A Mighty Wind

Big projects lift
renewables enterprise
Bigger Than
You Think
State’s economy
grows on innovation
Opportunity
Knocks
Novel initiatives boost
small communities
Read more
about the state’s
global aviation
leadership.
What’s
Online
kansas
economic development guide
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com
SpOnSORed BY The KAnSAS depARTMenT Of COMMeRCe | 2010
Workstyle
Shots Heard Round the World 32
Kansas breeds a booming bioscience industry.
A Mighty Wind 40
Siemens plant investment lifts the
state’s renewable energy profile.
Economic Engine 48
Kansas soars to global leadership
in aviation innovation.
A Kansas Address 56
Business advantages make the state a
major draw for corporate headquarters.
Growing Global 62
A diverse economy makes the state an export leader.
Good Things in Small Places 68
Rural Kansas plays a leading role in the
state’s economic development.
Opportunity Knocks 74
Innovative programs help small communities
across the state prosper.
Into the Great Wide Open 80
Natural beauty, history, culture shape
the Kansas experience.
A Perfect Match 88
Coordinated state programs aid employers, job seekers.
Table of Contents Continued
40
68
56
48
ON THE COVER The 5.4.7. Arts Center in Greensburg is the first building
in Kansas to receive a LEED Platinum rating. PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS
KANSAS
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 7
Insight
Overview 17
Business Almanac 19
Business Climate: Bigger Than You Think 24
Energy 107
Transportation 112
Economic Profile 125
Livability
‘Anything You Could Want’ 118
Education 96
107
112
118
96
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Finney County is where you will experience unlimited growth. With a stable and reliable workforce
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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 11
CONNECTIONS
Lifestyle
Find out what it’s like to live here and what
makes the state such a special place to be.
ONLINE
LI FEST YLE | WORKST YLE | DI GGI NG DEEPER | VI DEO | LI NK TO US | ADVERTI SE | CONTACT US | SI TE MAP
Workstyle
A spotlight on innovative companies
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NEWS AND NOTES >>
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Inside Scoop on the latest
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BREEDS SUCCESS >>
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A Mighty Wind
Big projects lift
renewables enterprise
Bigger Than
You Think
State’s economy
grows on innovation
Opportunity
Knocks
Novel initiatives boost
small communities
Read more
about the state’s
global aviation
leadership.
What’s
Online
KANSAS
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com
SPONSORED BY THE KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE | 2010
Rea
Wh
On
KANSAS
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 13
Western Kansas …
Where life works!
What you know about us …
Western Kansas, there is space to breathe and freedom to thrive here.
It’s a great place to grow up or raise a family, to be a part of a neighborhood.
Children receive personalized education through some of the best schools in the
nation, and they are raised in safe, affordable surroundings. Find peace in the
beautiful, clear, star-filled skies.
What you may not know about us is …
Western Kansas, even today, is full of unique and plentiful job opportunities.
In addition to the traditional industries, there are a host of new businesses that
will surprise you. New technologies and ideas have transformed your possibilities.

What you will find in Western Kansas …
The quality of life is better than ever, even with the sagging national economy.
There is a lot to do, short commutes, the cost of living is lower than many other
places, housing is affordable, the entrepreneurial environment is inspiring, and
the workplace needs you and appreciates you!
Visit WesternKSjobs.com to learn more about
the jobs and lifestyle of Western Kansas.
Turn the pages of our
Digital Magazine
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A Mighty Wind
Big projects lift
renewables enterprise
Bigger Than
You Think
State’s economy
grows on innovation
Opportunity
Knocks
Novel initiatives boost
small communities
Read more
about the state’s
global aviation
leadership.
What’s
Online
s
e
ssssss
e
KANSAS
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GUIDE
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com
SPONSORED BY THE KANSAS DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE | 2010
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 15
Overview
Taking a Lead Role in Jobs, Investment
KANSAS PROGRAMS HELP CREATE A DYNAMIC, DIVERSE STATE ECONOMY
With all the gloomy headlines
surrounding the national economy
for the past two years, it’s tempting
to think there’s no good news
to be found.
But in Kansas, we’ve weathered
the worst of the national downturn
and continue to achieve successes
in industries such as advanced
manufacturing, alternative energy,
biotechnology, agriculture and
professional services, to name a few.
Most importantly, we’ve achieved
these successes while remaining
true to our long-term economic goals
and strategies. As a result, Kansas is
well-positioned for economic growth
in the coming years – making it a
great place for business leaders
to relocate or expand a business.
As you read through this inaugural
edition of the Kansas Economic
Development Guide, you’ll notice
a few trends. First, you’ll notice
our state’s commitment to creating
a pro-business regulatory climate.
You’ll notice a commitment to our
educational institutions and the
development of a versatile workforce
to meet the ever-changing needs of
Kansas businesses. You’ll notice how
Kansas offers a central location and
logistical advantages that you can’t
find anywhere else.
Most importantly, you’ll notice
that Kansas is about leadership,
innovation and the strategic pursuit
of industries in which we have
a comparative advantage.
Kansas is the world’s aviation
capital, producing nearly 40 percent
of global general aviation aircraft.
Northeast Kansas is home to the
renowned Animal Health Corridor,
which comprises 40 percent of the
world’s animal health and veterinary
science interests.
Meanwhile, central and
western Kansas continue to
confirm our reputation among
the top states for wind energy and
renewable fuels – sectors in which
we’re primed for extraordinary growth
in the coming years.
But don’t take my word for it.
Listen to the stories of the
companies profiled throughout
this magazine. These are top-tier
companies that could go anywhere
in the world but recognize Kansas as
the best place to grow their business.
We like to say that Kansas is
“as big as you think.” We invite
you to come see what we mean.
Gov. Mark Parkinson
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 17
Almanac
UNTIL THE COWS
COME HOME
Got milk? Kansas does, and lots of it.
The state is promoting itself as the
“new frontier” for large dairy operations,
and western Kansas in particular has
seen growth in its dairy industry.
Promoters note the state is well situated
geographically and agriculturally for dairy
production, and cite such factors as a
favorable regulatory environment, available
expertise, abundant water supply, ideal
annual rainfall and climate conditions, and
access to feedstock, such as the 300 million
bushels of corn grown there annually.
Go to www.dairyinkansas.com for more.
MAKING THE CONNECTION
Kansas is committed to promoting broadband Internet
access and connectivity in all parts of the state.
The Kansas Department of Commerce has launched the
Connect Kansas program to work with broadband providers
in every region of the state to create detailed maps of
broadband coverage that will accurately pinpoint remaining
gaps in broadband availability.
In addition, the program is surveying residents on Internet
usage and screening applicants for federal grants designed
to improve access statewide. For more on the initiative,
go to www.connectkansas.org.
INNOVATION,
ONE TURN AT A TIME
If you key in “1200 E. 151st St., Olathe, KS,
66062-3426” into one of its products, you’ll get
step-by-step directions to the headquarters of
Garmin International, a world leader in global
positioning system navigation devices.
The company, which sprang from a brainstorming
session by a group of engineers sitting around
a card table in 1989, has grown today to
a worldwide workforce of more than 7,000.
The company’s products have applications for
automotive, mobile, wireless, outdoor recreation,
marine and aviation use. For more, go to
www.garmin.com.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 19
G
ussell
8
ounty
L
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RUSSELL COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU
445 £. Wichita Ave. - RusseII, kS 67665 - (785) 483-4000
rced¬russeIIks.org - www.visitrusseIIcoks.com
LUCAS
Harlow Lodging – (785) 525-7725
Rental house, days, weekends, etc.
Lucas RV Parks – (785) 525-6236
Rental apartments & mobile home, RV Park
Nelson Rentals – (785) 525-7753
Rental house, days, weekends, etc.
North Star Realty – (785) 525-6391
Real Estate Broker
Postusta Lodging – (785) 526-7767
Hunters, reunions, etc.
Stone Cottage Farm Bed & Breakfast
(785) 525-6494
XXXTUPOFDPUUBHFGBSNDPNr0WFSOJHIUMPEHJOH
Thacker’s Cottages – (785) 525-7739
Rental house, days, weekends, etc.
The South House
(785) 525-6292 or (785) 786-4980
Rental house, days, weekends
Wolf Creek Outfitters – (785) 525-6200
www.wolfcreekhunting.net
Guided hunting retreat
WILSON LAKE
Cedar Ridge Cabins – Wilson Lake
(785) 623-3937 or (785) 628-8088
Weekend house for rent
Wilson Lake Campgrounds – State Park
(785) 658-2465
Wilson Lake Campgrounds – Corp.
(785) 658-2551
LURAY
Lazy Cedar Hunting Cottage – (785) 698-2438
)VOUJOHSFVOJPOTWBDBUJPOSFOUBM
The Roost – (785) 698-2459
Rental house, days, weekends, etc.
GORAM
Dickenson Ranch – (785) 998-4401
www.dickensonranch.com
Working ranch experience
DORRANCE
Vonda Czech Inn
(785) 666-4334
Country Inn B&B
(785) 666-4334
RUSSELL
American Lodge & Suites
(785) 483-4200
www.americinn.com
Days Inn
(785) 483-4262
www.daysinn.com
Russell Inn
(785) 483-6660
www.russellinn.com
Super 8
(785) 483-2488
www.super8.com
Dunder Estates RV Park
(785) 483-2603
Prime 8 Inn
(785) 483-2200
KANSAS MADE, AND PROUD OF IT
Want to get a taste of Kansas? The Kansas Department of
Commerce’s Rural Development Division operates the Simply
Kansas program, which promotes products grown, raised,
produced or processed in the state, as well as Kansas
agritourism experiences. Member companies, which include
producers of a wide range of food products, wines and crafts,
as well as agritourism-related businesses, farmers markets,
restaurants and specialty retailers, are included on the Simply
Kansas online directory. Membership includes marketing and
technical assistance and the ability to use the Simply Kansas
logo on packaging and marketing materials. For more on the
Simply Kansas program, go to www.simplykansas.com.
HIGH-PROFILE STYLE
Its client list runs the gamut from former Vice President Dick
Cheney to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sir Elton
John and Janet Jackson.
Since 1993, Plainville, Kan.-based Dessin Fournir has
made a name for itself designing, manufacturing and
marketing home furnishings targeted at the high-end
residential and contract markets. The company’s
collections are featured in 14 showrooms
throughout the United States and one in
Canada, and it also sells its products online.
The company's product lines include Dessin
Fournir, Kerry Joyce and Gérard in furnishings,
textile outfit Classic Cloth, a fabric and
wallpaper operation, and C.S. Post & Co.,
retail and online stores that offer gifts,
jewelry, furniture and gourmet kitchen
accessories. Go to www.dessinfournir.com
for more information.
A KEY STOP ON THE
ROAD TO JUSTICE
The landmark U.S. Supreme Court
decision Brown vs. Board of Education
is commemorated in Topeka, Kan.
Brown v. Board of Education National
Historic Site & Museum features
interactive exhibits and audiovisual
media that educate visitors not
only about the historic high court
decision that banned segregation
in public schools, but also about
the U.S. civil rights movement.
Operated by the National Park
Service, the museum includes an
auditorium that screens the award-
winning film Race and the American
Creed, which explores events that
led up to the case. For more, go to
www.nps.gov/brvb/index.htm.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 21
Our schools, our seasonal climate, our excellent transportation,
our growing economy, and our proximity to a major metropolitan
area all combine to make Atchison, Kansas a great place to visit,
a great place to work, and a great place to live.
5l5 Kansas Avc. - Aìclison, KS 66uu2
(9l3} 367-5524 - (9l3} 367-3u92 fax
www.growatchison.com
A LEG UP IN DENIM
The Lee brand has been synonymous with denim jeans almost since its birth
as the Lee Mercantile Co. in 1889 in Salina, Kan.
The company's innovations include the Union-All work jumpsuit created
in 1913 and the first-ever "Overall" in 1920, the same year the Buddy Lee
doll was launched as a promotion, but quickly became a popular play doll.
Today, the company is owned by VF Corp., the largest apparel company
in the world.
Headquartered in Merriam, Lee manufactures and markets brand denim,
casual pants, shirts, fleece and knit apparel. The company founded Lee
National Denim Day, the largest single-day fundraiser for breast cancer
research. The event takes place each year on the first Friday in October.
Go to www.lee.com for more.
SUCCESS MAGNIFIED
Overland Park, Kan., is world headquarters for Bushnell, an industry leader
in high-performance sports optics for more than a half century.
Bushnell boasts leading market share in all
of the sports optics categories, and its
products, such as binoculars, scopes,
field glasses and range finders,
have consistently won design
and performance awards from
prestigious organizations.
The company's products are used
in outdoor pursuits including
spectator sports, nature study,
birding, fishing, hunting and
stargazing. For more, go to
www.bushnell.com.
WHO NEEDS
AN OCEAN?
Kansas isn't known for its
deep-water ports, but that
doesn’t mean they don’t know
how to build boats there.
The state is home to Cobalt Boats,
a company based in Neodesha,
Kan., that builds sports craft,
cruisers and yachts sold through
a worldwide dealer network.
The family-owned company, which
is more than 40 years old, has
won numerous accolades for
its crafts, including an eighth
consecutive “highest in customer
satisfaction” for its large
runabouts in J.D. Power and
Associates Boat Competitive
Information Study in 2009.
To learn more, go to
www.cobaltboats.com.
and its
opes,
d
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 23
Business Climate
innovation
low costs
workforce
Bigger Than
You Think
Kansas leverages know-how into global leadership
Story by Kevin Litwin
24 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
T
hough it has a population of just
over 2.8 million, Kansas packs
a heavy economic punch.
A proactive legislative and
regulatory environment, a range of
incentives and major advantages in
costs, taxes, skilled workforce, high-
caliber and research-oriented higher
education, and major transportation
assets have combined to make
the Sunf lower State a haven for
investment, innovation, expansion
and jobs.
The state ranked seventh on CNBC’s
annual America’s Top States for
Business report and, for the second
straight year, in the top 10 for site
selection by Pollina Corporate Real
Estate, one of the nation’s premier
corporate relocation firms. Kansas
was named one of the nation’s
10 most competitive states for
capital investment and new facility
development by Site Selection
magazine. Kansas ranked 15th on
Forbes 2009 list of best states for
business, an upgrade of six spots
from its 2006 ranking.
As a measure of the investment
buzz surrounding Kansas, consider
that in an eight-day stretch in
December 2009, the state announced
projects that will create 2,400 jobs and
$131 million in capital investment.
The state has built a reputation for
innovation in such diverse industry
sectors as bioscience, animal health,
energy technology, aviation, advanced
manufacturing and agriculture.
Wichita is the aviation capital of
the world, with 50 percent of domestic
general aviation aircraft and 40
percent of global aircraft produced
in the city. Northeast Kansas is home
to the burgeoning Animal Health
Kansas’ advantages have attracted a roster of national manufacturers, such as Goodyear Tire & Rubber, which has a Topeka operation.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 25
0
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100
120
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Cost of Doing Business Comparison
Corridor, with 40 percent of global
animal health and veterinary science
interests converged in the region.
