CL King’s 5th Annual Best Ideas Conference On Assignment, Inc.

September 2007

Peter Dameris President & CEO

Jim Brill Senior VP & CFO

Safe Harbor
Certain statements made in this presentation should be considered forwardlooking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These include statements about our future results of operations and operating targets, the size of the markets in which we operate, and our efforts to increase our market share and revitalize our business. We caution investors that these forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual results may differ materially. Investors should consider the important risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ, including those discussed in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006 and other filings we make with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We assume no obligation to update this presentation, which speaks as of today's date.

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Today’s Topics
• • • • • • Key Investment Highlights Industry and Market Overview Management Team Combined Company Overview Acquisition Rationale / Integration Pro Forma Financial Results

3

Key Investment Considerations

Large, Attractive End Markets

• • •

The staffing industry is a large and growing market, with total US revenues forecasted to grow 10% in 2006 to $131 billion Temporary employment penetration rates continue to increase Current “Goldilocks” economy bodes well for temporary staffing demand Highly skilled temps are in high demand but short supply, irrespective of the economic cycle, especially in areas like healthcare and highly specialized professional services Focused placements of high-end talent – not a mass market “bodyshop” like larger providers High-end focus yields higher bill rates, longer assignments and stickier customer relationships Unique, proactive recruiting and fulfillment model for specialized talent Pro forma combined, approximately 6,600 clients with no client accounting for more than 4% of FY 2006 revenues Customer diversification enhances revenue visibility and insulates margins Creates exciting opportunities for contract professionals

Strong, Position in Critical HighEnd Skill Sets Diverse, High Quality Customer Base

• • • • • •

Attractive Financial Characteristics

• • •

All three companies operate in high demand, high growth sub sectors of the broader staffing market, which drives organic revenue growth and increases gross margins Highly scalable front and back office creates operating margin expansion opportunities Low working capital and CapEx requirements result in strong conversion of EBITDA to free cash flow 338(h)(10) election yields an estimated $4.8 million in annual cash tax savings

Experienced Management Team

• •

CEO Peter Dameris has extensive experience in the staffing sector and a strong track record with public investors Veteran cadre of seasoned industry professionals leading each division Experienced finance and accounting department with strong back-office systems and reporting capabilities

4

Temporary Staffing Industry
Estimated total staffing industry revenues forecast to be $131 billion in 2006, up from $119 billion in 20051
• • • The US, UK, France, Japan and Germany are the largest geographic markets for the staffing industry with the US at 35% share of the global industry in 2004 Penetration rates remain low – the UK has the highest penetration of temporary employees at 5.1%, the US penetration rate is under 2% of the total workforce2 The US staffing market is projected to have grown at an annual growth rate of 10% between 2003 and 20071

Global Staffing Industry1
PEO 9.1% Outplacement 0.8% Permanent Placement Fees 15.1%

2006 Geographic Split2
US 35% Others 22%

Traditional Staffing 35.9%

Professional / Specialist Staffing 39.1%

Netherlands 3% Germany 4% Japan 9%

UK 18% France 10%

Sources: (1) Staffing Industry Analysts, Inc. (August 18, 2006) (2) Staffing Industry Sourcebook (2006)

5

Healthcare Staffing
• Demand for healthcare staffing services is expected to be driven by:
– – – – – An aging U.S. population Rapid advances in medical procedures and technologies Continuous shift by healthcare organizations to increased outsourcing Flexible business models An acute shortage of nurses and other healthcare professionals

The increased demand for health services and advances in life science and medical technology is expected to create significant demand for workers with specialized science and medical skills
Healthcare Temporary Staffing Market 2001-2007E1, 2
$14.0 $12.0 $11.1 $8.9 $10.2 $9.8
CAGR = 6.8%

Healthcare Temporary Staffing Market 2007 By Segment ($11.4 Billion Market)2
Allied $3.2 Loc um Tenens $1.6

$10.0

$10.7

$11.4

Market Size (US$Bn)

$10.0 $8.0 $6.0 $4.0 $2.0 $0.0

Travel Nurse $2.5

Per Diem Nurse $4.1

Source: (1) Staffing Industry Sourcebook (2006) (2) Staffing Industry Healthcare News: Forecast 2007: Healthcare Staffing to grow 7% (March 2007)

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007E

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Nurse Travel
Nurse Travel generated revenues of $2.3 billion in 20061
• • Nurse Travel is expected to grow 9% in 20071 A primary growth driver is nurse shortage, which is expected to grow to 12% by 2010, 20% by 2015, and to 29% by 20202

