serve adjacent
properties in lieu of, and until a rear public laneway is established.
Vehicular access points should be located off of laneways or side streets wherever possible. Vehicular access points should be consolidated and/or shared wherever possible.
Vehicular Access
To establish an uninterrupted public realm, vehicular
access should be provided via side streets and rear lanes,
not the Avenues. This may require new buildings to be
setback at-grade.
Mid-block Vehicular Access
public lane
side street
entrance
lane entrance
mid-block site for
mid-rise building
corner site for
mid-rise building
existing
buildings
existing buildings
min. distance from intersection
creation of new
public lane
existing
buildings
existing
buildings
future lane
new mid-block
mid-rise building
new driveway
Performance Standards
3.3.13 Vehicular Access on the Avenues
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study provides guidance
for vehicular access to new developments along an Avenue. To
establish an uninterrupted public realm, vehicular access, the
Study suggest, should be provided via side streets and rear
lanes, not the Avenues. This may require new buildings to be
setback at-grade.
Mid-block Vehicular Access
For mid-block sites without rear lane access, vehicular access
from the Avenue may be permitted, if
* The driveway is located as far from the adjacent
intersection as possible;
* Appropriate spacing between adjacent driveways is
maintained;
* A 7.0 metre public lane is provided at the rear of the
property which will form part of a continuous laneway
system within the block as adjacent properties redevelop;
and
* As redevelopment occurs, approved mid-block driveways
to the Avenue should be designated for shared access to
serve adjacent properties in lieu of, and until, a rear public
laneway is established.
The map in Section 2.14 shows the existing rear lanes within
the Dundas West BIA Avenue area. Approximately half of the
blocks within the study area are serviced by rear lanes. As the
Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study requests new lanes the
total developable area of those lots would be further reduced by
the rear lane setback. The majority of lots along Dundas West
are already defned as shallow. These lots would be severely
constrained by the taking of a rear lane.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 44
Toronto Avenues & Mid-Rise Buildings Study
Brook McIlroy Planning & Urban Design / Pace Architects
E.R.A. Architects
Quadrangle Architects Limited
Urban Marketing Collaborative
A below grade parking permitted
to property line
fr
o
n
t p
r
o
p
e
r
ty
lin
e
4.8m min.
sidewalk
B
Performance Standards
Minimum Sidewalk Widths & Streetscapes
Minimum sidewalk widths are required to create an attractive, welcoming and safe pedestrian experience. This may require
new buildings to be setback at-grade. Avenues on Transit City LRT routes may require additional sidewalk width.
Streetscapes should provide the highest level of urban design treatment to create beautiful pedestrian environments and
great places to shop, work and live.
Their design is guided by the City of Toronto Streetscape Manual which addresses the five main elements of the street -
paving, street trees, medians, lighting and street furniture.
A = Existing sidewalk
B = Setback required
below grade parking permitted
to property line
fr
o
n
t p
r
o
p
e
r
ty
lin
e
6m min.
sidewalk
A B
For rights-of ways between 20 metres and 30 metres a
minimum sidewalk width of 4.8 metres is required.
For rights-of ways greater than 30 metres a minimum sidewalk
width of 6 metres is required.
3.3.14 Minimum Sidewalk Widths & Streetscapes
on the Avenues
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study requires minimum
sidewalk widths to create an attractive, welcoming and safe
pedestrian experience. This may require new buildings to
be setback at-grade. Avenues on Transit City LRT routes may
require additional sidewalk width.
The Study suggests that streetscapes should provide the highest
level of urban design treatment to create beautiful pedestrian
environments and great places to shop, work and live. Their
design is guided by the City of Toronto Streetscape Manual
which addresses the fve main elements of the street - paving,
street trees, medians, lighting and street furniture.
For rights-of ways between 20 metres and 30 metres a minimum
sidewalk width of 4.8 metres is required.
The City’s Streetscape Manual requires a minimum pedestrian
width of 2.10 m. Where this is not possible, a reduction to no
less than 1.53 m can be considered.
Typical sidewalk widths along Dundas Street are in the range
of 3.5–4.5 meters. These sidewalk widths, although narrow, do
accommodate the minimum pedestrian width of 2.1m including
a total planting area, splash strip and curb of 1.4m. Although
the 4.8m sidewalk width suggested in the Avenues and Mid-
Rise Buildings Study would provide more public space it is not
required to meet the minimum requirements of the City’s own
Streetscape Manual.
Concrete Paver Band (2 Rows)
Special Street, Major Street, Existing Main Street, Emerging Main Street
• PAVI NG •
NOTES:
1. THE DESIRED WIDTH OF THE PEDESTRIAN
CLEARWAY IS A MINIMUM OF 2100mm.
WHERE THIS IS NOT POSSIBLE, A REDUCTION
TO NO LESS THAN 1530mm CAN BE CONSIDERED.
2. SIZE AND/OR COLOUR OF CONCRETE PAVERS
MAY VARY IN SITE-SPECIFIC CASES
VARIES
(800mm TYPICAL)
SEE NOTE 1
200mm CONCRETE
RETAINER STRIP
200mm
CONCRETE CURB
CONCRETE BASE
WITH PEDESTRIAN
LIGHT POLE
POURED IN PLACE
CONCRETE SIDEWALK
(BROOM FINISH)
WITH ACCESSIBLE
CURB RAMP
BICYCLE RING
STREET LIGHT OR
UTILITY POLE
200mm x 200mm
CONCRETE
UNIT PAVERS
(60% YORKTOWN
40% RUSSET OR
EQUIVALENT)
SEE NOTE 2
NTS
09/08 P-1
VARIES
(400mm TYPICAL)
200mm
200mm
Source: City of Toronto, Streetscape Manual
BMI/Pace 5
May 2010
A 20 metre wide R.O.W.
with several sites that may
accommodate potential
redevelopment.
Eventually the Avenues
will transform as vibrant
streets providing a
high level of services
and amenities
while protecting the
character of adjacent
neighbourhoods
The Avenue can
gradually intensify
through the introduction
of mid-rise buildings
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

45 December 2010
3.3.15 The City’s Vision for the Transformation of
the Avenues
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study vision for the
Avenues is described as a development form that is termed as
“Mid-Rise Urbanism”. The illustration at the right demonstrates
the potential evolution of a similar Avenues section just east of
the Dundas West BIA.
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study claims that the
Avenues will transform as vibrant streets providing a high level
of services and amenities while protecting the character of
adjacent neighbourhoods through mid-rise development that
is moderate in scale. The study anticipates that the Avenues
will gradually intensify through the introduction of mid-rise
buildings.
As the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study applies to all
properties equally the eventual complete transformation is seen
as inevitable. The resulting transformation of the street from
its original fne-scaled main street buildings to a continuous
mid-rise street wall erases the existing character and grain of
the neighbourhood.
Consultation with the Dundas West BIA and neighbourhood
residents found that the local community does not agree with a
vision for a future Dundas West that fully redevelops in a mid-
rise form. See section 4.5 for details.
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 46
3.3.16 Amended By-law Built Form Permissions
The amended zoning By-law adopts many of the guidelines of the Avenues and Mid-Rise
Buildings Study. A summary of the most relevant zoning permissions is below:
The minimum height of the frst storey measured foor-to-foor is 4.5 metres. (40.10.40.10 )
Building Setbacks (40.10.40.70)
Within the CR zone of Dundas west new buildings must be setback:
* A maximum of 3.0 Metres from a front lot line;
* A minimum of 75% of the main wall of the building facing a front lot line must be located at
or between the front lot line and the maximum setback;
* A minimum of 7.5 Metres from the rear lot line; and
* A minimum of 1.5 Metres from the rear lot line if the rear lot line abuts a lane.
Where the wall of a building does not contain windows or openings, the wall must be set back a
minimum of 3.0 metres from any abutting side lot line if the building is on a lot that abuts a lot in
a Residential Zone category, otherwise no setback is required.
Angular Plane (40.10.40.70)
For a lot within a CR Zone that abuts an O, ON or OR zone or a Residential Zone category, every
building on the lot in the CR Zone must not penetrate a 45 degree angular plane projected:
* Over a shallow lot, along the entire rear lot line, starting at an elevation of 10.5 Metres
above the average elevation of the ground along the rear lot line; and
* Over a deep lot, along the entire rear lot line, starting at an elevation of 7.5 Metres above the
average elevation of the ground along the rear lot line.
The by-law defnes a shallow lot is a lot with a lot depth less than or equal to 32.6 metres and a
deep lot is a lot with a lot depth greater than 32.6 metres for a 20 meter right-of-way such as
Dundas Street West. The by-law is inconsistent with the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study
that stipulates that a shallow lot on a 20m right-of-way should be 37.5m deep.
The building must not penetrate a 45 degrees angular plane, measured at a line parallel to and at
a height above a lot line that abuts a street and is not a rear lot line, equal to 80% of the width of
the street right-of-way on which the lot has frontage. In the case of the Dundas West area 80%
of the width of the right-of-way is 16 metres. As the height limit for the area is also 16 metres the
front angular plane does not affect the as-of-right built form restrictions for the Dundas West CR
area.
The New Zoning By-law
Commercial Residential Zone Requirements
Standard Set 2 – typical Main Streets
Max Height as
set out on
Overlay Map
(default is 14m)
Set backs
Set backs
Source: City of Toronto ,Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study 2010
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