A string of recent expansions and
new investments underscore that
Kansas is open for business. Siemens
Energy announced in 2009 that it
will build a 300,000-square-foot
wind-turbine manufacturing facility
in Hutchinson that will begin
operation in late 2010. That project,
the first major wind-turbine
equipment factory in Kansas,
will create 400 high-paying jobs.
“Kansas will be one of the top states
in the country for wind energy, no
doubt about it,” says Joe Monaco,
public information officer for the
Kansas Department of Commerce.
Global engineering and
construction giant Black & Veatch
considered more than 40 options
before deciding to buy the Overland
Park building that houses its world
headquarters and embark on a
250,000-square-foot expansion.
The firm has about 2,300 employees
at the headquarters, which is the
largest office complex in the state.
The new headquarters will include
several sustainability features,
including a solar courtyard, solar
canopy and bio garden.
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.
will make capital investments of
up to $250 million to modernize its
off-highway tires operation at its
Topeka plant and retain up to 1,400
employees for 10 years, in part from
up to $14.2 million in training
incentives made available through
the Kansas Department of Commerce’s
Investments in Major Projects and
Comprehensive Training, or
IMPACT, program.
“Kansas really stepped up and
showed a commitment to keeping
us here,” says Whitney E. Watson,
communications manager for
Goodyear-Topeka.
The company makes tires for
medium-radial trucks, such as UPS
vehicles and school buses, and tires for
Humvees used by the U.S. military. In
Source: Economy.com
2008 Cost of Doing Business Index
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 27
fact, more than 1.6 million tires have
been produced for the military alone
since the 9/11 terrorist attacks in
New York.
The plant makes gigantic earthmover
tires that stand 11.5 feet tall and weigh
more than four tons apiece.
The company has been a
manufacturing presence in Topeka
since 1944. The latest planned
investment comes on the heels of
$124 million in upgrades the company
made in Topeka from 2002 to 2008.
Goodyear has an annual payroll
in Topeka of $150 million in wages
and benefits, and pays another
$25 million annually to local
vendors and suppliers.
A pro-business commitment is
steadily elevating Kansas in the
overall national commerce picture.
“The word is getting out about
Kansas and its innovation in industry,”
says Monaco. “It’s good to be a Kansan
in business these days.”
Sprint Nextel maintains its world
headquarters in Overland Park.
“The word is getting out about Kansas and
its innovation in industry. It’s good to be
a Kansan in business these days.”
T
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T
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Kansas By
the Numbers
2.8 million
Kansas population
1.49 million
Total labor force
$36,768
Kansas per capita income in 2007
42
Kansas’ rank among the 50 states
for workers’ compensation
premium ratings
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 29
Major Projects in 2009
APRIA HEALTH CARE
Community: Overland Park
New Jobs: 550
Retained Jobs: 150
Capital Investment: $13.2 million
Description: Regional billing,
customer service
ARCHER TECHNOLOGIES
Community: Overland Park
New Jobs: 306
Retained Jobs: 131
Capital Investment: $6.4 million
Description: Custom computer
programming
BLACK & VEATCH
Community: Overland Park
New Jobs: 3,300
Retained Jobs: 2,800
Capital Investment: $115 million
Description: Engineering consulting
GENERAL MOTORS
Community: Kansas City, KS
New Jobs: 1,300
Description: Auto production
HOME DEPOT
Community: Topeka
New Jobs: 300
Capital Investment: $27 million
Description: Distribution services
J.P. MORGAN
Community: Overland Park
New Jobs: 650
Capital Investment: $30 million
Description: Financial services
KC STEAK CO.
Community: Kansas City, KS
New Jobs: 201
Retained Jobs: 166
Capital Investment: $9.6 million
Description: Meat processing
NCO GROUP
Community: Lenexa
New Jobs: 725
Capital Investment: $9.8 million
Description: Customer service
SARA LEE
Community: Kansas City, KS
New Jobs: 250
Capital Investment: $148.5 million
Description: Sliced meat processing
SIEMENS ENERGY
Community: Hutchinson
New Jobs: 400
Capital Investment: $30 million
Description: Wind turbine
manufacturing
TINDALL CORP.
Community: Newton
New Jobs: 405
Capital Investment: $65.9 million
Description: Wind tower base
production
U.S. BANK
Community: Overland Park
New Jobs: 1,174
Capital Investment: $21 million
Description: Financial services
What’s Online e
Learn more about new business
activity and investment in Kansas at
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 31
32 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Shots Heard
‘Round the
World
Kansas breeds a booming bioscience industry
Story by Michaela Jackson
I
f Kansas isn’t on the tip of your tongue
every time you think of the word
bioscience, you might not be getting
the full picture.
The state is earning a reputation around
the country and the world as a hub of research,
innovation and development in the
biosciences, ranging from animal health –
where it is an undisputed global powerhouse
– to prescription drug production to medical
device manufacturing.
Kansas had nearly 1,100 private bioscience-
related enterprises in 2006 employing more
than 16,000 people, according to a Kansas
Bioscience Authority report. Bioscience
venture capital investment in Kansas totaled
more than $101 million from 2004 to 2007 and
universities spent more than $220 million on
bioscience research in 2006 alone.
Kansas has successfully leveraged its long
history of innovation in crop sciences, animal
health and agriculture to create a booming
bioscience cluster. The legacy of
pharmaceutical giant Marion Laboratories in
Kansas City, which was partially acquired by
Dow Chemical and renamed Marion Merrell
More Insight
Kansas Bioscience
Authority
www.kansasbioauthority.org
(913) 397-8300
info@kansasbioauthority.org
KansasBio
www.kansasbio.org
(913) 495-4334
info@kansasbio.org
Kansas has emerged as a world leader in biosciences. PHOTO COURTESY OF HARLAND SCHUSTER
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 33
Bio By the Numbers
1,075
Bioscience firms in Kansas as
of 2006
424
Patents awarded in Kansas
in 2007
$61.6 million
Bioscience investment capital
in Kansas in 2007
$220 million
Research spending at Kansas
universities and colleges in 2006
Source: Kansas Bioscience Authority
Dow in 1989, along with renowned
research excellence at the University
of Kansas and Kansas State University,
have helped propel aggressive
industry growth.
Since 2005, more than a dozen
bioscience companies have chosen
Kansas as a place to land or expand.
“There is really no limit to the
amount of opportunity this region will
see over the next decade based on the
stars aligning and Kansas getting
there first,” says Angela Kreps,
president of the nonprofit KansasBio,
which serves as an advocate for the
bioscience community in Kansas.
In 2004, the state created the
Kansas Bioscience Authority, a $581
million initiative focused on building
research space, expanding the state’s
growing bioscience industry cluster,
attracting bioscience innovators and
fostering the growth of homegrown
bioscience startups.
At any given time, 2,000 clinical
34 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
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trials are in progress in Kansas,
involving twice as many physicians
as any other place in the country.
“Time equals money. If you are in
San Diego or San Francisco or Boston
trying to get your bioscience company
off the ground, you need to take a look
at Kansas, because we are in the
business of making this happen
faster,” Kreps says. “That’s the secret
sauce. Come here, get it done faster,
make your money work for you.”
Today, nationally recognized names
such as Quintiles, Bayer and Merck
fill the state’s corporate roster, and
companies new and old are lining
up to invest in Kansas.
“People are now starting to look at
The presence of companies such as Bayer
Animal Health have made Kansas the
epicenter of global animal health innovation.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF HARL AND SCHUSTER
What’s Online e
Learn more about the Kansas
bioscience industry at
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 37
Kansas as the place where bioscience
is buzzing,” Kreps says. “Everybody is
looking at what’s happening in Kansas
and bringing their checkbooks to
the table.”
The U.S. Department of Homeland
Security announced in December 2008
that it will build the $450 million
National Bio and Agro-Defense
Facility, or NBAF, in Manhattan,
Kan. Construction on the lab, which
will be dedicated to protecting the
United States from bioterror attacks
and disease outbreaks, could start
as early as 2010.
Roughly 32 percent of the $19
billion animal health industry is based
in the Kansas City area. The state is
known, in fact, as the animal health
capital of the world.
The early part of 2006 saw the
establishment of the Kansas City
Animal Health Corridor, which
runs from Manhattan, Kan.,
to Columbia, Mo.
“One of the advantages we saw
early on goes beyond just attracting
companies or allowing companies
here to grow. This really is an
opportunity to use the collaboration
of the industry to change the face
of veterinary medicine,” says Bob
Walker, director of communications
for Bayer Animal Health, a company
that was instrumental in the
development of the corridor. “We at
Bayer are committed to this region,
we’re committed to the Animal Health
Corridor. We see the tremendous
benefit that will come, that has
already touched us. And as the
corridor grows and thrives, the
companies that are associated
with it will follow suit.”
The bioscience sector employs more
than 16,000 people in Kansas.
0 5000 10000 15000
2004
2005
2006
Employment in private bioscience enterprises in Kansas
Source: Kansas Bioscience Authority
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K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 39
A Mighty Wind
Siemens plant investment lifts
Kansas’ renewable energy profile
40 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Kansas is ranked third nationally in wind-generation capacity and
10th in existing capacity. In 2009, Siemens Energy and Tindall Corp.
announced plans for new wind turbine production facilities in Kansas.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 41
42 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Story by Pamela Coyle
Photography by Jeff Adkins
T
hat famous Kansas wind is
blowing in favor of renewable
energy production, attracting
Siemens Energy to the state for its first
U.S. nacelle plant and setting the stage
for other firms in the wind supply
chain to take a look.
Siemens, part of German
conglomerate Siemens AG, is investing
$50 million on a new facility in
Hutchinson that will mean 400
new jobs at full production. The first
nacelles – large, heavy structures that
house the gearbox, drive train and
control electronics of a wind turbine –
are expected to ship in late 2010, says
Kevin Hazel, Siemens’ vice president
of supply chain management.
The fact that each nacelle weighs
90 tons – Siemens outsources the
Power is distributed from wind turbines
at the Kansas City Power & Light Wind
Energy Facility in Spearville.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 43
What’s
Online OOOOOOOOOO
Learn more about
Kansas’ role in
renewable energy
production at
kansaseconomic
development.com.
components and assembles them in the big,
steel housings it makes – contributed to the
location choice.
“It is one of the major wind zones in the
United States,” Hazel says. “To the south you
have Texas, New Mexico and Colorado, then
to the north are North Dakota, South Dakota,
Iowa and Illinois.”
Together, the two regions are and will be
major U.S. wind power producers. Siemens
wanted a spot from which its product could
be distributed efficiently, Hazel says.
Siemens is a big score for the Sunf lower
State; the company received proposals from
80 communities across the country, and state
officials say the Hutchinson decision is
creating a buzz.
“We are working with some companies
that are in the supply chain, international
companies looking to set up U.S. operations
because of companies like Siemens that are
setting up here,” says Randi Tveitaraas Jack,
international business recruiter for the
Kansas Department of Commerce.
South Carolina-based Tindall Corp.
announced plans in Dercember 2009 to build
a facility in Newton to manufacture concrete
base systems for wind turbines that will
enable the towers to be extended to optimal
heights for maximum power generation.
It was not previously economically feasible
to construct conventional steel towers
to those heights.
Tindall plans a 150,000- to 200,000-square-
foot facility, with a total capital investment
of approximately $66 million and employment
of nearly 200 workers by the end of the first
year. Employment is projected to reach 405
people at an annual payroll of $21 million
by the end of the third year.
Already, more than 200 existing Kansas
companies identify themselves as current
or prospective wind industry suppliers,
according to a December 2009 survey.
The Advanced Manufacturing Institute at
Kansas State University compiled the survey
results for the Commerce Department. The
department also hosted wind supply chain
workshops in Topeka and Wichita that drew
a combined 500 attendees.
Kansas is a wind production leader, too.
By the Numbers
PICKING UP A HEADWIND
3
Kansas’ rank among U.S. states in
potential wind generation capacity
10
Rank among U.S. states
in existing capacity
634
Number of turbines operating
1,013.5
Existing power capacity
in megawatts
Source: American Wind Energy Association
44 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 45
The state passed the 1,000-megawatt
mark in 2009, and its wind-generating
capacity tripled in less than two years
as major projects in Barber, Cloud,
Lincoln and Wichita counties
came online.
The American Wind Energy
Association ranks Kansas 10th
in existing capacity and third in
potential capacity in the United States.
Big projects owned by Westar
Energy, BP Alternative Energy,
Horizon Wind Energy, and Enel
North American added more than
600 megawatts in 2008 and 2009.
The state met its goal early of
producing 10 percent of its electricity
from renewable sources by 2010;
the new goal is 20 percent by 2020.
To help get there, state lawmakers
in their 2009 legislative session
approved incentives for big wind
and solar energy projects. Up to
$5 million in bond financing is
available for projects that create at
least 200 jobs with an average salary
of $32,500 or more. The minimum
capital investment is $30 million,
and companies pay back the bonds
with their share of employees’
withholding taxes.
Smaller projects are part of the
landscape, too. The Greensburg Wind
Farm, 10 turbines that will produce a
combined 12.5-megawatts, broke
ground in October 2009. Built by John
Deere Renewables, which has three
dozen wind farms in eight states, the
project is part of a broader effort to
rebuild a town destroyed by a tornado
in 2005.
Greensburg is using 1.25-megawatt
turbines; Siemens will build nacelles
for the 2.3-megawatt turbine in a
300,000-square-foot facility. Initial
output, at full speed, will be about
650 nacelles a year, though Siemens
is ready for more.
“The plant is designed to expand
on site to double output should it be
needed,” Hazel says.
Kansas is emerging as a prime destination for wind energy component manufacturing.
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48 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Economic
Engine
Kansas soars in aviation innovation
Story by Amy Stumpfl
W
ith its proud heritage
and promising future, the
aviation industry is taking
the Kansas economy to new heights.
More than half of the general
aviation aircraft produced in the
United States are built in Kansas,
with industry giants such as Cessna
Aircraft, Spirit AeroSystems, Hawker
Beechcraft Corp., Boeing Defense,
Space & Security and Bombardier
Aerospace Learjet leading the way.
These companies employ more than
33,000 workers, with many operations
clustered in the Wichita area.
Cessna, established in Kansas in
1927, is the largest producer of general
Hawker Beechcraft makes the Hawker 4000
in Kansas. Left: The Kansas aviation industry
employs more than 33,000 workers. P
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aviation aircraft and business jets
in the world, based on the number
of units delivered annually. Today,
Cessna has three major facilities in
Kansas – the company’s headquarters
and main assembly facility at
Wichita’s Mid-Continent Airport;
a subassembly production and
advanced development facility in
nearby Pawnee; and an assembly
facility in Independence.
Doug Oliver, Cessna’s director
of corporate communications, says
Kansas’ unique location bolsters its
reputation as Air Capital of the World.
“The foremost advantage of doing
business in Kansas is the quality of
the workforce,” he says. “These are
people who have grown up around
airplanes – it is a passion for most.
