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General Information
Founded in 1972, Five Towns College is an independent, nonsectarian, coeducational institution of higher education that serves both residential and commuter student populations. It is committed to providing high quality undergraduate and graduate programs at the Associate, Baccalaureate, Master’s, and Doctoral levels that lead to professional and liberal arts degrees. ACCREDITATION Five Towns College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools , 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 215-6625606. The Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. The Education Unit at Five Towns College is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), 2010 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036; phone (202) 466-7496. This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation programs and advanced educator preparation programs. The College is chartered by the New York State Board of Regents. Its curricula are registered by the New York State Education Department, 89 Washington Avenue - 2 West Mezzanine, Albany, New York 12234 (518) 474-3862. THE LONG ISLAND METROPOLITAN REGION Five Towns College is situated within an easy commute to the places where the world's greatest musicians gather and perform, as well as the varied cultural attractions that make the Long Island Metropolitan Region a mecca of world culture. The educational advantage of being in the artistic capital of the world cannot be overemphasized. New York City, with everything from Lincoln Center to Broadway, is just a train ride away and provides students with some of the best cultural advantages in the world. The opportunity to see, hear and directly experience the plethora of creative activities that only New York City offers is one that cannot fail to make a student's four years at Five Towns College much more than an opportunity for technical growth. It is truly a chance to expand every horizon and to mature intellectually, emotionally, and culturally. Closer to campus, the many communities of Long Island abound with cultural and recreational opportunities. The sandy shores of Jones Beach State Park and the Fire Island National Seashore are world renowned for their white sandy beaches. Just off campus is Long Island's bustling Route 110 corridor, the home of numerous national and multinational corporations.

MISSION STATEMENT Five Towns College orchestrates a lifelong pursuit of learning that fosters a commitment to ethical, intellectual, and social values. Dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and scholarship, the College celebrates the worlds of music, media, business, teaching, the performing arts, and the entertainment industry. By integrating rigorous academic inquiry, research, and practical experience, the College prepares graduates to be articulate and imaginative participants in our democratic society. Five Towns College nourishes in its students a global perspective, through distinctive curricula that combine content expertise with a general education program. By bringing students and faculty together in a creative community, the College facilitates an environment that respects both individuality and diversity, while challenging students to expand their unique talents to the fullest. GOALS OF THE COLLEGE • To foster a learning environment that encourages individual and collaborative creativity and respects the differences of others. • To develop in undergraduate students college-level proficiencies in general education. • To develop in undergraduate students content expertise consistent with their career objectives. • To strengthen graduate students' professional-level proficiencies in content-specific areas. • To promote a lifelong commitment to learning and professional development through curricular and extracurricular offerings that nourish a community of artists and scholars. THE CAMPUS Nestled in the rolling hills of Long Island's North Shore, Five Towns College offers students the opportunity to study in an attractive suburban environment. The College's serene 35-acre campus, located in the wooded countryside of Dix Hills, in the town of Huntington, New York, provides students with a parklike refuge where they can achieve their academic goals. The campus consists of a number of interconnected structures that house the academic and other related facilities of the College. These include a performing arts center, Upbeat Café, student center, library, classrooms, gymnasium, administrative offices and The John Lennon Center for Music and Technology. Residence Halls are located on campus in the new Living/Learning Center. The campus also contains an attractive central courtyard and athletic fields.

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College President and founders Stanley and Lorraine Cohen with actress Kitty Carlisle Hart and legendary writers and lyricists Betty Comden and Adolph Green at a Friars Foundation Annual International Gala Dinner and Ball.

Dr. Stanley Cohen, Cy Leslie and Clive Davis at recent commencement awarding an Honorary Doctor of Music Degree (Mus.D.) to Mr. Davis.

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Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed. )
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM (1-6) DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The graduate program in Childhood Education, leading to the Master of Science in Education (M.S.Ed.) degree is a direct outgrowth of the Bachelor of Science Program in Childhood Education. It enables graduates of the B.S. program and other qualified individuals to complete the Regents requirements in this area leading to New York State Certification. The program has been designed by the Education faculty of Five Towns College and teachers and administrators currently working in various school districts on Long Island. It is the intent of this program to enhance student understanding, pedagogical skills and appreciation of the recent Standards put forth by the Regents. The courses are organized in progressive tiers from the 500 level up to the research courses and seminars in the 700 level. The coursework can be completed in three semesters of full-time study or on a part-time basis. The objectives of the program are to provide graduates students with the ability to: • teach the history, philosophy and current trends in the field of childhood education; • apply current thinking on evaluations and assessment in the classroom; • teach literacy, mathematics and technology; • incorporate different cultures into the classroom; • meet the educational needs of exceptional children; and • evaluate research in the area of Childhood Education. The curriculum consists of 36 credits in Master’s level courses and 25 hours of field experience designed to develop or enhance the level of competencies of the classroom teacher in areas of instruction related to grades 1-6. Graduate students are taught research skills that will enable them to select, analyze and evaluate current research articles and proposals so that they can incorporate select findings into their instruction/learning processes. Courses are taught by instructors who have the academic credentials, college teaching and significant professional experience in Childhood Education that enables them to teach practical applications as well as current academic theory and practice. The program framework calls for consonance and coherence with its theoretical and conceptual base, student outcomes, courses, instruction and evaluation. The content of courses complement each other and are consistent with the conceptual framework of the program. The graduate program in Childhood Education is designed to develop and enhance the level of competencies of the classroom teacher in areas of instruction related to grades 1-6, to establish research skills in various education topics and increase expertise and knowledge of the teacher's role in the teaching-learning process. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Satisfactory completion of thirty-six (36) credits of course work that are designed to have the student acquire knowledge, expertise, and research skills in the field; 2. 25 hours of field experience; 3. A minimum of 24 credits at the College; 4. A minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0; and 5. A research project approved by the Graduate Advisor. Candidates for the master's degree must complete all requirements within five years of the date of matriculation. If continuous matriculation has not been maintained, a reevaluation of credentials will be required.

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CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (1-6) Master of Science in Education (M.S. Ed.) Degree Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 0802 COURSE REQUIREMENTS The courses below are required of all students in the graduate program in Childhood Education leading to the Master of Science Degree in Education. SEMESTER I Credits ELE 531 Current Issues in Education ..................... 3 ELE 533 Evaluation and Assessment of Learning .. 3 ELE 534 Exceptional Children and the Schools ..... 3 ELE 631 Social Studies in the Elementary School . 3 12 SEMESTER II ELE 551 Research Methods and Materials ............. ELE 632 Current Mathematical Concepts ............ ELE 633 Literature for Children ............................. ELE 634 Science and Technology.......................... SEMESTER III ELE 552 Project Seminar ........................................ ELE 732 Reading and Writing Seminar ................. ELE 733 Gifted Child Seminar ............................... ______ Elective .................................................... 3 3 3 3 12 3 3 3 3 12

ADMISSION STANDARDS Graduate study in Childhood Education leading to the Master of Science in Education degree is open to qualified individuals who possess an appropriate bachelor’s degree with major study in Liberal Arts and Childhood Education and have qualified for New York State Provisional/Initial Certification as Teacher of Childhood Education. Students seeking admission to the Childhood Education program leading to a Master of Science in Education degree must have a Baccalaureate Degree in Childhood Education with a G.P.A. of 2.75 or better in education courses that meet the New York State Regents Standards. Students may be admitted to the graduate program as matriculants, non-matriculants or matriculated with conditions. Students may not take more than twelve credits of graduate work before being accepted for matriculation. TRANSFER CREDIT Students who have taken graduate work at another institution may transfer up to twelve credits toward the Master of Science in Education degree if the course work was taken within a three-year period preceding matriculation at Five Towns College. The number of credits and type of course work transferred must be approved by the Graduate Admissions Committee. Students planning to take graduate courses for transfer credit at other institutions must have advance approval in writing from the Academic Affairs' Office.

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Master of Music (M.M.)
JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC PROGRAM DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The graduate program in Jazz/Commercial Music is offered with concentrations in Performance, Composition/Arranging, Music History, and Music Technology. It provides qualified students the opportunity to advance their study and research in the field of music and earn a Master of Music degree (M.M.). The program is designed to meet the needs of professional musicians, audio recording engineers, music business executives, multimedia specialists, and active professionals working in the music industry, music education, or a musicrelated field. Courses of study are flexible and designed to complement past experience and assist students in reaching current and future goals. Students meet each semester with the Graduate Advisor to plan their academic program. Students must satisfactorily complete at least 36 credits of approved graduate courses with a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0. Twenty-four of these credits must be completed in residence in order to be eligible for the Master's Degree. Undergraduate courses (100-400 level) may not be counted for credit toward a master's degree. The graduate program leading to the Master of Music Degree is planned for three semesters of full-time study. Many students, however, take two years or more to complete all requirements. Graduate courses are scheduled for the late afternoon or early evening for the convenience of working students. Candidates for the master's degree must complete all requirements within five years of the date of matriculation. If continuous matriculation has not been maintained, a reevaluation of credentials will be required. All candidates for the degree have the opportunity to perform with an instrumental/vocal performance ensemble during each semester of study. ADMISSION STANDARDS All candidates for admission are expected to demonstrate musical skills and a commitment to the advancement of their personal and professional accomplishments. Completion of a bachelor's degree in music or a related field with a 2.75 G.P.A. is required for admission. TRANSFER CREDIT Students who have taken graduate work at another institution may transfer up to twelve credits toward the Master of Music degree if the course work was taken within a three-year period preceding matriculation at Five Towns College. The number of credits and type of course work transferred must be approved by the Graduate Admissions Committee. Students planning to take graduate courses for transfer credit at other institutions must have advance approval in writing from the Dean's Office. RECITALS/PROJECT The Master of Music program requires performance majors to study with a member of the College faculty while matriculated for a degree, take a juried music examination at the end of their second semester, and perform a Graduate Recital at the end of their third semester. An approved research project is required of degree candidates in all concentrations. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. satisfactory completion of thirty-six (36) credits of course work that are designed to have the student acquire knowledge, expertise, and research skills in the field; 2. a minimum of 24 credits at the College; 3. a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0; 4. a minimum grade of "B" in all concentration courses; and 5. a research project approved by the Graduate Advisor. Candidates for the master's degree must complete all requirements within five years of the date of matriculation. If continuous matriculation has not been maintained, a reevaluation of credentials will be required.

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JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC PROGRAM Master of Music Degree (M.M.) HEGIS Code: 1004 COURSE REQUIREMENTS The courses below are required of all students in the graduate program in Jazz/Commercial Music leading to the Master of Music degree. Credits A.MUSIC CORE ........................................................ 12 B. CONCENTRATION ............................................... 18 C. ELECTIVES ........................................................... 6 Total 36 CONCENTRATION COMPONENTS Students in the graduate program in Jazz/Commercial Music take the courses in the music core and select one of the concentrations listed below. The 12 credits in the music core, 18 credits in the selected concentration, together with the 6 credits of electives complete the 36-credit requirement for the Master of Music degree. Composition/Arranging EDU 511 Computer Music Notation 1 ............... 3 EDU 552 Project Seminar .................................. 3 MUS 614 Composers Workshop 1 ...................... 3 MUS 511 Jazz Harmony 1 .................................. 3 MUS ___ Electives ............................................. 6 Total 18 Music History EDU 552 Project Seminar .................................. 3 MUH 502 American Songwriters 1900-1960...... 3 MUH 503 The Swing Era .................................... 3 MUH 601 American Musicals to 1940 or MUH 701 American Musicals after 1940 ........... 3 MUH ___ Electives ............................................. 6 Total 18 Music Performance EDU 552 Project Seminar .................................. 3 MUS 541 Major Instrument/Voice 1 .................. 2 MUS 542 Major Instrument/Voice 2 .................. 2 MUS 641 Major Instrument/Voice 3 .................. 2 PE __ ___ Performance Ensembles 1-3 .............. 3 MUS ___ Electives ............................................. 6 Total 18 Music Technology AUD 500 Multitrack Audio Production .............. 3 AUD 511 Nonlinear Production ......................... 3 AUD 512 Advanced Nonlinear Production ........ 3 EDU 552 Project Seminar .................................. 3 MUS ___ Electives ............................................. 6 Total 18 Choral Conducting EDU 506 Vocal Music Curriculum .................... 3 EDU 552 Project Seminar .................................. 3 EDU 607 Advanced Choral Conducting ............ 3 EDU 608 Choral Literature ................................ 3 MUS ___ Electives ............................................. 6 Total 18

A.MUSIC CORE ........................................................ MUH 501 Commercial Music Styles ............... AUD 521 MIDI Concepts ................................ EDU 551 Research Methods and Materials .... MUS 513 Electronic Music Composition 1.......

12 3 3 3 3

B. CONCENTRATION ............................................... C. ELECTIVES .........................................................

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JAZZ COMMERCIAL MUSIC Composition/Arranging Concentration Master of Music Degree (M.M.) Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 1004 JAZZ COMMERCIAL MUSIC Music History Concentration Master of Music Degree (M.M.) Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 1004

SEMESTER I * AUD 521 + EDU 511 * MUH 501 * MUS 513 SEMESTER II * EDU 551 + MUS 511 + MUS ___ _______

Credits MIDI Concepts ................................. 3 Computer Music Notation 1 ............. 3 Commercial Music Styles ................. 3 Electronic Music Composition 1 ...... 3 12 Research Methods and Materials ...... 3 Jazz Harmony 1 ................................ 3 Elective ............................................. 3 Elective ............................................. 3 12

SEMESTER I * AUD 521 * MUH 501 + MUH 502 * MUS 513 SEMESTER II + MUH 503 * EDU 551 + MUH ___ _______

Credits MIDI Concepts ................................. 3 Commercial Music Styles ................. 3 American Songwriters 1900-1960 .... 3 Electronic Music Composition 1 ...... 3 12 The Swing Era .................................. 3 Research Methods and Materials ...... 3 Elective ............................................. 3 Elective ............................................. 3 12

SEMESTER III + EDU 552 Project Seminar ................................. 3 + MUS 614 Composers Workshop 1 .................... 3 + MUS ___ Elective ............................................. 3 _______ Elective ............................................. 3 12 Total 36

SEMESTER III + EDU 552 Project Seminar ................................. 3 + MUH 601 American Musicals to 1940 or + MUH 701 American Musicals after 1940 .......... 3 + MUH ___ Elective ............................................. 3 _______ Elective ............................................. 3 12 Total 36

* Music Core Courses + Composition/Arranging Concentration

* Music Core Courses + Music History Concentration

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JAZZ COMMERCIAL MUSIC Music Performance Concentration Master of Music Degree (M.M.) Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 1004 JAZZ COMMERCIAL MUSIC Music Technology Concentration Master of Music Degree (M.M.) Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 1004

SEMESTER I * AUD 521 * MUH 501 * MUS 513 + MUS 541 + PE__ ___ SEMESTER II * EDU 551 + MUS 542 + PE__ ___ + MUS ___ _______

Credits MIDI Concepts ................................. 3 Commercial Music Styles ................. 3 Electronic Music Composition 1 ...... 3 Major Instrument/Voice 1 ................. 2 Performance Ensemble ..................... 1 12 Research Methods and Materials ...... 3 Major Instrument/Voice 2 ................. 2 Performance Ensemble ..................... 1 Elective ............................................. 3 Elective ............................................. 3 12

SEMESTER I + AUD 500 * AUD 521 * MUH 501 * MUS 513

Credits Multitrack Audio Production ............ 3 MIDI Concepts ................................. 3 Commercial Music Styles ................. 3 Electronic Music Composition 1 ...... 3 12

SEMESTER II + AUD 511 * EDU 551 + MUS ___ _______

Nonlinear Production ........................ 3 Research Methods and Materials ...... 3 Elective ............................................. 3 Elective ............................................. 3 12

SEMESTER III + EDU 552 Project Seminar ................................. 3 + MUS 641 Major Instrument/Voice 3 ................. 2 PE__ ___ Performance Ensemble ..................... 1 + MUS ___ Elective ............................................. 3 _______ Elective ............................................. 3 12 Total 36

SEMESTER III + AUD 512 Advanced Nonlinear Production....... 3 + EDU 552 Project Seminar ............................... 3 + MUS ___ Elective ............................................. 3 _______ Elective ............................................. 3 12 Total 36

* Music Core Courses + Performance Concentration

* Music Core Courses + Audio Recording Technology Concentration

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JAZZ COMMERCIAL MUSIC Choral Conducting Concentration Master of Music Degree (M.M.) Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 1004

SEMESTER I * AUD 521 + EDU 506 * MUH 501 * MUS 513

Credits MIDI Concepts ................................. 3 Vocal Music Curriculum ................... 3 Commercial Music Styles ................. 3 Electronic Music Composition ......... 3 12

SEMESTER II * EDU 551 + EDU 607 + MUS____ ________

Research Methods and Materials ...... 3 Advanced Choral Conducting........... 3 Elective(s) ......................................... 3 Elective ............................................. 3 12

SEMESTER III + EDU 552 Project Seminar ................................. 3 + EDU 608 Choral Literature ............................... 3 + MUS____ Elective(s) ......................................... 3 ________ Elective ............................................. 3 12 Total 36