47 December 2010
Residential Uses (40.10.40.70)
Any portion of a building or structure containing residential
uses located in the frst foor of a building must be set back a
minimum of 4.5 metres from the front lot line; or a minimum
of 3.0 metres from the front lot line provided that the foor
level of the frst foor is located a minimum of 0.9 metres and a
maximum of 1.2 metres above the average elevation of grade
along the front lot line.
Separation (40.10.40.80)
If a wall of the building has windows and a line projected at
a right angle from one of these walls intercepts another such
wall on the same lot, the minimum above ground distance
between the walls must be 11.0 metres; or if a wall of the
building has windows facing a wall which does not have
windows and a line projected at a right angle from one of
these walls intercepts the other wall, the minimum above
ground distance between them must be 5.5 metres.
http://www.toronto.ca/zoning/by-law/ZBL_NewProvision_
Chapter40_10.ht
Summary
The above series of drawings shows in a cross-section view the
different applications of city policies. The top row illustrates
the built form limits on a typical 30m shallow lot. The bottom
row illustrates the same rules on a typical 40m or deep lot. The
three columns illustrate, from left to right, the previous zoning,
the current zoning, and the recommendations of the Avenues &
Midrise Typology Study. Given a shallow lot the previous zoning
and current zoning yield a 5 storey building the only difference
is that the previous zoning enforced a small 45 degree setback
at the front of the top storey. The Avenues Study recommends a
taller height limit which allows 6 storeys and includes the same
small 45 degree setback at the front of the top storey.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 48
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

49 December 2010
4. Future Opportunities
4.1. Introduction
A key desire that emerged during the consultation process with
the Dundas West BIA was a vision for a diverse and dynamic
main street. Given the existing conditions and policy context,
opportunities for change within the Dundas West BIA Avenue
are highly constrained. This section examines the potential
for future growth within the area by examining the physical
site conditions with regard to current city policies. Future
opportunities and constraints are identifed with the intent of
protecting the unique qualities of the area including its fne-
scaled lot pattern, and heritage.
4.1.1 Optimal Site Conditions
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study acknowledges that
no two Avenues are identical, nor are there sites with identical
characteristics or conditions. The study also outlines some of
the ideal site conditions for the optimal development of mid-rise
buildings and exceptions for taller buildings while protecting
the character and vitality of Dundas West and adjacent
neighbourhoods.
Based on City policies this study identifes the sites that have
short to medium-term development potential. A block-by-
block analysis was conducted to determine which sites may
have development potential either as individual sites or an
assembled group of properties. These “Opportunity Sites” were
identifed in consultation with the Steering Committee and
presented at the Annual General Meeting of the BIA.
An opportunity map was produced that identifes the properties
with development potential. The constraints and opportunities
used to determine the opportunity sites are outlined below.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 50
CNR Lansdowne Av St. Clarens Av Margueretta St Brock Av Sheridan Av Dufferin St Gladstone St Rusholme Dr Rusholme Rd
Block 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Totals
North Side
Commercial GFA
473 m² 171 m² 1791 m² 3150 m² 2852 m² 2385 m² 1349 m² 2614 m² 14785 m²
Residential GFA
2412 m² 73 m² 3096 m² 4030 m² 3233 m² 3269 m² 1912 m² 18025 m²
Institutional GFA
3351 m² 3351 m²
Total GFA 473 m² 2583 m² 3351 m² 1864 m² 6246 m² 6882 m² 5618 m² 4618 m² 4526 m² 36161 m²
Block Area
1156 m² 2963 m² 4196 m² 2265 m² 4593 m² 5918 m² 3183 m² 3874 m² 2444 m² 30592 m²
Block Net FSI 0.4 x 0.9 x 0.8 x 0.8 x 1.4 x 1.2 x 1.8 x 1.2 x 1.9 x 1.2 x
South Side
Commercial GFA
6597 m² 412 m² 1860 m² 1013 m² 3392 m² 1915 m² 2291 m² 1123 m² 3059 m² 21662 m²
Residential GFA
2616 m² 2380 m² 1270 m² 4241 m² 13999 m² 2629 m² 4417 m² 2140 m² 33692 m²
Institutional GFA
1397 m² 674 m² 2071 m²
Total GFA 6597 m² 3028 m² 4240 m² 3680 m² 7633 m² 15914 m² 4920 m² 5540 m² 5199 m² 57425 m²
Block Area
20655 m² 3413 m² 2744 m² 3060 m² 5612 m² 12055 m² 2901 m² 3581 m² 2502 m² 56523 m²
Block Net FSI 0.3 x 0.9 x 1.5 x 1.2 x 1.4 x 1.3 x 1.7 x 1.5 x 2.1 x 1.0 x
4.2. Development Potential
A block-by-block analysis was conducted to measure the current
and residual development potential under the new zoning
regime. The chart below shows that none of the blocks achieve
the permitted density of 2.5x Floor Space Index (FSI) coverage.
In fact, most of the blocks achieve less than half of the permitted
density of the average for the whole Study Area is only 1.1x FSI.
The residual permitted Gross Floor Area (GFA) that has not been
achieved is 124,202 m². This represents about 100 additional
residential units that are permitted within the density but have
not been developed due to the constraints outlined in this study.
The provision of additional housing units within the corridor
would support the Offcial Plan by increasing the tax base,
providing life on the streets, increasing the retail potential,
bringing added amenities, support transit use, adding to the
affordable housing stock, providing more choice in housing
type, allowing people to stay within their neighbourhood.
Development within the Avenue is the only potential for future
change in the area as the Offcial Plan prohibits change due to
the protection of the neighbourhood zones.
DUNDAS STREET W
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COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
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Block Numbers
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

