You are on page 1of 16

Module Title: DIGITAL VIDEO PRODUCTION

Term and Year taken: WINTER 2010

MICHELLE CANNON

Reflec%ve  commentary  on  the  DVP  prac%cal  assignment  with  reference  


to  current  theore%cal  debates  about  digital  produc%on,  crea%vity  and  
media  educa%on

Word count (number of words): 2749

Student evaluation submitted: N

Copy posted on FirstClass/Blackboard:

FINAL

Name of Tutor(s): John Potter & James Durran

MA in Media, Culture & Communication


University of London, Institute of Education
Month and Year of Submission: (February 2011)
Reflec%ve  commentary  on  the  DVP  prac%cal  assignment  with  reference  to  current  
theore%cal  debates  about  digital  produc%on,  crea%vity  and  media  educa%on  
___________________________________________________________

Walter  Murch  highlighted  John  Huston’s  seduc6ve  no6on  that  film  is  “’the  closest  to  
thought  process  of  any  art’”  (Murch,  2001:60).  This  may  explain  why  we  feel  a  
certain  built-­‐in  familiarity  and  trust  with  the  medium,  a  readiness  to  surrender  to  the  
screen  as  early  as  infancy.  Our  thought  paNerns  are  con6nually  overlapping  and  
renewing  themselves  –  as  much  in  sleep  as  in  wakefulness  –  and  as  such,  Huston  
suggests  that  the  physiological  act  of  blinking,  which  unconsciously  punctuates  our  
percep6on,  is  analogous  with  the  rhythmic  cuQng  of  film.  If  so,  there  is  much  to  be  
learned  in  terms  of  how  we  make  sense  of  the  world  from  an  analysis  of  moving  
image  texts  and  the  social  and  cultural  processes  involved  in  their  produc6on.

Advances  in  digital  recording  devices,  edi6ng  soTware  and  methods  of  distribu6on  
have  impacted  drama6cally  on  informal  prac6ces,  par6cularly  those  exercised  by  
young  people.  Burn  &  Durran  argue  that:

“..the  inters66al  space  between  domes6c  camcorder  use  and  professional  


video  film  work  is  exactly  the  space  educa&on  is  best  suited  to  
occupy.”  (2007:274,  my  italics)

Tradi6onal  curriculum  approaches  to  the  cri6cal  analysis  of  literary  texts  can  be  
mirrored  in  the  context  of  media  texts  by  using  produc6on  technologies  as:

“tools  of  anatomy  …  to  undo  the  fabric  of  media  texts,  pulling  them  apart  to  
see  what  structures  hold  them  together  …  (not)  just  deconstruc&on…  this  kind  
of  anatomical  work  also  involves  re-­‐assembly,  re-­‐presenta6on,  and  a  kind  of  
crea6vity  that  is  about  ideas  as  well  as  the  pleasurable  manipula6on  of  the  
material  medium.”(ibid:276)

My  account  of  our  DVP  prac6cal  assignment  is  seen  through  a  pedagogical  lens,  one  
that  seeks  to:  unpack  the  film-­‐making  process,  its  poten6al  and  its  constraints;  define  
the  technical  and  conceptual  learning  outcomes  associated  with  edi6ng  and  
speculate  on  the  implica6ons  for  current  media  educa6on  prac6ces.

22
It  didn’t  seem  ambi6ous  during  planning;  the  agreed  storyline  just  seemed  a  good  
opportunity  for  us  to  have  equal  input  -­‐  three  friends  travelling  separately  to  a  happy  
mee6ng  on  a  bridge.  We  went  with  a  fluid,  pick-­‐n-­‐mix  approach  to  shots,  enjoying  
experimen6ng  with  different  camera  angles,  shot  distances,  moving  camera  work  
and  cutaways;  this  experience  in  hindsight  was  possibly  at  the  expense  of  a  cohesive  
narra6ve  and  clear  character  defini6on  in  the  mind  of  the  viewer.  I  took  measures  to  
resolve  this  in  the  edi6ng  phase,  but  generally  the  6me  we  could  spend  taking  varied  
shots  of  a  set  up,  as  characteris6c  of  single-­‐camera  shoo6ng,  was  limited  as  three  
individual  story  strands  needed  weaving  together.  