Occupations with Largest Projected Job Growth 2004-’14
3
Registered Nurses Postsecondary Teachers Customer Service Reps Janitors & Cleaners Waiters & Waitresses Food Prep & Serving Workers Home Health Aides Nursing Aides General & Ops Managers 0 524 471 440 376 367 350 325 308 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 Employment Growth (000s) 703

Supply and Demand Shortage of Registered Nurses
Number of Registered Nurses (mm)

Retail Salespersons

736

29%
2

1

0 2000

2005

2010 Supply

2015 Demand

2020

Source:

Bureau of Labor Statistics (2005)

Source:

US Department of Health and Human Services, HRSA (July 2002)

Sources: (1) Staffing Industry Healthcare News: Forecast 2007: Healthcare Staffing to grow 7% (March 2007) (2) US Department of Health and Human Services, HRSA (July 2002)

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Allied Health
Allied Staffing generated revenues of $2.9 billion in 20061
• Allied health staffing involves placing professionals other than physicians and nurses, such as rehabilitation and respiratory therapists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurse anesthetists, pharmacists, surgical technicians and radiologic technologists, in a variety of healthcare settings Industry Highlights
• Allied health staffing assignments generally last 13 weeks • According to SIA, allied health staffing is the second fastest growing component of the temporary healthcare staffing industry behind locum tenens

Growth
• Allied health staffing grew 11.5% in 2006, generating revenue of $2.9 billion and is expected to grow at a compound annual rate of 10% for the two year period ended December 31, 20071

Projected Allied Health Market Size1
($ in billions)
$3.5 $3.0 $2.5 $2.0 $1.5 $1.0 $0.5 $ -2004 2005 2006 2007 $2.4

CAGR = 9.8%
$2.6

$3.2 $2.9

Source: (1) Staffing Industry Healthcare News: Forecast 2007: Healthcare Staffing to grow 7% (March 2007)

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Locum Tenens
Locum Tenens generated revenues of $1.4 billion in 20061
• Locum Tenens: involves placing physicians, which include both general practitioners and specialists, on temporary assignments in a variety of healthcare settings Industry Highlights
High Barriers to Entry
• Need for malpractice insurance • Complexities involved in recruiting and marketing physicians • High level of specialized positions requiring specific training and experience • Lack of licensing reciprocity between states (unlike nursing) • Greater lead time needed to successfully fill positions

Growth
• Locum Tenens is the fastest growing component of the temporary healthcare staffing industry with expected growth of 14% in 2007

Projected Locum Tenens Market Size2
($ in billions)

Projected Physician Shortage
• By 2020 the US Department of Health & Human Services projects that physician shortages will reach 200,0003

$2.0

CAGR = 12.5%
$1.5 $1.1 $1.0 $1.2 $1.4

$1.6

Physician Workforce Demographics
• The proportion of physicians, both male and female, who were reported as working part-time increased to 20% in 2006 from 13% in 2005. Flexible work hours or part-time options were reported as one of the top three ongoing retention initiatives that medical group leaders have found to be effective4

$0.5

$ -2004 2005 2006 2007

Sources: (1) Staffing Industry Healthcare News: Forecast 2007: Healthcare Staffing to grow 7% (March 2007) (2) Staffing Industry Sourcebook (2006) (3) US Department of Health and Human Services (Spring 2003) (4) 2006 Retention Survey, American Medical Group Association and Cejka Search

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Life Sciences
U.S. market for outsourced Lab/Scientific staffing estimated market size >$1.0 billion1
• Lab support professionals assist clients in the life sciences industries with research and development, product production, quality control and assurance, regulatory affairs and compliance, engineering, consumer testing and clinical research Industry Highlights
• Highly fragmented • Market dynamics are favorable • Middle market, small/medium clients favor personalized service • Economic recovery favors specialty recruiting operations

Growth
• Scientific markets are growing • Janney Montgomery Scott (JMS) estimates that the domestic temporary scientific staffing market totaled more than $750 million in 2001 and that the market will reach $2 billion in sales by 2010

Source: (1) BLS, Company Reports, JMS Estimates (2001)