Theatre Department production of Anything Goes by Cole Porter

* Music Core Courses + Choral Conducting Concentration

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MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM (M.M.) DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The graduate program in Music Education requires satisfactory completion of 36 credits of approved graduate courses including a research project and 25 hours of field experience. It is designed for those individuals who have Provisional/Initial Certification and wish to attain Professional Certification to teach grades K-12. Twentyfour (24) of these credits must be completed in residence in order to be eligible for the Master's Degree. The program provides qualified students the opportunity to advance their study and research in music education and earn a Master of Music degree (M.M.). All requirements must be completed within five years of the date of matriculation. ADMISSION STANDARDS All applicants for admission are required to have Provisional/ Initial Certification and demonstrate by audition significant musical skills and a commitment to the advancement of their personal and professional accomplishments. Completion of an undergraduate major in music education with at least 36 credits of applied music courses and a 2.75 overall G.P.A. are required for admission. Students in the graduate program in Music Education take 18 credits of music education courses, 12 credits of music core courses, and 6 elective credits to complete the 36- credit requirement for the Master of Music degree. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 1. Satisfactory completion of thirty-six (36) credits of course work that are designed to have the student acquire knowledge, expertise, and research skills in the field; 2. 25 hours of field experience; 3. A minimum of 24 credits at the College; 4. A minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0; and 5. A research project approved by the Graduate Advisor. Candidates for the master's degree must complete all requirements within five years of the date of matriculation. If continuous matriculation has not been maintained, a reevaluation of credentials will be required. MUSIC EDUCATION RESEARCH CENTER The Music Education Research Center (MERC) is available to help public school districts and music teachers develop outstanding music programs of excellence. COURSE REQUIREMENTS The courses below are required of all students in the graduate program in Music Education leading to the Master of Music degree. Credits A.MUSIC CORE ........................................................ 12 B.MUSIC EDUCATION ............................................ 18 C.ELECTIVES............................................................ 6 Total 36 A.MUSIC CORE ........................................................ 12 AUD 521 MIDI Concepts ................................ 3 MUH 501 Commercial Music Styles ............... 3 MUS 511 Jazz Harmony 1 ............................... 3 MUS 513 Electronic Music Composition 1..... 3 B. MUSIC EDUCATION ............................................ 18 EDU 531 Current Issues in Education ............ 3 EDU 542 Music in the Elementary School ..... 3 EDU 551 Research Methods and Materials .... 3 EDU 552 Project Seminar ............................... 3 EDU 603 Computers in Music Education ....... 3 EDU/ELE Elective............................................ 3 C. ELECTIVES ......................................................... MUSIC EDUCATION Master of Music Degree (M.M.) Recommended Sequence of Courses HEGIS Code: 0832 SEMESTER I AUD 521 EDU 531 MUH 501 MUS 513 SEMESTER II MUS 511 EDU 551 EDU 542 _______ Credits MIDI Concepts ................................. 3 Current Issues in Education .............. 3 Commercial Music Styles ................. 3 Electronic Music Composition 1 ...... 3 12 Jazz Harmony 1 ................................ 3 Research Methods and Materials ...... 3 Music in the Elementary School ....... 3 Elective ............................................. 3 12 6

SEMESTER III EDU 603 Computers in Music Education ........ 3 EDU 552 Project Seminar ................................. 3 EDU/ELE Elective ............................................. 3 _______ Elective ............................................. 3 12 Total 36

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Newport Jazz Festival promoter George Wein being presented with an Honorary Doctorate from College President Dr. Stanley Cohen and Artist-in-Residence Ervin Drake.

Doctors Lee Evans, Judith Alstadter and Bernard Rose at a recent meeting of the Doctoral Governance Committee.

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Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.)
The College through its Graduate Division, accepts prospective candidates for the degree of Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.). The degree is granted in the fields of music performance, composition/arranging, music education, or music history and literature and requires demonstration of distinguished attainment. The degree is offered with an emphasis on jazz/commercial music in accordance with the mission of the College. Attainment of a doctoral degree at Five Towns College requires outstanding scholarship and research culminating in a dissertation that contributes to the general fund of knowledge in the area of concentration. Qualified doctoral candidates must earn a minimum of 60 credits beyond the master's level and must maintain a 3.0 G.P.A. or higher. Doctoral degrees in music at the College are intended for those planning to work at the most advanced academic and professional levels of musical endeavor. Students admitted to doctoral study are expected to achieve competence as musician/scholars who can communicate effectively both orally and in written form. They should be able to demonstrate the ability to write concisely with clarity and prepare critiques of musical performances that reflect mature, sensitive insights into musical values. Doctoral study requires a minimum of three or four years of graduate work. Completion of an appropriate masters degree is prerequisite to doctoral study. The degree program objectives listed below must be demonstrated by candidates for graduation as a prerequisite to qualifying for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree: • Intellectual awareness and curiosity sufficient to predict continued growth and contribution to the discipline; • Knowledge of the techniques of jazz harmony sufficient to analyze selected compositions; • Knowledge of representative literature and influential composers; • Expertise in music history, education, performance, or composition; • Expertise in the supervision of music programs; • Expertise in the application and utilization of appropriate research skills; and • Sufficient writing and speaking skills to communicate clearly and effectively to members of the scholarly and wider communities. MUSIC PERFORMANCE HEGIS Code: 1004 Degrees in this area are awarded for conducting or instrumental/vocal performance. In addition to demonstrating the technical achievements of the artist-performer, the candidate is expected to exhibit a thorough knowledge of the theoretical, pedagogical, and historical aspects of conducting or instrumental/vocal performance as well as knowledge of its literature. The program in performance includes conducting or instrumental/vocal performance. Performance competence should be demonstrated at the highest professional level with historical and theoretical knowledge supportive of the development of individualized interpretations. Competencies also include a broad knowledge of repertory and literature. Additional studies in the pedagogy of performance are recommended. Acceptance in the performance program requires submission of programs listing performances and recordings, an interview and audition demonstrating exceptional musical skills in conducting or major instrument/voice before a committee of graduate faculty.

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COMPOSITION AND ARRANGING HEGIS Code: 1004.10 This program offers the student an opportunity to acquire training for a career as a composer and arranger or as a College teacher of music theory and composition. A thorough knowledge of contemporary harmony and a background in orchestration are essential for this degree. The program in composition and arranging stresses creative activity emphasizing the development of a personal aesthetic expressible in sound. Competencies also include a broad knowledge of historical and contemporary compositional practices, music theory, history and criticism. The program involves the utilization and application of this knowledge to the compositional process. Acceptance in the program in composition/arranging will be based upon an interview, audition, evidence of creative talent and a knowledge of craftsmanship in writing music demonstrated in a portfolio of compositions/arrangements that includes both the scores and recordings.

MUSIC EDUCATION HEGIS Code: 0832 Emphasis is on an intensive and comprehensive study of the role of music in institutions of higher learning. The doctoral candidate develops a keen knowledge of the pedagogical, psychological, and social values of music education, as well as the theoretical and historical basis of music used in education. Candidates engage in research culminating in a dissertation that makes an original contribution to the field of music education. The program prepares teachers and administrators for the challenges of music education. The program in music education emphasizes the preparation of music administrators, teachers, and researchers who are able to think abstractly, generalize knowledge, carry on research and apply research findings to their own areas of specialization, and communicate effectively both orally and in written form. The program involves the scholarly study of the philosophical and psychological foundations of music education and the processes of teaching and learning music. Additional studies are recommended in such areas as performance, history of the other arts, the humanities and social sciences. Acceptance in the music education program requires at least three years of teaching experience, an interview, audition and a record of outstanding pedagogical achievement as evidenced in the three required letters of recommendation.

MUSIC HISTORy AND LITERATURE HEGIS Code: 1006 In this program the candidate has the opportunity to acquire the appropriate tools and methods of research in both history and literature and to study the history of music from the past to the present. The candidate also has the opportunity to undertake research in any cultural area or historical aspect of music that adds to the body of knowledge in music history and literature. A broad background in the humanities and social sciences is one of the essentials for this degree. The program in music history and literature emphasizes the scholarly study of music and its relationship to other fields such as social, political and art history. Competencies include bibliographic research, analytic techniques and writing skills. The ability to work conceptually with the relationships between music and music literature within cultural/historical contexts is essential as is knowledge of various historical periods, and the ability to produce and defend scholarly work. Acceptance in the program of music history and literature requires an interview, audition, and submission of a historical research essay demonstrating a high level of scholarly potential together with representative writing samples.

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ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES All applicants for admission to doctoral study must submit a completed application, three letters of recommendation, official transcripts documenting the successful completion of an appropriate masters degree with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better and schedule a personal interview and audition. Applicants must also submit an original essay of at least 1500 words on a musical subject of their choice. The essay must be typed and supported by citations and references. Applicants seeking acceptance must demonstrate exceptional musical skills on an instrument/voice, or present a record of outstanding pedagogical achievement, or submit a scholarly paper or portfolio of compositions/arrangements that provide evidence of superior potential and creativity. Establishment of Matriculation The Doctoral Governance Committee evaluates applications for matriculation based on the following criteria: (1) applicant's grade point average from previous degree programs; (2) letters of recommendation; (3) original essay; (4) personal interview; and (5) individual requirements set forth in the descriptions for each of the programs. Special Students Students who do not wish to enroll in a degree program are permitted to register as nondegree special students. Special students are not eligible for independent study or advisement. It should be noted that while in certain exceptional cases credits earned as a special student may later be applied to degree candidacy, special student status should not be viewed as a prelude or aid to the attainment of degree candidate status. In any case, no more than 12 credits of coursework earned as a special student can be applied to the D.M.A. degree. Past or present status as a special student is not considered during evaluation of an application for degree candidacy; the latter is considered a separate application, and different admissions criteria are applied. There can thus be no guarantee that individuals granted special student status will be accepted for degree candidacy should they apply. International special students taking fewer than twelve credits a semester are not eligible for a student visa. All special students taking 6 or more credits a semester must comply with New York State immunization regulations.

Major Professor After acceptance as a matriculated student seeking degree candidacy, the Doctoral Governance Committee will designate a major professor (advisor) for each student. The major professor will act as the student’s mentor and will be responsible for helping the student select the electives to complete a Plan of Study during the first academic year. The major professor meets with the student periodically to review his/her progress toward completion of the dissertation and degree requirements. Plan of Study In conjunction with their major professor, students are responsible for selecting the elective courses to complete a Plan of Study that identifies course work needed to fulfill degree requirements. The Plan of Study must have the approval of the student’s major professor. Graduate Fellowships Individuals who have been accepted for matriculation in a Doctoral Degree Program are eligible to apply for a Graduate Fellowship. Applications may be obtained from the Graduate Advisor in the Registrar's Office.

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Core Curriculum The Plan of Study includes 30 credits of core curriculum courses indicated below, 18 program credits and 12 elective credits for a total of 60 credits. Course Title Credits EDU 509 Jazz Pedagogy ..................................... 3 EDU 512 Computer Music Notation 2 ................ 3 EDU 541 College Teaching ................................. 3 EDU 651 Doctoral Research .............................. 3 MUH 605 Jazz History and Literature ................. 3 MUH 702 Modern Jazz ........................................ 3 MUH 703 Contemporary Music Seminar ............ 3 MUS 512 Jazz Harmony 2 ................................... 3 MUS 531 Keyboard Harmony ............................. 3 MUS 631 Jazz/Commercial Piano ....................... 3 Total 30 Time Limitation Students in the Doctoral Program must complete a Plan of Study prior to the end of their first year with the signed approval of the Administration, 12 credits during the first two years of study and all requirements within ten years of the date of matriculation. Exceptions are granted only in medical emergencies with the permission of the Doctoral Governance Committee. Other exceptions are reviewed on a case-by-case basis, but approval is very rare and appeals are actively discouraged. The following regulations are in effect for all doctoral students: 1. Students must register for MUS 801 Doctoral Advisement each semester after completion of EDU 652 Doctoral Seminar. Registration for Doctoral Advisement entitles students to access the Music Education Research Center and consult with their major professor in regard to their research project/dissertation. 2. If a student, who is still within the ten-year time period for degree completion, does not register for at least one three credit course, matriculation will lapse unless he/she registers for EDU 652 Doctoral Seminar or MUS 800 Continuous Registration. Students who fail to maintain matriculation by the end of the given semester will be considered to have withdrawn and will be required to reapply for admission to continue working toward his or her degree. Readmission to the program is not guaranteed. Performance Ensembles Doctoral students may be assigned to conduct or perform in major ensembles or chamber groups. These assignments are based on the interest of the student and made in consultation with the Music Division Chair and Dean of Graduate Studies. Leave of Absence In extraordinary cases a student may be granted a leave of absence upon written application to the Division Chair and with the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies. Leave of absences are typically granted only in cases of serious illness. The duration of the leave may be counted as part of the five years allowed for completion of the degree.

Transfer Credit There is no provision for advanced standing at the doctoral level. Graduate courses completed at an accredited institution, not applied to another graduate degree, completed with a grade of A or B, and not more than three years old, may be presented for transfer of credit. Grades below B in graduate classes do not carry doctoral credit.

Comprehensive Examination/Candidacy Before admission to degree candidacy, students must pass a Comprehensive Examination that tests the extent of the student’s knowledge in the general field of study and the area of specialization. The examination should be taken after completion of the 30 credit core curriculum and before completion of all course work. Doctoral candidates must be registered for either course credit or MUS 800 Continuous Registration in every semester until they graduate. Nine credits per semester are required for full-time status. Students will only be permitted a second attempt to pass the Comprehensive Examination upon the recommendation of the Doctoral Governance Committee. The second examination may not take place until four months after the date of the first examination.

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Dissertation Doctoral programs require the completion of a dissertation, a composition, or an article for publication in a scholarly journal, prepared under the supervision of a major professor, which meets required standards of scholarship and demonstrates the candidate’s ability to conduct original research. The Dissertation Proposal should include a statement on the significance/need for the study, research methodology, possible conclusions and recommendations for further research, and cite examples of literature related to the topic. Candidates are encouraged to submit proposals before completion of their first two years of study, and in no case later than the end of their third year of enrollment. Candidates may not offer their dissertation to any agency for publication without explicit approval in writing from the Doctoral Governance Committee. Enrollment in MUS 800 Continuous Registration is required until the dissertation is completed. Doctoral candidates seeking financial aid may apply for full-time status. Publications relating to the format of the dissertation and required abstracts, including previously published papers, papers accepted for publication and/or papers with multiple authors, are available for use by graduate students in the Music Education Research Center (MERC) housed in the College Library. Composition and Arranging Recitals Candidates in the composition and arranging program must compose a major work as well as a portfolio of other shorter works. Registration for Doctoral Seminar is required until the completion of the portfolio. Regulations governing publication of compositions are the same as those governing publication of dissertations. The required abstract must address the formal, stylistic, and technical elements of the compositions. In addition to the composition of an extended work, three performances of other compositions are required in a variety of media.

Concerts and Performance Recitals Candidates in the music performance program must conduct three major public concerts or present three recitals: (1) a solo recital during the second semester; (2) a recital of vocal and/or instrumental chamber music; and (3) a solo recital prior to graduation. No more than one concert or recital is permitted per semester. Each concert or recital will be evaluated independently by a panel of judges selected by the Doctoral Governance Committee. If a candidate’s performance is judged unsatisfactory, an additional one must be performed. In no case will a candidate be permitted to remain in the program if more than one concert or recital is determined to be unsatisfactory. The candidate will prepare and submit an article similar to those published in scholarly journals, prepared under the supervision of their major professor. This scholarly article, based on an aspect of the performance, must show evidence of the candidate’s ability to select and organize data pertinent to the music conducted or performed prior to graduation . The document must make a contribution to the field of knowledge in the candidate’s chosen subject area, and demonstrate the candidate’s ability to communicate effectively in writing.

Sam Teicher, Vice President of the New york Sheet Music Society

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Final Oral Examination Upon completion of all required courses and the dissertation, the candidate must petition for a Final Oral Examination. The examination focuses on the final document itself but can include general questioning related to the field of study within the scope of the dissertation. The Doctoral Governance Committee appoints at least three faculty members to schedule and conduct the examination. After successful completion of the examination, the candidate submits three copies of the dissertation and abstract to the Doctoral Governance Committee. The Doctoral Governance Committee will recommend conferral of the doctoral degree by the College Board of Trustees upon receipt of the final copies of the approved dissertation. A processing and microfilming fee must be paid to the Bursar’s Office, with a copyright fee if the student elects to have the dissertation copyrighted. Publication of the Dissertation University Microfilms, Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan processes the document and sends catalog information to the Library of Congress for printing and distribution of cards for depository catalogs and libraries. The abstract of the dissertation is printed in Microfilm Abstracts and distributed to leading libraries in the United States and elsewhere, and to a select list of journals and abstracting services. Two copies of the dissertation are archived in the Music Education Research Center (MERC) located in the College Library, where they serve as records of the student’s research. Successful candidates are encouraged to submit dissertation material for publication in scholarly or professional journals. Suitable acknowledgment must indicate the publication to be a dissertation, or portion of a dissertation, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a doctoral degree at Five Towns College.

Jo Sullivan-Loesser and Susan Loesser with Ervin Drake and David Eliscu before award ceremony conferring Honorary Doctor of Music (Mus.D.) degrees upon Frank Loesser and Edward Eliscu members of the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

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Course Descriptions
The graduate courses offered by the College are described below. The College reserves the right to cancel any elective course for which there is insufficient registration. For information about the specific course offerings for any given semester, consult the Graduate Class Schedule. COURSE NUMBERS Each course number has three digits. The first digit indicates the level of the course. The second digit indicates the area of the subject, and the third digit indicates the particular course in the area. Courses offered at the 500 level or above are designated as graduate courses.

AUD 511 NONLINEAR PRODUCTION 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: AUD 500 Nonlinear multitrack recording techniques as related to music production, audio/video sweetening and postproduction, and interactive CD construction. Track compositing, full digital realm "virtual" mixing, synchronization with the picture, spotting to hit points, and sound effect design. AUD 512 ADVANCED NONLINEAR PRODUCTION 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: AUD 511 Examination of Digital Audio Workstations (DAW) and the applications in digital sound manipulation. Emphasis on destructive and non-destructive editing techniques, DSP usage for sound enhancement, format protocols, sample rate and bit depth conversion, re-dithering for CD, CD-I, and multimedia applications. Digital mastering, sound restoration, and noise removal techniques. AUD 521 3 Credits MIDI CONCEPTS 3 Class Hours

MUSIC TECHNOLOGy AUD 500 3 Credits MULTITRACK AUDIO PRODUCTION 3 Class Hours

Study and demonstration of audio recording theory and practice. Topics include acoustics and sound propagation, microphone characteristics and technique, studio design, speakers and amplifiers, signal flow and outboard effect units. Development of skills with recording consoles, multitrack tape machines and special effect devices including digital reverb, digital delay, compression and noise gating.