51 December 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 52
4.3. Opportunities and Constraints
4.3.1 Opportunities
1. Property Depth: deeper sites have the potential to
accommodate a feasible building envelope within setbacks
and angular plane requirements. With the exception of
the large No Frills site, property depths in the Study Area
are typically between 30 metres to 45 metres. For this
study properties that were deeper than 37.5 meters were
considered as intensifcation sites as the Avenues and
Mid-rise Study defnes properties less than 37.5 meters as
shallow lots.
2. Property Width: Sites that are large enough, without
consolidation, or sites that require the assembly of fewer
properties, are more likely to redevelop.
3. Landmark Sites: There are several sites that the BIA,
consultants and community, identifed as important
landmarks, gateways or supported transit. These sites
have been identifed as potential landmark development
sites.
4. Existing Use: Sites that are currently under-utilized and
don’t support a healthy main street were identifed as high
priority for redevelopment. These sites include surface
parking lots, and former automobile uses.
4.3.2 Constraints
1. Property Depth: is the primary constraint for the
redevelopment of properties along Dundas Street.
Generally, properties less than 30 metres in depth are
constrained both by setbacks, height limits and the
space required to provide internal garbage storage and
underground parking. These sites were not included the
intensifcation list.
2. Property width: can constrain development potential.
Although property consolidation is possible,
redevelopment can be limited due to “hold-out” properties
or the expense of assembling lots. Property widths are
generally narrow along Dundas Street West. Consolidation
of multiple properties often takes many years. Most of the
properties within the BIA area are too narrow to redevelop
at taller heights. Properties less than 24 metres in width
are diffcult to redevelop.
3. Rental Housing: The City’s Rental Replacement By-law
requires the replacement of rental units on site to protect
the supply of rental housing. Buildings with many rental
units are thus unlikely to redevelop without an alternative
transfer site.
4. Likelihood of Redevelopment: Churches such as St.
Helen’s are unlikely to redevelop in the short-term as they
are supported by the community.
5. Heritage: A few of the properties along the corridor have
been identifed as Heritage buildings and are thus not
considered as future development sites.
6. Residential Anomalies: The built form of the existing
low-rise residential units that front or fank Dundas West
are anomalies within the Study Area. These buildings
were built prior to planning or zoning for the area at a
time when the street was on the edge of the city. These
buildings do not contribute to the public realm, life of
the street or retail activity. They relate poorly to the
prevailing character of the Study Area, and as such,
exemplify what is to be avoided in new development along
the main street.
4.4. Opportunity Sites
4.4.1 Defning Opportunity Sites
The follow pages provide conceptual demonstration plans
illustrating a maximum potential built form envelope for each
of the six Opportunity Sites. It is important to recognize that the
built form envelope shown for each Opportunity Site represents
either the maximum extent of the building mass based on City
policies or a recommended potential rezoning that fulflls the
intent of the Offcial Plan.
The built form envelopes were determined with the objective
of accommodating additional appropriate intensifcation. The
envelopes address site orientation, sunlight access and shadow
impact, views, transit access, relationship to adjacent land uses
and the width and type of the adjacent streets. The majority of
the intensifcation sites follow the Avenues Mid Rise Guidelines.
Upon analysis, some of the sites were identifed as being able
to accommodate taller buildings. Most of the Opportunity Sites
would require property consolidation to achieve their full
development potential and their redevelopment in the short-
term is unlikely.
There are some sites that, because of their location, adjacency
and physical characteristics, can accommodate buildings taller
than the zoning limit base height of 6 storeys, or the 19.5 meter
1:1 ratio of building height to street width recommended by the
Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study. While these sites can
accommodate taller than the maximum building heights, new
development mush be sensitive to the existing context, as well
as conform to all other built form and zoning recommendations.
The development tests on six opportunities sites, illustrated
over the next few pages show the potential creation of over
1000 people and 200 jobs in the area. The City of Toronto could
use a development permit system to unlock the potential of
these heights in a sensitive manner. The development permit
system is described in more detail in section 4.6 below.
DUNDAS STREET W
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COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
ST ANNES ROAD
LANGEMARK AVENUE
MOUTRAY STREET
ATKINS AVENUE
FISHER STREET
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MACKENZIE CRESCENT
BANK STREET
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HICKSON STREET
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Not Adjacent to Residental
Transit Route Intersectons
Heritage Buildings
>40m Depth Intensificaton Sites
Main Street Residental Anomalies
Large Opportunity Site
Gateway
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3.
4.
5.
6.
Intensifcation Opportunities
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

53 December 2010
4.4.2 Locating Opportunity Sites
The map below identifes the location and nature of the
opportunity sites. The map highlights boundaries that
are not adjacent to residential areas as having potential
for redevelopment. Transit route intersections have been
identifed to demonstrate the potential for landmark buildings
and transit supportive densities. Areas in grey describe main
street residential uses that are anomalies within the BIA. The
City should encourage the redevelopment of these uses to a
more intense mixed-use built form with retail at grade. Areas
highlighted in yellow have fewer constraints for intensifcation
given their lot size and distance from adjacent neighborhoods.
Areas marked with asterisks present opportunities for landmark
architecture and public space. These gateways lie at the
intersection of two transit routes and are located in highly
visible locations. Site 1 is highly visible along Dundas W. and
the rail corridor. Site 2 is visible along Dundas, Lansdowne and
College Streets. Site 6 is at the terminus of a bend on Dundas
Street and is also visible along Dufferin.
Proposed Permissions Current Zoning with Proposed Permissions
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 54
Opportunity Site 1: South-West Corner of Dundas St. W. & Lansdowne Avenue
Existing Zoning /Avenues Proposed
Height Limit (m) 10 (10)19.5 10.5 (25) Site Frontage (m) 241
GFA (m2) 0 102,727 39,781 Site Depth (m) 141
Commercial GFA (m2) 6,597 20,974 9,502 Site Area (m2) 20,641
Total GFA (m2) 6,597 123,701 49,283
Density (FSI) 0.3 6.0 2.4
Estimated Units 0 873 338 Above Current Zoning
Estimated Population 0 1,546 599 +599 Increase
Estimated Employees 132 419 190 +58 Increase
The BIA has identifed this site as an important gateway. High quality architecture, materials
and public space design should be considered for any future development plans. The No Frills
site is a large consolidated site that presents signifcant development potential if rezoned.
The size of the site and its relative isolation from residential neighbourhoods presents the
opportunity for tall buildings along the railway corridor. This site would be appropriate for
an increase in height limit (above zoning) because it is at a major intersection. The proposed
height limit ensures no shadow impact on the nearby residential areas and minimal shadow
impact on the Dundas West sidewalk. A lower than mid-rise podium of 3 storeys would match
the heights of the adjacent built form and protect sunlight access to sidewalks and increase sky
view. Towers should be located with deep step-backs from the street to minimize the impact
of height. The southern end of the site can accommodate shorter tower elements, ensuring no
shadow impact on the residential area to the east. Essential to a redevelopment of the site is
the preservation of the historic facade of the existing building and providing active frontages
along Dundas Street.
Opportunity Site 2: North-West Corner of Dundas St. W. & Lansdowne Avenue
Existing Zoning /Avenues Proposed
Height Limit (m) 16 16/19.5 10.5 (92) Site Frontage (m) 49.1
GFA (m2) 462 8,866 8,683 Site Depth (m) 56.4
Commercial GFA (m2) 472 1,841 1,710 Site Area (m2) 1,833
Total GFA (m2) 934 10,707 10,393
Density (FSI) 0.5 5.8 5.7
Estimated Units 4 75 74 Above Current Zoning
Estimated Population 7 133 131 +124 Increase
Estimated Employees 9 46 43 +33 Increase
The triangle between Dundas West, College West and Lansdowne has also been identifed as
a gateway. The size and shape of this site limits the development potential, somewhat. The
highly visible location makes it an ideal site for a landmark building. This site and the No Frills
site are both adjacent to intersecting transit lines and should be designed to support transit use.
Site 2 is a located along a vista to the St. Helen’s church steeple (a local landmark).The massing
of new buildings should be minimized along Dundas Street and pushed to the northern part of
the site ensuring sensitivity to the remnant residential area to the north of the site. Commercial
uses to the south, west, and east of Site 2 are less sensitive to height. The triangular shape
of the site ensures minimal bulk which limits the shadow impact of new development. New
buildings should be designed to have no shadow impact on the adjacent residential areas.
Sites 1 and 2 Today
Sites 1 and 2 illustrating Proposed Permissions
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

