Global Vision International, Phoenix Honduras Report Series No.

001

GVI Phoenix Honduras
Literacy, Numeracy and Stove-building Projects

6 month Report July2010 - December 2010
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GVI Phoenix Honduras 6 month Report

Submitted in whole to Global Vision International Produced by Dominic Williams – Phoenix Latin American Director Doreen de Williams – Phoenix Guatemala Project Manager Patrick Smith - Phoenix Honduras Project Manager Kat Chidzey - Phoenix Honduras Project Manager Patrick Smith Kat Chidzey Enrique Carrillo Marlen Carolina Rodas Project Manager Project Manager Honduras Coordinator Government.Teacher, Community Liaison & GVI Phoenix Secondary School Principal Government. Teacher and Community Liaison GVI Phoenix Secondary School Teacher & Driver GVI Phoenix Secondary School Teacher GVI Phoenix Secondary School Teacher GVI Phoenix Secondary School Teacher Government. Teacher and Community Liaison GVI Chort’i Teacher Stove Volunteer, USA Stove Volunteer, Canada Stove Volunteer, USA Stove Volunteer, USA Volunteer, Canada Volunteer, England Volunteer, England Volunteer, England Volunteer, Australia Volunteer, USA Volunteer, England Volunteer, Australia Volunteer, Australia Volunteer, Ireland Volunteer, England 1

Sandra Rebecca Orellana Edgar Adan Rodas Glenda Paola Gamez Celea Refugio Flores Mercedes Elizabeth Murcia Erica Yamileth Zalaya Jose Misael Alec Duffurena Marlene St-Jean Chris McEvoy Jenica Wood-Beauchamp Ken Weiss Laurence Halford Adam Newton Christopher Dales Susan Leighton Sara Wang Sophie Gray Shannyn Carty Cassandra Politanski Peter Rogan Florence Boniface

Hannah Moore Mary-Scott Moore Paul Freeman Ken Weiss Lawrence Halford Adam Newton Antonia Wheatley Alice Martin

Volunteer, USA Volunteer, USA Volunteer, USA Volunteer, USA Volunteer, England Volunteer, England Volunteer, England Volunteer, USA

GVI Phoenix Honduras Address: Guacamaya Spanish School, Barrio El Centro, Copan Ruinas, Copan, Honduras Email: phoenixhonduras@gviworld.com Web page: http://www.gvi.co.uk and http://www.gviusa.com Blog: gviphoenix.blogspot.com

GVI Charitable Trust http://www.justgiving.com/phoenixhonduras http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/give-children-education-in-honduras/

Executive Summary
GVI Phoenix Honduras assists with education in 2 Honduran National Schools in rural indigenous areas of the country, called San Rafael and Barbasco. This work will typically be covering Grades 1 and 2 in cooperation with local teachers throughout the school year

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and offering additional learning for the rest of the year with a “Summer School”. During the six month period from July 2010 until the end of December, 2010, the GVI Phoenix volunteers in Honduras have assisted learning in these two schools, providing over 1870 hours of teaching. In addition to this we provide a daily fruit program and subsidize the government “merienda” (a meal of rice, tortillas and beans, which can be the children’s only meal of the day).

Fig. 1 – Volunteers giving classes, San Rafael

We formally opened our own Secondary School in 2008 (Colegio GVI Phoenix San Rafael) and now have all 3 grades for our students to complete “El Basico”, these are the grades 7 to 9 which they under take before they undertake a professional qualification. GVI Phoenix Charitable Trust pays for the 3 local teacher’s wages and all costs, making it completely free for any student from the surrounding communities to attend. Volunteers assist by giving the English classes they need to receive as part of their vocation. In Honduras, 20.58% net.of the population enrol in secondary education (World Bank), though this number would be a lot lower for rural populations without access to a Colegio close by or the disposable income to pay the fees involved in attending. We hope by making this education free to the students who would like to attend, we can make this number much 3

higher, for example, by the start of the new school year over 70% of students graduating from the Barbasco Primary school will be attending our Private Colegio. In December 2010, 14 students graduated from our Secondary School receiving their “Basico” Diploma. 21 new students will start classes in February 2011, taking the number of students up to 53.

Fig. 2 – Colegio Graduation, San Rafael

Additionally, eight energy efficient stoves have been constructed in the last twelve months for families in the community of San Rafael. They use approximately 75% less firewood than traditional methods are able to cook more than one item at once, and the chimney provides ventilation for the smoke.

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Fig. 3 – StoveFig. 4 – Top Piece for Stove

Highlights
 During the months of July 2010 to the December 2010 GVI volunteers and staff have given over 1870 hours of classroom teaching in grades 1 and 2 in primary school in San Rafael and Barbasco         Over 20,000 pieces of fruit have been given to the children 8 additional energy-efficient stoves have been constructed in the community of San Rafael Summer School has been run in both communities, this was also for the first time in Barbasco. 18 students graduate from GVI Phoenix San Rafael Colegio, completing “El Basico”, which are the additional grades of 7th, 8th and 9th. In total, we paid for 56 students to attend GVI Phoenix San Rafael Colegio Privado. We continue to pay the wages for 7 local people. Supplementing government “Daily Food Program” Continued to provide a scholarship to a student in 11 th grade in a Colegio in Copan Ruinas

