Notes in Introductory Real Analysis

Ambar N. Sengupta
November, 2008
2 Ambar N. Sengupta
Contents
Introductory Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1 Ordered Fields and The Real Number System 7
1.1 Ordered Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.1.1 Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.1.2 Order Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.1.3 Ordered Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.1.4 The absolute value function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.1.5 The Archimedean Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1.2 The Real Number System R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1.2.1 Hilbert Maximality and the Completeness Property . . . . 19
1.2.2 Completeness of R and measurement . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Problem Set 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2 The Extended Real Line and Its Topology 23
2.1 The extended real line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2 Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.3 Types of points for a set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.4 Interior, Exterior, and Boundary of a Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.5 Open Sets and Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.6 Closed Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.7 Open Sets and Closed Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.8 Closed sets in R and in R

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.9 Closure of a set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.10 The closure of a set is closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.11 S is the smallest closed set containing S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.12 R

is compact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.13 Compactness of closed subsets of R

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.14 The Heine-Borel Theorem: Compact subsets of R . . . . . . . . . 36
3
4 Ambar N. Sengupta
2.15 Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.16 Limits points of a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
2.17 Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.18 Limit points and suprema and infima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.19 Limit of a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
2.20 Simple Examples of limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
2.21 The sequence 1/n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
2.22 The sequence R
n
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.23 Monotone Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
2.24 The limit of a sequence is unique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
2.25 Convergent sequences and Cauchy sequences . . . . . . . . . . . 49
2.26 Every Cauchy sequence is bounded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
2.27 Every Cauchy sequence is convergent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
2.28 The rationals are countable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
2.29 The real numbers are uncountable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
2.30 Connected Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3 Integration 57
3.1 Approaching the Riemann Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
3.2 Riemann Sums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.3 Definition of the Riemann Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
3.4 Refining Partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3.5 The Darboux Criterion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
3.6 Integrable functions are bounded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
3.7 Variation of a Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
3.8 The algebra R [a, b] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
3.9 C[a, b] ⊂R [a, b] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
3.10 The Integral as a Non-negative Linear Functional . . . . . . . . . 73
3.11 Additivity of the Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
3.12 Monotone Functions are Riemann Integrable . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
3.13 Riemann Sums and the Riemann Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
A Question Bank 89
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 5
Introductory Remarks
These notes were written for an introductory real analysis class, Math 4031, at
LSU in the Fall of 2006. In addition to these notes, a set of notes by Professor L.
Richardson were used.
There are several different ideologies that would guide the presentation of
concepts and proofs in any course in real analysis:
(i) the historical way
(ii) the most natural way
(iii) the most efficient way
(iv) a comprehensive way, explaining the insights from several different ap-
proaches
The reality of constraints of time makes (iii) the most convenient approach,
and perhaps the best example of this approach is Rudin’s Principles of Mathemat-
ical Analysis [5]. The downside is that there is little possibility of conveying any
insights or intuition.
In studying the notion of completeness, a choice has to be made whether to
treat the Cauchy sequence point of view or the existence of suprema as funda-
mental. I have chosen the latter; it conforms to the classical geometric notion of
a positive real number being specified by quantities greater than it and those less
than it. This point of view also guides the choice of approach in the treatment of
the Riemann integral; the Riemann integral of a function is the unique real number
lying between the upper Riemann sums and lower Riemann sums.
The notes here do not include a chapter on continuous functions, for which we
followed the Richardson notes.
These notes have not been proof read carefully. I will update them time to
time.
6 Ambar N. Sengupta
Chapter 1
Ordered Fields and The Real
Number System
In this chapter we go over the essential, foundational, facts about the real number
system.
Positive real numbers arose from geometry in Greek mathematics, as ratios of
magnitudes, such as segments or planar regions or even angles. In the discussion
below we focus on segments.
In Euclid’s Elements, a segment EF is taken to exceed a segment GH, symbol-
ically
EF>GH
if EF is congruent to a segment GK, where K is some point between E and F. An
important feature of this order relation is encapsulated in the archimedean axiom:
given any two segments, some multiple of any one of them exceeds the other.
Then aAa pair PQ and RS if for any positive numbers n and m, the segment
nAB (which is n copies of AB laid contiguously) exceeds the segment mCD if
and only if the segment nPQ exceeds the segment mRS. The ratio
AB
CD
is then essentially the equivalence class of all segment pairs which are in the same
ratio as AB is to CD. Euclid also defines the ratio XY/ZW to be greater than the
ratio PQ/RS :
XY
ZW
>
PQ
RS
if they are unequal and if whenever mZW>nXY then also mRS>nPQ.
7
8 Ambar N. Sengupta
A special case is that of commensurate segments: if a whole multiple of AB,
say nAB, is congruent to a whole multiple of CD, say mCD, then the ratio
AB
CD
is
rational, and is denoted by
m
n
.
It is readily checked that
m
n
=
p
q
if and only if
qm = pn.
Such ratios are the rational numbers. Other ratios are irrational. In either case,
Euclid’s considerations suggest that a ratio of segments may be understood in
terms of a set of rational numbers, for example the set of all those rationals which
exceed the given ratio.
The axioms of geometry, and the Euclidean construction procedures, show
that ratios of segments can be added and multiplied and, when 0 and negatives
are included, an algebraic structure called a field emerges (this is discussed at
length by Hilbert [3]). The maximal such field, respecting the axioms of geometry
pertaining to the order relation and congruence, constitutes the real number system
R.
Leaving aside the historical background, the real number system may be con-
structed by starting with the empty set, constructing the natural numbers, then the
rationals, and then the real numbers by Dedekind’s method of identifying a real
number with a splitting of the rationals into two disjoint classes with members of
one class exceeding those of the other.
Dedekind’s method has beed generalized in a striking, and vastly more power-
ful way, by Conway [1], who shows how the Dedekind cut method can be applied
to abstract sets leading to the construction of all real numbers as well as tran-
scendentals and infinitesimals. Knuth’s novel [4] is an unusual and entertaining
presentation of this construction.
1.1 Ordered Fields
In this section we define and prove simple properties of fields, ordered fields, and
absolute values. The reader wishing to move on to properties of the real numbers
may skim the contents of the first few subsections, and proceed to subsection
1.1.4.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 9
1.1.1 Fields
A field F is a set along with two binary operations
Addition : FF →F : (a, b) →a+b (1.1)
and
Multiplication : FF →F : (a, b) →ab (1.2)
satisfying the following axioms:
1. The associative law holds for addition
a+(b+c) = (a+b) +c for all a, b, c ∈ F (1.3)
2. There is an element 0 ∈ F, the zero or additive identity element, for which
a+0 = a = 0+a for all a ∈ F (1.4)
3. Every element a ∈ F has an additive inverse −a, called the negative of a:
a+(−a) = 0 = (−a) +a (1.5)
4. The commutative law holds for addition:
a+b = b+a for all a, b ∈ F (1.6)
5. The associative law holds for multiplication
6. The associative law holds for addition
a(bc) = (ab)c for all a, b, c ∈ F (1.7)
7. There is an element 1 ∈ F, the unit or multiplicative identity element, for
which
a1 = a = 1a for all a ∈ F (1.8)
8. Every non-zero element a ∈ F has an multiplicative inverse a
−1
, called the
reciprocal of a:
aa
−1
= 1 = a
−1
a for all non-zero a ∈ F (1.9)
10 Ambar N. Sengupta
9. The commutative law holds for multiplication:
ab = ba for all a, b ∈ F (1.10)
10. The distributive law holds:
a(b+c) = ab+ac, (b+c)a = ba+ca for all a, b, c ∈ F (1.11)
11. The element 1 is not equal to the element 0:
1 = 0
We have not attempted to provide a minimal axiomset, and some of the axioms
may be deduced from others. For instance, the commutativity of addition can be
deduced from the other axioms.
Because of the associative laws, we will just write
a+b+c
instead of a+(b+c), and
abc
instead of abc.
Let us note a few simple consequences:
Theorem 1 If x ∈ F is such that
a+x = a for some a ∈ F
and y ∈ F is such that
by = b for some non-zero b ∈ F
then
x = 0 and y = 1.
In particular, the additive identity and the multiplicative identity are unique. More-
over,
−0 = 0 and 1
−1
= 1
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 11
Proof. Adding −a to
a+x = a
shows that x is 0. Multiplying
by = b
by b
−1
shows that y is 1. The other claims follow from
0+0 = 0 and 1 1 = 1. QED
Theorem 2 If a, b ∈ F, and b = 0, then
−(−a) = a, and (b
−1
)
−1
= b.
Moreover,
(−a)b =−ab, and (−a)(−b) = ab.
The multiplicative inverse a
−1
is best written as the reciprocal:
1
b
= b
−1
,
and the product ab
−1
as
a
b
= ab
−1
There are many other easy consequences of the axioms which we will use
without comment.
We denote the set of natural numbers by P:
P =¦1, 2, 3, ...¦, (1.12)
and the set of integers by
Z =¦0, 1, −1, 2, −2, 3, −3, ...¦, (1.13)
We can multiply any element a ∈ F by an integer as follows. First define
1a = a,
where now 1 is the number one in Z. Next,
2a
def
= a+a,
12 Ambar N. Sengupta
and, inductively,
(n+1)a
def
= na+a (1.14)
for all a ∈ F and all n ∈ P. Next define negative multiples by
(−n)a =−(na) (1.15)
for all n ∈ P and all a ∈ F. Finally,
0a = a (1.16)
where 0 is the integer 0. The following facts can be readily verified:
x(ya) = (xy)a for all x, y ∈ Z and all a ∈ F (1.17)
x(a+b) = xa+xb for all x ∈ Z and all a, b ∈ F (1.18)
(x +y)a = xa+ya for all x, y ∈ Z and all a ∈ F (1.19)
There is a multiplicative analog of this given by powers of elements. If m is a
positive integer and a ∈ F we define
a
1
= a
and
a
m+1
= a
m
a.
We also define
a
0
= 1 for non-zero a ∈ F
and, for any positive integer m and non-zero a ∈ F,
a
−m
= (a
−1
)
n
=
1
a
m
We will use without comment simple facts such as
(a
m
)
n
= a
mn
,
valid for suitable a ∈ F and m, n ∈ Z.
The simplest example of a field is the two-element field
Z
2
=¦0, 1¦,
with addition and multiplication defined modulo 2; for example,
1+1 = 0 in Z
2
We will, however, be concerned with fields which permit a consistent ordering of
their elements.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 13
1.1.2 Order Relations
An order relation on a set S is a set O of ordered pairs (x, y) of elements of S sat-
isfying the conditions O1 and O2 below. It is convenient to adopt the convention
that
x < y means (x, y) ∈ O
We also write
y > x
to mean x < y. The axioms of order are:
O1. For any x, y ∈ F exactly one of the following hold:
x = y, or x < y, or y < x.
O2. If x < y and y < z then x < z.
It is also convenient to use the notation:
x ≤y means x = y or x < y
and, similarly,
x ≥y means x = y or x > y
If T is a subset of an ordered set S then an element u ∈ S is said to be an upper
bound of T if
t ≤u for all t ∈ T (1.20)
If there is a least such upper bound then that element is called the supremum of T:
supT = the least upper bound of T (1.21)
We define similarly lower bounds and infimums:
if l ≤t for every t ∈ T then l is called a lower bound of T (1.22)
and
inf T = the greatest lower bound of T (1.23)
Of course, the sup or the inf might not exist.
14 Ambar N. Sengupta
1.1.3 Ordered Fields
An ordered field is a field F with an order relation in which, in addition to the field
and order axioms stated above, the following hold:
OF1. If x, y, z ∈ F and x < y then x +z < y +z:
x < y implies x +z < y +z for all x, y, z ∈ F (1.24)
OF2. If x, y, z ∈ F and x < y, and if also z > 0, then xz < yz:
x < y and z > 0 imply xz < yz for all x, y, z ∈ F. (1.25)
If x > 0 we say that x is positive. If x < 0 we say that x is negative.
We have the following simple observations for an ordered field:
Theorem 3 Let F be an ordered field. Then
(i) x > 0 if and only if −x < 0
(ii) For any non-zero x ∈ F we have x
2
> 0
(iii) 1 > 0
(iv) For any r ∈ Z the element r1 ∈ F is > 0 if r is a positive integer and is < 0
if r is a negative integer
(v) x > y holds if and only if x −y > 0
(vi) If x ∈ F and x > 0 then 1/x > 0
(vii) The product of two positive elements is positive
(viii) The product of a positive and negative is negative
(ix) The product of two negative elements is negative
(x) If x > y and z < 0 then xz < yz.
(xi) If x > y then −x <−y
(xii) If x > y > 0 then 1/x < 1/y
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 15
Proof. We prove some of the results.
(i) Suppose x > 0. Then we have
x +(−x) > 0+(−x),
and so
0 >−x.
Conversely, if −x < 0 then adding x to both sides shows that x > 0.
(ii) If x > 0 then, by OF2, we have
x
2
= xx > x0 = 0.
On the other hand, if x < 0 then we know that −x > 0 and so
x
2
= (−x)(−x) > (−x)0 = 0.
(iii) Since 1 is 1
2
, it follows that 1 > 0.
(vi) Suppose x > 0. Since x(1/x) = 1, and 1 = 0, it follows that 1/x cannot be
zero. If 1/x < 0 then, however, x(1/x) would have to be < 0, but we know that
1 > 0. Thus, 1/x > 0.
(xi) If x > y then, adding −x −y shows that −y <−x.
(xii) If x > y > 0 then xy > 0 and hence 1/(xy) > 0. Multiplying x > y by the
positive element 1/(xy) gives 1/y > 1/x. QED
Observe that if x > 0 then
2x = x +x > x +0 = x,
and
3x = 2x +x > 2x +0 = 2x,
and, proceeding inductively, we have
0 < x < 2x < 3x < < nx < (n+1)x < for all n ∈ P and x > 0 in F
(1.26)
In particular, inside the ordered field F we have a copy of the natural numbers
1, 2, 3, ... on identifying n ∈ P with n1
F
, where 1
F
is the unit element in F. This
then leads to a copy of the integers inside F, and we can assume that
Z ⊂F (1.27)
16 Ambar N. Sengupta
Going further, if m, n ∈ Z, and n = 0, we have then the ratio
m
n
∈ F.
The set of all such ratios m/n is the set of rationals
Q⊂F (1.28)
and is an ordered subfield of the ordered field F.
1.1.4 The absolute value function
The absolute value [ [ function in an ordered field F is defined by
[x[ =

x if x ≥0
−x if x ≤0
(1.29)
For instance,
[1[ = 1, and [ −1[ = 1.
The definition of [x[ shows directly that
[ −x[ =[x[ ≥0 for all x ∈ F (1.30)
It is also useful to observe that
[x[ is the larger of x and −x (1.31)
We think of
[a−b[
as measuring the difference between a and b.
We have then
Theorem 4 For any a, b ∈ F we have:
(i) the triangle inequality
[a+b[ ≤[a[ +[b[ (1.32)
Equality holds if and only if a and b are both ≥0 or both ≤0.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 17
(ii) the absolute values differ by at most the difference in a and b:

[a[ −[b[

≤[a−b[ (1.33)
(iii) [ab[ =[a[[b[.
Proof. Recall that [x[ is the larger of x and −x. Therefore, [a[ +[b[ is greater or
equal to ±a+(±b); in particular, it is greater or equal to a+b and (−a) +(−b).
Consequently, [a[ +[b[ is greater or equal to a+b and −(a+b), and so
[a[ +[b[ ≥[a+b[.
Equality holds if and only if [a[ = a and [b[ = b or [a[ =−a and [b[ =−b. Thus,
equality holds if and only if a and b are either both ≥0 or both ≤0.
Next, using the triangle inequality we have
[a−b[ +[b[ ≥[a+b −b[ =[a[,
and so
[a−b[ ≥[a[ −[b[.
Interchanging a and b yields:
[b−a[ ≥[b[ −[a[.
Observe that
[b−a[ =[a−b[.
Thus,
[a−b[ is ≥ to both [a[ −[b[ and −([a[ −[b[).
Since the larger of the latter is

[a[ −[b[

, we have proved (1.33).
We know that [x[ is x or −x, whichever is ≥0. Consequently, the product [a[[b[
is one of the elements
ab, (−a)b, a(−b), (−a)(−b),
i.e. one of the elements ab and −ab. Thus, [a[[b[ is ab or −ab, whichever is ≥0,
and so it is [ab[. QED
18 Ambar N. Sengupta
1.1.5 The Archimedean Property
An ordered field F is said to have the archimedean property if for any x, y ∈ F,
with x > 0, there exists a multiple of x which exceeds y:
nx > y for some n ∈ ¦1, 2, 3, ...¦ (1.34)
The field Q of rationals is clearly archimedean:
Theorem 5 The ordered field Q of rationals is acrhimedean.
Proof. Let x, y ∈ Q, with x > 0. If y ≥ 0 then we have 1x > y and we are done.
Now suppose x, y > 0. Then
x =
p
q
y =
r
s
,
where p, q, r, s ∈ P. Take
n = qr +1.
Then
nx = qr(p/q) + p/q > pr ≥
r
s
= y,
and we are done. QED
In an archimedean ordered field there are no infinities, and there are also no
infinitesimals:
Theorem 6 If F is an archimedean field then for any w > 0 in F there is an n ∈ P
such that
1
n
w < x.
Proof. Simply choose n for which nx is > w. QED
1.2 The Real Number System R
We shall work with the real number system in an axiomatic way. We will assume
that it is an ordered field in which the completeness axiom of completeness holds.
Needless to say, it is essential to actually construct such a system so as to be
sure that there is no hidden contradiction between the axioms, but we shall not
describe a construction in these notes.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 19
1.2.1 Hilbert Maximality and the Completeness Property
As we have mentioned before, the structure of Euclidean geometry, as formalized
through the axioms of Hilbert, produces an archimedean ordered field. To com-
plete the story, one can add to these axioms the further requirement that this field
is maximal in the sense that it cannot be embedded inside any larger archimedean
ordered field. It turns out then that any such ordered field is isomorphic to any
other, and thus there is essentially one such ordered field. This ordered field is the
real number system R.
A crucial fact about R is the completeness property:
If L and U are non-empty subsets of R such that every element of L
is ≤ every element of U, then there is a real number m which lies
between L and U:
l ≤m ≤u for all l ∈ L and all u ∈U. (1.35)
This property is also often expressed as:
If R is partitioned into two disjoint subsets L and U whose union is
R, and if every element of L is ≤ every element of U then there is a
unique element x ∈ R which lies between L and U:
l ≤x ≤u for all l ∈ L and all u ∈U. (1.36)
It is useful to view the real numbers geometrically. Consider a line, with two
special points O and I marked on it. For any point P on the line on the same side of
O as P we think of the ratio OP/OI as a positive real number. Points on the other
side from I correspond to negative real numbers, and the point O itself should be
thought of as 0. The completebess property says that there are no ‘gaps’ in the
line.
The completeness property can be formulated equivalently as:
Every non-empty subset of R which has an upper bound has a least upper bound.
(1.37)
The completeness property implies the archimedean peoperty:
Theorem 7 If in an ordered field the property (1.37) holds then the archimedean
property also holds.
20 Ambar N. Sengupta
A proof of this is outlined in an exercise below.
The modern understanding and point of view on completeness grew out of the
work of Richard Dedekind [2].
1.2.2 Completeness of R and measurement
Even in Euclid’s geometry, a real number was, implicitly, understood in terms of
all rationals which exceeded it and all rationals below it. However, the traditional
axioms of Euclidean geometry, with requirements on intersections of lines and
circles, can work with a field which is larger than the rationals but smaller than R,
and completeness is not essential.
The simplest measurement problem is to devise a measure of sets of points
in the plane which are made up of a finite collection of segments constructed by
Euclidean geometry. Two such sets should have the same measure if they can be
decomposed into a finite collection of congruent segments. For this we would
not need the full complete system R of real numbers. Moving up a dimension,
with the task of measuring areas of polygonal regions constructed by Euclidean
geometry, one could still get away with a less-than-complete system of numbers.
However, it was shown by Max Dehn in 1900, in resolving Hilbert’s Third Prob-
lem, that there are polyedra in three dimensions which have equal volumes (as
defined by requirements of ‘upper’ and ‘lower’ approximations) which cannot be
decomposed into congruent pieces. This, along with, of course, the utility of
measuring areas of curved regions even in two dimensions, makes it absolutely
essential to work with a notion of measure that goes beyond simply decomposing
into geometrically congruent figures. For a truly useful theory of measure, the
completeness of the number system is essential.
Capturing a real number between upper approximations and lower approxima-
tions proves to be very useful. Archimedes and others computed areas of curved
regions by such upper and lower approximations. In modern calculus, this method
lives on in the Riemann integral, as we shall see later.
Problem Set 1
1. Prove that in any ordered field, between any two distinct elements there is
at least one other element.
2. Prove that in any ordered field, between any two distinct element lie in-
finitely many elements.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 21
3. If F is an archimedean ordered field, such as R, show that between any two
distinct elements there is a rational element.
4. Let F be an archimedean ordered field, and let x, y ∈ F with x < y. If z ∈ F
show that there is a rational multiple qz of z for which x < qz < y.
5. Suppose x ∈ R is ≥all elements of a non-empty subset S ⊂R. Explain why
this implies x ≥supS.
6. Suppose S is a non-empty subset of R and x ∈ R is not an upper bound of
S. Show that there exists y > x which is also not an upper bound of S.
7. Prove that the completeness property (1.37) implies the property (1.36).
[Hint: Suppose (1.37) holds. If S ⊂R is a non-empty set which is bounded
above, then we can take U to be the set of all upper bounds of S and L to be
the complement, i.e. all real numbers which are < some element of S. Let
x ∈ F be provided by (1.36). Show that x is the least upper bound of S.]
8. Prove that (1.36) implies the completeness property (1.37).
9. Prove that the completeness property implies the archimdean propery. [Hint:
Suppose F is an ordered field in which (1.37) holds. Let x, y ∈ F, with
x > 0. Suppose that no positive integral multiple of x exceeds y, and let
S = ¦nx : n ∈ P¦. Then y is, by assumption, an upper bound for S. Let
u = supS, the least upper bound of S. Consider the element u −
1
2
x. This,
being < u, is not an upper bound. Use this to produce an element of S
greater than u, thus reaching a contradiction.]
10. Suppose L and U are non-empty subsets of R such that (i) every element
of L is ≤ every element of R, and (ii) for any ε > 0 there is an element
l ∈ L and an element u ∈U with u−l < ε. Prove that there is a unique real
number which is ≤ all elements of U and ≥ all elements of L.
22 Ambar N. Sengupta
Chapter 2
The Extended Real Line and Its
Topology
In this chapter we study topological concepts in the context of the real line. For
technical purposes, it will be convenient to extend the real line R by adjoining
to it a largest element ∞ and a smallest element −∞. No metaphysical meaning
need be attached to these infinities. The primary reason for introducing them is to
simplify the statements of several theorems.
2.1 The extended real line
The extended real line is obtained by a largest element ∞, and a smallest element
−∞, to the real line R:
R

=R∪¦−∞, ∞¦ (2.1)
Here ∞ and −∞ are abstract elements. We extend the order relation to R by
declaring that
−∞ < x < ∞ for all x ∈ R (2.2)
Much of our work will be on R

, instead of just R.
We define addition on R

as follows:
x +∞ = ∞ = ∞+x for all x ∈ R

with x >−∞ (2.3)
y +(−∞) = −∞ = (−∞) +y for all y ∈ R

with y < ∞. (2.4)
Note that
∞+(−∞) is not defined,
23
24 Ambar N. Sengupta
i.e. there is no useful or consistent definition for it.
The following algebraic facts continue to hold in R

:
x +y = y +x, x +(y +z) = (x +y) +z, (2.5)
whenever either side of these equations holds (i.e. if one side is defined then so is
the other and the equality
2.2 Neighborhoods
A neighborhood of a point p ∈ R is an interval of the form
(p−δ, p+δ)
where δ > 0 is any positive real number. Thus, the neighborhood consists of all
points distance less than δ from p:
(p−δ, p+δ) =¦x ∈ R : [x −p[ < δ¦. (2.6)
For example,
(1.2, 1.8)
is a neighborhood of 2.
A typical neighborhood of 0 is of the form
(−ε, ε)
for any positive real number ε.
A neighborhood of ∞ in R

=R∪¦−∞, ∞¦ is a ray of the form
(t, ∞] =¦x ∈ R

: x >t¦
with t any real number. For example,
(5, ∞]
is a neigborhood of ∞.
A neighborhood of −∞ in R

is a ray of the form
[−∞, s) =¦x ∈ R

: x < s¦
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 25
where s ∈ R. An example is
[−∞, 4)
Observe that if U and V are neighborhoods of p then U∩V is also a neighbor-
hood of p. In fact, either U contains V as a subset of vice versa, and so U ∩V is
just the smaller of the two neighborhoods.
Observe also that if N is a neighborhood of a point p, and if q ∈ N then q had
a neighborhood lying entirely inside N. For example, the neighborhood (2, 4) of 3
contains 2.5, and we can form the neighborhood (2, 3) of 2.5 lying entirely inside
(2, 4).
Here is a simple but fundamental observation:
Distinct points of R

have disjoint neighborhoods. (2.7)
This is called the Hausdorff property of R

.
For example, 3 and 5 have the neighborhoods
(2, 4) and (4.5, 5.5)
The points 2 and ∞ have disjoint neighborhoods, such as
(−1, 5) and (12, ∞]
Exerise Give examples of disjoint neighborhoods of
(i) 2 and −4
(ii) −∞ and 5
(iii) ∞ and −∞
(iv) 1 and −1
2.3 Types of points for a set
Consider a set
S ⊂R

.
A point p ∈ R

is said to be an interior point of S if it has a neighborhood U lying
entirely inside S, i.e. with
U ⊂S.
26 Ambar N. Sengupta
For example, for the set
E = (−4, 5] ∪¦6, 8¦∪[9, ∞],
the points −2, 3, 11 are interior points. The point ∞ is also an interior point of E.
A point p is an exterior point if it has a neighborhood U lying entirely outside
S, i.e.
U ⊂S
c
.
For example, for the set E above, points −5, 7, and −∞ are exterior to E.
A point which is neither interior to S nor exterior to S is a boundary point of
S. Thus p is a boundary point of S if every neighborhood of p intersects both S
and S
c
.
In the example above, the boundary points of E are
−4, 5, 6, 8, 9, ∞.
Next consider the set
¦3¦∪(5, ∞)
The boundary points are 3, 5, and ∞. It is important to observe that if we work
with the real line R instead of the extended line R

then we must exclude ∞ as a
boundary point, because it doesn’t exist as far as R is concerned.
Example For the set A = [−∞, 4) ∪¦5, 9¦ ∪[6, 7), decide which of the following are
true and which false:
(i) −6 is an interior point (T)
(ii) 6 is an interior point (F)
(iii) 9 is a boundary point (T)
(iv) 5 is an interior point (F)
Exerise For the set B = [−∞, −5) ∪¦2, 5, 8¦∪[4, 7), decide which of the following
are true and which false:
(i) −6 is an interior point
(ii) −5 is an interior point
(iii) 5 is a boundary point
(iv) 4 is an interior point
(v) 7 is a boundary point.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 27
2.4 Interior, Exterior, and Boundary of a Set
The set of all interior points of a set S is denoted
S
0
and is called the interior of S.
The set of all boundary points of S is denoted
∂S
and is called the boundary of S.
The set of all points exterior to S is the exterior of S, and we shall denote it
S
ext
.
Thus, the whole extended line R

is split up into three disjoint pieces:
R

= S
0
∪∂S∪S
ext
(2.8)
Recall that a point p is on the boundary of S if every neighborhood of the
point intersects both S and S
c
. But this is exactly the condition for p to be on the
boundary of S
c
. Thus
∂S = ∂S
c
. (2.9)
The interior of the entire extended line R

is all of R

. So
∂R

= / 0.
Example For the set A = [−∞, 4) ∪¦5, 9¦∪[6, 7),
(i) A
0
= [−∞, 4) ∪(6, 7)
(ii) ∂A =¦4, 5, 9, 7, 6¦
(iii) A
c
= [4, 5) ∪(5, 6) ∪[7, 9) ∪(9, ∞]
(iv) the interior of the complement A
c
is
(A
c
)
0
= (4, 5) ∪(5, 6) ∪(7, 9) ∪(9, ∞]
28 Ambar N. Sengupta
For the set
G = (3, ∞)
the boundary of G, when viewed as a subset of R

