Master of Business Administration (International Business) Programme Code: MIB Duration – 2 Years Full Time

Programme Structure And Curriculum & Scheme of Examination 2009

AMITY UNIVERISTY UTTAR PRADESH
GAUTAM BUDDHA NAGAR

PREAMBLE

Amity University aims to achieve academic excellence by providing multi-faceted education
to students and encourage them to reach the pinnacle of success. The University has designed a system that would provide rigorous academic programme with necessary skills to enable them to excel in their careers. This booklet contains the Programme Structure, the Detailed Curriculum and the Scheme of Examination. The Programme Structure includes the courses (Core and Elective), arranged semester wise. The importance of each course is defined in terms of credits attached to it. The credit units attached to each course has been further defined in terms of contact hours i.e. Lecture Hours (L), Tutorial Hours (T), Practical Hours (P). Towards earning credits in terms of contact hours, 1 Lecture and 1 Tutorial per week are rated as 1 credit each and 2 Practical hours per week are rated as 1 credit. Thus, for example, an L-T-P structure of 3-0-0 will have 3 credits, 3-1-0 will have 4 credits, and 3-1-2 will have 5 credits. The Curriculum and Scheme of Examination of each course includes the course objectives, course contents, scheme of examination and the list of text and references. The scheme of examination defines the various components of evaluation and the weightage attached to each component. The different codes used for the components of evaluation and the weightage attached to them are: Components Case Discussion/ Presentation/ Analysis Home Assignment Project Seminar Viva Quiz Class Test Attendance End Semester Examination Codes C H P S V Q CT A EE Weightage (%) 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 10 - 10 05 70

It is hoped that it will help the students study in a planned and a structured manner and promote effective learning. Wishing you an intellectually stimulating stay at Amity University. July, 2009

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
FIRST SEMESTER
‘Course Code MIBGM 10101 MIBMK 10101 MIBFN 10101 MIBIT 10101 MIBOM 10101 MIBEN 10101 MIBRM 10101 MIBBS 10101 MIBBS 10102 MIBFR 10101 MIBGR 10101 MIBSH 10101 MIBJP 10101 MIBCE 10101 Course Title Principles of Global Business Management Marketing Management Accounting and Finance Essential IT Tools & Techniques for Global Managers Quantitative Applications in Management Economic Analysis Research Methods and Report Preparation Business Communication – I Behavioural Science – I Foreign Language – I French German Spanish Japanese Chinese TOTAL Lectures (L) Hours per week 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 1 1 2 Tutorial (T) Hours per week 1 1 1 1 Practical (P) Hours per week 1 Total Credits 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 Date of Exam 16 19 17 20 23 18 24

28

SECOND SEMESTER
MIBHR 10201 MIBOM 10201 MIBIB 10201 MIBFN 10201 MIBMK 10201 MIBIB 10202 MIBIB 10203 MIBBS 10201 MIBBS 10202 MIBFR 10201 MIBGR 10201 MIBSH 10201 MIBJP 10201 MIBCE 10201 Strategic Human Resource Management Operations Research Export Import Documentation and Logistics International Financial Management International Marketing International Institutions and Trade Implications Cross Cultural Management and Management of Multinational Companies Business Communication – II Behavioural Science – II Foreign Language – II French German Spanish Japanese Chinese TOTAL 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 4 4 3 3 4 1 1 2

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SUMMER INTERNSHIP THIRD SEMESTER
MIBIB 20301 MIBIR 20301 MIBFN 20301 MIBLW 20301 MIBHR 20301 MIBOM 20301 International Strategic Management Risk & Insurance in International Trade Management of Forex Transactions WTO and International Regulatory Environment Organization Behaviour: A Global Perspective Operations & Supply Chain 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

ERP & BPR TOTAL 3 3 3 2 1 1 2 1 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 9 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 33 . Acquisitions and Restructuring MIBFN 20303 Corporate Tax Planning Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & HR MIBHR 20302 Industrial Relations and Labour Laws MIBHR 20303 Management of Change and Compensation Management Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & IT MIBIT 20301 Data Warehousing & Data Mining MIBIT 20302 Data Communications. Networking & Emerging Computing Environments TOTAL MIBBS 20301 MIBBS 20302 1 1 2 - - 1 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 9 4 4 4 4 4 - 4 4 4 39 FOURTH SEMESTER MIBIB 20401 Growth Prospects of Thrust Areas of Indian Exports MIBIB 20402 Global Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability Management MIBFN 20401 Forex Banking MIBIT 20401 Leveraging Information Technology in Global Business MIBBS 20401 Business Communication – IV MIBBS 20402 Behavioural Science – IV Foreign Language – IV MIBFR 20401 French MIBGR 20401 German MIBSH 20401 Spanish MIBJP 20401 Japanese MIBCE 20401 Chinese MIBDI 20460 Dissertation Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & Marketing MIBMK 20401 Retail & Sales Management MIBMK 20402 Consumer Behaviour Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & Finance MIBFN 20402 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management MIBFN 20403 Strategic Financial Management Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & HR MIBHR 20401 Recruitment Selection Training & Development MIBHR20402 Performance Appraisal and Potential Evaluation Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & IT MIBIT 20402 Systems Engineering & Project Management MIBIT 20403 Workflow.Management Business Communication – III Behavioural Science – III Foreign Language – III MIBFR 20301 French MIBGR 20301 German MIBSH 20301 Spanish MIBJP 20301 Japanese MIBCE 20301 Chinese MIBSI 20350 Summer Internship (Evaluation) Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & Marketing MIBMK 20301 Product & Brand Management MIBMK 20302 Marketing of Services Elective Papers for Dual Specialization in IB & Finance MIBFN 20302 Mergers.

This course will provide the students with an integrated and practical approach to understand the concepts of Global Management and also to provoke critical thinking about various principles.Curriculum & Scheme of Examination PRINCIPLES OF GLOBAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The main purpose of this paper is to familiarize the participants with the various aspects of Principles of Global Management. challenging and globally oriented. and organizations where the students may seek to pursue an international business management career Course Contents: Module I: Globalization and trends in Management System Introduction. • Attain a clear understanding of the various factors that help determine the appropriateness of different management strategies for different types of international ventures. with a view that conducting business is exciting. guidelines and practices of Global Business Management. • Explore and evaluate different career opportunities. specific regional locations. Legal and Economic environment facing Global Business The Cultural Environment The concept of culture The strategy for managing across culture Cross-cultural differences & similarities The Political and Legal Environment The Political system and its functions Impact of Political system on management decision Formulating legal & political strategies in International Business The Economic Environment Facing Global Business Classifying Economic System Key Macroeconomic issues Adapting to Foreign Economic System (WTO) Module IV: Control Strategies Planning Control strategies in Internationalization Process Organization Structure Location of Decision making Module V: Issues in Functional Areas of Global Business Marketing in the global marketplace (Module 1 & 2) . MIBGM 10101 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: The learning outcomes that students are expected to achieve in this course include: • Develop a clear understanding of the conceptual frameworks and definitions of specific terms that are integral to the international management literature. Political. definition and explanation of globalization Drivers of Globalization Managing in Global Marketplace Strategies for going global Different Entry Modes Strategic Alliances Module II: International Trade Theory Benefits of Trade Comparative Advantage Heckscher-Ohlin Theory The Product Life Cycle Theory Competitive Advantage Porter’s Diamond Model Module III: The Cultural. • Examine ethical issues that are pertinent to international business management practices and to the personal value system of the student.

html • http://www. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.edu/ibrd/ibrd. P. class presentation by groups of students. Business Week Helpful Websites: • http://globaledge. Management : A Global Perspective. International Business. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Interactive sessions.com • http://www.eiu. International Management. Tata McGraw Hills Publishing Co. • Daniels John D. Prentice Hall • Daily Newspaper: Business Standard. Ltd. Case studies. Radedaugh. 2002. Fortune.fortune.. Cases are also to be analyzed. (2002). Seminars.Global Manufacturing Strategies Global Quality Standards Global Sourcing Global Purchasing and Supplying Strategies Role of Human Resource Manager in Global Perspective Country Difference in Accounting Standards Learning Methods: Tutorials. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Hodgetts Richard M & Luthans F. Tata McGrawHill References: • Robbins Stephen.com • http://www. 8th Edition • Hodgetts Richard M. (2004) Management. (2003). Tata McGraw Hills Publishing Co. (2001).forbes.economist. Extensive research projects.uncc.. Luthans Fred (2003).the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Pearson Education.asp • http://www. Management games. Ltd. Business World. Field visits.com • http://library. Ltd. Prentice Hall. International Marketing Cultural Strategy & Behaviour. Business Line.msu. 10th Edition. Weekend experience in companies . Economist.edu • http://www. Economic Times. Tata McGraw Hills Publishing Co. Sullivan Daniel P.. Radebaugh Lee H. Forbes.. self study sessions.. 8th Edition • Koontz Harold and Weihrich Heinz.org .com/globalbiz/index. Globalization and Business.worldpress. The Financial Express • Periodicals: The Week. • Daniels John D. • Hill Charles W L (2003) International Business: Competing in Global Marketplace.businessweek.com/fortune • http://www.

MARKETING MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to provide students with an introductory understanding of Marketing.concept Methods of estimating future demand Module VII: Building the Right Relationships with the Right Customers . Module VI: Consumer Markets. Demand forecasting. MIBMK 10101 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to: Explain key concepts and elements of marketing management and differentiate between marketing and sales Examine the 4Ps of Marketing and discuss different strategies Analyse consumer behaviour for various sectors and assess the STP strategies of different multi-national companies. Consumer Buyer Behaviour and Demand Forecasting Define consumer market. Product Life Cycle strategies. It will enable the students to realize the importance of customers and their behaviour in the context of marketing decisions. placement. Adoption and diffusion process for new products.concept. promotion. with a special focus on the role of marketing in an international business context.concept and importance Marketing Research. Rural marketing (only concepts) Module II: Marketing Environment. packaging and labeling. Module V: Integrated Marketing Communication Strategy Tools of marketing communication mix.Macro and Micro Factors Marketing Information System. price.BCG matrix. • Branding.Managing Profitable Customer Relationships Introduction to Marketing Differentiation between Marketing and Selling. Direct marketing. Marketing Management 5 Ps – product. Marketing Information System and Marketing Research Factors affecting marketing Environment. importance Retailers Vs Wholesalers Integrated supply chain management. It provides the students with an awareness and consideration of tools available to a marketer. Management orientations Customer relationship management and strategies Challenges Important concepts. Green marketing.Idea generation to commercialization.introduction and process Module III: New-Product Development and Product Life-Cycle Strategies Product Attributes New Product Development strategies. Process of IMC AIDA Model and L and S model Advertisement Sales Promotion Personnel Selling. Services marketing.different marketing strategies for different stages. Module IV: Marketing Channels and Supply Management Marketing channels. Course Contents: Module I: Marketing . place. Decision Making Process Types of buying decision behaviour Factors influencing consumer buyer behaviour.

To achieve the aforesaid. Planning. USA. India. 2001 • Harvard Business Review Helpful Web Sites: • http://www. 2nd . and then write about. Pearson Education. 3rd European ed. International Dictionary of Management. Case studies will be discussed by the instructor and accompanied by group presentations written and oral . Price Change Teaching and Learning Methods: The assessment programme will be student driven. Prentice-Hall.com • http://www. the marketing strategy followed by this company. and Control. G. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Kotler. Marketing Management: Analysis. 2003 • Hart. Marketing Management.marketingterms. Armstrong G. Norman A.Understand the major basis for segmenting consumer and business markets Market Targeting .com/general/terms. profusely illustrated by case examples of Indian and International companies. It will study. Kogan Page.Market Segmenting.by the students under the supervision of the faculty. USA. K. a mixed pedagogy will be followed including lectures.Identify attractive market segments and device a target marketing strategy.htm . 2002 • Kotler. H and Terry. The CIM Marketing Dictionary.2002 • Kotler P. requiring the student to develop his/ her communication skills by presentation and debate. P and Keller. Prentice hall. The students will form a group and each group will pick up any one major product category and select a non Indian company. Principles of Marketing. A Framework for Marketing Management. Saunders J and V Wong. P. 2005 References: • Kotler. 5th. P. Pearson Education. London. 11th. Price – Adjustment Strategies.knowthis. The class lectures will focus on an International context to understand the environment in which decisions have to be made and learning of tools of decision-making in marketing. Implementation. 1998 • Johannsen. Critical participation of students is expected in each of the assessment programme. Butterworth-Heinemann. Asia. 12th edition. USA. Positioning for competitive advantage Module VIII: Pricing Considerations and Approaches New product pricing Strategies Product mix pricing strategies.

Course Contents: Module I: Introduction ( Theory 1Q ) Concepts of accounting. profitability and share investment ratios. Financial Accounting. shares and stock markets. MIBFN 10101 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course the students should be able to: • Demonstrate an understanding of the double entry accounting system and basic accounting concepts • Prepare all major financial statements • Develop a skill to analyse the financial statements • Understand the basic concepts of company accounts and process of determination of cost. Module III: Analyzing of Financial Position (Theory Ratio & 1Q Prac) Financial ratios analysis: Liquidity. Cost Volume) Introduction to cost and management accounting. cost-sheets. Cost sheet. It aims to explain how the costing techniques are useful in the process of managerial decision making. Module V: Cost and Management Accounting (1Q Cost Sheet. Fixed assets and depreciation. Graded Problems & Solutions in Financial Management. 2000. 2004. Material Cost. financial structure. Process Costing. Users of accounting information. Process Costing. activity. Marginal costing and Cost Volume – Profit Learning Methods: A series of lectures will impart information and be complemented by interactive tutor-led and student-led discussion. Scope of and inter-relationship between financial. Formative tasks and presentations will enable students to build towards the completion of their assignment during the delivery of the unit. language and techniques of Financial and Cost accounting along with skills for preparation and analysis of financial statements for better management planning and control. Analysis of Financial Statements. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Tulsian P C. Analysis of a Company’ s Balance Sheet. Teaching consists of 3 hours per week. Accounting records and books. The unit has thus been designed to use a variety of teaching methods that should help students to study the various aspects of international financial business environment. Module II: Final Accounts (Theory Depreciation & Final A/c) Preparation of Profit and Loss account and Balance Sheet. cost and management accounting. Introduction to HR Accounting. Introduction to stocks. process and marginal costing.ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to develop an understanding of the importance. Trial Balance. Module IV: Company Accounts (A/c’ng & Buss A/c Theory) Accounting for Business Combinations. Inventory valuation and the matching of revenue and expenses. Galgotia Publishing Co . Tata McGraw Hill References: • Rustagi R P.

How these major components (operating systems.Site visibility • Evaluation of web sites and usability testing • Web site Optimization . content and traffic management • Web based solutions: ERP.T. Course Contents: Module I: Foundation of IT & E-business • Introduction of ICT for Managers • Fundamentals of ICT (Office Automation & Communication Technologies) • Definitions and content of E-business Module II: Launching an E-Business • E-Strategy . its language and issues. software. explaining online advertising. and emerging business practices on the Net. The personal computer has developed into a powerful tool for gathering. Networks and telecommunications technology allow delivering and retrieving information from around the world Managers at all levels must have a better understanding of IT. Module III: E-Business Models. role. CRM. promotional strategies.ESSENTIAL IT TOOLS & TECHNIQUES FOR GLOBAL MANAGERS Course Code: Course Objective: Information Technology (I. policies. and public policies. E-Tailing • E-business & various models • E-marketing & advertising • E-Tailing Module IV: Electronic Payment Systems & E-Security • E-banking • Payment System Models • The Risks & threats in Cyberspace . what network protocols are. manipulating. its major components and its broad applications.) has become a major factor in nearly every aspect of our society. MIBIT 10101 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes At the end of the course students will be able to: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Understand information technology. and delivering information and sophisticated databases allow us to store. national. function and impact of E commerce in global business operation. CMS etc. including internet risks. culture. Explore needed features for building an effective web site. and how systems use them to communicate How the Internet sends information around the world How web technologies provide information to users of the Internet The basics of client-server software development Explore E commerce dimensions. and global perspective. Armed with this knowledge. including driving forces and impact on business. Examine the evolution. Understand business security issues. Use common models to describe business to business and business to customer transactions. The course is concerned with the main functional areas of management and processing in the world of international business. the manager will be able to improve communication with the IT group and make more accurate business decisions This course aims to develop the students’ ability to manage commercial transactions electronically. individuals. protections.Marketing. privacy. Track electronic payment systems. regional. and global economics. collate. Describe ethical dimensions of the Internet in a local. The fundamental terminology of computing What an operating system is and what it provides How a computer uses software Networking. and access data. networks. and databases) relate to the personal computer or workstation. particularly through the internet.Hosting an E-Business • Things that can go wrong . E.

2000. Pearson Education • Awad Elias M. New Delhi) • Kennith Laudon and Jane Laudon – Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm 2005. 2005. 2002. Lee. • Raymond Frost and Judy Strauss. Electronic Commerce (Excel Books. 2002. It is very important that the students go through the textbook chapter(s) and other reference material before coming to the class. Wherever possible a link will be made between the academic underpinning and its practical application. 2002. evaluations of actual e commerce projects. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: References: • Turban. King and Chung. (Ninth Edition) Prentice Hall. Prentice Hall . guest lectures and self study sessions. Electronic Commerce.A Managerial Perspective.Electronic Commerce: A Managerial Perspective Prentice Hall. Students will be given time to develop skills and analyse the benefits and limitations of using e commerce in organisations. 2004. This will be achieved via a combination of case studies. Frontiers of Electronic Commerce Addison Wesley • Parag Diwan and Sunil Sharma. "E Marketing". A 'hands on' approach will ensure that students can develop a wide range of knowledge of different applications of IT. The practical knowledge can be used to develop an awareness of how e commerce can be adopted by organisations to improve business efficiency.• • • • Protection and Recovery -Encryption Legal & ethical issues E-governance Cyber Laws: A Global Perspective Module V: M-Commerce & Future of EC in Global Scenario • M-commerce in Indian and global perspective • Global EC • Future of EC Learning Methods: This course is based upon interaction between the students and the teachers. • Ravi Kalakota and Andrew B Whinston. 4th Edition • Joseph P T. Electronic Commerce: From Vision to Fulfillment Prentice Hall.

Limitations of Index Numbers. Irregular Variations Module IV: Probability Introduction to Probability and its theories. Quartile Deviation. Trend Analysis. Diagrammatic & Graphical Presentation of Data. Binomial. Time Series Analysis – Methods of Forecasting. Methods of Constructing Index Numbers. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Rao AB. MIBOM 10101 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to: Use statistical techniques to collect and analyse data Produce forecasts based on formalised procedures Apply quantitative techniques to business situations. Cyclical Analysis. Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Quantitative Decision Making . Average & Standard Deviation. Variance & Coefficient of Variation. Base shifting. Chain Index Numbers. It also aims to develop the understanding of the various optimization techniques used for decisions making in the functions of the management of any organization. Mode. Sampling Distributions. Weighted Mean Measures of Dispersion – Range.an overview Introduction to Business Statistics and its applications. Measures of Central Tendency . Teaching consists of 3 hours per week. Regression Analysis – Difference with correlation. Formative tasks and presentations will enable students to build towards the completion of their assignment during the delivery of the unit. Poisson and Normal distributions. The unit has thus been designed to use a variety of teaching methods that should help students to quantitatively study the various aspects of international business environment. Estimation Learning Methods: A series of lectures will impart information and be complemented by interactive tutor-led and student-led discussion. Methods of Correlation – Scatter Diagram.QUANTITATIVE APPLICATIONS IN MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The objective of this course is to develop the understanding of the various statistical models. Jaico Publishing House. Module V: Sampling Sampling Concept. Probability Distributions – Random Variable concept. regression coefficients and their relation with correlation coefficient. Module II: Correlation & Regression Correlation and its significance. Seasonal Analysis. Karl Pearson’s and Spearman’s Rank.Mean. Classification of Data. Quantitative Techniques in Business. Continuous and discrete probability functions. Random Sampling Methods. used for decisions making in the functions of the management of any organization with respect to International Business. Module III: Forecasting Techniques Introduction to Index Numbers and their business use. Median. Linear Regression. 2004. Ist Edition . Probability Laws. Standard Error & Sampling Errors.

Grinold And Ronald N. • Hooda. R. 1995 • Edward E.References: • Levin R. 2002. 12th Ed. R P.I. And Eric H. Sorensen. Hua.Macmillan Publication.Statistics for business and economics. Prentice Hall of India • Gupta S P & Gupta M P. Mac Millan India. 2007 . & Rubin S. 2000. Business Statistics. Sultan Chand & Sons • Sharma J K. New Delhi • Richard C. Ltd. Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management: Modern Techniques and Applications Chapman & Hall/Crc Financial Mathematics Series. Kahn. Active Portfolio Management: Quantitative Theory and Applications. Statistics for Management.(2003). 1997.3rd. Ronald H. Operations Research: Theory & Application. Qian. 9th Ed.

Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Managerial Economics (Micro and Macro) nature and scope Circular flow of Economic Activity Objective of a Firm Constrained Decision Making Module II: Basic Concepts Concept of Economic Profit. Cross Elasticity Using Elasticity in Decision Making Determinants of Market Supply Law of Supply Determination of Market Equilibrium Demand Forecasting Module IV: Production Analysis Production Function Production Function with one variable input – short run analysis Production Function with two variable input – long run analysis ISO COST and ISO QUANTS Economies of Scale Module V: Cost Analysis Economic concept of cost Opportunity Cost Explicit and Implicit Cost Marginal. Break Even. students will be able to: Understand the application of basic micro-economic principles and macro economic concepts for business decision making Develop a rational decision making perspective and analytical frame work required for managerial decision making. Incremental and Sunk Cost Short run Cost function Long run Cost function Contribution Analysis. Opportunity Cost and Accounting Profit Functional Relationship – Total. Average and Marginal Equi-Marginalism Time Perspective in Decision Making Module III: Demand. MIBEN 10101 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of the course. Supply and Market Equilibrium Determinants of Market Demand Law of Demand Deamand Function and its relationship with Total and Marginal Revenue Elasticity of Demand – Price Elasticity.ECONOMIC ANALYSIS Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to train the students with modern tools of micro economics and macro economic analysis and to help them understand and analyze the complexities of the real business world and also enhance their ability for intuitive decision making. Income Elasticity. Operating Leverage Estimation of Cost Function Module VI: Market Structure Price output under Perfect Competition Price output under Monopoly Price output under Monopolistic Competition Price output under Oligopoly Barrier to Entry and Strategic Behaviour leading to Imperfection .