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Table of Contents
Executive Summary ........................................................................................................ 2 Highlights ........................................................................................................................ 5 List of Figures ................................................................................................................. 7 Appendices ..................................................................................................................... 8 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................... 8 1.1Why financial support is important in education.......................................................... 9 1.1.1 Family Income ............................................................................................... 9 1.1.2The Canasta Básica ..................................................................................... 10 1.1.3 Put into numbers: ........................................................................................ 10 1.1.4 Additional Costs ................................................................................................... 10 1.1.5 Conclusion ........................................................................................................... 11 2.0 San Rafael and Barbasco Community Teaching Projects ....................................... 11 2.0.1 San Rafael Community Teaching Project .................................................... 13 2.0.2 Barbasco Community Teaching Project ....................................................... 14 2.0.3 Objectives ................................................................................................... 15 2.0.4 Literacy and Numeracy................................................................................ 15 2.0.5 Food and Fruit ............................................................................................. 15 2.1 Classroom-based Teaching .................................................................................... 16 2.1.1 Training and Methods .......................................................................................... 17 2.1.2 Celebrations ................................................................................................ 17 2.1.3 Arts and Crafts ............................................................................................ 18 2.2 Building Projects and Refurbishments .................................................................... 19 2.3 Local GVI Employees and Local Partnerships ........................................................ 20 2.4 The Orphanage: “Angelitos Felices” ........................................................................ 22 2.5 Activities and Achievements in San Rafael & Barbasco ........................................ 23 2.6 Activities and Achievement in San Rafael Colegio Privado (High School) ............... 24 2.7 Review .................................................................................................................... 27 3.0 Stove Projects ......................................................................................................... 28 3.0.1 Introduction ................................................................................................. 28 3.0.2 Facts about air pollution .............................................................................. 28 3.0.3 Comparison of Indoor Air Pollution to Malaria .............................................. 30 3.0.4 Facts on the Stoves..................................................................................... 30 3.0.5 Short-term economic benefits of installing a stove ....................................... 30 3.0.6 Long-term economic benefits of installing a stove ....................................... 31 3.0.7 Long-term responsibilities............................................................................ 31 3.0.8 Conclusion .................................................................................................. 31 4.0 Looking Forward ..................................................................................................... 32 4.0.1 Expanding Educational Opportunities .......................................................... 32 4.0.2 Supplementing Food Programs ................................................................... 32 4.0.3 Increasing Volume of Volunteers/Self Sufficiency in Funding ...................... 32 5.0 Financial Support .................................................................................................... 32 5.1 Charity Challenges 2010 ......................................................................................... 33 5.2 GVI Charitable Trust ............................................................................................... 33 6.0 References ............................................................................................................. 33 7.0 Appendices ............................................................................................................. 34

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List of Figures Fig. 1 – Volunteers giving classes, San Rafael Fig. 2 – Colegio Graduation, San Rafael Fig. 3 – Stove Fig. 4 – Top piece of stove Fig. 5 – Children in classes, Barbasco Fig. 6 – School in Barbasco Fig. 7 – Classes being taught, San Rafael Fig. 8 – Daily fruit being handed out, San Rafael Fig. 9 – English Lessons in San Rafael Fig. 10 – Independence Day Celebration, Barbasco Fig. 11 – Art Project in Colegio, San Rafael Fig. 12 – A Plaque Donated by the Community, San Rafael Fig. 13 – School Mural Being Painted, San Rafael Fig. 14 – Colegio Teachers Paola, Carolina, Mercedes and Government Teacher Erica Fig. 15 – Edgar, GVI Colegio Teacher and Driver Fig. 16 – Angelitos Felices, Copan Ruinas Fig. 17 – Angelitos Felices, Wilson 7

Fig. 18 – Angeltios Felices, Copan Ruinas Fig. 19 – The school in San Rafael, Honduras Fig. 20 – Diploma from the Colegio in San Rafael Fig. 21 – Supplies donated by GVI Phoenix to the students of San Rafael. Fig.22 - Danilo feeling proud of his artwork, San Rafael Fig.23 – Stove being built Appendices Appendix A. Children attending La Escuela Fransico Morazan (Barbasco) Appendix B. Children attending GVI Phoenix San Rafael Colegio (San Rafael) Appendix C. Children attending La Escuela Fransisco Morazan (San Rafael)

1.0Introduction The Global Vision International (GVI) Phoenix Project was initiated in Guatemala in 2002 in San Andrés Itzapa, a Kakchiquel-speaking indigenous community. Soon after, in 2004, another project was opened in Santa María de Jesús, as well, Kakchiquel-speaking. In the same year, Phoenix started operations in Honduras, firstly on fresh water tubing projects then later on, working in Estanzuela and then San Rafael at the beginning of 2006. Work commenced in Barbasco in 2010. Many of the older population speak Chortí. The Phoenix Secondary school was founded in 2008 in San Rafael. In 2005, operations started in Ecuador, in the Kichwa-speaking communities of Urcusiqui, Muenala and Huayrapungo, with a new community, Larcacunga, starting in 2007. In 2006 work began in Perú, primarily in Socabaya though then moving to two Quechua-speaking (the “people’s speech”) communities in Sachaca outside the base town of Arequipa; Maldonado and Triunfo. Work commenced in a third community, Chiguata, in 2010. Our work around Estelí, Nicaragua started in La Thompson in January 2009 and Chiriza in 2010. Work in Mata Escura, Salvador, Brazil, started in June 2010.

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Honduras is one of the poorest countries in the Western Hemisphere. The rate of unequal income distribution is shockingly high. Approximately 30 % of the total population lives on less than $2 a day (UNESCO). It is GVI Phoenix’s belief that one of the most effective ways of improving standards of living is through education, though only 79% of children complete primary education (UNESCO ), and 20% of Hondurans over 15 years old are illiterate ( UNESCO ). Furthermore, child malnutrition is often blamed for poor educational results. Over 25% of children in Honduras suffer from chronic malnutrition (UNWFP), with these percentages higher in rural areas where we work. In Honduras, only 61.7% of children starting 1 st grade will make it to 5th grade (UNESCO) Before GVI Phoenix started educational programs, the volunteers were involved in water tubing projects to several communities around the Copán area. 1.1 Why financial support is important in education The following reveals the short-comings of family income and reasons behind lack of education, mal-nourishment and lack of access to medicines (GVI Phoenix).