, is
∂G =¦3, ∞¦.
But if we decide to work only inside R then the boundary of G is just ¦3¦.
Exerise For the set B =¦−4, 8¦∪[1, 7) ∪[9, ∞),
(i) B
0
=
(ii) ∂B =
(iii) B
c
=
(iv) the interior of the complement B
c
is
(B
c
)
0
=
2.5 Open Sets and Topology
We say that a set is open if it does not contain any of its boundary points. For
example,
(2, 3) ∪(5, 9)
is open.
Also
(4, ∞]
is open.
But
(3, 4]
is not open, because the point 4 is a boundary point.
The entire extended line R

is open, because it has no boundary points.
Moreove, the empty set / 0 is open, because, again, it doesn’t have any boundary
points.
Notice then that every point of an open set is an interior point. Thus, a set S is
open means that
S
0
= S.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 29
Thus for an open set S each point has a neighborhood contained entirely inside
S. In other words, S is made up of a union of neighborhoods.
Viewed in this way, it becomes clear that the union of open sets is an open set.
Now consider two open sets A and B. We will show that A∩B is open. Take
any point
p ∈ A∩B.
Then p is in both A and B. Since p ∈A and since A is open, there is a neighborhood
U of p which is a subset of A:
U ⊂A.
Similarly there is a neighborhood V of p which is a subset of B:
V ⊂B
But then U ∩V is a neighborhood of p which is a subset of both A and B:
U ∩V ⊂A∩B.
Thus every point in A∩B has a neighborhood lying inside A∩B. Consequently,
A∩B is open.
Now consider three open sets A, B,C. The intersection
A∩B∩C
can be viewed as
(A∩B) ∩C
But here both A∩B and C are open, and hence so is their intersection. Thus,
A∩B∩C
is open. This type of argument works for any finite number of open sets. Thus:
The intersection of a finite number of open sets is open.
Exerise Check that the intersection of the sets (4, ∞) and (−35) and (2, 6) is open.
The collection of all open subsets of R is called the topology of R.
The set of all open subsets of R

is called the topology of R

.
30 Ambar N. Sengupta
2.6 Closed Sets
A set S is said to be closed if it contains all its boundary points.
In other words, S is closed if
∂S ⊂S
Thus,
[4, 8] ∪[9, ∞]
is closed.
But
[4, 5)
is not closed because the boundary point 5 is not in this set.
The set
[3, ∞)
is not closed (as a subset of R

) because the boundary point ∞ is not inside the
set. But, viewed as a subset of R it is closed. So we need to be careful in deciding
what is close and what isn’t: a set may be closed viewed as a subset of R but not
as a subset of R

.
The full extended line R

is closed.
The empty set / 0 is also closed.
Note that the sets R

and / 0 are both open and closed.
2.7 Open Sets and Closed Sets
Consider a set S ⊂R

.
If S is open then its boundary points are all outside S:
∂S ⊂S
c
.
But recall that the boundary of S is the same as the boundary of the complement
S
c
. Thus, for S to be open we must have
∂(S
c
) ⊂S
c
,
which means that S
c
contains all its boundary points. But this means that S
c
is
closed.
Thus, if a set is open then its complement is closed.
The converse is also true: if a set is closed then its complement is open. Thus,
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 31
Theorem 8 A subset of R

is open if and only if its complement is closed.
Exercise. Consider the open set (1, 5). Check that its complement if closed.
Exercise. Consider the closed set [4, ∞]. Show that its complement is open.
2.8 Closed sets in R and in R

The set
[3, ∞)
is closed in R, but is not closed in R

. This is because in Rit has only the boundary
point 3, which it contains; in contrast, in R

the point ∞ is also a boundary point
and is not in the set. Thus, when working with closed sets it is important to bear
in mind the distinction between being closed in R and being closed in R

. There
is no such distinction for open sets.
2.9 Closure of a set
The closure of a set S is obtained by throwing in all its boundary points:
S = S∪∂S (2.10)
Of course, if S is closed then its closure is itself.
For example, the closure of (3, 5) is [3, 5]. The closure of
(3, ∞)
is [3, ∞]. (But, in R the closure of (3, ∞) is [3, ∞).)
Let us see what the closure of Q is. Now every point in R

is a boundary point
of Q:
∂Q =R

,
because any neighborhood of any point contains both rationals (points in Q) and
irrationals (points outside Q).
It is useful to think of the closure
S = S∪∂S
in this way:
A point p is in S if and only if every neighborhood of p intersects S.
32 Ambar N. Sengupta
2.10 The closure of a set is closed
Consider the closure S of a set S. We will show that S is a closed set.
Take any boundary point p ∈ ∂S. We have to show that p is actually in S. Now
let N be any neighborhood of p. Then N contains a point q in S. Choose (as we
may) a neighborhood W of q lying entirely inside N. Since q ∈ S it follows that W
contains a point of S. Thus, N contains a point of S. So we have seen that every
neighborhood of p contains a point of S. This means p ∈ S. Thus, we have shown
that every boundary point of S is in S, and so S is closed.
2.11 S is the smallest closed set containing S
Consider any closed set K with
S ⊂K
Take any p ∈ S. Then every neighborhood of p intersects S, and hence also K.
Thus every neighborhood of p intersects K. So, either p is in the interior of K or
on its boundary. But K is closed, and so in either case p is in K. Thus,
S ⊂K
What we hae shown then is that S is the smallest closed set containing S as a
subset.
2.12 R

is compact
There is a special property of R

whose full significance is best appreciated at a
later stage. However, we have the language and tools to state and prove it now
and shall do so.
An open cover of R

is a collection U of open sets whose union covers all of
R

. For example,
¦[−∞, 5), (−1, 8), (7, 9) ∪(11, 15), (8, ∞]¦
is an open cover of R

. It is best to draw a picture for yourself to make this clear.
More formaly, an open cover of R

is a set U of open subsets of R

such that
every point x ∈ R

falls inside some open set U in the collection U, i.e. for each
x ∈ R

there exists U ∈ U such that
x ∈U ∈ U.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 33
Another example of an open cover of R

is
¦[−∞, 50), (2, 100), (8, 200) ∪(701, 800), (150, 750), (760, ∞]¦.
The examples of open covers of R

given above are both finite collections of
sets. Let us look at an example of a cover which uses infinitely many sets.
We start with an open cover of R, as opposed to R

: take all intervals of the
form (a, a+2), where a runs over all integers:
..., (−8, −6), (−7, −5), ...(−2, 0), (−1, 1), (0, 2), (1, 3), ...
In short we are looking at the collection
U
/
=¦(a, a+2) : a ∈ Z¦,
where, recall that Z is the set of all integers. This collection fails to include −∞
and ∞.
To obtain an open cover of R

from U
/
we could, for example, just throw in
the open sets [−∞, −4) and (5, ∞]. Thus, this gives us an open cover of R

:
U =¦[−∞, −4), (5∞]¦∪¦(a, a+2) : a ∈ Z¦.
If you look at this, however, you realize that even though this collection does
contain infinitely many open sets, we don’t reall need all of them to cover R

.
Indeed, we could just use the sub-collection
V =¦[−∞, −4), (−3, −1), (−2, 0), (−1, 1), (0, 2), (1, 3), (2, 4), (3, 5), (4, 6), (5, ∞]¦
and this would cover all of R

.
This is not just a feature of one particular example. It turns out that
Every open cover of R

has a finite subcover.
This property is called compactness, and so
Theorem 9 R

is compact.
We can prove the compactness of R

using the completeness of the real line.
Proof of compactness of R

. Let U be an open cover of R

. This is a collection
of open sets such that every point of R

falls inside some set in the collection. In
particular, −∞ is in some open set W ∈ U. Thus W contains a neighborhood of
−∞, i.e.
[−∞, t) ⊂W
34 Ambar N. Sengupta
for some t ∈ R. So, for one thing, all the elements of R

less than t are covered
by just the one set W in U; we would not need any other set from the cover if we
are to stick to points to the left of t. Now let
S =¦x ∈ R

: finitelymanysetsinUcover [−∞, x]¦
This set is not empty because −∞∈ S. In fact, t −1 is also in S. By completeness,
the set S has a supremum supS. Let
m = supS.
We will argue in three steps:
(i) First we explain that m isn’t −∞.
(ii) Next we prove that m is in fact, ∞.
(iii) Finally we prove that [∞, m], i.e. all of R

, can be covered by just finitely
many sets in U.
For (i), note, as before, that there is a real number t such that t −1 is in S, and
so m (being an upper bound of S) has to be ≥t −1. In particular, m is certainly
not −∞.
Now we show that m = ∞. Suppose to the contrary that m < ∞. Now there is
some open set U ∈ U such that m ∈U, because U covers all points of R

. Since
m is not −∞, and is being assumed to be also not ∞, it is in R and so there is some
neighborhood
(m−ε, m+ε) ⊂U,
where ε is a positive real number. Now m−ε being less than the least upper bound
m of S, there has to be some x ∈ S which is greater than m−ε. Thus
m−ε < x ≤m for some x ∈ S.
So, x being in S, there are finitely many sets, say U
1
, ...,U
N
, in U, which cover the
ray segment [−∞, x]. The set U covers (m−ε, m+ε). Thus, the collection
¦U
1
, ...,U
N
,U¦
covers all of
[−∞, m+ε).
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 35
But this means that, for example, m+
1
2
ε is in S, for the ray segment [−∞, m+1/2]
is covered by the finite collection U
1
, ...,U
N
,U. But now we have a contradiction,
because we have found a number, m+ε/2, greater than m, which is in S. Thus,
our original hypothesis concerning m must have been wrong. So m = ∞.
Finally we prove that R

is covered by finitely many sets in U. The element
∞ ∈ R

falls inside some open set V in the collection U. Therefore, there is some
‘ray-neighborhood’ of ∞
(r, ∞] ⊂V,
for some real number r. Now r being less than m = ∞, and the latter being the
least upper bound of S, there must be some y ∈ (r, ∞] which is in S. Thus,
[−∞, y]
is covered by finitely many open sets, say V
1
, ...,V
k
, in U. Note that
[−∞, y] ∪(r, ∞] =R

.
But then
V
1
, ...,V
k
,V
cover all of [−∞, ∞], since V covers the segment (r, ∞]. This prove that finitely
many sets from U cover all of R

.
2.13 Compactness of closed subsets of R

.
Consider now any closed subset D of R

. We will prove that it is compact, i.e.
that any open cover of D has a finite sub-cover.
Consider any open cover U of D. This is a collection of open sets such that
every point of D is covered by some set in the collection. Now the set D
c
, being
the complement of a closed set, is an open set. Throw this into the collection, and
consider
U
/
=U∪¦D
c
¦.
This covers all of R

: any point of D would be covered by a set in U while any
point in D
c
is, of course, covered by D
c
. Then we know that there has to be a finite
sub-collection
V
/
⊂U
/
36 Ambar N. Sengupta
which covers R

. Now throw out D
c
from V
/
in case it is there, and consider the
collection
V =V
/
`¦D
c
¦.
Of course, this is a finite subcollection of U. Moreover, it covers all points of D,
because no point in D could have been covered by the ‘rejected’ set D
c
. Thus, D
is covered by a finite sub-collection of sets from U.
Thus, every closed subset of R

is compact. The converse is also true, and we
can state:
Theorem 10 A subset of R

is compact if and only if it is closed.
We will leave out the proof of the converse part of this result.
2.14 The Heine-Borel Theorem: Compact subsets
of R
A subset B of R is said to be bounded if
B ⊂[−N, N]
for some real number N. Thus, for B to be bounded, there should exist a real
number N such that
[x[ < N for all x ∈ B.
Recall that a subset of Ris closed in Rif it contains no boundary point. Equiv-
alently, if a subset of R is closed if its complement in R is open.
Consider, for instance, the set
[4, ∞) ⊂R.
This is a closed subset of R because, in R, its only boundary point is 4, and this
point lies in the set. Note that [4, ∞) is not closed when considered as a subset of
R

.
We can now state the Heine-Borel theorem:
Theorem 11 Every closed and bounded subset of R is compact. Conversely, ev-
ery compact subset of R is closed and bounded.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 37
We shall prove half of this. Suppose K ⊂R is closed and bounded as a subset
of R. Boundedness implies that
K ⊂[−N, N]
for some real number N. Then K is closed also as a subset of R

. Let’s check
this. We will show that the complement U of K in R

is open. Consider any
point p ∈ U. If p ∈ R then we already know, by closedness of K, that p has a
neighborhood lying inside U. If p = ∞ then the neighborhood of p given by
(N+1, ∞]
lies entirely outside K. If p =−∞ then the neighborhood
[−∞, −N−1)
is entirely outside K. Thus, in all cases, p has a neighborhood outside K in R

. So
the complement of K in R

is open, and hence K is closed in R

. We know that
then K must be compact.
2.15 Sequences
A sequence of elements in a set A is a string
a
1
, a
2
, a
3
, ...
of elements of A.
More precisely, the sequence is actually a mapping
a : P →A : n →a
n
.
We will often be concerned with sequences in R

.
Sometimes out sequence will be specified explicitly as a string of numbers;
for example,
−5, −3, 5, 6, 9, 12, ...
Sometimes we may have a formula for the n-th term:
a
n
=
(−1)
n
n+1
.
38 Ambar N. Sengupta
Sometimes we have a sequence specified recursively. For example, we might
know that
b
1
= 1, b
2
= 1
and then
b
n
= b
n−1
+b
n−2
,
for all n ≥3. This generates the Fibonacci numbers
1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, ...
Sometimes it is better to label a sequence starting with the index 0:
a
0
, a
1
, a
2
, ...
For example, for a fixed real number r we can form the sequence
r
0
= 1, r
1
= r, r
2
, r
3
, ...
2.16 Limits points of a sequence
Consider a sequence
x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, ....
in R

. A point p ∈ R

is said to be a limit point of this sequence if every neigh-
borhood of p is visited infinitely often by the sequence.
For example, for the sequence
1
2
, 4,
1
3
, 4+
1
3
,
1
4
, 4+
1
4
,
1
5
, 4+
1
5
,
1
6
, 4+
1
6
, ...
it is intuitively clear that both 0 and 4 are limit points.
Suppose a sequence (x
n
) lies entirely inside a set S ⊂R:
x
n
∈ S, for all n ∈ P
Consider then any limit point p of this sequence. Let U be any neighborhood of
p. We know that this neighborhood is visited infinitely often by the sequence.
Therefore, at least one point of S must be in U. Thus, every neigborhood of p
contains a point of S, and so
p ∈ S.
Thus, any limit point of a sequence which lies always in a set S must be in the
closure of S.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 39
2.17 Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem
Consider any sequence in R

. We shall prove that it must have at least one limit
point.
Suppose to the contrary that no point is a limit of the given sequence. Then
each point p of R

has a neighborhood U
p
which is visited only finitely often by
the sequence. The neighborhoods U
p
form an open cover of all of R

. Then, by
compactness of R

, there are finitely many of them, say
U
p
1
, ...,U
p
N
which cover all of R

. But this is impossible: we have covered all of the extended
real line R

with finitely many sets each of which is visited only finitely many
times by the sequence! Thus, we have a contradiction and so there exist a limit of
the sequence.
Notice that all we needed above was the compactness of R

. Thus, we have
the more general Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem:
Theorem 12 Every sequence in a compact set has at least one limit point.
Of course, we have seen that a sequence may well have more than one limit
point. For example, the sequence,
1, 1, 2, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...
visits every natural number infinitely often and so every natural number is a limit
point of the sequence.
In the next subsection we will show how to actually obtain a limit point of a
sequence.
2.18 Limit points and suprema and infima
Consider a sequence
x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, ...
Let p be any limit point of this sequence.
Now let S
1
be the least upper bound of the set ¦x
1
, x
2
, ...¦:
S
1
= sup¦x
1
, x
2
, ...¦
40 Ambar N. Sengupta
In particular,
S
1
≥x
n
for each n.
Then it is clear that no point ‘to the right’ of S
1
could possibly be a limit of the
sequence: indeed any point r > S
1
would have a neighborhood lying entirely to
the ‘right’ of S
1
and this would never be visited by the sequence. Thus, p cannot
be > S
1
. So
p ≤S
1
Now we can apply the same argument to
S
2
= sup¦x
2
, x
3
, x
4
, ...¦
Again, p could not be greater than S
2
for then it would have a neighborhood to the
right of S
2
and this would have to be visited infinitely often by x
1
, x
2
, ... and so at
least once by x
2
, x
3
, .... Thus,
p ≤S
2
In this way, we can form
S
3
= sup¦x
3
, x
4
, ...¦
and have again
p ≤S
3
. Thus, p is a lower bound for all the S
k
’s:
p ≤S
k
for all k.
Now the inf of a set is the greatest lower bound of the set. Therefore,
p ≤inf¦S
1
, S
2
, S
3
, ...¦.
The infemum on the right is an important object and is called the limsup of the
given sequence:
limsup
n→∞
x
n
def
= inf¦sup
n≥k
x
n
¦ : k ∈ P¦ (2.11)
So we have proved that
Every limit point is ≤ the limsup
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 41
for any sequence.
Similarly, we have the notion of liminf: it is the supermum of the sequence of
infemums:
liminf
n→∞
x
n
def
= sup¦inf
n≥k
x
n
¦ : k ∈ P¦ (2.12)
In just the same way as before, we can prove
Every limit point is ≥ the limsup
Thus, for any limit point p if any sequence (x
n
) we have
liminf
n→∞
x
n
≤anylimit point ≤limsup
n→∞
x
n
. (2.13)
In fact, the limsup and liminf of the sequence are also limit points, but we won’t
prove this here.
2.19 Limit of a sequence
A sequence (s
n
) is said to lie in a set S eventually if after a certain value of n, all
the s
n
lie in S. Put another way, we say that s
n
lies in S for large n, if s
n
∈ S for all
values of n beyond some value, say n
0
.
For example, the sequence
−5, −4, −3, −2, −1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ...
will lie in the set (20, ∞) eventually.
Let us note again: a sequence (s
n
) lies in a set S eventually if there is an n
0
∈P
such that
s
n
∈ S
for all n ∈ P with n ≥n
0
.
A sequence (x
n
) in R

is said to have limit L ∈ R

if for any neighborhood U
of L the sequence lies in this neighborhood eventually.
We denote this symbolically as
x
n
→L, as n →∞.
42 Ambar N. Sengupta
We shall see later that if a limit exists then it is unique; the limit L is denoted
lim
n→∞
x
n
.
The notion of limit is one of the central notions in mathematics.
For example, the sequence
1, 2, 3, 4, ....
has limit ∞. For, if we take any neighborhood of ∞, say
(t, ∞]
then eventually n will exceed t (by the archimidean property) and so the sequence
will stay in (t, ∞] from the n-th term onwards.
The sequence
1,
1
2
,
1
3
,
1
4
, ...
has limit 0. We will look at this more carefully soon.
2.20 Simple Examples of limits
Let us look at some examples of sequences and try to see what their limits are.
The simplest sequence is a constant sequence which keeps repeating the same
value. For example,
3, 3, 3, 3, ....
The limit of the this sequence is 3: clearly every neighborhood of 3 is hit even-
tually by the sequence (indeed it is hit every time, since the sequence is stuck at
3).
The sequence
−1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8, ....
which eventually stabilizes at the constant value 8 has limit 8. For, again, given
any neighborhood of 8 the sequence falls inside this neighborhood eventually and
stays there.
In contrast, the sequence
1, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, 1, 3, 4, ...
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 43
does not have a limit. For example, the point 3 cannot be the limit of the sequence
because, for instance,
(2.5, 3.5)
is a neighborhood of 3, but the sequence keeps falling outside this neighborhood
(when it hits 1 or 4).
The sequence
1, 3, 5, 7, ...
has limit ∞. If you take any neighborhood of ∞, an interval of the form
(t, ∞]
then eventually the sequence falls inside the nighborhood and stays in there.
2.21 The sequence 1/n
Consider again the sequence
1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ...
It is intuitively clear that this sequence has limit 0. But let us prove this.
Note first that the n-th term of the sequence is
x
n
= 1/n.
We have to show that given any neighborhood of 0, our sequence will eventu-
ally lie inside this neighborhood. So consider any neighborhood of 0:
(−ε, ε),
where ε is a positive real number. We have to show that x
n
lies in (−ε, ε) for all n
beyond some value. Thus we should show that
1
n
< ε
for all n beyond some initial value. Now the condition 1/n < ε is equivalent to
nε > 1.
44 Ambar N. Sengupta
The archimedean property guarantees the existence of an n
0
∈ P for which
n
0
ε > 1.
Therefore, nε > 1 for all integers n ≥ n
0
. This proves that the sequence does
indeed tend to the limit 0:
1
n
→0, as n →∞
2.22 The sequence R
n
Consider the sequence
3
0
, 3
1
, 3
2
, 3
3
, ...
It is clear that in this sequence the terms get large very quickly, and intuitively it
is clear that the sequence has limit ∞.
Consider now the sequence of powers
R
n
where R > 1.
Let us see by how much each term exceeds the preceding:
R
n
−R
n−1
= R
n−1
(R−1)
But R is > 1, and so the multiplier R
n−1
is ≥1 (it is equal to 1 when n is actually
1). Thus,
R
n
−R
n−1
≥R−1.
Let us write x for R−1, and note that
x > 0
and we have
R
n
−R
n−1
> x.
Now it takes n ‘steps’ to climb from R
0
to R
n
, and so
R
n
≥1+nx,
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 45
because each step is at least x. Now it is clear that R
n
→∞ as n →∞. We just have
to show that for any given t,
1+nx >t
when n is large enough. But this is just Archimedes again: some multiple n
0
x of
xexceeds t −1, and then
nx >t −1
for all n ≥ n
0
. Note again that it is important that x > 0, and this comes from the
fact that R > 1.
Thus,
lim
n→∞
R
n
= ∞ for all R > 1.
Now consider the case R = 1. In this case the sequence is just all powers of 1,
and so it is
1, 1, 1, 1, ....
Thus
lim
n→∞
R
n
= 1 if R = 1.
Next consider the case
0 < R < 1.
As an example, we have R = 1/3 and the sequence
1,
1
3
,
1
3
2
,
1
3
3
, ...
We have here a sequence with denomiantor going to ∞ and numerator fixed at 1.
It seems then clear that the sequence goes to 0. Indeed, for any real ε > 0 we just
have to wait till
3
n
> 1/ε
and this would ensure that
1
3
n
< ε,
and so
1
3
n
∈ (−ε, ε) for large n.
Now consider the general case of
R
n
46 Ambar N. Sengupta
where R > 1. Observe that
R =
1
r
,
where r = R
−1
is > 1. Thus
R
n
=
1
r
n
,
where r > 1. Now, as we have seen above, the denominator r
n
goes to infinity,
and so it seems clear that 1/r
n
should decrease to 0. So we will prove that
R
n
→0
in this case. Consider any neighborhood of 0:
(−ε, ε)
where ε > 0 is a positive real number. We want R
n
to be in this neighborhood, i.e.
R
n
should be < ε. But this means we should show that r
n
is > 1/ε for all n large
enough. But we know that
r
n
→∞
So, after some n
0
, we have
r
n
> ε
−1
for all n ≥n
0
. Consequently,
R
n
=
1
r
n
< ε
and so
R
n
∈ (ε, ε),
for all n ≥n
0
. Thus
lim
n→∞
R
n
= 0 if 0 < R < 1.
Now it is also clear that
lim
n→∞
R
n
= 0 if R = 0.
Next consider negative values. Suppose
−1 < R < 0.
For example, for R =−1/3 we have the sequence
1, −
1
3
,
1
3
2
, −
1
3
3
,
1
3
4
, ...
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 47
It is clear that this is the same sequence as 1/3
n
except it swings back and forth
between negative and positive values. Thus, this sequence has limit 0.
More generally, if
−1 < R < 0
we can look at the distance between R
n
and 0:
[R
n
−0[ =[R
n
[ =[R[
n
and
[R[
n
→0 as n →∞,
because
0 <[R[ < 1.
Thus, the conclusion is that
lim
n→∞
R
n
= 0 if −1 < R < 0.
In short,
lim
n→∞
R
n
= 0 if [R[ < 1. (2.14)
Lastly, one should look at the case
R ≤−1.
You should examine a few examples and convince yourself that then there is no
limit, for the sequence swings back and forth between widely separated positive
and negative values.
Exerise Examine the sequence given by powers of −2:
1, −2, 4, −8, 16, ...
Does this sequence visit every neighborhood of ∞? Does it visit every
neighborhood of −∞?
48 Ambar N. Sengupta
2.23 Monotone Sequences
A sequence such as
1, 2, 5, 8, 9, 11, ...
where each term is ≥ the preceding term is said to be monotone increasing. An-
other example is the sequence
1, 1.1, 1.11, 1.111, 1.1111, ...
Thus, a sequence (x
n
) is
monotone increasing if x
n
≤x
n+1
for all n ∈ P (2.15)
We say that (x
n
) is
monotone decreasing if x
n
≥x
n+1
for all n ∈ P (2.16)
An example of a monotone decreasing sequence is
1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, ...
It is intuitively clear that a monotone increasing sequence (x
n
) will tend to the
limit sup¦x
1
, x
2
, ...¦. This is indeed true:
If (x
n
) is a monotone increasing sequence then
lim
n→∞
x
n
= sup
n≥1
x
n
.
To prove this let
L = sup
n≥1
x
n
.
The most extreme case is when L is −∞; as will become clear shortly, we need to
take care of this case separately. If L =−∞ each x
n
must be −∞. But in this case
lim
n→∞
x
n
=−∞,
since x
n
is just stuck at −∞. Now consider the other situation: L is not −∞. We
will show again that x
n
→L, i.e. we will show that for any neigborhood U of L, the
sequence (x
n
) falls eventually in U and stays there. So consider any neighborhood
U of L. Pick a point t of U to the left of L, i.e.
t < L and t ∈U.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 49
(Note that there would be no such t if L is −∞.) Since L is the least upper bound
of ¦x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, ...¦, the number t can’t be an upper bound, and so some x
n
0
is >t:
x
n
0
>t.
But recall that we are dealing with a monotone increasing sequence. Conse-
quently,
x
n
>t for all n ≥n
0
.
But recall that L is an upper bound of ¦x
1
, x
2
, ...¦; therefore,
all the x
n
are ≤t.
Those x
n
which are >t but ≤L are, of course, in the neighborhood U of L. Thus,
x
n
∈U for all n ≥n
0
.
This proves that L is indeed the limit of the sequence (x
n
).
In a similar way, if x
n
is a monotone decreasing sequence then
lim
n→∞
x
n
= inf
n≥1
x
n
.
2.24 The limit of a sequence is unique
Now we shall prove that a sequence can have at most one limit.
Consider a sequence (x
n
) and suppose both L and L
/
are limits of the sequence,
and L =L
/
. We will arrive at a contradiction. Since L and L
/
are distinct, they have
disjoint neighborhoods U and U
/
respectively. Since x
n
→L we know that x
n
∈U
eventually. But x
n
→L
/
, and so x
n
∈U
/
eventually. But this is impossible since U
and U
/
are disjoint and thus have no element in common.
Thus, a sequence which has a limit must have a unique limit.
2.25 Convergent sequences and Cauchy sequences
A sequence (x
n
) in R is said to be convergent if it has a limit and the limit is a real
number. If x
n
→L, and L ∈ R, we also say that the sequence x
n
converges to L.
Note that x
n
→L ∈ R if for any real r > 0 there is an n
0
∈ P such that
[x
n
−L[ < r
50 Ambar N. Sengupta
for all natural numbers n > n
0
.
This has a consequence: since the x
n
’s are all accumulating to L they are also
getting close to each other. More precisely, for any ε > 0 we can find N ∈ P such
that
[x
n
−x
m
[ < ε for all natural numbers n, m > N.
To prove this, observe that there is some N ∈ P such that
[x
k
−L[ < ε/2
for all k ∈ P with k > N. But then for any n, m ∈ P with n, m > N we have
[x
n
−x
m
[ = [x
n
−L + L−x
m
[
≤ [x
n
−L[ + [L−x
m
[
= [x
n
−L[ + [x
m
−L[
< ε/2+ε/2
= ε.
A sequence (x
n
) in R which bunches up on itself in the sense above is said to
be a Cauchy sequence, i.e. if for any δ > 0 there is an N ∈ P such that
[x
n
−x
m
[ < ε for all natural numbers n, m > N.
2.26 Every Cauchy sequence is bounded
Consider a Cauchy sequence (x
n
) in R. Then, eventually the points of this se-
quence are at most distance 1 from each other; in fact, there is an N ∈ P such
that
[x
n
−x
m
[ < 1
for all natural numbers n, m > N. In particular, fixing a particular j > N we have
x
n
∈ (x
j
−1, x
j
+1),
for all n ≥N. So
x
j
−1 < x
n
< x
j
+1
for all n ∈ ¦N +1, N +2, ...¦. Thus, at least from the (N +1)-th term on, the
sequence is bounded. But the terms not counted here,
x
1
, ..., x
N
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 51
are just finitely many, and so they have a largest B and a smallest A among them.
Thus,
every x
n
is ≤max¦B, x
j
+1¦
and
every x
n
is ≥min¦B, x
j
−1¦
Thus the entire sequence is bounded.
2.27 Every Cauchy sequence is convergent
The completeness property of the real line R has an equivalent formulation:
Theorem 13 Every Cauchy sequence in R converges.
Let us prove this.
Consider a Cauchy sequence (x
n
) in R. We have seen that it is bounded. Thus,
a ≤x
n
≤b for all n ∈ P
for some real numbers a and b.
We know that a sequence always has a limit point in R

