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Veritas CommandCentral™

Storage User's Guide

for Microsoft Windows and UNIX

5.1

CommandCentral Storage User's Guide
The software described in this book is furnished under a license agreement and may be used
only in accordance with the terms of the agreement.

Documentation version 5.1.1

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Contents

Technical Support ............................................................................................... 4
Chapter 1 Introducing CommandCentral Storage ........................... 23
About Veritas CommandCentral Storage .......................................... 23
About CommandCentral Storage components .................................... 24
CommandCentral Management Server ....................................... 24
CommandCentral managed hosts .............................................. 25
Agent Push Install Utility ........................................................ 26
Logging into the CommandCentral Storage Console ............................ 26
Logging out of the CommandCentral Storage Console ......................... 27
Changing your password ............................................................... 27

Chapter 2 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console .............. 29

About the CommandCentral Storage Console .................................... 29
Header ................................................................................. 30
Tabs .................................................................................... 30
Task pane ............................................................................. 31
Content pane ......................................................................... 31
Installing security certificates in supported web browsers ................... 32
Working with object views ............................................................. 34
Displaying object view panes .................................................... 35
Understanding icons ............................................................... 35
Interpreting graphs in tables .................................................... 36
Saving graphs ....................................................................... 36
Performing operations on objects .............................................. 36
Launching another object view ................................................. 37
Customizing views ....................................................................... 37
About custom views ................................................................ 38
Customizing a single object view pane ........................................ 39
Customizing a view for an object type ........................................ 40
Creating a custom pane ........................................................... 40
Creating a custom table ........................................................... 41
Working with tables ..................................................................... 42
Filtering the information displayed in tables ............................... 43
Specifying rows and columns in tables ....................................... 48

8 Contents

Sorting information in tables ................................................... 48
Accessing multiple pages of data in tables .................................. 49
Adjusting the width of table columns ......................................... 49
Showing and hiding tables ....................................................... 50
Printing table contents ............................................................ 50
Saving table contents .............................................................. 51
Managing tasks ........................................................................... 51
About a task’s status ............................................................... 51
Checking the status of tasks ..................................................... 52
Running a task immediately ..................................................... 52
Running a task again .............................................................. 52
Cancelling a task .................................................................... 53
Customizing the Favorites list ........................................................ 54
Adding a tool to the Favorites List ............................................. 55
Adding a view to the Favorites List ............................................ 55
Changing items in the Favorites List .......................................... 55
Deleting an item from the Favorites List ..................................... 56
Changing refresh settings .............................................................. 56
Accessing online help ................................................................... 57
Online help options ................................................................ 57
Accessing CommandCentral Storage Change Manager from the
CommandCentral Storage Console ............................................. 58

Chapter 3 Managing the storage network using the Topology
Map .................................................................................. 61

About managing the storage network using the Topology Map ............. 61
About the Topology Map ............................................................... 61
Using the Topology Map ................................................................ 63
Switching between global and object topology maps ..................... 63
Viewing objects and their relationships to each other ................... 64
Zooming and panning in the Topology Map ................................. 65
Changing the topology layout ................................................... 66
Moving objects in the Topology Map .......................................... 67
Customizing the Topology Map display ............................................ 67
Collapsing and expanding fabrics .............................................. 68
Displaying multiple-port connections as single connections ........... 68
Displaying port utilization statistics .......................................... 69
Limiting the display of network paths ........................................ 69
Repositioning the topology display using the Overview
window .......................................................................... 70
Updating alert status .............................................................. 71
Opening the Topology Map in a new browser window ................... 71

Contents 9

Showing grid lines .................................................................. 72
Saving topology data .................................................................... 72
Saving your customized Topology Map ...................................... 73
Deleting a custom map ............................................................ 73