1.1.1 Family Income Based on family A-Barbasco Mother, father and four children: one girl and three boys Family A is a family from the community of Barbasco. Dona Adriana Valezquez makes and sells bread to the rest of the community and is able to make $9 a week. During the 3 months between December & February, her husband and 4 children are paid to cut coffee in surrounding fincas. Between them, they can make $880 in this time, though they only have access to this “seasonal work”, the rest of their time will be spent on cultivating 2 or 3 different crops on their own land for their own consumption. When this amount is divided up for the whole year ($17) and added to the money made from bread, it becomes a weekly income of $26. Based on Family B-San Rafael 9

Mother, Father, four children: three boys and one girl. Family B is a family from the community of San Rafael. Orlin Jesus Garcia Rosales (Student) will work in the field along with his studies to cultivate beans and corn for the family to eat throughout the year. In the 3 months of the coffee cutting season, Orlin and his family will be paid to pick coffee. This will be the only time the family can bring in money. The family these earning equal to approximately $49 per week when evened out for the year.

NB: Coffee cutting is seasonal work, and the price that workers are paid rises and falls with the price of coffee on the market, making it difficult for the family to predict what little they will be able to earn during this time. 1.1.2 The Canasta Básica In Honduras the Canasta Básica (basic basket) or the basic food stuffs and other necessary essentials (including transport and education) needed by Family A & B is 42,014 Lempira per month or $556 per week (Ministerio de Trabajo y el Instituto Nacional de Estadistica - INE). NB: the cost of the Canasta Básica is based on the average size of rural family (6 people). 1.1.3Put into numbers: Dona Adriana’s family Income: Canasta Básica: What is left: $139/week $ -110

$26/week

Olrin’s family Income: $49/week Canasta Basica: Remaining: $ -90 $139/week

Using the example of Family A and Family Bit can see seen that their earnings in one week are not nearly sufficient to cover their basic needs. 1.1.4 Additional Costs The Canasta Básica does not take into account additional costs such as the following: 10

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Alcohol abuse can use from a third to a half of the family income and is a common problem with many low-income families

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Additional costs for education: uniforms, textbooks, transportation Illness, medicine Unforeseen events, accidents at work, days off (unpaid) Childcare for single parent families Transport to work Elderly relatives unable to work Family events: birthdays, weddings, deaths Loan repayments Rising prices of food and clothing items due to inclement weather, other factors

1.1.5 Conclusion Family A and Family B’s earnings are a mere 21% and 35% respectively of the Canasta Básica. These families, as is common to many families in these communities, are left to find other means to cover the remaining expenses of the Canasta Basica. This results in the majority of the children being underfed and undernourished. It also means that parents are more eager to pull students out of school early to work in the fields, or if they are girls, to go get married at an early age. 2.0 San Rafael and Barbasco Community Teaching Projects We currently work in two indigenous communities in San Rafael and Barbasco, Honduras. These communities are located in villages in rural areas close to Copan Ruinas. Both communities rely on coffee cutting as their main source of income, though this work will only be available 3 months of the year. The rest of the time is spent on sustenance farming, and small ways to supplement this meagre income, such as selling bread or excess corn. Houses are normally quite isolated and spread out along the hills, meaning a walk to school can take over an hour each way, or the walk to Copan Ruinas (the nearest town) can take 2 hours just get there. Indigenous peoples living in the communities have substantially higher poverty rates than the rest of the population. An estimated 71 per cent of indigenous peoples in Honduras live below the poverty line (IFAD)

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2.0.1 San Rafael Community Teaching Project GVI Phoenix began working in San Rafael in 2006. With the help of GVI Phoenix coordinator, Enrique Carrillos we started work in the government run school in May of that year. The school has been working with just 2 teachers for between 90 – 100 children spread over 6 grades, so time is limited for each child. Our volunteers here have taken on teaching grades one and two under the guidance of our local teachers, Carolina and Erika, giving them much needed extra attention and help. We have also undertaken essential renovations in the school, such as a toilet block, a “pila” with running water and a new roof. In 2007 we set up the GVI San Rafael Colegio Privado for those students from surrounding communities, wishing to continue with their education beyond grade 6, but without any means or funds to do so. Our colegio has given the chance to over 70 adolescents so far of completely free further education up to grade 9 and is increasing each year. We have students not only from San Rafael, but from many neighbouring communities, some walking up to 3 hours a day to receive their classes. In November 2010 we had our first grade 9 graduation with 100% of students receiving their diplomas. We will also be welcoming 21 new students January 2011.

Fig. 5 – Children in classes, Barbasco

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2.0.2 Barbasco Community Teaching Project The community teaching project in Barbasco began in March 2010 with the help of the local teacher Sandra Rebeca Orellana, providing teacher assistance in the local government school. Sandra had previously worked there for 4 years taking all 6 grades with between 45 – 60 children. GVI Phoenix volunteers assist by working with 1st and (when possible) 2nd grades, following the national curriculum and guidance of the local teacher. A daily Fruit Program was initiated to add much needed nutrition to their diet. Important maintenance was undertaken in the school, converting an extra classroom, putting whiteboards in all 3 rooms and painting the whole school. While volunteers work with the younger grades, giving them the extra attention they need, Sandra has been able to spend more time with the remaining grades and has smaller group of children to spread her time between. This has had marked improvement on the work of the children.