Conceptual background and implementation of the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) protocol. Use of the MIDI language for electronic instrument interconnection and synchronization. Sequencing and real time parameter controllers related to music composition and production. The impact of MIDI technology on recording, composition, education and live performance.

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CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ELE 514 LITERACY IN SCHOOLS 3 Credits 3 Class Hours The current methodologies, instructional techniques and materials used to develop literacy skills in schools. Emphasis on the teaching of reading, writing, listening, speaking and culturally diverse classrooms, assessment of students and textbooks, and increasing vocabulary. ELE 531 CURRENT ISSUES IN EDUCATION 3 Credits 5 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours Current curriculum and instructional practices. Special attention is given to national and local reform efforts, standards-based planning and teaching, school-based management, multicultural environments, assessment and accountability. ELE 533 EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Principles of educational evaluation and assessment in the schools. Current research and theories regarding the physical, cognitive, social and personality growth of children are explored. Various teaching strategies to meet the developmental needs and motivation of the child are analyzed together with the impact of socio-economic background, culture, race and gender on academic achievement and outcomes. Construction and use of standardized and teachermade tests. ELE 534 EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND THE SCHOOLS 3 Credits 5 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours Principles and practices relevant to the identification, assessment and teaching of learning disabled or physically handicapped children. Emphasis on differentiated curricula, inclusion in the regular classroom, and specialized programs. ELE 541 ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Methods and materials for integrating art into the elementary classroom that incorporates the new learning standards established by the New York State Education Department. Hands-on experience in creating art; preparing and developing lesson plans; locating materials, resource guides, web sites, field trip information and related children’s literature. ELE 542 MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 Credits 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours Methods and materials for integrating music into the elementary school classroom that incorporate the National Standards developed by the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) through use of an electronic keyboard. Emphasis on interdisciplinary projects that correlate music with social studies, language arts and other areas of the elementary school curriculum. ELE 543 THEATRE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Methods and materials for integrating theatre into the elementary school classroom that incorporate the Learning Standards established by the New York State Education Department. Emphasis on mime, puppetry and meeting the needs of diverse student populations. ELE 544 THEATRE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Methods and Materials for integrating theatre into the secondary school classroom that incorporate the learning standards established by the New York State Education Department. Techniques include mime, improvisation, scene study and script analysis. Emphasis on using drama in meeting the needs of diverse student groups. ELE 551 RESEARCH METHODS AND MATERIALS 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Methods, techniques, principles, and tools of research. Practical application through lectures, discussion, student critiques, and individual research project outlines. Significant issues and recent developments in educational research. Study and practice of expository writing about education.

ELE 552 PROJECT SEMINAR 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: ELE 551 Completion of a research project in the field of education developed from a previously prepared project outline. A copy of the final document is filed in the Education Research Center (ERC) and becomes the property of the College Library. This course may be repeated without credit.

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ELE 631 SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 3 Credits 5 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours The study of the social sciences and how they can be applied to the learning standards for the elementary school curriculum. The integration of history, geography, economics and civics into the teaching and learning processes. ELE 632 CURRENT MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS 3 Credits 5 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours Advanced mathematical research and methodology concepts that are in current use in elementary school math curricula in grades 1-6. Mathematical systems, numeration systems, and various math constructs. ELE 633 LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Study of children’s literature and the methodology for selecting and teaching literature based on the special needs, interests, cultural backgrounds and learning abilities of students in grades 1-6. Development of reading strategies to encourage reading and motivate the reluctant reader. ELE 634 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 3 Credits 5 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours Current research and theory in the fields of science and technology that relate to the learning standards required for grades 1-6. Emphasis on the use of scientific inquiry, the process of collecting and transferring information using technology and the application of scientific concepts, principles and theories to the physical setting and living environment. ELE 643 CLASSROOM PIANO 3 Credits 3 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours Individualized keyboard training in a group setting. Development of skills relevant to the performance of melodies and harmonic progressions in small position (SP) and accompaniment skills for the classroom teacher. Methods and materials for integrating music into the elementary school classroom that incorporate the National Standards developed by the Music Educators National Conference (MENC). ELE 732 READING/WRITING SEMINAR 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Current studies of literacy and the application of their findings to the methods and materials used to teach reading and writing to children in grades 1-6. In depth review of the principles of literacy learning and contemporary trends in the early grades. ELE 733 GIFTED CHILD SEMINAR 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Current educational theories and research as they relate to the education of the creative and gifted child. Study and analysis of special instructional patterns for educating the gifted child.

MUSIC EDUCATION EDU 506 3 Credits VOCAL MUSIC CURRICULUM 3 Class Hours

Comprehensive curriculum development for school vocal music programs including solos, duets, small ensembles, and choral groups of various types. Specific approaches to the development of the choral and vocal arts. Tone, diction, vocal techniques, literature, repertoire, and score analysis; competitions and public performances are emphasized.

EDU 509 3 Credits

JAZZ PEDAGOGY 3 Class Hours

Study of vocal and instrumental jazz literature, methodologies, and teaching principles and practices. Methods of jazz improvisation instruction are examined. Rehearsal techniques and approaches are analyzed together with strategies for teaching general music classes and both vocal and instrumental jazz ensembles in the public schools and colleges.

EDU 511 3 Credits

COMPUTER MUSIC NOTATION 1 3 Class Hours

Use of Sibelius software for music notation and scoring. Application to lead sheets, single line parts, large ensemble arrangements and preparation of printed music for a variety of educational purposes. Scoring techniques for classical, jazz and popular styles are developed.

EDU 512 COMPUTER MUSIC NOTATION 2 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: EDU 511 Application of Sibelius 4 software to large scale composition, non-standard music notation and scoring, part extraction, film scoring, and music publishing to commercial standards. Strategies for increasing speed and efficiency.

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EDU 521 TI:ME LEVEL 1A CERTIFICATION 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: Basic computer facility Basic skills in music notation, MIDI sequencing, and electronic keyboards in K-12 education. Exploration of ways to incorporate these tools into the curriculum. The course is taught in the SoundTree Music Lab and fulfills half of the TI:ME Level 1 Certification requirement. EDU 522 TI:ME LEVEL 1B CERTIFICATION 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: Basic computer facility Basic skills in using computer instructional software, configuring and using computers on networks and the Internet, and digital media in K-12 education. Exploration of ways to incorporate these tools into the curriculum. The course is taught in the SoundTree Music Lab and fulfills half of the TI:ME Level 1 Certification requirement. EDU 523 3 Credits Prerequisite: TI:ME LEVEL 2A CERTIFICATION 3 Class Hours EDU 521 & EDU 522 or TI:ME Level 1 Certification EDU 542 3 Credits MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 10 Field Experience Hours 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours

Methods and materials for integrating music into the elementary school classroom that incorporate the National Standards developed by the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) through use of an electronic keyboard. Emphasis on interdisciplinary projects that correlate music with social studies, language arts and other areas of the elementary school curriculum. EDU 551 3 Credits
RESEARCH METHODS AND MATERIALS 3 Class Hours

Advanced level course involving the use of “Sibelius” music notation software for pre-K-12 music educators. Students will learn how to input music using an electronic keyboard and computer and to print out musical scores and parts for individual players. Topics include: recording (entering) and editing music; page layout and design for various types of musical ensembles; incorporation of notation examples into other documents. EDU 531 3 Credits CURRENT ISSUES IN EDUCATION 5 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours

Methods, techniques, principles, and tools of research. Practical application through lectures, discussion, student critiques, and individual research project/dissertation outlines. Significant issues and recent developments in research. Study and practice of expository writing. EDU 552 PROJECT SEMINAR 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: EDU 551 Completion of a research project/dissertation developed from a previously prepared project outline. A copy of the final document is filed in the Music Education Research Center (MERC) and becomes the property of the College Library. This course may be repeated without credit. EDU 561-662 ORCHESTRA LITERATURE 1-4 3 Credits 3 Class Hours The Orchestra Director is provided the opportunity to play, conduct and evaluate standard and current orchestra literature suitable for both elementary and secondary school students. Rehearsal strategies, techniques, and warm-up routines will be reviewed and analyzed in the context of preparing for public performance of new literature and repertoire each semester.

Current curriculum and instructional practices. Special attention is given to national and local reform efforts, standardsbased planning and teaching, school-based management, multicultural environments, assessment and accountability. EDU 541 3 Credit COLLEGE TEACHING 3 Class Hours

Theory, research and techniques that provide the foundation of instruction and the teaching-learning environment in the college classroom. Methods and materials that support both the new and experienced instructor in their efforts to improve the quality, efficacy and outcomes of instruction for adults at the college level.

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EDU 571-672 JAZZ ORCHESTRA LITERATURE 1-4 3 Credits 3 Class Hours The Band Director is provided the opportunity to play and conduct standard and current jazz orchestra literature. Rehearsal strategies, techniques, and warmup routines are discussed, analyzed and evaluated in the context of preparing for public performance. EDU 581-682 CONCERT BAND LITERATURE 1-4 3 Credits 3 Class Hours The Band Director is provided the opportunity to play and conduct standard and current band literature suitable for both the elementary and secondary school. Rehearsal strategies, techniques, and warmup routines are discussed, analyzed and evaluated in the context of preparing for public performance. EDU 601 3 Credits MUSICAL THEATRE IN SCHOOLS 3 Class Hours EDU 607 3 Credits ADVANCED CHORAL CONDUCTING 3 Class Hours

Advanced conducting techniques: score analysis; conducting patterns; emphasis on the demands of tempo, dynamics articulation and text. Study of varied styles in choral music, choral conducting pedagogy, and literature suitable for school performance. EDU 608 3 Credits CHORAL LITERATURE 3 Class Hours

Survey of the history of choral literature from the Renaissance to the Contemporary Era with emphasis on selected choral literature, score study techniques and concert programming. EDU 611 3 Credits ADMINISTRATION OF MUSIC & THE ARTS 3 Class Hours

Study of selected musical plays, operettas, and comedies suitable for school use in the original form or through adaptation. Musical growth and learning are emphasized. Consideration is given to play selection, casting, rehearsal, accompaniment, musical direction, staging, and budgeting. EDU 602 3 Credits VOCAL PEDAGOGY 3 Class Hours

Planning and management of school music and arts programs. Emphasis on budgeting, financing, and fundraising. Scheduling and advocacy techniques, department promotion and maintaining status of programs. Festival administration and supervision, application forms, fees, busing, and relationship with the central administration. EDU 651 3 Credits DOCTORAL RESEARCH 3 Class Hours

Introduction to the art and science of teaching singing. Study of the skeletal system and muscles used for breathing and phonation. Special attention to choral literature, repertoire selection, program building, learning theories, teaching concepts, and vocal acoustics. EDU 603 3 Credits COMPUTERS IN MUSIC EDUCATION 10 Field Experience Hours 3 Class Hours

Methods, techniques, principles, scholarly writing and tools of research. Practical application through lectures, discussion, student critiques, and individual research outlines. Significant issues and recent developments in the methods and materials of educational research EDU 652, 653 DOCTORAL SEMINAR 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: EDU 651 Development of an outline for a research proposal in the field of music or music education and completion of the dissertation from a previously selected topic.

Study and evaluation of software for computer-assisted teaching of music; incorporation of computer-based methodology into the school music program. Emphasis on the development of curricula and effective utilization of computer-learning systems. EDU 604 ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Advanced conducting techniques and pedagogy for bands and orchestras. Score analysis, conducting patterns with focus on phrasing, tempo, intonation, blend and balance. Study of literature appropriate for school performances.

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MUSIC HISTORy AND LITERATURE MUH 501 3 Credits COMMERCIAL MUSIC STYLES 3 Class Hours

Study and analysis of American popular music with emphasis on its major composers and performers. Social, economic, and historical contexts are examined. Classification and comparison of often used syntax and popular styles. Emphasis on Jazz, Swing, Country, Broadway, Tin Pan Alley, and the Rock genre. MUH 502 3 Credits AMERICAN SONGWRITERS 1900-1960 3 Class Hours MUH 507 3 Credits CLASSICAL MUSIC TO 1840 3 Class Hours

The Golden Age of American popular music with special emphasis on songwriters such as Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, George Gershwin, Cole Porter, and Richard Rodgers. Analysis of trends in popular songwriting together with the social and economic influences on the enduring melodies and colorful life stories of five of this century's most engaging songwriters. MUH 503 3 Credits THE SWING ERA 3 Class Hours

Study of music from 1600 to 1840, with emphasis on vocal and instrumental forms and historical, stylistic and aesthetic principles. Composers such as Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven are explored and analyzed. MUH 508 3 Credits CLASSICAL MUSIC AFTER 1840 3 Class Hours

Intensive study of jazz and popular music of the early 1930's throughout the late 1940's. Influence of the Great Depression and World War II on the musical styles of the period. The big bands of Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Fletcher Henderson and Stan Kenton, as well as the small jazz ensembles of Coleman Hawkins, Teddy Wilson, Roy Eldridge and Art Tatum. MUH 504 3 Credits CLASSIC POP SINGERS 3 Class Hours

Study of the expressive art of the century after the birth of Schubert. Selected works of Brahms and other composers such as Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt, Wagner and Verdi are explored and analyzed together with the music of composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky, Berg, Hindemith, and Schoenberg. MUH 510 3 Credits POPULAR MUSIC IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION 3 Class Hours

An exploration of the fascinating lives of the great singers, such as Al Jolson, Louis Armstrong, Bing Crosby, Ethel Merman, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Barbra Streisand, who gave life to classic popular music. Their influence on the development of one of the most enduring music forms of our century, and its role in America's cultural history from the 1920s to the present day, are reviewed and evaluated. MUH 505 3 Credits HISTORY OF ROCK AND ROLL 3 Class Hours

The interaction of popular music and everyday life in the pre-World War II American Great Depression. Beginning with Black Tuesday, the day of the 1929 stock market crash, pop songs both reflected the national mood and helped shape it, from the whimsical I'm in the Market for You, to the despairing Brother Can You Spare a Dime, to the quietly philosophical Life Is a Bowl of Cherries. Among highlighted composers such as Irving Berlin, the Gershwins, Harry Warren, E.Y. "Yip" Harburg, their songs performed by Bing Crosby, the Boswell Sisters, Louis Armstrong, Ethel Waters, Ruth Etting, Cab Calloway, Mildred Bailey, et al. MUH 601 3 Credits AMERICAN MUSICALS TO 1940 3 Class Hours

The sociological and folk/artistic roots of Rock and Roll; its history and widespread influence on twentieth century culture, society and music. Emphasis will be on Rhythm and Blues Artists, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Beach Boys, James Brown, Motown and Stax Records.

Development of musical theatre in America to 1940. Study of the cultures, social customs, production techniques and theatres that influenced the content, role and function of music in this type of production. Emphasis on the works of Victor Herbert, Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Lerner and Lowe, Cole Porter, George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Stephen Sondheim and George M. Cohan.

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MUH 602 3 Credits POETS OF TIN PAN ALLEY 3 Class Hours MUH 611 3 Credits JOHN LENNON 3 Class Hours

The lyrics of the great songwriters who dominated American popular music from the turn of the century to the 1960s are analyzed in relation to the music. These include Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, George and Ira Gershwin, Rodgers and Hart. Oscar Hammerstein II, Howard Dietz and E.Y. Harburg, Dorothy Fields and Leo Robin, and Johnny Mercer. MUH 605 3 Credits JAZZ HISTORY AND LITERATURE 3 Class Hours

The musical artistry of John Lennon and his influence on contemporary popular music. In depth analysis of his most enduring work; pre and post Beatles. Songs such as: Imagine, Norwegian Wood, Revolution, In My Life, Mother, Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds, and others are used to illustrate his diversity as a composer and lyricist; thus, exploring the wide range of his influences. Investigation into his political activism and influence on social-issues during the 1960’s and 1970’s. MUH 701 3 Credits AMERICAN MUSICALS AFTER 1940 3 Class Hours

Comprehensive overview of jazz history from its earliest origins to the present. Study of selected jazz innovators and analysis of their music. Methods and materials of research; focus on a specific era or work of an influential jazz improviser, arranger or composer. MUH 606 3 Credits HOAGY CARMICHAEL 3 Class Hours

Development of musical theatre in America from 1940 to present. Study of the cultures, social customs, production techniques and theatres that influenced music in this type of production. Emphasis on the works of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Frank Loesser, Lerner and Lowe, and Andrew Lloyd Webber. MUH 702 3 Credits MODERN JAZZ 3 Class Hours

The impact of Hoagy Carmichael’s music on the entertainment world, including the motion picture industry, will be explored together with the socio-economic climate of the times. Songs such as: Stardust, Lazy River, Heart and Soul, Two Sleepy People, Skylark, Small Fry, Lazy Bones and Georgia On My Mind are used to analyze the special and enduring appeal of his melodies, harmonies and lyrics. MUH 607 3 Credits GEORGE AND IRA GERSHWIN 3 Class Hours

Study of jazz after 1958; emphasis on the Free jazz idioms and the liberation of melody from the fetters of traditional harmonic and rhythm patterns. Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler, Cecil Taylor, Roscoe Mitchell, Sun Ra, Chick Corea, and Herbie Hancock. MUH 703 3 Credits CONTEMPORARY MUSIC SEMINAR 3 Class Hours

George and Ira Gershwin: the development of their dual artistry through study of their greatest songs and shows, collaborative process, and orientation and relationship to the world in which they lived. The reasons for their continued popularity and the art of simultaneous and interactive lyric and music writing which they exemplify are examined. MUH 608 3 Credits HISTORY OF FILM MUSIC 3 Class Hours

Study and analysis of major contemporary musical styles and composition techniques. Intensive examination and evaluation of composers whose works can be categorized as innovative, influential and trend setting.