We  worked  well  together  as  a  group,  but  at  6mes  there  were  two  co-­‐exis6ng  film  
visions.  I  filmed  shots  conceptually  at  odds  with  what  I  thought  we  had  agreed  and  
knew  I  would  not  be  using  (mutually  so  I’m  sure)  but  we  filmed  them  anyway  for  
posi6ve  group  dynamics.  Conversely,  there  were  moments  of  spontaneity  and  
improvisa6on  which  worked  really  well.  For  an  effec6ve  crea6ve  collabora6on,  group  
members  should  seek  a  balance  between  open-­‐minded  compromise  and  an  
awareness  of  the  poten6ally  damaging  effects  of  any  “solitary  monolithic  
vision”  (Murch  2001:146).

My  previous  filming  experience  had  largely  been  the  un-­‐restructured  recording  of  
events  (taking  out  the  bad  bits)  as  well  as  linear  issue-­‐based  school  projects,  so  
undertaking  the  more  complex  task  of  a  6me-­‐based  narra6ve  was  squarely  out  of  my  
comfort  zone.  Once  a  few  shots  were  ‘in  the  can’  however  I  began  to  relax  and  it  felt  
as  if  an  accumula6on  of  implicit  film  knowledge  was  given  the  oxygen  of  an  
expressive,  crea6ve  outlet.  This  was  fun!  and  it’s  worth  reflec6ng  on  how  much  this  
pleasure  is  founded  on  “the  par6cipatory  promise  …  of  access  to  the  movie  dream”?  
(Furstenau  &  Mackenzie,  2009:8,  quo6ng  Acland).

We  were  undoubtedly  reproducing  the  Hollywood  con6nuity  style  and  those  of  a  
more  Leavisite  persuasion  might  ques6on  the  validity  of  the  unskilled  simula6on  of  
the  popular  arts.    Banaji  et  al  cri6que  Scruton’s  tradi6onal,  eli6st  views  on  innovatory  
prac6ces  in  architecture  for  example,  which  he  might  equally  have  applied  to  the  
novelty  value  of  amateur  film-­‐making:

33
“there  is  a  sense  in  which  ‘novelty’  is  viewed  as  a  nega6ve,  almost  dangerous,  
aNribute  when  proposed  by  those  who  do  not  possess  the  requisite  skill  and  
inspira6on  to  maintain  a  link  with  what  is  seen  to  be  the  best  in  the  
past.”  (Banaji  et  al,  2006:8)

Others,  on  the  other  hand,  observe  that  our  percep6on  of  crea6vity  is  some6mes  
clouded  by  vague  roman6c  no6ons  of  original  ar6s6c  genius  and  personal  vision  
(Burn  &  Durran  2007:13,  Buckingham  2003:127).  T.  Miller  claims  that  in  terms  of  
crea6ve  and  cultural  evalua6on  ‘the  blank  canvas’  impera6ve  is  overprivileged  and  
what  also  must  be  considered  is  the  socio-­‐historic  genesis  of  any  media  text  [or  
indeed  any  “uNerance”  (Burn  et  al  2001:37)]:

“(it  is)  occasionality  that  structures  the  condi6ons  under  which  a  text  is  made,  
circulated,  received,  interpreted  and  cri6cised”  (Furstenau  &  Mackenzie,  
2009:11,  quo6ng  Miller,  T  2001)

Furthermore,  Burn  et  al  demys6fy  the  no6on  of  crea6vity,  reassigning  it  as  an  
umbrella  term,  “a  loose  label”  covering:

“the  processes  by  which  people  represent  and  thereby  transform  aspects  of  
their  world  and  themselves  through  the  representa6onal  resources  the  
culture  makes  available.”  (2001:37)

Digital  technology  enables  material  experimenta6on  with  film  genres  and  


techniques,  it  widens  par6cipa6on  and  weakens  canonicity,  and  however  much  
digi6sa6on  might  nurture  the  idea  that  media  texts  simply  recycle  the  sediment  of  
previous  texts,  film-­‐making  is  s6ll  a  cra3  imbued  with  the  poten6al  to  achieve  skilful  
competence  and  emo6onal  reward.