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Information Technology
IT market is sized at $17.4 billion1
• IT staffing involves providing temporary professionals and placing full-time employees in areas ranging from multiple platform systems integration to end-user support, including specialists in programming, networking systems integration, database design and help desk support 77% of surveyed contingent staffing buyers plan to add to their contingent workforce next year. Technology/telecom is one of two industries projecting the greatest growth over the next two years and tech/engineering is the skill set with the greatest projected growth.2 •

Industry Highlights
Strong Industry Potential • During the IT boom in the late 1990s, IT staffing became a larger part of the staffing industry, generating 20.4% of industry revenues in 1999 versus 14.6% in 20051 • More recently the industry has returned to double-digit growth, with growth driven in part by a backlog of deferred corporate spending from the last downturn Shortage of Talent • One of the main constraints on growth in this segment is a shortage of talent, and not necessarily demand, due to the exodus of many mid-career professionals following the tech bubble and a steady decline in new computer science graduates Increasing Customer Investments • 13% of CIO’s are planning to expand their IT staff in Q4 2006, with 40% citing growth as the primary driver. Overall, the net hiring index remains above its average over the last 5 years3
Sources: (1) Staffing Industry Sourcebook (2006)

Growth
• IT segment is expected to grow at 10% in 2006 and 9% in 20071

Projected IT Market Size1
($ in billions)
$25.0 $20.0 $15.8 $15.0 $10.0 $5.0 $ -2004 2005 2006 2007

CAGR = 9.6%
$20.8 $19.1 $17.4

(2)
(3)

Staffing Industry Analysts “2007 Staffing Buyer Survey”
Robert Half Technology IT Hiring Index and Skills Report (September 2006)

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Competition
Bill Rates & Gross Margins

Specialization & Client “Stickiness” Industrial Staffing Generalist Staffing Specialist Staffing
• Areas of focus: healthcare, scientific, IT, engineering, accounting, legal • Skills in short supply and critical to revenue potential of clients • Competition based on quality of professional and speed and relevancy of response

• Areas of focus: light industrial; clerical / administrative; less specialized skills • Widely available skill sets • Providers seek large placements and compete on price

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Management Team

Peter Dameris
President & CEO

James Brill
Senior VP Finance & CFO

Emmett McGrath
President Lab Support

Shawn Mohr
President Healthcare Staffing

Michael McGowan
President Oxford Global Resources

Mark Brouse
President VISTA Staffing Solutions

• 12 years of staffing/public company experience • Metamor (MMWW) CEO/Chairman • Quanta (PWR) EVP/COO

• 18 years CFO experience, 26 years public company experience • Diagnostic Products CFO since 1999

• 22 years of staffing/public company experience • Yoh Scientific

• 10 years of staffing/public company experience • Kforce (KFRC), RemedyTemp (REMX)

• 11 years of staffing industry experience • Automatic Data Processing (ADP), The MEDSTAT Group, Kelly Services (KELYA) Middle Markets Division

• 20 years of staffing industry experience • Founded VISTA in 1990 • Entered the Locum Tenens industry in 1986

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Company Profiles
Business Description
On Assignment, Inc. (NASDAQ: ASGN) provides professional staffing services in healthcare and lab support Oxford Global Resources, Inc. is a leading provider of high-end information technology, engineering and telecom contract professionals in the US and Europe VISTA Staffing Solutions, Inc. is a provider of temporary physician staffing (locum tenens) and permanent search

Headquarters Contract Professionals / Employees FY 2006 Revenues

Calabasas, CA

Beverly, MA

Salt Lake City, UT

Qualified Database: 20,000+ Current on assignment: ~4,000 Full-Time Employees: ~470

Qualified Database: 24,000+ Current on assignment: ~900 Full-Time Employees: ~475

Qualified Database: 1,300+ Current on assignment: ~240 Full-Time Employees: ~160

$287.6 million

$178.4 million

$61.0 million

Key Customers

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Personnel & Geography
On Assignment On Assignment Full Time Full Time Employees Employees Oxford Oxford VISTA VISTA Approximately 470 employees Approximately 475 employees Approximately 160 employees

Contract Contract Professionals Professionals

Qualified Database: 20,000+ Current on assignment: ~4,000
United States

Qualified Database: 24,000+ Current on assignment: ~900

Qualified Database: 1,300+ Current on assignment: ~240

UK

Ireland

Netherlands Belgium

ASGN branch offices Oxford branch offices VISTA branch offices

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Business Diversification
ASGN Q2 2007 Revenue by Segment

(in $millions)