Many of our employees come from
a long line of aerospace workers.
In many cases, they come from
a long line of Cessnans.”
The dedication to aerospace has
helped shape education and training
in Kansas, Oliver says. Cessna works
directly with engineering schools at
several Kansas institutions, including
Wichita State University and its
world-renowned National Institute
for Aviation Research.
Established in 2005, Wichita-based
Spirit AeroSystems is the world’s
largest supplier of commercial
airplane assemblies and components.
“The quality of the workforce,
the Midwest work ethic – these are
certainly important,” says Richard
Buchanan, chief operations officer
of Spirit AeroSystems. “But it goes
beyond that. Aviation is almost a way
of life in this part of the country. I’m
second generation, my kids are third
generation, and that’s pretty typical
here. I like to say that aerospace is
a family business for Wichita.”
Like Oliver, Buchanan sees the
area’s higher education system as
a major draw for aircraft
manufacturers.
“They’re at the leading edge of
technology,” he says. “Wichita State,
Pittsburg State, the University of
Kansas, Kansas State – they all have
good curricula associated with what
Bottom: Wichita-based Spirit AeroSystems is a major content supplier for Boeing’s
new 787 Dreamliner. Left: Cessna has been a Kansas aviation fixture since 1927.
MAJOR KANSAS AVIATION EMPLOYERS
Spirit AeroSystems 10,300
Cessna Aircraft 8,200
Hawker Beechcraft 5,300
Boeing Defense, Space & Security 2,500
Bombardier/Learjet 2,250
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
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we do, and that gives manufacturers
a good base to recruit from.”
And despite the economic
downturn, many manufacturers
continue to grow.
For example, Park Aircraft
Technologies Corp. recently
announced plans to expand its
operations in Newton. The company
is adding another 42,000 square feet
to the recently completed facility,
which was designed to develop and
produce advanced composite materials
for the aircraft and space vehicle
industries. The company expects
to be operational by September 2010.
“We have a lot of experienced
people available, ” Buchanan says
of the state’s aviation sector. “But we
also have strong training programs in
place, with state and local support to
help grow the industry.”
HOURLY WAGES FOR SELECT
MANUFACTURING JOBS IN KANSAS
Aircraft Mechanics & Service Technicians $23.55
Assemblers & Fabricators $18.43
Avionics Technicians $23.59
Computer-Controlled Machine Tool Operators, Metal & Plastic $16.63
Electrical & Electronic Equipment Assemblers $12.14
Engineering Managers $50.12
First-Line Supervisors/Managers
of Production & Operating Workers $23.18
Industrial Machinery Mechanics $19.08
Industrial Production Managers $37.86
Machinists $15.40
Numerical Tool & Process Control Programmers $22.08
Production Workers, All Other $16.13
Structural Metal Fabricators & Fitters $14.39
Tool & Die Makers $23.92
Welding, Soldering & Brazing Machine Setters,
Operators & Tenders $15.66
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
Hawker Beechcraft’s T-6B Right: The
energy-efficient 787 Dreamliner from
Boeing PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BOEING CO.
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52 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
More Insight
The Kansas Legislature
in 2006 eliminated the
property tax on new
business and machinery,
generating major savings
for large-scale
manufacturers, including
aviation companies. In
2008, the legislature
approved making up
to $33 million in state
incentives available
for eligible large-scale
aviation projects.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 53
High Flier
RENOWNED RESEARCH INSTITUTE AIDS KANSAS AVIATION
Partnerships among businesses and universities
are nothing new. But the National Institute for Aviation
Research at Wichita State University takes this concept
to a new altitude.
Established in 1985, NIAR is renowned for its cutting-
edge research, design, testing and certification, providing
expertise and assistance to the aviation industry, as
well as government agencies and educational entities.
“We exist to serve the aviation manufacturing
industry,” says Tracee Friess, who oversees marketing
and communication for NIAR.
An industry advisory council – which represents major
manufacturers Boeing, Bombardier/Learjet, Cessna
Aircraft, Hawker Beechcraft and Spirit AeroSystems –
helps steer the direction of NIAR’s research.
“They provide valuable feedback and give us
recommendations as to what areas we need to focus
on and the types of equipment we need to invest in,”
Friess says.
And with 135,000 square feet of laboratory space,
NIAR’s research and testing capabilities are virtually
unmatched. The institute is home to more than a dozen
labs, specializing in such areas as advanced joining and
processing, aging aircraft, full-scale structural testing,
composites and advanced materials, crash dynamics,
environmental testing, human factors, mechanical
testing and virtual reality. A key part of the institute is
the Walter H. Beech wind tunnel, which provides industry,
government agencies and educational institutions
with the facilities, equipment and staff for aerodynamic
testing and research. Other NIAR labs offer support
in areas such as CAD/CAM, calibration and quality,
computational mechanics and visual technology.
“As part of the university, we are a nonprofit, which
means our services are quite affordable. We also are
able to draw upon the university’s outstanding talent,
collaborating with both professors and student assistants
on research,” Friess says.
NIAR also will serve as a partner in the new National
Center for Aviation Training at Jabara Airport in Wichita.
The $54 million, 200,000-square-foot facility is
scheduled for completion in August 2010.
“We will have significant laboratory space at the
new center,” Friess says. “And we will work closely
with Wichita Area Technical College to develop high-tech
training courses.” – Amy Stumpfl
Student workers receive training in the advanced joining technology lab at the National Institute for Aviation Research in Wichita.
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A Kansas
Address
State is a major draw
for corporate headquarters
Story by Pamela Coyle
Photography by Todd Bennett
K
ansas is growing a lot more than grain.
The state is fertile ground for new and
expanding corporate headquarters, major
division operations and professional offices. Kansas
has solid logistics, good schools, skilled workers and
aggressive incentives that make it a hot destination
for white-collar projects.
Consider this string of recent successes:
Farmers Insurance has chosen Olathe for a new
customer service operation and will add 600 new
customer service workers and build a $25 million
facility. And U.S. Bank tabbed Overland Park for a
new service center that will spur at least $21 million
in capital investment and create 1,100 jobs when fully
staffed by 2013. The bank says the service center will
be one of its largest in the United States.
Kiewit Power Constructors Co. & Kiewit Power
Engineers Co. recently built and moved into a
What’s
Online OOOOOOOOOO
Learn more about the
Kansas advantage in
drawing new jobs and
investment at
kansaseconomic
development.com.
Fortune 500 firm CenturyLink is based in Overland Park.
56 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 57
FORTUNE 1000 COMPANIES BASED IN KANSAS
Rank Company Revenue Location
64 Sprint Nextel $35.64 billion Overland Park
293 YRC Worldwide $8.94 billion Overland Park
405 CenturyLink $6.12 billion Overland Park
531 Seaboard $4.27 billion Shawnee Mission
620 Collective Brands $3.44 billion Topeka
824 Ferrellgas Partner $2.29 billion Overland Park
952 Westar Energy $1.84 billion Topeka
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
MAJOR PRIVATE-SECTOR NONMANUFACTURING EMPLOYERS
Company Number of employers Industry
Sprint/Nextel 10,005 Telecommunications
CenturyLink 3,800 Telecommunications
Black & Veatch 3,200 Construction & Engineering Services
Farmers Insurance Group 3,000 Insurance Claims Center
Blue Cross and Blue Shield 2,890 Insurance
YRC Worldwide 2,200 Trucking
Jostens 1,200 Printing & Publishing
150,000-square-foot, five-story
headquarters facility in Lenexa.
Sprint Nextel, CareCentrix, Inc.,
General Electric, Waddell & Reed,
Capital One, Prescription Solutions
and T-Mobile are among household
names that share a Kansas address.
Overland Park and other spots in
Johnson County are major magnets.
“It is one of most educated counties
in the country,” says Barbara Hake,
business recruitment manager for
the Kansas Department of Commerce.
“It is very white-collar, there is very
little manufacturing and it is high
on the radar screen for professional
services, headquarters-type projects.”
Major new projects in Overland
Park include a campus for Black &
Veatch, a global titan in engineering,
consulting and construction. The
company is adding 250,000 square
feet to its world headquarters for
a potential total of 850,000 square
feet and a workforce topping 3,400.
J.P. Morgan Retirement Plan
Services signed a 10-year lease
in December 2009 for a new
headquarters in Overland Park, a deal
that will create 800 jobs and at least
$30 million in capital investment.
The move to the 175,000-square-foot
facility is scheduled for early 2011.
Lenexa, also in Johnson County, is
another top destination. NCO Group
Inc., a global business outsourcer,
expanded its call center there in 2009,
generating $4 million in new capital
investment and plans for another
725 employees in 2010.
The metro area has about 2 million
people, and “there is a great
58 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Wichita is a major center of commerce and
the undisputed aviation capital of the world.
The city ranked No. 2 on Forbes magazine’s
list of Best Cities for Jobs in 2008.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 59
infrastructure, so people can move
around easily,” Hake says. “You can
get anywhere in the Kansas City metro
area in 20 to 30 minutes.”
That’s one of the reasons Coleman
Co. Inc., the Wichita-based camping
and outdoors gear giant, picked
Gardner for a huge new warehouse
and distribution facility that opened
in December 2009. The $43 million
facility is 2.5 miles outside Kansas
City in the Midwest Commerce Center
and will benefit from an intermodal
railway facility in the works.
“We found that we had shipments
going to Kansas City and then coming
back through Kansas City,” says JoAnn
Adams, Coleman’s senior vice
president for global human resources.
“Distribution becomes more efficient.”
The project created in excess of 100
jobs, which helped Kansas top 9,100
in new and retained jobs for the year
ending June 30, 2009.
Sports Associated Inc. and its
affiliated firms brought another
100 or so jobs when the specialty
transportation company moved from
Missouri in May 2009. CEO George
Hersh grew up in Kansas City, Kan.,
and was working with Kansas
Department of Commerce officials
to buy one old warehouse when
another property he was watching
dropped in price. “We bought it in
May and moved in May,” he says.
SAI handles transportation,
warehousing and trade shows for
power sport vehicles, electronic
equipment suppliers and other sectors
that need customized transportation.
Kansas came up with an incentive
package that included a forgivable
loan, workforce training, tax credits
and sales tax exemptions.
“They were all great,” Hersh says of
state and local officials. “They made it
easy for me to make a decision.”
U.S. Bank picked Olathe for a new datacenter. Wichita’s
Coleman is a household name in outdoors products.
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62 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Growing Global
Diverse economy makes Kansas an export leader
Story by Pamela Coyle • Photography by Todd Bennett
F
rom aircraft and cereals to meat
and machinery, Kansas is selling
more goods to more countries,
posting its fourth straight all-time
high in 2008, with $12.5 billion
in exports.
General aviation remains the state’s
biggest industry and its largest source
of exports.
Wichita produces 50 percent
of general aviation aircraft in the
United States and 40 percent of the
global supply.
Industrial machinery, cereals and
electrical machinery are next in size,
and total exports from Kansas have
nearly tripled since 1999, though the
state is not resting on its traditional
products or markets.
India and Brazil are emerging as
strong buyers, further diversifying
a lineup topped by Canada, Mexico,
Japan and Germany.
The Kansas Department of
Commerce operates trade offices in
Beijing, Mexico City and Tokyo and
contract representatives in several
other countries. State leaders will go
where the business is, and in October
2009, Gov. Mark Parkinson and top
Commerce Department officials made
two separate trips to Asia, including
MAJOR KANSAS EXPORT MARKETS
United Kingdom
Canada
Mexico
Japan
Germany
SOURCE: Kansas Department of Commerce
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
$346M
$2B
$1.2B
$624M
$380M
Vortex Valves in Salina increased exports nearly 150 percent in a three-year period.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 63
China’s Henan Province, a long-time
“sister state” of Kansas and buyer of
Kansas goods.
At home, Kansas spotlights one
exporter each year for the Governor’s
Exporter of the Year Award. Winners
are strong international marketers and
solid neighbors at home.
Vortex Valves, based in Salina,
won the award in 2008. The company
makes material handling valves
and increased its export sales by
148 percent from 2004 to 2007.
“Our core industries around the
world are f lour milling, plastics,
petrochemicals and minerals,”
says Russ Barragree, the company’s
marketing director.
Vortex’s gates and valves are used
to produce everything from Pringles
potato chips to solid rocket fuel and
handle hundreds of materials in
powder, dust, granule, pellet and
aggregate form. The company’s
customers include original equipment
manufacturers, Fortune 500 outfits
and process engineering firms. Export
destinations include Italy, Greece,
Poland, Spain, Ireland, Scotland,
Peru, Colombia and Venezuela.
Vortex, which is privately owned,
opened an office in Shanghai in
May 2009 that serves countries in
the Pacific region, including China,
Australia and New Zealand.
Cereal Ingredients Inc. won the
export award in 2009. The company
makes food particulates that add flavor,
color and texture to baked goods,
cereals, ice cream, crunches and
toppings. Its latest line, Nutri-Bites,
is used in high-nutrition food bars.
Exports increased 76 percent
between 2005 and 2008, and Cereal
Ingredients in late 2009 added
Indonesia as its 19th export
destination, says Kim Bledsoe,
executive assistant to Chief Executive
Officer Robert Hatch, who founded the
company in Missouri in 1990.
Cereal Ingredients moved to
Kansas, where it built and opened a
new plant and headquarters in 2005.
Two years later, it bought a
40,000-square-foot building next door
in the Leavenworth Industrial Park,
doubling its space.
“We grew so fast we didn’t have
time to build,” Bledsoe says.
Exports make up about 30 percent
of the company’s business, though
domestic and foreign sales continue to
grow. Cereal Ingredients typically
customizes products for its customers
and has its own research and
development lab in Leavenworth.
A worker checks a valve before it’s shipped from Vortex Valves in Salina. Right: Vortex, winner of the Governor’s Exporter of the Year
Award in 2008, makes gates and valves used by global customers in such industries as flour milling, plastics and petrochemicals.
64 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 65
2008 KANSAS EXPORT TOTALS
Products Value
Total value $12.5 billion
1. Aircraft, Spacecraft and Parts $4.0 billion
2. Industrial Machinery $1.5 billion
3. Cereals $1.2 billion
4. Electrical Machinery $800 million
5. Vehicles and Parts $594 million
SOURCE: Kansas Department of Commerce
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
The annual award winners may not
need it, but the Kansas Department
of Commerce sponsors conferences
and Web-based seminars to educate
companies about the export business.
Kansas itself keeps one strategy at
the top of its list. “Face to face contact
is absolutely critical,” says John
Watson, director of the Trade
Development Division of the
Kansas Department of Commerce.
“Any time we can help Kansas
business leaders make direct contacts
with foreign business leaders, we
make a big world a little smaller.”
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 67
Good Things
in Small Places
Rural Kansas plays a lead role in economic development
Story by Michaela Jackson
A
ny way you slice it, McPherson is a
small town.
With just 14,000 residents, the entire
central Kansas community weighs in at barely
more than half the population of Kansas State
University in nearby Manhattan.