Chapter 4 Viewing and managing storage resources .................... 75

About managing storage resources .................................................. 75
Viewing information about storage resources .................................... 76
Managing storage resources ........................................................... 78
Viewing a resource's zone memberships ........................................... 78
Viewing an object’s group memberships ........................................... 79
Viewing application dependencies ................................................... 79
Viewing reports for an object ......................................................... 80
Changing projection settings .......................................................... 80
Launching third-party applications in context ................................... 82
Checking explorer states and data ................................................... 83
Displaying explorer states for a managed resource ....................... 84
Scanning the resources visible to an explorer .............................. 84
Updating discovery data .......................................................... 84
Verifying that discovery can take place ...................................... 85
Using object views to monitor network resources ............................... 86
Managing attributes ..................................................................... 87
Displaying object attributes ..................................................... 87
Adding attributes for objects .................................................... 88
Editing user-defined attributes ................................................. 88
Deleting user-defined attributes ............................................... 89

Chapter 5 Viewing and managing storage ........................................ 91
About viewing and managing storage ............................................... 91
Storage arrays and user-created enclosures ...................................... 92
Viewing the Arrays Summary ................................................... 93
About virtualized storage in the Arrays Summary table ................ 94
About the Array Host Groups table for SMI-S managed Engenio
storage arrays ................................................................. 95
About performance monitoring for RAID groups from Hitachi
USP arrays ...................................................................... 95
Viewing an array's storage capacity graphs ................................. 96
Viewing deep mapping information ........................................... 96
Viewing disks ........................................................................ 97
Viewing enclosure ports .......................................................... 97
Viewing an array's raw storage volumes ..................................... 98

10 Contents

Viewing an array's volumes and volume groups for the IBM
DS6000 and DS8000 storage system enclosures ..................... 98
Viewing an array's extent pools and other objects for the IBM
DS6000 and DS8000 storage system enclosures ..................... 99
Viewing an array's replication objects ...................................... 100
Viewing an EMC CLARiiON array LUN's storage groups ............... 102
Viewing a storage adapter's connectivity .................................. 103
Viewing Hitachi HiCommand array performance
information ................................................................... 104
Viewing an array's special host connections .............................. 105
Refreshing HDS subsystems ................................................... 105
Performing operations on arrays ............................................. 106
NetApp unified storage ................................................................ 108
Viewing NetApp unified storage devices ................................... 109
Viewing NetApp volumes, aggregates, and FlexClones ................. 110
Viewing NetApp qtrees .......................................................... 112
Viewing NetApp disks ........................................................... 113
Performing operations on NetApp unified storage devices ........... 113
Direct-attached storage ............................................................... 114
Viewing direct-attached storage .............................................. 115
Performing operations on direct-attached storage devices ........... 115
Unenclosed devices ..................................................................... 116
Viewing unenclosed storage devices ......................................... 116
Performing operations on unenclosed storage devices ................. 116
LUNs ........................................................................................ 117
Viewing LUNs ...................................................................... 117
Performing operations on LUNs .............................................. 118
Device handles ........................................................................... 119
Viewing device handles ......................................................... 119
Performing operations on device handles .................................. 120

Chapter 6 Viewing and managing applications .............................. 121
About viewing and managing applications ...................................... 121
Exchange servers ....................................................................... 121
Viewing Exchange servers ...................................................... 122
Performing operations on Exchange servers .............................. 123
Clustered services ....................................................................... 124
Viewing clustered services ..................................................... 124
Viewing cluster nodes ........................................................... 124
Performing operations on clustered services ............................. 125
NetBackup instances ................................................................... 125
Viewing NetBackup instances ................................................. 125