R. London. Economics. SLR Module IX: Fiscal Policy Revenue Budget & Capital Budget Surplus Budgeting and Deficit Budgeting Learning Methods: A series of lectures will impart information and be complemented by interactive tutor-led and student-led discussion. “Microeconomic Theory and Application”. “Managerial Economics”. New Delhi. “Microeconomics”. Soumitra. “Business Economics”. Teaching consists of 3 hours per week. London. Macmillan. Business Economics. “Microeconomics for Management Studies”. 9th edition. • Ivan Png (2004). (1979). “Managerial Economics”. W.. 3rd edition.Theory Application. • Shapiro. New York. 1998 • Dornbush. New York. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Cris Lewis & Peterson. 2005 • Chaturvedi. Brijwasi Book. Boulding (1948). Edward Elgar. • K. The unit has thus been designed to use a variety of teaching methods that should help students to study the various aspects of international economic business environment. “Modern Microeconomics”. N.K. Rawat Publication. Managerial Economics: Concepts and Cases. (2004). Formative tasks and presentations will enable students to build towards the completion of their assignment during the delivery of the unit. References: • Samulson. 2003 • Branscon William H. 2nd Edition.the selected essays of Alan Walters. Edward. D. “Macroeconomics”. Scott Foresman and Co. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. Blackwell Publishers. E. Per Capita Income Human Development Index.. Managerial Economics.G. • Prabhat Patnaik (1997). Growth and Innovations”. J. (1999). Harper and Row. Real National Income. “Mathematical Analysis for Economists”. Macroeconomic Management. New York. 2004 • Mote.. Tata McGraw Hill • Dwivedi. Prentice hall of India. “Macroeconomic Analysis”. Fourth Edition. Tata McGraw Hill.W. E. Tata McGraw Hill. Macroeconomic theory and Policy. Macmillan Publication. A C. Macmillan. and Brownong. Economics and Politics of money. • Koutsoyiannis. Oxford University Press. • Brownong. • Pindyek & Rubinfield (2004). 2002.. Rudiger. London. New Delhi.D. (1956). Net National Product Module VIII: Monetary Policy Bank Rate Policy Open Market Operation Cash Reserve Ratio. Prentice Hall of India. (1989). 18th edition. New Delhi. L. Vikas Publishing House. Oxford University Press. Sloman. Physical Quality of Life Index Gross Domestic Product. Macmillan. V L. “Financial Institutions and Markets: Structure. “Monetary planning for India”. (2006). 2005 • Economics. • Economic Survey (2007-08) . Glenys J Ferguson (2000). Macroeconomics. • Salvatore. (1996). “Managerial Economics. • Gupta. D. New York. Norton and Co.. Kent. Suraj B. London.M. D D. 1989 • Sharma. E. • RH Dholakia and A. • Bhole. Paul A. Gross National Product. “Economic Analysis” Harper and Bros. 1995 • Mathews. 2004 • Mansfield. Managerial Economics: Text and Cases. • Allen. “Managerial Economics”. 2003 • Gupta.M. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Module VII: Indicators of Economic Growth National Income.N Oza (1997). and Cases”. • Parl R Ferguson. Oxford University Press. McGraw Hill. A. 3rd edition. Tata McGraw Hill.

Vikas Publishing House. The course will focus on quantitative and descriptive research methods and techniques that are essential for the validity and reliability of the research process. Mannur (1999). H. significance and types of research Research Methods vis-à-vis Methodology Research Process and criterion for good research Ethics in Business Research Module II: Research Problem and Research Design Defining and Identifying the Problem Formulation of Hypothesis Techniques involved in defining the Problem Meaning and features of Research Design Types of Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Research Developing a Research Plan: Industry Specific Research Proposals Module III: Sampling Design and Scaling Techniques Census and sample survey Criteria for selecting a sampling procedure Measurement and Scaling techniques Classification and importance of Scaling techniques Market Specific Sample survey Module IV: Interpretation and Analysis of Data Methods of Data collection: Primary and Secondary Data Constructing Questionnaires: Guidelines Elements / Type of Analysis of Data Processing Operations Usage of Statistical Software such as SPSS Problems of accuracy in interpretation of data Module V: Testing of Hypothesis Z-test F-test T-test Chi-Square Test Module VI: Design and Analysis of Experiments . H. Oscar Publications. “International Economics”.• • • Bhatia.. The course will identify and review the components essential for preparation of research proposals. Prentice Hall of India. business proposals and feasibility studies in order to develop report writing and formal presentation skills of the research projects undertaken.G. Course Contents: Module I: Research Methodology and Research Methods Objective. interpret and conclude research findings and provide relevant recommendations • Carried out a formal presentation on how to write a project report. research reports. “International Economics”.L. “Public Finance”. Sawyer & Sprinkle (2004). MIBRM 10101 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module students will have: • Considered the nature of research methods and research methodologies • Evaluated and justified the research methodologies to be employed • Identified the components and problems/constraints underlying a research project and report proposal • Developed the ability to analyze. RESEARCH METHODS AND REPORT PREPARATION Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to provide a thorough understanding of the essential characteristics and the basic tenets of research methodology and report preparation.

collate and analyze the data. There will be presentations also in which the student have to collect. Shajahan (2004). Quantitative Techniques for Business Decisions. Donald R and Schindler. Allied Publishers . Ramela (2000) Business Research Methods. Prentice Hall of India • Srivastava. 23 Design) Module VII: Report Writing Significance of Report Writing: Market Research and Experience Based Reports Mechanics and Steps in writing a Research Report Techniques and Interpretation of Research Process Salient aspects of Oral Presentation Learning Methods: Occasional. Wishwa Prakashan Publisher • Cooper. (1990) Research Methodology: Methods & Techniques. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Dr . The class will be doing Cases throughout the semester. Statistics for Management. Shenoy and Sharma (2002).S. Students will prepare three written cases in small groups of 4-6 students. 4th Ed .Analysis of Variance Completely Randomized Design Factorial Design (22 Factorial Experiment. 8th Ed. Research Methods for Management 2nd Edition. Jaico Publishers References: • Kothari C R. It is also expected that students will work the problems as the part of assignments. non-graded homework sets will be handed out in class. Tata McGraw Hill • Levin & Rubin (2004)..

and Simplicity) Improving the tone and style of sentences Module III: Barriers to Effective use of language Avoiding clichés Removing redundancies Getting rid of ambiguity Euphemism Jargons Code switching Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Text & References: • • • • Working in English. Swan M . Raman – Prakash. Cambridge . Jones. Clarity. Oxford Echoes: Jha Madhulika: Orient Longman Practical English Usage. Cambridge Business Communication. MIBBS 10101 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Fundamentals of communication Relevance of communication Effective communication Models of communication Effective use of language Module II: Tools of communication Proficiency in English – The international Language of business Building vocabulary (Denotative & connotative) Extensive vocabulary drills (Synonyms / Antonyms / Homonyms) One Word substitution Idioms & phrases Mechanics and Semantics of sentences Writing sentences that really communicate (Brevity.I Course Code: Course Objective: One cannot‘not communicate’.BUSINESS COMMUNICATION . This course is designed to facilitate our young Amitians to communicate effectively by emphasizing on practical communication through refurbishing their existing language skills and also to bring one and all to a common take-of level.

EQ and SQ Relevance of EI at workplace Self assessment.I (SELF-DEVELOPMENT AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS) Course Code: Course Objective: This course aims at imparting an understanding of: Self and the process of self exploration Learning strategies for development of a healthy self esteem Importance of attitudes and their effect on work behaviour Effective management of emotions and building interpersonal competence. MIBBS 101012 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Understanding Self Formation of self concept Dimension of Self Components of self Self Competency Module II: Self-Esteem: Sense of Worth Meaning and Nature of Self Esteem Characteristics of High and Low Self Esteem Importance & need of Self Esteem Self esteem at work Steps to enhance Self Esteem Module III: Emotional Intelligence: Brain Power Introduction to EI Difference between IQ. analysis and action plan Module V: Leading Through Positive Attitude Understanding Attitudes Formation of Attitudes Types of Attitudes Effects of Attitude on Behaviour Perception Motivation Stress Adjustment Time Management Effective Performance Building Positive Attitude Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer Examination Scheme Components Weightage (%) J 30 V1 30 A 5 CT 10 C1 10 C2 10 V2 5 . analysis and action plan Module IV: Managing Emotions and Building Interpersonal Competence Need and importance of Emotions Healthy and Unhealthy expression of emotions Anger: Conceptualization and Cycle Developing emotional and interpersonal competence Self assessment.BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE .

Khera Shiv: You Can Win. Dr. Lucie Press. A Manager’s Guide to Self-Development: Second edition. Daniel: Working with E. Dr. 1992 Edition. Harmony Books Chatterjee Debashish. 1999.I. Emotional Intelligence at work. 1998 Edition.Text & References: • • • • • • • • • • Towers. Singh. Simon & Schuster Ltd. Burgoyne John. Losoncy Lewis. First Edition. The Skills of Encouragement: St. Sage Publications. Bantam Books Goleman. Covey. Daniel: Emotional Intelligence. . Winning in the Game of Life: 1st Edition. Macmillan Gegax Tom. 1st Edition 1997. Leading Consciously: 1998 1st Edition. 2002. 1995 Edition. Viva Books Pvt Ltd. Dalip. McGraw-Hill Book company. Boydell Tom. American Media Pedler Mike. 1st Edition. R. Bantam Books. Stephen: Seven habits of Highly Effective People.. Marc: Self Esteem. Dinkmeyer Don. Goleman.

comparer des objets. Nommer des objets. s’adresser poliment à quelqu’un 2. faire un achat. 6. expliquer ses préférences Contenu grammatical: 1. expliquer leur usage 2. qui est-ce ? qu’estce que . Monter et situer des objets 4.. 3. ne. réponse Si Prépositions de lieu. vous sujets. question négative. verbes parler. s’appeler. présenter quelqu’un 3. masculin et féminin des adjectifs de nationalité tu. ? article défini.. il y a/qu’est-ce qu’il y a accord et place des adjectifs qualificatifs. 3. 2: pp. discuter le prix. Identifier des objets..I Course Code: Course Objective: To familiarize the students with the French language • with the phonetic system • with the accents • with the manners • with the cultural aspects To enable the students • to establish first contacts • to identify things and talk about things MIBFR 10101 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Unité 1. être. Décrire des objets 5.FRENCH . question avec est-ce que ?. 4. masculin et féminin des noms. être. pluriel des noms Je. aller. c’est moi/c’est toi verbes faire. 7. quel interrogatif adjectifs possessifs (1)... habiter. épeler 4.. pronom on Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: le livre à suivre : français. verbes parler. communiquer ses coordonnées Unité 2: Objets 1.com (débutant) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 . 8. avoir.pas/pas de. il manque. 2. 9. articles indéfinis. c’est/il est + profession. 5. se présenter. 10. vendre. elle sujets. pour + infinitif verbe avoir. Dire ce qu’on possède. connaître. ce qu’on fait 5. entrer en contact : dire tu ou vous. dire où on travaille. comparatifs et superlatifs. 01 to 37 Contenu lexical: Unité 1: Premiers contacts 1. il. pronoms toniques. complément du nom avec de.

their nationalitie and the language spoken in that country. lernen.GERMAN . which. Gute Nacht!. colorful.I Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to converse. plural structures and simple calculation like addition. sehr gut!. etc. Module III: Phonetics Sound system of the language with special stress on Dipthongs Module IV: Countries. modes of Transport Module VI: Professions To acquaint the students with professions in both the genders with the help of the verb “sein”. which will later help them to strengthen their language. Animals. family Tree with the help of the verb “to have” Module VIII: Colours All the color and color related vocabulary – colored. how many. “Wie viel kostet das?” Module X: Revision list of Question pronouns W – Questions like who. Fruits. miserabel! Module II: Interviewspiel To assimilate the vocabulary learnt so far and to apply the words and phrases in short dialogues in an interview – game for self introduction. kommen. etc. how. All personal pronouns in relation to the verbs taught so far. prima!. etc. wohnwn. when. Greetings: Guten Morgen!. what. trinken. Danke sehr!. Module IX: Numbers and calculations – verb “kosten” The counting. Vielen Dank!. feminine and neuter gender. nationalities and their languages To make the students acquainted with the most widely used country names. Guten Abend!. Hallo. To give the students an insight into the culture. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Text & References: • • • Wolfgang Hieber. ausgezeichnet!. political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany MIBGR 10101 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Self introduction: heissen. All Vegetables. colorless. Guten Tag!. Module VII: Pronouns Simple possessive pronouns. (es tut mir Leid!). The family members. Danke!. read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar. subtraction. light. your. geography. the use of my. multiplication and division to test the knowledge of numbers. Es geht!. Module V: Articles The definite and indefinite articles in masculine. Eatables. Lernziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler. nicht so gut!. so la la!. Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer . Furniture. Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach. etc. where. dark. arbeiten. pale. wie geht’s?: Danke gut!. how much.

Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A. Grundkurs .• • • P. Tangram Aktuell A1/1.2 Braun.L Aneja. Schmöe. 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al.1. Deutsch Interessant . Nieder.

Module III Concept of Gender and Number Months of the years. days of the week. En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras . Module IV Introduction to SER and ESTAR (both of which mean To Be). physical/geographical location. Introduction to numbers 1-100. Aquel/aquella etc) Module VI Introduction to some key AR /ER/IR ending regular verbs. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Text & References: • • Español. the language.Revision of ‘Saludos’ and ‘Llamarse’. Exercises highlighting usage of Ser and Estar. Introduction to alphabets Module II Introduction to ‘Saludos’ (How to greet each other. how to greet each other. the fact that spanish adjectives have to agree with gender and number of their nouns. professions.SPANISH – I Course Code: Course Objective: To enable students acquire the relevance of the Spanish language in today’s global context. How to present/ introduce each other). Colors. demonstrative pronoun (Este/esta. nationalities. Module V Time. the culture…and the relevance of Spanish language in today’s global context. How to present / introduce each other using basic verbs and vocabulary MIBSH 10101 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I A brief history of Spain. Goodbyes (despedidas) The verb llamarse and practice of it. Revision of numbers and introduction to ordinal numbers. seasons. Some adjectives. Latin America.

Expression of time and period. Asking and answering to small general questions Module II: Cardinal Numbers Numerals. Future tense Module IV: Prepositions Particles. everyday routine etc. Learning Outcome  Students can speak the basic language describing above mentioned topics Methods of Private study /Self help  Handouts. friend’s house etc. Adjectives to describe a person Module VII: Schedule Time Table. Forming questions Module V: Demonstratives Interrogatives. possession. Days. and self-do assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Text & References: Text: • Teach yourself Japanese References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1 . months Module III: Tenses Present Tense. party. audio-aids. Module VIII: Outings Going to see a movie.JAPANESE . pronoun and adjectives Module VI: Description Common phrases.I Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to learn the basic rules of grammar and Japanese language to be used in daily life that will later help them to strengthen their language. MIBJP 10101 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Salutations Self introduction.

Use of verb “zuo” and how to make sentences with it. Cantonese. Doctor. How to make interrogative sentences ending with “ma”. Use of “Nin” when and where to use and with whom. Use of “you” – “mei you”.CHINESE – I Course Code: Course Objective: There are many dialects spoken in China. Numbers. Measure words Days and Weekdays. The most widely spoken forms of Chinese are Mandarin. Module III Attributives showing possession How is your Health? Thank you Where are you from? A few Professions like – Engineer. Structural particle “de”. Maps. Use of interrogative particle “shenme”.) Practicing of Tones as it is a tonal language.. Module II Greetings Let me Introduce The modal particle “ne”. or Putonghua. Hakka. “shui”. the language of Mainland China. but the language which will help you through wherever you go is Mandarin. A brief self introduction – Ni hao ma? Zaijian! Use of “bu” negative. Wu and Xiang. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person. Use of Please ‘qing” – sit. Businessman. Teacher. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Text & References: • “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I” Lesson 1-10 . Getting to know each other. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. Module V Family structure and Relations. have tea …………. Changes in 3rd tone and Neutral Tone. (CHART – The Chinese Phonetic Alphabet Called “Hanyu Pinyin” in Mandarin Chinese. dialogue and retell. Practicing chart with Initials and Finals. Use of guixing. Worker. etc. Min. as it is called in Chinese. Gan. MIBCE 10101 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Show pictures. “ma” and “nar”. different languages and Countries. Are you busy with your work? May I know your name? Module IV Use of “How many” – People in your family? Use of “zhe” and “na”.

Policies. Identify the strategic aspects of HRM and linkages between these and business terms of effectiveness and best practice' approaches. Case Studies. Module II: Business and HR Strategy Relationships between the business and HR strategy. Determinants. Reaching out the Global Customer & Role of individuals Functional & Dysfunctional competition and cooperation in Organisation Summary & Review Questions. self study sessions. MIBHR 10201 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module students will be above to: Demonstrate an understanding of the historical development of approaches to labour mangement. Case studies. Case Studies. Socialisation. unitarism and frames of References: the 'excellence' literature and new managerialism Summary & Review Questions. Module V: Leading Effective Teams & working in Groups Team as a competitive strategy & obstacles for effective team performance Groups – Importance & Dynamics Global Organisation. Extensive research projects. and business. Models of Personality Concept of self – esteem. Case Studies Module III: Employment realtionship and organisational change Restructuring 'leanness' and 'downsizing' and the implications for the mangement of HR Implications of contextual change for HRM in relation to resourcing. Interactive sessions. Module VI: Learning organisations & Organisational learning Organisational learning – Process. competing approahces and models Changing Profiles of employees and customers Globalisation of Business and Human Resources Challenges of leading an organisation Summary & Review Questions. Case Studies. Policy. Diffusion & Institutionalisation Change & Effective implementation Employee autonomy and ethical Managers Goals. Field visits. Course Contents: Module I: Introduction & Development of Ideas on Human resources Introduction to Strategic Human Resource Management Difference between traditional HR and SHRM Pluralism. (including HRM) in certain western societies and critically appraise the relevance and appropriateness of each of these to contemporary organisations and employment. Case Studies. class presentation by groups of students. Components of attitudes Leadership styles and organisational values Challenges in Global business environs and Situational Leadership Summary & Review Questions. Each student is required to do the back ground reading . Creating and sharing vision Summary & Review Questions. Module IV: Personality and Leadership Concepts of Leadership. Concepts and Growth of HRM and HRD Summary & Review Questions. Case Studies.STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: This module will place previous studies of Human Resource Management within a strategic. Understand and evaluate the role of organisational change in affecting HR policies and employee perceptions of organisations.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Seminars. international dimension so as to illustrate the concept of competitive advantage applied to human resources. Weekend experience in companies . development Management of human resources. Learning Methods: Tutorials.

2nd.Managing human resource. Oxford University Press.New Delhi. 2001 • Aswthappa.com • www. New Delhi. Wayne F. New Delhi.Delhi: Macmillan. New Delhi. • Monappa. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Mello Jeffrey. Human resource management. K. PHI. Luis R G. HR and Personnel Management.umuc. 2000 • Udai Pareek.wikipedia. Human Aspects of management.allbusiness. Cases are also to be analyzed.com • www. 2002 • www. Jaico Publishing House. Derek. Understanding Organisational Behaviour.. Management.2000 • Cascio.google. Seema. 1997 • Mejia. Stephen.indianmba. 6th. Motivation theories and principles. 2003. Response Books.in/en.2006 • Beck.questia. Tata McGraw Hill. New Delhi.edu • www. 2003 • Ivancevich.New Delhi.4th.org/programs/uasp/CaseStudies • www. 2000. Towards personal excellence. P.icmrindia. Tata McGraw Hill. Robert C.org/casestudies/Case_Studies • www. Tata McGraw Hill. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. New Delhi.books.Pearson Education. 2005 • Biddle. Managing human resources . Strategic Human Resource Management. Tata McGraw Hill. John M.org/wiki/Human_Resource_Management . Managing Human Resource.co. Thomson Learning References: • Robbins.2004 • Sanghi.irex. 2002 • Epstein Robert. Pearson Education. Arun. Mumbai. The big book of motivation games. New Delhi.from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class.com • www.

Mathematical Model of Transportation problem Methods for finding Initial Solution Test for Optimality Introduction to Assignment Problem Methods of finding solution to Assignment Problem Module IV: Theory of Games Two-Person Zero-Sum Games Pure Strategies Mixed Strategies Module V: Network Analysis Network Diagram Critical Path Method PERT Probability in Network Analysis Module VI: Inventory Theory Introduction. Opportunities and Shortcomings Applications and Scope Module II: Linear Programming Introduction. Essential Features of a Queuing System Performance Measures of a Queuing System Probability Distributions in Queuing System Classification of Queuing Models: Single Server Queuing Models. tools and techniques of Operations Research. Advantages and Limitations of Linear Programming Linear Programming Model Formulation Graphical Solution Methods Simplex Method Big-M method Module III: Transportation and Assignment Problems Introduction. application. • Developed the ability to apply different optimal techniques and procedures for decision making process Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to Operations Research Nature and Significance Advantages. Application. MIBOM 10201 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module students will have: • Considered the nature of Operations Research • Understood problem solving methods based upon a careful discussion of model formulation. Multi-Server Queuing Models . solution procedure and analysis. Meaning of Inventory Control Functional Role of Inventory Factors Involved in Inventory Problem Analysis Inventory Model Building: Concept of EOQ Inventory Control Models without Shortages Inventory Control Models with Shortages Module VII: Queuing Theory Introduction. It also aims to develop the understanding of the various optimization techniques used for decisions making in the functions of the management of any organization. • Apply quantitative techniques to business situations.OPERATIONS RESEARCH Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to provide a thorough understanding of the essential features. relevance. The objective of this course is to develop the understanding of models building and quantitative approach to decisions making in the functions of the management of any organization with special focus on International Business.

Macmillan Business Books References: • F Hillier. Introduction to Operations Research. Ronald (latest ed. Singapore . Macmillian Publishing Company. New York • L Rardin. The class will be doing Cases throughout the semester. Pearson Education. G Lieberman (2005). It is also expected that students will work the problems as the part of assignments. Operation’s Research. New York • A Ravindran (latest). There will be presentations also in which the student have to collect. Tata McGraw-Hill • A Taha Hamdy (1987). John Wiley & Sons. Operations Research: Principles and Practices. Optimization in Operations Research. non-graded homework sets will be handed out in class.Learning Methods: Occasional. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • J K Sharma (2007). collate and analyze the data.). Operations Research–An Introduction. Students will prepare three written cases in small groups of 4-6 students.