But a closer look reveals that small
town does not equal small time. More than
50 businesses spanning at least a dozen
industries make McPherson arguably one of
the most industrialized communities in the
country on a per-capita basis. The business
roster includes national names like Hospira,
CertainTeed, Ultrafab, Milacron Marketing,
National Cooperative Refinery Association
and Johns Manville, companies producing
everything from hospital supplies to frozen
food products.
“A lot of states talk about rural devel-
opment, but not all of them have industries
in those areas that really have potential,”
says Joe Monaco, public information officer
for the Kansas Department of Commerce.
“But Kansas does.”
A slew of community readiness and
economic development programs such as
Kansas Main Street, which emphasizes
downtown redevelopment, the Office of
Rural Opportunity, which caters to
communities of 5,000 or fewer, and Kansas
PRIDE, which focuses on targeted community
improvement, form a network of resources
that give rural Kansas towns a leg up.
A steady tide of success stories proves
that the efforts are not in vain.
In Junction City, population 18,000,
a veritable bioscience hub has taken root.
In the last three years, the city has lured
three big-time players in the industry:
pharmaceuticals firm Ventria Bioscience,
renewable fuels producer Edenspace and
medical reference system developer Lead
Horse Technologies.
A biotech park is currently in development,
and that project, along with aggressive capital
incentives, make Junction City a top-notch
location for budding bioscience firms.
“We thought, ‘OK, we’re coming into a
nice, sleepy little Midwest town,’” says Ramie
Leibnitz, president of Lead Horse Technologies.
“And in fact, we have been embraced and
supported and cheered on every step of the
way ... and it’s been wonderful.”
A medical reference system developer,
Lead Horse relocated from Colorado in
part because of a generous economic
More Insight
The Kansas Department
of Commerce’s Office of
Rural Opportunity is an
initiative designed to serve
communities of 5,000 or
less and is a unique model
nationally. Housed within
the Kansas Department of
Commerce, the office has
four regional locations
throughout Kansas, which
allow staffers to maximize
their time in the field and
create a community-driven,
bottoms-up approach to
rural development in
Kansas. For more, go to
www.kansascommerce.
com/RuralDevelopment.
The C.L. Hoover Opera House in Junction City, one of Kansas’ many rural success stories. PHOTO BY JEFF ADKINS
68 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 69
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development incentive package.
The identification and cultivation of economic
development assets in rural communities, such as
McPherson’s knack for large-scale manufacturing,
is what makes Kansas unique, Monaco says.
One of the most promising sectors on the rural Kansas
horizon is the rapidly growing wind energy field. In May
2009, Siemens Energy, a global leader in wind turbine
production, announced it would build its first U.S.-based
turbine nacelle production facility in Hutchinson.
“When you look at Kansas, especially when you look
at renewable energy and wind energy, there is incredible
potential to not only rejuvenate, but also to spur growth
in rural communities,” Monaco says. “It really is the most
high-potential growth industry for rural Kansas right now
in a lot of ways.”
In 2008, Park Aircraft Technologies Corp. chose Newton,
a small community 20 miles north of Wichita, as the site
for a 50,000-square-foot advanced composite materials
facility. The company has the potential to tap into the
skilled aviation workforce and infrastructure in Wichita,
but also benefit from the cost and quality-of-life benefits
of a smaller suburb.
The small communities of Kansas are not putting all
their eggs in one basket. They’re inviting visitors to stop
by the farms and pick up a few eggs of their own.
Agritourism is a focal point of Kansas’ rural economic
development strategy, giving farms another revenue
opportunity and tourism backers more attractions to
promote. Just one example is the state’s blossoming
wine industry, which now numbers 19 wineries.
A companion program, Simply Kansas, encourages
Kansans to buy locally produced products. At
SimplyKansas.com, visitors can browse listings
of Kansas goods and even place orders directly.
“It might be hayrides, pumpkin picking or apple cider
tasting,” Monaco says. “You name it, but it’s anything that
will allow a farmer to expand his or her business to bring in
tourists and supplement their income.”
McPherson
Junction City
Newton
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Read more about initiatives that
boost investment in rural Kansas at
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 71
Rural Kansas communities have created vibrant and diverse
industry sectors, from agriculture to renewable energy to high tech.
Opportunity from Tragedy
AFTER A DEVASTATING TORNADO, GREENSBURG DEDICATES ITSELF TO A GREEN RECOVERY
When May 4, 2007, dawned,
Greensburg was a typical Kansas
community. Just 24 hours later,
95 percent of the town was gone.
A powerful tornado leveled the
community and left residents at
a life-changing crossroads: was
rebuilding an entire town worth
the effort?
A small group of local business
owners assembled the largest group
they could muster from Greensburg’s
roughly 115 businesses, along with
local officials, citizens and state and
federal recovery workers.
“At that meeting, 66 of the
businesses said they wanted to come
back in some way or fashion,” says
Mike Estes, a leader in Greensburg’s
economic recovery, whose family
company, BTI Greensburg, owns the
local John Deere Dealership. “So we
set about laying out plans as to how
we were going to get that economic
recovery going.”
With a clean slate before them,
leaders of Greensburg decided
72 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
It’s ?fd\ to Me
Calling all site selectors!
We are looking to fill
our industrial park lots.
CITY OF ANDOVER
909 N. Andover Rd.
Andover, KS 67002
(316) 733-1303 Ext. 226
(316) 733-4634 Fax
scoelho@andoverks.com
Visit us at
www.andoverks.com
State incentives/local incentives
A community willing
to work with you.
A growing business climate.
An industrial park
with open choices.
the circumstances gave them a
unique opportunity to rebuild their
community according to its name: it
was time to go green in Greensburg.
The city and county committed
to rebuilding all of their facilities
according to the LEED Platinum
and Gold standards, the two highest
certification levels established by
the U.S. Green Building Council.
The City of Greensburg is also
partnering with John Deere Renewables
and the Kansas Power Pool to build
a wind farm of 10 1.25-megawatt
turbines that will allow the city to
run solely on renewable energy.
“Were we in the wrong place at
the wrong time? Well, maybe we were
in the right place at the right time,”
Estes says. “A tornado made us see
the opportunity.”
Greensburg is being rebuilt as a ‘green’
community. The new 5.4.7 Arts Center
includes such sustainable features as
solar panels and wind turbines.
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What’s Online e
See video of how a town rebuilt itself into
a green community following a devastating
tornado at kansaseconomicdevelopment.com.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 73
74 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Opportunity
Knocks
Innovative Kansas program helps
small communities prosper
Story by Michaela Jackson
Photography by Todd Bennett
A
t the Office of Rural Opportunity in Kansas,
size definitely matters. The smaller the better.
In fact, this unique economic development
resource – the only one of its kind in the nation – is
exclusively for communities with fewer than 5,000 people.
“The Office of Rural Opportunity is a connector,” says
Carol Meyer, the Southwest Region representative for the
ORO. “It’s a connector to other programs, not only to the
Kansas Department of Commerce programs, but to other
programs that might be out there, and to information
and expertise.”
While many rural development organizations take a
financial approach to luring industry to rural communities,
the Office of Rural Opportunity focuses on community
development first and foremost, making sure that
towns are whole, healthy and ready before they begin
recruiting jobs.
Infrastructure development, health-care improvement
and housing availability are the kinds of issues that the
Cindy Boller, left, and Georgia Mann opened Destination Kitchen,
a combination store, restaurant and gourmet food shop, in Norton
in 2008 after they attended a Kansas Main Street conference.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 75
office helps communities address. The state
is covered by Offices of Rural Opportunity
in four regions, so communities get highly
personalized attention.
“All the resources don’t fit all the
communities, so telling them about all of them
probably isn’t going to do any good,” Meyer
says. “Finding out what they need assistance
with, or what they’d really like to get done and
then connecting them with the resources is
more valuable then just handing them phone
numbers and programs.”
In Scott County, a new jail and a new law
enforcement center, an expanded library and
plans for a new 25-bed hospital are the result
of focused cooperation between various
agencies throughout the county.
Scott and Greeley counties, each in Meyer’s
28-county Office of Rural Opportunity region,
were selected as two of nine E-Communities,
a competitive statewide program that allows
communities to use tax credits for
entrepreneurial endeavors.
Greeley County is also restoring a historic
theater with a grant through the Small
Communities Improvement Program, which
helps fund projects that are completed with
40 percent volunteer labor in communities
of 5,000 people or less. The community has
also established innovative programs for youth
involvement and built a solid reputation for
its health-care services.
Meade County recently joined the Public
Square Program, which helps communities
The Kansas Office of Rural Opportunity provides a range of resources and expertise to communities such as Norton.
What’s
Online OOOOOOOOOO
Learn more about
growth opportunities
in Kansas rural
communities at
kansaseconomic
development.com.
76 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 77
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foster collective discussions about problems and their
solutions within the community. The county is also home
to an investor park, and in the last year, community leaders
have begun looking in earnest at what it will take to attract
corporate tenants and create jobs for the county.
Entrepreneurship is a major emphasis of Kansas’
community readiness programs, and nowhere is the fruit
of those efforts more clearly seen than inside Destination
Kitchen in Norton.
Cindy Boller and Georgia Mann, owners of the specialty
shop that draws customers from a 90-mile radius, opened
their doors in October 2008 after a Kansas Main Street
conference encouraged them to attend a small business
boot camp in Colorado.
Playing on the owners’ passion for cooking and
food, Destination Kitchen is a combination retail store,
restaurant and gourmet food shop that has quickly
turned into a regional attraction. “People were anxious
for something like this and really looked forward to us
opening,” says Mann. “We have been greatly supported
by our community and the surrounding area.”
cutline bold: cutline cutline italic cutline
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Destination Kitchen was born from the entrepreneur owners’
passion for food and cooking.
Meade County
Scott County
Norton County
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 79
Into the Great
Wide Open
Natural beauty, history, culture
shape the Kansas experience
80 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Big Business
A 2006 economic impact
study found tourism
expenditures in Kansas
totaling more than $7.2
billion from more than
32 million business and
leisure travelers. More
than 50 percent of tourism
visits came from people
outside the state. The
study found more than
128,000 direct and
indirect jobs in Kansas
were associated with
tourism and travel
economic activity.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 81
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O
ver the years, visitors to Kansas have come to expect
the unexpected. Sure, there’s plenty of wide open
plains and frontier fun in the Sunf lower State.
But the uncommonly distinctive landscape holds a few
surprises, too.
“One of the things we hear from first-time visitors is that
they are surprised by the terrain,” says Richard Smalley,
marketing manager for the Kansas Department of
Commerce’s Travel & Tourism Division. “They assume
it’s all going to be f lat, high plains. But, of course,
that’s not the case.”
In fact, the state is home to several significant geological
formations, including vast deposits of limestone and chalk.
Monument Rocks and Castle Rock are both chalk
formations, while the Gypsum Hills in south-central
Kansas feature breathtaking views of buttes and mesas.
And the Kansas Underground Salt Museum invites tourists
to journey 650 feet below the Earth’s surface to see salt
deposits created millions of years ago.
The Flint Hills National Scenic Byway and the Tallgrass
Prairie National Preserve are two of the state’s most
popular tourist destinations.
The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is home to the largest
remaining area of tallgrass prairie in North America. “But it’s
Story by Amy Stumpfl
Photography by Jeff Adkins
Clockwise from top: The entrance to the Tallgrass Prairie National
Preserve near Strong City; Chip Ferguson tends bar at the Long
Branch Saloon at the Boot Hill Museum in Dodge City. A one-room
schoolhouse at Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve; Wyatt Earp’s
legend lives on in Dodge City.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 83
84 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Though born in Texas, Dwight D. Eisenhower,
famous general and 34th U.S. president, called
Kansas home. The Eisenhower Center in Abilene
includes his presidential library and boyhood home.
Amelia Earhart disappeared without a trace, but
the Atchinson native’s life can be discovered at the
Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum, and some of
her personal effects are on display at the Atchison
County Historical Society Museum.
Laura Ingalls Wilder, who wrote the Little House
on the Prairie books, lived in Independence as
a child. Independence was the site of the original
Little House, and a cabin there re-creates her home.
Walter Chrysler was born in Wamego and grew up
in Ellis. After a stint with General Motors, Chrysler
took over an ailing car company and turned it into
car colossus Chrysler Corp.
Famed cavalry scout and hunter William F.
“Buffalo Bill” Cody came to Kansas with his family
in 1854. In Oakley, a 16-foot tall Buffalo Bill
statue sits prominently on a hill outside of town
to commemorate the famous frontiersman.
IN GOOD COMPANY FROM BUFFALO BILL TO IKE, KANSANS STAND OUT
more than just a unique ecosystem,” Smalley says. “The Flint
Hills area is an important part of our history and culture.
The historic forts and cattle towns, the Santa Fe Trail, the
Pony Express – all of these things are part of our story.”
The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center honors
another important chapter in American history – the Space
Race. Founded in 1962 as the Hutchinson Planetarium,
the Cosmosphere is one of the world’s most comprehensive
space museums, attracting approximately 150,000 visitors
each year.
The museum boasts the largest collection of U.S. space
artifacts outside the Smithsonian National Air and Space
Museum in Washington, D.C., as well as the largest
collection of Russian artifacts outside of Moscow.
In addition, the Cosmosphere offers a wide range
of camps and educational programs.
“We have about 30,000 school children visit the
Cosmosphere each year through field trips,” says
Christopher Orwoll, president and CEO. “And we
have camp programs available for students starting
in elementary school on up through high school.
We even have programs for adults and seniors.”
The museum’s Intergenerational Camp, for example,
allows grandparents to experience space training with their
grandchildren, where they can build robots and rockets
and log time in simulators.
This type of family-friendly programming is typical
of the Kansas experience, Smalley says.
Major chapters of U.S. history are woven into the history
of Kansas. The state played a key role in the War Between
the States, and Kansas forts helped protect the frontier.
The U.S. Cavalry Museum at Fort Riley includes exhibits
of cavalry activities from their early beginnings in the
Revolutionary War to their modern deployment in the
Persian Gulf.
Cattle drives and cowboys are part of the Kansas
experience, and historic Dodge City, with attractions such
as the Boot Hill Museum and the Dodge City Trail of Fame,
gives visitors a f lavor of the Old West’s wilder days.
“Whether you’re into sports and outdoor recreation or
arts and history, you’ll find a number of sites that cater to
families,” Smalley says. “The Kansas Museum of History
in Topeka, the Old Cowtown Museum in Wichita, there
are even working cattle ranches where you can experience
hands-on a day in the life of a cowboy. There’s really
something for everyone.”
The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson draws 150,000 visitors a year. PHOTO BY TODD BENNETT
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 85
Three industrial parks
in south central Kansas
offering buildings,
land and infrastructure.
Cowley County Economic
Development Partnership
Kerri Falletti, CEcD, Director
22193 Tupper St., P.O. Box 832
Winfield, KS 67156
(620) 221-9951
www.cowleyfirst.com
Supporting a strong industry
base with companies such as:
= Creekstone Premium Beef
= GE – Jet Engine Services
= Meadwest Vaco-Calmar
= Morton Buildings
= Newell-Rubbermaid
Plus …
œ Skilled Workforce
œ Quality Customized Training
œ Access to Transportation
œ Central Location

Give us a Call!