Contents 11

Performing operations on NetBackup instances ......................... 126

Chapter 7 Viewing and managing databases ................................. 127
About viewing and managing databases .......................................... 127
Viewing Oracle database objects .................................................... 127
Viewing the Oracle Summary .................................................. 128
Viewing Oracle instances ....................................................... 128
Viewing Oracle tablespaces .................................................... 129
Viewing Oracle database files ................................................. 129
Performing operations on Oracle database objects ...................... 130
Viewing Sybase database objects ................................................... 130
Viewing the Sybase Summary ................................................. 130
Viewing Sybase adaptive servers ............................................. 131
Viewing Sybase databases ...................................................... 132
Viewing Sybase containers ..................................................... 132
Viewing Sybase segments ...................................................... 133
Viewing Sybase database files ................................................. 134
Performing operations on Sybase database objects ..................... 135
Viewing DB2 database objects ....................................................... 135
Viewing the DB2 Summary ..................................................... 135
Viewing DB2 instances .......................................................... 136
Viewing DB2 tablespaces ....................................................... 136
Viewing DB2 databases .......................................................... 137
Viewing DB2 containers ......................................................... 138
Viewing DB2 database files ..................................................... 138
Performing operations on DB2 database objects ......................... 139
Viewing MS-SQL database objects .................................................. 139
Viewing the MS-SQL Summary ............................................... 139
Viewing MS-SQL instances ..................................................... 140
Viewing MS-SQL databases .................................................... 141
Viewing MS-SQL file groups ................................................... 141
Viewing MS-SQL containers ................................................... 142
Viewing MS-SQL database files ............................................... 142
Performing operations on MS-SQL database objects .................... 143

Chapter 8 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs ....................... 145
About viewing and managing hosts and HBAs .................................. 145
Clusters .................................................................................... 146
Viewing clusters ................................................................... 146
Performing operations on clusters ........................................... 147
Hosts ....................................................................................... 147
Viewing the Hosts Summary ................................................... 148

........................ 151 Viewing Veritas Volume Manager disk groups ............................................................................. 157 Virtualization servers ............................................................................................................... 153 Virtual hosts ......................... 150 Viewing host volumes ...................................................... 156 Viewing virtual host details ............................. 171 About viewing and managing the storage infrastructure ...................................................... 161 Storage pools ................................... 162 Viewing storage pools ...................................................................................................... 155 Viewing virtual hosts ............. 172 Manually assigning names to fabrics ............................. 164 Viewing HBAs ............................................. 163 Viewing storage pool details ................................................. 165 Performing operations on HBA ports ...................................................................................................................... 164 Host bus adapters (HBAs) ..................................................... 152 Viewing Solaris Volume Manager disk sets and related objects ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 168 Viewing unidentified adapters ................... 171 Fabrics ....................................................... 167 Performing operations on iSCSI initiators ..................................................... 174 Viewing the Switches Summary ......... 174 .......................................................... 163 Performing operations on storage pools .... 151 Viewing host disks .................... 149 Viewing host file systems ................ 160 Performing operations on virtualization servers ...................................................................... 167 Viewing iSCSI initiators ................................ 164 Performing operations on HBAs ...... 149 Viewing host applications ................................................................................... 169 Chapter 9 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure ......................................................................................................... 166 iSCSI initiators ............................................................................................................... 167 Unidentified adapters ............................ 169 Performing operations on unidentified adapters ................................................................................. 159 Viewing virtualization server details .... 156 Performing operations on virtual hosts ............................................... 172 Viewing fabrics ................. 173 Switches ................................ 152 Performing operations on hosts ........................................12 Contents Viewing host file details ........................................... 172 Performing operations on fabrics ........................................................................................... 165 Viewing HBA ports ......................... 158 Viewing virtualization servers ..............

...... 187 Hubs ................. modifying...................... 191 Updating port bundles ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 180 Saving Cisco switch configurations .................................................. and zone aliases ............. 189 Performing operations on hubs .............................. 205 Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by specifying host information ........................................................................ 175 Viewing port bundles for switches .............................................................. 200 Chapter 11 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts ............................................... 186 Performing operations on zone objects ............ 196 Creating enclosure objects ....................................................................................... 177 Performing operations on switch ports ........................................................................... 176 Viewing switch ports ...................................................................... 175 Viewing isolated switches . 186 Viewing zones........................ 189 Viewing hubs ................................................................ 189 Using port bundles to manage links ..... 180 Saving and restoring Brocade switch configurations .......................................................................................... zone sets....................................... 190 Viewing port bundles . 205 Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by matching patterns in zone names or zone aliases . 208 ............................................... 201 How the Management Server discovers storage resources through agentless capabilities ........................................... 195 About user-defined objects ............................................. and zone aliases .............................................................................................. 179 Viewing performance data for switch ports .......................................... Contents 13 Viewing switch slots ......... 199 Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database ................... 178 Performing operations on other switch objects .... 202 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts .................................................. and deleting user-defined storage objects ............................................................. 176 Performing operations on switches ............ 179 Enabling and disabling switch ports ....................... 192 Deleting port bundles ...... 201 Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts ........... 198 Editing user-created hosts ............................. 193 Chapter 10 Creating................................... 184 Zones........ 195 Creating hub objects .................. 191 Creating port bundles .................................................... 183 Setting nicknames for McDATA switch connections ............... zone sets......