History and analysis of music composed for film. Emphasis on the major composers of film music from 1894 to the present, such as Kerngold, Steiner, Waxman, Hermann, Raskin, Bernstein, Williams and others. MUH 609 3 Credits LEONARD BERNSTEIN 3 Class Hours

The impact of Leonard Bernstein on modern music, theatre and education. Study and analysis of the life of one of America's most prolific and diverse composers whose cultural achievements and influence affected the course of classical, contemporary, and popular music.

State-of-the-Art Soundtree Synthesizer Laboratory equipped with Pro Tools nonlinear editing stations.

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PERFORMANCE/COMPOSITION/ARRANGING MUS 511 3 Credits JAZZ HARMONY 1 3 Class Hours

Study of diatonic and chromatically altered chords in melodic settings and harmonic progressions together with seventh chords and commonly used substitute dominants. Analysis of chord progressions found in popular music. MUS 512 JAZZ HARMONY 2 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: MUS 511 Study of ninth chords, non-chordal tones, and tone clusters used in chord progressions found in contemporary popular music. Analysis of selected examples of jazz/ commercial music and alternative harmonizations of standard progressions. MUS 513 3 Credits ELECTRONIC MUSIC COMPOSITION 1 3 Class Hours

MUS 532 PIANO ACCOMPANIMENT 2 Credits 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: MUS 332 Accompaniment techniques and skills for vocal workshops, ensembles, music jury examinations and recitals, musical theatre productions, and general music classes in grades K12. Emphasis on harmonization of melodies, modulation, transposition, sight reading, and the development of keyboard fluency and technique. MUS 541-842 MAJOR INSTRUMENT/VOICE 1-8 2 Credits each 1 Lesson per Week 6 Practice Hours Major instrument/voice instruction emphasizes all aspects of technical development and tonal production through the study of traditional methods and repertory as the foundation for the understanding and application of contemporary techniques of improvisation. All performance majors study instrument/voice with a qualified professional musician under the supervision of the Music Division Chair. Masters candidates, in the performance concentration, must present a recital open to the public at the end of the third semester. Recitalists must study with a faculty instructor during the semester in which the recital is given. Doctoral candidates, in the performance program, must present three recitals and submit a dissertation. Recitalists must study with a faculty instructor during the semesters in which the recitals are given. Special fee required. Students taking Private Instruction must attend at least two (2) recitals each semester that will serve to refine their musical judgment and submit Performance Critique Forms to their instructor that provide feedback to the soloist and expand their ability to describe and evaluate musical performances in writing.

A hands on course designed to merge the technology of digital sequencing with the art of music composition. The Korg M3 synthesizer is used as a workstation for arranging and recording original compositions which vary from simple melodies to complex canons on CD or MP3. MUS 514 ELECTRONIC MUSIC COMPOSITION 2 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: MUS 513 The use of sequencers and samplers for music composition. Advanced recording techniques are explored on the Korg M3 synthesizer. Special attention will be given to sampling techniques. Students mix their own composition on a CD or MP3 as a final project. MUS 521 3 Credits ADVANCED IMPROVISATION 3 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours

Improvisational principles and practices. Techniques used for the application of advanced melodic and harmonic composition and devices to instrumental and vocal performance of standard and current jazz repertory. Emphasis on the analysis of selected jazz idioms and their relationship to individual creative expression. MUS 531 3 Credits KEYBOARD HARMONY 2 Class Hours 6 Practice Hours

Musicianship training and keyboard facility. Harmonization of melodies, modulation, transposition, and improvisation. Score reduction and accompaniment techniques. Contemporary chord voicings and alterations and their application to the reharmonization of melodies.

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MUS 711 3 Credits JAZZ COMPOSITION/ARRANGING 3 Class Hours

Advanced arranging for small and large vocal and instrumental ensembles. Analysis and application of selected stylizations of major composers and arrangers. Rhythmic alteration of melodic phrases. Laboratory sessions for composing, writing, performing, recording, and the analysis and evaluation of arrangements. MUS 712 3 Credits FILM SCORING 3 Class Hours

MUS 611 CONTEMPORARY JAZZ HARMONY 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: MUS 512 Analysis of complex chord progressions based upon post1960 harmonic techniques. Study of modal harmony and its relationship to jazz improvisation. MUS 612 3 Credits ARRANGING FOR STUDIO ORCHESTRA 3 Class Hours

Scoring of original music for film and video. Study of the work of well known film composers and the basics of composition for film/video segments. Students will analyze music for its emotional and visual impact and compose music for film/video projects. MUS 714 3 Credits COMPOSERS WORKSHOP 2 3 Class Hours

Arranging techniques for the Studio Orchestra. Special voicings, orchestral combinations and reharmonization techniques as applied to the string, woodwind, brass and percussion sections of the studio orchestra. Analysis and application of the techniques of major arrangers and composers such as Gil Evans, Pat Williams, Claus Ogerman and Henry Mancini. MUS 614 3 Credits COMPOSERS WORKSHOP 3 Class Hours

Practicum for composer/arrangers including performance and discussion of student works. Emphasis on larger performing mediums on a grander scale utilizing arranging and orchestration techniques. Exploration of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic devices laying the groundwork for advanced portfolio development. MUS 800 +0 Credit CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION

Practicum for composer/arrangers including performance and discussion of student works. Emphasis on jazz/commercial idioms. Typical melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic devices and techniques are analyzed to provide an understanding of stylistic trends in contemporary popular music. Original compositions by students based upon creative inclinations. MUS 631 JAZZ/COMMERCIAL PIANO 3 Credits 3 Class Hours Prerequisite: MUS 531 Jazz/Commercial piano performance; study of popular standard songs and blues progressions; development of improvisational technique; the diatonic modes and a variety of harmonic progressions used by contemporary pianists. Analysis of solos by Bud Powell, Bill Evans, Oscar Peterson, Chick Corea and Dick Hyman.

Required of doctoral students for maintenance of matriculated status. Students must register for MUS 800 every semester in which they do not take at least one 3-credit course. Registration for this course entitles students to use the library and other research facilities, consult members of the faculty, and participate in College activities. This course may be repeated and carries no credit toward graduate degree requirements. +Two equated credits for the determination of tuition. MUS 801 Prerequisite: DOCTORAL ADVISEMENT EDU 652

Doctoral students are required to meet periodically with their major professor to review their Plan of Study and progress toward completion of their research project. Advisement must be taken each semester. Special fee required. MUS 801 does not meet the requirement for continuous registration.

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PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES Students may participate in more than one ensemble each semester providing that their academic progress is not affected. A maximum of six ensemble credits above the required program minimum will be accepted for elective credit. Students enrolled in ensembles are required to attend at least two (2) concerts and submit written Performance Critique Forms to their instructor. The purpose of these critiques is to deepen student insight into musical values, provide feedback to the instructor and the performers, and develop the ability to describe and evaluate the quality of musical performances. Students who are members of performance ensembles must wear formal attire for all concerts and shows such as the Great American Songbook. Information regarding the specific dress requirements may be obtained in the Admissions, Student Activities, or Music Division Offices.

BAND ENSEMBLES PEB 511-812 1 Credit Prerequisite: CONCERT BAND 1-8 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Audition and Permission of Instructor

Sight reading and study of standard, contemporary, and original concert band literature. Rehearsal and preparation for concerts, recitals, and public performances on and off campus. Special attention will be given to recording techniques and the demands of the pit band in the musical theatre. PEB 531-832 1 Credit Prerequisite: LAB BAND 1-8 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Audition and Permission of Director

Performance of standard, contemporary, and original music literature. Rehearsal and preparation for student recitals and public performances. Technical development and advancement coupled with repertoire extension covering diverse periods and styles. PEB 541-842 1 Credit Prerequisite: JAZZ ENSEMBLE 1-8 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Audition and Permission of Instructor

Joseph Zawinul of Weather Report fame at recent graduation.

Performance of standard, contemporary, and original music literature in small group settings. Rehearsal and preparation for student recitals and public performances. Technical development together with repertoire extension embracing major artistic trends.

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PEB 551-852 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor Study and performance of standard, contemporary, and original jazz literature. Interaction in the rhythm section using traditional and nontraditional groupings of rhythm instruments. PEB 561-862 JAZZ ORCHESTRA 1-8 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor Study and performance of classic and concert jazz ensemble literature are coupled with original compositions and arrangements. The music of artists and bands such as Louis Armstrong, Fletcher Henderson, Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Stan Kenton, and Paul Whiteman. PEB 591-892 SWING BAND 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor Study and performance of classic swing band arrangements from the libraries of bands such as Artie Shaw, Harry James, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Woody Herman, Les Brown and Benny Goodman. Emphasis on the vocal stylists and big bands of the Swing Era. STRING ENSEMBLES PES 511-812 GUITAR/BASS ENSEMBLE 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor Graded sight reading and study of standard, contemporary, and original jazz literature. Study and practice of materials for purposes of technical development, repertoire extension, and public performance. PES 521-822 1 Credit STRING ENSEMBLE 1-8 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours

Study and practice of a variety of standard and contemporary literature composed for the violin, viola, violoncello and string bass. Rehearsal and preparation for student recitals and public performances. PES 531-832 CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 1-8 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Instructor Designed for instrumentalists capable of public performance on a professional level. Opportunities to perform a varied repertoire, embracing major artistic trends, with selected professional soloists in the field. PES 541-842 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 1-8 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Orchestra dedicated to the performance of the traditional and contemporary literature. Opportunity to develop the skills and repertoire required for performing with a professional symphony orchestra. PES 551-852 THEATRE ORCHESTRA 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Professional orchestra designed to develop and enhance the skills required to accompany musical theatre productions that include the performance of overtures, interludes and backgrounds suitable for solo, group and ensemble presentations occurring on a theatre stage. The ability to follow a conductor from a recessed orchestra pit in front of the stage is emphasized and is a major requirement for orchestra members.

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VOCAL ENSEMBLES PEV 511-812 COLLEGIUM 1-8 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Ensemble for choral directors, music teachers, and professional musicians. Superior sight singing skills are required. The Collegium also serves as a conductor's workshop performing a diverse repertoire that includes music of the Renaissance to the 20th Century, Classical and Jazz. PEV 521-822 CHOIR 1-8 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Sight singing and study of a varied repertoire embracing major stylistic trends, a cappella and with accompaniment. Rehearsal and preparation for concerts, recitals, and public performances on and off campus. Special attention will be given to recording techniques and the demands of the recording studio. PEV 531-832 VOCAL JAZZ 1-8 1 Credit 3 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Vocal ensemble designed for vocalists desirous and capable of public performance on a professional level. Opportunities to perform a varied repertoire, embracing major artistic trends, a cappella and with instrumental accompaniment. Special attention will be given to recording techniques and the demands of the recording studio. PEV 541-842 1 Credit BARBERSHOP HARMONY 1-8 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours PEV 561-862 1 Credit OPERA WORKSHOP 1-8 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours

Individualized instruction in a group setting. Study of standard and contemporary operatic literature including solo arias and literary analysis of libretti. Rehearsal and preparation for concerts, recitals and other public performances. Technical development and advancement coupled with repertoire extension covering diverse periods and styles. Special attention to terminology, costuming, and traditions of the opera. PEV 571-872 1 Credit CABARET/TV WORKSHOP 1-8 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours

Individualized instruction in a group setting. Study of the skills required for professional vocal performance: microphone and rehearsal techniques, stage movement, presence and dress, music and show programming, master of ceremony and stage setups, lead sheet preparation, literary analysis of songs, terminology, traditions of the theatre, and the role of managers and agents. Preparation for public performance in the Great American Songbook held in the Upbeat Café and College Theatre. PEV 581-682 PROFESSIONAL CABARET 1-4 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Preparation for performance in Great American Songbook presentations in a variety of venues including, but not limited to, locations in NYC, the Upbeat Cafe and College Theatre. PEV 583-684 AMERICAN SONGBOOK 1-4 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Professional training designed for vocal, theatre, film and audio majors interested in a career that includes creating/ producing/acting/singing/performing on a television show that highlights songs from the Great American Songbook. PEV 591-892M MEN'S CHORUS 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Vocal ensemble for men interested in performing barbershop quartet literature in a large chorus. Performances in the College Theatre and other venues. PEV 591-892W WOMEN'S CHORUS 1-8 1 Credit 2 Class Hours 4 Practice Hours Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of Director Vocal ensemble for women interested in performing barbershop quartet literature in a large chorus. Performances in the College Theatre and other venues.

Professional level training for vocalists interested in a cappella performance of traditional barbershop quartet literature. Preparation for performances at regional and national competitions sponsored by the Barbershop Quartet Society (SPEBSQSA) and the Sweet Adelines, Inc.

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Charles Strouse three-time Tony Award winning composer of Bye Bye Birdie, Annie, Applause, Rags, Golden Boy and the theme song for All In The Family, surrounded by members of the cast appearing in the recent College production of Strouse on Strouse.

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Facilities and Equipment
The Five Towns College campus is equipped with the latest information technology and a wide variety of facilities that support the College’s instructional program, student services and extracurricular activities. These state-of-the-art facilities include three Audio Recording Studios, a Film/Television Studio, Piano Lab, MIDI Lab hosted by Apple G5 IMACs, Computer Graphics/Video Editing Lab hosted by Apple G5 PowerMacs, PC Lab, as well as the College Library, Learning Center, Music Rooms and Music Studios, Upbeat Café, Performing Arts Center and the College Bookstore. Multi-Strand Fiber optic cabling is the College’s backbone for its Local Area Network (LAN). A 50Mbps Ethernet hand off provides access to the World Wide Web. A Storage Area Network allows students archival and retrieval capabilities for their projects. THEATRE The College theatre provides the space and opportunity for a wide variety of cultural performances—by students, faculty and visiting artists. Performances are scheduled after regular class sessions and are as exciting as they are enlightening for both the performers and the audience. The theatre provides students with the opportunity to perform, act, sing and participate in professional quality productions and thereby experience the realities and joys that draw individuals to the entertainment field. The theatre is equipped with a digital lighting system by Electronic Theatre Controls, digital 24-track sound reinforcement by Tascam, a digital Barco 6300 projection system, and is a fully wired production studio with links to the recording and film/television studios. MIDDLE CLASS AMERICA PRODUCTIONS Middle Class American Productions (MCAP), the In-Residence Theatre Company formed in 1995, is the only alloriginal theatre group on Long Island. It provides on-campus opportunities for student internships on a professional level. In the last decade, MCAP has produced over 40 original works, including 5 new writers series, and has worked with over 175 actors. MCAP has performed in theatres such as the Dix Hills Performing Arts Center, Arena Players, Cultural Arts Playhouse, The Stage, Governor's & Brokerage venues. Featured playwright, John Blenn, has had 36 original plays staged & has garnered critical acclaim from media sources such as Newsday, News 12 TV and Good Times Magazine. AUDIO RECORDING STUDIOS Located within The John Lennon Center for Music and Technology, the audio recording complex was designed by studio architect John Storyk and contains eleven (11) studio/control room spaces. Each studio is unique and geared for specific learning and recording purposes.

Studio A is equipped with the SSL 9000J 72 channel recording console, outfitted with an SSL SL959 5.1 monitoring system for surround sound mixing. Dynamics are by Empirical Labs Distressor, Urei 1176, Aphex Gate, Aphex Expressor, dbx 160vu, Manly opto Comp, and Tube Tech comp. FX include T.C. Elec M5000, Ensoniq DP4, Sony D7, Lexicon 960 and Lexicon PCM 42. Nonlinear systems include ProTools HD3 utilizing three 192 interfaces providing 32 analog I/O, SYNC I/O, operating on Apple G5 or higher platforms. Playback and archiving devices include Otari MTR-12 ¼”, Panasonic DS-555 SVHS, JVC SVHS ET, Tascam 102 Cassette, Tascam DA-40 DAT, TEAC DV-H5000 DVD, and Panasonic 50” Plasma HDTV. Mutlitrack recorders include Studer A827 2” 24 track analog recorder, Otari MTR 90 24-track analog recorder, and three Tascam DA-98HR digital multi-track recorders. Amps and speakers include Genelec 1031 for left, right, rear and center channels, and Genelec 7060 12”Sub for subwoofer. Yamaha NS-10 monitors, JBL LSR-32 Mains, QSC EX4000, and Yamaha P2100 Cue Amp are also installed. Additional representative outboard gear include BBE Maximizer, Aphex Big Bottom, and Tube Tech EQ. Representative microphones include AKG, Sennheiser, Neumann, Audio Technica, Shure, Beyer Dynamic, and Crown. Headphones are by AKG and Fostex. Studio A is also equipped with a Yamaha 6’ 7” grand piano.