Healthcare Life Sciences Information Technology Locum Tenens Total Revenues

Q2 2007 $43.7 33.4 48.7 18.1 $143.9

Q2 2007 Revenue Mix by Segment
Locum Tenens, 12.58% Healthcare, 30.37%

Information Technology, 33.84% Life Sciences, 23.21%

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Overview of On Assignment
Diversified, “high demand, highly skilled” solutions across large and growing end markets
• Currently approximately 5,000 contract professionals at over 2,500 clients
— Employed over 150,000 contract professionals since 1992 — Execute high gross margin assignments–one of the highest in the industry with a gross margin of 32.1% in Q2 2007 — High gross margin despite low contribution (i.e. less than 3%) from permanent placement/conversion
40.0% 35.0%

Q2 2007 Revenue Mix by Segment
Locum Tenens, 12.58% Healthcare, 30.37%

Information Technology, 33.84% Life Sciences, 23.21%

Q2 2007 Gross Margin by Segment
34.1% 25.4% 37.2% 31.3%

• 714 Staffing Consultants (Q207 average) in 80 branch offices in the US, UK, Belgium and Netherlands
— Deliver fast, quality sales and fulfillment services

30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0%

Healthcare

Life Sciences

IT

Locum Tenens

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History of On Assignment
1992: 1985: Incorporated and commenced Lab Support operations IPO 1994-2001: Established and grew MF&A division March 2002: Acquired HPO (Nurse Travel) for $150mm November 2003: Peter Dameris is hired as COO September 2004: Emmett McGrath hired May 2004: Shawn Mohr hired November 2006: $76mm Follow-on September 2004: Peter Dameris is promoted to CEO January 2007: Acquired VISTA Staffing Solutions, Inc. (Locum Tenens) for $41.1mm Announcement of the acquisition of Oxford Global Resources (IT and Engineering) for $200mm James Brill hired

September 2001: New CEO brought in to replace retiring CEO

GOAL:

1985

1990’s - 2001

2002 - 2004

2005 - Current

Become leading provider of highend professional staffing services

34 quarters of • revenue and EPS growth Grew revenues from 1994-2001 at a 20% CAGR Grew cash balance • from $5mm in 1994 to $90mm in 2001

Pro forma revenues (adjusted for HPO acquisition) decreased approximately 30% from 2001-2004 However, cash flow from operations was still ~$20mm over 3 year period, turning negative in 2004

Since Q4 2004 revenues have grown at a CAGR of 22.2% Adjusted EBITDA margins have improved from (4.3)% in 2004 to 7.8% in Q4’06 10 consecutive quarters of meeting or exceeding analyst estimates Stock price up over 100% since Mr. Dameris joined the Company

18

Overview of Oxford
Oxford’s disciplined focus on the high-end of the technology and engineering markets yields industry leading bill rates, success rates and margins YTD Fiscal 2006 Revenue by Segment1
• • “The Right Talent. Right now.®” Two divisions:
– – Oxford International – nation-wide recruitment for nation-wide vacancies Oxford & Associates – local recruitment through branch network Time sensitive project requirements Traditional average assignment of 5 to 6 months or more Average bill rate of $100+ per hour Significantly higher success rate filling engagements than competitors Minimal client and industry business concentration; no customer accounts for more than 3% of revenues Acquired operations profitable every year since 1986 Above industry organic revenue growth rate Gross margins >30% for each of the last eight years
Engineering 13.4% Telecom 7.8%

High-end technology and engineering focus
– – –
Softw are / Hardw are 28.2%

Information Technology 50.6%

Proactive, recruiting-driven organization

YTD Fiscal 2006 Revenue by Region
U.S. Southeast 17.0% U.S. Northwest 12.0%

Attractive financial characteristics

– – –

U.S. South Central 13.0%

U.S. North Central 20.0%

U.S. Southwest 13.0%

U.S. Northeast 25.0%

Note: (1) Excludes revenues from the Remote Managed Services Division

19

Oxford – Financial Information
Revenue
($ in millions) ($ in millions)

Gross Profit

$200 $180
2 2 1. %

$70
$178.4

$65.5
23 .1 %

$60 $50 Gross Profit $40 $30 $20 $10 $36.1
35.4% 35.1%

$140 Revenue $120 $100 $80 $60 $40 $20 $0 2003 $103.0

28

31 .0 %

$160
.3 %

$147.2

$53.2
36.1%

36.7%

$114.7

$40.6

$0
2004 2005 2006

2003

2004

2005

2006

Note: 2003-2005 financial information based on financial results adjusted to exclude results of former subsidiaries and discontinued lines of business; YTD 2006 information based on preliminary, un-audited interim financial reports prepared by Oxford.