Unlike  the  New  Wave  cinema  d’auteurs,  whose  preferences  were  for  jump  cuts  and  
the  disrup6on  of  con6nuous  smooth  percep6on,  ours  was  an  exercise  in  con&nuity  
edi&ng  –  the  choreographing  of  a  linear,  seamless,  coherent  and  aesthe6cally  
engaging  narra6ve.  First  viewing  of  the  footage  revealed  a  general  movement  from  
leT  to  right  and  so  I  tried  to  make  this  a  “stylis6c  signature”  (Burn,  A.  et  al  2001);  
prac6cally  speaking,  it  also  made  for  6mely  and  economic  edi6ng  decisions.    I  added  

44
text  for  context  and  to  give  more  immediate  meaning  to  what  was  to  follow,  as  well  
as  a  has6ly  selected  score  to  help  direct  the  thoughts  and  feelings  of  the  audience.

1:  Long  establishing  shot   2:  Medium  establishing  shot

Cross-­‐fade  1  >  2:  boat  going  under  the  bridge  followed  by  panning  shot.    I  flipped  the  
laNer  to  echo  the  movement  of  the  boat,  in  line  with  cu6ng  on  ac&on  and  “rhythmic  
rela6ons”  (Bordwell  &  Thompson  2009:225);  shot  2  finishes  with  bold  foreground  
interest.  The  snow  is  a  pervasive  feature  and  is  seen  here  collected  -­‐  s6ll  and  pris6ne  
-­‐  against  the  ornate  lamp  post  base.

3.  Long   4:  Long  

Cross  fade  2  >  3:  with  a  contras6ng  movement  of  the  camera  from  the  ground  
upwards.  Here  the  snow  is  trampled,  but  stark  black  and  white  “graphic  
rela6ons”  (ibid)  are  maintained  through  the  parallel  lines  and  the  interes6ng  depth  
of  field.  The  bus  features  later.

Cut  3  >  4:  the  narra6ve  begins  with  Wendy  walking  leT  to  right  and  accompanying  
text.  The  merry-­‐go-­‐round  features  later.

55
5:  Close  up   6:  Medium  

Cut  4  >  5:  not  the  best  cut,  it  should  have  been  Helen’s  face  in  close  up,  but  it’s  a  nice  
detail  con6nuing  the  snow  theme.    

Cut  5  >  6:  originally  the  storyline  was  that  I  need  cheering  up,  but  in  the  final  edit  I  
removed  most  of  these  unconvincing  references  and  leT  it  open  to  interpreta6on.

7:  Over  the  shoulder  angle   8:  Medium  

Cut  6  >  7:  cut  in  for  over  the  shoulder  eyeline  match  looking  at  my  watch  -­‐  moves  the  
narra6ve  along.

Cut  7  >  8:  Wendy  passes  the  bus,  recalling  shot  3,  walking  off  screen  (s6ll  no  
closeup!)

Cut  8  >  9:  recalls  shot  5.  Her  name  wouldn’t  have  been  legible  here  in  the  chosen  
style  and  posi6on  so  appears  later.  Although  pleasing  photographically,  cuts  8-­‐15  
work  less  well  because  of  a  lack  of  rhythmic  and  graphic  rela6ons.  

66
9:  Medium  long   10:  Closeup  

Cut  9  >  10:  my  represented  cold/sadness  in  closeup  perhaps  adds  weight  to  the  final  
happy  scene.    It  is  hoped  that  the  audience  appreciates  simultaneous  ac6on  
throughout  the  friends’  travelling  sequences.

Cut  10  >  11:  Helen’s  cycles  leT  to  right,  contras6ng  with  opposite  taxi  movement  (s6ll  
no  closeup!).

11:  Long   12:  Closeup  

Cut  11  >  12:  focussing  more  here  on  aesthe6cs  at  the  expense  of  contextual  help  
with  the  narra6ve,  Wendy’s  black  boots  traverse  the  snow.

13:  Medium   14:  Medium  

77
Cut  12  >  13:  Helen  con6nues  on  foot.  We  should  perhaps  have  filmed  the  dismount.  
Leaves  on  the  ground  will  feature  later.

Cut  13  >  14:  I  am  also  on  foot  heading  in  the  same  direc6on.  There  were  difficul6es  
with  con6nuity  and  whether  my  hood  was  up  or  down  from  now  on.

Cut  14  >  15:  the  merry-­‐go-­‐round  recalls  shot  4.  Shot  15  -­‐  not  sure  about  this  -­‐  it  
doesn’t  add  anything  new.