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Studio B is equipped with the ORAM BEQ 32 channel console. Dynamics are by dbx 160X, Aphex Expressor, Aphex Compeller, Aphex Expander/Gate and Symetrix Expander/ Gate. FX include Aphex Aural Exciter Type C, Digitech Time Machine, Lexicon PCM91, Lexicon MPX500, and Sony D7. Multitrack Recorders are Tascam DA-98, Tascam DA-78, Tascam DA-38 and Otari MTR-90 II. Playback and archiving devices include Tascam DA-40 DAT, Tascam 112B Cassette, Panasonic DVD RP82, JVC Super VHS ET, and Panasonic Video Machine DS555. Amps and Speakers include QSC Power Amp EX2500 and Event Powered Monitor 20/20. Monitors include Panasonic 42” Plasma HDTV and View Sonic V61816 Flat Panels. Non-linear editing systems include ProTools HD1 running on the Apple G5 platform. Studio C is an all-digital facility based upon the ProTools operating platform and utilizing the ProControl master control surface with two Fader Packs and one Edit Pack. ProTools is v. HD3, which includes two 192 interfaces providing 24 analog I/O, Sync I/O, Apple G5, ViewSonic 18” flat panel monitors, and Panasonic 42" Plasma HDTV. Dynamics include Empirical Labs Distressor w/English Mod, Manly opto Comp, Summit Audio TLA-100 Stereo Compressor, Orban Stereo Parametric EQ, Urei Stereo Graphic EQ, PreSonus M80 – 8 ch. Mic Pre, ProTools HD Pre-8 ch. Mic Pre, Focusrite Red 7 single ch. Mic Pre, Avalon ST737 single ch. Mic Pre, and Amek 9098 single ch. Mic Pre w/parametric EQ. Playback and archiving devices include Panasonic DS-555 SVHS, Tascam 112 Cassette, Tascam DA-40 DAT, Panasonic DVD, and Panasonic 50” Plasma HDTV. Amps and speakers include Genelec 1031 APM for left, right, rear and center channels, and Genelec 7060 12” subwoofer, and Yamaha NS 10s. MIDI equipment includes MIDIman Oxygen 8 Keyboard and MOTU MIDI Timepiece AV. Multitrack recorder is Tascam DA-98HR. MUSIC STUDIOS The College provides a limited number of music studios for individual and small group use. These studios may be used by students who make application for their use, according to availability, at least one day in advance of the intended time of practice, and pay a fee at that time. Except for those rooms that have pianos, students are required to provide and use their own instruments and equipment. FILM/TELEVISION STUDIO Located within The John Lennon Center for Music and Technology, the Film/Television Studio is a multiformatted suite consisting of a soundstage, editing lab, control room, and classrooms. The soundstage is a professional production facility equipped with lighting grid, cyclorama, and green screen. The editing lab utilizes Avid and Final Cut Pro non-linear editing systems as well as the latest in effects and soundtrack software. Representative cameras include Arriflex SR3 Super 16mm, SR2 Super 16mm, and S 16mm film cameras, Panasonic HVX-200 HD P2 with Firestore, Canon XL2 miniDV, Sony DSR-390 and DSR-250 digicam, and JVC GY-500 miniDV. Lighting equipment includes KinoFlo, Arri, Mole-Richardson, Chimera, and Lowell, with a full complement of Matthews and Bogen grip equipment. Camera support equipment consists of Sachtler, Bogen, Cartoni, and Worrall, as well as a car mount and an 18ft remote control camera crane. Dollies include Moviola, Matthews, and Fisher, as well as numerous curved and straight track. Light meters by Sekonic and Spectra. Field audio recorders by Marantz, Shure, Fostex, and Audio Technica. Microphones and lavalieres by Sennheiser, Sony, Shure and Audio Technica. Video monitors by JVC, Transvideo, and Marshall. HD-Video monitors by Sony. There is also a full complement of video and film lens filters, and a wide assortment of gels and diffusion by Rosco and Lee. In all, the Film/Television Studio maintains enough equipment to fill several grip trucks. ELECTRONIC MUSIC -- MIDI LAB The MIDI Lab is equipped with MacIntosh G-5 or faster computers with dual processors. Workstations are equipped with KORG Triton Keyboards and Pro Tools v 6.9 or higher. Additional software packages include Digital Performer, Reason Band in a Box, Office 2001 and Finale 2002. The MIDI Lab is equipped with an LCD projection system and an HP color high-resolution network printer. All workstations are connected to the FTC LAN and have access to the Internet. STUDIO AND NEW SPACE THEATRES Both the Studio Theatre and the New Space Theatre provide a more intimate setting for rehearsal and performances. These facilities are equipped with computerized lighting and digital sound systems, dance surfaces, and a variety of specialized equipment.

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COMPUTER GRAPHICS MAC LAB The Computer Graphics Lab is equipped with Macintosh G-5 computers with dual processors utilizing the latest in MAC operating systems. Each computer is loaded with an Adobe suite and includes Adobe After Effects, Photoshop CS, Illustrator CS, GoLive CS, and InDesign CS, as well as Avid Xpress Pro, Final Cut Pro HD, Microsoft Office Suite, and Final Draft. The Mac Lab is equipped with an LCD projection system and an HP color high-resolution network printer. All workstations are connected to the FTC LAN and have access to the Internet. KEyBOARD LAB The Keyboard Laboratory contains electronic piano keyboards and is used for the teaching of functional piano skills. The Keyboard Lab is open on a convenient schedule to facilitate student practice and progress. Additional keyboards are available for student use in the Music Education Research Center located in the Five Towns College Library. PC LAB The PC Lab is equipped with computer workstations, each equipped with a Pentium III or faster IBM platform PCs utilizing a Windows NT operating system. Representative software includes Ad-Aware, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Office 2003, QuickBooks 2002, Shockwave, Network Associates Virus Scan, and Threshold Solo Competitor. The PC Lab is equipped with an HP high-resolution network printer. All workstations are connected to the FTC LAN and have access to the Internet. ATHLETIC FACILITIES Five Towns College maintains various athletic facilities for use by members of the College community. There is a large gymnasium and locker rooms for both men and women. It also has a regulation size basketball/volleyball court with bleacher seating for 400 persons. A dance studio, equipped with mirrored walls, and marley floor is used for dance, aerobics, and martial arts. Softball fields are conveniently located and with alternate striping may be converted to soccer, lacrosse, and other sports. BOOKSTORE The Campus Bookstore, located near the Student Lounge, carries all of the materials that students require. From textbooks and sweatshirts, to score paper and backpacks, the Campus Bookstore carries all items at discount prices, and is open each day when the College is in session, from orientation day through final examination week. CAR REGISTRATION AND PARKING All vehicles operating on the College campus must be registered with the Public Safety Office where registration forms and parking stickers may be obtained, and a valid registration sticker must be properly displayed on the vehicle at all times. Unregistered vehicles may be towed away at the owner’s expense. Students must adhere to all posted traffic and parking regulations at all times. Vehicles parked on campus after 12:00 AM must have a resident student parking sticker or a temporary overnight parking pass, which may be obtained from the Public Safety Office. Violations of College Parking Regulations carry a fine. Resident students with sophomore standing and higher may register a vehicle on campus. Freshmen may register a vehicle with permission from the Dean of Students for good cause. DINING FACILITIES The Upbeat Café is located adjacent to the College Theatre. This dining facility is open from 8:00 a.m. each day, and serves a wide assortment of hot and cold meals. For a full meal, or just a gourmet snack between classes, the Upbeat Café is the ideal place to meet and eat on campus. INTERNET ACCESS Residential students are provided with access to the internet via the FTC Network. Commuter students may utilize this Network, subject to availability at a variety of access points on campus. Students who do not reside on-campus will require an Internet Service Provider (ISP). It is preferable for the ISP to be a DSL or cable modem connection. While dial-up access may be adequate, students may experience long delays when downloading much of the content-rich learning materials utilized by the faculty. Most of the College campus is a wireless hot spot. MUSIC SKILLS CENTER Students who have specific questions or need extra attention in order to master course material in Keyboard, Harmony, Sight Singing or Ear Training classes may obtain assistance from a member of the music faculty in the Music Division Office or Keyboard Lab.

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STUDENT ACTIVITIES OFFICE Located on the lower-level of Symphony Hall, the primary purpose of the Student Activities Office is to improve student services, related to both the educational and social environments of the College, by increasing communication and the flow of information between the Administration, faculty and staff and the student body. The major goal that stems from this purpose is the publicizing and promotion of events, opportunities, happenings and activities available on campus or in the community that are worthwhile for student participation. The Office provides train and bus schedules and a bulletin board to advertise ride-sharing opportunities. The Student Activities Office is responsible for promoting the social/cultural events that take place on campus and serves as a clearing house for student activities. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS Students should expect that college-level learning requires a personal computer. Although access to computer technology and the internet is provided in a variety of locations across the campus, including wireless hot-spots, in order to fully participate in the academic process, students are expected to own or have unrestricted access to a computer and the internet at their residence or where they prepare for class. Students enrolled in the Film/Video program leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree or who have declared Audio Recording Technology as their major area of concentration are required to have a Mac-style computer that meets the minimum standards set forth below. All other students may utilize a Mac-style computer that meets these standards or they may utilize an IBM PC-style computer that meets the minimum standards set forth below for PC computers. The College does not endorse any specific computer hardware or software supplier, and will support any computer meeting the specifications listed below. However, when students plan to purchase a Mac-style computer, the College is pleased to recommend Apple Computers and advises that Apple provides an educational discount of 10% to college students generally. Five Towns College students receive an additional 5% discount when they purchase computers online through the College’s website or by utilizing the following hyperlink: http://store.apple.com/Catalog/US/Images/routingpage.html The College reserves the right to make modifications to these requirements from time-to-time in response to technological advances.

Apple Standards for Film/Video and Audio Recording Technology Students Hardware and Software for Film/Video and Audio Recording Technology • Mac computer with at least 1.25 GHz or faster • 2GB of RAM • Mac OS X v10.4.9 or later • QuickTime v7.1.6 or later • DVD drive/burner • External Firewire Hard Drive 400/800 • Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac Additional Hardware and Software for Film/Video Students Only • AGP or PCI Express Quartz Extreme graphics card • Display with 1024-by-768 resolution or higher • Final Cut Pro Studio 2 Additional Hardware and Software for Audio Recording Technology Students Only • MBOX Mini or higher • ProTools LE v7.4 or higher • Reason 4 or higher PC Standards Hardware and Software • Window XP or Windows Vista operating system • 1 GHz 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor • 1 GB system memory • 40 GB hard drive with at least 15 GB of available space • Support for DirectX 9 Graphics with WDDM Driver and 128 MB of graphics memory • DVD-ROM Drive • USB Flash Drive • Microsoft Office 2007 (Standard Edition) • Anti-Virus Software • Anti-Spyware Software

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LIBRARy The Five Towns College Library is an outstanding resource for students and faculty alike. It is also utilized by other libraries and researchers from around the world seeking information about various disciplines for which it holds specialized collections. Library holdings include a collection of nearly 30,000 books, more than 500 periodical subscriptions, and approximately 8,000 sound recordings. The collection includes over 2,500 scores/arrangements, several thousand pieces of sheet music, and a growing collection of more than 2,000 video recordings on VHS and DVD. The Five Towns College Library includes a variety of outstanding online subscription databases, including the International Index of Music Periodicals, EBSCO, ProQuest, Gale Literature Resource Center, the Kraus Curriculum Development Library (KCDL Online), Bloom's Literature Reference, Grove Music Online, Naxos Music Library and Wilson Web. The Library provides students with the latest information technology. Representative resources include T-3 connections to the Internet, online catalog, Macintosh and PC computer workstations, music listening stations, DVD and other multimedia players. The Five Towns College Library is affiliated with the Long Island Library Resources Council (LILRC). Through LILRC’s Interlibrary and Research Loan Programs, Five Towns College students and faculty have access to additional materials housed in libraries throughout the world. Staffed by professional librarians, the Library is a major resource for curriculum and instruction at the College. To help students become more aware of the Library’s holdings and more competent in using its resources, a Library Handbook is issued to all entering students. In addition, orientation visits are scheduled for freshman classes, workshops are held on a variety of topics, and all students are required to take courses on Information Literacy. LIBRARy HANDBOOK AND NEWSLETTER The Library handbook contains all the information about the College Library which its users need to know. This includes its materials, print and non-print, services, and procedures. The Library Newsletter lists recent arrivals of print and nonprint materials by subject area is issued periodically.

COLLEGE RADIO STATION WFTU Five Towns College is licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to operate commercial radio station WFTU 1570 AM. The main broadcast studio is located on the College campus at Dix Hills. WFTU transmission facilities and an auxiliary studio are located at Riverhead, NY. WFTU is licensed to serve the east end of Long Island with 1000 kW during the day and 500 kW at night. The broadcast signal of WFTU, which can be heard from Manorville to Montauk, Long Island, provides Five Towns College students with hands-on broadcasting experience. WFTU also streams over the Internet and can be heard online all over the world. WFTU also serves to promote the careers of students interested in broadcasting, and provides an outlet for music majors interested in becoming professional performing artists. TELEVISION STATION FTC TV Beginning in 2008, Five Towns College is the Entity responsible for administering the Verizon FIOS Cable Television System Public Access and Educational Access Channels in the Town of Huntington. The Public and Educational Access Channels provide a number of opportunities for students to develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in television production and broadcast operations, while also supporting this important public service initiative. The College strictly adheres to the rules and regulations of the New York State Public Service Commission in its administration of access channels. In addition, the Film/Video Division operates FTC-TV, which combines content from both the public and educational access channels with content prepared by students and faculty for streaming broadcast transmission world wide over the internet.

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Student Life
STUDENT ACTIVITIES The College's activities program plays a vital role in student growth and development. It is designed to provide a wide variety of leisure-time experiences, enable students to organize groups to explore mutual interests, increase opportunities for leadership and the development of administrative skills, and provide a positive and wholesome influence on student life at the College. STUDENT COUNCIL The Student Council is composed of elected student representatives. The Council is charged with the responsibility of providing student input on issues that have a direct relationship to student life at Five Towns College. It also serves as a means of improving communication within the College. The planning and carrying out of social and recreational activities are the responsibility of the Student Council. Such activities may take the form of an on-campus event, such as a musical theatre production or jazz concert, or an off-campus activity, such as a trip to Manhattan or a concert. STUDENT CLUBS From time to time, different organized activities are carried on in the form of clubs when varied groups of students evince an interest in business, photography, music, and other areas of personal involvement. COLLEGE yEARBOOK The College Yearbook, produced by interested students with the cooperation of faculty advisors, serves as a record in pictures and words of the graduating class as well as a vehicle for the literary, artistic, and photographic talents of all students. Students in the Journalism and Creative Writing classes generally contribute to this publication. FLyER The Flyer, a newsletter distributed to students and faculty members, keeps the College community abreast of campus activities, student responsibilities, administrative regulations, new courses, and other items of immediate interest.

UPBEAT CAFÉ The Upbeat Café serves to enhance the educational environment and improve the quality of student life at the College. It is a professional on-campus performance area where students can gather and music majors can perform to increase and improve their music skills and related professional expertise. The Café provides an attractive area for socialization where wholesome food and beverages are available at modest cost for faculty, staff, students and visitors. The management of the Upbeat Café through its entertainment selection and mode of operation reflects commitment to high standards, cultural variety, and maintains a clean, efficient, and attractive environment that serves to promote school spirit and College recognition. THE RECORD The Record, the College newspaper, is issued periodically and features student-written articles about campus events and activities. STUDENT HANDBOOK A student handbook is distributed to all new student at Orientation. Students are required to familiarize themselves with its contents. CAMPUS SAFETy Campus safety and security is an important concern on all college campuses today. In addition to applicable governmental laws, students are bound by the Student Code of Conduct as set forth in the Five Towns College Student Handbook. The Public Safety Office is always open, and is chiefly responsible for campus safety and security. Officers conduct regular foot and vehicle patrols, operate closed-circuit surveillance systems, respond to a variety of campus situations, conduct public awareness campaigns, and coordinate emergency services. These initiatives are designed to keep Five Towns College a safe place to learn. In accordance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Safety Act of 1990, the College collects information about campus security and its zero-tolerance policy regarding drug and alcohol abuse and weapons. This information is available to the public through the U.S. Department of Education’s web site: http://ope.ed.gov/security or from the Public Safety Office upon request.

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COLLEGE COMMITTEES The participation of students in the work of selected College standing committees is welcomed. Invitations to join these committees are extended at the beginning of each semester. The committees meet four times each semester. CREDIT CARD MARKETING POLICy The advertising, marketing, or merchandising of credit cards to students on the campus of Five Towns College is strictly prohibited. Any individual visitor, licensee, or invitee found violating this policy shall be banned from the campus for a period of two years and any credit card issuer represented by said visitor, licensee, or invitee shall be banned from the campus for a period of one year. Any student, faculty, or other staff found violating this policy shall receive a warning and be prohibited from any and all future credit card marketing on the campus. ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATION DEVICES The use of electronic communication devices in classes without the express permission of classroom instructors is prohibited, except when permitted by College regulation such as to accommodate learning disabilities in furtherance of the American’s With Disabilities Act (ADA). The use of cellular telephones, pagers, text-messaging, and other communication devices during class or during the administration of any examination is strictly prohibited. Using such devices during an examination is deemed to be dishonorable conduct in violation of the Student Code of Conduct, and may result in the voiding of test scores, a failing course grade, and further disciplinary action. CULTURAL HOUR PERFORMANCES These student performances in the College Theatre provide both entertainment and the opportunity for students to share the performing skills developed in musical ensembles and other classes at the College. VISITING ARTIST CLINICS/CONCERTS Visiting artists such as Billy Joel, Phil Ramone, Don Grusin, Bernard Purdie, Cyrus Chestnut, Randy Brecker and Ben Vereen have performed at special clinics and events for the benefit of the student body. The small intimate environment of these events enhances the educational value of interaction with these artists. MUSIC INDUSTRy CONFERENCE At this event, students get the opportunity to speak firsthand with broadcast executives and entertainment attorneys. Career decisions are explored, and students can find out directly from the experts about trends in the music industry. DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM All students are advised that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession or use of a controlled substance is prohibited at the College. Conviction for violation of such prohibitions will result in dismissal from the College. In accordance with the regulations of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, the College has established a Drug Prevention Program. Videos, books, and pamphlets describing the danger of drug abuse are available to all students as well as referral to appropriate agencies for drug counseling or rehabilitation. DIX HILLS CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS Dix Hills Center for Performing Arts at Five Towns College is a home for the arts on Long Island. Not only does the Center play an important role in the cultural education of Five Towns College students, but it also helps the College achieve its goal of enriching the lives of residents of the local community. Dix Hills Center sponsors numerous cultural events that are attended by both students and the general public. During past seasons the PAC has hosted musical performances and ensembles of nearly every genre and description. Representative theatrical productions include The Secret Garden, Suessical, Thoroughly Modern Millie, Into the Woods, Hamlet, The Crucible, and Little Shop of Horrors. Special events included musical tributes to John Lennon, Steely Dan, Chicago, Oscar Peterson, Charlie “Bird” Parker, and Wes Becamp. The continuing line-up of entertainment and campus activities includes magic, comedy, independent films and other performances specifically selected for their entertainment and educational value to the greater campus community. HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BAND FESTIVAL The Five Towns College High School Jazz Band Festival is held in the College Theatre. This event is both educationally worthwhile and enjoyable for all of the high school jazz ensembles that participate. Past experience has shown that students enjoy and benefit from the opportunity to perform before an audience of other musicians. The adjudicators for the competition consist of distinguished professional musicians and music educators. There are no fees of any kind.