Serving Arkansas City,
Winfield and
Cowley County, Kansas
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LIVING GREEN
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86 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
New Opportunity in a Vintage Business
WINE MAKING TAKES ROOT IN KANSAS
With its rich, fertile soil, it’s no surprise that Kansas
is a top location for agriculture.
But along with its wheat and beef production, Kansas
is cultivating a growing number of wineries, 19 in all,
that together produce more than 50,000 gallons of
wine each year.
Using locally grown grapes, berries and other fruits,
Kansas winemakers are steadily building a reputation,
garnering more than 300 international awards in
recent years.
“Kansas wines have gone toe to toe with prominent
wines across the country, so the quality is there,” says
Norm Jennings, a third-generation winemaker and general
manager of Smoky Hill Vineyards & Winery near Salina.
“The challenge is in getting the word out and reassuring
people of the experience they’ll have.”
Key to that goal, says Jennings, is a commitment to
education and customer service.
“Just as different flowers and plants thrive in different
parts of the country, so do different types of grapes.
Most wine drinkers think in terms of chardonnay,
cabernet sauvignon and merlot, which don’t do well in our
Midwest climate. But if we can have a conversation about
the style of wine they enjoy – in other words, sweet or dry
– people are usually happy to break open a bottle and try
something new.”
Jennings also sees the emerging agritourism
movement as having tremendous potential.
“For new wineries especially, it’s important to offer
ongoing specials to keep people interested,” he says.
“We offer winemaker dinners and special events, such
as a Christmas open house and murder mystery dinners.”
Of course, the winery also welcomes a number of
private parties each year, including everything from
corporate meetings to weddings. Kansas Wedding Plan
magazine recently named Smoky Hill Vineyards as one
of the state’s top five wedding locations.
“It’s all about the experience,” says Jennings,
“the ability to provide the personal touch that is
so often missing in our world today.”
Visit www.winesofkansas.com for a list of Kansas
wineries. – Amy Stumpfl
Smoky Hill Vineyards and Winery near Salina is one of 19 wineries in Kansas.
ANTONY BOSHI ER J EFF ADKI NS
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 87
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A Perfect
Match
Kansas programs boost workforce development
Story by Joe Monaco • Photography by Todd Bennett
I
n today’s complex global economy, a skilled
and adaptable workforce is crucial to
economic growth.
Recognizing this, Kansas business leaders
continue to enhance the state’s workforce
development system, titled KANSASWORKS,
to ensure that Kansas businesses have access
to a pool of skilled workers. In recent years,
the KANSASWORKS system has emerged as
one of the nation’s best – and those skilled
workers continue to be a key reason businesses
are choosing Kansas.
“Of all the factors that make Kansas an
attractive business location, none is more
important than our workforce,” says Caleb
Asher, deputy secretary of workforce services
for the Kansas Department of Commerce.
“Business executives constantly cite the
work ethic, skill level and versatility of
the workers here.”
The KANSASWORKS system’s goal is
straightforward: to link businesses, job
seekers and educational institutions to
ensure that Kansas employers can find
skilled workers. One such linkage is the
system’s network of 25 workforce centers,
where businesses can interview job seekers,
search applicant databases and explore
training options, while job seekers can
get resume-writing assistance, take online
assessments or receive certifications.
In addition, KANSASWORKS integrates
Kansas universities, community and technical
colleges so they can tailor their curriculum to
the needs of Kansas businesses. The result is
a seamless network in which workers receive
job-specific training that prepares them for
jobs in Kansas.
A crucial tool in shaping curriculum to
fit the needs of business is the Workforce
Solutions Fund. Established in 2004, the
WSF provides grants to Kansas post-secondary
training institutions to respond to the training
needs of the state’s critical industries.
In February 2010, Flint Hills Technical
College was awarded $150,000 through the WSF
to expand its industrial engineering technology
program and prepare more students for careers
in manufacturing. The award will help the
college purchase hydraulic-pneumatic and
automation equipment to provide students the
chance to train on the same machines they’d
encounter in the workforce. Other institutions
to receive funding include Cloud County
Key
Workforce
Partners
Kansas Department of
Commerce – Workforce
Development (State
Administrator)
State Workforce Board
Local Workforce
Investment Boards (LWIBs)
Kansas Department
of Labor
Kansas Board of Regents –
Technical Education
Authority
Kansas Department of
Education
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 89
Community College, Northeast Kansas
Technical College and Hutchinson Community
College, to name a few.
In addition to the Workforce Solutions
Fund, the state offers businesses workforce
training and retraining funds through the
Kansas Industrial Training (KIT), Kansas
Industrial Retraining (KIR) and Investments
in Major Projects and Comprehensive Training
(IMPACT) programs. These three incentives
encourage dozens of corporate expansions
and relocations in Kansas each year.
Recently, Kansas workforce officials have
taken steps to streamline the KANSASWORKS
system by eliminating program and staffing
silos between various federal funding sources.
The goal is to provide seamless services for
customers, increase responsiveness and reduce
overhead costs associated with duplicative
services. Officials have also condensed various
online services into KANSASWORKS.com,
the state’s official job-matching and career
services site, creating a user-friendly, one-stop
shop for job seekers and businesses.
While KANSASWORKS can help businesses
and job seekers in nearly every industry, the
system has increased its focus on the state’s
core sectors, including advanced
manufacturing and aviation, biotechnology
and green energy, which encompasses wind
and solar technologies, as well as alternative
fuels. These green efforts garnered even more
momentum in January 2010, when Kansas
was awarded a $6 million grant from the
U.S. Department of Labor to train Kansans
for employment in green industries.
While the state is focusing on these key
industries, officials continue to structure
KANSASWORKS so that it can adapt to an
ever-changing and unpredictable economy.
Asher says it would be short-sighted to create
a system that addresses today’s business needs
but won’t be able to adapt to tomorrow’s.
“If we expect our workers to be f lexible,
we need our KANSASWORKS system to be
equally f lexible,” Asher says. “What we’re
doing now, through integration, improved
online services and increased partnerships
between business and training institutions,
is creating a system that we can use for today’s
key industries but that will be just as effective
10 years from now if our critical industries
change. If we do it right, our workforce will
be prepared for anything.”
For more
information
KANSASWORKS.com is
the official labor exchange
site of the State of Kansas
and a highly utilized
resource for posting and
finding jobs in Kansas.
The site includes an array
of information, links and
listings for landing the
perfect job, finding
the perfect employee
or researching an industry
or workforce.
JoLynn Ashmore leads an employee skills training session at a KANSASWORKS office in Hays.
A windmill stands alone on the prairie along the Flint Hills Scenic Byway.
Photo by Jeff Adkins
90 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Gallery
A memorial in stained glass at
the Kansas Cosmosphere and
Space Center in Hutchinson
Photo by Todd Bennett
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 91
The 322-foot Wichita Riverfront Pedestrian
Bridge spans the Arkansas River.
Staff photo
92 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
The Bartlett Arboretum in Belle Plaine celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2010.
Photo by Todd Bennett
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 93
The Coronado Cross near Fort Dodge marks the spot where Spanish explorer
Francisco Vazquez de Coronado is said to have crossed the Arkansas River
(then known as the St. Peter and St. Paul River) in search of the fabled
“cities of gold” in 1541. Photo by Jeff Adkins
94 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
The sun sets over Greensburg’s new
5.4.7 Art Center, a building whose
numerous sustainable features include
three wind turbines and solar panels.
Photo by Jeff Adkins
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 95
96 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
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Kansas universities are
backbone of research,
innovation
B
arth Hague likes to say that many students who
graduate from Wichita State University have a
diploma – and a resume. Hague, Wichita State’s
associate vice president for public relations, points out that
the university has the largest cooperative education program
in Kansas, with more than half its students participating.
What makes it even more advantageous is that the
university is located near many top employers in the
Wichita area, including its renowned cluster of aviation
and aerospace companies. “Some WSU students even
co-op with NASA. Imagine working part time at NASA
while going to college – think of the career opportunities
Schools
of Thought
Story by Kevin Litwin
Education
Clockwise from top: The University of Kansas in Lawrence.
The Ablah Library at Wichita State University. Anderson Hall,
the administration building at Kansas State University in
Manhattan. On the move at KU.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 97
Education
89.1
Percentage of Kansans with a
high school diploma, among
the highest rates in the nation
16
Rank of Kansas among
states for percentage of
adults with college degree
65.4
Percentage of State General
Funds in Kanas that are
devoted to education
16
Rank of Kansas among
states for average score
on ACT
you’d have once you graduate,” Hague says.
With seven major universities including Wichita State,
Kansas State University and the University of Kansas, and
26 technical and community colleges creating a deep pool
of highly skilled graduates, companies doing business in
the state or considering it have a major advantage.
At Kansas State University, a world-renowned animal
health and agricultural sciences program attracts hundreds
of students each year, providing highly trained recruits for
the state’s booming Animal Health Corridor.
Kansas State’s agriculture curriculum dates to the 1860s,
and today, the Animal Sciences & Industry Department
manages 6,500 acres for research purposes, close to the
university’s main campus in Manhattan. In a typical year,
Kansas colleges and universities are key components in producing a
skilled workforce that attracts new investment and high-paying jobs.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 99
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the department’s research and teaching facilities
accommodate 3,000 cattle, 3,500 swine, 1,500 laying
hens, 250 sheep and 45 horses.
Construction began in 2009 on the $28 million Kansas
State Olathe Innovation Campus, which will house office
and lab space for research, education and technology
commercialization and become the home for the National
Institute for Animal Health and Food Safety when it opens
by early 2011. The university also offers major programs in
aeronautics, bioscience, energy research, engineering and
environmental studies.
The University of Kansas in Lawrence has one of the
nation’s top-ranked schools of pharmacy. Students who
earn an advanced pharmacy degree are virtually guaranteed
to earn a starting salary in excess of $100,000 a year.
“One of the pharmacists who taught here at KU
helped develop timed-release capsules, while one
of our alums helped develop insulin,” says Lynn Bretz,
Clockwise from above: On the campus at the University of Kansas
in Lawrence. Hale Library at Kansas State University. A statue of
Thomas Jefferson at Wichita State University
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 101
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KU’s director of communications.
Valentino Stella, a pharmaceutical chemistry
professor at the university, holds 34 drug
patents, including eight for anti-cancer drugs
that have been produced by the American
Cancer Institute.
In 2009, Forbes magazine named KU as one
of the Top 10 IQ Campuses in the United States
for trailblazing research. Bretz says the
university is also proud of many other
accomplishments, including the fact
that it offers 38 languages of study.
“Our public affairs curriculum is perennially
No. 1 in the country, and so is our special
education teaching curriculum,” she says.
“And perhaps surprising to many people,
we are strong in paleontology. Newt Gingrich
spoke on campus in 2009 and happened to visit
our Natural History Museum and Biodiversity
Research Center, then Twittered that he believed
KU has one of the top paleontology collections
in the world. He’s correct – we do.”
Kansas ranks 16th among states for adults with college degrees.
k a n s a s e c o n o m i c d e v e l o p m e n t . c o m 103
public
universities
inkansas
University of Kansas
www.ku.edu
Enrollment: 26,000
Kansas State University
www.k-state.edu
Enrollment: 22,000
Wichita State University
www.wichita.edu
Enrollment: 15,000
Washburn University *
www.washburn.edu
Enrollment: 6,200
Pittsburg State University
www.pittstate.edu
Enrollment: 6,000
Emporia State University
www.emporia.edu
Enrollment: 5,900
Ft. Hays State University
www.fhsu.edu
Enrollment: 12,000
* Municipal university
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Green with Opportunity
$6M FEDERAL GRANT STIMULATES EMERGING ENERGY JOBS
Kansas has been awarded a
$6 million grant from the U.S.
Department of Labor to train
Kansans for employment in
green industries.
The State Energy Sector
Partnership and Training Grant – as
authorized by the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act – is designed
to teach skills needed in emerging
green industries, including energy
efficiency and renewable energy.
The grant will focus primarily on
the green industries of renewable
energy operation and construction;
renewable energy manufacturing and
supply chain; energy transmission;
biomass; and green construction/
manufacturing. Through the grant,
program participants will receive
the technical and occupational skills
needed to obtain industry-recognized
credentials. Specifically,
the grant will allow Kansas
workforce partners to:
● Create an integrated system
of education, training and
support services that promotes
skill attainment and career
pathway development for
low-income, low-skilled
workers leading to green
industry employment.
● Support implementation
of a statewide energy sector
strategy, including the
governor’s overall workforce
visions, state energy policies
and training activities that lead
to employment in targeted
industry sectors.
● Build and strengthen
partnerships dedicated
to building a skilled clean
energy workforce.
● Partner with other agencies
receiving Recovery Act funds
to support planning and
implementation.
“This grant will help Kansans
re-train for new jobs in the
renewable energy sector,” said
Gov. Mark Parkinson. “With
these new resources, made
possible through the American
Recovery and Reinvestment
Act, Kansas will continue its
role as a leader in renewable
energy, with a ready and
skilled workforce.”
Kansas’ grant application
was shaped by the State
Energy Sector Partnership,
which was convened by
Gov. Parkinson and comprises
the KANSASWORKS State
Board; Local Workforce
Investment Boards;
KCC; energy and utility
representatives; labor
organizations; Kansas
Apprenticeship Program; The
Land Institute; KBOR; Veterans
Programs; Kansas economic
development agencies; and the
Kansas departments of Labor,
Corrections and Commerce.
104 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
kansaseconomicdevelopment.com
What makes Kansas such a favorable place to do
business? What is it about the livability of Kansas
that makes people who move there to work decide
to stay for the long term?
Experience the vitality and charm of Kansas from
the comfort of your computer.
Kansas Economic Development Guide
shows you Kansas like you’ve never
seen it before, thanks to the work of our
award-winning photographers and writers.
Kansas is just a click away.
DON’T JUST TAKE OUR WORD FOR IT
... see it for yourself
VIDEO >>
wKREDA
western Kansas Rural Economic
Development Alliance
Welcome Home to Western Kansas ...
Where Life Works
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Wel come Home to western Kansas ... Where Life Works!
S p e c i a l A d v e r t i s i n g S e c t i o n
T
rying to get a single, unified
voice out of a 54-county region
is no easy feat, but that was the
challenge in 1994. Sixteen years later,
the visionary founders of what would
become the western Kansas Rural
Economic Development Alliance can
look back on an organization that
continues to transform the landscape
for its members.
The goal was simple: Create an entity
that could address the economic
development concerns of roughly half
the state. While the communities and
counties were many, the problems were
all the same — loss of young people to
more populated areas, stagnant local
economies and little influx of new
residents and businesses. The thought
was that by pulling together, major issues
could be tackled on behalf of the entire
region, says Steve Miller, senior manager
of special projects for Sunflower Electric
and a founding member.