There will be presentations also in which the student have to collect. MIBIB 10201 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module students will have: • Considered the framework of export and import documentation • Evaluated and justified the various documents for processing export and import orders • Evaluated the legal implications in the area of exports and imports • Assessed the various terms and conditions of export finance • Developed the ability to critically examine the EXIM policy framework Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Export Documentation Framework Module II: Documents for processing export order and legal implications Processing of an Export Order INCO Terms Foreign Exchange Regulation Act and introduction to FEMA Module III: Export Finance and documents Export Payment Terms Export Finance Forward Exchange Cover Module IV: Central excise clearance Customs Clearance of Export Cargo Customs Clearance of Import Cargo Role of Clearing and Forwarding Agents Shipment of Export Cargo Negotiation of Export Documents Module V: EXIM Policy Framework EPCG Scheme Duty Exemption Scheme Export Oriented Units and Export processing Zones Exercise on Negotiation of Export Documents. The latest articles on international policies on exports and imports will be distributed for discussion. Learning Methods: Class room lectures: Each class is intended to be approximately 60 minutes of lecture and 15 minutes in discussion.EXPORT IMPORT DOCUMENTATION AND LOGISTICS Course Code: Course Objective: Trade procedures and documentation formalities are a critical part of international business management. 2002. collate and analyze the data. Students will prepare three written cases in small groups of 4-6 students. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: Khurana P K. Export Management. This subject aims at imparting knowledge of trade procedures and documentation formalities with a view to enable the participants to develop a systematic approach in handling trade transaction and incidental paper work. The class will be doing Cases throughout the semester. A few additional journal articles related to topics discussed will be made available at the Library. Galgotia Publications . The discussion period may involve newsworthy events related to EXIM policy etc.

Wood. 2002) • Thomas A. 2001 • Michael B.commin.tdctrade. Anthony Barone.in • www.nic. Paul Murphy.com • www.iift.org . And Daniel L. The Ultimate Guide To Export Management.in • www. Stroh.org. Wardlow.intracen. International Logistics.References: • Notes of Amity Distance Education Course for EIDL • E. 2002 • www. Johnson. Cook. Export/Import Procedures And Documentation (Export/Import Procedures & Documentation. 2006 • Donald F. A Practical Guide To Transportation And Logistics.

INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Course Code: Course Objective:
The purpose of the Financial Management in combination with International Financial Management course is to furnish students with a general understanding of the financial decision making process globally. The course principally concentrates to develop a high level understanding of the tactical and strategic significance of the financial management function in the Multinational organizations. The aim is not to turn participants into practicing accountants; the philosophy is rather to provide critical appreciation of the significance of financial concepts in the development of projects and operations. The unit will enhance the ability to extract relevant information from accounting data for the purpose of decision-making.

MIBFN 10201

Credit Units: 04

Learning Outcomes:
On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues in financial management and analyse time value of money. Differentiate methods of investment appraisals and apply appropriate appraisal technique for a given organization and Evaluate risk & return. Understand and apply the inter-relationship of exchange rates, inflation rates and interest rates. Design capital structure of a company and understand the determinants of dividend Identify and analyse the different forms of risk faced by organizations in an international environment Implement strategies to manage these risks.

Course Contents:
Module I: Core concepts of financial management Introduction: concept, nature, interaction of finance function with other management functions; role of the finance manager, objectives of financial management, focus on the shareholder’s wealth maximization principle; forms of business organizations. The time value of money: the concepts of time value, PV & FV. Module II: Long-term investment decisions Capital Budgeting: Principles and techniques: introduction: the nature, meaning, kinds and importance of investment decisions; Data requirement: identifying relevant cash flows, Evaluation techniques: accounting rate of return, payback method, net present value, internal rate of return, profitability index, accept reject criteria: NPV & IRR – a comparison, project selection under capital rationing. Concept and measurement of cost of capital: introduction, importance, definition, cost of debt, cost of reference shares, cost of equity capital, cost of retained earnings, computation of overall cost of capital. Module III: Financing decision Leverages: Operating leverage, financial leverage, combined effect of financial and operating leverage and breakeven analysis Capital structure: assumptions & definitions, the theoretical controversy about capital structure and the value of the firm; net income approach, net operating income approach, traditional approach Designing capital structure: introduction, profitability aspect, liquidity aspect, control, ratios, nature of industry, timing of issue, characteristics; discussion on any lead company’s capital structure. Module IV: Role of International Financial Management Introduction to International Financial Management, International Flow of Funds, Foreign Direct Investment, Multinational Capital Budgeting, International Cash Management, 21st Century Trends in International Banking and Finance

Learning Methods:
Class room lectures: Each class is intended to be approximately 60 minutes of lecture and 15 minutes in discussion. The discussion period may involve newsworthy events in international finance. Occasional, non-graded homework sets will be handed out in class. It is also expected that students will work the problems as the part of assignments. The class will be doing Cases throughout the semester. Students will prepare three written cases in small groups of 4-6 students. There will be presentations also in which the student have to collect, collate and analyze the data. A few additional journal articles related to topics discussed will be made available at the Library. As new crisis's appear in international finance, articles will be distributed for discussion.

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%)

C1 10

V 5

A 5

CT 10

EE 70

Text & References:
Text:

• •

Jeff Madura, International Financial Management, 6th ed., ITP, 2000 MY Khan & PK Jain, 2004, Financial Management Text & Problems (Tata McGraw -Hill Publishing company, Third edition) References: • Van Horne J C- Fundamentals of financial Management (Pearson Education, 2003) • IM Pandey- Financial Management (Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd, 2001) • Gitman-Principles of Managerial Finance (Pearson Education, 2003) • Brealy & Myers –Principles of corporate finance (McGraw-Hill) • Chandra P, 2003, Financial Management Theory & Practice (Tata Mc Graw -Hill Publishing company, Fifth edition) • Jeff Madura, International Financial Management, 6th ed., ITP, 2000 Further reading: Relevant articles from current and recent finance and business journals, such as: • Journal of Finance • Journal of International Financial Management & Accounting. • Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money.

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
Course Code: Course Objective:
The course introduces the student to the various aspects of international marketing with the principle objective of developing skills in the identification, analysis and solution of the problems encountered in the theories and the practice international marketing abroad.

MIBMK 10201

Credit Units: 03

Learning Outcome:
On the completion of the module the student will be able to: • Undertake secondary research into the national and international target markets. • Analyze and rank- order market opportunities. • Commission appropriate primary research in foreign markets. • Propose adaptations to the marketing mix to meet the needs of individual product/ market combinations. • Plan and create a programme of market expansion abroad.

Course Contents:
Module I: Global Marketing: An Overview Introduction to Global Marketing Reasons / Objectives Environment of International Marketing Transnational Marketing – Domestic to global - Various terms - EPRG framework Driving & Restraining Forces Module II: Social & Cultural Environment Basic aspects of culture - Cultural Knowledge - Culture and its elements Analytical Approaches to Cultural Factors - Maslow’s hierarchy of needs - Hofstede’s Cultural Typology - The SRC - Enviromental Sensitivity Module III: Global Advertising Global Advertising and Branding .Selecting an advertising agency Creating Advertising Module IV: Global Marketing Channels and Physical Distribution Channel objectives and Constraints Distribution Channels: Terminology and Structure Physical Distribution and Logistics Module V: Global Marketing Information Systems Overview of GMIS Sources of Market Information Formal marketing Research Module VI: Global segmentation Targeting & Positioning Global Market Segmentation Geographic Psychographic Behaviour Benefit Vertical Vs Horizontal Global Targeting Criteria for Global targeting Selecting a GTMS Global Positioning

P. Thompson Press. 12th. USA. USA. Contemporary Business 2003. 2001 Helpful Web Sites: • http://www. G. D.Marketing in a Developing Country Module VII: Global e-marketing The Death of Distance Relationship marketing Living in an Age of Technological Discontinuities Components of the Electronic value chain Learning Methods: The assessment programme will be student driven.2nd. 2005. J. requiring the student to develop his/ her communication skills by presentation and debate. Mc Graw Hill. Global Marketing Management.100 Branding Mistakes of all The Time. Kogan Page. P and Graham.com/business/management/ballmcculloch/directory2. 7th. 3rd European edition. H.com/ • http://www. 11th. 1998 • Kotler P and Kinzer C. Prentice-Hall.J.J and Piercy. 2nd. Armstrong. To achieve the pass in the module student should gain 40% in the both. examination and the course work. Principles of Marketing. Prentice Hall. Y. their acquired knowledge of theory and the ability to apply the same to practical situations. London. Saunders. which will reflect the various views available to the marketer. 1995 • Kotler. Pearson Education. Saunders J and V Wong. Principles of Marketing . London. . USA.mhhe. Students will be assessed on the basis of. G.com/general/terms.mhtml • http://www. 1999 • Hooley. E and Kurtz. Pearson Education. PrenticeHall. Keegan. Critical participation of students is expected in each of the assessment programme. Saunders.knowthis. International Marketing. in the form of projects and research assignments. USA • Hemel Hempstead.marketingterms. Brand Failures. 2003 • Kotler. Marketing Strategy and Competitive Positioning. Pretice Hall. A Framework for Marketing Management. UK • Cateora. Armstrong G. USA. Marketing Management. 2nd . 2002 • Kotler P. J and Wong.N. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: Warren. 2003. 2002 References: • Matt.2002 • Boone.htm . Prentice hall. P.

Course Contents: Module I: International Trade Environment Multilateral Trading System Institutional Framework for Multilateral Trading System – WTO Legal Framework for Multilateral Trading System Implications of Uruguay Round – The Indian Perspective 4th Ministerial Meeting – Doha Declaration Module II: Multinational Organisations Role of World Bank & IMF in International Trade UNCTAD MIGA International Trade Centre (ITC). ASEAN. Arbitration Action against Erring Exporters Quality Complaints and Settlement Mechanisms Module VI: FEMA and Export FEMA and Exchange Control Regulations Manner of Realisations of Export Proceeds Exchange Control Declaration Write Off of Unrealised Export Bills Liberalised Exchange Rate Management System.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture . Case studies.INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AND TRADE IMPLICATIONS Course Code: Course Objective: Foreign Trade Management has gained considerable significance in India in the last decade. policy framework. NAFTA. Weekend experience in companies . trade liberalisation initiatives taken by the government. Conciliation. Field visits. Interactive sessions. SAARC. Management games. CARICOM Module IV: Trade Information for Exports Ministry of Commerce Export Promotion Councils and Commodity Boards India Trade Promotion Organisation Export – Import Bank of India Export Credit and Guarantee Corporation (ECGC) of India Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO) DGCI & S Module V: Settlement of Trade Dispute Litigation. LAIA. trends and pattern of export – import trade and foreign trade management. Extensive research projects. The objective of the course is to inculcate a strong understanding on global economic and trading environment. Geneva Centre for Promotion of Imports from Developing Countries Module III: Regional Trade Blocks EU. MIBIB 10202 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues in the international trade environment Analyse the past and present export import policies of the country with References: to other nations Assess the role of multinational organizations and trade blocs in development of the international trade environment Explore and analyse the country’s foreign trade and implications of government policies. Seminars. Module VII: India’s Foreign Trade Trends and Direction in India’s Exports Learning Methods Tutorials.

2004 Useful Web Sites: • www.europa.miga.intracen. Shivaramu.aseansec.org .eu. Cases are also to be analyzed. Ltd.org • www. Galgotia Publishing Company.org • www.methods.org • www. 2001 • International Business Environment and Management – V.nafta-sec-alena.worldbank. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Export Management : 6th Revised Edition : P. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Anmol Publications Pvt.wto.int • www.org • www.K Khurana.K Bhalla & S.org • www. class presentation by groups of students.org • www. .org • www. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Nabhi Publications • International Business – Roger Bennett : Pearson Education. self study sessions.imf.unctad. 8th Edition. 2007 References: • Exporter’s Manuel 2004.

Module II: Modalities of Cross-Cultural Dimensions Kluckhohn and Strodtbeck`s Cultural Dimension Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions Trompenaars Cultural Dimensions Hall and Hall’s Cultural Dimension Module III: Styles of Management and its impact on the International Business Japanese Style of Management German style of Management UK style of Management French style of Management Spanish style of Management Style of Management of United States companies Management Characteristics of West European Companies Styles of Management in African Countries Style of Management of Latin American Countries Indian style of Management Module IV: Cross Cultural Leadership Differences in managerial behaviour Cultural influences on leaders and their behavioural patterns Module V: Business Ethics with focus on Corporate Governance Business Ethics and Corporate Governance Business Ethics and Management of Change in the International Organisation Comparative Analysis of Cultural Patterns in Different Economics and the issues. political and environmental aspects when doing business abroad is reinstated while highlighting the challenges. which affect the good governance Module VI: Management of Multinational companies Management of Multinational Companies . Enhance skill to manage international Business Negotiations Enhance the ability to work in groups. The course study provides knowledge of mechanics of doing business abroad. MIBIB 10203 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: Ability to integrate and apply concepts about managing in different work cultures. which management faces today in a global environment. Appreciation cross-cultural and ethical issues faced by managers in global enterprises. The course also introduces the importance of Business Ethics and how it pertains to social responsibility of Cross Cultural Managers and the role ethics play in the management of transnational companies. Ability to understand the work culture and management style of Multi National Organisations. Polish verbal and written communication skills. Provide opportunities for students to exercise leadership skills. as well as presentation skills through projects. economic. so as to be able to relate it to managerial activity in the new geo-economy.CROSS CULTURAL MANAGEMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES Course Code: Course Objective: The course seeks to impart understanding of Cross Cultural Management. Course Contents: Module I: Introduction The Concept of International Comparative Management Definition of Culture and impact of the culture on International Business. The importance of cultural.Problems & Prospects of MNCs in an International environment Module VII: Communication and International Negotiation . The Course Contents provide exposure to the diverse management styles across the globe and impart understanding of different approaches to comparative analysis of each management style.

J.uel.un. R. Formative tasks and presentations will enable students to build towards the completion of their assignment during the delivery of the unit.com • http://www. and Pustay. The unit has thus been designed to use a variety of teaching methods that should help students to study the various aspects of international business environment.uk • http://www.en. • Rugman. (2005). SAGE Publications You can also refer to the following useful websites: • http://www. W. Teaching consists of 2½ hours per week. and Hodgetts.wat. (2000). ISBN: 0-273-67374-2. New York: The Modern Library. C. (2003). Pearson Education Limited.us-asean. C. Inc. (referred to as D&R) References: • Hill. • Hibbert. FT/Prentice Hall. International Business.news. ISBN: 0-20164858-X. (2001). 4 th Edition. M. M.uk/wrstsd • http://www.org • http://www.org • http://www. M. D. Asian contributions to Cross-Cultural Psychology.int • http://www. W. (2002).bbc. M. (referred to as H) • Griffin.org • http://www. 4th edition. ISBN: 0-13-121726-7. M.gov/cia/publications/factbook/index.nytimes.eurunion. Prentice-Hall. Pearson Education Limited.ac. (2003). P.org/economy/rulemakers • http://www.. The Wealth of Nations.caricom. • Todaro.eubusiness. A. (2003).org/infores/eugide/Chapter1. and Pustay. M. R. McGraw-Hill. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Daniels. FT/Prentice Hall. R. M.wto. Janak. Globalization and the Politics of Development in the Middle East. W.htm • http://www.uel.html • http://ww. International Business: Environments and Operations. • Tayeb. Cambridge University Press.uk/elbs/postgraduate/courses/ibmo.org • http://www.org • http://www. and Radebaugh.com • http://www. MacMillan Press Ltd. • Pandey.bbc. Sinha Durganand.co.economist. • Henry. International Management: Theories and Practice. New Jersey. (2001). (2004). International Business: Competing in the Global Marketplace. E. and Springborg.htm • http://www.com • http://www.co. International Business Strategy and Operations. International Business: A Managerial Perspective.org • http://www.imf. International Business. 3rd Ed. 3rd edition. • Griffin. (referred to as R&H) • Smith. 10 th Edition.europa. (1997).uk/hi/english/events/the_launch_of_emu • http://finance.ch/guidedtour/tour. Economic Development. L. W. A.htm . 7th Edition.apec.cia.ac. R. Prentice Hall.Culture and Communication Major Obstacles to Intercultural Communication Nonverbal Communication Subtle art of negotiation Managing Negotiation with Multinational Companies Learning Methods: A series of lectures will impart information and be complemented by interactive tutor-led and student-led discussion.globalexchange.aseansec. H. W.org • http://www. (1937).news.

alchemymag.html http://www.nl/man_bib/rap/atkearney02.com/Web_First/SS.com/cgi-bin/currency.jinjapan.jhtml?page=29 http://www.php http://www.uk/cmt/0001.nike.com http://www.html http://managementconsult.html http://home.htm http://www.com/library/weekly/aa110698.com/markets/index.asp?ar=1029&L2=18&L3=30 http://www.cid.co.html http://www.com/markets/Bigmac/index.att.bsr.nsf/ArticleID/DDAS-4K7JD4/ http://www.ictsd.com/article_page.stanford.iasc.edu/group/scforum/Welcome http://www.com/online/44/porter.org/index.marketprices.worldbank.html http://lnweb18.com/online/61/ibm.pdf http://www.org/tradee.landsend.oas.org/public/english/standards/ipec http://www.asp http://www.virtualtourist.strategy-business.com/updates/index.org/essd/essd.org.gov.com/!beyondstrategic.org.economist.org http://www.vtc?s=p http://www.org/practix.htm http://www.com/markets/index.economist.htm http://www.sec.com/cgi-bin/currency.uk http://www.com/mtvinternational http://www.gc.tw/english.com/Web_First/SS.ilo.alchemymag.landsend.vtc?s=p http://www.net/~nickols/three_forms_of_strategy.moeaboft.asp .com/!beyondstrategic.marketwatch.org http://www.pdf http://www.nsf/ArticleID/DGRD-574TVN/ http://www.wtca.economist.stern.asp http://www.org/ngos/analysis/anal00.dk/Strategi/Costas/whatIsStrategy.interlog.apmforum.globalpolicy.com/~cjazz/action7b.nyu.profpages.cfm http://www.com/nikebiz/nikebiz.htm http://www.edu/~nroubini/asia/cur_policy/int_trade.htm http://www.com/strategy/strategy.org http://www.com/asia-business-strategy.org/webfeatures/viewpoints/global_strat_labor.mckinseyquarterly.uncitral.apmforum.html http://strategis.landsend.htm http://www.cfm http://www.datadivision.html http://www.htm http://www.oanda.fastcompany.htm http://www.mtv.refresher.ca/SSG/sc01071e.webofculture.com/bainweb/pdf/articles/7446.com http://www.com/articles/global/22118.org/en-index.com/html/home.planware.htm http://www.worldmarketsanalysis.com/InFocus2002/articles/globaloverview.html http://www.virtualtourist.com http://www.org http://www.business-standard.about.nestle.corpwatch.html http://www.gov http://bigcharts.com/markets/currencies/ab http://www.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • http://www.org http://pages.nsf/NGOs/home http://www.iasc.imf.pdf http://www.com/convert/classic http://www.worldbank.cfm http://www.fastcompany.com/convert/classic http://www.asp http://www.org http://www.harvard.html http://www.edu/cidtrade http://iserve.asp http://www.jp http://esl.ft.worldbank.epinet.com/strategist/index.uk/cmt/0001.co.sice.org/wbi/corpgov/csr/index.inc.html http://www.oanda.bain.html http://www.html http://www.georgetown.htm http://www.ic.org/today/culture.org/strategy.edu/sfs/programs/isd/schlesinger/since_sept11.refresher.capsresearch.fita.

org/arts/chinaphotos http://europa.int/comm/culture/parten_en.si.edu/~aaamc http://www.eu.htm http://www.edu/history_and_culture .indiana.• • • • http://www.asiasociety.

office communication Memos Notices Circulars Agenda and Minutes Business Report writing Resume writing Module II: Cross Functional Communication Marketing/ Integrated marketing communication Project management communication Human Resource communication Financial Communication Module III: Communication for Public Relations Functions and activities of PR Reputation Management Building Corporate Image and Identity Negotiation Techniques 1. Raman – Prakash. Oxford Business Communication for Managers: An Advanced Approach. The Verbal Communication (oral and written) will be the lingua franca of this endeavour. Ashley A. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • • • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Business Communication. MIBBS 10201 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Communication in Practice Verbal Communication Communication Networks Developing writing skills Inter. Penrose. 9/e. Thomson Understanding Human Communication. 2. Adler R Oxford . Krizan.II Course Code: Course Objective: This course is designed to hone the PR skills of the budding managers and enable them to be an integral part of the corporate communication network. Thomson Business Communication.BUSINESS COMMUNICATION .office communication The business letters E mail – Netiquette (etiquette on the mail) Intra. Oxford The Oxford Handbook of Commercial Corrospondence.

Naylor. Interaction and Transaction Patterns – Complementary.BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE .II (BEHAVIOURAL COMMUNICATION AND RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT) Course Code: Course Objective: This course aims at imparting an understanding of: Process of Behavioural communication Aspects of interpersonal communication and relationship Management of individual differences as important dimension of IPR MIBBS 10202 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Behavioural Communication Scope of Behavioural Communication Process – Personal. Christine. Inter Personal Communication and Human Relationships: Third Edition. Belinda: Effective Communication for Managers. Mark N. Anita. Allyn and Bacon • Julia T. Symmetrical and Parallel Types – Self and Other Oriented Steps to improve Interpersonal Communication Module V: Interpersonal Relationship Development Relationship circle – Peer/ Colleague. Impersonal and Interpersonal Communication Guidelines for developing Human Communication skills Relevance of Behavioural Communication in relationship management Module II: Managing Individual Differences in Relationships Principles Types of issues Approaches Understanding and importance of self disclosure Guidelines for effective communication during conflicts Module III: Communication Climate: Foundation of Interpersonal Relationships Elements of satisfying relationships Conforming and Disconfirming Communication Culturally Relevant Communication Guideline for Creating and Sustaining Healthy Climate Module IV: Interpersonal Communication Imperatives for Interpersonal Communication Models – Linear. maintaining and terminating IPR Direct and indirect strategies of terminating relationship Model of ending relationship Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer Examination Scheme Components Weightage (%) Text & References: J 30 V1 30 A 5 CT 10 C1 10 C2 10 V2 5 • Vangelist L. Interpersonal Communication everyday encounter • Simons. Superior and Subordinate Initiating and establishing IPR Escalating. Knapp. 1997 1st Edition Cassell . Wood.