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Strong Customer Base with Superior “Win” Rate
Customer Base Increasing Adjusted Fill Ratios

70%
Adjusted Fill Ratio

70%

66% 64% 63% 63%

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

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Overview of VISTA
• Full-service physician recruitment and staffing company • Places physicians in all 50 states, Australia and New Zealand • Headquartered in Salt Lake City and founded in 1990 • Approximately 160 full-time employees • Pool of 1,300+ physicians worldwide, with a range of medical specialties – Approximately 30 specialties through 13 employee teams • Average domestic locum tenens assignment lasts 6 weeks – New department for longer engagements • 240+ physicians on assignment daily

Geographic Reach & Office Location
United States

Wilkes-Barre, PA Salt Lake City, UT Cary, NC Atlanta, GA

Australia & New Zealand

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Locum Tenens Service Offering Mix
Diverse range of approximately 30 specialties served by 13 employee teams
YTD 2006 Revenue Mix
Family Practice 11.7%

Surgical

16.0%

Maternal 6.6%

Radiology 11.3%

IM 11.3% IM Subspecialties 5.2% OPN 2.8%

Anesthesiology 3.5%

Psychiatry 8.8%

Emergency Medicine 21.7%

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Diverse Client Base
YTD 2006 Client Revenue Mix

• • •

Minimal customer concentration Largest customer accounts for 3.0% of sales Primarily hospital and healthcare systems – physician practices form smaller portion Government agencies

Multi-Specialty Group & Single Specialty Group 32%

Hospital & Large Health Care Systems 50%

Government 18%

YTD 2006 Top Ten Client Revenue
($ in millions) Client A Client B Client C Client D Client E Client F Client G Client H Client I Client J Total Top 10 Other Total YTD 2006 $1,711,772 1,320,399 1,239,733 957,160 932,598 906,264 877,109 859,063 811,428 787,443 10,402,970 50,622,275 $61,025,245 % of Total 2.81% 2.16% 2.03% 1.57% 1.53% 1.49% 1.44% 1.41% 1.33% 1.29% 17.05% 82.95% 100.00%

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Acquisition Rationale
Highly Complementary Acquisitions • Focus on high-demand, highly-skilled talent • Similar business models and corporate cultures • Limited integration required

Accretive to Growth and Margins • Highly accretive to revenue growth, gross margins and EBITDA margins • Strong conversion of EBITDA to free cash flow

SG&A Absorption • Leverage ASGN’s highly scalable back-office infrastructure • Additional expansion capacity in credentialing, billing and payroll • Sales and recruiting function largely unchanged Diversifies Revenues • Addition of higher growth professional staffing capabilities • Expansion of healthcare staffing into attractive locum tenens business • No customer concentration

High-end professional High-end professional staffing services staffing services

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Acquisition Integration

Integration will be transparent to employees, contract Integration will be transparent to employees, contract professionals, and customers professionals, and customers • Senior management remains in place and reports to CEO Peter • Senior management remains in place and reports to CEO Peter Dameris Dameris • No major changes to recruitment and sales models and • No major changes to recruitment and sales models and commission plans: no channel conflicts commission plans: no channel conflicts •

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Pro Forma Financial Impact
On Assignment Financial Outlook • Combined company had pro forma annual 2006 revenue of $527 million • Combined company pro forma annual 2006 gross margins were 30.6% versus 27.1% standalone • Pro forma for the Oxford and VISTA acquisitions, ASGN will have Net Debt to 12/31 LTM Adjusted EBITDA of approximately 3.3x(2)
On Assignment FY 2006 Standalone (1)

($ in millions)

Revenue Gross Profit Margin Adjusted EBITDA Margin

$287.6 $77.8 27.1% 6.4%

Combined Company FY 2006 Pro Forma (3)
Notes: (1) (2) (3) On Assignment Adjusted EBITDA excludes equity-based compensation expenses. Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA also excludes certain expenses incurred by VISTA and Oxford as privately-held companies. Pro forma information is stated pro forma for the acquisitions of VISTA & Oxford. VISTA & Oxford results are based on preliminary, un-audited financial information provided by VISTA and Oxford management.