. Let L be a limit point
of (x
n
). We will prove that L is a real number and x
n
→L.
First it is clear that L must also be in [a, b]. Therefore, L is not ∞ or −∞, and
is a real number.
Take any neighborhood
(L−δ, L+δ)
of L, where δ > 0 is a real number.
The sequence (x
n
) visits the neighborhood
(L−
δ
2
, L+
δ
2
)
infinitely often. Now we also know that eventually, the terms of the sequence vary
from each other by < δ/2, i.e. there is some N ∈ P such that
[x
n
−x
m
[ < δ/2 for all n, m ∈ P with n, m > N.
52 Ambar N. Sengupta
We can choose some j > N such that
x
j
∈ (L−
δ
2
, L+
δ
2
)
because the sequence visits this neighborhood infinitely often. Then
[x
n
−L[ = [x
n
−x
j
+ x
j
−L[
≤ [x
n
−x
j
[ + [x
j
−L[
<
δ
2
+
δ
2
= δ.
This means that
x
n
∈ (L−δ, L+δ)
for all n > N. Thus,
x
n
→L.
2.28 The rationals are countable
A set is set to be countable if it is finite or if its elements can be enumerated in a
sequence. Thus, S is countable if there is a sequence x
1
, x
2
, ... such that
S =¦x
1
, x
2
, x
3
, ...¦
For example, the even numbers form a countable set:
¦2, 4, 6, 8, ...¦
It may seem at first that the set Z of integers is not countable, but we can certainly
lay out all the integers in a sequence:
0, 1, −1, 2, −2, 3, −3, ...
It is much harder to see that the rationals Q are also countable. This is what we
shall prove now.
We will constuct a sequence which enumerates all the rationals, i.e. a sequence
r
1
, r
2
, ... such that
¦r
1
, r
2
, r
3
, ...¦ = Q.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 53
Put another way, we will encode each rational by a unique natural number; thus
to each natural number n we would associate a rational r
n
, and in this way we will
cover all rationals.
There can be many such encoding schemes. Here is one: Take any rational
x ≥0 and write it as
p
q
where p and q are non-negative integers (of course q ≥1)
and q is the smallest possible denominator among all such ways of writing x. (For
example, 0.6 can be written as both 6/10 and 3/5, but we would take 3/5 as our
representation.) We know that every non-negative rational can be represented in
this way uniquely. Associate to this x the natural number
f (x) = 2
q
3
p
For example,
f (0) = f (0/1) = 2
1
3
0
= 2
f (1) = f (1/1) = 2
1
3
1
= 6, f (4/5) = 2
5
3
4
= 3281 = 2592.
This associates a unique natural number f (x) to each non-negative rational x. If
x ∈ Q is negative, x < 0, let us define f (x) to be just 5 times f (−x):
f (x) = f (−x) 5 if x < 0
Now we have labeled each rational by a unique natural number. To enumerate the
rationals in a sequence all we have to do then is to run this in reverse: let r
1
be
the rational number x with the smallest value for f (x) (so r
1
is in fact 0 because
f (0) = 2 is the lowest value possible for f ); let r
2
be the rational number with the
next lowest value for f (x), and so on. Thus, r
n
is the rational for which f (r
n
) is
the first value of f (x) greater than f (r
1
), ..., f (r
n−1
). For example,
r
1
= 0
and
r
2
= 1 because f (1) = 2
1
3
1
= 6, the next value for f (x) after 2
Thus we have produced a sequence of distinct elements r
1
, r
2
, ... such that
¦r
1
, r
2
, ...¦ = Q
54 Ambar N. Sengupta
2.29 The real numbers are uncountable
We will prove that R is not countable, i.e. there is no sequence which touches on
all the real numbers.
In fact we will show that even the real numbers between 0 and 1 cannot be
enumerated in a sequence.
The argument used here is the celebrated diagonal method due to Georg Can-
tor (1845-1912). The strategy is to make a list of strings, then take the main
diagonal string, and then form a new string by altering each element of the diago-
nal.
Consider any sequence x
1
, x
2
, ... lying in (0, 1). Now each real number y in
(0, 1) can be expressed uniquely in the form
y = 0.y
1
y
2
y
3
... =
y
1
10
+
y
2
10
2
+
y
3
10
3
+ ,
where y
1
, y
2
, ... ∈ ¦0, 1, 2, 3, ..., 9¦ and we exclude all such representations which
use an infinite string of 9’s at the end (for example, instead of 0.19999.... we would
use 0.20000....). Thus each of the numbers x
1
, x
2
, also has such an expansion:
x
1
= 0.x
11
x
12
x
13
. . .
x
2
= 0.x
21
x
22
x
23
. . .
x
3
= 0.x
31
x
32
x
33
. . .
.
.
. =
Now form a number
w = 0.w
1
w
2
w
3
...
as follows: take w
1
to be any number in ¦1, 2, ..., 8¦ other than x
11
; then choose
w
2
∈ ¦1, 2, ..., 8¦ other than x
22
, and so on. This way we make the n-th decimal
place of w different from the n-th decimal place of x
n
, for every n. Then w cannot
be equal to any of the x
n
, and w ∈ (0, 1). Thus the original sequence cannot
possibly have covered all of (0, 1). [The reason we excluded 0 and 9 from our
choices for w
n
was to avoid ending up at 0 or 1.]
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 55
2.30 Connected Sets
Consider a subset S of R

. If U is an open set then the part of U in S, i.e. U ∩S is
said to be open in S.
For example, in [2, 5] the set
[2, 4)
is open because, for example,
[2, 4) = (1, 4) ∩[2, 5]
Put another way, a subset J of S is said to be open in S if every p ∈ J has a
neighborhood N such that every point of N which is in S is in fact in J, i.e.
N∩J ⊂S
A set S is said to be connected if it cannot be split into two non-empty disjoint
pieces A and B each of which is open in S. The main result for connected sets is:
Theorem 14 A subset of R, or of R

, is connected if and only if it is an interval.
56 Ambar N. Sengupta
Chapter 3
Integration
Modern integration theory was built from the works of Newton, Riemann, and
Lebesgue, but the origins of integration theory lie in the computation of areas
and volumes. The idea of measuring area of a curved region by lower and upper
bounds is present even Archimedes’ study of the area enclosed by a circle.
The area of a rectangle whose sides are 2 units and 3 units is 6 square units,
because if you tile the rectangle with unit squares you will need three rows of such
squares, each row having 2 tiles. By extension, the area of a rectangle of sides 1/4
unit and 1/5 unit should be 1/20 square units because we would need 20 of these
rectangles to cover a unit square. Thus, it is clear that the area enclosed by a
rectangle whose sides are a units and b units, where a and b are rational numbers,
is ab square units. Consider now a rectangle R whose sides a and b are possibly
not rational. Take any rationals a
/
, a
//
, and b
/
, b
//
with
a
/
< a < a
//
, and b
/
< b < b
//
.
Then a rectangle R
/
of sides a
/
by b
/
sits inside R, while a rectangle R
//
of sides a
//
by b
//
contains R. Thus, it makes sense to suppose that
area of R
/
≤area of R ≤area of R
//
which is to say:
a
/
b
/
≤area of R ≤a
//
b
//
It is intuitively clear, and not hard to prove, that ab is the unique real number that
lies between all the possible values of a
/
b
/
and a
//
b
//
. Thus,
area of R = ab
57
58 Ambar N. Sengupta
The rectangle R is made up of two congruent right angled triangles, and so each
of these would have area (ab)/2. This makes it possible to compute the areas of
all kinds of polygonal figures but cutting up these fgures into right angled trian-
gles. However, this strategy fails when we try to compute the area enclosed by a
circle. No amount of cutting would turn a disc into a finite number of right angled
triangles.
Archimedes computed area enclosed by a circle C by consider polygons P
/
and P
//
, where P lies inside the circle C and P
//
encloses the circle C; thus
area A
/
enclosed by P
/
≤area enclosed by C ≤area A
//
enclosed by P
//
Some computation shows that for any ε > 0 there are such polygons P
/
and P
//
such that
A
//
−A
/
< ε
This implies that there is a unique real number A which lies between the area of
all the polygons P
/
and the polygons P
//
. Clearly then this number should be the
area enclosed by the circle C.
Our development of the theory of the Riemann integrals is based on these
ideas.
3.1 Approaching the Riemann Integral
Consider a function
f : [a, b] →R
and think of its graph. Assume, for convenience of visualization, that f ≥0. Then
f specifies a region which lies below its graph and above the x-axis. In general,
this is a region whose upper boundary, given by the graph of f , is curved. The
integral
Z
b
a
f
which is also, conveniently, written as
Z
b
a
f (x)dx
measures the area of this region.
The strategy used for computing the area is to cut up the region into vertical
slices. The area of each such slice is between the area of a larger ‘upper’ rectangle
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 59
and a smaller ‘lower’ rectangle. Thus we should expect the actual area to be the
unique real number lying between these ‘upper rectangle’ areas and the ‘lower
rectangle’ areas.
3.2 Riemann Sums
We will work with functions on an interval
[a, b] ⊂R
] where < b.
A partition X of [a, b] is specified by a sequence
X = (x
0
, x
1
, ..., x
N
)
of points x
0
, x
1
, ..., x
N
∈ [a, b] with
a = x
0
< x
1
< < x
N
= b
Here N ∈ ¦1, 2, 3, ...¦.
We will often use the notation
∆x
j
def
= x
j
−x
j−1
(3.1)
to denote the length of the j-th interval
[x
j−1
, x
j
]
marked out by the partition X.
The width or norm of the partition X is the maximum size of these intervals:
[[X[[ = max
j∈¦1,...,N¦
∆x
j
(3.2)
Consider a function
f : [a, b] →R
on an interval [a, b] ⊂R, where a < b.
Let
M
j
( f ) = sup
x∈[x
j−1
,x
j
]
f (x) (3.3)
60 Ambar N. Sengupta
and
m
j
( f ) = inf
x∈[x
j−1
,x
j
]
f (x) (3.4)
Thus, if A
j
were the area of the region under the graph of f over [x
j−1
, x
j
] then
m
j
( f )∆x
j
≤A
j
≤M
j
( f )∆x
j
.
Our objective is to specify the actual area A under the graph of f , and this would
be the sum of the A
j
.
The upper Riemann sumU( f , X) is defined to be
U( f , X)
def
=
N

j=1
M
j
( f )∆x
j
(3.5)
and the lower Riemann sum L( f , X) is
L( f , X)
def
=
N

j=1
m
j
( f )∆x
j
(3.6)
Note that
L( f , X) ≤U( f , X) (3.7)
We will show later that in fact every lower sum if less or equal to every upper sum,
i.e. L( f , X) is less or equal to U( f ,Y) for every partitions X and Y of [a, b].
Now consider a sequence
X

= (x

1
, ..., x

N
)
obtained by picking a point from each interval [x
j−1
, x
j
]::
x

j
∈ [x
j−1
, x
j
]
We shall indicate this by writing
X

< X
The Riemann sum S( f , X, X

) is
S( f , X, X

) =
N

j=1
f (x

j
)∆x
j
(3.8)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 61
Note that the upper sum is ∞ if and only if one of the M
j
is ∞, and this occurs
if and only if the superemum of f is ∞:
U( f , X) = ∞ if and only if sup
x∈[a,b]
f (x) = ∞ (3.9)
However, U( f , X) cannot be −∞, because that would mean that at least one of
the M
j
is −∞ which can only be if f is equal to −∞ on that interval [x
j−1
, x
j
]
which contradicts the fact that f is real-valued. (Note that we are working with
non-empty intervals because x
j−1
< x
j
.)
Similarly,
L( f , X) =−∞ if and only if inf
x∈[a,b]
f (x) =−∞ (3.10)
and L( f , X) can never be ∞.
It is useful then to observe that the difference
U( f , X) −L( f , X)
is always defined, i.e. we never have the ∞−∞ situation.
3.3 Definition of the Riemann Integral
Consider a function
f : [a, b] →R
on an interval [a, b] ⊂ R, where a < b. This function is said to be Riemann inte-
grable if there is a unique real number I lying between all the lower sums and all
the upper sums:
L( f , X) ≤I ≤U( f , X) (3.11)
for every partition X of [a, b]. This number I is the integral of f over [a, b] and
denoted
Z
b
a
f or
Z
b
a
f (x)dx (3.12)
The set of all Riemann integrable functions on [a, b] is denote
R [a, b] (3.13)
62 Ambar N. Sengupta
3.4 Refining Partitions
We work with a function
f : [a, b] →R.
We use the notation
M( f , [s, t]) = sup
x∈[s,t]
f (x), and m( f , [s, t]) = inf
x∈[s,t]
f (x) (3.14)
Let
X = (x
0
, x
1
, ..., x
N
)
be a partition of the interval [a, b] and let X
/
be a partition obtained by adding one
more point x
/
to X. Let us say that x
/
lies in the j-th interval
x
/
∈ [x
j−1
, x
j
]
Thus, X
/
cuts up [x
j−1
, x − j] into two intervals
[x
j−1
, x
/
] and [x
/
, x
j
]
Let us compare the upper sums U( f , X) and U( f , X
/
). To this end, let us write
M
j
= M( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
]), M
/
j
= M( f , [x
j−1
, x
/
]), M
//
j
= M( f , [x
/
, x
j
])
It is important to observe that
M
j
≥M
/
j
, and M
j
≥M
//
j
(3.15)
These sums differ only in the contribution that comes from [x
j−1
, x
j
]:
U( f , X) −U( f , X
/
) = M
j
(x
j
−x
j−1
)

M
/
j
(x
/
−x
j−1
) +M
//
j
(x
j
−x
/
)

= (M
j
−M
/
j
)(x
/
−x
j−1
) +(M
j
−M
//
j
)(x
j
−x
/
)
≥ 0.
Thus
U( f , X
/
) ≤U( f , X), (3.16)
i.e. adding a point to a partition lowers upper sums.
If we keep adding points to the initial partition, we keep lower the upper sums.
Arguing similarly, it follows that adding points to a partition raises lower
sums.
This observation is important enough to state as a theorem:
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 63
Theorem 15 Adding points to a partition lowers upper sums and raises lower
sums. Thus if X and X
/
are partitions of [a, b], with X
/
containing all the points of
X and some more, then
L( f , X) ≤L( f , X
/
) ≤U( f , X
/
) ≤U( f , X) (3.17)
for every function f : [a, b] →R.
Using this we can prove that upper sums always dominate lower sums:
Theorem 16 If f : [a, b] →R is a function on an interval [a, b] ⊂R, where a < b,
and if X and Y are any partitions of [a, b] then
L( f , X) ≤U( f ,Y) (3.18)
Thus, every lower sum is dominated above by every upper sum.
Proof. Here is a useful trick: we can combine the partitions X and Y to form a
partition Z which contains all points of X and all the points of Y as well. Therefore,
U( f , Z) ≤U( f ,Y)
and
L( f , X) ≤L( f , Z)
Stringing these together we have
L( f , X) ≤L( f , Z) ≤U( f , Z) ≤U( f ,Y)
and this gives the desired result. QED
We have used the fact that adding a point to a partition lowers upper sums and
raises lower sums. It will be useful to take a closer look at this and estimate by
how much the upper and lower sums move as points are added to the partition.
Recall the formula
U( f , X) −U( f , X
/
) = (M
j
−M
/
j
)(x
/
−x
j−1
) +(M
j
−M
//
j
)(x
j
−x
/
) (3.19)
where X
/
is the partition obtained from X by adding the single point x
/
to the j-th
interval [x
j−1
, x
j
] of the partition X = (x
0
, ..., x
T
). Now suppose instead of adding
just the one point x
/
, we add m distinct points y
1
, ..., y
m
to the interval [x
j−1
, x
j
] to
form the new partition X
/
. We label the new points y
i
in increasing order
y
1
< < y
m
.
64 Ambar N. Sengupta
For convenience of notation we write y
0
for x
j−1
and y
m+1
for x
j
. Thus
x
j−1
= y
0
< y
1
< < y
m
< y
m+1
= x
j
The intervals
[y
k−1
, y
k
]
make up the interval
[x
j−1
, x
j
]
Then:
U( f , X)−U( f , X
/
) =
m+1

k=1

M( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
]) −M( f , [y
k−1
, y
k
])

(y
k
−y
k−1
) (3.20)
Now
0 ≤M( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
]) −M( f , [y
k−1
, y
k
]) ≤2[[ f [[
sup
,
where [[ f [[
sup
is supremum of [ f [ over the full original interval [a, b]. The interval
lengths y
k
−y
k−1
add up to ∆x
j
. Consequently,
U( f , X) −U( f , X
/
) ≤2[[ f [[
sup
∆x
j
≤2[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[ (3.21)
This provides an upper bound for how much the upper sum is decreased by addi-
tion of points all in one single interval of the original partition X.
If we add points to each of N
/
intervals to create a new partition X
/
then
U( f , X) −U( f , X
/
) ≤2N
/
[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[ (3.22)
Similarly,
L( f , X
/
) −L( f , X) ≤2N
/
[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[ (3.23)
Note that
N
/
≤N,
where N is the total number of new points added. Consequently, we have
Lemma 1 If
X = (x
0
, ..., x
T
)
is a partition of the interval [a, b] ⊂ R, where a < b, and X
/
is a partition of the
same interval containing all the points of X and possibly some more, then
U( f , X
/
) −L( f , X
/
) ≤U( f , X) −L( f , X) (3.24)
but the decrease in the value of U −L is at most 2N[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[:
[U( f , X) −L( f , X)] −

U( f , X
/
) −L( f , X
/
)

≤2N[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[ (3.25)
where N is the number of new points added.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 65
3.5 The Darboux Criterion
Now that we know that the upper sums dominate the lower sums, it is clear that
there will be a unique real number between them if and only if the sup of the lower
sums equals the inf of the upper sums:
Theorem 17 A function f : [a, b] →R is Riemann integrable if and only if
sup¦U( f , X) : all partitions X of [a, b]¦ = inf¦L( f , X) : all partitions X of [a, b]¦
(3.26)
The common value is
R
b
a
f .
Thus, the function f is Riemann integrable if and only if there is no ‘gap’
between the lower sums and upper sums. Thus, another equivalent formulation is
the Darboux criterion:
Theorem 18 T:Darbouxcrit A function f : [a, b] →Ris Riemann integrable if and
only if for any ε > 0 there is a partition X of [a, b] for which
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε (3.27)
This is an extremely useful result: virtually all of our results on integrability
will use the Darboux criterion.
Proof. Suppose f is integrable. Then there is a unique real number I which
lies between all upper sums and all lower sums. Take any ε > 0. Consider the
interval
[I, I +ε/2)
All the lower sums lie to the left, i.e. ≤I. All upper sums lie to the right (≥) of I.
So since I is the only real number lying between the upper sums and lower sums,
there must be at least one upper sum which lies in [I, I +ε/2). Thus, there is a
partition Y for which
I ≤U( f ,Y) < I +ε/2
Similarly, there is a partition Z for which
I −ε/2 < L( f , Z) ≤I.
Let X be the partition obtained by pooling together Y and Z. Then
I −ε/2 < L( f , Z) ≤L( f , X) ≤U( f , X) ≤U( f , Z) < I +ε/2 (3.28)
66 Ambar N. Sengupta
Since both L( f , X) and U( f , X) lie in
(I −ε/2, I +ε/2)
it follows that
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε. (3.29)
Conversely, suppose that for every ε >0 there is a partition for which (3.29) holds.
Suppose that I and I
/
are distinct real numbers which both lie between all upper
sums and all lower sums. Let
ε =[I
/
−I[
We know that there is a partition X satifying (3.29). Now I and I
/
both lie between
U( f , X) and L( f , X). So the difference between I and I
/
is < ε:
[I
/
−I[ < ε
But this contradicts the deifnition of ε taken above. Thus I and I
/
must be equal.
So there is a unique real number between all the upper sums and all the lower
sums. Thus, f is integrable. QED
3.6 Integrable functions are bounded
Suppose f : [a, b] →R is integrable. We will prove that f must be bounded.
Theorem 19 Every Riemann integrable function is bounded.
Proof. Consider
f : [a, b] →R
where [a, b] ⊂R and a < b. Assume that f ∈ R [a, b].
Let us suppose that f is unbounded. Then we will reach a contradiction.
Suppose, for example, that f is not bounded above, i.e.
sup
x∈[a,b]
f (x) = ∞.
Consider any partition
X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 67
of [a, b]. Then there is some subinterval, say [x
j−1
, x
j
], on which f is not bounded
above, i.e.
M
j
= ∞.
But then the supper sum for f with this partition is also ∞:
U( f , X) =
N

k=1
M
k
∆x
k
= ∞
Thus, every upper sum for f is ∞. Now let
I =
Z
b
a
f
and recall that this is the unique real number lying between all upper sums and all
lower sums. Then
L( f , X) ≤I < I +1 < ∞ =U( f , X) (3.30)
for every partition X. But then I +1 would also be a real number lying between
all upper sums and all lower sums. Thus, we have a contradiction. QED
3.7 Variation of a Function
For any non-empty subset S ⊂R the diameter of S is
diam(S) = sup¦a−b : a, b ∈ S¦ (3.31)
It is easy to believe and not hard to prove that the diameter of S is the difference
between supS and inf S:
diam(S) = supS−inf S (3.32)
Now consider a function f on an interval [s, t]. It will be useful to have a
measure of the fluctuation of f over this interval.
The simplest such measure is given by the diameter of the range of f :
Var( f ) = diam(Rangeof f) (3.33)
More explicitly, the variation of f on the interval [s, t] is:
Var( f , [s, t]) = sup
x,y∈[s,t]
( f (x) − f (y)) (3.34)
68 Ambar N. Sengupta
It is also equal to
Var( f , [s, t]) = M( f , [s, t]) −m( f , [s, t]) (3.35)
Sometimes we may drop [s, t] and just write Var( f ):
Var( f ) = M( f ) −m( f ) (3.36)
We record the following algebraic facts about the variation of functions, which
will be very useful in proving corresponding facts about Riemann integration.
Lemma 2 For any functions f and g on an interval [a, b] ⊂ R with a < b, we
have:
(i) Var( f ) ≥0;
(ii) Var(k) = 0 if and only if k is constant;
(iii) the variation scales like length, i.e. the variation of a constant times a func-
tion is the absolute value of the function time the variation in the function:
Var(k f ) =[k[Var( f ) for any k ∈ R.
(iv) the variation satifies the triangle inequality:
Var( f +g) ≤Var( f ) +Var(g) (3.37)
(v) the variation of the product of two functions is bounded above by the sum
of their variations, weighted by their sup-norms:
Var( f g) ≤[[ f [[
sup
Var(g) +[[g[[
sup
Var( f ) (3.38)
(vi) the variations in f and in g differ by at most the variation in [ f −g[:

Var( f ) −Var(g)

≤Var( f −g) (3.39)
(vii) if f is not equal to zero anywhere then
Var(1/ f ) ≤M([ f [
−1
)
2
Var( f ) (3.40)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 69
(viii) the variation of a function increases montonically with the interval of vari-
ation:
Var( f , [s, t]) ≤Var( f , [a, b]) if [s, t] ⊂[a, b] (3.41)
(ix) The variation in the absolute value of f is bounded by the variation in f :
Var([ f [) ≤Var( f ) (3.42)
(x) The variation of f is bounded above by twice [[ f [[
sup
:
Var( f ) ≤2[[ f [[
sup
(3.43)
(xi) If s, t, u ∈ [a, b] with s <t < u then
Var( f , [s, u]) ≤Var( f , [s, u]) +Var( f , [u, t]) (3.44)
(xii) If f is monotone on an interval [s, t] then
Var( f , [s, t]) =

f (t) − f (s) if f (t) ≥ f (s)
f (s) − f (t) if f (t) ≤ f (s)
(3.45)
We also record the following result on variations and partitions for continuous
functions:
Lemma 3 If f : [a, b] →R is continuous, where [a, b] ⊂R and a <b, then for any
ε > 0 there is a partition X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
) of [a, b] such that
Var( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
]) < ε
for every j ∈ ¦1, ..., N¦.
Proof. Since f is continuous on the compact set [a, b] it is uniformly continu-
ous. So for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 such that
[ f (x) − f (x
/
)[ < ε/2
whenever x, x
/
∈ [a, b] with [x −x
/
[ < δ. Take any partition X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
) with
all the intervals having length less than δ. Then, for each j ∈ ¦1, ..., N¦,
f (x) − f (x
/
) < ε/2
70 Ambar N. Sengupta
for every x, x
/
∈ [x
j−1
, x
j
] since these intervals all have length < δ. Consequently,
Var( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
]) ≤ε/2
and we are done. QED
The sup-norm bound on the variation has the following consequence:
Proposition 1 If f
1
, f
2
, ... : [a, b] →Rconverge uniformly to a function f : [a, b] →
R, then
lim
n→∞
Var( f
n
) = Var( f ) (3.46)
It will be convenient to use the notation
Var
j
( f )
def
= Var( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
]) (3.47)
The reason why we are interested in the variation is summarized by
Theorem 20 For any function f : [a, b] → R, where [a, b] ⊂ R and a < b, and
every partition X of [a, b] we have
U( f , X) −L( f , X) =
N

j=1
Var
j
( f )∆x
j
(3.48)
Proof. Observe that
Var
j
( f ) = M
j
( f ) −m
j
( f ). (3.49)
Multiplying this by ∆x
j
and adding up over all j ∈ ¦1, ..., N¦ gives the result
(3.48). QED
3.8 The algebra R [a, b]
Recall that
R [a, b]
is the set of all Riemann integrable functions on [a, b].
Our main objective now is
Theorem 21 The set R [a, b] has the following properties:
(i) Every constant function belongs to R [a, b]
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 71
(ii) If f , g ∈ R [a, b] then f +g ∈ R [a, b]
(iii) If f , g ∈ R [a, b] then f g ∈ R [a, b]
(iv) If f ∈ R [a, b], and f is never equal to zero and 1/ f is bounded, then 1/ f ∈
R [a, b].
(v) If f ∈ R [a, b] then [ f [ ∈ R [a, b] and

Z
b
a
f


Z
b
a
[ f [ (3.50)
Properties (i)-(iii) say that R [a, b] is an algebra under pointwise addition and
multiplication of functions. It is important to note that the converse of (v) does not
hold, i.e. there are functions which are not Riemann integrable but whose absoulte
values are Riemann integrable.
Proof For a constant function k on [a, b] we have
L( f , X) = k(b−a) =U( f , X)
for every partition X and so k(b−a) is the unique real number lying between all
upper sums and all lower sums. Thus
Z
b
a
k = k(b−a)
Now supppose f , g ∈ R [a, b]. Let ε > 0. By the Darboux condition, there are
partitions Y and Z of [a, b] such that
U( f ,Y) −L( f ,Y) < ε/2 and U(g, Z) −L(g, Z) < ε/2
Let X be the partition obtained by combining Y and Z. Then, because upper sums
decrease and lower sums increase when points are added to a partition, we have
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε/2 and U(g, X) −L(g, X) < ε/2
Then, with X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
),
72 Ambar N. Sengupta
U( f +g, X) −L( f +g, X) =
N

j=1

M
j
( f +g) −m
j
( f +g)

∆x
j
=
N

j=1
Var( f +g, [x
j−1
, x
j
])∆x
j

N

j=1
Var( f , [x
j−1
, x
j
])∆x
j
+
N

j=1
Var(g, [x
j−1
, x
j
])∆x
j
(by Lemma 2 (ii))
= U( f , X) −L( f , X) + U(g, X) −L(g, X) by (3.48)
< ε/2+ε/2 = ε.
Thus, by the Darbox criterion, f +g is Riemann integrable.
The other results follow in a similar way by applying other parts of Lemma
2. QED
Consider the function g on [0, 1] given by
g(x) =