Fig. 6 – School in Barbasco

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2.0.3 Objectives GVI Phoenix’s main objective is to help provide a higher standard of education for the children in the schools in San Rafael and Barbasco. Schools in this area have high teacher to student ratios and the drop-out rate before 6th grade is high, even for Honduras. By assisting in the schools the children are receiving more attention and assistance and are also taught to value and enjoy their education. Through this, we hope we can help lower the amount of children leaving school early, improve their grades and their self esteem and through the “Colegio Privado” facilitate the children who wish to continue into further education. Broken down below, is the various ways in which we try to achieve this. 2.0.4 Literacy and Numeracy GVI Phoenix’s aim is to assist in the teaching of the curriculum (literacy, numeracy, both natural and social science, arts and crafts) in 1st and 2ndgrades, our main focus being on helping the children learn the basics first on how to read and write. The “Colegio Privado” also provides continued education taught by 3 locally hired teachers, with volunteers taking the English instruction part their course.

Fig. 7 – Classes Being Taught, San Rafael

2.0.5 Food and Fruit In San Rafael and Barbasco the children receive daily fruit while attending classes at the schools. This is to ensure that they receive at least some vitamins in their diet and help negate the problem of trying to work in class on an empty stomach, which usually would be the case. Government provides a daily “Merienda” at the schools, which provides a meal of 15

rice, beans and tortillas. Unfortunately the quantities send are never enough to provide the children for a sufficient meal (which can often be there only one that day), and do not last the whole school year. When the supplies run out, or are delivered late, GVI Phoenix buys the necessary food stuffs, to enable the schools to keep providing a daily hot meal and making sure they are given generous portions. The “GVI Phoenix San Rafael Colegio Privado” classes run from 12:30 till 5:30, so fruit and biscuits are provided to all students. This is also very important to help with the daily nutrition, especially for the students who walk long distances to attend classes. Fruit is also provided on every visit to the orphanage. These fruit and food programs are of vital importance as one in every four children in Honduras suffers from chronic malnutrition (UNWFP).

Fig. 8 – Daily fruit being handed out, San Rafael

2.1Classroom-based Teaching The volunteers teach their own classes, in Spanish, with help if possible from more experienced volunteers and/or GVI Phoenix staff. They must lesson plan using the curriculum and textbooks provided, along with other materials we have. Any costs incurred to undertake their classes are reimbursed.

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The majority of volunteers choose to take one-on-one Spanish classes at the beginning of their program. GVI Phoenix arranges for these classes in cooperation with the Guacamaya Spanish School in Copan Ruinas. 2.1.1 Training and Methods Volunteers are given the resources and shown how to teach the Honduran Government school curriculum. Volunteers use resources and teaching material provided by GVI Phoenix and located within the schools. Volunteers are always working under the guidance of an experienced GVI Phoenix member of staff and also receive assistance from the local teachers, giving volunteers and advise on their classes and lesson planning. All volunteers also receive a teaching presentation given in conjunction with “Teaching Manual” and aims to pair new volunteers with current volunteers or interns to aid new volunteers in teaching as well as lesson planning. Last, GVI Phoenix encourages volunteers to supplement lesson planning and instruction with their creativity and varied past experiences.

Fig. 9 – English Lessons in San Rafael

2.1.2 Celebrations It is important to celebrate occasions that are meaningful to the children and their communities. Each month we celebrate children’s birthdays with a party and small gifts for each child who has completed a birthday within that month. Further, we celebrate

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Christmas, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Day of the Child and other culturally relevant holidays such as Honduran Independence Day.

Fig. 10–Independence Day Celebration, Barbasco

2.1.3 Arts and Crafts Since we have started working in both schools we have made arts and crafts to 1st and 2nd grade a part of each school week. Each Friday, the students participate in a class with an art or craft project relating to a subject of study, holiday or creative topic of their choice. The children are rarely exposed to arts and crafts in the public school setting and through their participation they are able to use their creativity and imagination.

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Fig. 11 – Art Project in Colegio, San Rafael

2.2 Building Projects and Refurbishments Since the commencement of GVI Phoenix’s work in San Rafael & Barbasco in Honduras we have taken on many building projects, refurbishments and repairs. Here are a selection of them: We have built a kitchen and stove to enable the mothers to cook the merienda at school and to be used for special events by the community. The toilet block has constructed providing a more sanitary and hygenic area for the kids. A new pila and gutter system was built to help store and gather more water for school, as the running water supply can be very erratic in the community, often not running for days at a time Maintence and repairs are contacted annually at both schools, with storage units bought to protect the food supplies, and the school regularly painted. Brand new whiteboards have been supplies for all classrooms in both schools, and a new roof in San Rafael constructed to replace the old one 19

Fig. 12–A plaque donated by the community, San Rafael

Fig. 13 - School Mural being painted in San Rafael

2.3 Local GVI Employees and Local Partnerships As of December 2010, GVI Phoenix Honduras directly employs eight individuals from Honduras. They are Edgar Rodas, Colegio Teacher & Driver; Marlen Carolina Rodas, Colegio Principal; Glenda Paola Gamez, Celea Refugio Flores & Mercedes Elizabeth Murcia, Colegio Teachers ; Enrique Carrillo, Project Coordinator; and Jose Misael, Chort’i Teacher Further, GVI Phoenix has maintained and established several local partnerships. Volunteers take Spanish language classes at the Guacamaya Spanish School in Copan Ruinas and GVI Phoenix has maintained this partnership for over fives years. Additionally, volunteers stay with one of ten local host families in the town of Copan Ruinas. GVI

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Phoenix continues to use local builder, Candido, to complete construction projects and assist with stove building. GVI Phoenix partners with local taxi driver, Edgar Ricardo Cruz, to provide airport pickups and transport to bus terminals for volunteers and GVI Phoenix Staff.