15:  Long   16:  Closeup  

Cut  15  >  16:  I  had  been  looking  down  so  it  made  sense  to  film  my  point  of  view  whilst  
walking,  (though  it’s  not  clear  they  are  my  feet).  The  snow  and  leaf  mo6f  add  texture  
to  the  image.

Cut  16  >  17:  s6ll  shot  of  Wendy  indicates  the  ac6on  is  slowing  down.  Her  turning  
round  sets  up  shot  19  of  her  missing  me  walking  past  and  adds  drama  to  the  mee6ng  
climax.

17:  Medium   18:  Closeup  

88
Cut  17  >  18:  Cross-­‐cut  back  to  my  feet  to  indicate  simultaneous  walking.

Cut  18  >  19:  Cut  to  me  walking  past  Wendy,  but  this  layering  of  events  -­‐  to  add  depth  
to  the  narra6ve  -­‐  could  be  lost  on  the  audience  due  to  insufficient  closeups  and  
anchoring  of  iden6fica6on.

19:  Medium   20:  Long  

Cut  19  >  20:  the  bridge  mee6ng  point  is  in  view;  the  seagull  movement  will  have  
payoffs  later.    This  cutaway  and  the  following  one  func6on  as  6me-­‐lapses  so  that  I  
can  reach  the  rendezvous  point,  thus  maintaining  temporal  rela6ons.

Cut  20  >  21:  the  seagull  rests  by  the  lamp  post  featured  in  shot  2.  Contras6ng  light  
and  dark  asymmetry  adds  background  interest.    

21:  Medium   22:  Long  to  closeup

Cut  21  >  22:  from  a  long  shot  of  a  snowy  South  bank  scene  I  liked  the  idea  of  Helen  
entering  the  frame  from  below  and  looking  off  screen.  In  my  mind  Helen  is  looking  
up  at  me  wai6ng  on  the  bridge  but  this  might  not  be  clear  to  the  audience.

99
23:  Long   24:  Medium  zoom  

Cut  22>  23:  spacial  rela6ons  were  a  challenge  here.  Shot  29  will  dictate  that  she  
should  have  been  on  the  other  side  of  the  river  looking  to  her  leT  at  this  point  in  
order  to  preserve  the  180-­‐degree  rule  and  prevent  disrup6ng  the  logic  of  the  
viewer’s  perspec6ve.    Murch  proposes  that  if  there  is  a  hierarchy  in  editorial  
decision-­‐making  then  2-­‐dimensional  “planarity”  (2001:18)  is  less  important  than  
maintaining  emo6on,  story,  rhythm,  and  eyeline  and  there’s  a  sense  of  expecta6on  in  
Helen’s  performance  here  that  I  wanted  to  preserve.

Cut  23  >  24:  the  displaced  chair  reflects  my  melancholic  state,  the  seagull  reappears  
in  a  graphically  similar  posi6on  to  shot  21  and  again  I  am  looking  down  on  events.

25:  Long   26:  Long  

Cut  24  >  25:  from  passive  watching  something  takes  my  no6ce  and  glancing  leT  could  
signal  the  mee6ng  ...  but  it  cuts  to  a  flying  seagull.  

Cut  25  >  26:  ...  My  quiet  contempla6on  affords  Helen  the  6me  to  cross  the  bridge  
and  Wendy  to  climb  the  stairs  and  keeps  temporal  rela6ons.

10
10
27:  Long   28:  Medium  

Cut  26  >  27:  my  glance  leT  also  happens  to  take  in  Wendy’s  arrival  and  her  
serendipitous  slipping.    With  her  happy  gestures  and  performance,  the  mood  now  
brightens,  reinforced  by  a  change  in  music  tempo  and  genre.

Cut  27  >  28:  cuQng  in  to  my  reac6on  shot  registers  my  surprise  and  delight.

29:  Long   30:  Long  

Cut  28  >  29:  Helen’s  open-­‐armed  dash  from  the  opposite  direc6on  matches  the  tone  
and  rhythm  of  Wendy’s  arrival.