“I was spending a lot of time on
economic development, calling on
various chambers and development
people across the western half of
Kansas, and it dawned on me that they
all had the same problems,” Miller
recalls. “Most of the assistance we had
access to was more logically available
to larger places, so we got together and
said if we could group our resources,
we could market ourselves with a lot
of passion. That’s what drove us then,
and what does so now.”
Since those early days, wKREDA has
grown to encompass ongoing education
programs for its members, an annual
trip to the state capital to ensure that its
members’ voices are heard and multiple
Coming Together as One
wKREDA’s communal effort builds business success in 46-county region
This special section is published for western Kansas Economic
Development Alliance by Journal Communications Inc.
For more information, contact:
western Kansas Rural Economic Development Alliance
301 W. 13th St. • Hays, KS 67601
(785) 533-2222 • www.discoverwesternkansas.com
©Copyright 2010 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool
Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080.
All rights reserved. No portion of this special advertising
section may be reproduced in whole or in part without
written consent.
On the cover: Wyatt Earp Boulevard in Dodge City, Kan.
Photo by: Jeff Adkins The 46 counties of western Kansas have banded together to promote economic
development and the superior quality of life in their communities, such as Hays.
trade-show visitations around the
country to put western Kansas in front
of different business and industry
groups that are deemed to be a good fit
for the area. Successes include a major
uptick in dairy production thanks to
solid recruitment efforts, as well as a
growing manufacturing and
distribution sector.
A strong belief in the region’s future
drove Carol Meyer, then the economic
development director for the Garden
City Chamber of Commerce and now a
representative for the Kansas Office of
Rural Opportunity, to jump on board
in the early days.
“We knew we couldn’t compete with
each other, but also knew that there would
be some crossover where a marketing
push might be geared toward one area,
but would need another area’s help,”
Meyer says.
“We always look hard at what
industries match who we are and what
we do well,” she says. “We want those
that are growing, that fill a niche, to
continue to expand here. We still have
a lot of challenges, but we’ve been very
successful.”
– Joe Morris
w K R E D A
S p e c i a l A d v e r t i s i n g S e c t i o n
B
y successfully recruiting and retaining different
industries and businesses, the western Kansas Rural
Economic Development Alliance has been able to help
grow the region’s workforce. The focus now is on finding and
keeping good employees for those companies, which should
spur even more growth and development going forward.
“Four years ago, we got together to talk about how all of
our businesses needed employees to expand their businesses,
and how we could help in that effort,” says Jeff Hofaker,
director of Phillips County Economic Development and
co-chair of wKREDA’s workforce initiative committee. “We
began to talk about what we could to in terms of marketing
our region not just for new businesses, but also toward
recruitment of a new workforce.”
Those early discussions led to a workforce-initiative
committee, which focused its efforts on a regional approach
to recruiting, centered around a specialized Web site.
“It seemed the most reasonable way to put everything
together in one very accessible place, where we could put a
lot of information about our different communities in front
of people,” Hofaker says.
A grant from the Kansas Department of Commerce’s
Workforce Investment Act helped fund creation and
maintenance of the site, www.westernksjobs.com, which
lists jobs and serves as a hub for communities to link their
sites to. A collaboration with KansasWorks that allowed
spidering searches from there to include those of wKREDA’s
Web site proved beneficial as well.
A plan to generate traffic on the site included outside
marketing, such as billboards around the state, visits to
career fairs and other targeted efforts above and beyond what
wKREDA already was doing. The initiative also heightened
the organization’s profile within its coverage area, which
brought in more communities to the overall effort.
“We provided communities that didn’t have a full-time
economic development person or office the help to develop a
local Web site for jobs,” Hofaker says. “These local Web sites
provided much-needed grassroots representation, but also
engaged someone locally to enter the same data into our site.”
At the end of the day, Hofaker says, “The connections are
being made. Thinking regionally and collaboratively, helping
people find jobs, is happening. Residents of one county can
search and find work 40 to 50 or more miles away, and still
have the benefit of living in a rural area. This keeps people
in our state, and provides them with options not afforded
to them in other areas.”
Making it Work
wKREDA promotes job recruitment, retention for region
A wKREDA
initiative helps
promote the
numerous job
opportunities in
the region’s
communities.
Wel come Home to western Kansas ... Where Life Works!
S p e c i a l A d v e r t i s i n g S e c t i o n
R
evitalizing the dairy industry
was an early mandate for the
western Kansas Rural Economic
Development Alliance and its members,
and those efforts have been remarkably
successful.
While dairy farming and production
had been strong in the region
historically, many family farms had
been sold off or shuttered in recent
decades. But everything that made
western Kansas good for dairy
production – land, cost of living,
climate – was still intact, and just
needed a little promotional push.
Enter the western Kanas Rural
Economic Development Alliance, and
its traveling road show that put Kansas
dairy land in front of farmers from
coast to coast. Families from California,
Minnesota, Pennsylvania and other
states pulled up stakes to come to a
region with plenty of room, not only
to set up a farm, but to expand in
just about any direction.
“They had a lot of good programs
that gave us a lot of help when we moved
from Pennsylvania,” says Tom McCarty,
who along with wife, Kathy, and their
four sons relocated in 1999. “We had a
lot of contact with wKREDA when we
were looking at different locations in
western Kansas and we met a lot of great
people through them and also learned
a lot about all the different counties.”
The McCartys are in Thomas
County, about 14 miles east of Colby,
where they operate McCarthy Dairy.
They also own and operate the Bird City
Dairy, which they built and opened two
years ago. They have around 6,500 head
of cattle between the two operations.
They’ve made it a family affair, with
three or their sons involved in their
operations and a fourth running two
dairies just south of Syracuse, Kan.
“Where we’re from, the biggest
problem was the lack of ability to grow,”
McCarty says. “This part of the world
gives you a lot of opportunity for that,
which leads to more efficiency.”
The effort is now helping dairies
expand into full-scale production
for cheese and other products.
Partnerships have been formed with
local grain and beef operators, which
are using dairy herds to expand their
own operations.
Dairy University brings in national
experts to talk about industry trends,
giving local economic development
officials not yet involved a chance to
get into the game as well.
The initiatives have made a
substantial positive impact, and the
continued efforts should help a thriving
old-and-new industry sector regain its
historical place in the region.
“Agriculture back east is dying
because it’s a numbers game and you
just can’t create the level you need to
operate successfully,” McCarty says.
“That’s not the case here, and they are
very smart to show off western Kansas
as a good place for dairies.”
Milking Success in Dairy
Revitalized industry showcases wKREDA’s successful marketing efforts
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E
fforts to promote western
Kansas as a manufacturing
and distribution hub continue
to show positive results, thanks to the
presence of Interstate 70, excellent road
infrastructure, strong rail access and
air connections to the entire region.
The growth of manufacturing in
the region is a plus for those seeking
jobs, and the western Kansas Rural
Economic Development Alliance has
been working with both employers
and employees to ensure a steady
supply of qualified workers to
companies looking to move into
the area or expand their presence.
All this, plus a desire to come back
to his hometown, led Charles “Chuck”
Comeau to bring the distribution arm
of DessinFournir, a manufacturer of
customized furniture, lighting and
textiles, to his Plainville-based
headquarters in the 1990s. Comeau
has kept his manufacturing arm in
Los Angeles for a variety of reasons,
but says that Plainville has been a great
place to base the rest of his operations.
“I had been having trouble with a
lot of employment and quality issues
in California, and about that time a lot
of local people here were unemployed
because of the oil business going
down,” Comeau says. “I had put an ad
in the paper for someone to take care
of my yard, and a gentleman came and
said he wanted the job, and would do
what it took to remain here because his
family loved it in Plainville. He’s now
one of our top executives.”
Finding people with solid leadership
skills and the training necessary for the
business helped Comeau eventually
relocate most of his operations to western
Kansas, everything from public relations
and accounting to design, customer
care and warehousing. And as he’s
acquired other companies, he’s moved
their operations to Plainville as well,
and has grown his staff to about 85
people at the main operations center
and about 120 total around the country.
“We have offices all over, but the
Built to Last
Manufacturers, distributors find many reasons to call western Kansas home
focus is here,” Comeau says. “We’re
working with about 14 mills in nine
countries, and also have a joint venture
in Thailand, as well as work in Vietnam,
India and Bangalore. All the textiles are
imported to and distributed out of here,
and we do all of our architectural
lighting work here. We do tons of
shipping, and have been able to work
out a wonderful working relationship
with FedEx. Our location, even though
we’re not right on I-70, has never been
an inhibiting factor.”
Comeau says based on his success,
he sees strong growth for western
Kansas as a manufacturing and
shipping center, especially as state,
regional and local incentive packages
are put into place that allow for localized
borrowing for startup and expansion.
“Everyone needs money to tap into,
and that will greatly advance rural economic
development,” he says. “But this is a great
place to be. One of the biggest marketing
coups I ever pulled was setting up shop in
a small, rural area.”
Upscale furnishings company Dessin Fournir has found a home in western Kansas.
Wel come Home to western Kansas ... Where Life Works!
S p e c i a l A d v e r t i s i n g S e c t i o n
T
hanks to family ties and a growing reputation for job
opportunities, low cost of living and a great overall
quality of life, western Kansas is seeing a whole new
crop of settlers these days.
Take April and Arnie Teves. She grew up in Denver while
he’s a native of rural California, but her grandfather and his
family homesteaded in Logan and remained there over the
years. Family reunions and vacations were spent there, and
the seed was planted early on that this would be a good place
to live, April says.
“When my grandmother moved to Denver, my husband
said, ‘Let’s buy her house,’” she recalls. “He loves hunting and
fishing, that small-town atmosphere, and I really enjoy that,
too. We worked really hard to get ourselves out here, but since
arriving in October 2009, we have been absolutely loving it.”
Arnie is a mechanic with 30 years’ experience, and was
almost immediately offered a supervisory position at a NAPA
store, while April was able to transfer her work-from-home
job with little difficulty. She also began to explore opportunities
in ministry, and a youth-oriented position in nearby
Phillipsburg is looking like a good fit.
“A lot of doors have opened for us here, but we already
knew some people from visiting over the years, and I have
family here,” she says. “This part of Kansas really is an
undiscovered jewel, and our house payment is not even a
tenth of what it was in Denver.”
Quality of life, solid schools and a hometown feel are what
drew Travis and Katie Ruff back to Hanston, where Travis
operates Professional Gun Dogs, a full-service training
facility for pointing and retrieving breeds of hunting dogs.
(www.progundog.com)
The Ruffs note that access to high-speed Internet
connectivity allows them to operate a business well beyond
Hanston and for Katie to work remotely for a business in
Dodge City and be at home with the couple’s children.
Sean and Monica Kats and their three children moved
back to the region in mid-2009 to operate her family’s farm
and be closer to family, but they discovered a whole new side
to the Kansas they thought they already knew.
“We were able to find work through Prairie Land Electric,
while also operating the farm,” says Sean. “Our working farm
involves a cow-calf cattle operation and commodity crops, like
wheat for grain, so it’s a real working farm.”
The Kats, too, say that the area’s quality of life just can’t be
matched, and it’s a good place to live, work and raise a family.
“It’s certainly different than living in the city, but we really
enjoy it here,” says Sean Kats. “We’re really glad that the farm
brought us back.”
Modern-day Settlers
Returning families prove you can go home again – and successfully
Travis Ruff operates
a gun dog training
facility Hanston.
w K R E D A
S p e c i a l A d v e r t i s i n g S e c t i o n
K
eeping and expanding a pool of
qualified, well-trained workers
is vital for any ongoing economic
development plan, and the western
Kansas Rural Economic Development
Alliance is working to ensure that young
people are included in those efforts.
Through its jobs initiative and its
work with local economic development
organizations, wKREDA has been able
to ramp up recruitment and retention
throughout western Kansas. Now the
word is getting out to high school and
college students about the region’s
opportunities, so that when they finish
their studies they’ll go … right here.
"As counties in western Kansas
witness declining population, we as
wKREDA members have decided to
focus on how to retain the current youth
population in our territory, as well as
try to recruit former members of our
communities who have left home to
attend college, explore the world and
enter the workforce,” says Mendi Alexander,
economic development and networking
specialist for Rural Telephone/Nex-Tech
and wKREDA’s current president.
“We want to remind them of the
hometowns and all there is available to
them now that they may be married
with children, and are looking at their
current situation and realizing how
great it would be to have grandma just
down the street and knowing that their
children will be getting a great education
in the same classrooms they were taught
in and how life is so much safer and
enjoyable ‘back home.’”
The organization has been getting a
boost in recent months from the national
economic downturn, which has brought
several natives back to formerly empty
nests in search of employment, a better
quality of life and lower-cost housing.
"All of these are available to them in
their hometowns,” Alexander says.
“And, since they have lived there before,
it is easier for them to relocate to a
location that they are familiar with
and have great memories of.”
wKREDA also is targeting alumni
of high schools throughout western
Kansas, promoting a "come home"
theme through brochures inserted in
alumni mailers. wKREDA members are
also attending job and career fairs at
most of the state’s universities and even
reaching into neighboring Nebraska.
Cable television ads, billboards and
other promotional material all dovetail
into the ongoing job-recruitment efforts
at www.westernksjobs.com, which
itself has brought many Kansans back
into the fold.
“The youth initiative and other
related efforts to recruit and retain
skilled workers for multiple industries
in western Kansas is one that will be
ongoing and ever evolving,” Alexander
says. “And when a former student
comes back home to work and raise a
family, the community will embrace
this young professional and welcome
them with open arms.”
Homegrown Talent
Push to keep local youth down on the farm, and in the region, pays dividends
Cultivating
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S p e c i a l A d v e r t i s i n g S e c t i o n
Ethanol advances, oil and gas production fuel an industry
Renewed Energy
Energy/Technology
What’s
Online
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Learn more about the
energy and renewables
industry in Kansas at
kansaseconomic
development.com.
K
ansas is an energy leader on a number
of fronts. The state is fast becoming a
wind-energy powerhouse and, with one
of the largest deposits in the world, it is among
the nation’s leading producers of natural gas,
its 25,600 wells turning out 377.7 million Mcf
of gas in 2008 alone. The state’s more than
45,000 oil wells accounted for 39.6 million
barrels of production in 2008.
Playing on its long roots in agriculture,
Kansas has also developed a potent biofuels
industry and is now ranked among the
nation’s top five in ethanol production.
Ethanol is a biofuel additive for gasoline
that goes into cars and trucks. Corn along with
milo (sorghum) and cellulose are used in the
biofuel’s beginning process. Kansas is the No.
7 producing state for corn, and No. 1 for milo.
Kansas producers turn out some 440
million gallons of ethanol a year. State
The White Energy facility in Russell is one of a dozen ethanol production operations in Kansas.
Story by Kevin Litwin
Photography by Todd Bennett
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 107
air-quality standards allow existing
plants to produce a combined 520
million gallons of ethanol annually,
says Corey Mohn, agribusiness
development specialist with the
Kansas Department of Commerce.