Fig. 14 – Colegio Teachers Paola, Carolina, Mercedes and Government Teacher Erica

Fig. 15 – Edgar, GVI Colegio Teacher& Driver

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2.4 The Orphanage: “Angelitos Felices”

Volunteers also work in the afternoons at a local orphanage, Angelitos Felices, in the town of Copan Ruinas. The orphanage is made of a mix of children, some who have been abandoned, others who live there with their mothers and have no where to live, and the third group being single parents who unable to find anyway to have their children looked after during the day while they work. The numbers of children at the Orphanage change often but the average number this year has been 38, 21 sleeping at the facility and 17 being left there during the day.
Fig. 17 - Angelitos Felices, Wilson

Fig. 16 – Angelitos Felices, Copan Ruinas

During school time volunteers assist with homework and educational re enforcement, while during school holiday there is an emphasis on creative learning and interactive activities. The aim is for volunteers to help with the children’s educational development, but also social and personal skills, by giving positive reinforcement in their work and added attention and interaction which they just don’t receive very often due their circumstances. Fruit is also provided every visit, giving much needed variety to their normally basic diet.

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Fig. 18 – Angelitos Felices, Copan Ruinas

2.5Activities and Achievements in San Rafael & Barbasco We have been working in the community of San Rafael for over 5 years and Barbasco 9 months as of December 2010. GVI Volunteers have been working in conjunction with local teachers working with 1st and when possible 2nd grade. This means that the government teachers (Erica & Carolina or Sandra) are working with a third less children and 2 grades less. This results in more attention and assistance given to all the children in the school. 23.8% of adults in Honduras are illiterate (CIA World Factbook). With high numbers of volunteers we are able to work one on one or make small groups with children who having difficulties in their classes, making sure that they don’t fall behind in their studies, sidelined in class, or lose confidence in their academic ability. In this we hope to achieve a higher retention rate in school and higher grades for all the children. In Honduras, only 61.7% of children starting 1st grade will make it to 5th grade (UNESCO). In addition to the classes which are given by GVI Phoenix volunteers, there is also the Daily Fruit Program ( 20000 pieces of fruit given to students between July and December 2010 ), supplementing the government program, and providing monthly birthday celebrations in both schools.

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Fig. 19 – The School in San Rafael, Honduras

2.6 Activities and Achievement in San Rafael Colegio Privado (High School) In the San Rafael Colegio Privado, 56 students attended between the 1 st, 2nd and 3rd Curso ( 7th, 8th and 9th grade ). 18 students graduated from 3 rd Curso and received their diplomas. This is an amazing achievement as only 65.5% of the population will enrol in secondary school (Worldbank), the rate for poor rural areas in Honduras would obviously be a lot lower.

Fig.20 – Diploma from the Colegio in San Rafael

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As the Colegio Privado is completely free to students ( the only free private colegio in the department of Copan, Honduras ), GVI buys all supplies and resources for the pupils, teachers and school. We also make sure that all pupils in both schools are equipped with the basics that they will need for school. Here is a list of just some of the supplies we provided for the schools San Rafael: 350 cuadernos de 2 materias c/u----L 42 = L 14700.00 300 lapiz de carbon-----L 4 = L1200.00 300 lapiz tinta---------L 5 = L1500.00 70 cajas de crayones--L 25 = L 1750.00 70 cajas de marcadores--L30 = L 2100.00 30 compas--------------L 10 = L300.00 30 juegos de reglas--L 30 = L 900.00 80 sacapuntas---L 10 = L800.00 80 borradores--L 8 = L 640.00 70 correctores---L 38 = L 2660.00 70 mochilas----L 130 = L 9100.00 70 block,libro papel sin lineas--L 35 = L 2450.00 100 folder amarillo---L 2 = L 200.00 70 cuadernos para tareas---L 15 = L 1050.00 10 cajas de temperas---L 50 = L 500.00 30 marcadores acrilicos---L 25 = L 750.00 20 marcadores permanentes-- L 12 = L 240.00 20 gomas-----L 20 = L 400.00 5 masking tape---L 24 = L 120.00 5 tape grueso claro---L 15 = L 75.00 12 resmas de papel tamaño carta-- L 95 = L 1140.00 25

40 papel bond grande---L 3 = L 120.00 10 cartulina iris---L 8 = L 80.00 20 cartulina normal---L 5 = L 100.00 1 galon de resistol = L 350.00 1 caja de grapas = L 35.00

20 pliegos de fomi---L 18 = L 360.00 5 stick grandes----L 58 = L 290.00 5 stick pequeño ---L 20 = L 100.00 10 novelas pequeñas----L 65 = L 650.00 1 juego de reglas para Artes Plasticas grande---L 450.00 1 esfera --------------L 690.00 1 grapadora-----------L 150.00 1 sacabocado--------L 250.00 2 cuchillos------------L 60 = L120.00 10 flautas----------L 65 = L 650.00 2 calcomapas--L65 = L 130.00 3 atlas (sobre Honduras, Centroamerica y el mundo)--L150 = L 450.00 10 diccionarios de la lengua española---L160 = 1600.00 TOTAL = L 49150.00

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Fig. 21 – Supplies donated by GVI Phoenix to the students of San Rafael.