Crossfade  29  >  30:  the  elided  moment  of  mee6ng  is  supplanted  by  a  transi6on  to  the  
colourful  circling  merry-­‐go-­‐round,  invoking  childhood  friendship.  This  nod  to  
montage  technique  –  the  juxtaposi6on  of  images  as  symbols  with  an  emphasis  on  
the  ar6cula6on  of  ideas  or  emo6ons  drawing  on  Eisenstein’s  style  -­‐  directs  the  
thoughts  and  emo6ons  of  the  audience.

11
11
31:  Medium   32:  Long  

Crossfade  30  >  31:  the  merry-­‐go-­‐round  is  mirrored  by  the  circle  of  friends,  illustra6ng  
how  graphic  rela6ons  between  shots  can  convey  a  pleasing  symmetry.

Crossfade  31  >  32:  the  transi6on  illustrates  the  prac6cal  use  of  ellip6cal  edi6ng  and  
renders  acceptable  their  progression  along  the  bridge.  

Crossfade  32>  33:  by  dissolving  the  penul6mate  image  into  the  merry-­‐go-­‐round  both  
audience  and  receding  friends  are  leT  with  a  final  reminder  of  happy  6mes.

33:  Medium  

Although  vital  for  guiding  emo6ons  and  enhancing  engagement,  given  the  6me  
constraints,  sound  edi6ng  was  secondary.    Circumstances  dictated  that  inclusion  of  
diege6c  sound  was  not  possible  and  whilst  simplifying  the  edi6ng  process  to  some  
extent,  this  fact  introduced  its  own  constraints.  I  selected  two  “off-­‐the-­‐shelf”  
Garageband  tracks  of  an  appropriate  length  and  joined  them  with  a  cymbal  clash  to  
signpost  the  mood  shiT.    Not  perfect,  but  a  neat  and  6mely  improvisa6on.

12
12
Dealing  with  sound  with  something  of  a  supermarket  mentality  recalls  SeTon-­‐
Green’s  reflec6ons  on  the  crea6ve  use  of  databases  and  digital  effects.  Claims  on  
what  cons6tutes  crea6vity  con6nue  to  be  contested  and,  drawing  on  Lev  Manovich,  
SeTon-­‐Green  steers  away  from  debates  about  authen6city  and  originality  towards  a  
more  salient  interroga6on  of  the  mul6modal  “synaesthe6c  experience”  (2005:109)  
afforded  by  converging  produc6on  soTware  and  ques6ons  of:

“how  the  imagina6on  of  users  is  determined  and  how  (libraries  and  menus)  
might  influence  output  …  how  the  mind  might  organise  or  apply  an  
internalised  taxonomy  of  effects”  (2005:  103)

Adeptness  at  “manipula6ng,  selec6ng  or  combining  blocks  or  ‘units’  of  data”  (ibid  
2005:108)  has  become  a  key  crea6ve  as  well  as  technical  skill.  SenneN  would  argue  
that  these  are  the  skills  of  a  craTsman  and  that  what  is  required  for  progress  in  the  
manipula6on  of  raw  materials  is  an  understanding  of  “intui6ve  leaps”  (2008:  207).  
The  four  elements  necessary  to  making  these  leaps  could  equally  be  deployed  in  the  
context  of  edi6ng  digital  images,  sound  and  text:

a) reforma6ng  -­‐  an  aspect  of  reality  is  materially  reworked.

b)adjacency  -­‐  the  juxtaposi6on  of  “two  unlike  domains  ...  the  closer  they  are,  the  
more  s6mula6ng  seems  their  twined  presence.”  (2008:210)  Two  or  possibly  three  
domains  in  the  case  of  edi6ng.

c) surprise  -­‐  “you  begin  dredging  up  tacit  knowledge  into  consciousness  to  do  the  
comparing”  and  experience  “wonder”  (2008:211).  Trus6ng  in  the  feeling  of  the  
right  edi6ng  decision  begets  confidence  and  pleasure.

d)gravity  -­‐  recogni6on  that  leaps  do  not  defy  gravity  and  constraints  are  something  
of  a  constant:  “the  technical  import,  like  any  immigrant,  will  bring  with  it  its  own  
problems”  (2008:212).

CraTsmanship  and  contemporary  audiovisuality  conflate  at  the  edi6ng  interface,  


which  is  fer6le  ground  for  Vygotskyan  principles  and  his  thoughts  on  the  “dialec6cal  
process  of  crea6vity”  (Burn  &  Durran  2007:62).  He  refers  to  cultural  resources  being:  
internalised,  reformaNed  through  “acts  of  imagina6on  and  intellect”  (ibid)  -­‐  habits  

13
13
ideally  developed  through  childhood  role-­‐play,  materially  “crystallised”  and  finally  
returned  to  society.