........................ 229 Storage consumption ................................................. 218 Editing the master CSV for the automatic correlation process ............................................................ 225 Disabling the automatic correlation process ....................................................................................... 231 Monitoring the network ................................................................... 223 Approving the correlations that CommandCentral Storage detects ............................................................................................................. 220 Editing zone alias naming patterns for the automatic correlation process .. 228 Viewing reports for an object ................................................................................................................. 229 Efficient use of storage ................................................... 227 Viewing reports for the whole network ........... 223 Starting the automatic correlation process ...........................................................14 Contents Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by importing a CSV file ...................... 221 Enabling zone name and zone alias rules for the automatic correlation process ......................................... 224 Viewing the list unidentified adapters that were automatically correlated ............... 235 Specifying a directory for archived reports ........................................................................................................ 232 Summary reports .......... 236 Displaying archived reports .......................... 230 Resource inventory .......................................... 231 Performance and trends ..................................... 227 About managing storage and performance reports ...................................................................... 237 Sending archived reports by email ..................................... 225 Chapter 12 Using CommandCentral Storage reports ....... 234 Preserving report data ......................................................................... 228 Finding the reports you need .............................................................. 239 .. 238 Adjusting a report’s time frame ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 237 Deleting archived reports ........... 233 Detail reports ............................................................. 222 Disabling zone name and zone alias rules for the automatic correlation process ............................................ 217 Enabling the automatic correlation process ...... 235 Creating archive reports .. 219 Editing zone naming patterns for the automatic correlation process ......................... 232 About summary and detail reports ....................................................... 235 Archiving reports ...................................................................................................... 213 Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts ....................................................

....................................... 272 File Usage by User report ...................................................... 248 Storage Consumption Summary report ..................................... 275 Unified Storage Inventory Detail report ............ 260 Virtualization Server Capacity Trending report ................................................................................................................................................ 268 Directory Aging Summary report ........................ 270 Stale Directories report ................. 271 User Reports ............. 263 File Aging Detail report ..................................... 244 Online Storage Capacity Summary report .......... 273 File Type Usage by User report ...................................... 262 File Aging Summary report ................................... 258 Host Virtualization Detail Report ....................... 256 Storage Array Capacity Trend Summary report ......................... 262 File Type Usage report ............................................................................................................................................................................. 245 Online Storage Capacity Detail report ............................................................................................................................................................. 240 Chapter 13 Using the default reports .......... 280 Software Inventory Detail report ............... 265 Duplicate Files report ....................................................................... 255 Storage Array Replication Detail report ........................ 273 File Usage by Domain report .................................................................. 277 Physical Inventory Detail report ............................................... 260 File and directory reports .............................................. 276 Physical Inventory Summary report ... 274 File Aging by User report ...................... 256 Application Growth Summary report ....... 266 Duplicate File Details report .................................................................................................... 275 Unified Storage Inventory Summary report ......................... 267 Directory Usage report ............................................................................................................................. Contents 15 Getting help about reports ......................................................... 257 Storage Array Capacity Trend Detail report ................................................... 250 Storage Consumption Detail report ........................................................................... 269 Directory Aging Detail report ...................................................................... 267 Stale Files report ................................... 261 File Usage report ................... 254 Storage Array Replication Summary report .......................................................................... 258 Host Virtualization Summary Report ......... 264 File Type Aging report ...................... 243 About default reports .................................................. 278 Software Inventory Summary report ............................. 243 Storage reports ..................................... 274 Resource reports ............................... 280 .........................................