1 if x is rational
−1 if x is irrational
Then g is not Riemann integrable, because no matter what partition X we take of
[0, 1] the upper sum is always
U(g, X) = 1
and the lower sum is always
L(g, X) =−1
But the absolute value of g is the constant function 1:
[g[ = 1
and so [g[ is Riemann integrable.
3.9 C[a, b] ⊂R [a, b]
Every continuous function on a compact interval is integrable. This is a central
result of integration theory.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 73
Theorem 22 For any interval [a, b] ⊂R, with a < b, the set C[a, b] of continuous
functions on [a, b] is contained in the set R [a, b] of Riemann integrable functions
on [a, b]:
C[a, b] ⊂R [a, b]
The proof has been presented in class. The key result used is Lemma 3 which says
that the variation of a continuous function can be controlled suitably to apply the
Darboux criterion for integrability.
It should be noted that discontinuous functions might also be integrable. In-
deed, any function which is dicontinuous at only finitely many points is integrable.
3.10 The Integral as a Non-negative Linear Func-
tional
We have seen that the set
R [a, b]
of all Riemann integrable functions on a compact interval [a, b] ⊂ R, with a < b,
is a linear space, i.e. that sums and constant multiples of Riemann integrable
functions are again Riemann integrable. Our next objective is to show that the
Riemann integral viewed as a function
R [a, b] →R : f →
Z
b
a
f (3.51)
is linear:
Theorem 23 For interval [a, b] ⊂R, where a <b, and any f , g ∈R [a, b], we have
Z
b
a
( f +g) =
Z
b
a
f +
Z
b
a
g (3.52)
and, for any k ∈ R,
Z
b
a
(k f ) = k
Z
b
a
f (3.53)
Thus, the Riemann integral
R [a, b] →R : f →
Z
b
a
f (3.54)
is a linear functional on the linear space R [a, b].
74 Ambar N. Sengupta
Proof Let f , g ∈ R [a, b], and k ∈ R. We have already seen, in Theorem 21,
that f +g and k f are also in R [a, b]. Now let
X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
)
be any partition of [a, b]. As usual, let Var
k
(h) denote the variation of a function h
over the interval [x
j−1
, x
j
]:
Var
k
(h) = sup
s,t∈[x
j−1
,x
j
]
(h(s) −h(t)) = M
j
(h) −m
j
(h) (3.55)
Then
U( f +g, X) =
N

j=1
Var
k
( f +g)∆
j
x

N

j=1
Var
k
( f )∆
j
x +
N

j=1
Var
k
(g)∆
j
x
= U( f , X) +U(g, X)
Similarly,
L( f +g, X) ≥L( f , X) +L(g, X) (3.56)
Thus, L( f +g, X) and U( f +g, X) are squeezed into the interval
[L( f , X) +L(g, X),U( f , X) +U(g, X)] (3.57)
Now let ε > 0. By the usual trick of combining partitions, there is a partition X of
[a, b] such that
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε/2
and
U(g, X) −L(g, X) < ε/2
So
U( f +g, X)−L( f +g, X) ≤U( f , X)+U(g, X) −[L( f , X) +L(g, X)] <ε (3.58)
which, by the Darboux criterion implies that f +g ∈ R [a, b]. (Of course, we have
just repeated the proof of Theorem 21 (ii).)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 75
Let
I( f ) =
Z
b
a
f , I(g) =
Z
b
a
g, (3.59)
I( f +g) =
Z
b
a
( f +g) (3.60)
Then I( f ) lies between U( f , X) and L( f , X), and I(g) lies between U(g, X) and
L(g, X). Consequently,
L( f , X) +L(g, X) ≤I( f ) +I(g) ≤U( f , X) +U(g, X)
Moreover,
L( f +g, X) ≤I( f +g) ≤U( f +g, X)
Putting all this together, we see that I( f +g) and the sum I( f ) +I(g) both lie in
the interval
[L( f , X) +L(g, X),U( f , X) +U(g, X)] (3.61)
and the width of this interval is < ε. Therefore, I( f ) +I(g) and I( f +g) differ by
less than ε. But ε is any positive real number. Therefore,
I( f +g) = I( f ) +I(g) (3.62)
Next, consider the function k f , where k ∈ R. Let
X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
)
be a partition of [a, b] such that
U( f , X) −L( f , X) <
ε
1+[k[
(3.63)
(The 1+ in the denominator is to avoid trouble if k happens to be 0.) Then
U(k f , X) −L(k f , X) =
N

j=1
Var
j
(k f )∆x
j
=
N

j=1
[k[Var
j
( f )∆x
j
(by Lemma 2 (iii))
= [k[ [U( f , X) −L( f , X)]
≤ [k[
ε
1+[k[
< ε.
76 Ambar N. Sengupta
Thus, the interval
[L(k f , X),U(k f , X)]
has width less than ε. The Darboux criterion implies that k f is integrable. Let
I(k f ) =
Z
b
a
(k f ) (3.64)
Now for k ≥0 we have
M(k f , [s, t]) = sup
x∈[s,t]
k f (x) = k sup
x∈[a,b]
f (x) = kM( f , [s, t]) (3.65)
and for k < 0 we have
M(k f , [s, t]) = sup
x∈[s,t]
k f (x) = k inf
x∈[a,b]
f (x) = km( f , [s, t]), (3.66)
because multiplying by a negative number reverses inequalities and transforms
sup into inf, and inf into sup. Thus, also
m(k f , [s, t]) = km( f , [s, t]) if k ≥0 (3.67)
m(k f , [s, t]) = kM( f , [s, t]) if k ≤0 (3.68)
(3.69)
Doing this for each interval [x
j−1
, x
j
], and mutiplying everything by ∆x
j
and
adding up, we see that I(k f ) lies in the interval
[kL( f , X), kU( f , X)] if k ≥0
and it lies in
[kU( f , X), kL( f , X)] if k ≤0
Now I( f ) lies between L( f , X) and U( f , X), and so kI( f ) lies in the same interval
mentioned above as I(k f ) does. Consequently,

I(k f ) −kI( f )

≤[k[ [U( f , X) −L( f , X)] < ε, (3.70)
as before. Now since ε > 0 is any positive real number we have
I(k f ) = kI( f ).
This completes the proof. QED
The Riemann integral is a non-negative linear functional in the sense that it
carried non-negative functions into non-negative numbers:
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 77
Theorem 24 If [a, b] ⊂R with a < b, and f ∈ R [a, b] is non-negative, i.e. f (x) ≥
0 for all x ∈ [a, b] then
R
b
a
f ≥0:
f ∈ R [a, b] and f ≥0 imply that
R
b
a
f ≥0 (3.71)
Consequently, the integral is order-preserving
f , ∈ R [a, b] and f ≥g imply that
R
b
a
f ≥
R
b
a
g (3.72)
Proof. This is simply because if f ≥0 then all the lower sums are ≥0 and so the
integral
R
b
a
f , being ≥ all lower sums, is also ≥0.
Next, suppose f , g ∈ R [a, b] and f ≥g. Observe that
f −g = f +(−1)g
is also in R [a, b], and is, of course, ≥0. Thus,
f = ( f −g) +g
and so, by linearity,
Z
b
a
f =
Z
b
a
( f −g) +
Z
b
a
g
Now we have just shown that the first term on the right is ≥0. Therefore,
Z
b
a
f ≥
Z
b
a
g. QED
The linear functional given by the Riemann integral is a bounded linear func-
tional on R [a, b] for the sup-norm in the following sense:
Theorem 25 For any compact interval [a, b] ⊂ R, with a < b, and for any f ∈
R [a, b] we have

Z
b
a
f

≤[[ f [[
sup
(b−a) (3.73)
Proof We know that if f ∈ R [a, b] then [ f [ ∈ R [a, b] and

Z
b
a
f


Z
b
a
[ f [ (3.74)
78 Ambar N. Sengupta
Now the function [ f [ is bounded above by the constant [[ f [[
sup
(recall from Theo-
rem 19 that this is finite.) Therefore,
Z
b
a
[ f [ ≤
Z
b
a
[[ f [[
sup
=[[ f [[
sup
(b−a)
and we are done. QED
A useful but simple consequence of this result is:
Theorem 26 For any compact interval [a, b] ⊂R, with a <b, if f
1
, f
2
, ... ∈R [a, b]
converge uniformly to a function f on [a, b] then f ∈ R [a, b] and
lim
n→∞
Z
b
a
f
n
=
Z
b
a
f (3.75)
Proof First let us show that f ∈ R [a, b]. Let ε > 0. By uniform convergence, we
have an n ∈ P such that
[[ f
n
− f [[
sup
<
ε
4(b−a)
(3.76)
By integrability of f
n
we know that there is a partition X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
) of [a, b]
such that
U( f
n
, X) −L( f
n
, X) =
N

j=1
Var
j
( f
n
)∆x
j
<
ε
2
(3.77)
Now

Var
j
( f
n
) −Var
j
( f )

≤ Var
j
( f
n
− f )
≤ 2[[ f
n
− f [[
sup
< 2
ε
4(b−a)
=
ε
2(b−a)
and so
Var
j
( f ) ≤Var
j
( f
n
) +
ε
2(b−a)
(3.78)
Therefore,
U( f , X) −L( f , X) =
N

j=1
Var
j
( f )∆x
j

N

j=1
Var
j
( f
n
)∆x
j
+
ε
2(b−a)
N

j=1
∆x
j
<
ε
2
+
ε
2
= ε.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 79
Thus, f ∈ R [a, b].
Next, we have

Z
f
n

Z
f

≤[[ f
n
− f [[
sup
(b−a) →0, as n →∞. QED
3.11 Additivity of the Integral
We will show that the integral of a function over an interval [a, b] is the sum of the
integrals of the function over [a, c] and [c, b] for any point c ∈ (a, b).
If
F : S →U
is a function, and T is a non-empty subset of S, then
F[T
denotes the restriction of F to the smaller domain T, i.e. F[T is the function
whose domain is T and whse values are given through F:
(F[T)(x) = F(x) for all x ∈ T (3.79)
Theorem 27 Let a, c, b be real numbers with a <c <b, and consider any function
f : [a, b] →R
which is intergable over [a, c] and over [c, b]. Then f ∈ R [a, b], and
Z
b
a
f =
Z
c
a
f +
Z
b
c
f (3.80)
Proof. Let ε > 0. By Darboux, there is a partition Y of [a, c] and a partition Z of
[c, b] such that
U( f [[a, c],Y) −L( f [[a, c],Y) < ε/2 (3.81)
and
U( f [[c, b], Z) −L( f [[c, b], Z) < ε/2 (3.82)
Now put together the points of Y and Z. This yields a partition X of the combined
interval [a, b]. Then,
U( f , X) =U( f [[a, c],Y) +U( f [[c, b], Z) ≥
Z
c
a
f +
Z
b
c
f (3.83)
80 Ambar N. Sengupta
and
L( f , X) = L( f [[a, c],Y) +L( f [[c, b], Z) ≤
Z
c
a
f +
Z
b
c
f (3.84)
Consequently,
U( f , X) −L( f , X) = U( f [[a, c],Y) +U( f [[c, b], Z) − [L( f [[a, c],Y) +L( f [[c, b], Z)]
= U( f [[a, c],Y) −L( f [[a, c],Y) + U( f [[c, b], Z) −L( f [[c, b], Z)
< ε/2+ε/2
= ε
Therefore, by Darboux, f ∈ R [a, b].
Now from (3.83) and (3.84) it follows that the sum
Z
c
a
f +
Z
b
c
f
lies between L( f , X) and U( f , X), and, of course, so does
R
b
a
f . Therefore,
R
c
a
f +
R
b
c
f and
R
b
a
f differ by less than ε.
Since ε > 0 is arbitrary, it follows that
Z
b
a
f =
Z
c
a
f +
Z
b
c
f . QED
Now we prove that if a function is ingtergable on an interval then it is inte-
grable on any sub-interval:
Theorem 28 If [a, b] ⊂ R, with a < b, and if s, t ∈ [a, b] with s < t then for any
function f ∈ R [a, b] we have f [[s, t] ∈ R [s, t].
Proof This is, as always, a matter of applying Darboux using one of the properties
of Var. Let ε > 0. Since f ∈ R [a, b] there is a partition Y of [a, b] such that
U( f ,Y) −L( f ,Y) < ε.
Add to Y the points s and t, in case they are not in Y, to obtain a partition
Z = (z
0
, ..., z
M
)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 81
of [a, b]. We know that this lowers the upper sum and raises the lower sum and so
U( f , Z) −L( f , Z) < ε.
Now let X be the partition of [s, t] obtained by taking the points of Z which are in
[s, t]. Then
U( f , Z) −L( f , Z) =U( f [[s, t], X) −L( f [[s, t], X) +

j∈J

M
j
( f ) −m
j
( f )

∆x
j
(3.85)
where J consists of those j ∈ ¦1, ..., M¦ for which the interval [z
j−1
, z
j
] is not
contained in [s, t]. Therefore,
U( f , Z) −L( f , Z) ≤U( f [[s, t], X) −L( f [[s, t], X) < ε,
and we are done. QED
3.12 Monotone Functions are Riemann Integrable
We have made the remark that not every Riemann integrable function is continu-
ous. We will now prove that every monotone function is Riemann integrable on
any compact interval.
Let
f : [a, b] →R
be a monotone function, where [a, b] ⊂R and a < b. Let
X = (x
0
, x
1
, ..., x
N
)
be any partition of [a, b]. Then
U( f , X) −L( f , X) =
N

j=1
Var
j
( f )∆x
j

N

j=1
Var
j
( f )

[[X[[
where
[[X[[ = max
1≤j≤N
∆x
j
,
82 Ambar N. Sengupta
is the maximum width of the intervals making up the partition.
Suppose for convenience that f is monotone non-decreasing, i.e.
f (x) ≤ f (y) for all x, y ∈ [a, b] with x ≤y
Then, by the property of Var for monotone functions given in (3.41) we have
Var
j
( f ) = f (x
j
) − f (x
j−1
) for all j ∈ ¦1, ..., N¦
Therefore, the sum of the variations over all the intervals is simply the variation
over the full interval:
N

j=1
Var
j
( f ) = Var( f , [a, b]) (3.86)
The same conclusion holds even if f is monotone non-increasing, i.e. if
f (x) ≤ f (y) for all x, y ∈ [a, b] with x ≥y
Thus, in either case, we have
U( f , X) −L( f , X) = Var( f , [a, b])[[X[[ (3.87)
To make this less than any chosen ε > 0 all we have to do is take a partition X
with all the interval sizes less than
ε/[1+Var( f , [a, b])].
For example, we could divide [a, b] into N equal pieces, with N chosen large
enough that
b−a
N
<
ε
1+Var( f , [a, b])
.
Thus we have proved:
Theorem 29 If f is a monotone function on a compact interval [a, b] ⊂ R, with
a < b, then f ∈ R [a, b].
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 83
3.13 Riemann Sums and the Riemann Integral
We have used the Archimedean strategy of capturing the value of the integral
between upper sums and lower sums. This approach led to a smooth development
of the central results of the theory. However, this method is not the most intuitive
in understanding concepts such as arc length. It is therefore useful to understand
the Riemann integral in terms of Riemann sums as well. This method is also
amenable to generalizations such as the notion of line integrals. Furthermore, the
Riemann sum approach motivates the construction of more advanced notions such
as the stochastic integral of Itô.
So consider a function
f : [a, b] →R
where [a, b] ⊂R with a < b. Let
X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
)
be any partition of [a, b]. Recall that the norm or width of X is the length of the
largest interval
[[X[[ = max
j
∆x
j
Now consider any sequence
X

= (x

1
, ..., x

N
)
subordinate to X, i.e. with x

j
∈ [x
j−1
, x
j
] for each j. We denote this by
X

< X
Recall the Riemann sum
S( f , X, X

) =
N

j=1
f (x

j
)∆x
j
(3.88)
Now
m
j
≤ f (x

j
) ≤M
j
,
for each j, and so
L( f , X) ≤S( f , X, X

) ≤U( f , X) (3.89)
If f is integrable, with I =
R
b
a
, then for any ε > 0 we can choose partition X such
that
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε.
84 Ambar N. Sengupta
Since both I and S( f , X, X

) are squeezed in between the upper and lower sums,
it follows that
[S( f , X, X

) −I[ < ε (3.90)
The following result is is often used to define the Riemann integral in alterna-
tive approaches to the theory.
Theorem 30 A function f : [a, b] →R is Riemann integrable if and only if there
is a real number I such that for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 such that
[S( f , X, X

) −I[ < ε (3.91)
for every partition X of norm < δ and every X

< X. In this case,
I =
Z
b
a
f
Proof. Suppose the given condition holds. Then there is a real number I such
that for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 for which the condition
[S( f , X, X

) −I[ < ε/4 (3.92)
holds for all partitions X of [a, b] of width < δ and all X

< X. Thus,
I −ε/4 <
N

j=1
f (x

j
)∆x
j
< I +ε/4
for every sequence X

< X. Then, taking the supremum over all possible x

1
in the
first interval [x
0
, x
1
], we see that
M
1
∆x
1
+
N

j=2
f (x

j
)∆x
j
≤I +ε/4
and, taking the infimum over all possible x

1
in [x
0
, x
1
], we have
I −ε/4 ≤m
1
∆x
1
+
N

j=2
f (x

j
)∆x
j
Carrying this successively for j = 2, 3, ..., N, we conclude that
I −ε/4 ≤L( f , X) ≤U( f , X) ≤I +ε/4
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 85
Consequently,
U( f , X) −L( f , X) ≤ε/2 < ε
and so, by Darboux, f ∈ R [a, b]. Moreover, since both I and the integral
R
b
a
f
are trapped in the interval [L( f , X),U( f , X)] whose width is ε it follows that I and
R
b
a
f differ by less than ε. But, ε is any positive real number. Thus,
I =
Z
b
a
f .
For the converse, suppose f ∈ R [a, b]. Let ε > 0. By Darboux, there is a
partition
Y = (y
0
, ..., y
N
)
of [a, b] such that U( f ,Y) and L( f ,Y) differ by less than ε:
U( f ,Y) −L( f ,Y) < ε/2 (3.93)
Now let
δ =
ε/2
1+2N[[ f [[
sup
. (3.94)
(Where we get this from will be clear later.) Consider any partition
X = (x
0
, ..., x
T
)
of [a, b] of norm less than δ:
[[X[[ < δ
We will compare U −L for X with that for Y and conclude that U −L for X is
indeed less than ε. Using our standard trick, let Z be the partition of [a, b] obtained
by combining X and Y. Then
U( f , Z) −L( f , Z) ≤U( f ,Y) −L( f ,Y) < ε/2 (3.95)
We also know by Lemma 1 that U −L for Z differs from that for X by at most
2N[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[, because at most N points were added to X to obtain Z. Thus, the
most U −L for X could be is
U( f , Z) −L( f , Z) +2N[[ f [[
sup
[[X[[ (3.96)
Thus,
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε/2+2N[[ f [[
sup
δ (3.97)
86 Ambar N. Sengupta
In (3.94) we chose δ just so this right side now works out to ε:
U( f , X) −L( f , X) < ε/2+ε/2 = ε (3.98)
Now take any X

<X. Then the Riemann sum S( f , X, X

) is sandwiched between
the lower sum L( f , X) and the upper sum U( f , X), and so it the integral
R
b
a
f .
Therefore, S( f , X, X

) and
R
b
a
f both lie in the interval
[L( f , X),U( f , X)]
whose width is < ε. Thus,

S( f , X, X

) −
Z
b
a
f

< ε (3.99)
We have shown that for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 such that (3.99) holds for any
partition X of width < δ and any X

< X. QED
Bibliography
[1] Conway, John H. 2001. On Numbers and Games. (Second Edition) A.K.
Peters.
[2] Dedekind, Richard. 1901. Essays on the Theory of Numbers. The
Open Court Publishing Company. Online at http://www.gutenberg.org/
etext/21016
[3] Hilbert, David. 1956. Grundlagen der Geometrie. (Eight Edition, with
supplementary material and revisions by Paul Bernays.) H.G. Verlagsge-
sellschaft mbH, Stuttgart.
[4] Knuth, Donald.1974. Surreal Numbers. Addison-Wesley Professional.
[5] Rudin, Walter. 1976. Principles of Mathematical Analysis. (Third Edition.)
McGraw-Hill.
87
88 Ambar N. Sengupta
Appendix A
Question Bank
Set 1
1. Prove that there is no rational number whose square is 7.
89
90 Ambar N. Sengupta
2. Let ε be any positive real number.
(i) Show that there is an n
0
∈ N such that
1
n
2
< ε
for all n ∈ N with n ≥n
0
.
(ii) Let a be any real number. Show that there is some n
1
∈ N such that
2a
1
n
< ε
for all n ∈ N with n ≥n
1
.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 91
3. Suppose a is a positive real number with a
2
< 7. Show that

a+
1
n

2
< ε
for all n ∈ N large enough (i.e. there is some n
/
∈ N such that the preceding
inequality holds for all natural numbers n ≥n
/
).
92 Ambar N. Sengupta
4. Let
S =¦x ∈ R : x > 0andx
2
< 7¦.
(i) Show that S = / 0.
(ii) Show that S is bounded above in R.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 93
(iii) Let a = supS. Prove that a
2
≥7. (Hint: Suppose a
2
were less than 7.
Then use the result of Problem 3.)
(iv) Prove that a
2
is, in fact, equal to 7. Thus, there is a real number whose
square is 7.
94 Ambar N. Sengupta
Set 2
1. For the set B =¦−4, 8¦∪[1, 7) ∪[9, ∞), viewed as a subset of R

:
(i) B
0
=
(ii) ∂B =
(iii) B
c
=
(iv) the interior of the complement B
c
is
(B
c
)
0
=
(v) (B
0
)
c
=
(vi) B =
(vii) ∂B =
(viii) ∂B
0
=
(ix) The interior of (B
0
)
c
is:
(x) The closure of B
c
is:
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 95
2. Provide brief explanations/answers for the following:
(i) If U is an open set then U
0
=
(ii) For any set A, the interior of the interior of A is the interior of A, i.e.
(A
0
)
0
= A
0
.
(iii) The set [0, ∞) is closed as a subset of R.
(iv) If S is closed then its closure S is S itself, i.e. S = S.
(v) Is there a subset of R whose boundary in R is all of R?
96 Ambar N. Sengupta
3. Give an example of an open cover of (−1, 1) which does not have a finite
subcover.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 97
Set 5
1. Consider the partition
X = (.25, .5, .75, 1)
of [0, 1]. For the function f on [0, 1] given by
f (x) = x
2
for all x ∈ [0, 1]
(i) Work out the upper sumU( f , X)
(ii) Work out the Riemann sum S( f , X, X

), where
X

= (0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8)
98 Ambar N. Sengupta
2. Consider the partition
X =

1
N
,
2
N
, ...,
N
N

of [0, 1]. For the function f on [0, 1] given by
f (x) = x
2
for all x ∈ [0, 1]
(i) Show that
U( f , X) =
1
6

1+
1
N

2+
1
N

[Hint: Use the sum formula 1
2
+2
2
+ +k
2
= k(k +1)(2k +1)/6.]
(ii) Show that
L( f , X) =
1
6

1−
1
N

2−
1
N

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 99
(iii) Assuming that f is integrable, prove that
Z
1
0
x
2
dx =
1
3
using the definition of the Riemann integral and the results of (i) and
(ii).
100 Ambar N. Sengupta
3. Consider the function g on [0, 1] given by
g(x) =

1 if x is rational
−1 if x is irrational
Prove that g is not Riemann integrable.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 101
4. Prove that, for a, b ∈ R with a < b, if f , g ∈ R [a, b], then f +g ∈ R [a, b].
102 Ambar N. Sengupta
Set 6
1. Write out in a complete and neat way the proof that every continuous func-
tion on a compact interval is Riemann integrable.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 103
2. For a function
f : [a, b] →R
we define the variation Var( f ) by
Var( f ) = sup
x,y∈[a,b]
( f (x) − f (y)) = M( f ) −m( f ),
where
M( f ) = sup
x∈[a,b]
f (x), andm( f ) = inf
x∈[a,b]
f (x).
Prove that for functions f and g on [a, b],
Var( f g) ≤M([ f [)Var(g) +m([g[)Var( f )
104 Ambar N. Sengupta
3. Explain the notion of the Riemann integral by clearly stating the definitions
of upper sums and lower sums, all properly explained in your own terms,
and then stating and explaining the definition of the Riemann integral. Work
out a simple integral in such a way as to illustrate the definition of the Rie-
mann integral. Clearly explain, in your own words, the Darboux criterion.
(Please note that every piece of notation you bring in must explained.)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 105
Test 1
1. Mark True or False:
(i) If S is a bounded subset of R then it contains a largest element
(ii) If S is a bounded, non-empty subset of R then it has a least upper
bound in R
(iii) The point ∞ is a boundary point of [1, ∞]
(iv) The point 1 is an interior point of [0, 1]
(v) The point 4 is a boundary point of [0, 4)
(vi) The set [0, ∞) is a closed subset of R

(vii) The set [0, ∞) is a closed subset of R
(viii) Every real number is a boundary point of Q
(ix) The set ¦1, 2, 3¦ is compact
(x) The set (1, 5] is compact
106 Ambar N. Sengupta
2. Prove one of the following statements:
(i) The union of any collection of open sets is open.
(ii) The complement of a closed set is open.
(ii) If S is a non-empty subset of R

then supS is in the closure S.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 107
3. State
(i) the Heine-Borel Theorem
(ii) the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem.
108 Ambar N. Sengupta
4. State the definitions of the following:
(i) Limit point of a sequence (x
n
) in R

.
(ii) Limit of a sequence (x
n
)in R

.
(iii) A Cauchy sequence in R.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 109
Test 2
1. Mark True or False:
(i) A continuous function on any subset of R is bounded.
(ii) A continuous function on any closed subset of R is bounded.
(iii) A continuous function on a compact set is bounded.
(iv) A continuous function on a compact set attains a mimimum value at
some point in the set.
(v) If a sequence of functions converges to a function pointwise then it
converges uniformly.
(vi) If a sequence of functions converges to a function unformly then it
converges pointwise.
(vii) If f
n
: [0, 1] →R is a sequence of functions, and f
n
→ f , as n →∞,
pointwise, and if each f
n
is continuous at a point p ∈ [0, 1], then f is
continuous at p.
(viii) Every uniformly Cauchy sequence of functions converges uniformly.
(ix) Every uniformly convergent sequence of functions is uniformly Cauchy.
(x) The uniform limit of a sequence of continuous functions is continuous.
110 Ambar N. Sengupta
2. Suppose f : [0, 1] →Ris continuous, and f (p) >0 for some p ∈[0, 1]. Show
that there is a neighborhood U of p such that f (x) > 0 for all x ∈U ∩[0, 1].
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 111
3. State
(i) the Intermediate Value Theorem
(ii) the Extreme Value theorem.
112 Ambar N. Sengupta
4. Show that the equation
x
3
+5x −2 = 0
has a solution in the interval (0, 1).
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 113
Test 3
1. Consider a function f on an interval [a, b] ⊂R, where a < b,:
f : [a, b] →R.
(i) Let X = (a, b) be the simplest partition of [a, b]. Write down an ex-
pression for L( f , X), explaining your notation clearly. (5pts)
(ii) Now consider a partition X
/
which contains one addtional point t, i.e.
X
/
= (a, t, b),
where a < t < b. Write down an expression for L( f , X
/
), again ex-
plaining the notation clearly. (5pts)
114 Ambar N. Sengupta
(iii) Show that (5pts)
L( f , X
/
) ≥L( f , X).
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 115
2. Consider a function f : [a, b] →R, where [a, b] ⊂R and a < b. Let X and Y
be partitions of [a, b] with Y containing all the points of X and some more.
Prove that (5pts)
U( f ,Y) −L( f ,Y) ≤U( f , X) −L( f , X)
116 Ambar N. Sengupta
3. If f ∈ R [a, b] and [c, d] ⊂[a, b] prove that f ∈ R [c, d]. (5pts)
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 117
4. Mark TRUE or FALSE: (10pts)
a. For any function f : [a, b] → R and any partition X = (x
0
, ..., x
N
) of
[a, b],
U( f , X) −L( f , X) =
N

j=1
Var
j
( f )∆x
j
,
where Var
j
( f ) = sup
x∈[x
j−1
,x
j
]
f (x) −inf
x∈[x
j−1
,x
j
]
f (x), and ∆x
j
= x
j

x
j−1
.
b. Every Riemann integrable function is bounded.
c. Every bounded function is Riemann integrable.
d. Every monotone function is Riemann integrable.
e. Every continuous function is Riemann integrable.
f. Every Riemann integrable function is continuous.
g. If f ∈ R [a, b] and f is never zero then 1/ f ∈ R [a, b].
h. For a bounded function on an interval [a, b] ⊂R, there is always a real
number which is ≥ all the lower sums and ≤ all the upper sums.
i. If [ f [ ∈ R [a, b] then f ∈ R [a, b].
j. If f ∈ R [a, b] then [ f [ ∈ R [a, b].
118 Ambar N. Sengupta
Cumulative Question Set
1. Consider the set
S = [2, 4) ∪(5, 6) ∪¦1, 8¦.
Mark True or False:
(i) 2 is an interior point of S.
(ii) 4 is an interior point of S.
(iii) 4 is a boundary point of S.
(iv) 9 is an isolated point of S.
(v) 1 is an isolated point of S.
(vi) S is an open set.
(vii) S is a closed set.
(viii) S is compact.
(ix) Every sequence in S has a subsequence which is convergent.
(x) Every sequence in S has a subsequence converging to a point in S.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 119
2. Let S be a non-empty subset of R.
(i) If t a real number with t < supS. Explain why there exists x ∈ S with
x >t.
(ii) Show that there is a sequence of elements s
n
∈ S such that s
n
→supS.
[Hint: Let U = supS. First assume that S is bounded above; in this
case U ∈ R. Now apply (i) to produce an s
n
using 1/n for t. If you
have time, try also the case U = ∞.]
120 Ambar N. Sengupta
3. Suppose f is continuous at a point p, and f (p) > 2. Prove that there is
a δ > 0 such that f (x) > 0 for all x in the domain of f which lie in the
neighborhood (p−δ, p+δ).
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 121
4. Let f be a continuous function on a closed and bounded set S ⊂ R. Prove
that f reaches its maximum value on S, i.e. there is a point p ∈ S such that
f (p) = sup
x∈S
f (x). [Hint: Let U = sup
x∈S
f (x). Then choose a sequence
of points s
n
∈ S such that f (s
n
) →U. Apply Bolzano-Weierstrass.]
122 Ambar N. Sengupta
5. Let a, b ∈ R, with a < b. Let ( f
n
) be a sequence of functions on [a, b]. Mark
True or False:
(i) If there is a function f on [a, b] such that f
n
(x) → f (x) for all x ∈ [a, b]
then f
n
→ f uniformly.
(ii) If f
n
→ f uniformly then f
n
(x) → f (x) for all x ∈ [a, b].
(iii) If ( f
n
) is Cauchy in sup-norm then f
n
→ f uniformly, for some func-
tion f on [a, b].
(iv) If f
n
→ f uniformly and each f
n
is continuous then f is continuous.
(v) If f
n
(x) → f (x) for every x ∈ [a, b], and if each f
n
is continuous, then
f is continuous.
Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 123
6. Consider an interval [a, b] ⊂R. Mark true or false.
(i) C[a, b] ⊂R[a, b].
(ii) If f ∈ R[a, b] then