2.7 Review The work of GVI Phoenix over the past twelve months in Honduras has been successful due to the coordination between GVI Phoenix staff members, local Honduran GVI Phoenix staff members, the community members in San Rafael and Barbasco and the GVI Phoenix volunteers. GVI Phoenix Volunteers have helped fund the food programs, school materials, local staff salaries, host family accommodations and other direct field expenses. Further, funding from the GVI Charitable Trust (see 5.0.2), has allowed us to continue or work in GVI Colegio.

Fig. 22–Danilo feeling proud of his artwork, San Rafael

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3.0 Stove Projects Building an energy-efficient stove takes two days to build and is a long-term, sustainable method of reducing both health problems and deforestation. 3.0.1 Introduction With the help of GVI Phoenix volunteers and the local mason, we have built 36 stoves in the community of San Rafael. In the last twelve month period 8 stoves have been constructed. The stoves provide a more economically viable and environmentally friendly option to the traditionally used open fire. Approximately 75% less wood is consumed, multiple food items can be cooked at the same time, smoke is funnelled outside of the house, the stove maintains its heat much longer, and provides a much safer option than an open fire.

Fig. 23 – Stove Being Built

3.0.2 Facts about air pollution - More than one-third of humanity, 2.4 billion people worldwide use solid fuels, including wood, dung and coal for their energy needs. - Solid fuels have been used for cooking since the beginning of time and when used properly, they can be an effective way of heating a home or cooking a meal. Unfortunately, due to economic, political and cultural factors, most families today use what is referred to as a three stone fire, which is three round stones surrounding a wood fire, 28

over which a metal plate is placed for cooking. Coupled with poor ventilation in most homes, this leads to high levels of indoor air pollution. - Smoke in homes from these cook stoves is the fourth greatest risk factor for death and disease in the world’s poorest countries - Worldwide, 1.6 million annual deaths, predominantly women and children, are caused by indoor air pollution, including one million children’s lives each year (more than malaria or AIDS) - Children under the age of 5 account for 56% of deaths from indoor air pollution. The main killer caused by indoor air pollution is acute lower respiratory infections.

Pneumonia, serious burns and eye infections are other health risks. Many women go blind in their forties due to smoke from the cooking fires. - Women typically spend between three and seven hours per day by the fire, longer when fires are also used for heating the home. Children under the age of five are also particularly at risk because they spend most of their time with their mothers; often very young ones are strapped to their mother’s body. The impact this length of exposure has on small children is exacerbated by a number of factors. Children’s airways are smaller, therefore more susceptible to inflammation. Their lungs are not fully developed until they are teenagers, so they breathe faster. Also, their immune systems are not fully developed ,a process that may be further delayed by malnutrition. These facts mean that children absorb pollutants more readily than adults and also retain them in their system for longer. - Another major problem is depleting resources and the time necessary to collect the firewood - Up to 85% of the energy generated by a three-stone open fire is wasted, which is a real problem considering that poor families spend up to 20% of their income on solid fuels and/or spend one quarter of their time gathering wood - In most societies it is also the women’s responsibility to provide the biomass fuel. The time cost alone in rural areas can be extreme. Estimates range from two to twenty hours per week spent collecting fuel, and the distances covered over difficult terrain can be 29

considerable. In Nepal, for example, women can walk over 20 km per journey in search of wood. This level of work not only reduces the amount of time women can spend on other activities, such as earning money or resting, but it contributes to a range of additional threats to health and wellbeing. Often, if the mother cannot collect the wood, it is the responsibility of one of the

daughters in the family, thus taking away from time that could be spent in the school 3.0.3 Comparison of Indoor Air Pollution to Malaria Twenty per cent of the world’s population is at risk from malaria; almost 50% are at risk from indoor air pollution. - Malaria kills about one million people per year; indoor air pollution kills over 1.6 million. - Recently the UN General Assembly restated their aim to control malaria. While indoor air pollution is starting to gain recognition, there is not yet a worldwide campaign for healthy indoor air. 3.0.4 Facts on the Stoves - They are simple wood burning stoves made from cement, block and bricks that encase the fire and provide a chimney to vent smoke out of the home. - They cut down the amount of smoke and carbon dioxide in the home by 70%. - They use 75% less firewood than three-stone fires thus saving resources and time used collecting firewood. - They add 10-15 years of life to every person in the household. - They protect small children from major burns and women from losing their eyesight prematurely - In September 2000 the member states of the United Nations unanimously adopted the Millennium Declaration that set in place the Millennium Development Goals of reducing poverty by 2015 to include reducing child mortality - The stoves greatly contribute to the goal of reducing child mortality by two-thirds by 2015 3.0.5 Short-term economic benefits of installing a stove  Stoves themselves are NOT an “income enhancer” – a family does not earn more income by having a stove

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  

Does not affect the main income earner, the father, who still works outside of the home Less time spent by mother and children collecting firewood, allowing more time for education and potential economic opportunities for the mothers Money can be saved (spent on food, clothes, medicine) by not having to spend on medical bills for lung disease caused by smoke inhalation, though this is small as this money often isn’t spent anyway, so cannot be put into the argument

Any money saved should be put towards educating and feeding the child

3.0.6 Long-term economic benefits of installing a stove     The most obvious one is the children and education A child spending less time searching for firewood has more time for study A child’s potential earning capacity is greatly enhanced, thus more education, especially secondary and college. Here is where the payback can happen: an educated child in better employment knows the long-term benefits of education for their own children, so MUST commit to sending their children to school as well. 3.0.7 Long-term responsibilities The family with a stove must do all they can to make sure their child is educated, fed and looked after. A healthy child is more likely to pass exams than a sickly one. The child must also be given time for homework, study etc. The educated and better-employed child must do all they can to make sure their own children have a better education 3.0.8 Conclusion Stoves do not create wealth immediately, the money earner in the family still works in the fields, whether he/she has a stove or not. Stoves do allow increased time resources for the children for study and for mothers to work more. The stoves have been viewed as a success and there are families in San Rafael with children in our school who want a stove in their home. GVI Staff will continue with the stove building project in San Rafael and will introduce the scheme in Barbasco in the near future. 31