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Student Services
ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER Located in Room 107, the Academic Support Center is open to all Five Towns College students on a drop-in basis. The Center provides tutoring, academic counseling, learning strategy seminars, and a variety of other services designed to help each student reach his or her academic potential. The Center also administers the College’s HEOP, PASS, SCOPE and MORE programs. • HEOP (Higher Education Opportunity Program) is designed for academically and economically disadvantaged students. If selected for the program, HEOP participants are required to attend a pre-freshman program during the summer preceding fall entry. Advising, counseling, tutoring and financial assistance are provided for these students for the duration of their degree programs if eligibility requirements are continuously met. • PASS (Promoting Academic Success for Students) is designed to provide academic support to those students who meet the academic requirements for HEOP but do not qualify for financial assistance. PASS participants have access to the same advising, counseling, and tutoring services that are essential to the success of HEOP students. • SCOPE (Serving Opportunity Program Students Educationally) is designed to address the unique challenges faced by international students while attending the College. Eligible foreign students receive advisement, counseling and tutoring services tailored to their specific needs, which often includes programs to strengthen English language skills and processing student visas and other governmental documents. • MORE (Motivated, Organized, Realistic and Enthusiastic) is designed to provide support services and reasonable learning accommodations to students with documented learning disabilities. TUTORIAL SERVICES One of the forms of academic assistance given to students who require help in their courses is the tutoring service provided by faculty members and peer tutors. A student can see his/her instructors during office hours. A student can also receive assistance in the Academic Support Center. ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT Academic planning and advisement are an integral part of the ongoing educational process at the College and begin as soon as the student is accepted. Each student is assigned to a faculty member who serves as his her academic advisor. Conferences with their academic advisors provide opportunities for students to plan their programs and review their academic progress. Prior to each registration period academic advisors help students to prepare their program for the following semester. Academic advisors may be consulted for individual needs at any time throughout the academic year during a regular schedule of office hours. Although academic advisement is provided, students are solely responsible for their course selections and for meeting degree requirements. CAREER SERVICES AND EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING CENTER The Career Services and Experiential Learning Center makes students aware of job opportunities and helps them acquire the necessary skills in searching for jobs, preparing resumes and cover letters, and doing well in interviews. The selection of a career is one of the most crucial decisions a student is called upon to make. The College's career education program, which includes testing, guidance, and reading materials, seeks to assist each student in making that decision. The Center also facilitates the internship, co-operative education, study abroard, and after experiential learning opportunities. HEALTH SERVICES Information and help for students with emotional problems and referrals for professional psychological services are made available through the College Counseling Office. Lectures and literature are offered in such areas as sex, family, marriage, nutrition, and personal health. The College does not provide on campus medical services, but does maintain a relationship with the Dolan Health Center off campus for students. In addition, the College does require that students purchase mandatory health insurance through the College, unless they present proof of health insurance through their own provider at the time of registration or re-registration.

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HOUSING The Living/Learning Center is a complex of four residence halls. Each building has a variety of single and double rooms, internet access, cable TV, telephone, and other service. A minimum mandatory meal plan is required. Students interested in on-campus living must file a separate application. If granted, a housing license is valid for the current academic year/semester. While every effort is made to accommodate the housing needs of continuing students, the College does not warrant that a subsequent license will be issued beyond the current academic year/semester. In order to respond to the high demand for on-campus housing, students who have resided on campus for six (6) semesters may only remain in residence on-campus thereafter with the permission of the Dean of Residential Life. Students who reside on campus are required to attend classes on a full-time basis, and to carry a course schedule of classes that meets five (5) days per week, except with permission of the Dean of Residential Life. NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION New Student Orientation is designed to familiarize students with the College and with the social and recreational resources in the area. Orientation includes an introduction of the general education technological competency skills necessary to utilize various learning technologies, including knowledge of computer hardware and software, file management, word processing, spreadsheets, Internet, and email systems. It includes an overview of college policies and regulations, with emphasis on the development of self-management, career planning, and decision making skills. Orientation events include a special schedule of informal small group meetings where freshmen may share opinions and plans with other students and faculty members in a relaxed and comfortable environment. Students are encouraged to participate in varied campus activities so that they may become well-adjusted members of the College community. PERSONAL COUNSELING The individuality of each student is a basic concern of the College. Every effort is made to provide an environment in which each student can develop his or her particular capabilities and interests to the fullest. The College Counseling Office provides personal counseling in a confidential setting to assist students in making decisions related to personal and academic situations. Referral to outside professional agencies may be made in situations requiring more specialized counseling. DISTANCE LEARNING/ONLINE COURSES Five Towns College reserves the right to offer a portion of each degree program in an online course format. In such cases, the College expects that students registering for these courses will supply their own computer and access to the internet, as set forth in the Catalog section entitled “Computer Requirements.” The College also reserves the right to limit the number of online courses that any student may pursue wholly online. In order to ensure the integrity of online courses, the College may require students enrolled in online courses to present themselves at the College for a variety of reasons, including course orientation, and midsemester and final examinations. OFFICIAL EMAIL NOTICES All Five Towns College students are provided with an official email address when they initially register for College. Students are expected to check their official email box regularly for official notices and other important information from the College. Students will be deemed to have received notifications from the College that have been transmitted to their email address.

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Academic Information
The College seeks to make available the finest quality of instruction. Students are expected to achieve appropriate levels of academic performance, to be familiar with prerequisites for admission to specific courses, and to be aware of requirements for graduation and other regulations as announced in official College publications. The Registrar's Office is responsible for the registration of students and the maintenance of all academic records and credentials. Students should address all requests and/or petitions about matters of academic standing to the Academic Standards Committee. GRADING SySTEM The following grading system is used for graduate courses: GRADE GRADE QUALITY OF ACHIEVEMENT POINTS A Excellent .......................... 90-100 4.0 B Good ................................ 80-89 3.0 C Passing ............................. 70-79 2.0 F Failure .............................. 0-69 0.0 WU Unofficial Withdrawal ..... 0.0 I Incomplete ....................... — W Official Withdrawal ......... — AU Audit (Not For Credit) ..... — T Transfer Credit ................. — P In-Service Credit .............. __ F In-Service Credit .............. __ GRADE POINT AVERAGE (G.P.A.) Grade point averages are computed by multiplying the point value of each grade by the credits designated for each course. This gives the grade point total. The sum of these totals divided by the number of credits attempted gives the G.P.A. for the semester. LEAVE OF ABSENCE Students applying for a leave of absence must file a Leave of Absence form and seek approval of the Academic Standards Committee. Recipients of financial aid, in the form of grants, scholarships, or loans, are reminded that a leave of absence does not in and of itself constitute a waiver of the College's Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress. A waiver must be applied for separately in accordance with published College policy. Students applying for a leave of absence for a semester in progress are cautioned to consult with the Financial Aid Office before making application. AUDITING COURSES A student may audit a course by obtaining written permission from the Division Chair and registering for the course after paying the per credit fee. Audited courses may not be taken later for credit. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE A student who believes that he or she has been personally aggrieved or discriminated against by a staff or faculty member should first seek to resolve the problem through discussion with that individual. Failing a resolution of the matter, the student may then bring the matter in written form to the attention either of the chairperson of the program involved or the supervisor of the particular service or activity. A written response will be made within two weeks. If the student is dissatisfied with the decision, he/she may then appeal to the Vice President/Provost for redress. The College's complete FERPA Policy Statement is available in the Registrar's Office. INCOMPLETE GRADES (I) I is a grade recorded for a course in which a student has failed to complete certain work or has been absent from the final examination because of circumstances beyond his/her control. The written approvals of the Chairperson and Dean are required before an I grade may be given. An incomplete which is not removed before the tenth week of the following semester becomes an F. Responsibility for removing an INC within this time limit rests with the student. WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES OR COLLEGE Students who find it necessary to withdraw from courses or College are required to notify their academic advisors, secure their approval, and complete all necessary forms. Program change fees must be paid in the Bursar's Office, and the completed forms must be presented to the Registrar's Office before a student can be considered officially withdrawn from courses or College. Students may withdraw from courses without penalty during the first ten weeks of a semester with a grade of "W." A student who has not filed an official Withdrawal Form and who has been excessively absent will be assigned a grade of "WU" (Unofficial Withdrawal), which is equivalent to an "F" grade. Official withdrawal status is based on the date of receipt and approval of a completed Withdrawal or Program Change Request form and not on the last date of attendance. Students who withdraw from the College will receive grades in accordance with the procedures detailed above. STUDENT RECORDS FiveTowns College complies with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy ct of 1974. Students have the A right to inspect and review certain of their educational records and to correct inaccurate or misleading data through hearings. The student's right to privacy is also protected by limiting the transfer of these records without the student's consent.

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Rick McKay, Sheldon Harnick and Stewart Lane at a recent Convocation.

Michael Feinstein with the Jingle Belles at recent visit to the College.

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Tuition and Fees
Tuition and fees are payable prior to the start of the semester. Checks and money orders should be made payable Five Towns College. The privileges of the College are not available to the student until completion of registration and the payment of all fees and tuition. College policy does not permit a student to register for a subsequent semester if the student is in arrears for a prior semester. The Trustees of the College reserve the right to make changes in fees, tuition, curriculum, and regulations and to charge for additional services whenever such action is deemed advisable. APPLICATION FEE A non-refundable fee of $50 is required at the time of application to process applications. FULL-TIME TUITION Masters students taking 12 or more credits are full-time. Full-Time Masters Tuition per semester .................$ 6,250 Doctoral students taking 9 or more credits are full-time. Full-Time Doctoral Tuition per semester ................$ 6,885 PART-TIME TUITION Students taking less than 12 credits are part-time. Masters Tuition per credit .........................................$ 525 Doctoral Tuition per credit .........................................$ 765 COLLEGE FEE PER SEMESTER 12 + Credits ....................................................... $150 7-11 redits ....................................................... 120 C 4-6 Credits ....................................................... 60 1-3 Credits ....................................................... 30 STUDENT ACTIVITy FEE PER SEMESTER This $25 fee is administered by the Student Council and is used for student activities. TUITION DEPOSIT A tuition deposit of $500 is required within two weeks after acceptance in order to reserve a place in class. SCHEDULE OF PAyMENTS Fall tuition balances are due on or before July 1. Spring tuition balances are due on or before January 3. CREDIT CARDS Mastercard, Discover Card, and Visa are accepted for payment of tuition and fees. STUDENT ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE All full-time students are required to have sickness and accident insurance. Full time students are automatically enrolled in the Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan sponsored by the College. Students can waive enrollment in the College's plan by completing a waiver form, with a copy of a valid medical insurance ID card, before the start of the semester. A separate brochure is available in the business office. MONTHLy PAyMENT PLAN This plan, available through TuitionPay (Sallie Mae Business Office Solutions) for a $55 annual fee, enables students to pay tuition and fees in ten monthly installments commencing June 15. TuitionPay can be contacted directly at (800) 635-0120 or www.tuitionpay.com for additional information. SPECIAL FEES Application for Readmission ................................. $50 Audio Recording Technology Lab ......................... 50/400 Auditing a course, per credit .................................. 765 Computer Lab, per course ...................................... 50 Doctoral Advisement ............................................. 200 Electronic Portfolio ................................................ 85 Film /Video Lab, per semester ............................... 100/400 Graduation (payable at registration) ...................... 50 Identification Card replacement ............................. 25 Independent Study, per course plus tuition ............ 350 Keyboard Lab, per semester .................................. 10 Late Registration .................................................... 50 Major Instrument/Voice, per semester 45-minute private lesson per week ..................... 775 Make-Up Final Examination/Recital ..................... 40 MIDI Lab, per semester ......................................... 75 Music Studio, per hour........................................... 1 Parking for unregistered car, per day ..................... 10 Private Instrument/Voice, per semester 30-minute private lesson per week ...................... 525 Program Change (each).......................................... 5 Qualifying Examination (student teaching) ........... 40 Returned Check service charge .............................. 35 Transcript - High School/College .......................... 10 Transcript - Academic Record ............................... 10 LATE PAyMENT Unpaid balances of student accounts are subject to interest charges of 12 percent per annum from the first day of class until payment is received.

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Michael Feinstein and Robert Sillerman at a recent Convocation.

Rick McKay, award-winning producer/director/writer/cinematographer of the hit film Broadway: The Golden Age, with the Jingle Belles, a College vocal quartet.

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Education Faculty
SUSAN BARR, Associate Professor B.A., Hunter College M.S., Hofstra University Ph.D., Capella University Professional with dual New York State certification in special education and levels K-6, and former teacher in the U.S. Virgin Islands, Dr. Barr has worked with multicultural populations at all levels of education. Member of HEOPPO-Long Island Region, National Association for Developmental Education (NCADE), and Adults and Children with Learning and Developmental Disabilities, Inc. (ACLD). ANN SCHEREL HELLER, Associate Professor B.A., Queens College M.A., Hunter College P.D., Hofstra University District Reading Director, Uniondale Public Schools. Recipient Reading Administrator/Supervisor Award New York State Reading Association, Syracuse, New York 2000; Convention Speaker New York State Reading Conferences 1988, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000; Presenter International Reading Association Conference, 1992. RICHARD KELLEy, Professor, English Liberal Arts Division Chair B.A., St. Bonaventure University M.A., Ph.D., SUNY Stony Brook 2009 winner of the Lorraine Kleinman Award of Excellence in College Teaching. Over forty years experience in the high school and college classroom. Presented his work before the Popular Culture Association and The New York State Council for Social Studies. His work on Thoreau, Parkman, Whitman and other 19th-century American figures has been acknowledged by a number of scholars in the field of American studies, including the well-known critic Alfred Kazin. MARIANNE McCREERy, Professor Director of Graduate Education Studies B.A., Hunter College; M.A., City College Ph.D., Union Institute School Principal, Babylon, New York. Post-doctoral Research Scientist, State University of New York at Stony Brook. New York State School District Administrator.

PATRICIA SCHMIDT, Professor Education Division Chair B.A., M.A., P.D., Queens College M.S., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University Experienced teacher-trainer, curriculum supervisor, bilingual coordinator New York City Board of Education. Member: Higher Education Task Force on Quality Inclusive Education; NYSATEYFT. SAL SOMMA, Associate Professor Director of Music Education B.A., M.S., CUNY Queens College District Director of Music, Plainview-Old Bethpage Central School District; Assistant Principal for Supervision: Music and Director of Performing Arts, Edward R. Murrow High School; Performing Arts Program Coordinator, Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Music Teacher, Michelangelo Intermediate School; Summer Music Program Coordinator, Glen Cove City School District.

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Adjunct Education Faculty
KATHLEEN BANNON, Assistant Professor B.A., SUNY Old Westbury; M.S., P.D., Dowling College Ed.D., St. John's University Assistant Superintendent Curriculum & Instruction, Copiague. DOUGLAS BORSUK, Assistant Professor B.S., Rider College; M.S. Adelphi University P.D., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Brentwood and New York City public school teacher. JEFF DAILEy, Associate Professor B.A., Wagner College M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., New York University Director of Fine and Performing Arts, Deer Park. Expanded school district theatre program; developed partnerships with several theatre companies and the NYC Student Shakespeare Festival; began The Puppet Project, a program to increase reading and writing proficiency in elementary schools. JOSEPH DEL GIUDICE, Assistant Professor B.S., M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Mathematics teacher, Half Hollow School District. Coached American Computer Science League teams. ROSE HUTCHERSON, Assistant Professor B.S., M.A., SUNY Binghamton M.S.Ed., SUNY Albany Ed.D., Hofstra University Director of 21st Century Grant, Amityville, UFSD. Former Associate Director Long Island Regional School Support Center at Eastern Suffolk BOCES. Consultant to NYSED in Office of K-12 Initiatives. MADELINE NELSON, Assistant Professor B.S., North Adams State College M.S.Ed., Hofstra University Experienced reading teacher, West Islip School District. East Islip Teacher Center in-service instructor. NINA PRASSO, Associate Professor B.A., M.S.Ed., Specialist Diploma, CUNY Queens College Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University District Coordinator of Music and the Arts, Garden City UFSD. Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society, Kappa Delta Pi National Educational Honor Society. JULIA A. RAGONESE, Assistant Professor B.S., M.S. in Ed., Long Island University P.D. Educational Leadership, Dowling College Ed.D., Walden University/University of Indiana Experienced Special Education teacher. A.B.A. certified. STEVEN V. RAND, Assistant Professor B.S., SUNY Old Westbury M.S. in Ed., Five Towns College Hockey, Basketball, Tennis Coach. Member: Huntington Historical Society; Greater Long Island Running Club. JOHN SHORTER, Associate Professor B.A., State University College at Geneseo, NY M.A., New York University Former Secondary School Theatre Program Coordinator at Manhasset High School. Contributor to and developer of the New York State Learning Standards for the Arts and Content Area Specialty Test for Theatre Certification. Item reviewer, developer, and scorer for ASSETS Theatre Arts Assessment. Former President of, and current Board Trustee for, the New York State Theatre Education Association. President of the Long Island Theatre Education Association. MARIANNA STEELE, Assistant Professor B.A., Transylvania University M.A., Georgetown College SAS/SDA College of New Rochelle Ed.D., St. John's University Assistant Superintendent for Secondary Curriculum, Hempstead, UFSD; New Teacher Mentor; science teacher. Member: ASCD, NADCO, NABSE, LIASCD, SAANYS and PDK. LINDA STOLLOW, Assistant Professor B.S., SUNY Old Westbury M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Science teacher-Syosset Central School District. Coach for Western Long Island Regional Science Olympiad. NyLES TEICHER, Assistant Professor Director, Distance Learning B.A., Queens College M.A., M.ED., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University Experienced public school educator, former faculty member at Columbia University, Distance Education developer since 1993.