Z
b
a
f


Z
b
a
[ f [
(iii) If f
n
∈ R[a, b], for n ∈ N, and f
n
(x) → f (x) for every x ∈ [a, b] then
R
b
a
f
n

R
b
a
f .
(iv) If X is a partition of [a, b], and f ∈ R[a, b], then
L( f , X) ≤
Z
b
a
f
(v) If f is a function on [a, b], and X and Y are partitions of [a, b] with
X ⊂Y then
U( f , X) <U( f ,Y)

2

Ambar N. Sengupta

Contents
Introductory Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Ordered Fields and The Real Number System 1.1 Ordered Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.1 Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2 Order Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3 Ordered Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.4 The absolute value function . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.5 The Archimedean Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 The Real Number System R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.1 Hilbert Maximality and the Completeness Property 1.2.2 Completeness of R and measurement . . . . . . . Problem Set 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Extended Real Line and Its Topology 2.1 The extended real line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Types of points for a set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Interior, Exterior, and Boundary of a Set . . . . . 2.5 Open Sets and Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 Closed Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 Open Sets and Closed Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 Closed sets in R and in R∗ . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9 Closure of a set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.10 The closure of a set is closed . . . . . . . . . . . 2.11 S is the smallest closed set containing S . . . . . 2.12 R∗ is compact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.13 Compactness of closed subsets of R∗ . . . . . . . 2.14 The Heine-Borel Theorem: Compact subsets of R 3 5 7 8 9 13 14 16 18 18 19 20 20 23 23 24 25 27 28 30 30 31 31 32 32 32 35 36

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. . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . .21 2. 3. . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 2. . . . . . . .27 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Limits points of a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Approaching the Riemann Integral . . . . . . . . . .28 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . b] . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Riemann Sums and the Riemann Integral .4 Refining Partitions .7 Variation of a Function . . . The sequence Rn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem . . .11 Additivity of the Integral . . . .12 Monotone Functions are Riemann Integrable . . . Convergent sequences and Cauchy sequences Every Cauchy sequence is bounded . . . .29 2. . . . . . . . Connected Sets . . The limit of a sequence is unique . . . . . . .19 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Integrable functions are bounded . . . . . . b] ⊂ R [a. . .15 2. . . 3. .16 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . A Question Bank . . . . . . . . . . . The rationals are countable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The real numbers are uncountable . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 2.24 2. . . . Monotone Sequences . Limit points and suprema and infima . . . . . . .26 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 2. . . . . . . 3. Sengupta . . . Every Cauchy sequence is convergent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Definition of the Riemann Integral . . . . . . . . . .20 2. . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 C[a. . . . . . . . . .8 The algebra R [a. . . . 37 38 39 39 41 42 43 44 48 49 49 50 51 52 54 55 57 58 59 61 62 65 66 67 70 72 73 79 81 83 86 89 3 Integration 3. . . b] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The sequence 1/n . . . . . . . . 3. .4 2. .25 2. . . .10 The Integral as a Non-negative Linear Functional 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Simple Examples of limits . . . . . . Ambar N. . . . . . .2 Riemann Sums . . . . . . .18 2. . . . . . .5 The Darboux Criterion . . . . . . 3. . Limit of a sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

There are several different ideologies that would guide the presentation of concepts and proofs in any course in real analysis: (i) the historical way (ii) the most natural way (iii) the most efficient way (iv) a comprehensive way. the Riemann integral of a function is the unique real number lying between the upper Riemann sums and lower Riemann sums. I will update them time to time. Richardson were used. a choice has to be made whether to treat the Cauchy sequence point of view or the existence of suprema as fundamental. for which we followed the Richardson notes. at LSU in the Fall of 2006. The downside is that there is little possibility of conveying any insights or intuition. a set of notes by Professor L. and perhaps the best example of this approach is Rudin’s Principles of Mathematical Analysis [5]. . These notes have not been proof read carefully. it conforms to the classical geometric notion of a positive real number being specified by quantities greater than it and those less than it. Math 4031. In studying the notion of completeness. This point of view also guides the choice of approach in the treatment of the Riemann integral. In addition to these notes. I have chosen the latter.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 5 Introductory Remarks These notes were written for an introductory real analysis class. The notes here do not include a chapter on continuous functions. explaining the insights from several different approaches The reality of constraints of time makes (iii) the most convenient approach.

Sengupta .6 Ambar N.

where K is some point between E and F. a segment EF is taken to exceed a segment GH. 7 . In Euclid’s Elements. Euclid also defines the ratio XY/ZW to be greater than the ratio PQ/RS : XY PQ > ZW RS if they are unequal and if whenever mZW>nXY then also mRS>nPQ. as ratios of magnitudes. foundational. some multiple of any one of them exceeds the other.Chapter 1 Ordered Fields and The Real Number System In this chapter we go over the essential. An important feature of this order relation is encapsulated in the archimedean axiom: given any two segments. facts about the real number system. such as segments or planar regions or even angles. The ratio AB CD is then essentially the equivalence class of all segment pairs which are in the same ratio as AB is to CD. Then aAa pair PQ and RS if for any positive numbers n and m. symbolically EF>GH if EF is congruent to a segment GK. Positive real numbers arose from geometry in Greek mathematics. In the discussion below we focus on segments. the segment nAB (which is n copies of AB laid contiguously) exceeds the segment mCD if and only if the segment nPQ exceeds the segment mRS.

Sengupta A special case is that of commensurate segments: if a whole multiple of AB. Dedekind’s method has beed generalized in a striking. an algebraic structure called a field emerges (this is discussed at length by Hilbert [3]).1.8 Ambar N. and is denoted by m . and then the real numbers by Dedekind’s method of identifying a real number with a splitting of the rationals into two disjoint classes with members of one class exceeding those of the other. The maximal such field. and absolute values. then the rationals. constitutes the real number system R. The axioms of geometry. constructing the natural numbers. is congruent to a whole multiple of CD. then the ratio AB is CD rational. and vastly more powerful way. when 0 and negatives are included. and the Euclidean construction procedures. say mCD. Knuth’s novel [4] is an unusual and entertaining presentation of this construction. The reader wishing to move on to properties of the real numbers may skim the contents of the first few subsections. In either case. Such ratios are the rational numbers. respecting the axioms of geometry pertaining to the order relation and congruence. say nAB. who shows how the Dedekind cut method can be applied to abstract sets leading to the construction of all real numbers as well as transcendentals and infinitesimals. . n It is readily checked that m p = n q if and only if qm = pn. ordered fields.4. the real number system may be constructed by starting with the empty set. Leaving aside the historical background. by Conway [1]. 1. and proceed to subsection 1. Euclid’s considerations suggest that a ratio of segments may be understood in terms of a set of rational numbers. show that ratios of segments can be added and multiplied and.1 Ordered Fields In this section we define and prove simple properties of fields. Other ratios are irrational. for example the set of all those rationals which exceed the given ratio.

The associative law holds for addition a(bc) = (ab)c for all a.2) (1. for which a1 = a = 1a for all a ∈ F (1. There is an element 0 ∈ F. c ∈ F (1. called the reciprocal of a: aa−1 = 1 = a−1 a for all non-zero a ∈ F (1. Every non-zero element a ∈ F has an multiplicative inverse a−1 . Every element a ∈ F has an additive inverse −a. b) → ab satisfying the following axioms: 1. The associative law holds for addition a + (b + c) = (a + b) + c for all a. c ∈ F (1. b.1) 2. the zero or additive identity element.5) 5.8) 8. The commutative law holds for addition: a+b = b+a for all a. b ∈ F (1. for which a+0 = a = 0+a for all a ∈ F (1. The associative law holds for multiplication 6.3) (1.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 9 1. the unit or multiplicative identity element. There is an element 1 ∈ F. called the negative of a: a + (−a) = 0 = (−a) + a 4.4) 3.7) 7. b. b) → a + b and Multiplication : F × F → F : (a.9) .6) (1.1.1 Fields A field F is a set along with two binary operations Addition : F × F → F : (a.

b ∈ F Ambar N. Sengupta (1. In particular.11) 11. Moreover. The element 1 is not equal to the element 0: 1=0 We have not attempted to provide a minimal axiom set. the commutativity of addition can be deduced from the other axioms. we will just write a+b+c instead of a + (b + c). The commutative law holds for multiplication: ab = ba 10. Let us note a few simple consequences: Theorem 1 If x ∈ F is such that a + x = a for some a ∈ F and y ∈ F is such that by = b for some non-zero b ∈ F then x=0 and y = 1. (b + c)a = ba + ca for all a. and abc instead of abc. c ∈ F (1.10) for all a. Because of the associative laws. b. the additive identity and the multiplicative identity are unique. The distributive law holds: a(b + c) = ab + ac. For instance. and some of the axioms may be deduced from others. −0 = 0 and 1−1 = 1 .10 9.

Adding −a to a+x = a shows that x is 0.}. −2. where now 1 is the number one in Z. 2a = a + a. We can multiply any element a ∈ F by an integer as follows. b and the product ab−1 as a = ab−1 b There are many other easy consequences of the axioms which we will use without comment.... b ∈ F. . −1. 1. The other claims follow from 0+0 = 0 and 1 · 1 = 1. and the set of integers by Z = {0. (−a)b = −ab. QED 11 Theorem 2 If a. Next.13) (1.12) and (b−1 )−1 = b.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Proof. . 3. 2. 3. 2. Moreover. First define 1a = a. then −(−a) = a. We denote the set of natural numbers by P: P = {1.}. def . and (−a)(−b) = ab. The multiplicative inverse a−1 is best written as the reciprocal: 1 = b−1 . −3.. (1. and b = 0. Multiplying by = b by b−1 shows that y is 1.

inductively. 1}. . We also define a0 = 1 for non-zero a ∈ F and. y ∈ Z and all a ∈ F x(a + b) = xa + xb for all x ∈ Z and all a. b ∈ F (x + y)a = xa + ya for all x. 1 am We will use without comment simple facts such as a−m = (a−1 )n = (am )n = amn .12 and. with addition and multiplication defined modulo 2. (n + 1)a = na + a for all a ∈ F and all n ∈ P.14) (1. valid for suitable a ∈ F and m. Next define negative multiples by (−n)a = −(na) for all n ∈ P and all a ∈ F. for example. 0a = a def Ambar N.15) (1. Sengupta (1.19) There is a multiplicative analog of this given by powers of elements. n ∈ Z. however.18) (1. The following facts can be readily verified: x(ya) = (xy)a for all x.17) (1. The simplest example of a field is the two-element field Z2 = {0. Finally. If m is a positive integer and a ∈ F we define a1 = a and am+1 = am a. for any positive integer m and non-zero a ∈ F. be concerned with fields which permit a consistent ordering of their elements. 1+1 = 0 in Z2 We will. y ∈ Z and all a ∈ F (1.16) where 0 is the integer 0.

similarly. O2. It is convenient to adopt the convention that x < y means (x. the sup or the inf might not exist.20) If there is a least such upper bound then that element is called the supremum of T : sup T = the least upper bound of T We define similarly lower bounds and infimums: if l ≤ t for every t ∈ T then l is called a lower bound of T and inf T = the greatest lower bound of T Of course.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 13 1. If x < y and y < z then x < z.22) (1. For any x. y) of elements of S satisfying the conditions O1 and O2 below. x ≥ y means x = y or x > y If T is a subset of an ordered set S then an element u ∈ S is said to be an upper bound of T if t ≤ u for all t ∈ T (1.21) . or x < y. or y < x. The axioms of order are: O1. (1. It is also convenient to use the notation: x ≤ y means x = y or x < y and.23) (1. y) ∈ O We also write y>x to mean x < y.1.2 Order Relations An order relation on a set S is a set O of ordered pairs (x. y ∈ F exactly one of the following hold: x = y.

We have the following simple observations for an ordered field: Theorem 3 Let F be an ordered field. If x > 0 we say that x is positive.3 Ordered Fields An ordered field is a field F with an order relation in which. z ∈ F and x < y.25) (1. Sengupta 1. y. and if also z > 0. then xz < yz: x < y and z > 0 imply xz < yz for all x. y. z ∈ F and x < y then x + z < y + z: x < y implies x + z < y + z for all x.24) . z ∈ F OF2. z ∈ F. in addition to the field and order axioms stated above. y.1. If x < 0 we say that x is negative. If x. Then (i) x > 0 if and only if −x < 0 (ii) For any non-zero x ∈ F we have x2 > 0 (iii) 1 > 0 (iv) For any r ∈ Z the element r1 ∈ F is > 0 if r is a positive integer and is < 0 if r is a negative integer (v) x > y holds if and only if x − y > 0 (vi) If x ∈ F and x > 0 then 1/x > 0 (vii) The product of two positive elements is positive (viii) The product of a positive and negative is negative (ix) The product of two negative elements is negative (x) If x > y and z < 0 then xz < yz. If x. (xi) If x > y then −x < −y (xii) If x > y > 0 then 1/x < 1/y (1.14 Ambar N. y. the following hold: OF1.

QED Observe that if x > 0 then 2x = x + x > x + 0 = x. and. Thus. (ii) If x > 0 then. (vi) Suppose x > 0. we have for all n ∈ P and x > 0 in F (1. if x < 0 then we know that −x > 0 and so x2 = (−x)(−x) > (−x)0 = 0. but we know that 1 > 0. it follows that 1/x cannot be zero. and we can assume that Z⊂F (1. We prove some of the results. if −x < 0 then adding x to both sides shows that x > 0. x(1/x) would have to be < 0. and 1 = 0. Since x(1/x) = 1.. and so 0 > −x. adding −x − y shows that −y < −x. proceeding inductively. however. we have x2 = xx > x0 = 0. If 1/x < 0 then.26) In particular. and 3x = 2x + x > 2x + 0 = 2x. on identifying n ∈ P with n1F .27) 0 < x < 2x < 3x < · · · < nx < (n + 1)x < · · · . (xi) If x > y then.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Proof. Conversely. it follows that 1 > 0. by OF2. 15 (iii) Since 1 is 12 . (xii) If x > y > 0 then xy > 0 and hence 1/(xy) > 0. 2. 1/x > 0.. On the other hand. (i) Suppose x > 0. Then we have x + (−x) > 0 + (−x). inside the ordered field F we have a copy of the natural numbers 1. This then leads to a copy of the integers inside F. where 1F is the unit element in F. 3. . Multiplying x > y by the positive element 1/(xy) gives 1/y > 1/x.

16 Going further. The definition of |x| shows directly that | − x| = |x| ≥ 0 It is also useful to observe that |x| is the larger of x and −x We think of |a − b| as measuring the difference between a and b. Ambar N. |1| = 1. b ∈ F we have: (i) the triangle inequality |a + b| ≤ |a| + |b| Equality holds if and only if a and b are both ≥ 0 or both ≤ 0.1. and n = 0. We have then Theorem 4 For any a. (1. n The set of all such ratios m/n is the set of rationals Q⊂F and is an ordered subfield of the ordered field F.28) 1.29) .4 The absolute value function The absolute value | · | function in an ordered field F is defined by |x| = For instance. Sengupta (1.32) (1. and | − 1| = 1.30) x −x if x ≥ 0 if x ≤ 0 (1. n ∈ Z.31) for all x ∈ F (1. we have then the ratio m ∈ F. if m.

We know that |x| is x or −x.33). using the triangle inequality we have |a − b| + |b| ≥ |a + b − b| = |a|. Next. in particular. whichever is ≥ 0. |a||b| is ab or −ab. (−a)b. Consequently. (−a)(−b). a(−b). Equality holds if and only if |a| = a and |b| = b or |a| = −a and |b| = −b. 17 (1. i. Consequently. the product |a||b| is one of the elements ab. Thus.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis (ii) the absolute values differ by at most the difference in a and b: |a| − |b| ≤ |a − b| (iii) |ab| = |a||b|. whichever is ≥ 0. Observe that |b − a| = |a − b|. |a| + |b| is greater or equal to a + b and −(a + b). |a − b| is ≥ to both |a| − |b| and −(|a| − |b|). we have proved (1. Thus. and so |a| + |b| ≥ |a + b|. |a| + |b| is greater or equal to ±a + (±b).33) Proof. it is greater or equal to a + b and (−a) + (−b). QED . equality holds if and only if a and b are either both ≥ 0 or both ≤ 0. Therefore. Recall that |x| is the larger of x and −x. Thus. and so it is |ab|. and so |a − b| ≥ |a| − |b|. Interchanging a and b yields: |b − a| ≥ |b| − |a|.e. Since the larger of the latter is |a| − |b| . one of the elements ab and −ab.

QED In an archimedean ordered field there are no infinities.18 Ambar N. but we shall not describe a construction in these notes. Let x.1. . 2. Take n = qr + 1. . We will assume that it is an ordered field in which the completeness axiom of completeness holds.. s (1. it is essential to actually construct such a system so as to be sure that there is no hidden contradiction between the axioms. Then x= where p. QED 1. q. Then nx = qr(p/q) + p/q > pr ≥ r = y. Proof. If y ≥ 0 then we have 1x > y and we are done. s p q r y= .. 3. with x > 0.2 The Real Number System R We shall work with the real number system in an axiomatic way. and there are also no infinitesimals: Theorem 6 If F is an archimedean field then for any w > 0 in F there is an n ∈ P such that 1 w < x. there exists a multiple of x which exceeds y: nx > y for some n ∈ {1. Needless to say. Now suppose x.} The field Q of rationals is clearly archimedean: Theorem 5 The ordered field Q of rationals is acrhimedean. Sengupta 1. y ∈ F.34) and we are done. y ∈ Q. y > 0. with x > 0.5 The Archimedean Property An ordered field F is said to have the archimedean property if for any x. Simply choose n for which nx is > w. r. s ∈ P. n Proof.

A crucial fact about R is the completeness property: If L and U are non-empty subsets of R such that every element of L is ≤ every element of U.1 Hilbert Maximality and the Completeness Property As we have mentioned before. as formalized through the axioms of Hilbert.37) holds then the archimedean property also holds. (1. This ordered field is the real number system R. and the point O itself should be thought of as 0. Points on the other side from I correspond to negative real numbers. This property is also often expressed as: If R is partitioned into two disjoint subsets L and U whose union is R.2. one can add to these axioms the further requirement that this field is maximal in the sense that it cannot be embedded inside any larger archimedean ordered field.37) The completeness property implies the archimedean peoperty: Theorem 7 If in an ordered field the property (1. Consider a line. The completeness property can be formulated equivalently as: Every non-empty subset of R which has an upper bound has a least upper bound. The completebess property says that there are no ‘gaps’ in the line. (1. and thus there is essentially one such ordered field. with two special points O and I marked on it.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 19 1. It turns out then that any such ordered field is isomorphic to any other. produces an archimedean ordered field.36) (1.35) It is useful to view the real numbers geometrically. and if every element of L is ≤ every element of U then there is a unique element x ∈ R which lies between L and U: l ≤ x ≤ u for all l ∈ L and all u ∈ U. then there is a real number m which lies between L and U: l ≤ m ≤ u for all l ∈ L and all u ∈ U. For any point P on the line on the same side of O as P we think of the ratio OP/OI as a positive real number. . To complete the story. the structure of Euclidean geometry.

the traditional axioms of Euclidean geometry. one could still get away with a less-than-complete system of numbers. The modern understanding and point of view on completeness grew out of the work of Richard Dedekind [2]. 2. a real number was. The simplest measurement problem is to devise a measure of sets of points in the plane which are made up of a finite collection of segments constructed by Euclidean geometry. understood in terms of all rationals which exceeded it and all rationals below it. Prove that in any ordered field. . In modern calculus. Archimedes and others computed areas of curved regions by such upper and lower approximations. For a truly useful theory of measure. this method lives on in the Riemann integral. Two such sets should have the same measure if they can be decomposed into a finite collection of congruent segments. However. of course. Problem Set 1 1. makes it absolutely essential to work with a notion of measure that goes beyond simply decomposing into geometrically congruent figures. For this we would not need the full complete system R of real numbers.20 Ambar N. with requirements on intersections of lines and circles. However. implicitly. This.2 Completeness of R and measurement Even in Euclid’s geometry. 1. Sengupta A proof of this is outlined in an exercise below. and completeness is not essential. in resolving Hilbert’s Third Problem.2. the completeness of the number system is essential. between any two distinct element lie infinitely many elements. along with. Capturing a real number between upper approximations and lower approximations proves to be very useful. the utility of measuring areas of curved regions even in two dimensions. as we shall see later. with the task of measuring areas of polygonal regions constructed by Euclidean geometry. between any two distinct elements there is at least one other element. Moving up a dimension. that there are polyedra in three dimensions which have equal volumes (as defined by requirements of ‘upper’ and ‘lower’ approximations) which cannot be decomposed into congruent pieces. Prove that in any ordered field. can work with a field which is larger than the rationals but smaller than R. it was shown by Max Dehn in 1900.

i. Show that there exists y > x which is also not an upper bound of S. Let x ∈ F be provided by (1. all real numbers which are < some element of S. is not an upper bound. Show that x is the least upper bound of S. If F is an archimedean ordered field.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 21 3. Let F be an archimedean ordered field. then we can take U to be the set of all upper bounds of S and L to be the complement. This.36) implies the completeness property (1. Suppose x ∈ R is ≥ all elements of a non-empty subset S ⊂ R. y ∈ F.37) implies the property (1. Prove that (1.36). [Hint: Suppose F is an ordered field in which (1. and let x. If S ⊂ R is a non-empty set which is bounded above. 7. by assumption. Explain why this implies x ≥ sup S. 6.e. Then y is. Prove that the completeness property implies the archimdean propery. being < u. Prove that there is a unique real number which is ≤ all elements of U and ≥ all elements of L. 4. thus reaching a contradiction. Suppose S is a non-empty subset of R and x ∈ R is not an upper bound of S. . 9. Suppose L and U are non-empty subsets of R such that (i) every element of L is ≤ every element of R. an upper bound for S. and (ii) for any ε > 0 there is an element l ∈ L and an element u ∈ U with u − l < ε. and let S = {nx : n ∈ P}. Let 1 u = sup S. [Hint: Suppose (1. with x > 0. show that between any two distinct elements there is a rational element. Prove that the completeness property (1. Use this to produce an element of S greater than u.37) holds.37). the least upper bound of S.] 10.36). such as R. 5. Consider the element u − 2 x. Let x. Suppose that no positive integral multiple of x exceeds y.] 8. If z ∈ F show that there is a rational multiple qz of z for which x < qz < y.37) holds. y ∈ F with x < y.

Sengupta .22 Ambar N.

2.2) Much of our work will be on R∗ . We define addition on R∗ as follows: x + ∞ = ∞ = ∞ + x for all x ∈ R∗ with x > −∞ y + (−∞) = −∞ = (−∞) + y for all y ∈ R∗ with y < ∞. instead of just R. ∞} (2. it will be convenient to extend the real line R by adjoining to it a largest element ∞ and a smallest element −∞. 23 (2.1) Here ∞ and −∞ are abstract elements. to the real line R: R∗ = R ∪ {−∞. The primary reason for introducing them is to simplify the statements of several theorems. and a smallest element −∞.1 The extended real line The extended real line is obtained by a largest element ∞.3) (2.4) . We extend the order relation to R by declaring that −∞ < x < ∞ for all x ∈ R (2. For technical purposes.Chapter 2 The Extended Real Line and Its Topology In this chapter we study topological concepts in the context of the real line. Note that ∞ + (−∞) is not defined. No metaphysical meaning need be attached to these infinities.

ε) for any positive real number ε. A neighborhood of ∞ in R∗ = R ∪ {−∞. ∞] = {x ∈ R∗ : x > t} with t any real number. (5.e.8) is a neighborhood of 2.e. Sengupta x + (y + z) = (x + y) + z. there is no useful or consistent definition for it. if one side is defined then so is the other and the equality 2. For example. Ambar N.24 i. p + δ) = {x ∈ R : |x − p| < δ}.5) whenever either side of these equations holds (i. s) = {x ∈ R∗ : x < s} (2. ∞} is a ray of the form (t. p + δ) where δ > 0 is any positive real number. Thus. ∞] is a neigborhood of ∞.2 Neighborhoods A neighborhood of a point p ∈ R is an interval of the form (p − δ. 1.6) . the neighborhood consists of all points distance less than δ from p: (p − δ.2. A typical neighborhood of 0 is of the form (−ε. (1. A neighborhood of −∞ in R∗ is a ray of the form [−∞. For example. (2. The following algebraic facts continue to hold in R∗ : x + y = y + x.

3 Types of points for a set S ⊂ R∗ . For example. Consider a set A point p ∈ R∗ is said to be an interior point of S if it has a neighborhood U lying entirely inside S. either U contains V as a subset of vice versa. and we can form the neighborhood (2. 3) of 2. 4) of 3 contains 2. such as (−1.5) (2. For example. . Observe also that if N is a neighborhood of a point p. 4). and if q ∈ N then q had a neighborhood lying entirely inside N.5. with U ⊂ S.5. An example is [−∞. 4) and (4. and so U ∩V is just the smaller of the two neighborhoods. the neighborhood (2. 5) and (12.e.7) The points 2 and ∞ have disjoint neighborhoods. 3 and 5 have the neighborhoods (2. ∞] Exerise Give examples of disjoint neighborhoods of (i) 2 and −4 (ii) −∞ and 5 (iii) ∞ and −∞ (iv) 1 and −1 2.5 lying entirely inside (2. This is called the Hausdorff property of R∗ .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis where s ∈ R. i. Here is a simple but fundamental observation: Distinct points of R∗ have disjoint neighborhoods. 5. 4) 25 Observe that if U and V are neighborhoods of p then U ∩V is also a neighborhood of p. In fact.

U ⊂ Sc . 3. 11 are interior points. and −∞ are exterior to E. Example For the set A = [−∞. The point ∞ is also an interior point of E. Next consider the set {3} ∪ (5. 5] ∪ {6. ∞) The boundary points are 3. i. 8} ∪ [4. −5) ∪ {2. 5. Thus p is a boundary point of S if every neighborhood of p intersects both S and Sc . 7. ∞]. 7). . ∞. 8. 9} ∪ [6. for the set E above. 5. 6. A point which is neither interior to S nor exterior to S is a boundary point of S. It is important to observe that if we work with the real line R instead of the extended line R∗ then we must exclude ∞ as a boundary point. points −5.e. In the example above. decide which of the following are true and which false: (i) −6 is an interior point (T) (ii) 6 is an interior point (F) (iii) 9 is a boundary point (T) (iv) 5 is an interior point (F) Exerise For the set B = [−∞. Ambar N. 5. because it doesn’t exist as far as R is concerned. 7). Sengupta the points −2. the boundary points of E are −4. A point p is an exterior point if it has a neighborhood U lying entirely outside S. for the set E = (−4. 4) ∪ {5. decide which of the following are true and which false: (i) −6 is an interior point (ii) −5 is an interior point (iii) 5 is a boundary point (iv) 4 is an interior point (v) 7 is a boundary point.26 For example. and ∞. 9. For example. 8} ∪ [9.