What  was  apparent  to  me  during  the  DVP  module  was  the  ‘hands  off’  pedagogical  
approach  and  from  a  feeling  of  being  ‘at  sea’  with  all  the  limitless  possibili6es,  
logis6cal  constraints  and  the  weather  condi6ons,  one  took  refuge  in  the  soTware  to  
restore  order  and  regain  control.  In  parallel,  SeTon-­‐Green  encourages  a  re-­‐imagining  
of  crea6ve  produc6on  tools  as  a  “scaffold”  (2005:108):

“an  open  structure  that  allows  for  interven6on,  support,  reflec6on  and  
experimenta6on  ....  an  accessible  social  process  locking  a  kind  of  ‘pedagogy’  
into  the  rela6onship  between  screen  and  user”  (ibid:  109)

This  reflects  Burn  &  Durran’s  argument  that  in  so  far  as  digital  produc6on  tends  to  
“the  expressive  needs  of  the  moment”  (2007:160),  it  is  the  teacher’s  responsibility  to  
be  alert  to  students’  improvisatory  skills  and  interests;  to  intuit  the  moment  to  
intervene  with  cri6cal  insight  and  to  personally  develop  an  ever-­‐widening  and  
dynamic  apprecia6on  of  media  texts.  Screens  are  intrinsic  to  everyday  western  living  
and  this  fact  ‘locks’  most  of  us  into  a  social  impera6ve  to  learn,  almost  indefinitely.

One  of  the  aims  of  media  educa6on  is  to  “[make]  the  familiar  strange”  (Buckingham  
2003:71)  and  the  task  of  reflexively  analysing  one’s  own  text  was  a  memorable  
challenge  which  did  just  this.  In  terms  of  how  to  proceed,  Burn  &  Durran  helpfully  
characterise  it  as  “50%  opportunity  planned  by  us,  and  50%  
improvisa6on”  (2007:160).  If  so,  I  aspire  to  become  more  of  an  intui6ve  media  
facilitator  embracing  the  limita6ons  and  poten6al  of  soTware  form  and  structure,  
whilst  waving  through  students’  imagina6ve  leaps  as  they  nego6ate  the  scaffold  to  
their  own  “endlessly  provisional”  (Burn  et  al  2001:35)  unspecified  ends.

________________________________________________________

References:

Banaji  S,  Burn  A,  Buckingham,  D  (2006)  The  Rhetorics  of  Crea&vity:  a  review  of  the  
literature

Buckingham,  D  (2003)  Media  Educa&on

Bordwell  &  Thompson  (2009)  Film  Art

14
14
Burn,  A  &  Durran,  J  (2006)  Digital  Anatomies:  Analysis  as  produc&on  in  Media  
Educa&on,  (Digital  Genera6ons,  Ed.  Buckingham  and  Willets)

Burn,  A  et  al  (2001)  The  Rush  of  Images  (English  in  Educa6on  Vol  35:2)

Burn,  A  &  Durran,  J  (2007)  Media  Literacy  in  Schools

Furstenau,  M  &  Mackenzie,  A  (2009):  The  promise  of  ‘makeability’:  digital  edi&ng  
so3ware  and  the  structuring  of  everyday  cinema&c  life  (Visual  Communica6on  2009  
Vol  8:5)

Murch,  W  (2001)  In  the  Blink  of  an  Eye  

SeTon-­‐Green,  J  (2005)  Timelines,  Timeframes  and  Special  Effects:  so3ware  and  


crea&ve  media  produc&on  (Educa6on,  Communica6on  &  Informa6on  Vol  5)

SenneN,  R  (2008)  The  Cra3sman

15
15
Appendix  1  -­‐  Shot  list.

During  planning  I  think  we  would  have  benefiNed  from  a  storyboard  approach  to  nail  
the  narra6ve  sequence  and  shot  type  rather  than  this  fairly  haphazard  list.  If  only  
because  it  was  too  cold  to  keep  referring  to  it  and  I  know  that  images  would  have  
stayed  in  my  head  beNer!

16
16