.................................................................................................................... 289 Array Performance Detail report .......................................................................................... 284 Unified Storage Performance Summary report ................. 296 Audit History Detail report ........................................... 292 History reports ............. 299 About creating custom reports and notification ................ 310 Sending data from a single report by email ............................................................ 300 Naming and classifying a custom report ............................ 303 Setting report precision ................. 293 Alert Summary report ............................................................ 300 Creating custom reports ..............................................................................................................16 Contents Switch Port Usage Summary report ............................................ 283 Switch Port Usage Trend report ................................................................................................. 282 Switch Port Usage Detail report ........ 286 Host Performance Summary report ................................................................................................................................................. 294 Alert Detail report ....................................................... 299 Changing the display in the default reports ................................................... 291 Switch Port Performance Detail report . 307 Scheduling reports for notification ................................................... 304 Viewing and managing custom reports ................................................................... 308 Scheduling regular report notification .............................. 310 Cancelling report notification ........... 301 Selecting which tables and graphs display ................................................................. 285 Unified Storage Performance Detail report ...................... 283 Performance reports ........ 305 Modifying custom reports ................................................................................................................................ 297 Chapter 14 Creating custom reports and using them for notification ......... 310 ..................... 306 Grouping custom reports ................... 295 Audit History Summary report ................. 289 Switch Port Performance Summary report ........................ 306 Deleting custom reports .... 307 Using custom reports for notification ..... 305 About sample ad hoc reports ....... 284 How performance reports use collectors .................. 287 Array Performance Summary report .......................... 299 Customizing the display in a report .................................................................................................. 301 Setting the custom report scope .......................... 303 Setting the time frame for a report ................................. 286 Host Performance Detail report ..................................................... 308 Changing the schedule for report notification .... 305 Viewing custom reports .............................................................................................................

.............................................................................. 317 Policy-based monitoring ....................... 324 The way policies work ................................................. 321 The Simple Instrumentation Collection Layer (SICL) ..... 323 About policies ........................................................................................................................................................ 327 Editing policies .......................................................................... Contents 17 Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) ........................................ 319 SNMP polling ................................................................... 323 The elements of a policy .............. 325 The role of alerts ................................... 327 Establishing your own policies .............. 332 Editing global conditions for policies ................ 311 Sample queries for ad hoc reports ............... 321 Array-specific monitoring tools ............................... 336 Defining trap notifications for policies .............. 328 Editing the policy scope ...... 339 ................................................ 317 About CommandCentral Storage monitoring features ..... 333 Defining email notifications sent when policy conditions occur ..... 338 Enabling an Alarm Manager-initiated executable to interact with the Windows desktop ........................... 322 Chapter 16 Monitoring storage resources using policies ........ 322 Collector information in CommandCentral Storage reports .................................................................................... 311 Creating and saving an ad hoc report ...................................................................................... 324 Examples of policies ..... 318 Methods used by CommandCentral Storage to gather data ......................... 335 Defining error log notifications for policies ......................... 315 Chapter 15 Monitoring the storage network ................................................................................... 318 Policies and collectors ............................................. 325 Types of policy conditions ............. 329 Editing policies based on numeric conditions ................... 321 Displaying monitoring data in the CommandCentral Storage Console ...................................................... 322 Policies and the Alert Manager . 319 The Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) ....................................................................................................... 326 Types of policy actions ................................................................................................................................................................. 330 Editing policies based on textual state conditions ............ 337 Defining command actions initiated by policies ................................................................................................................................ 313 Modifying an ad hoc report ......................................................................................... 327 Resources you can manage with policies ..................... 319 SNMP traps .............................................