55 December 2010
Proposed Permissions Current Zoning with Proposed Permissions
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 56
Opportunity Site 3: South-West Corner of Dundas St. W. & Sheridan
Existing Zoning /Avenues Proposed
Height Limit (m) 16 16/19.5 10.5 (22.5) Site Frontage (m) 97.8
GFA (m2) 1,712 9,399 7,516 Site Depth (m) 37.5
Commercial GFA (m2) 995 2,184 1,992 Site Area (m2) 2,615
Total GFA (m2) 2,707 11,583 9,508
Density (FSI) 1.0 4.4 3.6
Estimated Units 15 80 64 Above Current Zoning
Estimated Population 26 141 113 +87 Increase
Estimated Employees 20 55 50 +30 Increase
The site located on the south-west corner of Dundas Street West and Sheridan Avenue has
deep lots that would have to be assembled to unlock the development potential. Site 3 has
been identifed as a site that can accommodate some modest additional height as it is the only
deep site on its block. Other than the additional height permission, new development should
conform to all of the mid-rise and zoning step-backs and setbacks including the 45 degree
angular plane from the rear property line. These restrictions would limit the height to 8 storeys.
As the site is on the south of Dundas Street this height would have no shadow impact on
adjacent properties. It would have minimal shadow impact on the Dundas West sidewalks as it
would be the only tall building on the block.
Opportunity Site 4: North-East Corner of Dundas St. W. & Sheridan
Existing Zoning /Avenues Proposed
Height Limit (m) 16 16/19.5 19.5 Site Frontage (m) 32.6
GFA (m2) 0 6,298 3,722 Site Depth (m) 39.2
Commercial GFA (m2) 0 1,519 1,468 Site Area (m2) 1,895
Total GFA (m2) 0 7,817 5,190
Density (FSI) 0.0 4.1 2.7
Estimated Units 0 54 32 Above Current Zoning
Estimated Population 0 95 56 +56 Increase
Estimated Employees 0 38 37 +37 Increase
The former garage site on the north-east corner of Sheridan Avenue and Dundas Street West
is a good opportunity for a mid-rise development that follows the City’s guidelines. This site
is presently under-utilized and would revitalize the street if developed properly. The property
is large enough for a redevelopment without the need for additional properties. Because
of its direct proximity to the residential properties to the north, it is recommended that new
development fully comply with the current zoning and avenues mid-rise guidelines. This would
limit the height to 6 storeys with the designated setbacks and stepbacks. The height would have
no shadow impact on the residential areas or the Dundas West sidewalk as it is on the north
side of the street.
Site 4 Today
Site 4 illustrating Proposed Permissions
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

57 December 2010
Proposed Permissions Current Zoning with Proposed Permissions
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 58
Opportunity Site 5: Mid-Block between Sheirdan and Dufferin St.
Existing Zoning /Avenues Proposed
Height Limit (m) 16 16/19.5 19.5 Site Frontage (m) 55.2
GFA (m2) 9,435 32,990 16,378 Site Depth (m) 154.9
Commercial GFA (m2) 0 1,570 1,572 Site Area (m2) 8,820
Total GFA (m2) 9,435 34,560 17,950
Density (FSI) 1.1 3.9 2.0
Estimated Units 80 280 139 Above Current Zoning
Estimated Population 142 496 246 +104 Increase
Estimated Employees 0 39 39 +39 Increase
The TCHC McCormick Park housing complex on the south side of Dundas West, although,
protected by the Rental Replacement By-law, presents an opportunity for a mid-rise addition
along Dundas West. A thoughtful addition could add affordable housing above retail and
would greatly contribute to the life of this stretch of the main street.
Because of its mid-block location and direct adjacency to Opportunity Site 6 , it is recommended
that new development fully comply with the current zoning and avenues mid-rise guidelines.
This would limit the height to 6 storeys with the designated setbacks and stepbacks. The
Dundas Street frontage of the side has no impact on residential areas and the mid-rise height
limits would ensure no shadow impact on the northern Dundas Street West sidewalk.
Opportunity Site 6: South-West Corner of Dundas St. W. & Dufferin St.
Existing Zoning /Avenues Proposed
Height Limit (m) 16 16/19.5 10.5 (31.5) Site Frontage (m) 38.9
GFA (m2) 2114 6,701 9,085 Site Depth (m) 29.7
Commercial GFA (m2) 1057 1,625 1,624 Site Area (m2) 1,096
Total GFA (m2) 3,171 8,326 10,709
Density (FSI) 2.9 7.6 9.8
Estimated Units 18 57 77 Above Current Zoning
Estimated Population 32 101 137 +105 Increase
Estimated Employees 21 41 41 +19 Increase
Although, the properties located at the south-west corner of Dundas West and Dufferin are
deep, they would have to be assembled to unlock the development potential. The site has
been identifed as a gateway due to its location on the intersection of two major streets and
transit lines. As the site is on the southern side of the street with only the southern edge of the
site exposed to residential uses, it could potentially accommodate a taller building with little
adverse effect on the neighbourhood. In order to limit the height, while allowing for a taller
building on this important site, a 60 degree angular plane limit is recommended rather than the
45 degree plane described in the zoning. The height limit would still ensure no shadow impact
on the nearby residential areas and maintain minimal shadow impact on the Dundas West
sidewalk. A lower than mid-rise podium of 3 storeys would match the heights of the adjacent
built form and protect sunlight access to sidewalks and sky view. The tower should conform
to the City’s tall building guidelines with step-backs from the street to minimize the impact of
height.
Site 6 Today
Site 6 illustrating Proposed Alternative Solution
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

59 December 2010
Today
Looking west along Dundas West towards Site 6
Looking east along Dundas West towards Sites 4,5,6
Looking east along Dundas West past Sites 1 and 2
Current Zoning if Fully Built Proposed Alternative Solution
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 60
Today Incremental As-of-Right Additions Toronto’s Mid-rise Vision Proposed Alternative Solution
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

61 December 2010
4.5. The Trouble with Toronto’s
Mid-Rise Vision
Toronto’s mid-rise vision carries two major issues for Dundas
West: it restricts development and, if actually built out, it would
erase the fne-grained heritage of the neighbourhood.
The illustrations on the facing page show three built form
scenarios for three views along the Dundas West corner. The
left column shows the existing conditions, the centre column
illustrates the full build-out of the current zoning, the right
column shows a proposed fexible zoning system that could be
enabled with a development permit system. The central column
shows the monotony of the mid-rise vision: a relentless street-
wall that produces continuous shadow, on the south side of the
street. The right column illustrates a more realistic development
future and a better built-form future. A future that looks allows
height and density to respond to views, vistas, transit proximity
and context.
The series of images at the top of the page illustrate the
same issue, in elevation. These images were used in the
public consultation process to gather input. The public
overwhelmingly chose the image at the right. The proposed
solution protects most of the heritage buildings and allows a
taller building to carry the future density of the neighbourhood.
The mid-rise vision erases the existing main street.
4.6. The Development
Permit System
Given the nature of the built form and Dundas West’s heritage,
there is a need to ensure that new development complements
the character of the area. At the same time there is also a need
for a planning process that is clear, transparent and expedient.
The Development Permit System is a planning tool that
combines zoning, site plan and minor variance processes into
one application and approval process. It promotes investment
and facilitates development by signifcantly reducing the time
required to obtain approvals.
The Development Permit System offers the City of Toronto the
option to set a range of conditions on development approvals
that would minimize negative impact, yet allow growth. Under
the system, the City of Toronto would have the authority to
consider exterior design of buildings and the ability secure
streetscape improvements such as landscaping, street furniture
and bicycle parking facilities. These tools could help create
a sense of place and character for Dundas West. The permit
system increases the clarity and transparency of the land use
planning system by requiring the City to declare the standards
for development up front in the offcial plan policies and the
development permit bylaw.
In addition to identifying minimum and maximum development
standards, a development permit bylaw would establish a
specifed range of variation from these standards which can
be permitted (without a bylaw amendment). The Development
Permit System allows the public to have a say in offcial plan
policies as the development permit bylaw requires public
review. The Development Permit System should be considered
along with development standards and design guidelines
that are unique to Dundas West and provide fexibility for
implementation on a case-by-case basis. A Development Permit
System could allow for the preservation of character areas
while allowing for more permissive height and setbacks for
new development. Given that the height of buildings along
Dundas West has potential impact on the public realm, it is
recommended that an absolute maximum height be established
in order to implement the BIA’s urban design vision for the
area. The Development Permit System would include regulatory
tools such as Development Permit Urban Design Guidelines,
Application, Citizens guide and Site Design Standards. Such
a system would protect the adjacent neighbourhoods, while
requiring appropriate improvements to the public realm.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 62
Encourage a Diversity of Signage
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63 December 2010
5. Storefront Design Guidelines
5.1. Storefront Design
Main Streets are vital to the health of neighbourhoods and the
economy of the city. Main streets are comprised of a group of
businesses that combine to create a place. These businesses
contribute to the look, feel and character of the street and
create places of social and economic exchange. The design of
storefronts in combination with the design of the public realm
create the identity for the street and reinforce the brand of the
place. Each storefront should add to the vitality of the street. A
key recommendation that emerged from the consultation with
the BIA was that the street should maintain its architectural and
social diversity.
5.1.1 Commercial Facade Improvement Program
In 2011, the BIA will be eligible for the Commercial Facade
Improvement Program. This program allows owners of the
retail spaces to apply to the City for grants to offset the costs of
improving their business façade. Details of this program are
outlined in the Streetscape Study. The BIA should advise its
members of this date and be ready with plans.
5.1.2 Encouraging Business Occupancy
To encourage an even greater diversity of businesses and to fll
current vacancies, the BIA should consider creating a business
recruitment team. This team could attract desirable tenants
as per community needs, such as those expressed during the
community consultation for the Branding Strategy. The BIA web
site could be instrumental in this process and provide space to
advertise storefronts currently for lease.
5.2. Storefront and Signage
Design Guidelines
5.2.1 Commercial Ground Floor
Commercial activity should occupy ground foor space. This
will keep the street active and courage pedestrian life. New
developments should maintain commercial activity at grade
and the City should discourage the conversion of storefronts to
residential uses along Dundas West.
5.2.2 Transparency and Permeability
Transparency and permeability are important to the vibrancy
of and commercial success of the main street. Glass windows
should dominate the length and height of storefronts. Roll
down shutters should be dissuaded during both day and night.
Tinted and refective glass should also be discouraged, as well
as other materials that hinder pedestrians’ view into a building.
5.2.3 Lighting
Keeping storefronts lit at night creates a comfortable place for
strolling. It also provides the opportunity for window shopping
and may highlight attractive architectural features. Storefronts
should be lit in a way that is bright and warm.
5.2.4 Signage
The BIA appreciates the diversity of colours, materials, and size
of our signage. Signs should not plaster windows, or dominate
the street. Signage should display a shop’s unique identity by
using quality materials and design.
“The unique, independent shops – local, maybe family-run/staffed – make newcomers really welcome.”
- BIA Member
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 64
Walkability Checklist Guidance
1. Incorporate plants, signage, lights as well as different textures, colors, and materials that add and visual interest.
Recommended Not Recommended
2. Add scale and interest to the building facade by articulated massing.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
1. Incorporate plants, signage, lights as well as different textures, colors, and materials that add and visual interest.
Recommended Not Recommended
2. Add scale and interest to the building facade by articulated massing.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
1. Incorporate plants, signage, lights as well as different textures, colors, and materials that add and visual interest.
Recommended Not Recommended
2. Add scale and interest to the building facade by articulated massing.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
1. Incorporate plants, signage, lights as well as different textures, colors, and materials that add and visual interest.
Recommended Not Recommended
2. Add scale and interest to the building facade by articulated massing.
Recommended Not Recommended
1. Incorporate plants, signage, lights as well as different textures, colors, and materials that add and visual interest.
2. Add scale and interest to the building facade by articulated massing.
Not Recommended
Not Recommended
Recommended
Recommended
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