The set of all boundary points of S is denoted ∂S and is called the boundary of S. 6} (iii) Ac = [4. 4) ∪ (6. and Boundary of a Set S0 The set of all interior points of a set S is denoted and is called the interior of S. (i) A0 = [−∞. Thus ∂S = ∂Sc . 7) (ii) ∂A = {4. 5. 5) ∪ (5. The interior of the entire extended line R∗ is all of R∗ . 7). ∞] (2. 9. Example For the set A = [−∞.4 Interior. 4) ∪ {5. 9) ∪ (9.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 27 2. 6) ∪ [7. 9} ∪ [6. ∞] (iv) the interior of the complement Ac is (Ac )0 = (4. But this is exactly the condition for p to be on the boundary of Sc . So / ∂R∗ = 0. 9) ∪ (9. Exterior. 5) ∪ (5. The set of all points exterior to S is the exterior of S.9) .8) Recall that a point p is on the boundary of S if every neighborhood of the point intersects both S and Sc . Thus. the whole extended line R∗ is split up into three disjoint pieces: R∗ = S0 ∪ ∂S ∪ Sext (2. 7. 6) ∪ (7. and we shall denote it Sext .

But (3. ∞). it doesn’t have any boundary points.28 For the set G = (3. For example. 3) ∪ (5. ∞}.5 Open Sets and Topology We say that a set is open if it does not contain any of its boundary points. when viewed as a subset of R∗ . a set S is open means that S0 = S. (i) B0 = (ii) ∂B = (iii) Bc = (iv) the interior of the complement Bc is (Bc )0 = 2. the empty set 0 is open. 9) is open. Thus. 7) ∪ [9. because the point 4 is a boundary point. Exerise For the set B = {−4. 4] is not open. Sengupta But if we decide to work only inside R then the boundary of G is just {3}. 8} ∪ [1. because it has no boundary points. / Moreove. ∞] is open. (2. is ∂G = {3. Notice then that every point of an open set is an interior point. . ∞) the boundary of G. because. The entire extended line R∗ is open. Also (4. again. Ambar N.

The set of all open subsets of R∗ is called the topology of R∗ . there is a neighborhood U of p which is a subset of A: U ⊂ A. In other words. B. it becomes clear that the union of open sets is an open set. Thus every point in A ∩ B has a neighborhood lying inside A ∩ B. Exerise Check that the intersection of the sets (4. Now consider two open sets A and B. Take any point p ∈ A ∩ B. The collection of all open subsets of R is called the topology of R.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 29 Thus for an open set S each point has a neighborhood contained entirely inside S. Thus: The intersection of a finite number of open sets is open. and hence so is their intersection. A ∩ B ∩C is open. The intersection A ∩ B ∩C can be viewed as (A ∩ B) ∩C But here both A ∩ B and C are open. Consequently. Then p is in both A and B. 6) is open. We will show that A ∩ B is open. Now consider three open sets A. Similarly there is a neighborhood V of p which is a subset of B: V ⊂B But then U ∩V is a neighborhood of p which is a subset of both A and B: U ∩V ⊂ A ∩ B. Since p ∈ A and since A is open. Viewed in this way. A ∩ B is open. ∞) and (−3 5) and (2. . This type of argument works for any finite number of open sets.C. Thus. S is made up of a union of neighborhoods.

Sengupta 2. But recall that the boundary of S is the same as the boundary of the complement Sc .30 Ambar N. But [4. But. The converse is also true: if a set is closed then its complement is open. Thus. The set [3. The full extended line R∗ is closed. ∞] is closed. for S to be open we must have ∂(Sc ) ⊂ Sc . / Note that the sets R∗ and 0 are both open and closed. But this means that Sc is closed. Thus. which means that Sc contains all its boundary points. [4. if a set is open then its complement is closed. / The empty set 0 is also closed. 8] ∪ [9.7 Open Sets and Closed Sets Consider a set S ⊂ R∗ . ∞) is not closed (as a subset of R∗ ) because the boundary point ∞ is not inside the set. So we need to be careful in deciding what is close and what isn’t: a set may be closed viewed as a subset of R but not as a subset of R∗ . In other words. . If S is open then its boundary points are all outside S: ∂S ⊂ Sc . S is closed if ∂S ⊂ S Thus.6 Closed Sets A set S is said to be closed if it contains all its boundary points. viewed as a subset of R it is closed. Thus. 5) is not closed because the boundary point 5 is not in this set. 2.

(But.) Let us see what the closure of Q is. This is because in R it has only the boundary point 3.9 Closure of a set The closure of a set S is obtained by throwing in all its boundary points: S = S ∪ ∂S Of course. 5). but is not closed in R∗ . ∞]. 2. because any neighborhood of any point contains both rationals (points in Q) and irrationals (points outside Q). Consider the closed set [4. ∞) is closed in R.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Theorem 8 A subset of R∗ is open if and only if its complement is closed. in contrast. 5]. The closure of (3. Exercise.8 The set Closed sets in R and in R∗ [3.10) . Now every point in R∗ is a boundary point of Q: ∂Q = R∗ . 2. Consider the open set (1. Show that its complement is open. ∞) is [3. 5) is [3. There is no such distinction for open sets. For example. when working with closed sets it is important to bear in mind the distinction between being closed in R and being closed in R∗ . It is useful to think of the closure S = S ∪ ∂S in this way: A point p is in S if and only if every neighborhood of p intersects S. ∞) is [3. ∞). which it contains. in R∗ the point ∞ is also a boundary point and is not in the set. ∞]. Thus. the closure of (3. in R the closure of (3. if S is closed then its closure is itself. (2. 31 Exercise. Check that its complement if closed.

e. Since q ∈ S it follows that W contains a point of S. We have to show that p is actually in S. So. ∞]} is an open cover of R∗ .11 S is the smallest closed set containing S S⊂K Consider any closed set K with Take any p ∈ S. (7. i. 9) ∪ (11. Thus. Thus. Then every neighborhood of p intersects S. and so S is closed. Choose (as we may) a neighborhood W of q lying entirely inside N. for each x ∈ R∗ there exists U ∈ U such that x ∈ U ∈ U. Then N contains a point q in S. However. More formaly. N contains a point of S. (8. 2. 15). Sengupta 2. {[−∞. Take any boundary point p ∈ ∂S.32 Ambar N. and hence also K. we have shown that every boundary point of S is in S. This means p ∈ S.10 The closure of a set is closed Consider the closure S of a set S. Thus every neighborhood of p intersects K. 5).12 R∗ is compact There is a special property of R∗ whose full significance is best appreciated at a later stage. we have the language and tools to state and prove it now and shall do so. and so in either case p is in K. (−1. an open cover of R∗ is a set U of open subsets of R∗ such that every point x ∈ R∗ falls inside some open set U in the collection U . . either p is in the interior of K or on its boundary. 2. 8). So we have seen that every neighborhood of p contains a point of S. Now let N be any neighborhood of p. It is best to draw a picture for yourself to make this clear. We will show that S is a closed set. For example. But K is closed. An open cover of R∗ is a collection U of open sets whose union covers all of R∗ . Thus. S⊂K What we hae shown then is that S is the smallest closed set containing S as a subset.

(2. This property is called compactness. This is a collection of open sets such that every point of R∗ falls inside some set in the collection. (150. 2). ∞]}. (−8. ∞].. (8.(−2. Let U be an open cover of R∗ . It turns out that Every open cover of R∗ has a finite subcover. Thus W contains a neighborhood of −∞. as opposed to R∗ : take all intervals of the form (a. 0). −5). however. (−1. and so Theorem 9 R∗ is compact. . (5∞]} ∪ {(a. where.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Another example of an open cover of R∗ is {[−∞. (2.e. 200) ∪ (701. (0. Let us look at an example of a cover which uses infinitely many sets. (−3. just throw in the open sets [−∞. If you look at this. where a runs over all integers: . 6).. (5. 4). 100). ∞]} and this would cover all of R∗ . −∞ is in some open set W ∈ U . 3). (−7. we don’t reall need all of them to cover R∗ . −4). (1.. 1).. We start with an open cover of R. Indeed. (4. Thus. 1). i. 3). This collection fails to include −∞ and ∞. We can prove the compactness of R∗ using the completeness of the real line. 0). .. To obtain an open cover of R∗ from U we could. a + 2) : a ∈ Z}. a + 2). 5). −4).t) ⊂ W . this gives us an open cover of R∗ : U = {[−∞. 750). −1). 800). 50). In particular. In short we are looking at the collection U = {(a. This is not just a feature of one particular example. (−1.. −6). we could just use the sub-collection V = {[−∞. a + 2) : a ∈ Z}. Proof of compactness of R∗ . (760. 33 The examples of open covers of R∗ given above are both finite collections of sets. (−2. (0. −4) and (5. for example. 2). [−∞. (3. you realize that even though this collection does contain infinitely many open sets.. recall that Z is the set of all integers. (1.

x being in S. . .. there has to be some x ∈ S which is greater than m − ε. . In particular. all of R∗ .U} covers all of [−∞. for one thing.e. m]. So. Suppose to the contrary that m < ∞.. and so m (being an upper bound of S) has to be ≥ t − 1. ∞. all the elements of R∗ less than t are covered by just the one set W in U . the set S has a supremum sup S. Sengupta for some t ∈ R. Let m = sup S. i. The set U covers (m − ε. m is certainly not −∞. For (i). x]} This set is not empty because −∞ ∈ S.. x]. because U covers all points of R∗ . can be covered by just finitely many sets in U .. Now there is some open set U ∈ U such that m ∈ U. in U . where ε is a positive real number.UN . that there is a real number t such that t − 1 is in S. Now we show that m = ∞. which cover the ray segment [−∞. m + ε). we would not need any other set from the cover if we are to stick to points to the left of t. as before. In fact. there are finitely many sets. the collection {U1 . note. (iii) Finally we prove that [∞. Thus m − ε < x ≤ m for some x ∈ S.. say U1 . We will argue in three steps: (i) First we explain that m isn’t −∞. m + ε). Now m − ε being less than the least upper bound m of S.UN . By completeness. and is being assumed to be also not ∞. Now let S = {x ∈ R∗ : finitely many sets in U cover [−∞. m + ε) ⊂ U.. Thus.34 Ambar N. t − 1 is also in S. Since m is not −∞. (ii) Next we prove that m is in fact. So. it is in R and so there is some neighborhood (m − ε.

i. The element ∞ ∈ R∗ falls inside some open set V in the collection U . 2.13 Compactness of closed subsets of R∗. This covers all of R∗ : any point of D would be covered by a set in U while any point in Dc is... Thus.. But then V1 . Finally we prove that R∗ is covered by finitely many sets in U . ∞] which is in S. Therefore. Throw this into the collection. for example.Vk . y] ∪ (r.V cover all of [−∞. our original hypothesis concerning m must have been wrong. since V covers the segment (r. .UN . . m + 2 ε is in S. there is some ‘ray-neighborhood’ of ∞ (r. This is a collection of open sets such that every point of D is covered by some set in the collection. say V1 . So m = ∞. Consider now any closed subset D of R∗ .. Now r being less than m = ∞. But now we have a contradiction.. m + ε/2. there must be some y ∈ (r. that any open cover of D has a finite sub-cover. in U . Thus. [−∞.. Note that [−∞.e. being the complement of a closed set. for some real number r. for the ray segment [−∞. ∞] ⊂ V.. ∞]. of course. and consider U = U ∪ {Dc }. m + 1/2] is covered by the finite collection U1 . .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 35 1 But this means that. because we have found a number. Then we know that there has to be a finite sub-collection V ⊂U .. We will prove that it is compact. ∞] = R∗ .. This prove that finitely many sets from U cover all of R∗ .Vk . which is in S. y] is covered by finitely many open sets. and the latter being the least upper bound of S.U. Consider any open cover U of D. Now the set Dc . covered by Dc . is an open set. ∞]. greater than m.

its only boundary point is 4. . this is a finite subcollection of U . because no point in D could have been covered by the ‘rejected’ set Dc . Moreover.14 The Heine-Borel Theorem: Compact subsets of R A subset B of R is said to be bounded if B ⊂ [−N. every compact subset of R is closed and bounded. ∞) ⊂ R. Equivalently. Of course. This is a closed subset of R because. We can now state the Heine-Borel theorem: Theorem 11 Every closed and bounded subset of R is compact. Sengupta which covers R∗ . for instance. ∞) is not closed when considered as a subset of R∗ .36 Ambar N. the set [4. it covers all points of D. Thus. The converse is also true. Now throw out Dc from V in case it is there. D is covered by a finite sub-collection of sets from U . Thus. We will leave out the proof of the converse part of this result. for B to be bounded. every closed subset of R∗ is compact. and consider the collection V = V \ {Dc }. N] for some real number N. Thus. Recall that a subset of R is closed in R if it contains no boundary point. if a subset of R is closed if its complement in R is open. in R. and we can state: Theorem 10 A subset of R∗ is compact if and only if it is closed. Consider. Conversely. there should exist a real number N such that |x| < N for all x ∈ B. Note that [4. and this point lies in the set. 2.

. ∞] lies entirely outside K.15 Sequences a1 . Boundedness implies that K ⊂ [−N. by closedness of K. p has a neighborhood outside K in R∗ .. Consider any point p ∈ U. 12. We will often be concerned with sequences in R∗ . a3 . We will show that the complement U of K in R∗ is open. Thus. the sequence is actually a mapping a : P → A : n → an .. Sometimes we may have a formula for the n-th term: an = (−1)n . So the complement of K in R∗ is open. and hence K is closed in R∗ . Then K is closed also as a subset of R∗ . More precisely.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 37 We shall prove half of this. −N − 1) is entirely outside K. N] for some real number N. in all cases. If p = −∞ then the neighborhood [−∞. n+1 . If p ∈ R then we already know. . 9. −5.. a2 . 6. If p = ∞ then the neighborhood of p given by (N + 1. −3. Sometimes out sequence will be specified explicitly as a string of numbers. for example. We know that then K must be compact. 2. A sequence of elements in a set A is a string of elements of A. Let’s check this.. Suppose K ⊂ R is closed and bounded as a subset of R. that p has a neighborhood lying inside U. 5.

5. . r1 = r. at least one point of S must be in U.. 4 + ... Sometimes it is better to label a sequence starting with the index 0: a0 . a2 . a1 . For example.. 13. x2 . for the sequence 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 .. 2.16 Limits points of a sequence Consider a sequence x1 . r3 . We know that this neighborhood is visited infinitely often by the sequence. . Let U be any neighborhood of p.. 4. For example. we might know that b1 = 1. b2 = 1 and then bn = bn−1 + bn−2 . . .. .. any limit point of a sequence which lies always in a set S must be in the closure of S. 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 it is intuitively clear that both 0 and 4 are limit points.38 Ambar N.. 8. 4+ . A point p ∈ R∗ is said to be a limit point of this sequence if every neighborhood of p is visited infinitely often by the sequence. in R∗ . This generates the Fibonacci numbers 1. Thus. for a fixed real number r we can form the sequence r0 = 1. 4+ . . For example. 21. Sengupta Sometimes we have a sequence specified recursively. 1. for all n ∈ P Consider then any limit point p of this sequence. Thus. Therefore. .. every neigborhood of p contains a point of S. . x3 . and so p ∈ S. . . r2 . 3.. Suppose a sequence (xn ) lies entirely inside a set S ⊂ R: xn ∈ S. for all n ≥ 3. 4+ . 2.

by compactness of R∗ . x3 . We shall prove that it must have at least one limit point.. 1. 1. there are finitely many of them. x2 . 1. x2 . 2. 1. .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 39 2. we have a contradiction and so there exist a limit of the sequence.. visits every natural number infinitely often and so every natural number is a limit point of the sequence. . Then each point p of R∗ has a neighborhood U p which is visited only finitely often by the sequence. 3. Consider a sequence Let p be any limit point of this sequence.} .. the sequence. The neighborhoods U p form an open cover of all of R∗ . 2. say U p1 . But this is impossible: we have covered all of the extended real line R∗ with finitely many sets each of which is visited only finitely many times by the sequence! Thus. Now let S1 be the least upper bound of the set {x1 . Thus.. 4. 3. .. 3. 5. 2. 2. For example. 4.. 2.... 1. 1.}: S1 = sup{x1 . we have seen that a sequence may well have more than one limit point. Notice that all we needed above was the compactness of R∗ . Of course.18 Limit points and suprema and infima x1 . Then. x2 ... . In the next subsection we will show how to actually obtain a limit point of a sequence. 2. 3.U pN which cover all of R∗ .17 Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem Consider any sequence in R∗ . we have the more general Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem: Theorem 12 Every sequence in a compact set has at least one limit point. . Suppose to the contrary that no point is a limit of the given sequence.

p cannot be > S1 . p could not be greater than S2 for then it would have a neighborhood to the right of S2 and this would have to be visited infinitely often by x1 . x3 .11) .. x3 .. p is a lower bound for all the Sk ’s: p ≤ Sk for all k. x4 . Therefore. we can form S3 = sup{x3 . .} Again.. Thus.. S3 .. S2 . .} and have again p ≤ S3 ..}. ... Sengupta Then it is clear that no point ‘to the right’ of S1 could possibly be a limit of the sequence: indeed any point r > S1 would have a neighborhood lying entirely to the ‘right’ of S1 and this would never be visited by the sequence. Now the inf of a set is the greatest lower bound of the set. . S1 ≥ xn for each n. Ambar N. p ≤ inf{S1 . x2 .. and so at least once by x2 .. Thus. Thus. . The infemum on the right is an important object and is called the limsup of the given sequence: lim supn→∞ xn = inf{supn≥k xn } : k ∈ P} So we have proved that Every limit point is ≤ the limsup def (2. p ≤ S2 In this way. x4 . So p ≤ S1 Now we can apply the same argument to S2 = sup{x2 .40 In particular..

19 Limit of a sequence A sequence (sn ) is said to lie in a set S eventually if after a certain value of n. the sequence −5. 2. −3. . for any limit point p if any sequence (xn ) we have def (2. 1. Put another way. will lie in the set (20.. we can prove Every limit point is ≥ the limsup Thus. as n → ∞. if sn ∈ S for all values of n beyond some value. 2. (2. 3. 0. Similarly. We denote this symbolically as xn → L. we have the notion of liminf: it is the supermum of the sequence of infemums: lim infn→∞ xn = sup{infn≥k xn } : k ∈ P} In just the same way as before. say n0 . −1. −4.13) In fact.12) lim infn→∞ xn ≤ any limit point ≤ lim supn→∞ xn .. all the sn lie in S. but we won’t prove this here. For example. the limsup and liminf of the sequence are also limit points. Let us note again: a sequence (sn ) lies in a set S eventually if there is an n0 ∈ P such that sn ∈ S for all n ∈ P with n ≥ n0 . A sequence (xn ) in R∗ is said to have limit L ∈ R∗ if for any neighborhood U of L the sequence lies in this neighborhood eventually. −2.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 41 for any sequence. . ∞) eventually. we say that sn lies in S for large n.

The sequence −1. . The limit of the this sequence is 3: clearly every neighborhood of 3 is hit eventually by the sequence (indeed it is hit every time.42 Ambar N. the limit L is denoted n→∞ lim xn . 5. . . 3. The simplest sequence is a constant sequence which keeps repeating the same value. 8. 4. 4. 1. since the sequence is stuck at 3). which eventually stabilizes at the constant value 8 has limit 8.. 3. again.. if we take any neighborhood of ∞. 3. For example. 2. For. ∞] from the n-th term onwards.. For. 2 3 4 has limit 0. 4. The sequence 1 1 1 1. . . . The notion of limit is one of the central notions in mathematics. 8.. Sengupta We shall see later that if a limit exists then it is unique. In contrast. 8. 3. For example.. 3. 2. 4.. 4. . . 8. given any neighborhood of 8 the sequence falls inside this neighborhood eventually and stays there.... has limit ∞. ∞] then eventually n will exceed t (by the archimidean property) and so the sequence will stay in (t. 4.. say (t. 1. 1. the sequence 1. 3.. 7. We will look at this more carefully soon. 3.. . 3. 3. 8.20 Simple Examples of limits Let us look at some examples of sequences and try to see what their limits are. the sequence 1..

Consider again the sequence It is intuitively clear that this sequence has limit 0. 5. 1/4. 1/3. 1/2. 3. Note first that the n-th term of the sequence is xn = 1/n. The sequence 1.. 2. where ε is a positive real number..5) is a neighborhood of 3. For example.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 43 does not have a limit. ∞] then eventually the sequence falls inside the nighborhood and stays in there. If you take any neighborhood of ∞. 3.21 The sequence 1/n 1. Now the condition 1/n < ε is equivalent to nε > 1. .5. . So consider any neighborhood of 0: (−ε. has limit ∞. ε). the point 3 cannot be the limit of the sequence because.. our sequence will eventually lie inside this neighborhood. an interval of the form (t. but the sequence keeps falling outside this neighborhood (when it hits 1 or 4). . (2. 7. We have to show that xn lies in (−ε. for instance. But let us prove this. Thus we should show that 1 <ε n for all n beyond some initial value. ε) for all n beyond some value.. We have to show that given any neighborhood of 0.

Let us see by how much each term exceeds the preceding: Rn − Rn−1 = Rn−1 (R − 1) But R is > 1. and intuitively it is clear that the sequence has limit ∞. Now it takes n ‘steps’ to climb from R0 to Rn . n as n → ∞ 2. 32 .. It is clear that in this sequence the terms get large very quickly. Let us write x for R − 1. and note that x>0 and we have Rn − Rn−1 > x. This proves that the sequence does indeed tend to the limit 0: 1 → 0. nε > 1 for all integers n ≥ n0 . and so the multiplier Rn−1 is ≥ 1 (it is equal to 1 when n is actually 1). . Sengupta The archimedean property guarantees the existence of an n0 ∈ P for which n0 ε > 1. Consider now the sequence of powers Rn where R > 1. .44 Ambar N. Thus. Rn − Rn−1 ≥ R − 1.. Therefore. 33 .22 The sequence Rn Consider the sequence 30 . 31 . and so Rn ≥ 1 + nx.

Thus n→∞ lim Rn = 1 if R = 1. Next consider the case 0 < R < 1. Indeed. for any real ε > 0 we just have to wait till 3n > 1/ε and this would ensure that 1 < ε. 3 3 3 We have here a sequence with denomiantor going to ∞ and numerator fixed at 1.. and then nx > t − 1 for all n ≥ n0 . Rn and so 1 ∈ (−ε.. 1 + nx > t when n is large enough. n→∞ Now consider the case R = 1.. Now it is clear that Rn → ∞ as n → ∞. But this is just Archimedes again: some multiple n0 x of xexceeds t − 1. As an example. 1. Note again that it is important that x > 0. ε) 3n Now consider the general case of .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 45 because each step is at least x. It seems then clear that the sequence goes to 0. and so it is 1. . 1.. . 3 . 3n for large n. we have R = 1/3 and the sequence 1 1 1 1. We just have to show that for any given t.. lim Rn = ∞ for all R > 1. In this case the sequence is just all powers of 1. Thus. . 1. 2 . and this comes from the fact that R > 1.

i. 2 . Consider any neighborhood of 0: (−ε. as we have seen above. 4 .46 where R > 1. Rn = and so Rn ∈ (ε. for all n ≥ n0 . the denominator rn goes to infinity. ε). Thus Now it is also clear that n→∞ rn > ε−1 1 <ε rn n→∞ lim Rn = 0 if 0 < R < 1. for R = −1/3 we have the sequence 1 1 1 1 1. Thus Ambar N.e. Observe that where r = R−1 is > 1. Now. . and so it seems clear that 1/rn should decrease to 0. But we know that rn → ∞ So. For example. after some n0 . − 3 . − . So we will prove that Rn → 0 in this case. rn where r > 1. Suppose −1 < R < 0. 3 3 3 3 . we have for all n ≥ n0 . Sengupta 1 R= . ε) where ε > 0 is a positive real number.. We want Rn to be in this neighborhood. Next consider negative values. Consequently. lim Rn = 0 if R = 0.. Rn should be < ε. But this means we should show that rn is > 1/ε for all n large enough. r Rn = 1 .

the conclusion is that n→∞ as n → ∞.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 47 It is clear that this is the same sequence as 1/3n except it swings back and forth between negative and positive values.14) . Thus. for the sequence swings back and forth between widely separated positive and negative values. 16. −8.. this sequence has limit 0. Does this sequence visit every neighborhood of ∞? Does it visit every neighborhood of −∞? if |R| < 1. one should look at the case R ≤ −1. More generally. In short. limn→∞ Rn = 0 Lastly. You should examine a few examples and convince yourself that then there is no limit. if −1 < R < 0 we can look at the distance between Rn and 0: |Rn − 0| = |Rn | = |R|n and |R|n → 0 because 0 < |R| < 1. Thus. 4. lim Rn = 0 if −1 < R < 0.. . (2. −2. Exerise Examine the sequence given by powers of −2: 1.

}.. It is intuitively clear that a monotone increasing sequence (xn ) will tend to the limit sup{x1 .23 Monotone Sequences A sequence such as 1. 1/5.1111..111. 11. . . But in this case n→∞ lim xn = −∞. 9. since xn is just stuck at −∞.. 1. i. 8. Another example is the sequence 1. 1. So consider any neighborhood U of L.16) lim xn = sup xn .. i.11. Sengupta 2. n≥1 The most extreme case is when L is −∞. 1/4. 1/2. 1. If L = −∞ each xn must be −∞. a sequence (xn ) is monotone increasing if xn ≤ xn+1 for all n ∈ P We say that (xn ) is monotone decreasing if xn ≥ xn+1 for all n ∈ P An example of a monotone decreasing sequence is 1. where each term is ≥ the preceding term is said to be monotone increasing. t < L and t ∈ U. . we need to take care of this case separately. We will show again that xn → L. .e.. n≥1 To prove this let L = sup xn . the sequence (xn ) falls eventually in U and stays there.48 Ambar N. Pick a point t of U to the left of L..1. Now consider the other situation: L is not −∞. 2.. x2 . 5.. Thus. as will become clear shortly. we will show that for any neigborhood U of L. .15) (2. 1/3. 1.e. This is indeed true: If (xn ) is a monotone increasing sequence then n→∞ (2.

and so some xn0 is > t: xn0 > t. 2. Consequently. in the neighborhood U of L. xn > t for all n ≥ n0 .25 Convergent sequences and Cauchy sequences A sequence (xn ) in R is said to be convergent if it has a limit and the limit is a real number. and so xn ∈ U eventually.}... Thus.}. therefore. Thus. In a similar way. Since xn → L we know that xn ∈ U eventually. n≥1 2. If xn → L. Note that xn → L ∈ R if for any real r > 0 there is an n0 ∈ P such that |xn − L| < r . But recall that L is an upper bound of {x1 . we also say that the sequence xn converges to L. We will arrive at a contradiction.. But xn → L . xn ∈ U for all n ≥ n0 . a sequence which has a limit must have a unique limit. x3 . Since L and L are distinct. Consider a sequence (xn ) and suppose both L and L are limits of the sequence. all the xn are ≤ t. . x2 . of course. the number t can’t be an upper bound. But recall that we are dealing with a monotone increasing sequence.) Since L is the least upper bound of {x1 . But this is impossible since U and U are disjoint and thus have no element in common. x2 .. and L = L .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 49 (Note that there would be no such t if L is −∞.24 The limit of a sequence is unique Now we shall prove that a sequence can have at most one limit. . This proves that L is indeed the limit of the sequence (xn ). they have disjoint neighborhoods U and U respectively. and L ∈ R. if xn is a monotone decreasing sequence then n→∞ lim xn = inf xn . Those xn which are > t but ≤ L are.

In particular. N + 2. if for any δ > 0 there is an N ∈ P such that |xn − xm | < ε for all natural numbers n. m ∈ P with n. observe that there is some N ∈ P such that |xk − L| < ε/2 for all k ∈ P with k > N.. More precisely.. m > N. But the terms not counted here. m > N. This has a consequence: since the xn ’s are all accumulating to L they are also getting close to each other. i.. To prove this. for any ε > 0 we can find N ∈ P such that |xn − xm | < ε for all natural numbers n. Thus. But then for any n. A sequence (xn ) in R which bunches up on itself in the sense above is said to be a Cauchy sequence.. the sequence is bounded. in fact. for all n ≥ N. .50 Ambar N. x1 . x j + 1). xN . m > N.e. Then. fixing a particular j > N we have xn ∈ (x j − 1. eventually the points of this sequence are at most distance 1 from each other. . So x j − 1 < xn < x j + 1 for all n ∈ {N + 1.}. m > N we have |xn − xm | = ≤ = < = |xn − L + L − xm | |xn − L| + |L − xm | |xn − L| + |xm − L| ε/2 + ε/2 ε. Sengupta for all natural numbers n > n0 . there is an N ∈ P such that |xn − xm | < 1 for all natural numbers n.. 2. at least from the (N + 1)-th term on.26 Every Cauchy sequence is bounded Consider a Cauchy sequence (xn ) in R.