“We have 12 ethanol facilities
in Kansas, plus a couple of small
biodiesel plants that use soybeans
or waste animal fat,” he says. “We
are certainly one of the leaders in
this industry.”
Kansas is also home to ICM Inc.,
headquartered in Colwich and
considered the leading ethanol
engineering and design company in
the United States. The company works
around the country getting ethanol
plants up and running, and at
maximum efficiency.
Mohn notes that the corn and milo
U.S. Average
Illinois
Missouri
New York
Kansas
Oklahoma
California
$0 $3 $6 $9 $12 $15
Average consumer natural gas prices
Dollars per 1,000 cubic feet
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 109
end product that doesn’t go into
ethanol can be distributed as livestock
feed. “There are certainly plenty of
livestock head in Kansas,” he says.
“And with so many cattle in the state,
the end product feed doesn’t have to
be trucked long distances from the
ethanol plants to the farms.”
The U.S. Department of Energy has
approved several multimillion-dollar
grants that allow companies to further
research and develop the industry.
One current project involves
developing an innovative biomass
collection system. Another project
is researching how cars can efficiently
perform on ethanol fuel blends
that are higher than the current
10 percent maximum.
“The ethanol industry in this
country is only going to get larger and
more advanced, and Kansas is going
to remain in the forefront,” Mohn
says. “This is where the grain is.”
KANSAS OIL PRODUCTION
Year Barrels Wells
2004 33,878,472 41,920
2005 33,619,258 43,012
2006 35,668,804 43,923
2007 36,591,296 43,412
2008 39,581,656 45,105
Source: Kansas Geological Survey
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
Kansas suppliers, such as Prairie Horizon Agri-Energy in Phillipsburg, produce some 440 million gallons of ethanol per year.
“The ethanol industry in this country is only going
to get larger and more advanced, and Kansas is
going to remain in the forefront.”
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 111
112 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
Location, transportation network
put Kansas in the sweet spot
I
ts location in the heart of the nation and
proximity to major markets makes Kansas
an attractive logistics and distribution
destination and allows companies to bring in
raw materials and ship out finished products
easily and efficiently.
Kansas is centrally located, providing
next-day freight delivery to 70 percent of U.S.
markets. Major east-west route Interstate 70
and north-south route I-35 cross in Kansas
and connect with I-29, part of the NAFTA
highway corridor linking the United States
to Mexico and Canada. In addition, the state
is served by Class I rail service.
Major airports in Kansas City, Mo.,
and Wichita offer service by national and
regional carriers and are supported by eight
regional airports that also offer commercial
air service.
Facilities such as Syracuse-Hamilton
In the Middle
of Everywhere
Story by Kevin Litwin
Photography by Todd Bennett
Transportation
What’s
Online
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Learn more about
what moves the
goods in Kansas at
kansaseconomic
development.com.
Class I rail service is a Kansas advantage.
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 113
Wichita Mid-Continent Airport
is a full-service air carrier airport
that serves as the primary hub
for air travel in Kansas. Most
major airlines operate out of
Mid-Continent, offering
worldwide travel capability and
nearly 100 daily flights. Wichita’s
renowned aerospace manufacturing
industry is responsible for producing
70% of US general aviation aircraft.
By taking residence in
Mid-Continent’s aerospace
industrial campus, you’ll join
world-class aviation tenants such
as Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft,
Bombardier/Learjet, Honeywell,
Garmin, Rockwell Collins, Pratt &
Whitney, and more. We have over
800 acres of land available for
development for your company.
Mid-Continent is conveniently
located 5.2 miles southwest of the
central business district, bordered
on the north by US Highway 54/400
and on the south by Highway K-42.
It also provides easy access to and
from Interstate 235.
Supplementing Mid-Continent
Airport is Colonel James Jabara
Airport, a general aviation reliever
airport for the Wichita metro area.
Located nine miles northeast
of the central business district,
Jabara Airport consists of 802
acres of which 208 acres are
available for development.
CONTACT:
Victor D. White, A.A.E.
Director of Airports
Wichita Airport Authority
E-mail: vwhite@wichita.gov
2173 Air Cargo Rd.
Wichita, KS 67209
(316) 946-4700
(316) 946-4793 fax
The Air Capital
of the World
sss
It’s where you belong
sss
sss
www.flywichita.com
County Airport serve an important role in the state’s
transportation network. Syracuse-Hamilton County is
in a rural portion of the state, but the presence of an air
facility offers a benefit to large companies that often
insist on having their offices or plant near an airport.
“We are certainly in remote farm country, but are
important to our area’s dairy industry, as well as
corporations out here that grow and ship wheat, alfalfa,
corn and milo,” says Steve Phillips, manager of Syracuse-
Hamilton County Airport and president of the Kansas
Association of Airports.
As for the overall state, Phillips says being in the heart
of the nation and near major markets makes Kansas an
attractive logistics and distribution destination.
“Wichita is already huge in aviation manufacturing and
engineering, so it seems natural that a current goal of the
Kansas Association of Airports is to evolve our statewide
airport system into one of the best in the country,” he says.
“In the last couple of years, we have aggressively addressed
many airport maintenance issues, and now we will
make even more improvements to make this part of
the transportation sector as strong as it can be.”
Transportation and logistics were key factors in a May
2009 announcement that Siemens Energy will build a wind
turbine nacelle production plant in the state. Hutchinson
BILLARD AIRPORT
– Located northwest of the
City of Topeka, close to downtown
FORBES AIRPORT
– Located south of the city
– Catering to military and large
charter operations
– Approximately 1,000 acres of land
available for lease development,
equally divided between air-side
and land-side property
CONTACT:
Eric M. Johnson
President/Director of Aviation
METROPOLITAN TOPEKA
AIRPORT AUTHORITY
Forbes Field, Bldg. 620
P.O. Box 19053
Topeka, Kansas 66619
(785) 862-2362
ejohnson@mtaa-topeka.org
www.mtaa-topeka.org
THE TOPEKA AIR INDUSTRIAL PARK
– Located at Forbes Field, approximately a mile from two
warehouse distribution commerce parks developed by
the Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce
– Approximately 250 acres of green space in various lot sizes
– Adjustable lot size to accommodate specific development
METROPOLITAN
TOPEKA
AIRPORT
AUTHORITY
MARKETS WITHIN
500 MILES OF KANSAS
Population 89.3 million (30.2% of U.S.)
Households 33.7 million (30.4%)
Buying Power $1.6 trillion (29.5%)
Businesses 3.9 million (30.7%)
Total Sales $5.3 trillion
Consumer Expenditures $1.22 trillion (31.0%)
MORE AT KANSASECONOMICDEVELOPMENT.COM
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 115
was the city selected after an extensive search showed
it offers a viable workforce and excellent transportation
network, which includes Hutchinson Municipal Airport
and an Arkansas River port.
“Large companies want to be located near airports,
but the entire transportation in this state is impressive,”
Phillips says. “Transportation is a key reason why Kansas
will be making plenty of big news in the near future.”
Such a transportation network is vital in the wind
industry because turbine parts are large, and shipping is
costly and complex. A central location puts manufacturers
nearer to customers and can make shipping more efficient.
Construction on the wind energy site commenced in
August 2009, with the first shipment scheduled to occur
in December 2010.
“It speaks volumes about our prime transportation
location in the nation’s wind corridor,” says Kansas Gov.
Mark Parkinson. “Kansas should be a national hub of both
wind farms and the factories that manufacture turbine
parts. It makes perfect sense.”
A network of commercial airports keeps people and business moving in Kansas.
Dodge City Regional Airport
www.dodgecity.org/index.aspx?nid=60
Forbes Field (Topeka)
www.mtaa-topeka.org
Garden City Regional Airport
www.fly2gck.com
Goodland Municipal Airport
www.goodlandks.us/
Great Bend Municipal Airport
www.greatbendks.net/?nid=190
Hays Regional Airport
www.haysusa.com/html/airport.html
Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport
www.cityofliberal.com/c_airport.htm
Manhattan Regional Airport
www.flymhk.com
Salina Municipal Airport
salinaairport.com
Wichita Mid-Continent Airport
www.flywichita.org
KANSAS COMMERCIAL SERVICE AIRPORTS
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 117
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118 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
From east to west, the heart
of America beats in Kansas
C
hrista and Jason Hines wanted to raise
their family in a culturally diverse
metropolitan area.
“We wanted to have plenty to do, see
and learn without sacrificing a wholesome,
family-friendly environment for our children,”
Christa Hines says. “I think we’ve found
that place.”
Growing up as a military brat, Hines had
tasted life in five states and Germany before
she and Jason moved to Olathe, a city of about
115,000 in northeastern Kansas.
“We love living in the Midwest. Eastern
Kansas has its own unique charm,” she says.
“Most people assume Kansas is f lat and
boring, but the landscape is a bit unexpected
with its rocky, hilly terrain and rough,
bucolic beauty.”
Jason Hines enjoys the many sporting teams
and events available nearby.
With two small children, Christa Hines is
‘Anything
You Could
Want’
Story by Claire Ratliff
Livability
What’s
Online
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See what the Old West
was like through a video
tour of Dodge City at
kansaseconomic
development.com.
Kansas offers an abundance of arts,
entertainment, culture, sports and outdoor
recreation opportunities. J
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Kansas communities have preserved and restored their historic downtowns.
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120 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
201 S. ólh Sl. * Csoge Clly, KS óóó23
[Z8óì ó283Z14 * www.osogeclly.com
PROUD PAST, BRILLIANT FUTURE!
Csoge Clly ÷ Ve´re proud ol our homelown herlloge ond we oller whol
lhe blgger cllles con´l ÷ o sense ol communlly. Ve ore home lo over
3,000 resldenls ond locoled ln Morlheosl Konsos wllh convenlenl occess
lo lopeko, Emporlo, Cllowo, Konsos Clly ond Vlchllo. For you, your
lomlly or your buslness ÷ Csoge Clly ls o greol ploce lo coll home.
The Santa Fe Depot located
in the center of town
KAN BUILD INC.
* Quality Built
Modular Structures
º Homos
º Edoco|ionol Focili|ios
º Mol|i·Fomily Pro|oc|s
º Commorciol S|roc|oros
www.kanbuild.com
ORBIS
Mor|h Amorico´s
looding monoloc|oror
ol plos|ic roosoblo
con|oinors ond
pollo|s. Tho Òsogo Ci|y plon| prodocos
con|oinors, cro|os ond |roys osod by |odoy´s
looding bokory, bovorogo, pool|ry ond moo|
componios. www.orbiscorporation.com
24
Number of state parks
in Kansas
6
Number of national parks
and historic sites
18
Average travel time in
minutes for Kansas
commuters
10
Kansas’ rank among states
for lowest cost of living
grateful for the accessibility of quality
health care, strong public schools, a
wide variety of attractions and events,
and good neighbors.
“The people here are very warm
and friendly,” she says. “I can’t tell you
how many times I have had people ask
me if I need help when I’m in parking
lots trying to steer a full grocery cart
with my sons in tow.”
Clay and Beth Belcher met in
Chicago and lived in France before
Clay Belcher accepted a position at the
University of Kansas. After 17 years
of teaching, he decided to open
a business and stay in Lawrence.
“The cost of living is pretty
moderate,” Belcher says. “In general,
Kansas is a pretty inexpensive place
to live and do business.”
Clay’s Signs of Life bookstore and
art gallery overlooks picturesque and
historic Lawrence.
“This is a great town,” he says.
“We’ve raised a family here and we
really enjoy it.”
The Belchers and their four children
enjoy hiking, fishing and simply
taking advantage of amenities such
as nearby Clinton and Perry lakes and
Perry State Park. Still, it’s the people
that give the Belchers roots in Kansas.
“There are natural wonders all over
the country, so you could make an
argument for just about anywhere,”
Belcher says. “It’s the personal
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 121
No Place
Like Home
It’s one of the most famous
lines in movie history, and
it’s also the premise of the
Kansas Department of
Commerce’s campaign
to encourage young
professionals to consider
a life in Kansas. While the
campaign promotes Kansas
to a variety of audiences,
it’s geared primarily toward
recent Kansas graduates
who’ve left the state to
pursue a career but who
might now be interested in
returning home. “When it’s
time to buy a home, start
a family and settle in a
community that offers a real
quality of life, we want to
remind these former Kansans
that there’s no place like
their home state,” says Caleb
Asher, deputy secretary of
workforce services for the
Kansas Department of
Commerce. An online hub
at www.thinkkansas.com
includes a cost-of-living
calculator, links to Kansas
job databases, video
testimonials and social
networking opportunities.
relationships that make this our home.
The people are down to earth. That’s
the main thing.”
A native of North Central Kansas,
Leon Flax is a senior vice president
at Fidelity State Bank & Trust Co. in
Dodge City. He credits the foresight of
community leaders for the economic
strength of his city.
A dedicated 1 percent sales tax
garners approximately $4 million
annually for recreational purposes.
The area boasts baseball complexes,
soccer facilities and a new, 6,000-seat
special events center for hockey,
concerts and rodeos. Within 25 miles,
a reservoir is nearly complete, offering
bountiful recreational opportunities.
A casino is scheduled to open soon. S
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122 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
LOCATION,
LOCATION, LOCATION
Center of the United States
Wichita MSA
TRANSPORTATION
ADVANTAGES
I-35, BNSF & UP Rail, Airport
INCENTIVES AVAILABLE
Enhanced Enterprise Zone
Hub-Zone Designation
HIGHLY SKILLED
WORKFORCE
Midwest Work Ethic
Aviation, Plastics, Composites,
Communications, Wind, Wine
HOMETOWNS WHERE
YOU HAVE ALWAYS
WANTED TO LIVE
Small-Town Living Near Big City Amenities
Low Crime Rate
Great Schools
ALL TRAILS LEAD
TO SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS
CONTACT:
Sumner County Economic Development Commission
(620) 326-8JJ9 º scadc@cc.sumna|.ks.us
www.gcsumna|.ccm
“Helping Your Business Is Our Business”
“There’s tremendous history here,”
Flax notes. “But we’re also very
progressive.”
While many communities
nationwide are struggling with high
unemployment, Dodge City is actually
seeking employees. Agriculture is
strong and the city is home to two of
the nation’s largest packing plants.
“We’d love to show you what we’ve
got,” Flax says. “Come look around.
We have diversity in weather, business
and lifestyle. Anything you could want
is right here in Kansas.”
From top: The Emporia Granada Theatre is
a multipurpose facility capable of seating
800 people; young professionals are being
drawn to Kansas in increasing numbers.
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K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 123
Getting to Know Kansas Culture
THE STATE IS RICH IN HISTORY, ARTS, MUSIC
WICHITA ART MUSEUM
www.wichitaartmuseum.org
Three centuries of painting, sculpture, works on
paper and decorative arts are a part of the impressive
collection of American art. The museum, the largest
in Kansas, includes the nationally renowned Roland P.