Effective Communication: United States of America Beebe. Beebe and Redmond. Allyn and Bacon Publishers. 1996.• • Harvard Business School. Interpersonal Communication. .

42 to 72: Contenu lexical: Unité 3: Emploi du temps 1. pourquoi. il est interdit de 10. verbes : aller. acheter un billet de train. partir .Com (Débutant) . ? Parce que . où. il faut+ infinitif. verbe pouvoir + infinitif.FRENCH .par où.. verbes impersonnels 5. consulter un tableau d’horaires Contenu grammatical: 1. question avec à quelle heure ? adjectifs démonstratifs 2. questions avec d’où. des horaires 2. adjectif tout 7. une obligation 5.. expression indiquant la date. dire la date. les prépositions à et de : aller à venir de 3. situer sur une carte 4. de ses loisirs 4.. verbes devoir+infinitif. 4: pp. lundi prochain 6. demander et donner l’heure. à quel. impératif présent (1).. adjectifs possessifs (2). nombres ordinaux 8. questions avec est-ce que ? à et en + moyen de transport. une interdiction. le lundi. verbes pronominaux au présent. venir. adverbes de fréquence. en/au+pays 9. parler de ses déplacements. exprimer un conseil. raconter sa journée 3. parler du temps qu’il fait 5. ? 4. expliquer un itinéraire 3. réserver une table au restaurant Unité 4: Voyage 1. de quel Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Text & References: le livre à suivre : Français. parler de ses habitudes au travail.II Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the student • to talk about his time schedule • to talk about travel MIBFR 10201 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Unité 3. fixer rendez-vous (au téléphone par e-mail). demander la note 2. réserver une chambre d’hôtel.

Grundkurs .L Aneja.1. political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany Introduction to Grammar to consolidate the language base learnt in Semester . Schmöe. Adverbs of time and time related prepositions Module II: Irregular verbs Introduction to irregular verbs like to be. Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach. schlafen. Weekdays. geography. seasons. essen. to learn the conjugations of the same.2 Braun. months. sprechen und ähnliche). Module III: Separable verbs To comprehend the change in meaning that the verbs undergo when used as such Treatment of such verbs with separable prefixes Module IV: Reading and comprehension Reading and deciphering railway schedules/school time table Usage of separable verbs in the above context Module V: Accusative case Accusative case with the relevant articles Introduction to 2 different kinds of sentences – Nominative and Accusative Module VI: Accusative personal pronouns Nominative and accusative in comparison Emphasizing on the universal applicability of the pronouns to both persons and objects Module VII: Accusative prepositions Accusative propositions with their use Both theoretical and figurative use Module VIII: Dialogues Dialogue reading: ‘In the market place’ ‘At the Hotel’ Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • • • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 • • Wolfgang Hieber. Nieder. To give the students an insight into the culture. (fahren. Lernziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler. read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar. and others. Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P. Tangram Aktuell A1/1. 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al. which will later help them to strengthen their language.I MIBGR 10201 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Everything about Time and Time periods Time and times of the day. Deutsch Interessant. lessen. Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A.GERMAN – II Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to converse.

my house. Introduction to root changing and irregular AR/ER/IR ending verbs Module III More verbal phrases (eg. Que lastima etc). poco). computer/internet related vocabulary Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • Español. bastante. my school/institution. Simple texts based on grammar and vocabulary done in earlier modules.descriptions of people. muy. Module IV Possessive pronouns Module V Writing/speaking essays like my friend. Dios Mio. MIBSH 10201 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Revision of earlier modules. mucho. grammar. Verbal Phrases to understand simple texts and start describing any person or object in Simple Present Tense. En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 . Module II Some more AR/ER/IR verbs. adverbs (bueno/malo. myself….SPANISH – II Course Code: Course Objective: To enable students acquire more vocabulary. objects etc.

intransitive verbs Module II: More prepositions More particles. movie and how to accept and refuse in different ways Module VI: Comprehension’s Short essay on Family. hospital etc.JAPANESE . References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1 C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 . articles and likes and dislikes. and self-do assignments. Module VII: Conversations Situational conversations like asking the way. At a post office. Module IV: Adverbs Different adverbial expression. no smoking etc. family Module VIII: Illness Going to the doctor. visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm. Module III: Terms used for instructions No parking. Inviting somebody for lunch. Module V: Invitations and celebrations Giving and receiving presents. Learning Outcome  Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics. Friend etc. MIBJP 10201 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Verbs Transitive verbs. Methods of Private study/ Self help   Handouts. Use of library. audio-aids. dinner. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Teach yourself Japanese.II Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic particles and be able to define the situations and people using different adjectives.

Module II Where do you live? Learning different colors. the language of Mainland China. Saying the units of time in Chinese. “ma” with a third tone. Use of interrogative pronoun – “duoshao” and “ji”. bed. .. Afternoon. eg what is placed where and how many things are there in it? Review Lessons – Preview Lessons. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person. Measure words. Evening. Etc. bookshelf. wais hang. Night. to begin. I also like swimming. and same syllables with different tones mean different things. Learning to say useful phrases like – 8:00. Module V The verb “qu” Going to the library issuing a book from the library Going to the cinema hall. Expression ‘yao”.. “gen”. everyday.. rising and rising/falling). “Whose”??? Sweater etc is it? Different Games and going out for exercise in the morning. morning 3:58. to end …. When you say.CHINESE – II Course Code: Course Objective: Chinese is a tonal language where each syllable in isolation has its definite tone (flat. How to tell time. etc Going to the buy clothes …. chair. Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes. Hobby. months in a year etc. 11:25. evening. house or hostel room. 10:30 P. it mean horse and “ma” with the first tone is Mother. Description of room.M. More sentence patterns on Days and Weekdays. Use of Preposition – “zai”. Comprehension and answer questions based on it. buying tickets Going to the post office. Days of week. etc. Tone practice. Module III Use of words of location like-li. afternoon. I am learning Chinese. falling. Glad to meet you. buying stamps Going to the market to buy things. Making an Inquiry – What time is it now? Where is the Post Office? Days of the week. Morning. “xiang” and “yaoshi” (if). etc. MIBCE 10201 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Drills Practice reading aloud Observe Picture and answer the question. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. Introduction of basic sentence patterns. Months in a year... night. Tones of “bu” Buying things and how muchit costs? Dialogue on change of Money. xia Furniture – table. Is Chinese difficult? Module IV Counting from 1-1000 Use of “chang-chang”. one hour.

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I” Lesson 11-20 .

Opportunities & threats . material management and quality etc. Hence ‘International Strategy’ and ‘Global Strategy’ are sometime used interchangeably.Macro & Micro environment . Capabilities & Core Competencies. It is a distinct area of management.INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: International Strategy is a term used to describe strategic activities of firm operating across borders.Global business environment Internal Environment Strengths & weaknesses Present strategies. The course presents a process of developing and implementing a strategic plan within an organization for international business MIBIB 20301 Credit Units: 03 Learning Objectives: At the end of the course.Building strategic alternatives & choices Porter’s 5 Force Model ETOP & SAP Profile SWOT/TOWS Matrix BCG. Module III: Vision. International Strategic Management is relatively new and dynamic discipline and requires strong relationship with other areas of management. International Strategic Management is thus deeply interwoven with other aspects of business management. Goals and Objectives of Global Companies Module IV: Evolution of Global Corporation Why do firms internationalize / Globalize Phases of Global strategy Global Strategic Planning/ Management Problems in IS Planning Corporate Social Responsibility Module V: Global Strategic Analysis. The aim of this course is to give learner an understanding of theory and principles of strategic management with a wider perspective towards ‘Global Strategic Thinking’. marketing. Business Definition. HR. the student will be able to: • Understand the concepts of strategy and strategic management • Learn its role in International Business Management • Conduct strategic analysis for making right strategic choices • Develop strategic alternatives • Make right choices of strategies and effectively implement them. GE Nine Cell Matrix Hofer’s Model Strickland Grand Strategy selection model Module VI: Formulating International Strategies Generic strategies Grand strategies . ‘Global’ is a new replacement for the term ‘International’. A new strategic initiative can not be successfully implemented unless it is supported by all the other functional areas of the organization like production. finance. Course Contents: Module I: Introduction & Basic Concepts Introduction and Course Overview Concept of Strategy and Strategic management Nature of ‘International Strategic Management’ Evolution of Strategic Management Strategic Management Process Levels of Strategy Module II: Role of environment on strategy Value chain analysis External environment . Mission.

improving oral presentation skills. F. Addison-Wesley Publishing • • • B. Tau 1995. 2005 References: • Strategic Management: A Methodical Approach. Prentice Hall India 2006 Global Strategic Management. Snyder. Implementation and Control.J. Content.Corporate/Business/Functional strategies International strategic alliances Module VII: Implementation. E.O. by A. Evaluation and Control of International strategies Operationalising and Institutionalizing strategy Strategic leadership Managing culture in a global organization Strategic evaluation and control Balance Score Card Learning Methods: Various teaching and learning styles will be used in this module. Meyer 1994. Strategic Management: Formulation. Journal of Information Technology Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases. Oxford University Press • • • . Rowe. De Wit and R. Mason and N. Implementation and Control. Case studies will be used as a basis for reinforcing ideas. and develop an appreciation for team participation. Academy of Management Journal. 2001 • Johnson & Scholes. Pearson Higher Education • Pearce John A & Robinson Richard B. Kamel Mellahi & J George Frynas. 2001. New York. McGraw Hill. R. Lecturing will be used in a number of classes to clarify background information. McGraw Hill. David Fred R. Strategy-Process. Strategic Management Journal.H. Exploring Strategic Change. Strategic Management. Strategic Management: Formulation. improving written communication skills. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Pearce John A & Robinson Richard B. The responsiveness of information technology to business strategy formulation – An empirical study. Addison Wesley. West Publishing. 2003 • T L Wheelen and J D Hunge 1996. Dickel. Context. Interactive discussions will be used to help students learn from each other.

Management games. MIBIR 20301 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Ratings Trade and Investment Barriers Measures for containing Political Risk Module IV: Credit Risk Credit Risk of Payment Procedures Credit Management and Credit Insurance Role of Export Credit Guarantee Corporation Products and Services Recovery and Claim Procedures Module V: Interest Rate Risk Importance of Interest rate risk Measurement of interest rate risk Interest rate risk management Futures. Weekend experience in companies . Country Risk. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. class presentation by groups of students.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Human Development Index. Corruption Index. Seminars.RISK AND INSURANCE IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims at making the students conversant with risk of cross border business (Trade. Extensive research projects. Aviation and Transport Risks Marine Insurance Law Marine Insurance Policies – major insurance clauses Principles of assessment and underwriting Claim Procedures Liability Insurance Group discussion of marine and air cargo policies issued by Indian and foreign companies Module III: Political Risk Political Risk analysis. self study sessions. Field visits. Investments and Long Term Projects) and the techniques available for mitigating those risks. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. the student will be able to: understand the concept of risk in business management learn various techniques available to assess and mitigate those risks develop strategic alternatives evaluate different kinds of risks and their impact on different areas Course Contents: Module I: Concept of Risk Concept of Risk and Objectives of Risk Management Risk Management Techniques Review Session Module II: Insurance Concept of Insurance Marine. Sovereign Risk. Options and Swaps Learning Methods: Tutorials. The role of Insurers and the products and services offered by them would be gone in detail to equip the students with decisions making tools. Interactive sessions. Cases are also to be analyzed. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . Case studies.

1st Edition References: • Shapiro A C. Universal Publishers. Prentice Hall of India • E C G C Brochures and Marine Risk Policy . Prentice Hall of India • Jain P K. 2004.Text & References: Text: • Singh MP & Chopra VS. Peurard J and Yadav S. 2005. International Financial Management. 2003. Multinational Financial Management. Risk Management in International Trade.

the changing financial landscape. the role of international financial markets.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods.on European monetary system. Module IV: Forward and Future Markets and Contract Introduction. Membership criteria. Derivatives market in India. Seminars. relevant terminology. Convertibility. Development Of Organized Exchanges. Interactive sessions. Interest Rate Swaps and Currency Swaps Learning Methods: Tutorials. The course would lay foundation so that students may take up careers of foreign exchange dealing. self study sessions. Cases are also to be analyzed. Clearing House. Theories. Types Of Forward Contracts. Default Risk And Forward Contracts. international financial market. Turnover. The Relationship Between Futures Price And Cash Price. Options Clearing Corporation. Global derivatives markets. how international financial markets are classified. MIBFN 20301 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Motives Behind Using Futures. Termination Of A Forward Contract. Options pay offs. location of international financial markets. Option terminology. participants and functions . Risk management system. Extensive research projects. class presentation by groups of students. Other Options. Factors influencing option prices. Settlement Procedures. Elementary Investment Strategies. Products. Basic concepts of Balance of payments Module II: International Financial Market Introduction. Delivery And Settlement Of A Forward Contract. Organization Of Exchanges. the international monetary system. Case studies. Development of exchangetraded derivatives. Difference Between Futures And Forwards. the student will be able to: Understand the concept of foreign exchange Examine the role and evolution of various theories of forex management Appreciate the international monetary systems and markets Develop the ability to implement the key forex activities strategically Develop the ability to calculate financial derivatives Course Contents: Module I: Basics of foreign exchange Definition. Introduction to swaps. Management games. Field visits. Trading mechanism. Orders In Futures Market. Determination of foreign exchange. Put-Call Parity. Contango And Backwardation. The Structure Of Global Forward Markets. participants in international financial markets. Module III: Introduction to derivatives Derivatives defined. Derivatives market at NSE. Approval for derivatives trading. Exchange-traded vs. History Of Futures Markets.MANAGEMENT OF FOREX TRANSACTIONS Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims at familiarizing the participants with the basic aspects of mechanics of foreign exchange transactions as also operations in the foreign exchange market. financial intermediaries. International monetary system (impact). OTC derivatives markets. Types Of Futures Module V: Introduction to Options and swaps Introduction to options. Types Of Margins. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Clearing House Mechanism. Cost-Of-Carry. Binomial Option Pricing Model. Basis. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model. Contract Specifications For Futures. Trading Strategies of Options. Clearing and settlement.Types of derivatives. Definition Of Futures. Weekend experience in companies . Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Meaning.

Multinational Finance. 2003 • Ghassem A. Jacque. Practice and Risk Management. Foreign Exchange and Money Markets: Theory. Managing Foreign Exchange Risk: How to Identify and Manage Currency Exposure (Risk Management). International Financial Management Galgotia. 2003 • Dominic Bennett. Chorafas. Treasury Operations and the Foreign Exchange Challenge: A Guide to Risk Management Strategies for the New World Markets (Wiley Finance). 1997 • Laurent L. Homaifar.K. New Delhi 2003 • Seth A. 2000. Mar 1992) • Ghassem A. South Western References: • Shaprio.Text & References: Text: • Madura Jeff. Managing Global Financial and Foreign Exchange Rate Risk. C. Managing Global Financial and Foreign Exchange Rate Risk. Management and Control of Foreign Exchange Risk. A. 1997 • Bob Steiner. New Delhi 2003 • Dimitris N. Homaifar. International Financial Management. 2002 . John Wiley & Sons.

E. Quotas and Licensing Sanitary and Phyto Sanitary Measures Technical Barriers to Trade. EOUs.WTO AND INTERNATIONAL REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The primary objective of this course is to provide the students with a thorough understanding of the global. Nature of Modern Business Internal and External Environment P.E. Finally the students will be able to analyze the various nuances associated with international trade. STPs Module V: International Trading Environment Multilateral and Plurilateral Trading System and the legal framework Protection of Domestic Market with relation to Tariff Tariff Reduction.T. Safeguards and Rules of Origin Agreement on Agriculture Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Trade Related Investment Measures (TRIMS) General Agreements on Trade and Services .L Analysis Module II: Contemporary Global and National Business Environment Part A Theory of Absolute Advantage Theory of Comparative Cost Advantage Theory of Competitive Advantage Export Marketing. MIBLW 20301 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the concept of global and national regulatory environment in business management Appreciate the role of various bodies in the international regulatory environment Evaluate the various measures taken by different nations to regulate their business environments Course Contents: Module I: Business and its Environment Meaning of Business. The major focus of this course is to highlight the international norms and regulatory bodies for enhancing global trade. economic. Pricing and Distribution Part B Import Substitution Export Substitution Module III: Protectionism and International Trade Determination of Tariff Types of Tariff & Role Effective Rate of Protection Welfare effect: Small nation vis a vis large nation Module IV: Regulatory Function of Foreign Trade Policy EXIM Policy to FTP SEZs. conduct of Trade according to MFN and NTC clauses Unfair Trade Practices and Barriers to Trade (Non technical) Module VI: Rules Governing International Trade under WTO Uniform Trade Practices Agreements on Antidumping Subsidies and countervailing measures Pre-shipment Inspections Module VII: Measures to Regulate Trade Environment Quantitative Restrictions.S. political and legal environment prevalent in international trade.

1996 • Mathur.L -Foreign Trade Management in India. 2003 • Hoekman. Seminars. Exim dynamic of service and WTO. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. WTO and the multinatinal trading system.. Hema.. Bhagirath Lal. Bernard. Book Well.. ed. New Delhi. Ltd. 2004 • Das. Jaipur. W T O and regionalism in world trade. 2005 • Garg. 2005. Development trade & the WTO: a handbook. The World press. Management games. New Delhi. Case studies. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Debroy Bibek. Oscar Publications References: • Exports of India’s Major Products: Problems and Products. class presentation by groups of students. WTO and India. Extensive research projects. Vikas Publishing House. Aditya. New Century. 2004 • Mattoo. New Century. New Delhi. Oxford University Press. India and the WTO. Weekend experience in companies . self study sessions. Economic and Social Environment. Washington. Field visits. 2002 • Prasad. Interactive sessions. Cases are also to be analyzed. 2001 Edition • Verma M. 2002 . Ed. Pawan Kr Graga • Chauhan Sandeep-GATT to WTO – Deep & Deep Publication Pvt. Rawat Publications. New Delhi. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Common Wealth Publishers.Dispute Settlement Mechanism Learning Methods: Tutorials.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. 2001. Vibha. H Ashok.

ORGANISATION BEHAVIOUR: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Course Code: Course Objective: The main purpose of this paper is to familiarize the participants understanding the human as well as organisational behaviour and management practices. It’s nature and scope. Various approaches : Social System approach. To course will equip the student with the skills which visualize the impact of globalisation on individuals and organisation. Hawthrone’s Experiments & Human Relations. . Custodian Model. Various management skills & roles. Case Studies. Case Studies. Impact of changing trends in Organisational structure and functioning Identify and analyze issues related to work and motivation in organisation Course Contents: Module I: Understanding Organizational Behavior: Defining OB. Understanding Human Behavior. Taylor’s Scientific Management. Fayol’s Administrative Management and Bureaucracy. effect on organisational behaviour. Case Studies. Understand the factors of globalisation. Supportive Model. Disciplines Contributing to Organisation Behavior. with a blend of theoretical formulations with practical applications in global context. OB today – The Infotech age. MIBHR 20301 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues in Organisational Behaviour. Collegelial Model Summary & Review Questions. Organisation Behavior Models : Autocratic Model. Module II: Background & Foundations of OB Human Relations & Organisation Behavior. Module III: Understanding People and Organizations : Uniqueness of Human Beings Human Limitations Influence of Internal and External Factors on Human Behavior Instinct Vs Environment Personality Vs Environment Cognition Vs Environment Understanding Behavior Learning Why Organizations Exist Organizational Tasks Task Design and Efficiency Task Design and Motivation The Social Aspect of Organizations Summary & Review Questions. Module IV: Diversity and Ethics : Concept and Nature of Diversity Managing Diversity in Organizations Creation of Family-Friendly Workplaces Providing Diversity Training to Employees Developing Mentoring Programs for Employees Individual and Organizational Approaches to Managing Diversity Individual Approaches Organizational Approaches Developing the Multicultural Organization Ethics and Ethical Behavior in Organizations Sexual Harassment Pay and Promotion Discrimination Employee Privacy Issues Summary & Review Questions. various challenges & Opportunities. Case Studies. Human behavior approach System’s approach & Contingency approach Summary & Review Questions. Emphasis is on practically applied behavioural science concepts and techniques to understand and learn the challenges of human organisations in this highly competitive world.

Andrew F. New Delhi • Paul Hersey. Allied. Peter F. Seminars. Arun. frustration and burnout Summary & Review Questions. Deep & Deep. Jaico Publications References: • Robbins. Organisational Behaviour. The Handbook of human resource management . 1992. Case Studies. 2004. Stephen. Field visits. Case studies. Understanding Organisational Behaviour.Module V: Managing work and Motivation : Models & Integration of Four Motivation theories Job satisfaction and morale Promotion of intrinsic motivation in global context The Global perspective of motivating through work Coping behaviour. 2002. 1975. New Delhi • Monappa. The Management of human resources: personnel text and current issues / Andrew F Sikula and John F McKenna . 2000. Extensive research projects. Organisation Behaviour and Managing People. Weekend experience in companies . Cases are also to be analyzed.Oxford: Blackwell . 1984. self study sessions. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.. Managing human resources . PHI. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Module VI: Organisation Design & Development Various types of Organisational Structure & design Impact of technology on Organisation design & development Role of Ethics in organisation growth Social responsibility – Organisational obligation Summary & Review Questions.New York: John Wiley • Towers Brian.Delhi: Macmillan • Sikula.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. class presentation by groups of students. 2004. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Griffin & Moore. Oxford University Press. New Delhi • Udai Pareek. 2001. Prentice Hall of India. The Practice of Management. Case Studies. Organizational Behaviour. • Nirmal Singh. Dewey Johnson Management of Organisational Behaviour. Interactive sessions. Management games. P. 2001. Learning Methods: Tutorials. New Delhi • Drunker. managing stress.