Therefore.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 51 are just finitely many. L + ) 2 2 infinitely often. First it is clear that L must also be in [a. Thus. We know that a sequence always has a limit point in R∗ . and is a real number. We have seen that it is bounded. x j − 1} Thus the entire sequence is bounded. Take any neighborhood (L − δ. Consider a Cauchy sequence (xn ) in R. Thus. where δ > 0 is a real number. m ∈ P with n.e. and so they have a largest B and a smallest A among them. every xn is ≤ max{B. .27 Every Cauchy sequence is convergent The completeness property of the real line R has an equivalent formulation: Theorem 13 Every Cauchy sequence in R converges. b]. i. Now we also know that eventually. the terms of the sequence vary from each other by < δ/2. L + δ) of L. a ≤ xn ≤ b for all n ∈ P for some real numbers a and b. x j + 1} and every xn is ≥ min{B. 2. Let us prove this. m > N. Let L be a limit point of (xn ). The sequence (xn ) visits the neighborhood δ δ (L − . there is some N ∈ P such that |xn − xm | < δ/2 for all n. We will prove that L is a real number and xn → L. L is not ∞ or −∞.

. . . −2..} It may seem at first that the set Z of integers is not countable. 6. a sequence r1 . such that {r1 . . We will constuct a sequence which enumerates all the rationals. i.. 2. Sengupta because the sequence visits this neighborhood infinitely often. 1.} = Q. 2.52 We can choose some j > N such that δ δ x j ∈ (L − . x2 .. −1. This means that xn ∈ (L − δ. It is much harder to see that the rationals Q are also countable. .. 8.. 3.} For example. r2 . . the even numbers form a countable set: {2. such that S = {x1 . Then |xn − L| = |xn − x j + x j − L| ≤ |xn − x j | + |x j − L| δ δ < + 2 2 = δ. r3 . L + ) 2 2 Ambar N.. 4. xn → L. −3. but we can certainly lay out all the integers in a sequence: 0. S is countable if there is a sequence x1 . . . r2 .e. x2 . Thus.28 The rationals are countable A set is set to be countable if it is finite or if its elements can be enumerated in a sequence..... This is what we shall prove now. L + δ) for all n > N. Thus. x3 ..

. Associate to this x the natural number f (x) = 2q × 3 p For example. rn is the rational for which f (rn ) is the first value of f (x) greater than f (r1 ). . x < 0... To enumerate the rationals in a sequence all we have to do then is to run this in reverse: let r1 be the rational number x with the smallest value for f (x) (so r1 is in fact 0 because f (0) = 2 is the lowest value possible for f ). and so on. and in this way we will cover all rationals.. . let r2 be the rational number with the next lowest value for f (x). f (4/5) = 25 × 34 = 32 × 81 = 2592. f (rn−1 )..) We know that every non-negative rational can be represented in this way uniquely. r2 .6 can be written as both 6/10 and 3/5. There can be many such encoding schemes. we will encode each rational by a unique natural number. For example. 0. f (0) = f (0/1) = 21 × 30 = 2 f (1) = f (1/1) = 21 31 = 6. This associates a unique natural number f (x) to each non-negative rational x.. the next value for f (x) after 2 Thus we have produced a sequence of distinct elements r1 . r2 . . but we would take 3/5 as our representation. thus to each natural number n we would associate a rational rn . such that {r1 . Thus. r1 = 0 and r2 = 1 because f (1) = 21 31 = 6. If x ∈ Q is negative. let us define f (x) to be just 5 times f (−x): f (x) = f (−x) × 5 if x < 0 Now we have labeled each rational by a unique natural number. (For example..} = Q .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 53 Put another way. Here is one: Take any rational p x ≥ 0 and write it as q where p and q are non-negative integers (of course q ≥ 1) and q is the smallest possible denominator among all such ways of writing x.

1). 8} other than x22 .x21 x22 x23 . and so on.x11 x12 x13 . 8} other than x11 . Consider any sequence x1 .29 The real numbers are uncountable We will prove that R is not countable.. 2. . then take the main diagonal string.. = ··· . In fact we will show that even the real numbers between 0 and 1 cannot be enumerated in a sequence. Thus each of the numbers x1 . there is no sequence which touches on all the real numbers. x3 = 0. . . Then w cannot be equal to any of the xn . as follows: take w1 to be any number in {1. x2 = 0. 1) can be expressed uniquely in the form y = 0.19999... The argument used here is the celebrated diagonal method due to Georg Cantor (1845-1912). x2 . 2.. 2.54 Ambar N. Now form a number w = 0...x31 x32 x33 . x2 ... . . The strategy is to make a list of strings. = y2 y3 y1 + 2 + 3 +··· . 9} and we exclude all such representations which use an infinite string of 9’s at the end (for example.. 1)... Thus the original sequence cannot possibly have covered all of (0. we would use 0.w1 w2 w3 . .. Now each real number y in (0..... . . instead of 0. ∈ {0. 3.. [The reason we excluded 0 and 9 from our choices for wn was to avoid ending up at 0 or 1. 1. ..20000.). i. and then form a new string by altering each element of the diagonal. This way we make the n-th decimal place of w different from the n-th decimal place of xn .. y2 . and w ∈ (0. 1). . for every n. also has such an expansion: x1 = 0.. 10 10 10 where y1 .e.y1 y2 y3 . lying in (0. . . .. Sengupta 2. then choose w2 ∈ {1.] ..

U ∩ S is said to be open in S. a subset J of S is said to be open in S if every p ∈ J has a neighborhood N such that every point of N which is in S is in fact in J. 4) is open because. i. or of R∗ .e. For example. . in [2. If U is an open set then the part of U in S. [2. 4) ∩ [2. N ∩J ⊂ S A set S is said to be connected if it cannot be split into two non-empty disjoint pieces A and B each of which is open in S. 4) = (1. i.30 Connected Sets Consider a subset S of R∗ . 5] Put another way.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 55 2.e. for example. is connected if and only if it is an interval. The main result for connected sets is: Theorem 14 A subset of R. 5] the set [2.

56 Ambar N. Sengupta .

Thus. the area of a rectangle of sides 1/4 unit and 1/5 unit should be 1/20 square units because we would need 20 of these rectangles to cover a unit square. Take any rationals a . that ab is the unique real number that lies between all the possible values of a b and a b . area of R = ab 57 . because if you tile the rectangle with unit squares you will need three rows of such squares. and b . each row having 2 tiles. The idea of measuring area of a curved region by lower and upper bounds is present even Archimedes’ study of the area enclosed by a circle. and not hard to prove.Chapter 3 Integration Modern integration theory was built from the works of Newton. Thus. where a and b are rational numbers. it is clear that the area enclosed by a rectangle whose sides are a units and b units. while a rectangle R of sides a by b contains R. it makes sense to suppose that area of R ≤ area of R ≤ area of R which is to say: a b ≤ area of R ≤ a b It is intuitively clear. Then a rectangle R of sides a by b sits inside R. By extension. The area of a rectangle whose sides are 2 units and 3 units is 6 square units. and Lebesgue. Consider now a rectangle R whose sides a and b are possibly not rational. but the origins of integration theory lie in the computation of areas and volumes. b with a <a<a . and b <b<b . is ab square units. Riemann. Thus. a .

that f ≥ 0. Sengupta The rectangle R is made up of two congruent right angled triangles. Our development of the theory of the Riemann integrals is based on these ideas. where P lies inside the circle C and P encloses the circle C. In general. this is a region whose upper boundary. Assume. However. for convenience of visualization. thus area A enclosed by P ≤ area enclosed by C ≤ area A enclosed by P Some computation shows that for any ε > 0 there are such polygons P and P such that A −A < ε This implies that there is a unique real number A which lies between the area of all the polygons P and the polygons P . Archimedes computed area enclosed by a circle C by consider polygons P and P . This makes it possible to compute the areas of all kinds of polygonal figures but cutting up these fgures into right angled triangles.58 Ambar N.1 Approaching the Riemann Integral Consider a function f : [a. given by the graph of f . No amount of cutting would turn a disc into a finite number of right angled triangles. written as Z b f (x) dx a measures the area of this region. 3. b] → R and think of its graph. The strategy used for computing the area is to cut up the region into vertical slices. The area of each such slice is between the area of a larger ‘upper’ rectangle . conveniently. and so each of these would have area (ab)/2. this strategy fails when we try to compute the area enclosed by a circle. The integral Z b f a which is also. is curved. Then f specifies a region which lies below its graph and above the x-axis. Clearly then this number should be the area enclosed by the circle C.

xN ∈ [a... xN ) of points x0 .. b] ⊂ R. x1 .2 Riemann Sums [a... Let M j( f ) = max j∈{1. where a < b. The width or norm of the partition X is the maximum size of these intervals: ||X|| = Consider a function f : [a. b] is specified by a sequence X = (x0 . 3.1) ∆x j (3. A partition X of [a..x j ] f (x) (3.N} def (3...2) sup x∈[x j−1 . b] → R on an interval [a.}. .. . . We will often use the notation ∆x j = x j − x j−1 to denote the length of the j-th interval [x j−1 .3) .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 59 and a smaller ‘lower’ rectangle. x j ] marked out by the partition X. x1 . 2.. Thus we should expect the actual area to be the unique real number lying between these ‘upper rectangle’ areas and the ‘lower rectangle’ areas... b] ⊂ R We will work with functions on an interval ] where < b. 3. b] with a = x0 < x1 < · · · < xN = b Here N ∈ {1.

X) ≤ U( f . .4) Thus.. b].Y ) for every partitions X and Y of [a. The upper Riemann sum U( f .x j ] Ambar N. if A j were the area of the region under the graph of f over [x j−1 . x j ]:: x∗ ∈ [x j−1 . X. X) is L( f . x j ] then m j ( f )∆x j ≤ A j ≤ M j ( f )∆x j .7) We will show later that in fact every lower sum if less or equal to every upper sum. Now consider a sequence ∗ ∗ X ∗ = (x1 .e.8) . X) = and the lower Riemann sum L( f . X) is less or equal to U( f . Sengupta inf f (x) (3. X. Our objective is to specify the actual area A under the graph of f . X ∗ ) is S( f . L( f .. xN ) def N j=1 def N j=1 ∑ M j ( f )∆x j (3. X ) = ∗ j=1 ∑ f (x∗j )∆x j N (3.. X) is defined to be U( f .6) obtained by picking a point from each interval [x j−1 . X) (3.5) ∑ m j ( f )∆x j (3. i. X) = Note that L( f . and this would be the sum of the A j . x j ] j We shall indicate this by writing X∗ < X The Riemann sum S( f .60 and m j( f ) = x∈[x j−1 .

3.3 Definition of the Riemann Integral f : [a. b] ⊂ R. X) (3. This function is said to be Riemann integrable if there is a unique real number I lying between all the lower sums and all the upper sums: L( f . we never have the ∞ − ∞ situation.12) The set of all Riemann integrable functions on [a. X) is always defined. because that would mean that at least one of the M j is −∞ which can only be if f is equal to −∞ on that interval [x j−1 . i. b] (3. L( f . and this occurs if and only if the superemum of f is ∞: U( f . b] is denote R [a. (Note that we are working with non-empty intervals because x j−1 < x j . b] → R Consider a function on an interval [a.9) However. b] and denoted Z Z b b f a or a f (x) dx (3. x j ] which contradicts the fact that f is real-valued. b].13) .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 61 Note that the upper sum is ∞ if and only if one of the M j is ∞. This number I is the integral of f over [a.11) for every partition X of [a. X) − L( f . U( f .10) and L( f . where a < b.e. X) = ∞ if and only if sup f (x) = ∞ x∈[a.b] (3.) Similarly. X) can never be ∞. X) cannot be −∞. X) = −∞ if and only if inf f (x) = −∞ x∈[a. X) ≤ I ≤ U( f . It is useful then to observe that the difference U( f .b] (3.

t]) = sup f (x).t] (3. [s. . b] → R.. we keep lower the upper sums. Let us say that x lies in the j-th interval x ∈ [x j−1 . x1 . x∈[s. (3. X ) ≤ U( f .15) M j = M( f . x j ]) These sums differ only in the contribution that comes from [x j−1 .62 Ambar N. xN ) be a partition of the interval [a. [x j−1 .t] and m( f .. it follows that adding points to a partition raises lower sums. x j ] Let us compare the upper sums U( f . To this end. If we keep adding points to the initial partition. let us write M j = M( f . Sengupta 3. x ] and [x . x j ] Thus.4 Refining Partitions We work with a function f : [a.16) i. M j = M( f .t]) = inf f (x) x∈[s. x − j] into two intervals [x j−1 . X) and U( f . and M j ≥ M j (3. X ). X cuts up [x j−1 . We use the notation M( f . This observation is important enough to state as a theorem: . [x . X) −U( f . x j ]). adding a point to a partition lowers upper sums. Thus U( f . [x j−1 . Arguing similarly. [s. X). X ) = M j (x j − x j−1 ) − M j (x − x j−1 ) + M j (x j − x ) = (M j − M j )(x − x j−1 ) + (M j − M j )(x j − x ) ≥ 0. It is important to observe that M j ≥ M j.14) Let X = (x0 .e. b] and let X be a partition obtained by adding one more point x to X.. x ]). x j ]: U( f .

19) (3. X ) ≤ U( f . Recall the formula U( f . Z) ≤ U( f . then L( f . X) ≤ L( f . U( f .. Using this we can prove that upper sums always dominate lower sums: Theorem 16 If f : [a. and if X and Y are any partitions of [a. b]. X ) = (M j − M j )(x − x j−1 ) + (M j − M j )(x j − x ) (3. X) ≤ L( f . x j ] of the partition X = (x0 . Now suppose instead of adding just the one point x .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 63 Theorem 15 Adding points to a partition lowers upper sums and raises lower sums. Proof. where a < b. X) ≤ L( f .. xT ). ym to the interval [x j−1 .17) where X is the partition obtained from X by adding the single point x to the j-th interval [x j−1 . b] ⊂ R. b] then L( f . It will be useful to take a closer look at this and estimate by how much the upper and lower sums move as points are added to the partition.18) (3. b] → R. We label the new points yi in increasing order y1 < · · · < ym . X ) ≤ U( f .. . X) ≤ U( f . Thus if X and X are partitions of [a. Here is a useful trick: we can combine the partitions X and Y to form a partition Z which contains all points of X and all the points of Y as well. Z) Stringing these together we have L( f .Y ) and L( f . . we add m distinct points y1 . QED We have used the fact that adding a point to a partition lowers upper sums and raises lower sums.Y ) and this gives the desired result.Y ) Thus. X) −U( f . X) for every function f : [a. Therefore.. Z) ≤ U( f .. Z) ≤ U( f . . b] → R is a function on an interval [a. with X containing all the points of X and some more.. every lower sum is dominated above by every upper sum. x j ] to form the new partition X .

[yk−1 . X) ≤ 2N || f ||sup ||X|| Note that N ≤ N. X)] − U( f . [yk−1 .22) . [x j−1 . X ) = Now ∑ k=1 M( f . yk ] make up the interval [x j−1 . L( f . X) −U( f . X ) ≤ 2N|| f ||sup ||X|| where N is the number of new points added.64 Ambar N. The interval lengths yk − yk−1 add up to ∆x j . X ) ≤ U( f . xT ) is a partition of the interval [a. where || f ||sup is supremum of | f | over the full original interval [a. where N is the total number of new points added. b] ⊂ R. X) − L( f . X ) − L( f . b]. where a < b. yk ]) ≤ 2|| f ||sup . x j ] Then: m+1 U( f . then U( f .. If we add points to each of N intervals to create a new partition X then U( f . X ) − L( f . X) −U( f . and X is a partition of the same interval containing all the points of X and possibly some more. x j ]) − M( f . (3. X) but the decrease in the value of U − L is at most 2N|| f ||sup ||X||: [U( f .23) (3.. Consequently. X ) ≤ 2|| f ||sup ∆x j ≤ 2|| f ||sup ||X|| (3.25) (3. we have Lemma 1 If X = (x0 . U( f .. [x j−1 .24) (3.20) 0 ≤ M( f . Consequently. x j ]) − M( f . yk ]) (yk − yk−1 ) (3. .21) This provides an upper bound for how much the upper sum is decreased by addition of points all in one single interval of the original partition X. X) − L( f . Sengupta For convenience of notation we write y0 for x j−1 and ym+1 for x j . X ) − L( f . X) −U( f . Thus x j−1 = y0 < y1 < · · · < ym < ym+1 = x j The intervals [yk−1 . X ) ≤ 2N || f ||sup ||X|| Similarly.

X) < ε (3.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 65 3. another equivalent formulation is the Darboux criterion: Theorem 18 T:Darbouxcrit A function f : [a.26) R The common value is ab f . Z) ≤ L( f . Take any ε > 0. Let X be the partition obtained by pooling together Y and Z. Consider the interval [I. b] → R is Riemann integrable if and only if for any ε > 0 there is a partition X of [a. there is a partition Y for which I ≤ U( f . Z) ≤ I. Suppose f is integrable. I + ε/2) All the lower sums lie to the left. it is clear that there will be a unique real number between them if and only if the sup of the lower sums equals the inf of the upper sums: Theorem 17 A function f : [a. b] for which U( f .Y ) < I + ε/2 Similarly.5 The Darboux Criterion Now that we know that the upper sums dominate the lower sums. All upper sums lie to the right (≥) of I. X) − L( f . b]} = inf{L( f . I + ε/2). X) ≤ U( f . b] → R is Riemann integrable if and only if sup{U( f . Z) < I + ε/2 (3. i. there must be at least one upper sum which lies in [I. Thus. ≤ I.e. the function f is Riemann integrable if and only if there is no ‘gap’ between the lower sums and upper sums. Thus. Then there is a unique real number I which lies between all upper sums and all lower sums. X) : all partitions X of [a. b]} (3. X) : all partitions X of [a. Thus. So since I is the only real number lying between the upper sums and lower sums.28) . there is a partition Z for which I − ε/2 < L( f . Then I − ε/2 < L( f . Proof.27) This is an extremely useful result: virtually all of our results on integrability will use the Darboux criterion. X) ≤ U( f .

Proof. X) and U( f . suppose that for every ε > 0 there is a partition for which (3. So there is a unique real number between all the upper sums and all the lower sums. So the difference between I and I is < ε: |I − I| < ε But this contradicts the deifnition of ε taken above. X).66 Since both L( f . xN ) . Suppose. b].29) Conversely. Thus I and I must be equal. QED 3. b] ⊂ R and a < b. b] → R where [a. Then we will reach a contradiction.6 Integrable functions are bounded Suppose f : [a. I + ε/2) it follows that U( f .29) holds. sup f (x) = ∞..e. for example. We will prove that f must be bounded. Theorem 19 Every Riemann integrable function is bounded.b] Consider any partition X = (x0 ... f is integrable. that f is not bounded above. Let us suppose that f is unbounded. . Let ε = |I − I| We know that there is a partition X satifying (3. X) lie in (I − ε/2. Sengupta (3. Suppose that I and I are distinct real numbers which both lie between all upper sums and all lower sums. X) − L( f .29). b] → R is integrable. i. Ambar N. Assume that f ∈ R [a. X) and L( f . X) < ε. Consider f : [a. x∈[a. Thus. Now I and I both lie between U( f .

we have a contradiction.33) (3. M j = ∞. QED 3. b ∈ S} (3.e.30) for every partition X. The simplest such measure is given by the diameter of the range of f : Var( f ) = diam (Range of f) More explicitly. X) = ∑ Mk ∆xk = ∞ k=1 Thus.y∈[s. b]. [s. Now let Z b I= a f and recall that this is the unique real number lying between all upper sums and all lower sums.t]. X) ≤ I < I + 1 < ∞ = U( f .34) . i.7 Variation of a Function diam(S) = sup{a − b : a.t] (3. Then there is some subinterval. X) (3.31) For any non-empty subset S ⊂ R the diameter of S is It is easy to believe and not hard to prove that the diameter of S is the difference between sup S and inf S: diam(S) = sup S − inf S (3. the variation of f on the interval [s.t]) = sup ( f (x) − f (y)) x. Then L( f . every upper sum for f is ∞. say [x j−1 . But then I + 1 would also be a real number lying between all upper sums and all lower sums. But then the supper sum for f with this partition is also ∞: N U( f . on which f is not bounded above. It will be useful to have a measure of the fluctuation of f over this interval. x j ].t] is: Var( f . Thus.32) Now consider a function f on an interval [s.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 67 of [a.

37) (v) the variation of the product of two functions is bounded above by the sum of their variations.36) We record the following algebraic facts about the variation of functions. [s. Lemma 2 For any functions f and g on an interval [a.t]) − m( f . weighted by their sup-norms: Var( f g) ≤ || f ||sup Var(g) + ||g||sup Var( f ) (vi) the variations in f and in g differ by at most the variation in | f − g|: Var( f ) − Var(g) ≤ Var( f − g) (vii) if f is not equal to zero anywhere then Var(1/ f ) ≤ M(| f |−1 )2 Var( f ) (3.35) (3. i.t] and just write Var( f ): Var( f ) = M( f ) − m( f ) Ambar N. [s. the variation of a constant times a function is the absolute value of the function time the variation in the function: Var(k f ) = |k|Var( f ) for any k ∈ R. b] ⊂ R with a < b. (iv) the variation satifies the triangle inequality: Var( f + g) ≤ Var( f ) + Var(g) (3.39) (3. (ii) Var(k) = 0 if and only if k is constant.e. which will be very useful in proving corresponding facts about Riemann integration.t]) = M( f . (iii) the variation scales like length. Sengupta (3.t]) Sometimes we may drop [s. [s.38) . we have: (i) Var( f ) ≥ 0.68 It is also equal to Var( f .40) (3.

Take any partition X = (x0 . b] ⊂ R and a < b. N}.. b] (3.42) Var( f .Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 69 (viii) the variation of a function increases montonically with the interval of variation: Var( f . b] with |x − x | < δ. b] it is uniformly continuous. f (x) − f (x ) < ε/2 . [x j−1 . N}. Since f is continuous on the compact set [a. xN ) with all the intervals having length less than δ. [u.. b] such that Var( f .. So for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 such that | f (x) − f (x )| < ε/2 whenever x. . xN ) of [a. b] → R is continuous.43) (3....t]) = (3. [s.t] ⊂ [a.. where [a. [s.t]) (xii) If f is monotone on an interval [s. . x j ]) < ε for every j ∈ {1. then for any ε > 0 there is a partition X = (x0 . . [s. u ∈ [a.t. [s.45) We also record the following result on variations and partitions for continuous functions: Lemma 3 If f : [a... b]) if [s. Then..t]) ≤ Var( f . [a. b] with s < t < u then Var( f .41) (ix) The variation in the absolute value of f is bounded by the variation in f : Var(| f |) ≤ Var( f ) (x) The variation of f is bounded above by twice || f ||sup : Var( f ) ≤ 2|| f ||sup (xi) If s..44) (3. for each j ∈ {1. u]) ≤ Var( f . x ∈ [a. u]) + Var( f ..t] then f (t) − f (s) if f (t) ≥ f (s) f (s) − f (t) if f (t) ≤ f (s) (3. . Proof.

70

Ambar N. Sengupta

for every x, x ∈ [x j−1 , x j ] since these intervals all have length < δ. Consequently, Var( f , [x j−1 , x j ]) ≤ ε/2 and we are done. QED The sup-norm bound on the variation has the following consequence: Proposition 1 If f1 , f2 , ... : [a, b] → R converge uniformly to a function f : [a, b] → R, then lim Var( fn ) = Var( f ) (3.46)
n→∞

It will be convenient to use the notation Var j ( f ) = Var( f , [x j−1 , x j ]) The reason why we are interested in the variation is summarized by Theorem 20 For any function f : [a, b] → R, where [a, b] ⊂ R and a < b, and every partition X of [a, b] we have
N def

(3.47)

U( f , X) − L( f , X) = Proof. Observe that

j=1

∑ Var j ( f )∆x j

(3.48)

Var j ( f ) = M j ( f ) − m j ( f ).

(3.49)

Multiplying this by ∆x j and adding up over all j ∈ {1, ..., N} gives the result (3.48). QED

3.8 The algebra R [a, b]
Recall that

R [a, b]
is the set of all Riemann integrable functions on [a, b]. Our main objective now is Theorem 21 The set R [a, b] has the following properties: (i) Every constant function belongs to R [a, b]

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis (ii) If f , g ∈ R [a, b] then f + g ∈ R [a, b] (iii) If f , g ∈ R [a, b] then f g ∈ R [a, b]

71

(iv) If f ∈ R [a, b], and f is never equal to zero and 1/ f is bounded, then 1/ f ∈ R [a, b]. (v) If f ∈ R [a, b] then | f | ∈ R [a, b] and
Z b
a

f ≤

Z b
a

|f|

(3.50)

Properties (i)-(iii) say that R [a, b] is an algebra under pointwise addition and multiplication of functions. It is important to note that the converse of (v) does not hold, i.e. there are functions which are not Riemann integrable but whose absoulte values are Riemann integrable. Proof For a constant function k on [a, b] we have L( f , X) = k(b − a) = U( f , X) for every partition X and so k(b − a) is the unique real number lying between all upper sums and all lower sums. Thus
Z b
a

k = k(b − a)

Now supppose f , g ∈ R [a, b]. Let ε > 0. By the Darboux condition, there are partitions Y and Z of [a, b] such that U( f ,Y ) − L( f ,Y ) < ε/2 and U(g, Z) − L(g, Z) < ε/2

Let X be the partition obtained by combining Y and Z. Then, because upper sums decrease and lower sums increase when points are added to a partition, we have U( f , X) − L( f , X) < ε/2 Then, with X = (x0 , ..., xN ), and U(g, X) − L(g, X) < ε/2

72

Ambar N. Sengupta

N

U( f + g, X) − L( f + g, X) = = ≤

j=1 N j=1 N j=1

M j ( f + g) − m j ( f + g) ∆x j

∑ Var( f + g, [x j−1, x j ])∆x j
N j=1

∑ Var( f , [x j−1, x j ])∆x j + ∑ Var(g, [x j−1, x j ])∆x j
by (3.48)

(by Lemma 2 (ii)) = U( f , X) − L( f , X) + U(g, X) − L(g, X) < ε/2 + ε/2 = ε.

Thus, by the Darbox criterion, f + g is Riemann integrable. The other results follow in a similar way by applying other parts of Lemma 2. QED Consider the function g on [0, 1] given by g(x) = 1 if x is rational −1 if x is irrational

Then g is not Riemann integrable, because no matter what partition X we take of [0, 1] the upper sum is always U(g, X) = 1 and the lower sum is always L(g, X) = −1 But the absolute value of g is the constant function 1: |g| = 1 and so |g| is Riemann integrable.

3.9 C[a, b] ⊂ R [a, b]
Every continuous function on a compact interval is integrable. This is a central result of integration theory.

It should be noted that discontinuous functions might also be integrable.51) Theorem 23 For interval [a. g ∈ R [a. with a < b. Our next objective is to show that the Riemann integral viewed as a function R [a. 3. b] We have seen that the set of all Riemann integrable functions on a compact interval [a. with a < b. b] ⊂ R. for any k ∈ R. is a linear space. we have Z b Z b Z b ( f + g) = a a f+ a g (3. and any f . b]: C[a. any function which is dicontinuous at only finitely many points is integrable.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 73 Theorem 22 For any interval [a. i. . b] → R : f → Z b f a (3. the Riemann integral R [a. that sums and constant multiples of Riemann integrable functions are again Riemann integrable. b] ⊂ R. b].53) Thus. Indeed. b] of Riemann integrable functions on [a.10 The Integral as a Non-negative Linear Functional R [a. b] ⊂ R.54) is a linear functional on the linear space R [a. Z b Z b (k f ) = k a a f (3. b] → R : f → is linear: Z b f a (3. where a < b. b] The proof has been presented in class.52) and.e. the set C[a. The key result used is Lemma 3 which says that the variation of a continuous function can be controlled suitably to apply the Darboux criterion for integrability. b]. b] is contained in the set R [a. b] ⊂ R [a. b] of continuous functions on [a.