.............. and alerts .. 346 Creating a policy based on a specific collector ................................................................................. 352 Defining and managing notification ................................................................................ 368 .............................. 358 About notification failure logs .............................. 342 Editing the policy’s alert message ... 364 Viewing collector descriptions .... 366 Configuring logging for a numeric collector ........................... 349 Creating a global policy .......................................................... 364 Viewing the collectors associated with an object .................... 347 Creating a policy for a specific object ..................................................................................................... 360 Importing policies ............................................................................................... 356 Defining a notification recipient group ......... policies......................................................... 367 Configuring logging for a state collector ................... 360 Chapter 17 Viewing and managing collectors..................................................................................... 352 Deleting policies ......................................... 358 Deleting notification recipients .......... 351 Disabling and enabling policies ............................................. 343 Copying policies .............................................................. 344 Copying a policy for a different object ..................................... 357 Editing notification recipient groups ...................................................................................... 346 Creating a policy by selecting a collector from a list ......................... 354 Defining a new notification trap recipient ............................................................................. 351 Disabling policies ................................................................ 344 Copying a policy and applying it to a single object ............ 368 Configuring data retention for collector and alert data ........... 345 Creating policies ................................................. 355 Editing notification information for trap recipients ................................ 359 Distributing policies among multiple systems .. 339 Editing the policy name and description ........................................................ 365 Configuring logging for multiple numeric collectors .....18 Contents Using variable data in notifications and alerts ... 350 Customizing a new policy ............................... 363 About viewing and managing collectors ................... 365 Viewing the collectors associated with a policy ................................................................... 353 Defining a new notification email recipient ..... 366 Configuring logging for multiple state collectors ..................... 353 Editing notification information about email recipients ..................... 351 Enabling policies ........................................................................................................ 363 Using collector tables .................................................................... 348 Creating a policy for an object type .............. 359 Exporting policies ..............

... 383 About virtual fabrics: Providing enhanced access control ..................................................................................................... 375 Acknowledging alerts ................................................. 392 Expanding EMC CLARiiON RAID groups . 384 Chapter 19 Making storage resources available to hosts ......................... 374 Displaying alerts for a network resource .................. 372 Viewing the alerts summary ................................................................................... 377 About provisioning: Allocating storage to hosts ............................ 369 Displaying policies and collectors associated with a particular object .............. 388 Finding LUNs using the LUN Query Tool ................................................ 369 Using policy tables ...... 381 About zoning in CommandCentral Storage ................................................................ 372 Working with individual alerts ......... 370 Viewing information about notifications and recipients ........................... Contents 19 About viewing and managing policies ............. 379 About provisioning: Fabric zoning ......... 383 Scheduling storage provisioning tasks ..................... 370 Viewing and working with individual policies ................ 378 About provisioning: LUN masking ............................................ 391 Creating RAID groups and LUNs on EMC arrays ................................................................................................................................................................... 388 Adding or editing LUN attributes ... 382 About zone sets .................. 394 Creating EMC CLARiiON FLARE LUNs ..... 379 About provisioning: Virtual fabric partitioning .......................................................... 375 Displaying alerts for associated objects ............. 387 About identifying storage that meets your needs ............... 375 Chapter 18 Provisioning resources in your storage network ..... 394 Creating EMC Symmetrix metadevices ....... 398 Expanding EMC CLARiiON metaLUNs ....................................................... 370 Displaying policies based on a particular collector ................................................................................................................................................................. 401 .... 379 About groups: Organizing storage resources ................................................ 377 About provisioning: LUN binding ... 395 Creating EMC CLARiiON metaLUNs ..................................................... 372 About alert severity levels .................................. 393 Creating EMC Symmetrix/DMX devices (symdevs) ........ 392 Creating EMC CLARiiON RAID groups ................................ 387 About making storage resources available to hosts ......................................................................... 380 About soft and hard fabric zoning .......................... 380 About zones: Controlling access to storage resources ............................................. 371 Viewing and managing alerts ................................................................................