AS. MIBOM 20301 Credit Units: 03 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Significance of POM in business POM model and its elements Scope of POM History of POM. categories Product design and development Commercial production and launch Support and up-gradation Case discussion Module IV: Processes and Technology Types of productive systems Types of production processes Comparison of production processes Case discussion Module V: Forecasting Significance of forecasting for operations management Forecasting techniques Mathematical models and their practical applications Forecasting errors. and continuously improving the quality of the final product. adopting efficient work methods. SPC and practical applications Case discussion Module VIII: Performance improvement in operations Latest techniques in operations management Just-In-Time technique Ergonomics and work study Case discussion . This course is based on a foundation in the theories and practice of management in businesses where operations and supply chain management are critical to success. types. SQC. These include product and process design. choosing appropriate technology. streamlining the flow of people and materials. Laws of forecasting and how they affect operations Module VI: Planning and Scheduling Operations Planning and Scheduling Long range and aggregate output planning Master production schedules Functional planning and production control Operations scheduling Case discussion Module VII: Quality Management Quality management SQT. planning (including location and facilities layout).OPERATIONS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: Operations and Supply chain are an integral contributor to an organisation’s top and bottom line success. Module II: Competitive Advantage through operations management Competitive Advantage through POM Critical factors for gaining competitive advantage Operations models Operations strategy Case discussion Module III: Product Product – levels. in order to create internal and external customer value.

Production and Operations Management. Taylor. Neale. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Norman Gaither & Greg Frazier. customer service management Procurement. Cases are also to be analyzed. 2007 • Roberta (Robin) Russell and Bernard W. 2007 • Roberta (Robin) Russell and Bernard W. 2005. Manufacturing Operations and Supply Chain Management: The LEAN Approach. Prentice Hall of India • Cecil Bozarth and Robert B. Hau L. Harrison. returns management Learning Methods: Tutorials. 2005 • Sunil Chopra and Peter Meindl. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Elements of supply chain management systems Demand management. Taylor and David Brunt. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. self study sessions. Lee. Handbook of Global Supply Chain Management. Interactive sessions. and John J. 2005. Myers.Thomson . Case studies. Handfield. Taylor.Module IX: Operations Management in the Indian context Implementation of operations management techniques by Indian companies Case discussion Module X: Supply Chain Management Operations capacity Capacity measures Capacity planning process Evaluation of alternatives for capacity expansion Module XI: Site Location and Layout Planning Factors affecting site location decisions Evaluation of site location options Objectives of layout planning Types of layouts Designing of layouts Module XII: Supply Chain Management Basic Concepts Characteristics of business partners of a supply chain. Loose Leaf. Field visits. Management games. Operations Management: Creating value along the Supply Chain. 2006 C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . 2000 • John Tom Mentzer. supplier relationship management Physical distribution management. Supply Chain Management: Strategy. 2000 • David L. Weekend experience in companies . South Western References: • E Adam and Ronald J Ebert. class presentation by groups of students. Outsourcing. The Practice of Supply Chain Management: Where theory and application converge (International Series in Operations Research & Management Science). and Theodore P.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Matthew B. Extensive research projects. Operations Management: Creating value along the Supply Chain. Seminars. 6th Edition . Operations Management . Planning and Operations. 2008 • Terry P. Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management 2nd Edition.

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION . 9/e. Thomson Understanding Human Communication. Thomson Business Communication. Adler R Oxford . Oxford Business Communication for Managers: An Advanced Approach.’ This course is designed to enable the young Amitian to decipher the relevance of Kinesics. Penrose. Raman – Prakash.verbal communication Kinesics Proxemics Paralanguage and visible code Module II: Speaking Skills Pronunciation drills (Neutralizing regional pulls) Conversational English Guidelines to an effective presentation Module III: Interviews and GDs Examination scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • • • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Business Communication. Proxemics and Para Language that cater to the fundamental requirements of effective business presentations and speeches. MIBBS 20301 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Non.Verbal Communication Principles of non. Krizan.III Course Code: Course Objective: ‘Actions speak louder than words.’ Every business communicator needs to understand the nuances of ‘body language and voice.

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE - III (LEADING THROUGH TEAMS)
Course Code: Course Objective:
This course aims to enable students to: Understand the concept and building of teams Manage conflict and stress within team Facilitate better team management and organizational effectiveness through universal human values.

MIBBS 203012

Credit Units: 01

Course Contents:
Module I: Teams: An Overview Team Design Features: team vs. group Effective Team Mission and Vision Life Cycle of a Project Team Rationale of a Team, Goal Analysis and Team Roles Module II: Team & Sociometry Patterns of Interaction in a Team Sociometry: Method of studying attractions and repulsions in groups Construction of sociogram for studying interpersonal relations in a Team Module III: Team Building Types and Development of Team Building Stages of team growth Team performance curve Profiling your Team: Internal & External Dynamics Team Strategies for organizational vision Team communication Module IV: Team Leadership & Conflict Management Leadership styles in organizations Self Authorized team leadership Causes of team conflict Conflict management strategies Stress and Coping in teams Module V: Global Teams and Universal Values Management by values Pragmatic spirituality in life and organization Building global teams through universal human values Learning based on project work on Scriptures like Ramayana, Mahabharata, Gita etc. Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer

Examination Scheme Components Weightage (%) Text & References:

J 30

V1 30

A 5

CT 10

C1 10

C2 10

V2 5

Organizational Behaviour, Davis, K. • Hoover, Judhith D. Effective Small Group and Team Communication, 2002,Harcourt College Publishers • LaFasto and Larson: When Teams Work Best, 2001, Response Books (Sage), New Delhi • Dick, Mc Cann & Margerison, Charles: Team Management, 1992 Edition, viva books

• •

J William Pfeiffer (ed.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science, Vol 2, Group (1996); Pfeiffer & Company Smither Robert D.; The Psychology of Work and Human Performance, 1994, Harper Collins College Publishers

FRENCH - III
Course Code: Course Objective:
To furnish linguistic tools • to talk about work and problems related to work • to perform simple communicative tasks (explaining a set back, asking for a postponement of appointment, give instructions, place orders, reserve) • to master the current social communication skills • oral (dialogue, telephone conversation) • Written (e-mails, reply to messages)

MIBFR 20301

Credit Units: 02

Course Contents:
Unité 5, 6: pp. 74 to 104 Contenu lexical: Unité 5: Travail 1. manger au restaurant, comprendre un menu, commander 2. engager une conversation téléphonique 3. parler de sa formation, de son expérience, de ses compétences 4. Raconter des événements passes 5. consulter sa boite e-mails, répondre aux messages Unité 6: Problèmes 1. identifier un problème, demander des précisions 2. expliquer un contretemps, déplacer un rendez-vous 3. demander de l’aide (par téléphone, par e-mail) 4. donner des instructions 5. expliquer un problème, suggérer une solution Contenu grammatical: 1. futur proche, articles partitifs, un peu de, beaucoup de, une bouteille de, un morceau de… 2. pronoms COD, venir de + infinitif, verbes appeler (au présent) 3. passé composé avec avoir, affirmatif et interrogatif, savoir et connaître 4. passé composé avec être, accord du participe passé, négation 5. pronoms COI, être en train de 6. ne…rien, ne…personne, ne…plus, ne…pas encore, qu’est-ce que/ qu’est-ce qui/qui est-ce que/qui est-ce qui 7. passé composé des verbes pronominaux 8. si/quand+présent, ne…plus, ne …pas encore 9. impératif présent (2) place du pronom et verbes pronominaux 10. trop/pas assez, verbe devoir au conditionnel présent

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%)

C 20

P 20

V 10

Q 5

A 5

CT 40

Text & References:
le livre à suivre : Français.Com (Débutant)

1. 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al. A telephone conversation Module VII: Directions Names of the directions Asking and telling the directions with the help of a roadmap Module VIII: Conjunctions To assimilate the knowledge of the conjunctions learnt indirectly so far Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • • • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 • • Wolfgang Hieber. Lernziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler. political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany MIBGR 20301 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Modal verbs Modal verbs with conjugations and usage Imparting the finer nuances of the language Module II: Information about Germany (ongoing) Information about Germany in the form of presentations or “Referat”– neighbors. Tangram Aktuell A1/1. Module III: Dative case Dative case. Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach. comparison with accusative case Dative case with the relevant articles Introduction to 3 different kinds of sentences – nominative. accusative and dative Module IV: Dative personal pronouns Nominative. states and capitals.GERMAN . Nieder. Grundkurs .III Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to converse. To give the students an insight into the culture. read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar. Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A. accusative and dative pronouns in comparison Module V: Dative prepositions Dative preposition with their usage both theoretical and figurative use Module VI: Dialogues In the Restaurant. and also a few other topics related to Germany. Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P. Deutsch Interessant . which will later help them to strengthen their language. important cities and towns and characteristic features of the same. geography.L Aneja. Schmöe.2 Braun. At the Tourist Information Office.

Ir…. How to ask for directions (using estar) Introduction to IR + A + INFINITIVE FORM OF A VERB Module IV Simple conversation with help of texts and vocabulary En el restaurante En el instituto En el aeropuerto Module V Reflexives Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Español. English-Spanish. Revision of Gustar and usage of it Module III Translation of Spanish-English. MIBSH 20301 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Revision of earlier semester modules Set expressions (idiomatic expressions) with the verb Tener. Weather Module II Introduction to Gustar…and all its forms. En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras -Nivel Elemental .SPANISH – III Course Code: Course Objective: To enable students acquire knowledge of the Set/definite expressions (idiomatic expressions) in Spanish language and to handle some Spanish situations with ease. Poner. Practice sentences.

Learning Outcome   Students can speak the language and can describe themselves and situations effectively They also gain great knowledge in terms of Japanese lifestyle and culture. audio-aids. Note: The Japanese script is introduced in this semester. possess. Module V: Comparison Comparative and Superlative degree Module VI: Wishes and desires Expressing desire to buy. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Teach yourself Japanese References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1 C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 .III Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic verbs and to express themselves effectively and narrate their everyday short encounters. MIBJP 20301 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Verbs Different forms of verbs: present continuos verbs etc Module II More Adverbs and adverbial expressions Module III: Counters Learning to count different shaped objects. Superlative degree. and self-do assignments. Module VII: Appointment Over phone. Module IV: Tenses Past tense. formal and informal etc. Use of library. visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm. Comparative degree. hold. Usage in negative sentences as well.JAPANESE . Students are also given projects on Japan and Japanese culture to widen their horizon further. which help them at the time of placements. Methods of Private study /Self help   Handouts. Past continuous tense.

cold. by airplane. use of to enter to exit Structural particle “de” (Compliment of degree). by boat. stomach ache. on the bike. Young-Old. inside. Bus. head ache. Clean-Dirty. boat. the language of Mainland China. mei nian etc. etc.g. top. What game do you like? Difference between “hii” and “neng”. outside. Talking about studies and classmates Use of “it doesn’t matter” Enquiring about a student. Comprehension reading followed by questions. Going to the Park. . right. by train. train. Character writing and stroke order Module II Measure words Position words e. . Use of the modal particle “le” Making a telephone call Use of “jiu” and “cal” (Grammar portion) Automobiles e. But the system runs into a problem because the underlying name of personal name is often obscure so they are almost always transcribed according to their pronciation alone. xibian. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person.g. Directional words – beibian. Grammar: Negation of a sentence with a verbal predicate. Old-New. dongbian. Description about class schedule during a week in school. Little-More. the emphasis is on the meaning rather than the sound. Module V Persuasion-Please don’t smoke. Boy-Girl. MIBCE 20301 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Drills Dialogue practice Observe picture and answer the question. behind. BigSmall. Not feeling well words e. fever. Easy-Difficult. nanbian. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. middle. zhongjian. bike etc. by bus.. Please speak slowly Praise – This pictorial is very beautiful Opposites e. Introduction of written characters. Our school and its different building locations. Module IV The ordinal number “di” “Mei” the demonstrative pronoun e.g. Black-White.g. “keyi”. side. Slow-Fast … etc.g. mei tian. Grammar use of “li” and “cong”. Practice reading aloud Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes. left. straight. Module III Changing affirmative sentences to negative ones and vice versa Human body parts. Traveling. in front.CHINESE – III Course Code: Course Objective: Foreign words are usually imported by translating the concept into Chinese. car. description about study method. bottom.

Part-2” Lesson 21-30 .Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I.

Entire effort in internship is in terms of extending the program of education and evaluation beyond the classroom of a university or institution. there is no layout prescribed by the organization the following components should be included in the report:  Title or Cover Page The title page should contain Project Title. Introduction – Short. 1. not too descriptive but fully informative. professional judgment and decision making ability. It is incomplete without student’s signature. 4. graphs and other information related to your Internship experience. brochures. Acknowledgements Acknowledgment to any advisory or financial assistance received in the course of work may be given. INTERNSHIP FILE The Internship File aims to encourage students to keep a personal record of their learning and achievements throughout the Programme. The educational process in the internship course seeks out and focuses attention on many latent attributes. It can be used as the basis for lifelong learning and for job applications. on-the-job experience working with successful professionals and experts in the field. First paragraph should state what was accomplished with regard to the objectives. buildings and co-workers. a personal review of the student’s management skills and how they have been developed through the programme. 3. date started and completed. In case. In order to achieve these objectives. major projects contributed to. charts. forms. issues discussed with the students. The internship programme can best be described as an attempt to institutionalize efforts to bridge the gap between the professional world and the academic institutions. sense of responsibility etc. inter-disciplinary approach. Items can be drawn from activities completed in the course modules and from the workplace to demonstrate learning and personal development. The File will assess the student’s analytical skills and ability to present supportive evidence. Student’s Name. skills for data handling. The File will include five sections in the order described below. The lay out of the report should be as per the standard layout prescribed by the organization wherein the student undertakes the Internship. meetings attended and their purposes. Main Body – Should include a brief summary/ executive summary of the Internship Project Report that the student has worked on. Year and Semester and Name of the Faculty Guide. doubts if any clarified and signed as having done so. The abstract does not have to be an entire   . name of the Supervisor/Guide and his/her designation. its needs and his/her own personal contribution to the organization. 5. Table of Content – An outline of the contents of the file by topics and subtopics with the page number and location of each section. Abstract A good "Abstract" should be straight to the point. These attributes are intellectual ability.SUMMER INTERNSHIP Course Code: MIBSI 20350 Credit Units: 09 There are certain phases of every Intern’s professional development that cannot be effectively taught in the academic environment. an analysis of the company/organization in which the student is working. This will form the basis of continuous evaluation of the project. he has to select any one aspect of the organization and prepare a research report on it). 2. technical and descriptive literature. which do not surface in the normal class room situations. ability in written and oral presentation. INTERNSHIP REPORT The Internship Report is the research report that the student has to prepare on the project assigned by the organization. name of internship organization. The File is essentially a comprehensive documentation of how one proceeds while working on the assignment and should be regularly checked by the faculty guide/ supervisor. Appendices – Include pamphlets. each student will maintain and submit a file (Internship File) and a report (Internship Report). These facets can only be learned through direct. The Title Page – An Internship Experience Report the Students’ Name. (Incase a student is not assigned a specific research project in the organization. the daily tasks performed. observations and feelings. dates and hours spent on a task. listing of tools and materials and their suppliers. but should include how and why the student obtained the internship experience position and the relationship it has to their academic/professional and career goals. and photographs if possible of projects. Programme. whilst demonstrating understanding of their organization. and number of credits for which the report is submitted.

Introduction Here a brief introduction to the problem that is central to the project and an outline of the structure of the rest of the report should be provided. Examples For research article Voravuthikunchai SP. While presenting the results. it should lead to generalization of data on the chosen sample. 8 (suppl 1): 116–117.     Conclusion(s) & Recommendations A conclusion should be the final section in which the outcome of the work is mentioned briefly. It includes organization site(s).summary of the project. Clin Microbiol Infect . Lortheeranuwat A. but rather a concise summary of the scope and results of the project. all figures and tables should as far as possible be next to the associated text. if they are. The titles of journals preferably should not be abbreviated. Usually one should not use more than two researches in either case of supporing or contradicting the present case of research. books etc. Supawita T. referred to in the body of the report. so excessive details should be avoided. Ninrprom T. In writing this section. Appendices The Appendices contain material which is of interest to the reader but not an integral part of the thesis and any problem that have arisen that may be useful to document for future reference. numbered. abbreviations must comply with an internationally recognised system. sample. emphasis should be laid on what has been performed and achieved in the course of the work. All major equations should also be numbered and unless it is really necessary. instruments used with its validation. Results and Discussion Present results. materials used (wherever applicable). discuss and compare these with those from other workers. procedures followed and precautions. do not write in “point” form. This data interpretation should be in congruence with the written objectives and the inferences should be drawn on data and not on impression. (2002) Antibacterial activity of Thai medicinal plants against enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: H7. in the same orientation as the main text. References References should include papers.  Table of Contents Titles and subtitles are to correspond exactly with those in the text. Results and its discussion should be supporting/contradicting with the previous research work in the given area. The students should check that their work answers the following questions: • Did the research project meet its aims (check back to introduction for stated aims)? • What are the main findings of the research? • Are there any recommendations? • Are there any conclusion on the research process itself?  Implications for Future Research This should bring out further prospects for the study either thrown open by the present work or with the purpose of making it more comprehensive. The result interpretation should be simple but full of data and statistical analysis. if any. Popaya W. It should not exceed more than 1000 words. write at length about the the various statistical tools used in the data interpretation. Pongpaichit S. An opening and closing paragraph in every chapter could be included to aid in smooth flow. The introduction should aim to catch the imagination of the reader. Methodology should be mentioned in details including modifications undertaken. Avoid abrupt changes in contents from section to section and maintain a lucid flow throughout the thesis. etc. Materials and Methods This section should aim at experimental designs.   . and given appropriate titles or captions. It is to be noted that in writing the various secions. Avoid writing straight forward conclusion rather. These should be written in the alphabetical order of the author's surname. rather than discuss in detail what is readily available in text books.

Methodology 3. Knowledge/ Comprehension of the problem/ issue & critical Discussion of relevant literature 4. H.M. Internship proposal L. Nutman IBP). G.5 • Top and bottom margins: 1 inch/ 2. E. SYMBIOTIC NITROGEN FIXATION PLANTS (editor P. 7: 63-67 The Layout Guidelines for the Internship File & Internship Report: • A4 size Paper • Font: Arial (10 points) or Times New Roman (12 points) • Line spacing: 1.For book Kowalski. Diary Faculty/ Student Contact Background Research & Preparation for Case Study Final Case Study Synopsis Application & Understanding of SPSS Enhancement of Presentation Skills Report Writing Skills and Upgradation of Techniques of Research Methodology Total K. Presentation & Organization B. Mid Term & Final Evaluation (Including invitation for corporate Meet) M.25 inches/ 3 cm Examination Scheme: A.(1976) Transduction of effectiveness in Rhizobium meliloti. D. Introduction / Objectives 2. Conclusions / Recommendations. Questionnaires Total GRAND TOTAL 10 15 05 15 10 20 15 30 120 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 20 90 10 10 20 40 250 . J. Analysis of Issues & Problems 5. I.S. left and right margins: 1. Future Implications 7.5 cm. F. Data handling 6. Presentation & Viva Total C. Internship Report (Research/ Problem based) 1.

PRODUCT AND BRAND MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The main objective of the course is to make the students learn and conceptualize the entire gamut of developing new products. improving the existing products and managing the performance of product items and product line(s) as a whole to maximize the company’s profit. The course also gives students the insight of process involved in branding decisions and strategies for growth of brands. Screening And Development of New Product Ideas Innovation and the new product development process Generation of new product ideas Sources of new product ideas Methods of generating new product ideas Screening of new product ideas Criteria for screening new product ideas Development of new product ideas Module V: Economic Analysis Evaluation of New Product ideas/concepts Purpose of Economic Analysis Market Potential Market Demand . MIBMK 20301 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues and concepts of products and brands Evaluate product and brand strategies and make suitable recommendations Conceptualize suitable marketing decisions for product mix and product lines Course Contents: Module I: The Product Management Process The Product Management Function Product Management Decisions What is a Product Portfolio? Drawbacks of the Product Portfolio Approach Product Management Basics Defining competitive set Category Attractiveness Analysis Competitor Analysis Customer Analysis Module II: The Product Planning System The Traditional Approaches to Product Planning A Matrix Approach to Product Planning Product Evaluation Matrix in a Nutshell PLC as an aid to Product Planning PLC as a Tool to Plan Market Share Strategies Product Strategy over Life Cycle Module III: Diffusion of Innovation The adoption Process Classification of Adopters Diffusion of Consumer Innovations Diffusion of Industrial Innovations Module IV: Generation.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Brand Extension. Extensive research projects. Sales and Profits Break-Even Analysis Return on Investment Economic Analysis Summary Form Module VI: Test Marketing and New Product Launch Purposes of Test Market Test Marketing Strategies Simulated Test Marketing New Product Launch – the Marketing Plan Defining and Selecting the Target Market Product Strategy and Product Positioning Pricing the New Product Advertising the New Product Module VII: Packaging Decisions Importance of Packaging in Marketing Packaging Strategies Legal Aspects of Packaging Cost Effectiveness of Packaging Social Aspects of Packaging Module VIII: Branding and Brand Positioning Branding Consumer Based Brand Equity [CBBE] What is brand equity? CBBE: Keller’s Model Aaker’s BE Model Brand Identity Elements Brand identity prism Meaning of Brand identity Need for Identity Dimensions of brand identity Brand identity prism Brand ExtensionMeaning. Needs. Case studies. Examination Scheme: Components C1 V A CT EE .Estimating Sales Sales Forecasting Methodologies Estimating Costs. Management games. class presentation by groups of students. Field visits. Cases are also to be analyzed. Seminars. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Interactive sessions. Weekend experience in companies . Types. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. self study sessions. Brand architecture Brand Hierarchy Designing Branding Strategy Brand Valuation Brand Valuation Methods Aaker’s Brand Equity 10 Interbrand Method Brand Name Selection Process Positioning of a Brand Repositioning the Competition Module IX: Marketing Integrated Communication Process The Role of Marketing Communication Concept of Marketing Communication\ The Occurrence of Marketing Communication The Sources of Misunderstanding in Communication Elements of the Promotion Mix Learning Methods: Tutorials.