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Music Faculty
SCOTT BALLIN, Assistant Professor, Music Mus.B., M.M., Five Towns College Jazz pianist and the accompanist for the Great American Songbook, Musical Director for the Rat Pack Show at the Rainbow Room. Has appeared at jazz venues such as Birdland, Iridium, and the Metronome. STANLEy G. COHEN, Distinguished Professor, Music President of the College B.S., New York University; M.A., Queens College Ed.D., New York University Music Director and Arranger at the Lake Placid Club, the Crossman and Concord Hotels in New York State, and the Plantation Supper Club in North Carolina; Lincoln Center Performance Chairman; former Assistant Principal, Supervisor of Music; New York Society of Experimental Study for Education; Assistant Director of Music License, New York City Board of Education. ANGELO DIPIPPO, Professor Emeritus, Music B.A., Holy Cross College; M.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Composer, arranger of more than 75 record albums including Lost Horizons and The Godfather. Recording artist with Peggy Lee, Billy Eckstein, Mitch Miller, Rudy Vallee and Connie Haines. Appeared in the films The Godfather and Lovers and Other Strangers. Internationally prominent jazz accordion soloist with own trio at Newport Jazz Festival. Music director for Roberta Peters and Robert Merrill. ERVIN DRAKE, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Music Composer-in-Residence B.S., City College of New York Ervin Drake, Vice Chairman, Songwriters Hall of Fame, has been writing popular songs for over fifty years. His I Believe was recorded by Barbra Streisand and LeAnn Rimes, and even though Frank Sinatra made It Was A Very Good Year a hit years ago, the song was more recently recorded by Ray Charles and Willy Nelson. Other popular songs include Good Morning Heartache, Tico Tico and Now That I Have Everything. He has also composed and produced over 700 primetime telecasts, including the famous Timex Comedy Hour, which was hosted by talk show legend Johnny Carson. He has worked with leading artists of the time, including Perry Como, Ethel Merman, and Andy Williams. Ervin Drake's popularity and success is at an all time high with Barbra Streisand's recording of One God, Tony Bennett's recording of Good Morning Heartache with Sheryl Crowe, and Robbie Williams recording of It was a Very Good Year — all of which have reached platinum status.

LEE EVANS, Professor Emeritus, Music B.A., New York University; M.A., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University Conductor/Pianist for Engelbert Humperdinck and Carol Channing. Music Contractor for Tom Jones, Cat Stevens, Gilbert O'Sullivan, and Emerson, Lake, and Palmer. Seven LPs on Capitol, Command, and MGM Records. Former Music Director, Americana Hotel. Author of more than ninety piano books published by Hal Leonard. STEPHEN GLEASON, Associate Professor, Music Mus.B., Mus.M., Five Towns College Professional musician, vocalist and choral conductor. Extensive experience with a cappella vocal groups. Currently working in New York's premiere top 40 band The Touch as a singer/guitar player and as a session player for selected artists' recordings at Jellybean and Arista records. WAyNE GRIMMER, Assistant Professor, Music Mus. B., Five Towns College Conductor of the Long Island Sound Men's Chorus, member of the award winning barbershop quartet 'Round Midnight and conductor of the Twin Shores Chorus.

Ervin Drake presenting the Honorary Doctor of Music Degree (Mus.D.) to Sheldon Harnick.

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DEAN KARAHALIS, Assistant Professor, Music Director of Instrumental Music Mus.B., Mannes College of Music M.A., Queens College; P.D., Hofstra University Founder of The Concert Pops as well as the conductor and music director. He has performed with the Radio City music Hall Orchestra, New York Lyric Opera, Goldovsky Opera and is Musical Director/Founder of the New York Brass Choir. He is an Artist-Clinician for the Conn/Selmer Musical Instrument Company and has performed extensively as a guest conductor and soloist throughout the United States. Conducting highlights have included performances at the United States Figure Skating Championships, U.S. Air Force Band, Washington, D.C. and a Night at the Opera with Metropolitan Opera star Robert Merrill. In 1992, he was appointed Conductor-Musical Director for The Eglevesky Ballet and is currently musical consultant to the Moscow Festival Ballet, Ballet de Bordeaux and has extensive guest-conducting schedule. The Concert Pops have performed concerts throughout the east coast in their "Pops Under the Stars" series. Some highlights are performances with guest soloists, Marvin Hamlisch, The Manhattan Rhythm Kings, Broadway's Tommy Tune, Betty Buckley, Enzo Stuarti, Joel Gray, and Metropolitan Opera great Robert Merrill. JEFFREy LIPTON, Professor, Music Music Division Chair Director of the Choir, Vocal Jazz and Great American Songbook B.M., SUNY Potsdam; M.M., Bowling Green State University Professional Choral Director, Performances at Avery Fisher Hall in Lincoln Center and Saint Peter's Cathedral in New York City. Choir Director, Mineola Choral Society. Studied conducting with Robert Spano, Music Director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. Active as a guest conductor and clinician in the New York Metropolitan Region. JILL MILLER, Professor, Music Director of Graduate Music Studies Coordinator of Piano Lab B.M., M.M., Ithaca College D.M.A., Temple University Composer of two symphonies, various chamber works and piano music. Composition studies with Karel Husa, Pulitzer Prize winning composer at Cornell University. Lecturer at Muhlenberg College and Temple University. Synthesizer performer at Theatre Three in Port Jefferson. Board member of the Pennsylvania Sinfonia Orchestra and Chairperson for Concert Competition. JOSEPH D. LA ROSA, Professor Emeritus, Music B.S., M.S., New York University D.M.A., University of Arizona Conductor of choral, orchestral and operatic music. Former Director of Performing and Fine Arts, Mineola Public Schools.

Stewart Lane presenting the Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters Degree (L.H.D.) to Robert Sillerman.

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HOSUN MOON, Associate Professor, Music Coordinator of Piano Studies B.M., Yon-Sei University, Korea M.M., Manhattan School of Music D.M.A., SUNY Stony Brook Professional harpsichordist and pianist. Performances at the 92nd Street Y, Merkin Concert Hall, Columbia University and LeFrak Concert Halls with the New York Bach Ensemble and South Shore Philharmonic. Director of Music at Central Presbyterian Church in Huntington, NY and North Country Reform Temple in Glen Cove, NY. CHUCK MyMIT, Professor, Music Editor of Five Towns College Press B.M., Berklee College of Music M.A., New York University Jazz/commercial pianist, composer, arranger, and conductor. Author, A Beginner's Approach to Jazz Improvisation, Club Date Pianist, Introduction to Small Band Arranging, and Contemporary Harmony 1, 2. Recipient, Tisch School of the Arts award for Film Scoring. Composer and Musical Director for the Off-Broadway production of Night Visions. Recording artist, The Romantic Piano. JIM ODRICH, Professor, Music B.S., Queens College M.A., Ed. D.,Columbia University Performed with United States Air Force Airmen of Note. Composet, synthesist for video industrial films, Marc Brown Productions, and Ann Margaret. Special arranger for school band publishers, Kendor and Cherry Lane Music. Piano soloist and recording artist for Music Minus One Records. PETER M. ROGINE, Professor, Music Coordinator of Guitar Studies B.A., Queens College M.A., Long Island University Professional guitarist with extensive recording and TV experience. Performances with Bob Florence, Cab Calloway, Al Martino, Four Aces, Four Lads, Patti Paige, and such Broadway shows as "They're Playing Our Song." Columnist for Just Jazz Guitar magazine. GERRy SAULTER, Associate Professor, Music Director of Private Instruction B.A., SUNY Stony Brook M.M., Five Towns College Guitar instructor and performer. Classical guitarist of the multi-award winning flute and guitar duo, Serenade. Performances at CarnegieHall and Merkin Concert Hall. Contributing author for 20th Century Guitar Magazine. Member of Chamber Music America and the Guitar Foundation of America. Concert performances throughout Puerto Rico, Europe and the USA. DEMETRIUS SPANEAS, Assistant Professor, Music B.M., M.M., New England Conservatory of Music Saxophone soloist, composer, recording artist. Has commissioned, recorded, and premiered works by John Cage, John Harbison, Donald Martino, Bernard Rands, and Gunther Schuller. Has performed with the Funk Brothers, Ray Charles, and Aretha Franklin. Founder and leader of World Music Ensemble. Former Composer-in-Residence with the Bay Area Chamber Symphony in California.

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yoko Ono at the dedication of the John Lennon Center for Music and Technology.

Robert F.X. Sillerman, Rick McKay, Sheldon Harnick, Stewart Lane and Michael Feinstein visiting the Entertainment Industry Gallery of Honor Museum at Five Towns College.

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Adjunct Music Faculty
JUDITH R. ALSTADTER, Professor, Music B.S., Juilliard School M.M.A., D.M.A., Yale University School of Music Concert Pianist and recording artist with appearances at Lincoln Center. Soloist with prominent symphony orchestra and chamber groups. Studied in France with Jeanne-Marie Dorre, in New York with Rosina Lhevinne, Sascha Gorodnitzki, and Volya Cossack, and in New Haven with Ward Davenny. Her Alice Tully Hall series at Lincoln Center devoted to the complete piano works of Gabriel Fauré was widely acclaimed for her keyboard command, sensitivity and color, imagination and dramatic flair. New York appearances include recitals at Carnegie Recital Hall in a series on Romantic Women Composers, which were praised for their uniqueness and sensitivity. Dr. Alstadter is a lecturer, coach, and clinician for music organizations, libraries, elder hostels, and community groups and is a Steinway Piano Artist whose recordings include: The Poetic Piano, Spirituality and Music, Women Composers: Romantic to Ragtime and the Piano Music of Gabriel Fauré. PAUL M. BARKAN, Assistant Professor, Music Technology B.A., SUNY Stony Brook M.M., Five Towns College Professional musician, sound engineer and studio designer; composer, arranger, conductor and producer of professional caliber music in the studio and for musical theater. Specialist in computer music notation and technology. MELANIE BIRNBAUM, Assistant Professor, Voice B.F.A., SUNY Purchase M.M., Manhattan School of Music D.M.A., SUNY Stonybrook Lyric Soprano. Active performer and teacher. Performances at Carnegie Hall and throughout the United States and Europe. Winner of the Young Artists Concert Auditions, and National association of teachers of singing competition. Festivals participated in include Tanglewood, and Aspen. SCEMEA member. GREG BOBULINSKI, Assistant Professor, Music B.M., North Texas State University Jazz trumpet; widely recognized virtuoso; recording and performing experience with Clark Terry, Chris Woods, Carman McRae, and Johnny Hartman. Recipient of National Endowment For The Arts and American Music Center Fellowships.

BRyAN CARROTT, Assistant Professor, Music B.A., William Paterson College A native New Yorker, Mr. Carrott has toured and recorded throughout the U.S., Europe and Japan, with Ralph Peterson, Henry Threadgill, Butch Morris, Dave Douglas, The Jazz Passengers and Charlie Hunter. He is a two-time recipient of New York's Meet The Composer Award and has been cited for several years in Down Beat Magazine's International Critics' Poll. He has also been featured on BET's Jazz Central, on the film soundtrack, 3 A.M. with Branford Marsalis, and as a mallet/multi-percussionist for Disney's Lion King on Broadway. As a clinician for Ross Mallet Instruments, Bryan has led performances at the International Association of Jazz Educators (IAJE) and the Percussive Arts Society Conventions. He was a featured soloist with Cologne, Germany's WDR Orchestra conducted by Gunther Schuller. KENNETH E. COOK, Associate Professor, Music B.M., SUNY Potsdam M.M., University of Michigan Ph.D., Michigan State University Saxophone soloist, chamber musician and private instrumental music teacher. Professional affiliations include, but are not limited to, the Music Educators National Conference, North American Saxophone Alliance and Parliamentarian for the Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Music Fraternity. Research Assistant, Entrepreneurial Education Resource Center, SUNY College of Technology at Utica/Rome, certified adjudicator for New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) solo festivals. AZANDE CUMMINGS, Assistant Professor, Music Coordinator of Percussion Studies B.A., SUNY Old Westbury M.M., Five Towns College Percussionist with the Duke Ellington Jazz Ensemble, American and Harlem Dance Theatres. Extensive musical theatre experience playing shows such as West Side Story, Cabaret, Kiss Me Kate, Ain't Misbehavin, Sound of Music, Oklahoma, Oliver, The Wiz, Gigi, Annie, Zorba, Fiddler on the Roof, Guys and Dolls, Dream Girls, Music Man, Funny Girl, Chicago, Mame, Carousel, Sophisticated Lady, Showboat, Hello Dolly, and Porgy & Bess.

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JEFF DAILEy, Professor, Music B.A., Wagner College M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., New York University District-wide Director of Fine and Performing Arts, Deer Park, New York. Former music director for St. John's University theatre program and band director for White Plains High School. Musicological consultant for orchestras and opera companies including the Czech Philharmonic, Hong Kong and Mississippi Operas, Ambassadors of Opera Worldwide and the Boston Academy of Music. Professional bassoonist. DAVID DOIG, Associate Professor, Music, Business B.A., M.S., M.M., D.M.A., SUNY Stony Brook Professional guitarist and recording artist. Concert tours with performances at U.C.L.A., Universities of Arizona and Santa Barbara, University of Colorado at Boulder, Carnegie Hall, Merkin Hall and Lincoln Center. Numerous publications such as Popular Guitar Classics and Solo Music for Acoustic Guitar. KENNETH FRIESE, Associate Professor, Music B.S., SUNY Potsdam M.M., Boston University Choral director, clinician, organist, accompanist and vocal coach, currently at Plainview Old Bethpage/John F. Kennedy High School. Organist/director of music at Old First Presbyterian Church and Temple Beth-El both in Huntington. PETER HANSEN, Assistant Professor, Music and Music Technology B.A., Queens College; M.S., Hofstra University Music educator, Soundtree/Korg MIDI-Lab expert, professional affiliations include MENC, NYSSMA, NCMEA, IAEKM, GMS and NCMEA. ROBERT HINZ, Assistant Professor, Music B.A., SUNY Stony Brook M.M., University of Rochester: Eastman School of Music Ph.D., New York University Professonal jazz pianist and adjudicator at NYSSMA. Composer, author, solo piano recitalist, and music educator. Author of books and articles on Bud Powell, George Shearing, and Bill Evans. Featured pianist on Marion McPartland's Piano Jazz National Public Radio broadcast. Articles published in Clavier, Creative Keyboard, Jazz Educators Journal, Teaching Music, and the Music Educators Journal. STEPHEN PAGANO, Associate Professor, Voice A.A.S., Nassau County Community College B.A., CUNY Queens College M.A., Long Island University Former director of the vocal program and musical theatre productions at Freeport High School. He has conducted vocal groups and performed at Carnegie Hall, Shea Stadium, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ellis Island, West Point, and the DisneyWorld Choral Festival in Orlando, Florida. MATTHEW PIERCE, Assistant Professor, Music B.M., M.M., The Johns Hopkins University: Peabody Conservatory of Music Gemini Youth Orchestra Music Director, Metropolitan Youth Orchestra Assistant Conductor/String Specialist. Prior teaching experience includes The Julliard School and Peabody Conservatory of Music. Mary Tiller Award for Excellence (Peabody Conservatory). Performers Certificate (Mannes College of Music), Conductors Institute (Bard College of Music). Violin performance credits include Jewel, Sheryl Crow, Suzanne Vega, and Philip Glass. NINA PRASSO, Associate Professor, Music Education B.A., M.S.Ed.,CUNY Queens College Specialist Diploma, CUNY Queens College Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia University District Coordinator of Music and the Arts, Garden City UFSD. Pi Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society, Kappa Delta Pi National Educational Honor Society. ARTHUR ROMEO, Assistant Professor, Music B.S., Hofstra University M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Music Educator and jazz/commercial pianist with appearances in the New York City Metropolitan area. Performances in the Broadway productions of Irma La Douce, Fiddler on the Roof, Zorba, Carnival, and Cabaret. BERNARD ROSE, Associate Professor, Music Mus.B, Manhattan School of Music Mus.M., Ph.D., University of North Texas Post-Doctoral Study, Eastman School of Music Featured soloist on saxophone and clarinet. Member of U.S. Army Field Band, and the Spokane and Winnipeg Symphony Orchestras. Performances with Mel Torme, Louis Bellson, Ed Shaughnessy, Pearl Bailey, Steve Lawrence and Edie Gorme, Louise Mandrell, Milt Hinton, Bob Crosby, Shirley Jones, Leslie Uggams, Bob Hope, George Burns, Carol Channing, Debbie Reynolds and Arturo Sandoval. Reviewer for the Council for Research in Music Education (CRME) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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JON TRASK, Assistant Professor, Music Education B.A., Alfred University Mus.B., Mus.M., Five Towns College Certified Instructor for the Technology Institute for Music Education (TI:ME) - Computer Assisted Instruction, Music Notation, Sequencing, Multi-Media, and Administration. MAURy yESTON, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Music B.A., M.A., Clare College, Cambridge B.A.,Yale University M.A., Yale University Ph.D., Yale University Composer/Lyricist – Concert: An American Cantata: 2000 Voices; for Orchestra, Double Mixed Choir, Boys Choir and Gospel Chorus (Kennedy Center Commission, National Symphony, L. Slatkin Conductor). December Songs – A Song Cycle (Carnegie Hall Centennial Commission). Concerto For Cello and Orchestra (Yo Yo Ma Soloist, Gilbert Levine Conductor); Broadway: Nine 2003 Broadway Revival (Tony Award, Best Revival of a Musical, Grammy Nomination), Titanic (Tony Award: Best Score, Best Musical, Grammy Nomination). Nine (Tony Award: Best Score, Best Musical; Two Drama Desk Awards – Music and Lyrics; Grammy Nomination, Olivier Award Nomination). Grand Hotel with Wright & Forrest (Tony and Drama Desk Nominations).