....................................... 418 Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard ...................................... 404 Creating LUNs on Hitachi arrays ............20 Contents Creating disk groups and virtual disks (LUNs) on H-P EVA arrays ........................................ 415 Creating Engenio volumes (LUNs) ................................................................. 405 Creating Hitachi logical devices (LDEVs) .................................................................... 428 ... 413 Creating volume groups and volumes (LUNs) on Engenio arrays ........................... 424 Creating host connections on IBM ESS (Shark) arrays ............................... 428 Specialized groups ................................... 420 Creating and managing CLARiiON storage groups ....................................................................... 419 Unmasking array storage from host ports using the LUN Masking wizard ... 417 Destroying raw storage volumes (RSVs) ....................... 408 Creating IBM ESS (Shark) volumes ............ 428 Viewing groups and their members ........................ 415 Returning storage to its original state ................................................................................................ 407 Creating RSVs and LUNs on IBM arrays ...................................................................................... 418 Providing access to storage ..................... 406 Creating Hitachi LUSE aggregate LUNs .... 411 Creating RAID groups and logical volumes (LUNs) on Fujitsu arrays .............................................................. 412 Creating Fujitsu RAID groups ......................................... 410 Creating IBM DS4000 (FastT) logical drives ........ 408 Creating IBM ESS (Shark) volume spaces .................................................................... 422 Creating HBA port groups on H-P StorageWorks EVA arrays ........................................................................... 413 Creating Fujitsu logical volumes (LUNs) ..... 409 Creating IBM DS4000 (FastT) volume arrays ............................................................................. 421 Creating HBA port groups on EMC CLARiiON arrays .................... 426 Chapter 20 Organizing storage assets using groups .................................................................................. 414 Creating Engenio volume groups .............................. 427 About groups ................. 427 Nested groups .................................................... 402 Creating H-P EVA disk groups ........................................................... 403 Creating H-P EVA virtual disks (LUNs) ............................................... 425 Creating initiator groups on NetApp unified storage devices .............................................. 402 Expanding H-P EVA disk groups .............................................................................................................. 417 Destroying individual LUNs ................. 420 Creating logical groupings of resources for provisioning .............................................................................................................

..................................................... 440 Creating zone aliases ........ 461 .................................................................................................................. 448 Viewing active and inactive zone sets ................. 458 Editing storage views (array virtual ports) ........................... 457 About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs .................. 433 Creating and modifying zones ............................................... 441 Modifying zone aliases ................. 449 Chapter 22 Using virtual fabrics to allocate storage resources ...................................................................... 432 Chapter 21 Provisioning storage using zones ................. 439 Using zone aliases to simplify zone administration .............................. 453 Enabling and disabling virtual fabrics ........... 433 Creating zones .................................................................. 433 Modifying zones ................. 458 Creating storage views (array virtual ports) .................... 430 Deleting generic groups .............................................................. 451 Viewing and managing virtual fabrics ........................................ 444 Creating zone sets ............... 429 Creating groups ...... 436 Removing zones ............................................................................... 454 Chapter 23 Advanced provisioning ...................................................................................... 454 Saving the Cisco MDS switch configuration ......... 446 Removing zone sets ........................ 444 Using zone sets to handle changing network conditions ........................................................ 460 Creating array virtual ports ............................. 443 Viewing zone aliases .................................. 447 Enabling and disabling zone sets ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 453 Changing a virtual fabric’s active status ........................................................... 429 Updating groups .............................................................................................................................. 455 Performing advanced LUN mapping .......................................................... 451 Creating and updating virtual fabrics .................................................... Contents 21 Creating and updating generic groups .... 455 Mapping LUNs manually ............ 454 Deleting virtual fabrics .................... 459 Destroying storage views (array virtual ports) ......................................... 442 Removing zone aliases ............................................................. 446 Modifying zone sets ..................................................................... 445 Copying zone sets ........................................................... 455 Removing array port mapping from LUNs ...............................................................................