Murdock Collection, with masterworks by such renowned
artists as Mary Cassatt, Arthur Dove, Grace Hartigan,
Winslow Homer and Edward Hopper. A centerpiece of
the museum is a spectacular 6,000-square-foot hall that
features elegant glass works by internationally renowned
artist Dale Chihuly.
MARIANNA KISTLER BEACH MUSEUM OF ART
beach.k-state.edu
The museum in Manhattan houses Kansas State
University’s permanent collection, which numbers
more than 6,500 pieces featuring Kansas and
Midwestern artists.
Housed in a 43,000-square-foot complex that was
expanded in 2007, the museum draws more than
25,000 visitors each year.
NICODEMUS NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
www.nps.gov/nico/index.htm
Settled by former slaves fleeing the South in 1877,
Nicodemus is the only remaining town west of the
Mississippi River founded and settled by African
Americans at the end of Reconstruction.
Now a National Historic Site, Nicodemus features five
signature structures: A.M.E Church, First Baptist Church,
Nicodemus School, Fletcher Hotel and Township Hall.
A visitor center in Township Hall includes orientation
videos.
WALNUT VALLEY FESTIVAL AND NATIONAL
FLATPICKING CHAMPIONSHIPS
www.wvfest.com
Each September, Winfield in southeastern Kansas
is the epicenter of bluegrass and acoustic music. The
five-day festival features dozens of renowned performers
appearing on four separate stages and competitions
in such events as the National Flat-Pick Guitar
Championship, National Bluegrass Banjo Championship
and National Mountain Dulcimer Championship.
In addition to the music, the festival features
workshops, arts and crafts, camping, children’s events
and food. The dates for the 2010 festival are Sept. 15-19.
WILLIAM INGE CENTER FOR THE ARTS
www.ingecenter.org
Located at Independence Community College, the
center is named after award-winning playwright and
Kansas native William Inge. The center, which began
year-round activities in 2002, includes a Playwrights
in Residence program and a Playwrights-in-the-Schools
program, a teaching residency that places accomplished
playwrights in area schools to teach literary skills.
The center stages the annual four-day William Inge
Festival, now in its 29th year, which includes seminars,
workshops, lectures, readings of Inge’s works and
showings of select film adaptations of his plays and
original screenplays. The 2010 dates are April 21-24. The Wichita Center for the Arts
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124 K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T G U I D E
BUSINESS SNAPSHOT
Wichita is the aviation capital of the world, with 50 percent of domestic
general aviation aircraft and 40 percent of global aircraft produced in the
city. Northeast Kansas is home to the burgeoning Animal Health Corridor,
with 40 percent of global animal health and veterinary science interests
converged in the region.
ECONOMI C PROFI LE
What’s Online e
For more in-depth demographic, statistical and community information on
Kansas Economic Development Guide, go to kansaseconomicdevelopment.com
and click on Economic Profile.
POPULATION
2,802,134
2008
2,688,816
2000
Change: 4.2%
MAJOR POPULATION
CENTERS
Wichita
357,000 (MSA - 545,000)
Overland Park
166,000 (MSA - 1.8 million)
Kansas City, KS
147,000 (MSA - 1.7 million)
Topeka
122,000 (MSA - 170,000)
MAJOR EMPLOYERS
Spirit AeroSystems 10,300
Sprint/Nextel 10,005
Cessna Aircraft 8,200
Hawker Beechcraft 5,300
CenturyLink 3,800
Black & Veatch 3,200
Cargill 3,200
Farmers Insurance Group 3,000
Blue Cross and Blue Shield 2,890
Garmin International 2,700
Schwan’s Global
Supply Chain 2,700
Boeing Defense,
Space & Security 2,500
Bombardier Learjet 2,250
YRC Worldwide 2,200
Koch Industries 1,800
HOUSING MARKET
Median house or condo value (2007)
$92,100
Topeka
$93,800
Kansas City
$111,000
Wichita
$224,600
Overland Park
$121,200
Kansas
LABOR FORCE
Nonagricultural employment
2008: 1,391,000
2007: 1,379,800
2006: 1,353,800
INCOME
Per Capita Personal Income (2007)
$36,483
Median Household Income (2007)
$47,341
TRANSPORTATION
COMMERCIAL
SERVICE AIRPORTS
Dodge City Regional Airport
www.dodgecity.org/index.
aspx?nid=60
Forbes Field (Topeka)
www.mtaa-topeka.org
Garden City Regional Airport
www.fly2gck.com
Goodland Municipal Airport
www.goodlandks.us/
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 125
Great Bend Municipal Airport
www.greatbendks.net/?nid=190
Hays Regional Airport
www.haysusa.com/html/
airport.html
Liberal Mid-America
Regional Airport
www.cityofliberal.com/c_airport.htm
Manhattan Regional Airport
www.flymhk.com
Salina Municipal Airport
salinaairport.com
Wichita Mid-Continent Airport
www.flywichita.org
HIGHWAYS
Interstate 70 provides east-west
access to major markets on both
coasts. Interstate 35 runs north
and northeast to the Kansas/
Missouri border. I-35 connects
with I-135 in Wichita and runs
south to north connecting
Oklahoma with Nebraska. I-29
heads north from Kansas City,
Services
Government
Wholesale & Retail Trade
Manufacturing
Finance, insurance and real estate
Construction
Transportation and warehousing
MORE AT KANSASECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT.COM
23.1%
14.2%
12.8%
15.2%
5.6%
3.6%
3.6%
and I-44 offers east-west, four-
lane access close to communities
in southeast Kansas. There are
65 intrastate contract carriers
and more than 2,400 intrastate
common carriers, 1,600
Kansas-based and nearly
2,900 interstate-exempt
carriers licensed in Kansas.
RAILROAD (CLASS I)
Burlington Northern Santa Fe
www.bnsf.com
Kansas City Southern
www.kcsouthern.com
Norfolk Southern
www.nscorp.com
Union Pacific
www.up.com
WATER
Access to 122 miles of the
Missouri River along the northeast
corner of the state. Kansas ports
are at Atchison, Leavenworth and
Kansas City.
MAJOR EMPLOYMENT
SECTORS
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 127
visit our
advertisers
Atchison County Economic
Development Board
www.growatchison.com
City of Andover
www.andoverks.com
City of Derby
www.derbyweb.com
City of Fort Scott
www.fscity.org
City of Independence
www.independenceks.gov
City of Liberal
www.cityofliberal.com
City of Osage City
www.osagecity.com
City of Parsons
www.parsonsks.com
City of Pittsburg
Clay County Economic Development Group
www.claycountykansas.org
CloudCorp/Cloud County
www.cloudcorp.net
Cowley First
www.cowleyfirst.com
Dodge City Ford County
Development Corporation
www.dodgedev.org
El Dorado Inc.
www.360eldorado.com
Ellis County Coalition
of Economic Development
www.haysamerica.net
Emporia Regional
Development Association
www.emporiarda.org
Emporia State University
www.emporia.edu
Finney County Economic
Development Corporation
www.ficoedc.com
Fort Hays State University
www.fhsu.edu
Great Bend Chamber of Commerce for
Economic Development
www.greatbend.org
Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce
www.topekachamber.org
Greater Wichita Economic
Development Coalition
www.gwedc.org
Harvey County Economic
Development Council
www.harveycoedc.org
Hutchinson/Reno County Chamber
of Commerce
www.hutchchamber.com
Junction City-Geary County
Economic Development
www.jcgced.com
Kansas Association of Community
College Trustees
www.kacct.org
Kansas Bioscience Authority
www.kansasbioauthority.org
Kansas Department of Commerce
www.thinkbigks.com
Kansas State University
www.ksu.edu
KCP&L
www.kcpl.com
Kingman County Economic
Development Council
www.kingmanks.com
Lawrence Chamber of Commerce
www.lawrencechamber.com
Location One – “Real Estate”
www.locationone.com
Manhattan Area Chamber of Commerce
www.pickmanhattan.com
McPherson Industrial
Development Company
Metropolitan Topeka Airport Authority
www.mtaa-topeka.org
Olathe Chamber of Commerce
www.olathe.org
Ottawa Area Chamber of Commerce
www.ottawakansas.org
Overland Park Economic
Development Council
www.opedc.org
Russell County Economic Development
& Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitrussellcoks.com
Salina Area Chamber of Commerce
www.salinakansas.org
Shawnee Economic Development Council
www.shawnee-edc.com
Sherman County Economic Development
www.gogoodlandks.com
Sumner County Economic
Development Commission
www.gosumner.com
The University of Kansas
www.ku.edu
Washburn University
www.washburn.edu
Wichita Airport Authority
www.flywichita.com
wKREDA
www.discoverwesternkansas.com
6/GA/;3@71/
3::7A1=C<BG
/ll /mèrica City locatèo halí-way
bètwèèn Dènvèr ano Kansas City
on l-7C: laroèst rètail pull íactor in
thè statè: l-7C ano US ¹83 traínc
count: 56,5CC/oay: hiohly èoucatèo
workíorcè: two lnoustrial parks:
¹,¹CC hotèl rooms: sèvèral bèoroom
communitiès: short commutès:
hiohly rankèo by >`]U`SaaWdS
4O`[S` ano 0Wh8]c`\OZ
POPULATlON
Hays - 2C,CCC
Ellis County - 3C,CCC
MAJOR lNDUSTRlES
Oil - Laroèst prooucino county
in thè statè: /oriculturè: Eoucation:
Rètail: lníormation: Mèoical
Sèrvicès: ano Manuíacturino
Fort Hays Statè Univèrsity
· Partnèrships with inoustry
· Spècial nèèos trainino
· lntèrnational partnèrships
North Cèntral Kansas Tèchnical
Collèoè: Vorkíorcè trainino ano
tèchnical èoucation
Hays Mèo - Tèrtiary mèoical carè
· DèPakèy Hèart Cèntèr
· Drèilino/Schmiot
Cancèr lnstitutè
· Cèntèr íor Hèalth lmprovèmènt
· Cèntèr íor Vomèn's Hèalth
· Orthopèoic lnstitutè
ENTERTAlNMENT
lntèrcollèoiatè athlètics: Encorè
(pèríormino arts prèsèntations by
travèlino proíèssional troupès):
oloèst /rts Council in Kansas:
outooor sports: huntino: nshino:
car racino: county íairs: oozèns
oí annual cultural èvènts: musèums:
uniouè oowntown
TRANSPORTATlON
l-7C: US Hwy ¹83: UP railroao
/irport - 6,5CC íoot runway:
íour commèrcial niohts pèr oay
MlDWEST ENERGY
· Kansas' laroèst combination
natural oas ano èlèctric utility
· Nationally rècoonizèo ènèroy
èíncièncy proorams
· Kansas laroèst wino purchasèr
(basèo on pèrcèntaoè oí wino
purchasèo by customèr avèraoè)
Paio /ovèrtisèmènt
For More lnformation:
Mike MichaeIis
EIIis County CoaIition
mike§haysamerica.net
(785) S28-3102
www.haysamerica.net
Sources:
www.city-data.com
thinkbigks.com
quickfacts.census.gov
COST OF LIVING
COMPARISON
91.2
Dodge City
87.1
Garden City
90.8
Wichita
88.8
Hays
94.4
Hutchinson
93.4
Lawrence MSA
97.9
Manhattan
88.4
Salina
89.6
Topeka MSA
100
U.S. Average
Source: ACCRA Cost of Living
Composite Index
CLAY COUNTY 
in the center of it all!
Clay County Economic Development Group
|Iêî) ã11-î9I4 - |am|«c|a¡ceaat¡kaasas.erc
www.c|a¡ceaat¡kaasas.erc
· tea.ea|eat|¡ |ec+tea +t t|e
|ater.ect|ea. el |w¡. ¹! +aa z1
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|ert |||e¡
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· Ne|a||er|eea re.|t+||t+t|ea
t+\ re|+te.
· |e.er.e e.me.|. w+ter lrem aew
w+ter tre+tmeat l+c|||t¡
· |+a.+. |aterar|.e leae |aceat|.e.
\e eller |a||a|aa .|te., |ec+| ar+at +aa
|ew-|atere.t |e+a |aceat|.e., +aa + aa+||t¡
el ||le t|+t m+|e. t|+¡ teaat¡ t|e aerlect
a|+ce te wer|, |e+ra, a|+¡, ret|re +aa ||.e!
Make Clay County your next
destination on the road to success!
STAMP OUT BREAST CANCER
W!TH YOUR FEET.
Evèry stèp you takè in thè Susan G. Komèn Racè íor thè Curè
®
hèlps
raisè vital íunos íor thè noht aoainst brèast cancèr. Put oon't lèt your |ournèy stop thèrè.
Takè a stèp towaro improvino your own hèalth by èoucatino yoursèlí about thè oisèasè ano
oèttino rèoular scrèèninos. Stèp by stèp, this Racè will bè won.
Learn more about the Komen Race for the Cure by visiting www.komen.org
or caIIing 1-877 GO KOMEN.
¯his srace is rrcVicec as a roL¦ic serVice. 2OO8 ¯osan C. ¦cnen ícr ¦he Core
±
K A N S A S E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T . C O M 129
Ad Index
22 ATCHISON COUNTY
ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT BOARD
73 CITY OF ANDOVER
86 CITY OF DERBY
54 CITY OF FORT SCOTT
46 CITY OF INDEPENDENCE
110 CITY OF LIBERAL
121 CITY OF OSAGE CITY
126 CITY OF PARSONS
98 CITY OF PITTSBURG
129 CLAY COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT GROUP
18 CLOUDCORP/CLOUD COUNTY
86 COWLEY FIRST
105 DODGE CITY
FORD COUNTY
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
15 EL DORADO INC.
128 ELLIS COUNTY COALITION
OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
6 EMPORIA REGIONAL
DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION
102 EMPORIA STATE UNIVERSITY
10 FINNEY COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
60 FORT HAYS STATE UNIVERSITY
66 GREAT BEND CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE FOR
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
C2 GREATER TOPEKA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Ad Index (cont.)
C3 GREATER WICHITA ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COALITION
16 HARVEY COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
108 HUTCHINSON/RENO COUNTY
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
11 JUNCTION CITY-
GEARY COUNTY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
31 KANSAS ASSOCIATION OF
COMMUNITY COLLEGE TRUSTEES
36 KANSAS
BIOSCIENCE AUTHORITY
C4 KANSAS DEPARTMENT
OF COMMERCE
100 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
130 KCP&L
123 KINGMAN COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
1 LAWRENCE CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE
12 MANHATTAN AREA CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE
26 MCPHERSON INDUSTRIAL
DEVELOPMENT COMPANY
115 METROPOLITAN TOPEKA
AIRPORT AUTHORITY
2 OLATHE CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE
116 OTTAWA AREA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
28 OVERLAND PARK ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
20 RUSSELL COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT & CONVENTION
& VISITORS BUREAU
127 SALINA AREA
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
8 SHAWNEE ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
38 SHERMAN COUNTY
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
123 SUMNER COUNTY ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION
4 THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS
104 WASHBURN UNIVERSITY
114 WICHITA AIRPORT AUTHORITY
14 WKREDA

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