Major Instrument/Voice Faculty
Private Instruction is provided by the music faculty listed below and in the preceding pages. STEVE BRIODy, Guitar Mus. B.,SUNY Potsdam M.M., Five Towns College Professional guitarist/composer. Guitar Lesson columnist for Guitar Player Magazine in 2009. Performances and recordings with Jeff Lorber, Eric Marienthal, Greg Adams, Mario Cruz, Don Grusin, Dave Valentin, Carl Fischer, Bucky Pizzarelli, Funk Filharmonik, Kevin Covais, Randy Brecker, Bernard Purdie, Bill Heller, Paula Atherton, and Sean Grace. Styles range from jazz to latin, funk, pop, and top 40. CHASEy DEAN, Woodwinds B.S., Hofstra University M.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Woodwind soloist and studio recording artist. Member of the Charlie Barnet, Elliot Lawrence and Pete Rugulo bands with Peggy Lee and Billy Eckstine. Performed with the Xavier Cugat orchestra and Abbe Lane. Four years with the Copacabana show band and Broadway theatre orchestras for productions such as Fiddler On The Roof with Carol Burnett. Featured soloist at the Birdland Jazz Club in Manhattan. PETER DeSALVO, Percussion B.M., SUNY Potsdam M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Professional credits include performances with Aaron Copland, Clark Terry, Milt Hinton, Marion McPartland, Petepr Eldridge, Darmon Meader, Hilary Cole, Ann Hampton Callaway, Gerry Niewood, and Ray Anderson. JOHN DEWITT, Bass Coordinator of Bass Studies M.M.E., Cornell University Diploma, Mannes College of Music; M.A., Queens College Performances with the Sound Symphony, Nassau Symphony, The New Orchestra of Long Island, I Solisti da Camera, and Lyra Chamber Players. New Music with Lothlorien, with performances on National Public Radio. Pit orchestras, Radio City and Broadway shows. Extensive jazz and popular music performance experience. Concert and festival performances with David Amram. Author, Rhythmic Figures for Bassists, Volumes I and II, Everyone Plays the Classics, and Scale Studies for the Jazz Bassist.

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PENELOPE GROVER, Voice B.M., Boston University School for the Arts Lyrical Soprano. Co-Founder and performer of “A small company in America” theatre in residence at New York Institute at SUNY Old Westbury. Thirty years of private instruction experience. ARNIE GRUBER, Voice B.S., CUNY Queens College Professional pianist and vocalist. Swing Band Leader with more than ten years' experience with Hank Lane Music. Regional appearances include The Rainbow Room and the Dix Hills Performing Arts Center. Additional graduate studies at Queens and New York University. HEIDI HEPLER-RAMO, Voice A.A., Schoolcraft College Featured performer at the Festival Jazz di Roma (1990 - 94). Representative collaborations and festivals include Archie Schepp, Ornette Coleman, The Manhattan Transfer, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Pat Methany, James Moody, John Faddis, Tower of Power and others. Representative performances include Bird Land, Iridium Jazz Club, Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, and the Village Gate Jazz Club. JOHN KELLy, Guitar Mus.B., Five Towns College Professional guitar and mandolin performer and recipient of the Tony Mottola Award. LILLIAN LaBARBARA, Voice B.M., Manhattanville College M.S., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Professional pianist, choral director, accompanist and vocal coach. Former director of chorus at Northport High School, Northport, NY. Director of choir at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Church, Centerport, NY. MICHELLE LAPORTE, Flute Coordinator of Woodwind Studies B.A., SUNY at Stony Brook M.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Flute educator and performer. Flutist of the multi-award winning and guitar duo, Serenade and Miyazawa Performing Artist. Concerts performances at Carnegie Hall and Merkin Concert Hall. Member of the National Flute Association, New York Flute Club, Chamber Music America, and Long Island Flute Club. Concert performances in Puerto Rico, Europe and the USA.

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AUDRA MORICCA, Voice Cordinator of Vocal Studies B.M., Mannes College of Music; M.A., Queens College Extensive post graduate work with Steven Crawford, Richard Crittenden, Joanna Levy, Leo Lozito, Gary Norden, Daniel Ragone, and Elisabeth Vrenios. Audra's roles include Leonora in both Il Trovatore and La Forza del Destino, Amelia in Un Ballo in Maschera, and the title roles in Tosca and Ariadne auf Naxos. Recent appearances include James Marvel's Marriage of Figaro with North Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. STEPHEN PAGANO, Associate Professor, Voice A.A.S., Nassau County Community College B.A., CUNY Queens College M.A., Long Island University Former director of the vocal program and musical theatre productions at Freeport High School. He has conducted vocal groups and performed at Carnegie Hall, Shea Stadium, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Ellis Island, the United States Military Academy at West Point, and the DisneyWorld Choral Festival in Orlando, Florida. TONy ROMANO, Guitar Mus.B., Five Towns College Versatile Jazz, Latin, and Pop guitarist. Professional credits include Randy Brecker, Joel Frahm, Stanley Jordan, Antonio Hart, Brit Woodman, Joe Bataan, Candido, Yomo Toro, Debbie Gibson, Alex Gemignani, and the Broadway musical It Ain't Nothin' But The Blues. Musical Director for vocalist Mary Foster Conklin. Score Editor for Northeast Ohio Jazz Society presentations. HOLLy SICKINGER, Voice Mus.B., Five Towns College Spoleto (Italy) Vocal Arts Symposium. Representative operatic credits include Princess Ida and HMS Pinaofre (Gilbert & Sullivan Light Opera Company of L.I.), Iolanthe and The Old Maid and the Thief (A Small Company In America). WILL SPRAGUE, Trombone Mus.B., SUNY Fredonia M.M., SUNY Stony Brook Certified music educator with more than 30 years' experience with the Sayville UFSD. Member: SCEMEA, NYSSMA, and Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society. Recipient of SUNY Fredonia President's Scholar Award and Performer's Certificate for Excellence in Applied Music.

Joseph Zawinaul of Weather Report fame speaking with Dr. Judith Alstadter during a recent graduation ceremony.

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Legendary Music Producer Phil Ramone, College President Stanley Cohen, Distinguished Artist-in-Residence, Ervin Drake and Mrs. Edith Drake at a recent Songwriters Hall of Fame Dinner.
VALERIE SULZINSKI, Woodwinds B.F.A., SUNY Purchase Professional credits include Atlantic Wind Symphony, the Garden City Cathedral Orchestra, Long Island Gilbert & Sullivan Light Opera Theatre Company, Manhattan Chamber Orchestra, Nassau Symphony Orchestra, Queens Philharmonia, and St. Martins Symphony Orchestra. CHRISTOPHER TIBALDI, Percussion B.A., Hofstra University Additional studies at Five Towns College and Berklee College of Music. Endorser for GMS Drum Company, Rhythm Tech Percussion, and HQ Percussion. Endorser and Clinician for Sabian Cymbals and Vic Firth. Session Experience for Deep Wave, Killingsworth, Sabella, and Cove City Studios. BILL TROIANO, Tuba B.M., SUNY Ferdonia; M.M., University of Rochester Professional credits include performances at Carnegie Hall and at the Mozart Festival (VT) with Harvey Phillips. Former member of the Guy Lombardo Orchestra. Member of the Atlantic Wind Symphony, the Old Bethpage Village Restoration Brass Band, and the Long Island Tuba Quartet. Member of the Suffolk County Music Educators Association (SCMEA) Executive Board. FRANK VERBSKy, Cello, Violin B.A, Queens College; M.A., Hofstra University Concert artist and educator. Recent concerts with Five Towns College Chamber Society, Island Senior String Orchestra, and Queens Festival Orchestra. Membership includes Local 802 musicians' union, NYSSMA, LISTA, American Symphony Orchestra League, and the Conductor’s Guild of America. MARK VERDINO, Electric and Acoustic String Bass B.M., SUNY Potsdam M.M., Manhattan School of Music Award winner at the 1999 Notre Dame Jazz Festival, performances at the Gateway Playhouse in Bellport and Theatre Three in Port Jefferson. Studied with Harvie Swartz and Dave Liebman. DEANA VERONE, Voice B.A., Molloy College M.A., Long Island University: C.W. Post College Professional credits include vocal performances with the Concert Pops of Long Island and the Boca Pops (Boca Raton, FLorida). NYSSMA Adjudicator. New York State Professional Music Education Certification for grades K-12. Yamaha MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) Keyboard Clinician.

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PRIVATE INSTRUCTION FACULTy
BRASS Greg Bobulinski, Trumpet* Will Sprague, Trombone Bill Troiano, Tuba PERCUSSION Bryan Carrott* Azande Cummings Peter DeSalvo Christopher Tibaldi WOODWIND Kenneth Cook, Saxophone, Oboe Chasey Dean, Saxophone, Clarinet Michelle LaPorte, Flute* Demetrius Spaneas, Saxophone Valerie Sulzinski, Clarinet, Oboe BASS John DeWitt* Mark Verdino VOCAL Melanie Birnbaum, Soprano Kita DeSesa, Soprano Kenneth Friese, Baritone Wayne Grimmer, Tenor Penelope Grover, Soprano Arnie Gruber, Baritone LaTanya Hall, Mezzo-soprano Heidi Hepler-Ramo, Soprano Kelly Horsted, Tenor Lillian LaBarbara. Soprano Jeffrey Lipton, Baritone Audra Moricca, Soprano* Stephen Pagano, Tenor Holly Sickinger, Soprano Deana Verone, Soprano Lynnen Yakes, Mezzo-soprano * Coordinator STRING Matthew Pierce, Violin* Frank Verbsky, Cello, Violin PIANO Scott Ballin Robert Hinz Jill Miller Chuck Mymit Hosun Moon* Arthur Romeo Yuki Yamaguchi GUITAR Steve Briody David Doig Steven Gleason John Kelly Peter Rogine* Tony Romano Gerry Saulter** ** Director

Professor Ken Friese with students at a recent choral event.

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APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE ADMISSIONS

FIVE TOWNS COLLEGE
305 North Service Road Dix Hills, New York 11746-5871 Tel: (631) 656-2110 Fax: (631) 656-2172 Email: admissions@ftc.edu

FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Application Fee Transcript Requested Transcript Received Decision Sent Follow Up Tuition Deposit

PERSONAL INFORMATION

Please enclose the $50 fee with this application. Fall Spring Summer Male Year _______ Female

Please indicate the semester and year you plan to attend: Name

Last

First

Middle

Maiden or Former Name (if any) Permanent Address Mailing Address (if different than above) Telephone ( Email Address Date of Birth Citizen: )
Number and Street - Apt. Town State Zip

Social Security Number Place of Birth United States Non-United States

-

-

Permanent U.S. Resident

If not a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident, indicate type of Visa and Admission identification number (if any) Indicate your citizenship:
ETHNIC ORIGIN. (This question is voluntary and is asked only to permit the college to comply with the civil rights act.)

Native American or Eskimo White Caucasian (Non-Hispanic) First language, if other than English: WORK EXPERIENCE Present Employer: Address: City/Town: Telephone: ( E-mail: Certification Status: None )

Black or African American Hispanic, Latino

Asian or Pacific Islander

Language spoken at home:

Zip: Fax: ( ) Number of Years of Service: Provisional / Initial Professional / Permanent

Applicants for an Education Masters Degree must present proof of their NYS Certification.

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EDUCATIONAL PLANS (Please check your intended program of study.) MUSIC EDUCATION (M.M.) DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS (D.M.A.) Programs Performance Composition and Arranging Music History and Literature Education Please indicate your Instrument/Voice An interview and audition are required of all D.M.A. applicants. JAZZ COMMERCIAL MUSIC (M.M.) Concentrations Performance Composition/Arranging Music History Music Technology CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (M.S. in Education) Matriculated Special Student ACADEMIC BACKGROUND Please list all colleges or universities attended since the completion of high school.
UNDERGRAD

Institution (full name)

Attendance Dates

Major Field

Degree & Date

Forward official transcripts of all previous college work, both undergraduate and graduate, to the Graduate Admissions Office. A final transcript from a four-year college or university showing that a baccalaureate degree has been awarded must be received together with one letter of recommendation before the applicant can be accepted as a candidate for a masters degree. An appropriate masters degree is required for admission to doctoral study. Additional Information forms will be mailed to applicants for doctoral study after receipt of official transcripts. PERSONAL STATEMENT Please provide a personal statement regarding your goals, values or accomplishments. Briefly describe any distinctions or honors you have achieved. You may also submit an audition video and/or audio tape, which reflects your talents and abilities (tapes will not be returned). If you need more space, you may attach additional pages.

I certify that all information provided is accurate and complete. If I attend Five Towns College, I authorize the College to release information about my college work to any former school that I have attended, if requested. I further understand that Five Towns College reserves the right to amend or rescind any offer of admission, if I have withheld or falsified any information. I also certify that I have read the College Catalog and agree to abide by the regulations contained therein, including payment of all fees, tuition, and other charges as they become due. The required non-refundable application fee is enclosed. Signature of Applicant Date The College complies fully with the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 and does not discriminate on the basis of sex, age, race, nationality, religion, physical handicap, or marital status in its education programs or activities. Any grievance relating to this policy may be presented to the College's Affirmative Action Officer.
Five Towns College is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE) and the New York State Board of Regents. Education programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

GRAD

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Academic Calendar 2010-2011
FALL SEMESTER 2010
MARCH 15– APRIL 9 Monday-Friday Registration APRIL 12-JULY 30 Monday-Friday Late Registration AUGUST 23 Monday Residence Halls Open – New Students AUGUST 24, 25 Tuesday, Wednesday Orientation – New Students AUGUST 25 Wednesday Residence Halls Open – Continuing Students AUGUST 26 Thursday Classes Begin SEPTEMBER 3 Friday Last Day for Program Changes and Application for December Graduation SEPTEMBER 6 Monday Labor Day – No Classes SEPTEMBER 9 Thursday Rosh Hashanah – No Classes SEPTEMBER 18 Saturday Yom Kippur – No Classes OCTOBER 11 Monday Columbus Day – Classes in Session NOVEMBER 2 Tuesday Election Day – Classes in Session NOVEMBER 5 Friday Last Day to Remove “Incomplete” Grades NOVEMBER 11 Thursday Veterans’ Day – No Classes NOVEMBER 23 Tuesday Residence Halls Close NOVEMBER 24-28 Wednesday-Sunday Thanksgiving Recess – No Classes NOVEMBER 28 Sunday Residence Halls Reopen DECEMBER 15 Wednesday Last Day to Withdraw from Classes with Grade of “W” DECEMBER 16-21 Thursday-Tuesday Final Examinations DECEMBER 22 Wednesday Residence Halls Close JANUARy INTERSESSION 2011 JANUARY 3-23 Monday - Sunday JANUARY 17 Monday Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – No Classes

SPRING SEMESTER 2011
NOVEMBER 1–30 Monday-Tuesday Registration DECEMBER 1–JANUARY 7 Wednesday-Friday Late Registration JANUARY 24 Monday Residence Halls Open – All Students New Student Orientation – 9:00 a.m. JANUARY 25 Tuesday Classes Begin JANUARY 31 Monday Last Day for Program Changes and Application for May Graduation FEBRUARY 21 Monday Presidents Day – No Classes MARCH 22 Tuesday Faculty Development Days – No Classes Long Island Media Arts Show MARCH 25 Friday Residence Halls Close MARCH 26-APRIL 3 Saturday-Sunday Spring Recess – No Classes APRIL 3 Sunday Residence Halls Reopen APRIL 8 Friday Last Day to Remove “Incomplete” Grades MAY 11 Wednesday Last Day to Withdraw from Classes with a Grade of “W” MAY 12–17 Thursday-Tuesday Final Examinations MAY 18 Wednesday Graduation Rehearsal 10 AM Spring Picnic 12 Noon Residence Halls Close – Except Graduates MAY 21 Saturday 37th Annual Commencement Exercises, 9:30 AM Residence Halls Close – Graduates MAY 30 Monday Memorial Day – No Classes JULY 4 Monday Independence Day Observed SUMMER SESSIONS 2011 Undergraduate: Session 1 U1 MAY 24 - JUNE 10 Tuesday- Friday Session 2 U2 JUNE 14 - JULY 1 Tuesday-Friday Session 3 U3 JULY 5 - 22 Tuesday-Friday Graduate: Session 1 G1 JULY 5 - 22 Tuesday-Friday Session 2 G2 JULY 26 - AUGUST 12 Tuesday-Friday

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LOCATION OF THE COLLEGE The College is located in Dix Hills, Long Island, on the North Service Road of the Long Island Expressway (Route 495) between Exits 50 Bagatelle Road and 51 Deer Park Avenue. DIRECTIONS TO THE COLLEGE AUTOMOBILE From the East Long Island Expressway (Rte. 495) to Exit 51 Deer Park Avenue (Rte. 231). Continue west on the North Service Road for 1.5 miles to Burr's Lane. Turn right and proceed to College entrance on right. From the West Long Island Expressway (Rt. 495) to Exit 50 Bagatelle Road. Turn left onto Bagatelle Road and right at Half Hollow Road. Proceed to College entrance on right. PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Long Island Railroad to the Babylon Station. Suffolk County Bus S-23 from the Babylon Station or Walt Whitman Mall on Route 110 to the College. The following buses connect with the S-23 Bus: Walt Whitman Mall S-1, S-54, N79, H-4, H-9 Babylon L.I.R.R. S-20, 25, 27, 29, 40, 42, N19, N72

For public bus information, call the Suffolk County Transit Information Service at (631) 852-5200. For Nassau County bus information, call the Metropolitan Suburban Bus Authority at (516) 766-6722.

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