4.0 Looking Forward In our work with both Primary Schools in the communities of San Rafael & Barbasco, we plan to continue receiving more volunteers to enable us to give more assistance in the schools, either providing greater one on one / small group teaching, or helping the teachers with more grades in the school. In the Colegio Privado there is huge potential to expand our work as students are extremely eager to continue their studies. Are aims in these areas involve expanding and improving educational opportunities, supplementing our food programs, increasing the number of volunteers with in our projects and beginning to become self-sufficient in terms of funding. 4.0.1 Expanding Educational Opportunities    Extend the Colegio Privado to include the next “Carrera”, next three grades of education, 10th,11th& 12th Building more classrooms to allow more grades in the colegio and to have the local kindergarden as part of the San Rafael school Building a new classroom in Barbasco to allow the students a move spacious environment to study ( at present conditions they are very cramped ). 4.0.2 Supplementing Food Programs  Beginning vegetable gardens in both schools to supplement the daily food programs: fruit, vegetables, etc 4.0.3 Increasing Volume of Volunteers/Self Sufficiency in Funding    Generating more staff to past/future volunteer communication First Honduras Bike Charity Challenge in 2011 Expanding and improving our projects to attract future and creative ways to generate funding

5.0 Financial Support The substantial fixed costs and variable costs to run GVI Phoenix in Honduras is covered mainly (up to 80%) by volunteer fees and the rest by the GVI Charitable Trust. This is, of course, dependent on volunteer numbers.

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5.1 Charity Challenges 2010 Between 21st November and 3rd December, two consecutive groups completed the Volcano Charity Challenges, with guides from Old Town Outfitters, climbing five volcanoes each: Pacaya, Santa María, Tajumulco, San Pedro and Acatenango to raise money for the projects via the GVI Charitable Trust. In all, over $20,000 were raised which were invested in increased food and fruit programs (with the increase in number of children), refurbishments, increased community schemes, a new school in Santa María and a $5,000 emergency fund. A Biking Challenge is set for March 2011 and the Volcano Challenge will again be run in November.

5.2 GVI Charitable Trust We rely on the GVI Charitable Trust to make up the difference between the money we receive from GVI volunteers for fixed costs, and what we need overall. These two sources of income are our only sources. Volunteers raise money before and after they join us, running marathons, weddings etc and also through Standing Orders. The GVI Charitable Trust is registered in the UK, Charity Registration number: 1111494. 100% of all money raised through the Trust comes to us in the field, as GVI covers all administration costs. It is forecast that we will need $36,000 in 2011 to cover these extra costs through the GVICT. 6.0References UNESCO Database: ECLAC, Millennium Development Goals, A Latin American and Caribbean Perspective 2005 33

GVI Phoenix – Sandra Rebecca, Barbasco; Carolina Rodas, San Rafael United Nations World Food Program - http://www.wfp.org/countries/honduras IFAD - http://www.ruralpovertyportal.org/web/guest/home CIA World Factbook https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-

factbook/geos/ho.html World Bank - http://data.worldbank.org/country/honduras Ministerio de Trabajo y el Instituto Nacional de EstadisticaINE -

http://www.ine.gob.hn/drupal/ 7.0 Appendices Appendix A. Children attending La Escuela Fransico Morazan (Barbasco) Name Marta Lidia Garcia Blanca Alicia Lopez Wendy Arely Lopez Henry Josue Cordova KevenJosue Rivera Marvin Adan Cordova Orlin Ariel Rivera OrlinNoe Lopez Brenda Aracely Garcia Eva Lucilinda Garcia Iris Floridalma Garcia Juana Argentina Bueso Maria Guadelupe Perez DeibyOquelyMontufar Elder Eli Gutierrez ErlinJosue Guerra Ever Adaliol Lopez Juan Antonio Marvin Jesus Garza Melvin Antonio Garza Osman Josue Rivera Delmi Esperanza Garcia Karol Yaneth Cordova Marleny Concepcion Guerra Grade 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd 3rd 34

Rosa Maydei Lopez Yeni Patricia Arevalo Cain Antonio Erick Danilo Lopez Jose Manual Ramos Luis Antonio Lopez Saul Ernesto Gutierrez Brenda Adali Guerra Denia Elizabeth Arevalo Digna Ester Lopez Erika Patricia Lopez Gloria Isabel Perez Franklin JosueGaldomez Jose Donaldo Cardona Jose Roberto Montutar Oscar Geovany Lopez Walter Mauricio Arevalo Claudia Guerra Elsa Orlinda Lopez Karla YesseniaArevalo SuaniYulissa de Jesus Flor Amanda Guerra HeidyLizethArevalo Maria Del CarmanPerez Cardona Tania Elizabeth Domingez BayronDaniloArevalo Carlos Moises Cardona Daniel de Jesus Lopez Darwin Esau Guerra Franklin Eliud Alvarez Hugo Leonel Rosales Marco Antonio Montutar

3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 5th 5th 5th 5th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th

Appendix B. Children attending GVI Phoenix San Rafael Colegio Amalia Patricia Guerra Vasuez Dora Alicia Rosales Lopez Ernestina Recinos Gutierrez LedyJohanaArevaloGaldamez MadelinaRecinosRecinos Gutierrez Maria Angelica Martinez Recinos Mariana Recinos Garcia Marianela Garcia Rosales 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 35