($ in millions) Revenue Gross Profit Margin Adjusted EBITDA Margin

$527.0 $161.3 30.6% 8.5%

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Potential 338 (h)(10) Tax Benefit
► Potential tax benefit from 338(h)(10) election and amortization of tax deductible goodwill created from the acquisition ► May achieve up to approximately $5mm(1) in after tax savings per year for 15 years, subject to the Company having positive taxable income to offset ► No impact on GAAP effective tax rate but substantial potential cash tax savings

Note: (1) Based on preliminary calculations

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2nd Quarter 2007 Financial Results
ASGN Standalone ASGN Pro Forma YOY Growth

Q206 Revenue Healthcare Life Sciences Information Technology Locum Tenens Consolidated Revenues Gross Margin Healthcare Life Sciences Information Technology Locum Tenens Consolidated Gross Margin Adjusted EBITDA Adjusted EBITDA Margin Productivity ($GP/SC) EPS $ $ $ $ 39,566 29,070 68,636 $

Q206 39,566 29,070 44,767 14,810 128,213 $

Q207 43,668 33,388 48,678 18,119 143,854

Pro Forma 10.37% 14.85% 8.74% 22.34% 12.20%

$

$

$

24.12% 33.45% 28.10% 4,449 6.5% 76,500 0.07 $

24.12% 33.45% 36.61% 30.05% 31.28% $

25.39% 34.05% 37.23% 31.25% 32.10% 14,809 10.3%

57,583

$ $

64,780 0.08

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Consolidated Balance Sheet Data
As of

June 30, 2007 Cash and Cash Equivalents Accounts Receivable, net Intangible Assets Total Assets Bank Debt – Current Portion Current Liabilities Bank Debt – Long Term Other Long Term Liabilities Stockholders’ Equity Days Sales Outstanding $ 29,383 78,023 235,668 374,745 1,450 40,981 142,825 5,349 185,590 49.4 $

June 30, 2006 28,611 35,084 18,260 100,819 18,140 476 82,203 46.5

March 31, 2007 $ 22,577 76,753 239,680 371,575 1,450 43,445 143,188 4,870 179,516 50.6

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2007 Guidance
($ in millions, except per share data) FY ’07 Guidance Q3 2007
Revenue % Growth (y/y) Gross Margin SG&A (excluding-D&A and Equity-Based Compensation Expense) Depreciation & Amortization Equity-Based Compensation Expense EPS (including Equity-Based Compensation Expense) Adjusted EBITDA $149.0 – 151.0 9 - 10% 31.9 – 32.3% $31.8 – 32.8 $5.3 $1.4 $0.09 – 0.13 $14.8 – 17.0

FY 2007
$565.0 – 575.0 10 - 12% 31.6 – 31.9% $124.2 – 125.7 $21.6 $6.2 $0.27 – 0.38 $52.8 – 59.2

• % Growth: Calculated on a pro forma basis
Note: • Achievement of these goals is subject to the various risk factors set forth in our public filings

31

Key Investment Considerations

Large, Attractive End Markets

• • •

The staffing industry is a large and growing market, with total US revenues forecasted to grow 10% in 2006 to $131 billion Temporary employment penetration rates continue to increase Current “Goldilocks” economy bodes well for temporary staffing demand Highly skilled temps are in high demand but short supply, irrespective of the economic cycle, especially in areas like healthcare and highly specialized professional services Focused placements of high-end talent – not a mass market “bodyshop” like larger providers High-end focus yields higher bill rates, longer assignments and stickier customer relationships Unique, proactive recruiting and fulfillment model for specialized talent Pro forma combined, approximately 6,600 clients with no client accounting for more than 4% of FY 2006 revenues Customer diversification enhances revenue visibility and insulates margins Creates exciting opportunities for contract professionals

Strong, Position in Critical HighEnd Skill Sets Diverse, High Quality Customer Base

• • • • • •

Attractive Financial Characteristics

• • •

All three companies operate in high demand, high growth sub sectors of the broader staffing market, which drives organic revenue growth and increases gross margins Highly scalable front and back office creates operating margin expansion opportunities Low working capital and CapEx requirements result in strong conversion of EBITDA to free cash flow 338(h)(10) election yields an estimated $4.8 million in annual cash tax savings

Experienced Management Team

• •

CEO Peter Dameris has extensive experience in the staffing sector and a strong track record with public investors Veteran cadre of seasoned industry professionals leading each division Experienced finance and accounting department with strong back-office systems and reporting capabilities

32

NASDAQ: ASGN www.onassignment.com