65 December 2010
Walkability Checklist Guidance
3. Maintain the existing facade rhythm and proportions along the street with architectural elements.
Recommended Not Recommended
4. Discourage blank walls and provide more pedestrian friendly streetscape; contribute to neighborhood safety
as well by providing windows at the street that act as “eyes on the street“.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
3. Maintain the existing facade rhythm and proportions along the street with architectural elements.
Recommended Not Recommended
4. Discourage blank walls and provide more pedestrian friendly streetscape; contribute to neighborhood safety
as well by providing windows at the street that act as “eyes on the street“.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
3. Maintain the existing facade rhythm and proportions along the street with architectural elements.
Recommended Not Recommended
4. Discourage blank walls and provide more pedestrian friendly streetscape; contribute to neighborhood safety
as well by providing windows at the street that act as “eyes on the street“.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
3. Maintain the existing facade rhythm and proportions along the street with architectural elements.
Recommended Not Recommended
4. Discourage blank walls and provide more pedestrian friendly streetscape; contribute to neighborhood safety
as well by providing windows at the street that act as “eyes on the street“.
Recommended Not Recommended
3. Maintain the existing facade rhythm and proportions along the street with architectural elements.
4. Discourage blank walls and provide more pedestrian friendly streetscape; contribute to neighborhood safety as well by providing windows at the street that act as “eyes on the street“.
Not Recommended
Not Recommended
Recommended
Recommended
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 66
Walkability Checklist Guidance
6. Include overhead architectural features, such as awning, canopies, trellises or cornice
treatments that provide shade and reduce heat gain.
Recommended Not Recommended
Walkability Checklist Guidance
6. Include overhead architectural features, such as awning, canopies, trellises or cornice
treatments that provide shade and reduce heat gain.
Recommended Not Recommended 6. Include overhead architectural features, such as awning, canopies, trellises or cornice treatments that provide shade and reduce heat gain.
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

67 December 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 68
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