2003 • Panwar. Beyond consumer marketing . • Kapoor. 2002 • Matt. Jagdeep. 2004 • Keller. Jaico Enterprises. Response books. Steve. London. New Delhi. 2005. New Delhi. Brand switch. Pearson Education. Jaico Publishing House. Brand Failures. 12th edition. 2003 • Minett. Kevin Lane. 1st Edition References: • Kotler Philip. Stratigic brand management building. 2002. Mumbai. H. Marketing Management – Thompson Press(I) Ltd.Weightage (%) Text & References: 10 5 5 10 70 Text: • Morse Stephen. ORV. 1st Edition • Kapoor Jagdeep. Handbook of Successful Product Management. Jaico Publishing House. Mumbai. 2003. Prentice Hall. Kogan Page. 2004 • Owens. Jaico Enterprises. Brand Switch.100 Branding Mistakes of all The Time. 2003. The psychology of relationship selling. B2B marketing : A radically different approach. J S. UK .

People: Role of employee. Marketing segmentation basis. Marketing mix Educational Services The concept: Justification of marketing Educational services. Users of the above services. Media choice and selection. Users of the above services. Promotion mix. Segmentation and targeting. Retention strategies. Customer perceptions and physical evidence. Managing the promotional effort. Marketing mix Consultancy Services . Customer perception: Influencing factors. Users of the above services. Market segmentation. Service design and positioning Module IV: Financial Services Marketing – an introduction Special characteristics of financial services marketing. Non. Marketing segmentation basis. Pricing: Pricing the service. Users of the above services. pricing issues for services. Module III: Customer expectations of the service Levels. Promotional message. Corporate image. Non-financial services rules and regulation. Life cycle concept. Marketing segmentation basis. Marketing Information system. Corporate identity. Marketing mix Hospitality Services The concept: Justification of marketing hospitality services. Financial services marketing mix Bank Marketing. Marketing segmentation basis. Organisational objectives and pricing policy Promotion and communication: Internal/ external communication process. Strategies. The concept: Justification of marketing banking services. Marketing and competitive environment. Understanding perception through Marketing Research Building Customer Relations: Relationship Marketing. Training and development Process and physical evidence.MARKETING OF SERVICES Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to differentiate services from tangible products and to make the students understand the complexities of handling intangibles. Users of the above services. Why Marketing of Services? The behavioural profile of users. Marketing mix Module V: Non Financial Services Marketing – an introduction Special characteristics of Non-financial services marketing. Marketing segmentation basis.financial services marketing mix Bank Marketing. related issues. Influencing factors. Positioning of services. Marketing and competitive environment. Staff selection and recruitment. A comparative analysis. Process and technological development. Marketing mix Hospital Services The concept: Justification of marketing hospital services. It also aims to sensitize the students on strategic areas needing special attention in effective marketing of services and to explain service quality management and related challenges in service management MIBMK 20302 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the aspects of services marketing Course Contents: Module I: Foundation of Services Marketing Introduction-services. Financial services rules and regulation. Module II: Detailed aspects of services marketing Marketing Mix of Services – an Introduction: Service attributes. Salient features of marketing services. The concept: Justification of marketing banking services.

Stephen J. Services Marketing. 101 Marketing Strategies for Accounting. Weekend experience in companies . 2008 • Christopher Lovelock and Jochen Wirtz. Marketing The Professional Services Firm: Applying the principles and the Science of Marketing to the Professions. The Financial Services Marketing Handbook: Tactics and techniques that produce results. 5th Edition • Valarie A. 2002 • Laurie Young. Management games. and Joby John. 2002 • Raymond P. Bloom. class presentation by groups of students.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. and Paul N. Seminars. and Professional Services Firms.Revised. Mary Jo Bitner. Marketing Professional Services . 2006 • By Philip Kotler. self study sessions. 2002. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Law. 2002. Marketing your Services : For people who hate to sell. Interactive sessions. Fisk. Cases are also to be analyzed. Marketing segmentation basis. Services Marketing. 2007. • Evelyn Ehrlich and Duke Fanelli. Thomas Hayes. Extensive research projects. 2004 . Prentice Hall. Zeithaml. Services Marketing. 3rd Edition References: • Christopher Lovelock. Tata McGraw Hill. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Valerie Zeithaml & Mary Jo Bitner. Consulting. And Dwayne D. Gremler. Grove. Marketing mix Learning Methods: Tutorials. 2004 • Rick Crandall. Interactive Services Marketing Third Edition. 6th Edition. Field visits. Case studies. Services Marketing.The concept: Justification of marketing consultancy services. 2005 • Troy Waugh. Users of the above services.

split up. Takeover Code Module V: Defensive Strategies Defensive actions on takeover bids Module VI: Merchant Banking and M&A Role of Merchant Bankers in Mergers & Acquisition Module VII: M&A Models and Theories Valuation Models on Merger & Acquisition: (a) DCF Model. the potential sources of value creation. LBO. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. ACQUISITIONS AND RE-STRUCTURING Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to make students learn how to analyze the mechanisms underlying the creation (and destruction) of value in mergers. premium & Taxation aspects 72A. They will also study some instances of corporate restructuring. Interactive sessions. Congolmerate. MBO. Weekend experience in companies . . spin off. (c) Book Value. (d) Adjusted Book value (e) Three Stage growth model. HLL Restructuring. class presentation by groups of students. MTNL Module II: Introduction to Acts and policies Merger & Acquisition and Amalgamation as per AS-14. acquisition. types of merger. Module III: De-mergers and Reverse Mergers De-merger. International Cases: AOL & Time Warner Learning Methods: Tutorials. Reverse Merger (L & T-Grasim). Vertical. Bill 2002 Horizontal. OBC-GTB. demerger. competition. tax advantages of demerger.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. (b) Public Enterprises. and again. whether they are driven by strategic considerations of external pressures. Case studies. The students will learn to examine the reasons to acquire. risks and challenges. Valuation Practices in India. Module IV: Role of SEBI SEBI regulations on Merger & Acquisition. Field visits. MIBFN 20302 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues and concepts of mergers and acquisitions Understand the major strategies that underlie most M&A transactions Examine the necessary conditions for value to be created Assess various case studies to analyse valuation strategies. risks and pitfalls of the approach. Tax Benefit of Merger & Acquisition. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Course Contents: Module I: Basics of Mergers and Acquisition Corporate Restructuring-objectives of merger. BSNL. choice of target and recognition of the anticipated challenges. Management games. Seminars. acquisitions and corporate restructuring. Module X: Post Merger Analysis Success and failure of Merger & Acquisition. Module VIII: Ratio Analysis and Valuation Strategies Swap Ratio. Case studies on Tata Tetley. self study sessions. 2(140. pre and post merger issues and challenges.MERGERS. Extensive research projects. Case Study-Tata Tetley Module IX: Taxation Aspects in M&A Treatment of goodwill. Cases are also to be analyzed.

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Rajeshwer C H.New Perspectives ICFAI Press References: • www.indiataxes.gov.in • www.incometaxindia. 2004.com C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . Merger and Acquisition .

Computation under this head Module III Setting off of losses inter heads of income and carry forward of losses to next year. rebate u/s 88. Income under the head of profit and gain of business & profession Chargeability of income under the head profit and gain of business and profession. total income. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Field visits. Tax planning in respect of residential status Concepts: Tax planning. concept of deemed ownership. standard deduction. provision of advance tax. Filing of return. corporation tax and capital gains tax for individuals and businesses. provident fund. Interactive sessions. entertainment allowance. MIBFN 20303 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Understand the Indian tax environment and types of taxation therein Compute income and tax under the specifies heads in the Indian corporate tax system Develop the ability to file returns and meet the legal norms and procedures. class presentation by groups of students. types of companies. Weekend experience in companies . 88c. tax deducted at source. net taxable income. Course Contents: Module I: Basic term and concept Person.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Minimum alternate tax. Value added tax.88b. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Deduction under sec 80CCC to 80U. taxation of companies. carry forward and set off of losses. Deduction. transaction not considered as transfer. and tax payable in case of individual and company. assessment procedure. Seminars. The unit covers Income tax. maintenance of accounts by certain person carrying out business and profession. essential condition for taxing income under this head.CORPORATE TAX PLANNING Course Code: Course Objective: In this unit students will learn about tax provisions for both individuals and limited companies. Extensive research projects. Cases are also to be analyzed. encashment of leave. Case studies. amount not deductible. treatment of gratuity. compulsory audit of accounts. perquisites. They will learn how to calculate taxable income and tax payable taking account of all types of Income and relevant expenditure and any appropriate tax-free allowances. Income under the head capital gain Basis of charge. rate of taxes. deduction from annual value. meaning of salary. assessment year. assessee. taxation authorities. type of capital asset. Tax planning v tax management Module II: Income under the head salary Employer–employee relationship. Tax planning with respect to companies. pension. basis of charge. . Computation of capital gain Income under the head income from other sources Chargeability. Module V Computation of total income. Management games. expenses deductible. scope of total income and residential status& income exempt from tax. residential status and tax incidence. tax evasion. Learning Methods: Tutorials. self study sessions. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . allowance. previous year. profit in lieu of salary. Tax planning with respect to salaries Income under the head house property Basis of charge. determination of annual value. tax avoidance. leave travel concession. income. Module IV Corporate tax in India. Tax avoidance v tax evasion.

Bharat Law House 2007 • Girish Ahuja and Ravi Gupta Corporate Tax Planning & Management. Income Tax Rules. S. 2003 • R. Bharat Law House 2007 • Taxmann's statutory manual for chartered accountants. Strategic Corporate Tax Planning. Taxmann. 2007 • Ready Recknor Taxmann. 2. 2003 • Ghosh. No.Text & References: Text: • Singhania V K. advocates. Direct Taxes Planning and Management. 2003 Cumulative Supplement. Swenson. Corporate Tax Planning. Charles W. 2007. Girish Corporate Tax Planning & Management Bharat Law House 2007 • Girish Ahuja and Ravi Gupta Corporate Tax Planning & Management Bharat Law House 2007 • John E. 6th Ed.. Girish Corporate Tax Planning & Management.K. 2006 • George Brode. 2007. company secretaries. 1. 2007 • Rajeev Puri. Tax Planning for Corporate Tax Planning for Corporate Acquisitions. 2002 • Kaushal Kumar Agrawal. cost and works accountants. . & Saha.New Delhi: Taxmann.. 2007 . • Ahuja. Neff. R. and Joseph W. Corporate tax planning. Vol. Corporate Tax Planning and Management. Karayan. Taxmann References: • Ahuja. Taxman ND 2007 • Singhania V K. Corporate Tax Planning Handbook. Kindle Edition. Lakhotia.N.

Management & Government in IR Conditions for good IR and cause of poor IR Introduction to Social Security. Case Studies. Future role of Trade unions in India Trade Union Act – 1926.INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS AND LABOUR LAWS Course Code: Course Objective: The main Purpose of this paper is to familiarize the participants with the various aspects of Industrial Relations and to inculcate in-depth knowledge on labour laws as well as Industrial relations as designed and enacted in India. Attitudes and Different Schools of thought Roles of Workers. Workmen’s Compensation act . legislations EPF and miscellaneous provisions act – 1952. Case Studies. key provisions of I. Understand Trade unionism and role of government. . Insight on various Labour laws and Industrial applets. Identify and analyse issues related to conflict negotiation Course Contents: Module I: Theory and Concepts of Industrial Relations IR – Theories. Module II: Trade Unions and Industrial Disputes Origin and Importance of Trade unions. Payment of Wages Act Contract Labour (Regulation & Abolition) act -1970 Summary & Review Questions. D act Summary & Review Questions. An insight about the systems in case of employer – employee disputes is also given for the students understanding. Payment of Gratuity act . Module V: Employee discipline and workers participation Importance of discipline & disciplinary actions (Process and limitations) Handling indiscipline – Management’s options Objectives and forms of workers participation in Management Forums of Participation and how to make WPM effective in India? Summary & Review Questions. Forms of Unrest & Effect of strikes Changing Public Perception of Trade unions. impact on employee relations Summary & Review Questions. Module IV: Grievance Management Types. Module III: Collective Bargaining Nature and advantages of collective bargaining Negotiation of Agreement and Implementation of agreement Renewal and revision of agreement Current Collective Bargaining trends and reasons for failure of CB in India Summary & Review Questions. Case Studies. MIBHR 20302 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues in Industrial Relations and Labour Law. Module VI: Labour Legislation Scope and significance of social security. Case Studies. Causes and Effects of grievances Model grievance redressal in India & Procedure Handling a grievance & Enforcing Grievance resolution methodology Collecting & Analysing Grievance data Summary & Review Questions. Case Studies. Case Studies. Industrial Dispute Act – 1947 Machinery for settlement of industrial disputes.1923 Maternity Benefits act – 1961.1972 ESI act – 1948.

discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. 2006 • Sen. Industrial Relations in Indian Enterprise. 2000 • Soundarapandian. David. Industrial Relations. Vikas Publication House. New Delhi • Mamoria. Dynamics of Industrial Relations in India. • R. self study sessions. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Monappa Arun 1989. migration & labour market adjust. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. New Delhi. Industrial relation in India: Shifting Paradigms. Seminars. Excel Books. trade. New Delhi. C.S. • Aswathappa. Personnel Management. investment. Ratna. New Delhi • Handerson. RBSA Publishers. B. 2005 • Venkataratnam. Pearsoneducation. Managing Human Resource: Industrial relation. class presentation by groups of students. Human resources and personnel management . New Century. New Delhi. Galgotia Publication. New Delhi. Managing HR. Macmillan Publication. Industrial Relations. Globalization and Labour Management Relations. Compensation Management & Knowledge Based World.New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill . Himalaya Publishing House. R. Galgotia. Cases are also to be analyzed. Industrial Relations.Learning Methods: Tutorials. 4th Rev. Jaipur.. Hampshire References: • Flippo. Weekend experience in companies . New Delhi. 2004 • Srivastava.C. 2004. Richard I. Mahendra. Ed. Management games. 2002. B... Extensive research projects. S. Industrial Relations & Labour Laws. 1997 • Raj. K. 2005 • Tiwari. Response Books.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. 2003 • Joseph. Tata Mc Graw Hill. Rural Labour Market. 2001. Ed. 2005 • Greenaway. 2000. M. Industrial relations in India. Palgrave Macmillan. Interactive sessions. Serials Publications. C. New Delhi. Jerome. Field visits. Response Books. E. 2005 • Arora. Tata Mc Graw Hill. Mondal. S. New delhi. Aparna.S. new Delhi. Case studies. Dwiwedi. Mechanism in perspective of Industrial Relations. 9th. 2005 • Diwedi. Delhi.

Seminars. technologies and various approaches with reference to globalisation and also to provoke critical thinking about various principles. Module IV: Linking wages with performance Performance criteria & Choices Objectives & scope of linking wages with performance Types of performance based compensation schemes. class presentation by groups of students. Reaching out the Global Customer Adaptations of change in organisation Learning and preparing for the change Consulting approaches and skills Summary & Review Questions. international perspective Designing performance based compensation schemes Summary & Review Questions. Learning Methods: Tutorials. Case Studies. Case Studies. Understand the factors of globalisation. guidelines and mechanisms adopted in this science. challenging and globally oriented. MIBHR 20303 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: Identify the key issues of Compensation and Change management. Case Studies. and importance of Job evaluation Concepts of Job Description and specification Principles and Methods of Job evaluation Internal & External equity. Field visits.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Module V: Change Management Global Organisation.MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE AND COMPENSATION MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The main Purpose of this paper is to familiarize the participants with the various aspects of Change Management. Interactive sessions. The course discusses meaning. Module II: Management – Job Evaluation Nature. bonus. compensation mechanism and changes Course Contents: Module I: Overview of Compensation Management Nature. Scope. This course will provide the students with an integrated and practical approach to understand the basic concepts of Change in Management. Module III: Pay and benefits Principles of reward strategy. Weekend experience in companies . with a view that conducting business is exciting. self study sessions. developing and designing salary structures Pre requisites for salary fixation. Management games. Case studies. effect on compensation and related changes Impact of changing trends in evaluation of job. Scope and wage concepts Principles & Machinery for wage determination Management Thinkers & critical evaluation Acts related to Compensation management Summary & Review Questions. Extensive research projects. incentives Monitory benefits as motivators – scope and process Social security and retirement benefits Summary & Review Questions. Case Studies. Job surveys Summary & Review Questions. importance and scope of Compensation Management. Importance & Objective of Compensation Management Philosophy. Each student is required to do the back . Case Studies. design and redesign of jobs Identify and analyse issues related to Job.

discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.. S C. Compensation Management in a Knowledge-Based World (9th Edition). New Delhi.ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. 2000 • Sen.. Ratna. P. 2005 C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . 4th Rev. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Richard I. Delhi. Pearson Education. Prentice Hall of India • C. Stephen. McGraw hill edition References: • Robbins. 2000. Mamoria. Industrial relation in India: shifting paradigms. Labour Management. J M. New Delhi. 2006 • Srivastava. Compensation Management in and knowledge based world. Discovery Publishing House.1996 • Handerson. Richard I. Personnel Management. 2004. Himalaya Publications • Dewan.9th. Industrial relations & labour laws. New Delhi. Cases are also to be analyzed. Henderson. Macmillan Publication. Organisation Behaviour. Vikas Publication House.

major features and functions. components & framework. Need for multidimensional analysis. extraction and usage of transformed data for various functional areas. 2004 References: • Data Warehousing in Real world. Development Phases. Marakas. Knowledge discovery process. various activities starting from design. 2002 . Data warehouses and data marts. MIBIT 20301 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Data Warehousing in Business Data Warehousing goals and objectives. Dimensional analysis Module IV: Data warehouses architecture Data warehouse architecture model. Process flow within a data warehouse. decision support systems. Various data mining techniques are examined to assess their relevance in respective areas of mining information. Snowflake Schema Module VI: OLAP in the Data Warehouse Data warehouse versus Operational systems. John Wiley & sons. Mining. operational versus Decision support systems. Failures of past Decision support systems. Sam Anahory and Dennis Murray. importance of Metadata. 2004 • George M. Major Data Mining Techniques. H. Dimensional Modeling Concepts . Paulraj Ponniah.Star Schema. 2005 • Building the Data Warehouse. and Visualization: Core Concepts. Module III: Data Warehousing Planning & requirements Key issues is planning data warehouse. Module VII: Data Mining Basics & techniques Data Mining definition. OLAP implementation considerations. The course also provides an insight into another related area that helps mines useful information from loads of data. Overview of components and metadata in the data warehouse. OLAP vs. Module V: Data warehouse design From requirements to data design. Data Mining Applications. John Wiley & Sons. and definition of data warehousing Module II: Data Warehouse: The building blocks Defining Features. Publisher: Prentice Hall. loading. Inmon. Warehousing as a viable solution.DATA WAREHOUSING AND DATA MINING Course Code: Course Objective: The objective of this course is to familiarize the students with the concepts of databases. data Warehouses and to provide an in-depth insight into their architectural types. data Mining. Learning Methods: Lectures Exercise for Practice Presentations for better understanding of concepts Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Data warehousing fundamentals. Addison Wesley. Modern Data Warehousing.2. W. OLAP models.

Business Data Communications and Networking – John Wiley & Sons. 2005. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Field visits. applications and managerial implications of data communication. goals & types Communication media Network Topologies Network Models. implications for management Wireless LANs WANs architecture Virtual Private Networks Internet – Concept. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • FitzGerald Jerry & Dennis Alan. Interactive sessions. 8th Edition . Case studies. Channel Capacity & bandwidth Computer networks. Extensive research projects. Seminars Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. implications for management Module IV: Mobile Communication GSM. Network Standards and Future Trends Module II: Network Architecture ISO OSI Model – its description & its drawbacks Protocols in OSI Reference Model TCP/IP Model & its drawbacks Comparison between OSI and TCP/IP Module III: Networking Technologies LANs – Importance. types. architecture & access technologies. Communications Channels. CDMA technologies and their pros and cons Module V: Network Security and Managerial Implications Need for Security. MIBIT 20302 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to Data Communications & Networks Data Communications networks & its components.definition. Management games. Components & IEEE 802. NETWORKING AND EMERGING COMPUTING ENVIRONMENTS Course Code: Course Objective: The objective of this course is to familiarize the students with the concepts.DATA COMMUNICATIONS.3 (Ethernet). networking and emerging computing environments. types of threats Emerging solutions Network Configuration and management Cost Management Implications for management Learning Methods: Tutorials. Cases are also to be analyzed.

HarleyThe internet complete reference.References: • Tanenbaum. Prentice Hall • Stamper. 3). Raymond R. Computer networks 4th ed. Business Data communications .Pearson Education • Comer.2ndPearson Education • Hahn. 3rd. Internetworking with TCP / IP: client server (vol. H M Internet & world wide web: how to program 3rd. Tata McGraw Hill • Panko. 2nd. Prentice Hall . 6th ed. David A. Andrews. Douglas E. Business Data communications and networking. Pearson Education • Deitel.

class presentation by groups of students. Case studies. and trends of Indian exports • Understand the factors effecting Indian international trade • Assess the status. Interactive sessions.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. MIBIB 20401 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Examine the past and present scenario. Extensive research projects. self study sessions. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Cases are also to be analyzed. Seminars. Field visits. Weekend experience in companies . to understand India’s Foreign Trade Policy and the Institutional mechanism for promoting exports from India.GROWTH PROSPECTS OF THRUST AREAS OF INDIAN EXPORTS Course Code: Course Objective: The course aims to develop an awareness of thrust products of India’s exports and to identify specific market for thrust products of India’s export. EPZs and SEZs in India’s Export Learning Methods: Tutorials. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: . Coffee and Spices Module III: Foreign Trade Policy-2004-09 Special Focus Initiatives General Provisions Regarding Imports and Exports Promotional Measures Duty Exemption / Remission Schemes Export Promotion Capital Goods Scheme Module IV: Study of Specific Markets USA: World biggest importer and Exporter EU: Single Largest market Focus LAC: Potential Market for Export from India Module V: Institutional Framework for Export Promotion of Thrust Sectors Role of EPCs and other Trade Promotion bodies is promoting Export from India Role of EoUs. Management games. potential. It will enable the students to understand prospects of India’s export in the background of multi lateral trading system & global competitors and to develop an ability to use trade information avail from various sources to analyze and prepare market potential reports. challenges and strategies for furthering exports in key thrust areas Course Contents: Module I: Introduction India’s International Trade-Present Scenario Trends in India’s Export Future outlook Module II: Focus on Specific Growth Sectors Gems and Jewellery Leather and Footwear Textiles Agriculture and Processed Food Sector Engineering/Automobile Sector Tea.