X) − L( f + g.57) (3.t∈[x j−1 . X) − L(g.. X) − [L( f . . L( f + g. g ∈ R [a.74 Ambar N. X) ≥ L( f . and k ∈ R. X) − L( f . X) Thus.58) which.) . b]. X) and U( f + g. We have already seen. X) Similarly. X) are squeezed into the interval [L( f . X)] < ε (3. that f + g and k f are also in R [a. let Vark (h) denote the variation of a function h over the interval [x j−1 .. X) + L(g. b].x j ] (h(s) − h(t)) = M j (h) − m j (h) (3. X)] (3. X) < ε/2 So U( f + g. there is a partition X of [a. by the Darboux criterion implies that f + g ∈ R [a. x j ]: Vark (h) = Then N sup s. xN ) be any partition of [a. By the usual trick of combining partitions. in Theorem 21. b]. we have just repeated the proof of Theorem 21 (ii).55) U( f + g.U( f . L( f + g. X) < ε/2 and U(g.56) Now let ε > 0. b]. b] such that U( f . X) + L(g. As usual. Sengupta Proof Let f . X) +U(g.. X) +U(g. (Of course. Now let X = (x0 . X) +U(g. X) = ≤ j=1 N j=1 ∑ Vark ( f + g)∆ j x N j=1 ∑ Vark ( f )∆ j x + ∑ Vark (g)∆ j x = U( f . X). X) ≤ U( f . X) + L(g.

X). X)] ε ≤ |k| 1 + |k| < ε. Let X = (x0 . consider the function k f . X) − L( f . I( f + g) = I( f ) + I(g) Next. X) < ε 1 + |k| (3. L( f . b] such that U( f . X).63) (3. X) Moreover. X) ≤ I( f ) + I(g) ≤ U( f ..) Then N U(k f . But ε is any positive real number. X).61) and the width of this interval is < ε. X) + L(g. . X)] (3.59) (3.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Let Z b Z b 75 I( f ) = a f. we see that I( f + g) and the sum I( f ) + I(g) both lie in the interval [L( f . L( f + g. . and I(g) lies between U(g.62) (The 1+ in the denominator is to avoid trouble if k happens to be 0. (3. Consequently. X) + L(g. I( f ) + I(g) and I( f + g) differ by less than ε.60) Z b I( f + g) = a ( f + g) Then I( f ) lies between U( f . Therefore. X) − L( f . X) +U(g.. Therefore.U( f . xN ) be a partition of [a. where k ∈ R. X) − L(k f . X) and L(g.. X) and L( f . X) ≤ I( f + g) ≤ U( f + g. X) Putting all this together. X) +U(g. I(g) = a g. X) = = j=1 N j=1 ∑ Var j (k f )∆x j (by Lemma 2 (iii)) ∑ |k|Var j ( f )∆x j = |k| [U( f .

70) if k ≥ 0 . Now since ε > 0 is any positive real number we have I(k f ) = kI( f ).t] x∈[a. X)] < ε.t]) = sup k f (x) = k inf f (x) = km( f . [s.t]) if k ≥ 0 m(k f .64) Now for k ≥ 0 we have M(k f .b] (3.66) because multiplying by a negative number reverses inequalities and transforms sup into inf. I(k f ) − kI( f ) ≤ |k| [U( f . [s. and inf into sup. Consequently.69) Doing this for each interval [x j−1 .t]) if k ≤ 0 (3. also m(k f . [s. X). X). we see that I(k f ) lies in the interval [kL( f .68) (3. X). This completes the proof. QED The Riemann integral is a non-negative linear functional in the sense that it carried non-negative functions into non-negative numbers: (3. Sengupta has width less than ε.t]) = kM( f .76 Thus. [s. X)] if k ≤ 0 Now I( f ) lies between L( f . [s. x j ]. and so kI( f ) lies in the same interval mentioned above as I(k f ) does. X). X)] Ambar N.t]).b] (3.t]) = sup k f (x) = k sup f (x) = kM( f . The Darboux criterion implies that k f is integrable. and mutiplying everything by ∆x j and adding up. as before.t]) x∈[s. [s. [s. X) − L( f .67) (3. kU( f . kL( f . Thus.t] x∈[a. Let Z b I(k f ) = a (k f ) (3. X) and U( f .t]) = km( f . x∈[s.U(k f . X)] and it lies in [kU( f . [s. the interval [L(k f .65) and for k < 0 we have M(k f .

b] for the sup-norm in the following sense: Theorem 25 For any compact interval [a. and for any f ∈ R [a. Z b a f≥ Z b g. and f ∈ R [a. Next. by linearity.71) f≥ Rb a g (3. This is simply because if f ≥ 0 then all the lower sums are ≥ 0 and so the R integral ab f . b]. b] and f ≥ 0 imply that Consequently. b] and Z b a f ≤ Z b a |f| (3.e. with a < b. ∈ R [a. b] we have Z b a f ≤ || f ||sup (b − a) (3. b] ⊂ R. is also ≥ 0. Thus.74) . b] and f ≥ g imply that Rb a Rb a f ≥0 (3. f = ( f − g) + g and so. of course. the integral is order-preserving f .72) Proof. b] then ab f ≥ 0: f ∈ R [a. being ≥ all lower sums. i. Therefore. f (x) ≥ R 0 for all x ∈ [a. b] then | f | ∈ R [a. b] and f ≥ g. g ∈ R [a.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 77 Theorem 24 If [a. b] is non-negative. suppose f . Z b Z b Z b f= a a ( f − g) + g a Now we have just shown that the first term on the right is ≥ 0. and is. b] ⊂ R with a < b. ≥ 0. Observe that f − g = f + (−1)g is also in R [a. a QED The linear functional given by the Riemann integral is a bounded linear functional on R [a.73) Proof We know that if f ∈ R [a.

b] then f ∈ R [a... X) = ∑ Var j ( fn )∆x j < (3.. X) − L( f . ∈ R [a. QED A useful but simple consequence of this result is: Theorem 26 For any compact interval [a.76) 4(b − a) By integrability of fn we know that there is a partition X = (x0 . b] ⊂ R. By uniform convergence. b] converge uniformly to a function f on [a.. N ε 2(b − a) (3. X) = ≤ < j=1 N j=1 ∑ Var j ( f )∆x j ε 2(b − a) N j=1 ∑ Var j ( fn)∆x j + ∑ ∆x j ε ε + = ε. f2 .78) U( f . X) − L( fn .75) Proof First let us show that f ∈ R [a. b] and Z b n→∞ a Z b lim fn = f a (3.78 Ambar N. . we have an n ∈ P such that ε || fn − f ||sup < (3. with a < b. Z b a |f| ≤ Z b a || f ||sup = || f ||sup (b − a) and we are done. xN ) of [a.. 2 2 . b].77) 2 j=1 Now Var j ( fn ) − Var j ( f ) ≤ Var j ( fn − f ) ≤ 2|| fn − f ||sup ε ε < 2 = 4(b − a) 2(b − a) and so Var j ( f ) ≤ Var j ( fn ) + Therefore. Let ε > 0. Sengupta Now the function | f | is bounded above by the constant || f ||sup (recall from Theorem 19 that this is finite.) Therefore. b] such that N ε U( fn . if f1 . .

and T is a non-empty subset of S.83) . as n → ∞. we have Z 79 fn − Z f ≤ || fn − f ||sup (b − a) → 0. b].81) and U( f |[c. Then f ∈ R [a. Next. This yields a partition X of the combined interval [a.Y ) − L( f |[a. QED 3.80) Proof.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Thus. c].79) Theorem 27 Let a. c. Z) < ε/2 (3. there is a partition Y of [a. Then. c] and a partition Z of [c. b]. b]. Z) ≥ Z c Z b f+ a c f (3. c]. U( f . X) = U( f |[a. f ∈ R [a.e. If F :S →U is a function. and consider any function f : [a. By Darboux. b]. b]. b] → R which is intergable over [a. c] and [c.Y ) < ε/2 (3. b]. b] is the sum of the integrals of the function over [a.82) Now put together the points of Y and Z. i. F|T is the function whose domain is T and whse values are given through F: (F|T )(x) = F(x) for all x ∈ T (3. b] such that U( f |[a.11 Additivity of the Integral We will show that the integral of a function over an interval [a. Z) − L( f |[c. c]. and Z b Z c Z b f= a a f+ c f (3. b be real numbers with a < c < b. b] for any point c ∈ (a. then F|T denotes the restriction of F to the smaller domain T . c] and over [c. Let ε > 0. b).Y ) +U( f |[c. b].

with a < b. c].84) U( f |[a.t] ∈ R [s. to obtain a partition Z = (z0 . as always. Proof This is. zM ) .Y ) − L( f . and if s. Z) − [L( f |[a. of course. in case they are not in Y .80 and L( f . b]. Z) ≤ Consequently. Add to Y the points s and t. X).Y ) + L( f |[c. so does Rc a f . b] there is a partition Y of [a. U( f .83) and (3. Since ε > 0 is arbitrary. b]. b] ⊂ R. c]. Sengupta Z c Z b f+ a c f (3. Let ε > 0. Since f ∈ R [a. c].t ∈ [a. b] such that U( f .Y ) < ε. X) = = < = Ambar N. a matter of applying Darboux using one of the properties of Var. Z) − L( f |[c.84) it follows that the sum Z c Z b f+ a c f Rb a lies between L( f .Y ) − L( f |[a. X) − L( f .t]. it follows that Z b Z c Z b f= a a f+ c f. b]. c]. QED Now we prove that if a function is ingtergable on an interval then it is integrable on any sub-interval: Theorem 28 If [a. b]. b] with s < t then for any function f ∈ R [a. and.Y ) + L( f |[c. Therefore. Now from (3.. f+ Rb c f and Rb a f differ by less than ε. Z) ε/2 + ε/2 ε Therefore..Y ) + U( f |[c. c]. b]. f ∈ R [a. Z)] U( f |[a. b] we have f |[s. .Y ) +U( f |[c. X) and U( f . X) = L( f |[a. by Darboux. b]..

. Let X = (x0 . 1≤ j≤N . X) − L( f . b] → R be a monotone function. U( f . X) − L( f |[s. Now let X be the partition of [s. Then N U( f .85) where J consists of those j ∈ {1. Z) − L( f . We know that this lowers the upper sum and raises the lower sum and so U( f . We will now prove that every monotone function is Riemann integrable on any compact interval. Therefore.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 81 of [a. b]. M} for which the interval [z j−1 . . b]. Z) − L( f .t]. X) − L( f |[s. QED 3. z j ] is not contained in [s. x1 .. where [a. b] ⊂ R and a < b.. . X) + ∑ M j ( f ) − m j ( f ) ∆x j j∈J (3. Z) ≤ U( f |[s. Then U( f . Z) − L( f . Z) < ε.. xN ) be any partition of [a.12 Monotone Functions are Riemann Integrable We have made the remark that not every Riemann integrable function is continuous. X) = ≤ where j=1 ∑ Var j ( f )∆x j N j=1 ∑ Var j ( f ) ||X|| ||X|| = max ∆x j .. Let f : [a. X) < ε.t].t].t]. and we are done.t].t] obtained by taking the points of Z which are in [s.. Z) = U( f |[s.t].

For example. [a. b].86) The same conclusion holds even if f is monotone non-increasing. y ∈ [a. [a.41) we have Var j ( f ) = f (x j ) − f (x j−1 ) for all j ∈ {1. b] into N equal pieces. [a. . y ∈ [a. b] ⊂ R.82 Ambar N. Suppose for convenience that f is monotone non-decreasing.. N 1 + Var( f .e. then f ∈ R [a.. b] with x ≤ y Then. b]) (3.e. f (x) ≤ f (y) for all x. the sum of the variations over all the intervals is simply the variation over the full interval: N j=1 ∑ Var j ( f ) = Var( f . by the property of Var for monotone functions given in (3.87) To make this less than any chosen ε > 0 all we have to do is take a partition X with all the interval sizes less than ε/[1 + Var( f . N} Therefore. we could divide [a. X) − L( f . b])||X|| (3. b])]. we have U( f . i. i. b]) Thus we have proved: Theorem 29 If f is a monotone function on a compact interval [a. . with N chosen large enough that b−a ε < . with a < b.. b] with x ≥ y Thus. Sengupta is the maximum width of the intervals making up the partition. if f (x) ≤ f (y) for all x. X) = Var( f . in either case. [a.

Recall that the norm or width of X is the length of the largest interval ||X|| = max ∆x j j Now consider any sequence ∗ ∗ X ∗ = (x1 . b]. It is therefore useful to understand the Riemann integral in terms of Riemann sums as well. Furthermore. and so L( f ... X. b] → R where [a. i. . this method is not the most intuitive in understanding concepts such as arc length. X) − L( f . x j ] for each j. X ∗ ) = Now m j ≤ f (x∗ ) ≤ M j .89) then for any ε > 0 we can choose partition X such U( f . j=1 ∑ f (x∗j )∆x j N (3. with x∗ ∈ [x j−1 . . We denote this by j X∗ < X Recall the Riemann sum S( f ... b] ⊂ R with a < b. X. X ∗ ) ≤ U( f .. So consider a function f : [a. X) If f is integrable.. However. xN ) be any partition of [a.88) (3. X) < ε. with I = that Rb a. X) ≤ S( f . This approach led to a smooth development of the central results of the theory.e. j for each j.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 83 3. xN ) subordinate to X. the Riemann sum approach motivates the construction of more advanced notions such as the stochastic integral of Itô.13 Riemann Sums and the Riemann Integral We have used the Archimedean strategy of capturing the value of the integral between upper sums and lower sums. Let X = (x0 . . This method is also amenable to generalizations such as the notion of line integrals.

x1 ]. it follows that |S( f . X ∗ ) − I| < ε for every partition X of norm < δ and every X ∗ < X.. b] of width < δ and all X ∗ < X. . Suppose the given condition holds. X ∗ ) − I| < ε (3. X.84 Ambar N. X.90) The following result is is often used to define the Riemann integral in alternative approaches to the theory. N. Then there is a real number I such that for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 for which the condition |S( f . X) ≤ U( f .92) j=1 ∑ f (x∗j )∆x j < I + ε/4 N ∗ for every sequence X ∗ < X. we see that M1 ∆x1 + ∑ f (x∗ )∆x j ≤ I + ε/4 j j=2 ∗ and. we have N I − ε/4 ≤ m1 ∆x1 + ∑ f (x∗ )∆x j j j=2 N Carrying this successively for j = 2. Z b (3. I − ε/4 < (3.. x1 ]. X ∗ ) − I| < ε/4 holds for all partitions X of [a. Sengupta Since both I and S( f . taking the supremum over all possible x1 in the first interval [x0 .. Then. we conclude that I − ε/4 ≤ L( f . taking the infimum over all possible x1 in [x0 . X ∗ ) are squeezed in between the upper and lower sums. b] → R is Riemann integrable if and only if there is a real number I such that for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 such that |S( f . Thus. X) ≤ I + ε/4 . X.91) I= a f Proof. Theorem 30 A function f : [a. 3. X. In this case.

.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Consequently. by Darboux.Y ) and L( f . b] of norm less than δ: ||X|| < δ We will compare U − L for X with that for Y and conclude that U − L for X is indeed less than ε. let Z be the partition of [a. U( f .) Consider any partition X = (x0 .96) . For the converse. But.Y ) < ε/2 (3. Moreover. since both I and the integral ab f are trapped in the interval [L( f . Z) − L( f .Y ) − L( f . R Z b I= a f. b]. X). xT ) of [a. By Darboux. Z) ≤ U( f . Using our standard trick.. 1 + 2N|| f ||sup (3. X) − L( f . yN ) of [a.97) (3.. X) − L( f . . b] such that U( f . the most U − L for X could be is U( f .Y ) differ by less than ε: U( f . Z) + 2N|| f ||sup ||X|| Thus. Let ε > 0. ε is any positive real number..94) (3. f ∈ R [a. X)] whose width is ε it follows that I and Rb a f differ by less than ε. . Z) − L( f . Then U( f .93) (Where we get this from will be clear later.U( f . U( f .Y ) < ε/2 Now let δ= ε/2 . there is a partition Y = (y0 . b] obtained by combining X and Y ... because at most N points were added to X to obtain Z. b].Y ) − L( f . X) < ε/2 + 2N|| f ||sup δ (3. suppose f ∈ R [a. Thus.95) We also know by Lemma 1 that U − L for Z differs from that for X by at most 2N|| f ||sup ||X||. X) ≤ ε/2 < ε 85 and so. Thus.

X)] whose width is < ε. X). X) < ε/2 + ε/2 = ε (3. X). X. and so it the integral ab f . X) and the upper sum U( f .98) Now take any X ∗ < X. Then the Riemann sum S( f . R Therefore. X ) − ∗ Z b f <ε a (3.U( f . X ∗ ) is sandwiched between R the lower sum L( f . Sengupta In (3. X.94) we chose δ just so this right side now works out to ε: U( f .99) holds for any partition X of width < δ and any X ∗ < X. Thus. QED . S( f .86 Ambar N. S( f . X. X ∗ ) and ab f both lie in the interval [L( f . X) − L( f .99) We have shown that for any ε > 0 there is a δ > 0 such that (3.

with supplementary material and revisions by Paul Bernays. 1956. 1901. Surreal Numbers.G. Principles of Mathematical Analysis. Walter.gutenberg.Bibliography [1] Conway. Addison-Wesley Professional. Verlagsgesellschaft mbH. [5] Rudin.org/ etext/21016 [3] Hilbert. Peters. (Eight Edition. Richard. Donald. John H. (Second Edition) A. (Third Edition. 87 . 1976. Grundlagen der Geometrie. [4] Knuth.K. Online at http://www. On Numbers and Games.) H. The Open Court Publishing Company. Essays on the Theory of Numbers.) McGraw-Hill. Stuttgart. 2001. David.1974. [2] Dedekind.

88 Ambar N. Sengupta .

Appendix A Question Bank Set 1 1. 89 . Prove that there is no rational number whose square is 7.

(i) Show that there is an n0 ∈ N such that 1 <ε n2 for all n ∈ N with n ≥ n0 . Sengupta (ii) Let a be any real number. Ambar N. Let ε be any positive real number. . Show that there is some n1 ∈ N such that 1 2a < ε n for all n ∈ N with n ≥ n1 .90 2.

Suppose a is a positive real number with a2 < 7.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 3. Show that a+ 1 n 2 91 <ε for all n ∈ N large enough (i. .e. there is some n ∈ N such that the preceding inequality holds for all natural numbers n ≥ n ).

Ambar N.92 4. Sengupta (ii) Show that S is bounded above in R. . Let S = {x ∈ R : x > 0 and x2 < 7}. / (i) Show that S = 0.

) (iv) Prove that a2 is. . equal to 7. in fact. there is a real number whose square is 7. Thus. (Hint: Suppose a2 were less than 7. Then use the result of Problem 3. Prove that a2 ≥ 7.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 93 (iii) Let a = sup S.

7) ∪ [9. For the set B = {−4. ∞). Sengupta 1.94 Set 2 Ambar N. viewed as a subset of R∗ : (i) B0 = (ii) ∂B = (iii) Bc = (iv) the interior of the complement Bc is (Bc )0 = (v) (B0 )c = (vi) B = (vii) ∂B = (viii) ∂B0 = (ix) The interior of (B0 )c is: (x) The closure of Bc is: . 8} ∪ [1.

(iii) The set [0. i. S = S. i.e. ∞) is closed as a subset of R. Provide brief explanations/answers for the following: (i) If U is an open set then U 0 = 95 (ii) For any set A.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 2. (iv) If S is closed then its closure S is S itself. the interior of the interior of A is the interior of A.e. (A0 )0 = A0 . (v) Is there a subset of R whose boundary in R is all of R? .

96

Ambar N. Sengupta 3. Give an example of an open cover of (−1, 1) which does not have a finite subcover.

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Set 5 1. Consider the partition X = (.25, .5, .75, 1) of [0, 1]. For the function f on [0, 1] given by f (x) = x2 for all x ∈ [0, 1]

97

(i) Work out the upper sum U( f , X)

(ii) Work out the Riemann sum S( f , X, X ∗ ), where X ∗ = (0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8)

98 2. Consider the partition X= 1 2 N , , ..., N N N

Ambar N. Sengupta

of [0, 1]. For the function f on [0, 1] given by f (x) = x2 for all x ∈ [0, 1]

(i) Show that U( f , X) = 1 1 1+ 6 N 2+ 1 N

[Hint: Use the sum formula 12 + 22 + · · · + k2 = k(k + 1)(2k + 1)/6.]

(ii) Show that L( f , X) = 1 1 1− 6 N 2− 1 N

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis (iii) Assuming that f is integrable. . prove that Z 1 0 99 x2 dx = 1 3 using the definition of the Riemann integral and the results of (i) and (ii).

100 3. . Consider the function g on [0. 1] given by g(x) = 1 if x is rational −1 if x is irrational Ambar N. Sengupta Prove that g is not Riemann integrable.

g ∈ R [a. Prove that. b]. for a.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 101 4. . b]. if f . then f + g ∈ R [a. b ∈ R with a < b.

Write out in a complete and neat way the proof that every continuous function on a compact interval is Riemann integrable.102 Set 6 Ambar N. Sengupta 1. .

x∈[a. b] → R we define the variation Var( f ) by Var( f ) = sup ( f (x) − f (y)) = M( f ) − m( f ).b] Prove that for functions f and g on [a. x.b] andm( f ) = inf f (x). x∈[a.y∈[a. Var( f g) ≤ M(| f |)Var(g) + m(|g|)Var( f ) . For a function f : [a.b] 103 where M( f ) = sup f (x). b].Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 2.

and then stating and explaining the definition of the Riemann integral. all properly explained in your own terms.) . Clearly explain.104 Ambar N. (Please note that every piece of notation you bring in must explained. Work out a simple integral in such a way as to illustrate the definition of the Riemann integral. Sengupta 3. in your own words. the Darboux criterion. Explain the notion of the Riemann integral by clearly stating the definitions of upper sums and lower sums.

∞] (iv) The point 1 is an interior point of [0. 2. 4) (vi) The set [0. ∞) is a closed subset of R (viii) Every real number is a boundary point of Q (ix) The set {1.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Test 1 1. Mark True or False: (i) If S is a bounded subset of R then it contains a largest element 105 (ii) If S is a bounded. 1] (v) The point 4 is a boundary point of [0. 3} is compact (x) The set (1. ∞) is a closed subset of R∗ (vii) The set [0. non-empty subset of R then it has a least upper bound in R (iii) The point ∞ is a boundary point of [1. 5] is compact .

. Ambar N.106 2. (ii) The complement of a closed set is open. Sengupta (ii) If S is a non-empty subset of R∗ then sup S is in the closure S. Prove one of the following statements: (i) The union of any collection of open sets is open.

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 3. . State (i) the Heine-Borel Theorem 107 (ii) the Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem.

Sengupta (ii) Limit of a sequence (xn )in R∗ . State the definitions of the following: (i) Limit point of a sequence (xn ) in R∗ . Ambar N. (iii) A Cauchy sequence in R.108 4. .

(x) The uniform limit of a sequence of continuous functions is continuous. 1]. 109 (iv) A continuous function on a compact set attains a mimimum value at some point in the set. (iii) A continuous function on a compact set is bounded. pointwise. (v) If a sequence of functions converges to a function pointwise then it converges uniformly. (ii) A continuous function on any closed subset of R is bounded.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Test 2 1. and if each fn is continuous at a point p ∈ [0. 1] → R is a sequence of functions. . and fn → f . (vi) If a sequence of functions converges to a function unformly then it converges pointwise. (viii) Every uniformly Cauchy sequence of functions converges uniformly. (ix) Every uniformly convergent sequence of functions is uniformly Cauchy. as n → ∞. then f is continuous at p. (vii) If fn : [0. Mark True or False: (i) A continuous function on any subset of R is bounded.

1] → R is continuous. 1]. Suppose f : [0. . and f (p) > 0 for some p ∈ [0.110 Ambar N. Show that there is a neighborhood U of p such that f (x) > 0 for all x ∈ U ∩ [0. Sengupta 2. 1].

. State (i) the Intermediate Value Theorem 111 (ii) the Extreme Value theorem.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 3.

Sengupta . Ambar N. Show that the equation x3 + 5x − 2 = 0 has a solution in the interval (0. 1).112 4.

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis Test 3 1. Consider a function f on an interval [a, b] ⊂ R, where a < b,: f : [a, b] → R.

113

(i) Let X = (a, b) be the simplest partition of [a, b]. Write down an expression for L( f , X), explaining your notation clearly. (5pts)

(ii) Now consider a partition X which contains one addtional point t, i.e. X = (a,t, b), where a < t < b. Write down an expression for L( f , X ), again explaining the notation clearly. (5pts)

114

Ambar N. Sengupta

(iii) Show that L( f , X ) ≥ L( f , X).

(5pts)

Notes in Introductory Real Analysis

115

2. Consider a function f : [a, b] → R, where [a, b] ⊂ R and a < b. Let X and Y be partitions of [a, b] with Y containing all the points of X and some more. Prove that (5pts) U( f ,Y ) − L( f ,Y ) ≤ U( f , X) − L( f , X)

116 3. d] ⊂ [a. If f ∈ R [a. b] and [c. b] prove that f ∈ R [c. Sengupta (5pts) . d]. Ambar N.

Every Riemann integrable function is bounded. and ∆x j = x j − x j−1 . b].. there is always a real number which is ≥ all the lower sums and ≤ all the upper sums. For a bounded function on an interval [a. Every continuous function is Riemann integrable. j. b] → R and any partition X = (x0 . If f ∈ R [a. N U( f . . c. Every monotone function is Riemann integrable. b. b] and f is never zero then 1/ f ∈ R [a..x j ] f (x) − infx∈[x j−1 . Every bounded function is Riemann integrable. Mark TRUE or FALSE: 117 (10pts) a. X) = j=1 ∑ Var j ( f )∆x j . For any function f : [a. d. where Var j ( f ) = supx∈[x j−1 . f. If f ∈ R [a. Every Riemann integrable function is continuous. X) − L( f . b]. h. b] ⊂ R. b]. b] then | f | ∈ R [a. xN ) of [a. i.. b] then f ∈ R [a. b]. e. . g.x j ] f (x).Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 4. If | f | ∈ R [a.

Consider the set S = [2. Sengupta (ix) Every sequence in S has a subsequence which is convergent. (iv) 9 is an isolated point of S. (vi) S is an open set. . (ii) 4 is an interior point of S. (x) Every sequence in S has a subsequence converging to a point in S. (v) 1 is an isolated point of S. (viii) S is compact. 8}. (vii) S is a closed set.118 Cumulative Question Set 1. Ambar N. (iii) 4 is a boundary point of S. Mark True or False: (i) 2 is an interior point of S. 4) ∪ (5. 6) ∪ {1.

Let S be a non-empty subset of R.] . (ii) Show that there is a sequence of elements sn ∈ S such that sn → sup S. try also the case U = ∞.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 2. in this case U ∈ R. 119 (i) If t a real number with t < sup S. Explain why there exists x ∈ S with x > t. Now apply (i) to produce an sn using 1/n for t. First assume that S is bounded above. If you have time. [Hint: Let U = sup S.

. p + δ). Sengupta 3. Suppose f is continuous at a point p. Prove that there is a δ > 0 such that f (x) > 0 for all x in the domain of f which lie in the neighborhood (p − δ. and f (p) > 2.120 Ambar N.

e. Prove that f reaches its maximum value on S.] . Apply Bolzano-Weierstrass. there is a point p ∈ S such that f (p) = supx∈S f (x). i. Let f be a continuous function on a closed and bounded set S ⊂ R.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 121 4. [Hint: Let U = supx∈S f (x). Then choose a sequence of points sn ∈ S such that f (sn ) → U.

for some function f on [a. b].122 Ambar N. b] then fn → f uniformly. b ∈ R. (iii) If ( fn ) is Cauchy in sup-norm then fn → f uniformly. b]. b]. Let ( fn ) be a sequence of functions on [a. . and if each fn is continuous. b] such that fn (x) → f (x) for all x ∈ [a. (iv) If fn → f uniformly and each fn is continuous then f is continuous. Mark True or False: (i) If there is a function f on [a. then f is continuous. with a < b. Let a. (v) If fn (x) → f (x) for every x ∈ [a. (ii) If fn → f uniformly then fn (x) → f (x) for all x ∈ [a. Sengupta 5. b].

b]. and fn (x) → f (x) for every x ∈ [a. Consider an interval [a. b]. b] ⊂ R[a. b] then Z b a 123 f ≤ Z b a |f| (iii) If fn ∈ R[a. b]. (iv) If X is a partition of [a.Y ) . b]. b] with X ⊂ Y then U( f . b] then Rb Rb a fn → a f . (ii) If f ∈ R[a. and X and Y are partitions of [a.Notes in Introductory Real Analysis 6. b] ⊂ R. Mark true or false. for n ∈ N. X) ≤ Z b f a (v) If f is a function on [a. and f ∈ R[a. b]. (i) C[a. X) < U( f . then L( f .

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