69 December 2010
6. Key Recommendations
6.1. Background
Urban change and development are guided by the City of
Toronto through a number of policy documents to ensure
that change occurs in a comprehensive and sustainable way.
Municipal policies are guided by larger policies established by
the Province of Ontario. Our recommendations for the Dundas
West BIA area respond to the objectives set by the City’s OP
policy and to the Provincial Growth Plan. The Dundas West
BIA area meets many of the expectations of the Offcial Plan:
it represents a diverse functioning main street that is well
connected to transit and a fne grained urban environment. The
success of the main street is challenged by a lack of growth over
the last few decades.
Physically and historically the Dundas West BIA study area is
a typical Toronto traditional main street. Through our study,
we have learned that the area that is well served by transit
and reasonably well connected with a fne grid of streets. The
neighbourhood is connected to a larger network of main streets
and BIAs in an increasingly desirable part of Toronto.
Dundas West has some signifcant physical challenges
compared with the typical City of Toronto Avenue. The
neighbourhood is constrained to the north and the south by
College Street and the Railway Line, respectively. The lots
along the main street are typically very shallow (30m and
under) and the majority of those lots are narrow and shaped as
parallelograms. These lot confgurations signifcantly impede
the assembly and redevelopment of much of the main street.
Among these constrained lots lie a few larger consolidated lots
or blocks of lots that present future development potential.
Buildings along Dundas West are predominantly two and three
storeys tall – and thus do not achieve the as-of-right zoning in
the area. The majority of the buildings along the main street
are much older than the city average. These physical conditions
explain, in part, the lack of change along this transit-oriented
main street.
The single biggest issue is growth.
The area has seen little or no redevelopment or an increase in
population over the last 15 years. In fact, the population of the
area has been falling. The issue of redevelopment prevents the
Dundas West area from meeting the expectations of growth
and change of the Offcial Plan. This issue is a primary concern
for the BIA as their local businesses are supported by residents
within walking distance of the main street. Population density
and household income are primary drivers of successful retail.
Successful retail, in turn, supports a vital main street that
supports residential neighbourhoods.
Although the Offcial Plan places great importance on the
Avenues and their role with regard to re-urbanization,
affordable housing, transit, traffc, cyclists, pedestrians, and
economic vitality, in practice these issues are isolated by
policy. We know that these things are connected but our
civic bureaucracy still functions as if these challenges occupy
separate spheres. Within the Dundas West area this separation
is highlighted by outdated zoning that does not support the
transit, growth, affordable housing or economic development
goals of the Offcial Plan. The primary recommendation of this
report is that the City should review the zoning of the Dundas
West BIA area with a complete neighbourhood approach that
explicitly ties the built form and density of the Avenue to the
Offcial Plan’s larger socioeconomic goals. Built from issues
are not singularly tied to the OP goal of protecting stable
neighbourhoods. An integrated approach would align priorities
to achieve the multiple goals of the Offcial Plan. An integrated
approach for Dundas West would allow the neighbourhood to
become a complete community with a full range of services and
housing options.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 70
6.2. Recommendations:
6.2.1 Growth and Re-urbanization Study
Despite Offcial Plan policies that encourage the re-urbanization
of the area, Dundas West has seen little or no redevelopment,
or increase in population over the last 15 years. The OP states
that “In growth areas, such as Centres and Avenues, the planned
context generally anticipates change” (Section 3.1.2). The OP
recognizes that neighbourhoods will not be frozen in time and
will beneft from directing growth to the Avenues by enjoying
better transit service, greater housing choices, increased
shopping opportunities, an improved pedestrian environment
and other advantages. (Section 2.3.1) In fact, the population
of Ward 18 fell by 7.2 % between 2001 and 2006. The City
should study growth in the area and review the zoning of the
area to ensure that specifc growth targets are achieved as well
as affordable housing, and transit supportive densities are
achieved. The study should recommend amendments to the
regulatory framework (i.e. Offcial Plan, Zoning By-laws, and
Design Guidelines) to create a better climate for development
of mid-rise buildings on Dundas West while providing the
neighbourhood with a level of comfort about the character of
development.
6.2.2 Zoning Review and the Development
Permit System
The newly amended zoning by-law carries forward the height
regime of the previous by-law. These heights limits contradict
existing density allowances and restrict growth.
Dundas West throughout the study area is approximately 20m
wide. According to the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study
the maximum allowable height for the area should be 19.5
metres for a Mixed-Use building along the 20 metre R.O.W.
width of Dundas Street W. The current zoning bylaw limits
height along most of the study area to 16 metres. The current
zoning for the area treats all properties along Dundas West
with equal restrictions, regardless of location or physical shape
and size. As shown in the Site Opportunities section of this
document, it is recommended that the City review the zoning on
a block-by-block basis and allow for exceptions to the consistent
zoning based on lot size, depth, potential assemblage, gateway
locations, proximity to transit and proximity to residential uses.
One policy tool that should be considered is the Development
Permit System that would combine zoning, site plan and minor
variance processes into one application and approval process.
The Development Permit System offers the City of Toronto the
option to set a range of conditions on development approvals
that would minimize negative impact. Under the system, the City
of Toronto would have the authority to consider exterior design
of buildings and the ability secure streetscape improvements
such as landscaping, street furniture and bicycle parking
facilities. These tools could help create a sense of place and
character for Dundas West. The permit system increases the
clarity and transparency of the land use planning system by
requiring the City to declare the standards for development up
front in the Offcial Plan policies and the Development Permit
Bylaw. In addition to identifying minimum and maximum
development standards, a Development Permit Bylaw would
establish a specifed range of variation from these standards
which can be permitted (without a bylaw amendment).
6.2.3 Active Transportation Study
Active transportation is higher than the city average in the area
but the area is under-served by bike lanes. In fact there are no
bike lanes that cross the study area. The City should undertake
an Active Transportation Study of the area to determine the
appropriate delivery of bike lanes and pedestrian connections.
6.2.4 Character Area Study
The City should undertake a Character Area study for the area
including assessing Brockton Village as a potential Heritage
Conservation District as identifed in the Avenues and Mid-Rise
Buildings Study.
6.2.5 Retail at Grade
The Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings Study states that
consistent at-grade retail uses lining the edges of the
streetscape is a fundamental component in the community
role and design character of the Avenues. In recent years, the
area has seen residential conversions of grade-related retail.
These residential uses reduce the vitality of the commercial
corridor. The City should consider policies that limit or prohibit
residential uses at grade along Dundas West.
6.2.6 Tax Review
Two deterrents to main street revitalization on the Avenues are
high property taxes and capital gains tax. The City of Toronto is
heavily dependent on property tax for revenue. In Toronto, the
current commercial property tax rate is fve times higher than
the residential rate. Capital gains tax can deter revitalization
due to the back taxes owed on property depreciation. The City
should conduct a study to determine the effect of taxes on the
redevelopment of the Avenues, on a city-wide basis.
6.2.7 Rear Lanes
Approximately half of the blocks within the study area are
serviced by rear lanes. As the Avenues and Mid-Rise Buildings
Study requests new lanes the total developable area of those
lots would be further reduced by the rear lane setback. The
majority of lots along Dundas West are already defned as
shallow. These lots would be severely constrained by the taking
of a rear lane. The City should review the guideline requirement
for rear lanes along Dundas West on a block-by-block basis.
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71 December 2010
6.2.8 Developing a Design Review Team
Develop a design review committee to help business owners
fnd designers, pick signage designs or facade materials, and
apply for funding to successfully update their look. Many
designers live and work in the area including BIA members
that could volunteer for a committee. The design review
committee could distribute information regarding signage,
provide workshops, and to help businesses design signage that
works and celebrate examples of good design in the area. This
committee would ensure that Dundas West maintains its brand
as an emerging creative corridor in Toronto.
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73 December 2010
7. Appendices
7.1. AGM Panel Feedback
Below are a selected list of questions/comments recorded at the
Public Open House / Annual General Meeting:
Unique independent with uncertain draw or franchises with a
certain market?
* Unique shops make the neighbourhood unique
* The unique, independent shops – local, maybe family-run/
staffed – make newcomers really welcome
* I think a combination of both but with careful
consideration to what gentrifcation fts in and will
improve business for all
* Agree w. above
* Agree w/ above and NO STARBUCKS PLS!
Unity with colour or unity with consistent style?
* Both in unison
* - Guidelines on both colour and style = benefcial
* A combination of both
* Combination of both – agreed!
* People have v. diff. tastes on color – be careful w. what you
choose.
* Style is very important – choose high end fnishes – it will
increase the real estate value even if it costs more initially
– we’ll make it back on (increased) property value
Safe, shut and concealed or trusting, open and visible?
* Shut and concealed give the impression that the
neighbourhood is unsafe and unfriendly
* Do not like too concealed, looks scary, open and trusting
with great displays make the area stoppable and stand out
night or day
* Open!
* Open and transparency = inviting and friendly (window
shopping is also a form of promo)
Eclectic and diverse or clean and repetitive?
* Eclectic and diverse bring variety and interest to the public
realm
* Eclectic is best makes it unique and not look like a strip
mall
* Avoid name brands, Starbucks, Tim Horton’s but have a
“feel” to the neighbourhood. The “eclectic” picture looks
better and is actually not as eclectic as what we already
have now – we could use some consistency
Products on sidewalks for vibrancy or clear sidewalks to
facilitate pedestrian fow?
* More products and cafés for people to sit at makes the
area more friendly – with guidelines to keep it from
looking too junky
* Agree w. Above
* A bit of both, but yes, w/guidelines
High-impact individual branding or understatement and
streetscape cohesion?
* Streetscape cohesion but diversity in branding
* Open to both with guidelines. The example here is a bit
intrusive
* Have streetscape cohesion – think SOHO in NYC even the
big stores keep it tasteful
* Streetscape cohesion
Over and dominating written communication or storefront
transparency?
* Storefront transparency makes a friendlier street
* Transparency but depends on the business
* Transparency
Diversity of signage types or conformity to one style?
* Diversity of signage – we don’t want a mall
* Yes! Diversity!
* Diversity
* Diversity but some guidelines so nothing extremely tacky
gets put in.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 74
Buildings as art or buildings as billboards?
* Building as art! Promote good design!
* Building as buildings – with quality, controlled
advertising.
* Buildings as art, billboards above or on top of
* Billboards are not appropriate for this neighbourhood
* Art!
Where do your patrons come from? The local neighbourhood?
Other neighbourhoods? Afar?
* Mostly within the area
* Mostly within
* Mostly within or from nearby neighbourhoods
Do people come for the qualities of DuWest? What are these
qualities? Why do they come?
* Funky benches by local crafts people
* Great coffee at all hours. Music. Meat.
* Right now they come for music @ Lula or the bakery but
many use it as a pass through & don’t stay long enough to
notice the rest of us
* For me, the clientele is established & goes where I go.
* I think some people come here because we are last
unpretentious & authentic & REAL community in Toronto
West, but they don’t have enough incentive to linger.
Will more local residents help your business? Will this improve
the vibrancy of DuWest? How so?
* Yes, bringing new customers who see the area as their
own
* Yes! Yes! More people = more business = self-
sustainable community
Additional comments:
* Try to limit businesses that create excess noise, bad
odours, etc.
* No change to an existing block
* -Change – this isn’t beautiful architecture
* Change if it improves run down areas or vacant lots
DUNDAS STREET W
EST
COLLEGE STREET WEST
LUMBERVALE AVENUE
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LANGEMARK AVENUE
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where you live
where you eat
where you shop
where you avoid
Results of Dot Placement Exercise from Community Consultation
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

75 December 2010
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 76
7.1.1 Incremental additions to an existing block
* No, looks really cheap & junky
* Depends on it’s done. The current picture does not look
like it matches with old buildings well
* I like the intent of this – to avoid the stretch looking
monotonous.
7.1.2 Mid-rise replacement to an existing block
* Yes, increase the density but keep things to scale. Eg. 6
storey beside 3 story rather than 10 storey, etc
* Where is Dundas West?
* Replacement need it here
* No, would rather the Tower or no change
* My business couldn’t afford the rent
7.1.3 Tower added to an existing block
* Yes, In some places this could work
* Yes, if it has retail on the main/ground foor
* Only on selected sites, but am not opposed to this.
* Yes, if we save some of the older shops
Incremental additions to an existing block Existing conditions
Mid-rise replacement to an existing block Tower added to an existing block
Dundas West Business Improvement Area Urban Design Study