New Century.gov • www. 9th Centax Publication.cbi. India : foreign trade policy & W T O.com • www.org • www.cbi. • www.cgcc.in • Centre for Promotion of Imports from Developing Countries. Foreign trade policy and handbook of prodeduess 2006-07.hk • www.com • www..org.com • www. Vibha. R K.wcoomd.nic. Dikshit.fieo.comtrade.org • www. 2006 • Mathur. Wiley Authors:.com • www.org • www. Deep & Deep Publications.apeda. www.igep.com • www.org • www.customs.nic. 2001 • Jain.int • www. Anand. 2002. New Century Publications References: • Pratima.china. usiness Data pub.com • www. • Khurana.aepcindia. 2002 • Weiss Kenneth D.com • www.com • www.bisnetindia.worldbank..wto. Building an Import/Export Business.org.agmarknet.intracen.org • www.reservebank.indianemarketplace.apectariff.cn • www. Comp.org.eanindia.org • www.fao.texprocil.nl • Annual Economic Survey of India • RBI Bulletins • Newsletters of Trade Promotion Organisations and Export Promotion Councils. New Delhi. P K. Export management. Export of India’s major products: Problem & Prospects.tdctrade.commin.Text: • Garg Pawan Kumar. 2006 Helpful Websites: • www.eu.mkaccdb.org • www. New Delhi. 2003 • Garg. New Delhi.com • www. Foreign trade policy and handbook of procedures 2004-2009 (vol. 2002 • Website of Ministry of Commerce. 3rd Edition. www.capexil. New Delhi.ustreas.com • www. Dynamics of Indian Export Trade. Galgotia Publication.indianindustry.nl • www. 1).com • www.in • www.chemexcil.org .

but in business ethics.. Course graduates will possess the understanding and experience to integrate environmental and social sustainability with commercial and economic success. voluntary standards. and financial accountability of businesses Module II: Principles of Sustainable Management (SM) Social and environmental sustainability challenges Integration of SM with commercial and economic success Current practices of sustainability in business Global issues and major frameworks Scientific foundations and economic principles Module III: Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility Bottom of the Pyramid: Social Responsibility or Market Opportunity Corporate Strategy and CSR What CSR Is and Is Not A Moral Argument for CSR A Rational Argument for CSR An Economic Argument for CSR Why is CSR Relevant Today CSR: Do Stakeholders Care? . The course also addresses the global issues surrounding sustainable management and reviews the major frameworks of sustainability that provide the scientific foundations and economic principles of how sustainability can help managers to achieve natural competitive advantage. corporate social responsibility and human rights. Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Definitions. • Discuss on how businesses need to manage their sustainability agenda as an integral part of their competitive strategy and to get their various stakeholder groups onto the same platform. new styles of networked commerce. The primary objective of this course is to impart a basic understanding of the social and environmental sustainability challenges facing managers in today’s world. students will be able to: • Define new and emerging business opportunities and financial risks associated with environmental quality. all integral to the agenda of sustainable development which directly relates to competitive advantage and corporate governance on a continuous basis. MIBIB 20402 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course. Planet. Lectures and readings provide an overview of the critical literature in environmental and social issues. • Evaluate ways to meet such challenges proactively using tools such as self-regulatory initiatives. environmental. relevance and need for internalization of CSR & sustainability management for corporations Principles of Sustainable Management Triple Bottom Line – TBL/3BL: ‘People. and radically new triple bottom line management systems. The course reflects that investors are also showing growing concern not only on eco-efficiency. The course seeks to develop students’ critical capacities for self-reflection and action in relation to these concepts. • Examine shifts in responsibility for sustainability from self regulation to public regulation and use new technology. ‘soft innovation’ focusing on new forms of strategic thinking. social justice and economic efficiency. social and economic sustainability on a continuous basis. together with profits are popularly known as the ‘triple bottom line’ issues of Sustainable Development (SD). reporting and communication processes etc. the history of the sustainability movement. including the various social and economic movement from which the current practices of sustainability in business and society grew. • To assist businesses and concerned stakeholders in establishing and managing systems to steer environmental. to remain globally competitive.GLOBAL CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The main purpose of this paper is to make the managers of tomorrow aware of the imperative need to recognize and address the global environmental and social impacts of their activities which. Profit’: the social. new accounting procedures. and the key actors and the basic literature in the field.

the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods.& David Chandler. New York. Werther Jr.csrwire.Short Term & Medium term Implementation from a Strategic Perspective: Planning Implementation from a Firm Perspective: Action Module V: Managing Global Corporate Social Responsibility: Issues Organizational Issues Economic Issues Societal Issues Module VI: Triple Bottom Line (TBL/3BL) – the goal of sustainability Definition The Bottom Lines Arguments in favor of the concept Arguments against the concept Legislation Module VII: Monitoring and Reporting Systems Energy.learningforsustainability.C. Environment and Social Audits Sustainability Reporting Learning Methods: Tutorials. Extensive research projects.ibef.iisd.org • www. John Wiley & Sons. self study sessions.ca • www. • C. Government and Civil Society”. XII • Andreasen Alan R. Free Press. Strategies for changing public behaviour.ubc.org • www.ch/research/centers/csm/index. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class.Module IV: The Strategic Context of CSR & its Implementation The Strategic Lens: The E.beyondgreypinstripes.imd. Management games. SAGE Publications References: • Kotler Philip & Nancy Lee.net • www. Harvard Business Review.” Strategic Corporate Social responsibility .trst. Seminars. K.” Leading Change toward Sustainability.Stakeholders in a Global Environment “.. Profitably”. 1989.S. Framework Positive Brand Building Crisis Management CSR Business Plan of Action . Prahalad & Allen Hammond. Inc.” Serving the World’s Poor.rmes. class presentation by groups of students. Field visits. Interactive sessions. A Change-Management Guide for Business.ibscdc. Case studies.org • www.cfm • www. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: • William B. Weekend experience in companies . “Corporate Social Responsibility: Doing the Most Good for your company and your Cause”.org/networks/manage • www. 2001 • Doppelt Bob . discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.” Social marketing. 2003 Helpful Websites: • www.com • www.com .” Ethics in Social Marketing “ Georgetown university Press. September 2002 • Kotler P & Roberto EL.S. Cases are also to be analyzed. Greenleaf Publishing.

Field visits.I.3rd. Extensive research projects.. Prentice Hall. New Delhi. It will also help the students to translate their theoretical knowledge into practical dimensions of Forex Banking.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods.risk and term premia – various theories: pure expectations. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.Tata McGraw Hill.FOREX BANKING Course Code: Course Objective: This course focuses on the practical aspects of Forex Banking Management. Foundation of finanical markets and institutions. Paul R. Capital Markets and Structure of interest rates Discount markets – parallel markets – monetary policy and money markets – significance of capital markets -bonds . Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Van Horne. Cases are also to be analyzed.H. New Delhi. MIBFN 20401 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Understand the factors and concepts of foreign exchange and their role in banking operations • Have a grasp of the workings of the financial and capital markets • Examine the various banking operations and their relevance to industry • Assess the procedures and policies of government and other regulatory bodies and their implications for the naming industry • Analyse financial derivatives and Foreign exchange risk Course Contents: Module I: The role of the financial system and Banking theory Financial institutions – financial markets – the financial system and the real economy Role and functioning of International banks – commercial banks and creation of money – Building Societies Module II: Money. International economics theory and policy.2002 • Pathak. Learning Methods: Tutorials. References: • Bhattacharya. P. Seminars. Fundamentals of future and options options markets. Management games. Indian financial system.Pearson Education. New Jersey.. Hrishike. New Delhi. Inc. Financial Markets Rates and Flows. New Delhi.2006 • Hull. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Frank J.equities 'Administered' and market-determined interest rates – loan able funds v liquidity preference theories – term structure . New Delhi. preferred habitat –rates Module III: Foreign exchange market Exchange rate risk Nature of forex markets . 2006 . 6th edition. John C. Bharti V.4th. James C. Interactive sessions. class presentation by groups of students. 2003 • Krugman. Pearson Education.6th. self study sessions. Working capital management: strategies & techniques.Interest Rate Parity – International Fisher Effect – Purchasing Power Parity Risk management Module IV: International Capital Markets Eurobonds – financial globalizations – regulation of the currencies.Tata McGraw Hill. market segmentation. Case studies. 2001. Weekend experience in companies .2005 • Fabozzi..

New Delhi.Pearson Education. 2006 . futures & other derivations.6th. John C.• Hull. Options.

OAS. Wherever possible a link should be made between the academic underpinning and its practical application. categorization of information on the basis of nature and characteristics Module II: Information Systems within Business Management Introduction to common used system and models Relationship between IS. an . role. It will develop the students’ ability to identify sources of information and how these can be used in the decision-making process by leveraging IT and networking. function and impact of IT & IS in global business operation. Course Contents: Module I: Information Technology in Management Fundamentals of Information Technology in management Organizations. MIBIT 10101 Credit Units: 03 Learning Outcomes: At the end of the course students will be able to: Explain key concepts and elements of information technology and information systems Examine the evolution. information and its attributes The level of people and their information needs Types of Decisions and information . Environments. Identify sources of information and assess how they can be used in the decision making process by leveraging information technology and networks. ESS and SIS) Information management and decision making Managing international Information systems Module III: Knowledge based systems Intelligent support systems & concepts of Artificial Intelligence Data Mining & Data warehousing Emerging trends in Information management systems Module IV: Managerial implications of IT/IS in Global business Planning. DSS.Data.Information System.LEVERAGING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN GLOBAL BUSINESS Course Code: Course Objective: The aim of this unit is to introduce the student to the evolution. IT & IS The Organization: Structure. role. This course requires the students to develop practical applications ability and knowledge as well as the ability to recommend how IS and IT should be used in global business. MIS. This will be achieved via a tutor-developed case study. The practical knowledge can be used to develop an awareness of how IT and IS can be adopted by organisations to improve business efficiency. Tools and techniques Legal and Ethical issues Future of Information management Module V: Practical aspects and applications of IT/IS Introduction to MIS packages and tools Web interface and techniques Introduction to ERP & CRM solutions Learning Methods: This course is based upon interaction between the students and the teachers. organizations and business processes Types of IS (TPS. Organizing and controlling Information Security. Managers and activities . Students will be given time to develop skills and analyse the benefits and limitations of the use of IS and IT in organisations. A ‘hands on’ approach will ensure that students can use integrated programmes and have a wide range of knowledge of different applications. function and impact of Information Technology (IT) and Information Systems (IS) in international business operations. Students will also demonstrate their understanding of fundamental business issues of the Information Age Enterprise through in-class discussion of real-world business cases.

John Wiley & Sons • Rober Murdic G. Tata McGraw Hill .evaluation of a local organisation. (1998) . guest lectures and industry visits.Management Information Systems. McLean and Wetherbe (2004) – Information Technology for Management 4th Edition. References: • Turban.S. Part of the learning process will also be producing a paper (in groups) on a relevant topic. Prentice Hall of India.Management Information Systems. (1998) . 9th Edition. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Laudon Kennith and Laudon Jane (2005) – Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm. Prentice Hall of India • Jawadekar W.

Thomson Understanding Human Communication. Adler R Oxford . 9/e.BUSINESS COMMUNICATION . Penrose. Oxford Business Communication for Managers: An Advanced Approach. Receiver and Situation related barriers Measures to overcome the barriers Listening skills Module III: Cross cultural communication Characteristics of culture Social differences Contextual differences Nonverbal differences Ethnocentrism Examination Scheme Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 Business Communication. This course is designed to inculcate transcultural communication skills among the young Amitians. MIBBS 20401 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Importance of Culture in Communication Principles of effective cross cultural communication Developing Communication Competence Module II: Barriers to effective communication Sender. FDIs and Retail Management makes global communication a harsh reality and offers cultural communication challenges. Raman – Prakash.IV Course Code: Course Objective: The influx of multinationals.

conference. Developing professional power: Goal-setting. time management. Organizational and Environmental Personal Styles and strategies of coping Module V: Professional Success Building independence & interdependence Reducing resistance to change Continued reflection (Placements. projects extracurricular Activities etc.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science. 1994. Harper Collins College Publishers . strength & style Analyzing choke points in your personal processes by analysis in area of placements. The Psychology of Work and Human Performance. interruptions and time wasters Module III: Career Planning Knowing one’s Interest and Aptitude Identifying available Resources Setting goals to maintain focus: Developing Positive attributes in personality Self-reliance and Employability skills Module IV: Stress Management for Healthy Living Meaning and Nature of Stress Stages of stress Causes and Consequences of stress: Personal.) Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer Examination Scheme Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • J 30 V1 30 A 5 CT 10 C1 10 C2 10 V2 5 J William Pfeiffer (ed.IV (PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL EXCELLENCE) Course Code: Course Objective: This course aims at imparting an understanding of: Build and leverage your professional reputation Maintain focus in pressure situations Make a balanced choice between professional and personal commitments MIBBS 20402 Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Individual. Pfeiffer & Company Smither Robert D. Society and Nation Individual Differences and Dimensions of Personality Socialization Process Relating to the Nation: Values. events. conferences. seminars. Group (1996). extracurricular activities.. events. Religion Sense of pride and Patriotism Managing Diversity Module II: Components of Excellence Personal Excellence: Identifying long-term choices and goals Uncovering the talent. Culture. Vol 2. seminars. projects etc.BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE . handling criticism.

Raman, A.T. (2003) Knowledge Management: A Resource Book. Excel Books, Delhi. • Kamalavijayan, D. (2005). Information and Knowledge Management. Macmillan India Ltd. Delhi

FRENCH - IV
Course Code: Course Objective:
To strengthen the language of the students with both oral and written To provide the students with the know-how • to master the tenses – present, past and future • to express emotion • to accomplish simple tasks of day-to-day programmes • to prepare résumé

MIBFR 20401

Credit Units: 02

Course Contents:
Unité 7: pp. 106 Rédiger un résumé (Cf. Campus 2 – P.6, Français.Com, Intermédiaire- p.98) Passer un entretien d’embauche. Français.Com, Intermédiaire – p.100 Contenu lexical: Unité 7: Tranches de vie 1. évoquer un souvenir 2. raconter une histoire 3. rapporter des événements marquants d’une vie professionnelle 4. expliquer une situation de stress, donner son avis 5. faire des projets Contenu grammatical: 1. formation de l’imparfait, chaque/chacun 2. emploi du passé composé et de l’imparfait 3. relatifs qui, que, où, mise en relief, indicateurs de temps : depuis, il y a, pendant, pour, en 4. pronom en de quantité, propositions complétives : je pense que…, je crois que … 5. futur simple, pronom y

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References:

C 20

P 20

V 10

Q 5

A 5

CT 40

le livre à suivre : Français.Com (Débutant)

GERMAN - IV
Course Code: Course Objective:
To enable the students to converse, read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar, which will later help them to strengthen their language. To give the students an insight into the culture, geography, political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany. Introduction to Advanced Grammar Language and Professional Jargon

MIBGR 20401

Credit Units: 02

Course Contents:
Module I: Present perfect tense Present perfect tense, usage and applicability Usage of this tense to indicate near past Universal applicability of this tense in German Module II: Letter writing To acquaint the students with the form of writing informal letters. Module III: Interchanging prepositions Usage of prepositions with both accusative and dative cases Usage of verbs fixed with prepositions Emphasizing on the action and position factor Module IV: Past tense Introduction to simple past tense Learning the verb forms in past tense Making a list of all verbs in the past tense and the participle forms Module V: Reading a Fairy Tale Comprehension and narration Rotkäppchen Froschprinzessin Die Fremdsprache Module VI: Genitive case Genitive case – Explain the concept of possession in genitive Mentioning the structure of weak nouns Module VII: Genitive prepositions Discuss the genitive propositions and their usage: (während, wegen, statt, trotz) Module VIII: Picture Description Firstly recognize the persons or things in the picture and identify the situation depicted in the picture; Secondly answer questions of general meaning in context to the picture and also talk about the personal experiences which come to your mind upon seeing the picture.

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • • • • •

C 20

P 20

V 10

Q 5

A 5

CT 40

Wolfgang Hieber, Lernziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant - 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1, 2 Braun, Nieder, Schmöe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

MIBSH 20401 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Revision of earlier semester modules Introduction to Present Continuous Tense (Gerunds) Module II Translation with Present Continuous Tense Introduction to Gustar. to give them vocabulary. voice modulations/intonations to handle everyday Spanish situations with ease.SPANISH . Apetecer. grammar. Parecer.IV Course Code: Course Objective: To enable students acquire working knowledge of the language. doler Module III Imperatives (positive and negative commands of regular verbs) Module IV Commercial/ business vocabulary Module V Simple conversation with help of texts and vocabulary En la recepcion del hotel En el restaurante En la agencia de viajes En la tienda/supermercado Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • Español Sin Fronteras (Nivel – Elemental) C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 .

Note: Teaching is done in roman as well as Japanese script. making requests Module II Seeking permission Module III Practice of conversations on: Visiting people. students will be taught katankana (another form of script) in this semester i. MIBJP 20401 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Comparison using adjectives. Methods of Private study /Self help   Handouts. writing formal letters Learning Outcome  Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics. to be able to write all the foreign words in Japanese.JAPANESE . audio-aids.IV Course Code: Course Objective: To enable the students to comfortably interact using basic Japanese. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Teach yourself Japanese References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1 C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 . and self-do assignments. At a ticket vending machine etc Module IV Essays. role-plays. Students are also encouraged to attend Japanese film festival and other such fairs and workshops organized in the capital from time to time. After work. Party. Meetings.e.

The adverb “geng”. Progressive aspect of an actin “zhengzai” Also the use if “zhe” with it. An educate person in China can probably recognize around 6000 characters. Part-2” Lesson 31-38 . The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. Module IV Shipment. the doctor examines. “yiwai” (Before and after).000 characters the vast majority of which were rare accumulated characters over the centuries. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • C 20 P 20 V 10 Q 5 A 5 CT 40 “Elementary Chinese Reader. takes temperature and writes prescription. Module III Going to a friend house for a visit meeting his family and talking about their customs. To welcome someone and to see off someone …. I cant go the airport to see you off… etc. Basic dialogue on – Do u like Chinese food? Basic dialogue on – I am planning to go to China. the language of Mainland China. Ma?” The construction “yao … le” (Used to indicate that an action is going to take place) Time words “yiqian”. Electronic items Module II Traveling – The Scenery is very beautiful Weather and climate Grammar question with – “bu shi …. Is this the place to checking luggage? Basic dialogue on – Where do u work? Basic dialogue on – This is my address Basic dialogue on – I understand Chinese Basic dialogue on – What job do u do? Basic dialogue on – What time is it now? Module V Basic dialogue on – What day (date) is it today? Basic dialogue on – What is the weather like here. MIBCE 20401 Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Dialogue Practice Observe picture and answer the question Pronunciation and intonation Character writing and stroke order.CHINESE – IV Course Code: Course Objective: How many characters are there? The early Qing dynasty dictionary included nearly 50. Fallen sick and going to the Doctor. Aspect particle “guo” shows that an action has happened some time in the past.

• Drawing up initial dissertation outlines considering the aims and objectives of the dissertation. involving a systematic approach to gathering and analysis of information / data and leading to production of a structured report. The topic is the specific area that the student wishes to investigate. the synopsis/dissertation plan is an outline of what the student intends to do. subject to the availability of adequate sources of information and to the student’s knowledge. Deciding this is often the most difficult part of the dissertation process. or formulating questions to be investigated.DISSERTATION Course Code: MIBDI 20460 Credit Units: 09 The Aim of the Dissertation The aim of the dissertation is to provide the students with an opportunity to further their intellectual and personal development in their chosen field by undertaking a significant practical unit of activity. having an educational value at a level commensurate with the award of their degree. The dissertation plan/ outline or Synopsis It is recommended that the students should have a synopsis/dissertation plan to guide them right from the outset. chapter wise and therefore should reflect the aims and objectives of the dissertation in detail along with detailed bibliography and critical review of literature. and therefore helps build up confidence. Few restrictions are placed on the choice of the topic. clearly focused so as to facilitate an in-depth approach. of value and interest to the student’s personal and professional development. The dissertation can be defined as a scholarly inquiry into problem(s) or issues(s). Workout various stages of dissertation • Devising a timetable to ensure that all stages of dissertation are completed in time. The title may not be decided until the dissertation has been written so as to reflect its content properly. Normally it is expected that the topic is: relevant to business. and requires thorough preparation and background research. to make constructive comments and help guide the direction of the research. The Dissertation Topic It is usual to give the student some discretion in the choice of topic for the dissertation and the approach to be adopted. Planning the dissertation This entails the following: • Selecting a topic for investigation. It is important to distinguish here between ‘dissertation topic’ and ‘dissertation title’. • The writing of a plan is the first formal stage of the writing process. related to one or more of the subjects or areas of study within the core program and specialization stream. defined broadly. Consider very carefully what is worth investigating and its feasibility. . Kindly ensure that the dissertation is related to the field of specialization. The timetable should include writing of the dissertation and regular meetings with your dissertation guide. Essentially. at an early stage. There are several reasons for having a dissertation plan • It provides the correct area of focus • It provides the faculty-guide with an opportunity. • Establishing the precise focus of the study by deciding on the aims and objectives of the dissertation.