Rosa Delmy Lopez Rosa Yaneth Velasquez Garcia Wendy Carolina ArevaloGaldamez Abner Jose Rosales Lopez Daniel de Jesus Portillo Romero Eber Alexander Arevalo Guerra Hector Rene Martinez Lopez Henry JosueArriaga Hernandez Jesus Adalberto Rivera Lopez Luis Edilberto Garcia Hernandez Mario Hernandez Martinez Olvin Jose Rosales Garcia Santos Cruz Perez Hernandez WillianAdalbertoArita Pineda Brenda Maribel Martinez Diaz Fatima del Carmen Velasquez Maria Elena Velasquez Pineda Maria Orbelina Rivera Velasquez Nolvia Lourdes Guerra Vasquez Nora Rosa Amalia MartinezDiaz Norma Leticia Rivera Velasquez Sandra ConcepcionVelasquezGarcia Gonzalo PerezMendez Jesus Armando Martinez Rivera Manuel de JesusLopezVasquez Miguel Angel Mendoza Martinez Nelson Adalberto Arevalo Guerra Santos MartiroPerezMendez YoniJohelVelasquez Pineda Argelia del Carmen LopezVelasquez Gladis Ondina LopezVelasquez Gloria Argentina Velazquez Pineda Hilda del Carmen Guerra Vasquez Carlos Alberto LopezGarcia Edvin de Jesus Rivera Martinez Edwin Gabriel Cardona Garcia GadieJosueGarcia Rosales JoseAdanNajeraVelasquez Jose Ernesto RoveraNajera JoseRaulNajeraVelasquez Juan Carlos LopezVasquez Noe Perfecto Martinez Recinos NolvinOreniel Montufar Cardona Pedro Alexis NajeraLopez

7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 7th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 8th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 9th 36

Santos David Guerra Vasquez Santos Evelio LopezMartinez Wilmer Alejandro Montufar

9th 9th 9th 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 37

Appendix C. Children attending La Escuela Fransisco Morazan (San Rafael) Darling Leticia Lopez GladisSuyapa Gutierrez Pascual Irma Esperanza Gutierrez Pascual Kenia Madelyn Rosales Lopez Maria Esperanza Lopez Maritza Yaneth Portillo Romero Merlin Corina Rosa Garcia SindyMariela Lopez Garcia CristianJosue Martinez Najera Edvin Jose Lopez Diaz Elmer Javier Alverado Garcia Emanuel De Jesus Aquino GersonNahaman Lopez Mainor Alexander Martinez Garcia Pablo Rivera Aguilar Ruben Leonal Diaz Diaz Samuel De JesusDiazDiaz WiliamVincente Cruz Rivera Wilson Omar Guerra Lopez Geidy Mariela Portillo Romero Doris Yamileth VelasquezLopez Karen Adela Martinez Rivera Karen Julissa Rosales Lopez KeilynNohemy Rivera Villeda Lidia Esperanza GutierrezCanan Lola Esperanza Garcia Nolvia Carolina Mendoza Martinez Olga Carolina MartinezDiaz Rosa Idalia HernandezMartinez Antonio LopezLopez Cristian EfrainRamirez Salvador Eric JeovanyLopez Rivera Jaime De JesusMartinez Recinos JesusLopezLopez Jose Orlando RamirezRamirez Junior JackelinePerezDiaz Marcos Isaias Cruz Rivera Merlin Danilo Guerra Lopez Santos SaulGarcia Rivera

Ada Maybeli Portillo Romero Belkis Nohemi Guerra Lopez Denia Esther Lopez Villeda Edixa Yolanda LopezLopez MariaOrbelina Rosales Lopez Melida Antonia Portillo Romero Osiris YesseniaLopezGarcia Jairo Humberto MartinezLopez Jose Adalid Mendoza Martinez Jose Manuel VasquezRamirez Jose Noel Rosales Lopez Mariano Rivera Aguilar Wendy Maribel LopezHernandez Aura CorenaGutierrezCanan Delsy Marina Garcia Rivera DilciaMarilu Guerra Lopez Elsa Maribel Martinez Rivera Elsa Marisol DiazDiaz Tatiana Marbely Portillo Rivera Vilma Esperanza Martinez Rivera Hector Daniel DiazDiaz Joel Alberto Salvador Guerra Jose Cecilio VelasquezLopez Jose Luis LopezVasquez Kevin Jazmin Portillo Romero Marco Tulio Martinez Recinos Olban Alfredo MartinezLopez OrlinJesusGarcia Rosales Otoniel De Jesus Aquino Najera Gladis Yolanda Portillo Romero Gloria Arely NajeraVelasquez Sara Marisol Rivera Gutierrez Elmer IsaiasGarciaHenandez Hugo Orlando GutierrezVelasquez Jesus Isidro NajeraLopez JoseAdelmoGutierrezVelasquez JoseJeremiasNajeraLopez Jose Manuel Garcia Rosales Juan Carlos NajeraVelasquez Juan MoisesLopezGarcia Manuel De Jesus Carranza Marvin Antonio Garcia Rivera Mauro NoeVasquez Miguel AngelMartinez

3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 3rd 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 4th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 5th 38

Samuel De Jesus Rivera Berta Lidia Mendoza Martinez Francis JakelineMartinez Gloria Suyapa Cruz Rivera Sara Esperanza DiazDiaz Sonia Maribel HernandezMartinez Leonel HernandezNajera

5th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th 6th

39

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