77 December 2010
7.2. City of Toronto Other
Applicable Building
Regulations
7.2.1 Design Criteria for Review of Tall Buildings
The Tall Building Guidelines, completed in 2006, indicate
preferred design considerations for tall buildings and required
analysis of potential implications of tall buildings in preparation
for their review. Tall buildings are defned as “generally, a
building whose height is greater than the width of the right of
way of the principal street on which it is located or the wider
of two principal streets if located on an important intersection”
(Design Criteria for Review of Tall Building Proposals 2006).
The guidelines are to ensure that tall buildings do not adversely
affect public space (open space, streetscapes, building edges),
the local environment (wind, shadow, micro-climates), heritage
buildings, and domestic concerns like privacy, light, and safety,
and that they consider sustainable building practices such as
building orientation, lighting and heating systems, and green
roofs. All proposed tall buildings are subject to these guidelines
and they apply to any tall building application on the Bloor
Street Corridor.
http://www.toronto.ca/planning/pdf/tallbuildings_udg_aug17_
fnal.pdf
7.2.2 Green Development Standards
The City approved new Green Development Standards in spring
2009, which became applicable Jan 31, 2010. These Standards
have required and voluntary elements, which build on the
previous Green Standards Checklist, in place since 2008. These
new standards relate to air quality, water quality, ecology,
solid waste and greenhouse gases. Therefore, we should be
evaluating this checklist early on in the building design process
for its application. In particular, a more onerous bicycle parking
standard is generated above the City Zoning that should be
considered in building design, prior to planning approvals
(rezonings and variances).
http://www.toronto.ca/planning/greendevelopment.htm
7.2.3 Green Roof By-Law
Similarly, the new green roof by-law came into application on
the same date, Jan 31, 2010, and is applied to new residential,
commercial and institutional projects that is applied at building
permit. On Jan 31, 2011, it will apply to new industrial projects
as well. Based on the building size, the amount of roof as
“green” will be required. There is an exemption process for less
percentage of green roof, or a payment cash in-lieu.
http://www.toronto.ca/greenroofs/
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 78
7.3. City of Toronto Exceptions
to Regulations
7.3.1 Offcial Plan Amendment
If you wish to use, alter or develop your property in a way that
does not conform with the Offcial Plan, you must apply for a
site specifc Offcial Plan Amendment. Any change to the Offcial
Plan requires an Offcial Plan Amendment application.
7.3.2 Rezoning
If you wish to use, alter or develop your property in a way that
does not conform with the Zoning By-law, you must apply for a
site-specifc amendment to the By-law. You can do this through
either a Zoning By-law Amendment application (commonly
called a Rezoning).
7.3.3 Minor Variance application
Rezonings are used for major revisions to the By-law such as
land use changes or signifcant increases in permitted building
heights and development densities. Minor Variances are used
for issues such as small changes to building setback or parking
requirements.
7.3.4 The Committee of Adjustment
City Council-appointed district panels empowered to hear and
make decisions on minor planning matters such as: minor
changes to the Zoning By-law; legal non-conforming use
applications; and applications for consent to divide land. All
decisions may be appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board.
7.3.5 Section 37 of the Planning Act
Section 37 of the Planning Act allows the City, through a
rezoning, to grant additional height and/or density beyond
what is otherwise permitted in the Zoning By-law in return
for facilities, services or matters provided by the owner and
referred to as community benefts. If community benefts are
appropriate, they are secured through an agreement registered
on title.
7.3.6 Site Plan Control
Site Plan Control is a process that examines the design and
technical aspects of a proposed development to ensure it
is attractive and compatible with the surrounding area and
contributes to the economic, social and environmental vitality
of the City. Features such as building designs, site access and
servicing, waste storage, parking, loading and landscaping
are reviewed. The authority for the City to review a proposed
development in such detail is provided by the Planning Act,
which grants the City the authority to include in its Offcial Plan
areas to be designated as “areas of Site Plan Control”.
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79 December 2010
7.4. Glossary
accessibility:  The ease with which a building, place
or facility can be reached by people and/or goods
and services.
actve edge:  Provided by a building or other feature
whose use is directly accessible from the street or
space which it faces; the opposite efect to a blank
wall.
adaptability:  The capacity of a building or space to
respond to changing social, technological, economic
and market conditons.
amenity:  Something that contributes to an area’s
environmental, social, economic or cultural needs.
appearance:  Combinaton of the aspects of a place
or building that determine the visual impression it
makes.
architecture:  and built environment centre A
building or organizaton that provides a focus for a
range of actvites and services (such as discussions,
informaton, exhibitons, training, collaboraton
and professional services) relatng to design and
planning. See www.architecturecentre.net.
artculaton:  Architectural detail that gives a
building interest and added richness.
as-of-right development:  Development which does
not require formal planning permission provided it
complies with criteria set out in legislaton.
authentcity:  The quality of a place where things are
what they seem:  where buildings that look old are
old, and where the social and cultural values that the
place seems to refect did actually shape it.
background building:  A building that is not a
distnctve landmark.
barrier:  An obstacle to movement.
block:  The area bounded by a set of streets and
undivided by any other signifcant streets.
boulevard:  Area between the curb and the sidewalk
for: street trees, newspaper boxes, parking meters,
light poles, bike rings etc. so that sidewalks are kept
free and clear for pedestrians.
building element:  A feature (such as a door, window
or cornice) that contributes to the overall design of a
building.
building envelope guidelines:  Diagram(s) with
dimensions showing the possible site and massing of
a building.
building line:  The line formed by the frontages of
buildings along a street. The building line can be
shown on a plan or secton.
building shoulder height:  The top of a building’s
main facade.
built environment:  The entre ensemble of
buildings, neighbourhoods and cites with their
infrastructure.
built form:  Buildings and structures.
bulk:  The combined efect of the arrangement,
volume and shape of a building or group of buildings.
Also called massing.
character:  The unique qualites of urban areas.
character area:  An area with a distnct character,
identfed as such so that it can be protected or
enhanced by planning policy.
compatble / compatbility:  When the density, form,
bulk, height, setbacks, and/or materials of buildings
are able to co-exist with their surroundings.
context:  The setng of a site or area.
defensible space:  Public and semi-public space
that is ‘defensible’ in the sense that it is surveyed,
demarcated or maintained by somebody. Derived
form Oscar Newman’s 1973 study of the same name,
and an important concept in securing public safety
in urban areas, defensible space is also dependent
upon the existence of escape routes and the level of
anonymity which can be antcipated by the users of
space.
density:  The mass or foorspace of a building or
buildings in relaton to an area of land. Density can
be expressed in terms of plot rato (for commercial
development); homes or habitable rooms per
hectare (for residental development); site coverage
plus the number of foors or a maximum building
height; space standards; or a combinaton of these.
desire line:  An imaginary line linking facilites or
places which people would fnd it convenient to
travel between easily.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 80
development:  The carrying out of building,
engineering, mining or other operaton in, on, over
or under land, or the making of any material change
in the use of any building or other land. Most forms
of development require planning permission.
development control:  The process through which a
local authority determines whether (and with what
conditons) a proposal for development should be
granted planning permission.
distnctve:  The positve features of a place and
its communites which contribute to its special
character and sense of place.
driveway:  A private way across land used for
vehicular access from a public street - includes a
private right-of-way.
enclosure:  The use of buildings to create a sense of
defned space.
energy efciency:  The result of minimizing the use
of energy through the way in which buildings are
constructed and arranged on site.
eyes on the street:  People whose presence in
adjacent buildings or on the street make it feel safer
(see also defensible space and natural surveillance).
façade:  The principal face of a building (also
referred to as the front wall).
feasibility:  The appropriateness of development in
relaton to economic and market conditons.
fenestraton:  The arrangement of windows on a
facade.
fne grain:  The quality of an area’s layout of
building blocks and plots having small and frequent
subdivisions.
fagship project:  One intended to have the highest
profle of all the elements of a regeneraton scheme.