• After this concluding chapter. give a list of all the references used.g. Nov. among others. Prentice Hall. No6. Are the objectives and methodology of practical relevance to the business world/economy? 4. • Finally. Draper P and Pandyal K. • Make clear what is a direct a direct quotation and what is a paraphrase. possibly with a suggestion of the direction of future research on the area. the plan encourages the student to come to terms with the reading. Are the techniques employed by the student to analyse the data / information appropriate and relevant? 9. a discussion of their implications.references with the text. If there is more than one objective. title. Keeping records This includes the following: • Making a note of everything read. Do the conclusions relate well to the objectives of the project? 11. Is this based on up-to-date developments in the topic area? 7. • Front page should provide title. International Financial Management. methodological issues and problems. • Chapter I should be a general introduction. thinking and writing in a systematic and integrated way. graphs and tables giving titles and page references. the following details are required e. Has the student succeeded in drawing conclusion form the analysis? 10. do these constitute parts of a whole? 3. pp 791-832.• In many ways. on a critical review of the previous relevant work relating to the major findings. 3rd Ed. the following details are required: Levi. Name of degree/diploma and the date of submission. • The next page should be the table of appendices. The number of chapters and their sequence will usually vary depending on. date of publication. the plan. • Making an accurate note of all quotations at the time they are read. Has the student developed an appropriate analytical framework for addressing the problem at hand? 6. faculty guide will consider the following aspects: 1. (Students may consider starting a card index or database from the outset). For articles from journals. place of publication and publisher are included. • Second page should be the table of contents giving page references for each chapter and section. • Next is the ‘acknowledgements’. 1991. author’s name and initials. and conclusions. • Next to follow should be a synopsis or abstract of the dissertation (approximately 500 words) titled: Executive Summary. include appendices. These should be cross . giving the background to the dissertation. These should only include relevant statistical data or material that cannot be fitted into the above categories. • Other chapters will constitute the body of the dissertation. including those discarded. Has the student done sufficient background reading and reviewed the available literature critically? 5. The limitations of the dissertation should also be hinted in this chapter. • Ensuring that when recording sources. the objectives of the dissertation. For books. Vol18. Has the student been regular in his work? 12. Guidelines for the assessment of the dissertation While evaluating the dissertation. Journal of Business Finance and Accounting. The Investment Trust Discount Revisited. author. Layout of the written report. Has the student collected information / data suitable to the frameworks? 8. New York. the rationale for the dissertation. Dissertation format All students must follow the following rules in submitting their dissertation. 1996 • Finally. 1996. . the dissertation plan generally provides a revision point in the development of the dissertation report in order to allow appropriate changes in the scope and even direction of work as it progresses. with plenty of time left for changes. M. Has the student made a clear statement of the objective or objective(s) 2.

.13. Confidence and knowledge of the student while answering questions and giving the presentation.

G. D. C. E. Viva and Presentation Contents & Layout of the Report Conceptual Framework Objectives & Methodology Implications & Conclusions Final Viva and Presentation 30 30 20 40 40 40 50 250 .Examination Scheme: A. Total Synopsis Mid Term Review. F. B.

RETAIL AND SALES MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The Retail Management module aims to make students learn the intricacies of formulating and implementing Retail Strategies and the Retail Mix by taking into account the logistics and supplies of goods/services and to understand the implications of retail management on customer satisfaction and leveraging the Retail Strategy to create Competitive Advantage. MIBMK 20401 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Understand the concepts of retail and sales in business management • Develop plans for retail and sales of different product categories • Analyse strategies of retail and sales management adopted by multinational organisations • Assess the importance of quality. Merchandise Management and Pricing) Module V Merchandising and pricing in retail management Retailer/Vendor relations Integrated marketing communications in retail management Challenges and recent developments in retail management Integrating and controlling the retail strategy Module VI Sales Auditing Sales Budgeting Sales Organization Module VII Quality of a good sales person Compensation of the sales person Learning Methods: Tutorials. budgeting and auditing in the area of retail and sales. Weekend experience in companies .the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Management games. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Seminars. self study sessions. Course Contents: Module I Introduction/Overview of Retailing Key terms and concepts Benefits and nature of the retailing industry Module II Strategies and Operational framework Strategic positioning tactics Developing retail plan to achieve competitive advantage Analysis of ethical. legal. Financial Analysis and Mgmt. Human Resource Management and Operations Management. social. economic and competitive environment. class presentation by groups of students. . Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Case studies. Cases are also to be analyzed. Design and Layout. and their implications on retail management Module III Customer identification and understanding consumer behaviour Purchase decision process and categorizing customers Applying research and customer information to retail management Module IV All about retail stores (Location and site evaluation.. Field visits. Interactive sessions. Extensive research projects.

2002. 2004. A Framework for Marketing Management.2002 • Kotler P.Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Bajaj Chetan & Tuli Rajnish. The CIM Marketing Dictionary. Prentice Hall. Pearson Education. USA. Marketing Management. G. Prentice hall. Selling Today. International Dictionary of Management. Sales Management References: • Barry Berman. London. H and Terry. Evans. India. 2nd. Norman A. Butterworth-Heinemann. 2003 • Hart.7th edition • Kotler. 1998 • Johannsen. Saunders J and V Wong. 5th. 9th Edition Prentice Hall • Gerald Manning & Barry Reece. Retail Management. Retail Management: A Strategic Approach. Kogan Page. 2005. 2002 • Kotler. Oxford University Press. P. Joel R. P. Pearson Education. 1st Edition • Cliff Richard & Govoni. 11th. 2001 • Harvard Business Review . Armstrong G. Principles of Marketing. Asia. 3rd European ed. USA.

quality. An attempt will be to make the subject easier by examine in an organized fashion the consumer behavioural aspects such as personality. perception of a variety of external situation. delivery and price issue while making final buying decisions . The course therefore will help students stimulate their minds to think coherently about consumers by identifying relevant variables. describing their basic characteristics and specifying how the variable relates to each other.CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR Course Code: Course Objective: Consumer Behaviour is full of complexities due to involvement of umpteen variables. learning. Each of these variable influences each other in the buying process. motives and so and so forth. MIBMK 20402 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Understand the characteristics and significance of consumer behaviour. • Appreciate the influencing factors on consumer behaviour • Assess the various models and theories of consumer behaviour and apply them suitably for making decisions Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Defining and describing the scope of Consumer Behaviour A few examples of consumer behaviour having a variety of marketing implication Consumer characteristics leading to selection of target markets Module II: Environmental influences Socio.culture influnces Role of: Culture Sub-culture Social Class Social Groups Inter-personal influnces Module III: Individual determinants of consumer behaviour How consumer proceeds through a decision process relating to product and services Personality and Self concept Motivation and involment Information processing Learning and Memory Attitudes and Attitude change Module IV: Consumer Decision Process Decision-making based on envirnmental influnces and individual determinants Problem Recognition Information Search and evaluation Purchasing process Post purchase behaviour Module V: Popular models of consumer behaviour Consumer Research Process Importance of research in marketing decision making Consumerism-Consumer position in society and the problems facing the marker place and the marketer Ethical and Social Responsibilities of Business. Government and consumers themselves Module VI: Organizational Buying Behaviour Psychology of Buyers and Suppliers The concepts of Buying Centre The role of each of the member involved in organization buying process The weightage given to obervations/comments of each member in term of materials.

the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Case studies. 2002. Paul W. 2002. 2001.Learning Methods: Tutorials. Field visits. Brunce I Newman. 9th edition. Seminars. 2nd edition • Leon G Schifman. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Consumer Behaviour. Prentice Hall of India. Extensive research projects. Management games. Minard. Cases are also to be analyzed. Consumer Behaviour. James F Engel. Interactive sessions. Blackwell. class presentation by groups of students. Banwari Mittal. Leshe Largar Kamank. The Drydon Press Harcourt Brace College Publishers References: • Rose D. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Sheth Jagdish N. Harcourt collage Publisher. Weekend experience in companies . .Consumer Behaviour and Beyond. self study sessions. 7th Edition .

Module III Capital Asset Pricing Model . Cases are also to be analyzed. Case studies.Assumptions .Risk Adjusted Measures . self study sessions.Resistance and support Lines . Performance Measurement. Asset Allocation.Portfolio Risk . Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class.Treynor's Volatility Ratio .Total Risk .the Capital Market Line . placing a premium on well-trained young men and women possessing superior professional skills in financial analysis and management. The finance manager of today is called upon to evolve finance strategies that dovetail with the firm’s competitive business strategies. Weekend experience in companies . Extensive research projects. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: .Different Patterns.Combining Risky and Risk less . Module II: Fundamental Security Analysis Economic Environment Analysis . Module IV: Equity Valuation Financial Markets and Instruments.Charts and Trend Lines .Sharpe's Reward-to-Variability . Interactive sessions. Analysis and Valuation of Equity Investments Module V: Fixed Income Valuation and Analysis Financial Markets and Instruments Analysis of Derivatives and Other Products Module VI: Portfolio Management Modern Portfolio Theory.Company Analysis . Management games. Efficient market theory.Dow Theory . Investment Policy. Risk and Return .Industry Analysis . Portfolio Evaluation: Portfolio Formula Plans . Practical Portfolio Management. MIBFN 20402 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Assess the various financial market instruments and securities • Understand the factors effecting equity valuations • Analyse the various theories of portfolio management and apply quantitative tools for optimum results Course Contents: Module I: Nature and Scope of Investment Management and Portfolio Analysis Investment Management and Security Analysis .Behaviour of Stock Prices . Seminars.Jensen's Differential Return.Security Market Line . Field visits.Market Risk . discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods.Growth Stocks.Portfolio Management Practices in International markets. Technical Analysis : Basic Tenets of Technical Analysis . Management of Investment Institutions Learning Methods: Tutorials.Major Trends .SECURITY ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The far-reaching developments in the world of finance have redefined the role of the finance manager.Securities.CAPM with Relaxed Assumptions.How Diversification Helps? . class presentation by groups of students.

Kolkata 2001 • Reilly. Tata Macgraw Hill.T. S. N. Norton and Company.W. David G. & Brown. 2002 • Brealey. “Investment Science.. D.” Oxford University Press. Prentice Hall. Dryden Press. ND 2002 • Luenberger. F.C. “A Random Walk Down Wall Street.. Risk.E. 2001 References: • Gleason. Investment Analysis & Portfolio Management.. Burton G.. & Myers. New York. • Prassanna Chandra Investment Analysis & Portfolio Management Tata Macgraw Hill 2002 . Security Analysis & Portfolio Management.• Fisher. 1998.. • Malkiel. Jaici.” 6e.A. J. R. 1996.D.K.The New Management Imperative in Management. K. Principles of Corporate Finance. W.

STRATEGIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: To make students learn the intricacies of formulating and implementing Financial Strategies and the Financial Mix by taking into account the EVA. The words ‘Strategy’ and Strategic Management’ is a game plan a policy an action plan or a ‘tactic’? It is long-term or short term? It is visible or invisible? It is to be decided upon only by seniors? Is it a piece of advice? Ultimately. what is it? MIBFN 20403 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Understand the role of strategy in the area of business finance • Assess the various tools of value chain analysis. cost analysis and business accounting • Evaluate the need for corporate restructuring and its strategies • Develop the ability to carry out the valuation of business units and brands. ABC. Course Contents: Module I Strategic Financial Management Strategy and the Strategist The ‘Nine References’ for Strategic Financial Management Strategic Investigation of Growth on Profit-Leakages (A qualitative assessment) Module II Value Chain Analysis Value chain and Investment Strategic Business Units (SBU’S) Responsibility Accounting Activity Based Costing (ABC) and objective Based Costing (OBC) Economic Value Added Owners Value Added (OVA) Module III Strategic Cost Analysis Discussion on the Case-Problem Cost Profit-Sales Analysis Using a Product/Project as Profit Centre Ratios Module IV Financial Aspects of Corporate Restructuring What is Corporate Restructuring? Scope for Restructuring Symptoms for Restructuring Operational Symptoms Strategic Symptoms Financial Symptoms Market. Economy-level and Global Symptoms Financial Aspects of Various Restructuring Exercises (for Various Purposes) Module V Innovative Financial Engineering Project-Finance Instrument Venture Finance Futuristic Securitisation Special Purpose vehicle Module VI Valuation Valuation of a Business Enterprise Approaches to Enterprise Valuation Based on Various Objectives Realisable Value Vs Replacement Cost . OVA & other financial reengineering techniques.

ND. Tata Macgraw Hill. Interactive sessions. 2002 C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 . discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. Weekend experience in companies . 2002 • Brealey.A. P. M. Cases are also to be analyzed. Field visits. 2002 • Khan.Y. Tata Macgraw Hill..C.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. ND. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: Text: • Jakhotiya G P Strategic Financial Management Vikas Publishing House. ND. Case studies. Management games. & Jain.. R. Seminars. Tata Macgraw Hill..K.Realisable Value Valuation of the Company’s Intrinsic Strength Important Conclusion The Components of Business Valuation Brand Valuation Various Methods of Brand Valuation Learning Methods: Tutorials. Principles of Corporate Finance. & Myers. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. India Financial Services. class presentation by groups of students. M. Basic Financial Management. self study sessions. Extensive research projects.Y. S. 2004 References: • Khan.

training and development Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to Recruitment Introduction and Importance of Recruitment Recruitment strategies in diverse work force Labour Market information & Sources Forecasting supply and demand for labour Internal & External Applicants Summary. SELECTION. Module V: Retaining Human Resources Global Dilemma. Module IV: Managerial Effectiveness & Training Tools to improve managerial effectiveness . Case Studies. development and its effective link to policies and strategic practices in organisation for effective people management right from forecasting the requirement of employees to the effective development. Weekend experience in companies . Seminars. acquisitions & globalisation • Appreciate the various tools of training and structured training programmes in organisation • Forecast demand & supply of human resources. Managing Transnational Teams Motivation – Rewarding and Rewarded Jobs Team / Incentive based systems Design and redesign of working systems Summary & Review Questions. Field visits. Cisco Systems Industry and occupational trends Strategies to accommodate change Summary & Review Questions. Review Questions & Case Studies Module II: Employee Selection Selection – An HR Responsibility Evaluating Abilities & Selection Process Screening & Hiring Alternatives International HRM. self study sessions. Training and Development in any organisation on global context. Climate for Change Summary & Review Questions. Selection. Case Studies. Expatriate Rights Temporary and Leasing Help Summary. MIBHR 20401 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Identify the key issues of Selection. The module is designed to understand the role of HR Planning. A Broader and wider perspective is undertaken in relation to the management of employment relationship.Time Management Training Process and Methodology – Need and objectives. Case Studies Learning Methods: Tutorials. Review Questions & Case Studies Module III: Trends effecting HRM & Requirement of Training Impact of technology Diversity initiatives at Intel. Tools and Aids for Training Learning Principles. Management games.RECRUITMENT. Case studies.Kaizen Quality Circles . Interactive sessions. Each student is required to do the back .the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. training and development • Understand the factors effecting recruitment due to mergers. class presentation by groups of students. Extensive research projects. TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The main Purpose of this paper is to familiarize the participants understanding the applicability and techniques of Recruitment.

New Delhi. Tata McGraw Hill.. Response Books. 2002 • Epstein Robert. Jaico Publishing House. Managing Human Resource. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work.New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill. 1997 • Mejia. Motivation theories and principles. Arun. Human Aspects of Management. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text & References: Text: • Pareek. Ahmedabad: A H R D. • Monappa. PHI. Pearson Education. 1992 References: • Appraising and Developing Managerial Performance . 2006 • Beck. 2003 • Ivancevich.ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. P. Oxford University Press. Robert C. K. 2005 • Biddle. 2001 • Aswthappa. 6th. 4th. Towards personal excellence. Mumbai. New Delhi. 2004 • Sanghi. New Delhi. 2000 • Cascio. New Delhi. Managing human resources . Managing human resource.Delhi: Macmillan. Tata McGraw Hill. Derek. 2000 • Udai Pareek. HR and Personnel Management. 2000. Wayne F. John M. Tata McGraw Hill. New Delhi. Pearson Education. Tata McGraw Hill. 2nd. Luis R G. 2002 . Cases are also to be analyzed.Rao. Seema. New Delhi. New Delhi. Human resource management. The Big Book of Motivation Games. 1992 • Robbins. Understanding Organisational Behaviour. Udai Managing transition: the HRD response. Management. T V. Stephen. conference papers . New Delhi.

Review Questions & Case Studies Module III: Methods and importance of Performance Management Importance and Scope of Performance Management Different methods of Performance Appraisal Rating Errors & Tools for improvement Steps for effective Performance Appraisal System Summary. Review Questions & Case Studies Module II: Evaluation of Management Systems Performance Management and feedback Need and objective of Appraisal Systems Tools and aids for evaluation of performance Model for benchmarking HR Practices. Cases are also to be analyzed. Review Questions & Case Studies Module V: Training and Development Training the Appraisers Planning and strategizing training Integrating training with Performance management systems Importance of employee development Setting Objectives and Selecting Training Approach Learning Methods: Tutorials. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. The module is designed to understand the role of HR Planning. self study sessions. class presentation by groups of students. development and its effective link to policies and strategic practices in organisation for effective people management. Interactive sessions. Review Questions & Case Studies Module IV: Management by Objectives Management by Objectives Appraisal Schedule. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class.PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL AND POTENTIAL EVALUATION Course Code: Course Objective: The main Purpose of this paper is to familiarize the participants understanding the applicability and techniques of performance appraisal and potential evaluation on global context. Ethics and Concepts of Performance Management Summary. . Weekend experience in companies . • Understand the factors effecting performance appraisal and performance management • Various tools of performance measurement and performance appraisal • Management by objectives. Case studies. Field visits. role of HR personnel in Performance appraisal Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to Performance Appraisal Performance Appraisal Management System Classical approaches to people and organisations Current trends in Performance Appraisal Definition. Problems with PA Forms Monitoring Employees on the job International Applications Competency Mapping Summary. Seminars. A Broader and wider perspective is undertaken in relation to the management of employment relationship.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Extensive research projects. Legal Considerations Summary. Management games. MIBHR 20402 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Identify the key issues of potential evaluation and performance appraisal.

1987 • Mills. 6th. Barrie O.New Delhi. 1992 • Pettman. John M. Mumbai: Himalaya. Analysis in human resource training and organization development . Gordon E. New Delhi.Chaturvedi. Tata McGraw Hill. Robert C. Tata McGraw Hill. Human resource management.New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.Dessler. Pearson Education. conference papers . Wayne F. 1984 • Beck. 1988 • Pareek. K K.Reston: Reston Pub.2003 • Ivancevich. Managing Human Resource.2004 . Gary 3rd ed .2000 • Cascio. 1994 • Personnel Management: modern concepts and techniques . Alan H Oxford: Blackwell.England: Gower. Lesley The Changing nature of personnel management-London: Institute of Personnel Management.Anderson. 1984 • Mackay. 1998 References: • Effective Personnel Management: a skill and activity based approach . Udai Managing transition: the HRD response. New Delhi.Reading: AddisonWesley.Motivation theories and principles.Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Personnel Management for Executives . Manpower planning workbook .

McGraw Hill International Edition . Peralita. evolving role of software. Rapid Application Development. Business Modeling. Each student is required to do the back ground reading from the specified chapters of the prescribed book before coming to class. Weekend experience in companies . Test Plans. Key challenges in SE. Thayer. Project Evaluation. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: • C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 • • • • Roger S. tools and Quality. McGraw Hill International Edition Stevens. • Understand the concept of System Modeling. User Interface design. Product Modeling and modeling of system architecture • Plan .SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT Course Code: Course Objective: The objective of this course is to make the student aware of the latest practices in Project management and systems engineering with an emphasis on Quality concepts. Estimate and Schedule a project plan Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to Software Engineering Introduction to Software Engineering . Milestones. Quality Factors. Walkthroughs and Inspections. Quality Concepts. WileyIEEE Computer Society Pr. 2nd Edition. Types of Testing . Pressman. Methods and Tools Software Process Models – Waterfall Model. FTRs.definitions. Risk Management and Configuration Management MIBIT 20402 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Identify the key issues in Software Processes. Addison Wesley Edward Yourdon and Richard H. Cohesion & Coupling Module IV: Software Testing Software Testing Fundamentals. Testing Strategies. Using UML software engineering with objects & comp. Field visits. SQA. Risk Management. Interactive sessions. Case studies. self study sessions. Architectural design. Data design.WBT & BBT. SRS – contents and characteristics. Pearson education Ian Sommerville. Management games. Pressman . Debugging Module V: Software Reliability and Quality Management Software Reliability. Software Configuration Management Learning Methods: Tutorials. V Model Software Engineering Institute Capability Maturity Model – SEI/CMM Module III: Software Requirements and Design Requirements Engineering Process. discussed in groups (teams) outside the class as preparatory work. class presentation by groups of students.Software Engineering . Quality Models. Software Project Planning. Cases are also to be analyzed. Software Engineering Project Management. Seminars. Spiral Model. Prototyping. Software Engineering – Roger S. Effort Estimation (COCOMO Model) and Project Scheduling. Data Modeling. Types of Projects. Software Design Basics. Activities covered by SPM.the course is covered by adopting a combination of lecture methods. Module VI: Software Project Management Project Management Concepts. Design Approaches – function & object-oriented. Extensive research projects. Test Case Design. Module II: The Software Proces Software Engineering – Process. Software Engineering (6th Edition).

SCM and CRM applications Module II: ERP Implementation Introduction. Students learn about the state-of-the-art techniques used in support of business process redesign. TMH. ERP AND BPR Course Code: Course Objective: In the face of intense competition and other business pressures on organizations. though still essential. Harper Business • Process Mapping: How to Reengineer Your Business Process. incremental process improvement. Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to ERP Overview of ERP. PeopleSoft & Open Source ERP Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) Text & References: C1 10 V 5 A 5 CT 10 EE 70 Text: • Enterprise Resource Planning: Alexis Leon. Why ERP. will no longer be sufficient. McGras-Hill . vies and latest methodologies of business process design • Understand key concepts in the design and utilization of best business practices embedded in an Enterprise Resource Planning System.WORKFLOW. Success & Failure Factors of an ERP Implementation ERP Package Selection and Evaluation ERP Implementation Process Module III: Present and Future ERP and eBusiness ERP. ERP Packages. El Sawy. 2nd Edition References: • Michael Hammer and James Champy. Evolution. and its future Functional Modules of ERP. MIBIT 20403 Credit Units: 04 Learning Outcomes: On the successful completion of this module the student will be able to: • Understand the concepts. Internet and WWW Future Directions and Trends in ERP Module IV: Business Engineering and marketing of ERP BPR. V. Risks & Benefits of ERP. Reasons for Implementing ERP. Such radical levels of change require powerful information technology tools such as ERP to facilitate the fundamental redesign of work. its importance. Joe Peppard and Philip Rowland. Advantages of ERP. quality initiatives and continuous. Daniel Hunt. Omar A. ERP & IT – their linkage Business Model of ERP Marketing Dynamics & Competitive Strategy Module V: Practical aspects of ERP Introduction to ERP packages – SAP. John Wiley & Sons • The Essence of Business Process Reengineering. Implementation Challenges ERP Implementation Life Cycle. ERP & related technologies Integration of ERP. Prentice-Hall • Redesigning Enterprise Processes for e-Business. BAAN.

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