foor area rato:  A measurement of density
expressed as gross foor area divided by the net site
area.
foorplate:  The area of a single foor of a building.
form:  The layout (structure and urban grain),
density, scale (height and massing), appearance
(materials and details) and landscape of
development.
frontage zone:  The area in the right-of-way between
the building and the sidewalk; can include plantng,
outdoor patos, etc.
gateway:  A main point of entrance into a district
or a neighbourhood and a good locaton for
intensifcaton.
glazing:  Clear or lightly tnted glass windows.
hard landscape:  Landscape features other than
plant materials (e.g. decoratve pavers, planter
boxes, walks, fences, retaining walls, etc.).
intensifcaton:  Higher, bigger and more compact,
mixed-use, pedestrian-oriented development.
landmark:  A building or structure that stands out
from the background buildings.
lane:  A narrow street at the back of buildings,
generally used for service and parking.
landscape:  The appearance of land, including its
shape, form, colours and elements, the way these
(including those of streets) components combine in
a way that is distnctve to partcular localites, the
way they are perceived and an area’s cultural and
historical associatons.
layout:  The way buildings, routes and open spaces
are placed in relaton to each other.
legibility:  The degree to which a place can be easily
understood by its users and the clarity of the image
it presents to the wider world.
light polluton:  Light created from excessive
illuminaton, by unshielded or misaligned light
fxtures, and by inefcient lamp sources, with health
implicatons to humans and wildlife.
massing:  The combined efect of the arrangement,
volume and shape of a building or group of buildings.
This is also called bulk.
mews:  Small pedestrian passageway to link parking
to public sidewalks, parks to sidewalks, etc.
mixed use:  A mix of complementary uses within
a building, on a site or within a partcular area.
“Horizontal” mixed uses are side by side, usually
in diferent buildings.”Vertcal” mixed uses are on
diferent foors of the same building.
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81 December 2010
mobility:  The ability of people to move round
an area, including carriers of young children,
older people, people with mobility or sensory
impairments, or those encumbered with luggage or
shopping.
movement:  People and vehicles going to and
passing through buildings, places and spaces.
natural surveillance (or supervision):  The
discouragement to wrong-doing by the presence
of passers-by or the ability of people to see out of
windows. Also known as passive surveillance (or
supervision). node A place where actvity and routes
are concentrated.
nodes:  Important locatons in a city to highlight,
feature or intensify, occurring at key intersectons
and neighbourhood gateways.
on-site parking:  Parking within a building’s site
boundary, rather than on a public street or space.
overlook:  The design of a private amenity space of
one unit has the potental, if incorrectly placed, to
“overlook” the private amenity space of another.
parking lot:  A lot or other place used for the
temporary parking of vehicles.
pedestrian area:  The area between the front
façade of a building and the curb. The pedestrian
area consists of a sidewalk clear zone closest to the
building, and a parallel parkway/street furniture zone
that is between the sidewalk and the curb.
pedestrian scale:  A size of a building or space
that a pedestrian perceives as not dominatng or
overpowering.
pedestrian travel route:  The unobstructed porton
of the sidewalk.
pedestrian walkway:  Sidewalk on private property.
performance criterion/criteria:  A means of
assessing the extent to which a development
achieves a partcular functonal requirement (such as
maintaining privacy). This compares with a standard,
which specifes more precisely how a development
is to be designed (by setng out minimum distances
between buildings, for example).
permeability:  The degree to which a place has
a variety of pleasant, convenient and safe routes
through it.
permeable surface:  A surface formed of material
that allows infltraton of water to the sub-base.
property line:  The legal boundary of a property.
public realm:  The streets, lanes, parks and open
spaces that are free and available to anyone to use.
right-of-way:  A public or private area that allows
for passage of people or goods, including, but not
limited to, freeways, streets, bicycle paths, alleys,
trails and pedestrian walkways.
scale:  The size of a building in relaton to its
surroundings, or the size of parts of a building or its
details, partcularly in relaton to the size of a person.
screening:  Vegetaton, landforms, or structures
that serve to reduce the impact of development on
nearby propertes.
setback:  The required distance from a road,
property line, or another structure, within which no
building can be located.
sidewalk:  Unobstructed concrete or paved area for
pedestrian travel in the public right-of-way.
sight line:  The direct line from a viewer to an object.
sof landscape:  Plantng such as trees, shrubs, vines,
perennials and annuals.
stacking lane:  An on-site queuing lane for motorized
vehicles, which is separated from other vehicular
trafc and pedestrian circulaton by barriers,
markings or signs.
stepback:  An additonal setback that applies
to upper storeys of a building. Stepbacks can be
efectve in reducing the percepton of building mass
at ground level, reducing potental “wind tunnel”
efects, increasing the amount of sunlight at ground
level, providing increased artculaton of the street
wall, and avoiding a “canyon efect” for corridors.
strategic view:  The line of sight from a partcular
point to an important landmark or skyline.
streetscape:  The overall character and appearance
of a street formed by buildings and landscape
features that frame the public street. Includes
building façades, street trees, plants, lightng, street
furniture, paving, etc.
street frontage:  The front of the property facing the
street.
Sweeny Sterling Finlayson &Co Architects Inc. 82
street furniture:  Structures in and adjacent to the
highway which contribute to the street scene, such
as bus shelters, liter bins, seatng, lightng and
signs. topography A descripton or representaton of
artfcial or natural features on or of the ground.
street secton:  A street cross-secton which includes
the horizontal line of the street plus the vertcal
edges of the buildings, on either side, that face it.
streetwall:  Street edge, along which a line of
buildings can occur and defnes the limits of the
right-of-way.
transitonal height plane:  A two-dimensional,
geometric plane that defnes the upper boundary
(i.e., maximum permited height) of the buildable
area of a higher intensity district that is adjacent to
a lower-intensity residental district. The efect of a
transitonal height plane is to progressively lower
the allowable building height of a higher intensity
district as one approaches that district’s boundary
and the adjacent lower-intensity residental district.
The plane does not supersede other building height
restrictons; it is an additonal height restricton that
must be considered in conjuncton with any other
height restrictons imposed.
urban design:  The art of making places. Urban
design involves the design of buildings, groups of
buildings, spaces and landscapes, in villages, towns
and cites, and the establishment of frameworks and
processes that facilitate successful development.
urban design framework:  A document setng
out how development plan policies should be
implemented in a partcular area where there is a
need to control, guide and promote change. Such
areas include transport interchanges and corridors,
regeneraton areas, town centres, urban edges,
housing estates, conservaton areas, villages, new
setlements, urban areas of special landscape value,
and suburban areas identfed as being suitable for
more intense development.
urban design guidelines:  A generic term for
documents providing guidance on how development
can be carried out in accordance with the planning
and design policies of a local authority or other
organizaton.
urban design policy:  Relates to the form and
appearance of development, rather than the land
use.
urban design principle:  An expression of one of the
basic design ideas at the heart of an urban design
framework, design guide, development brief or
design code. Each such planning tool should have its
own set of design principles.
urban design standards:  Produced by districts and
unitary authorites, usually to quantfy measures of
health and safety in residental areas.
urban grain:  The patern of the arrangement and
size of buildings and their plots in a setlement;
and the degree to which an area’s patern of street-
blocks and street junctons is respectvely small and
frequent, or large and infrequent.
urban structure:  Urban structure refers to the
patern or arrangement of development blocks,
streets, buildings, open space and landscape which
make up urban areas. It is the interrelatonship
between all these elements, rather than their
partcular characteristcs that bond together to
make a place. Urban structure does not imply
any partcular kind of urbanism. Urban structure
is important because its structure provides the
foundatons for detailed design of the consttuent
elements.
vernacular:  The way in which ordinary buildings
were built in a partcular place before local styles,
techniques and materials were superseded by
imports.
visual cluter:  The uncoordinated arrangement of
street furniture, signs and other features.
walk shed:  A line on a map or plan showing
the furthest distance that can be walked from a
partcular point at an average pace in a certain tme
(usually fve or ten minutes).
Some defnitons are derived from By Design (ODPM/
CABE, 2000) and The Dictonary of Urbanism
(Streetwise Press, 2003)
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83 December 2010

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