.................................................... 463 Making paths available to Volume Manager hosts ............................................................................... 483 Capacity policies for disk arrays ................ 467 About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage ................................................................................................................................. 462 Removing array virtual ports ............................................................. 484 Environment policies for disk arrays ............................................... 474 Storage pool and raw disk mapping utilization ........................... 468 Logical storage ............................................................................................................................. 474 Storage consumption ..................................................................................... 480 Availability policies for switches ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 481 Availability policies for hosts ................22 Contents Modifying array virtual ports ............................................................. 500 Glossary . 464 Viewing objects that are configured for multipathing ......................................... 490 Error policies for switches .... 495 Traffic policies for switches ....................................................................................... 473 Server virtualization allocation . 479 Administration policies ......................................... 464 Enabling and disabling paths ..... 503 Index .......................................................... 482 Availability policies for databases and applications .. 477 Appendix B Predefined policies ...................................... 483 Capacity policies for file systems ....... 499 Navigating the CommandCentral Storage Console ......... 476 Storage usage by applications . 469 Claimed status for allocated storage ....................................................................................................................................................................... 496 Appendix C Accessibility features .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 464 Appendix A Definitions for storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage .................. 484 Environment policies for switches .......................... 479 Availability policies for disk arrays ....................................................... 492 Performance policies for disk arrays ............. 475 Storage usage by hosts ... 499 Accessibility features in dialog boxes .......... 521 ............................... 467 Physical storage ....................

email. The Console enables users to set policies that automate notification. and zoning capabilities to ensure that the storage infrastructure runs as efficiently as possible. recovery. applications. giving you what you need to manage your storage infrastructure more effectively. manage. The CommandCentral Storage Console seamlessly integrates performance and policy management. . It gives you the following capabilities: ■ Offers a single console from which data center administrators deploy. storage provisioning. and expand a multi-vendor networked storage environment. and other user-definable actions. Chapter 1 Introducing CommandCentral Storage This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About Veritas CommandCentral Storage ■ About CommandCentral Storage components ■ Logging into the CommandCentral Storage Console ■ Logging out of the CommandCentral Storage Console ■ Changing your password About Veritas CommandCentral Storage Veritas CommandCentral Storage by Symantec represents an entire storage resource management (SRM) solution. The reporting features in CommandCentral Storage provide a complete and detailed view into precisely how and where storage—for office documents. and databases—is used in your enterprise. files. ■ Discovers and tracks the utilization and allocation of storage resources down to the disk level.

and uninstall of UNIX managed hosts is accomplished via the product’s install and uninstall scripts. CommandCentral Storage helps ensure optimal performance and availability of business critical applications. generates HTML pages for end users. ■ Agent Push Install Utility—a Windows application that enables you to install. Armed with this data.24 Introducing CommandCentral Storage About CommandCentral Storage components ■ Shows usage trends and makes forward projections. See “CommandCentral Management Server” on page 24. event and policy management. storage arrays. Installation. About CommandCentral Storage components Based on a distributed client-server architecture. CommandCentral Storage also offers customizable policy-based management to automate notification. This means you can get baseline information without huge deployment costs. You also have what you need to implement a program of departmental chargeback. IT managers have the tools they need to perform real. end-to-end storage resource management and make strategic decisions about their future storage needs. active. files. or uninstall Windows managed hosts. The Management Server performs the following functions: . You can gather data both locally and remotely (through a managed host). CommandCentral Storage consists of the following components: ■ CommandCentral Management Server—provides discovery of network and storage resources. Using CommandCentral Storage together with other Symantec software. CommandCentral Management Server The CommandCentral Management Server constantly explores your storage network to make data available to client applications. provides data collection and logging. recovery. you can do predictive modeling to analyze the return on your storage investment. and other user-definable actions. upgrade. See “CommandCentral managed hosts” on page 25. By actively managing the entire data path from application to array. and applications. upgrade. See “Agent Push Install Utility” on page 26. and notification services. ■ CommandCentral managed hosts—discovers comprehensive information about storage resources connected to the hosts in your storage network. hosts.

These managed hosts. and—using policies you can create and customize—perform actions in response to certain events and conditions ■ Monitor the ways in which allocated storage is used by applications and file systems ■ Collect and log data for the purpose of generating reports in the CommandCentral Storage Console ■ Provide mechanisms with which Symantec products and components can share common functionality and interoperate with each other CommandCentral Storage ships with several explorers. Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) clusters. routers. direct-attached storage. managed hosts assist the Management Server in discovering and managing resources throughout the entire network. . and virtual hubs ■ Information about Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM) hosts. The Web Engine transmits content from the Management Server to users who view the Console in Web browsers. Each explorer is a software tool that uses a unique methodology to discover information about a particular kind of object on the network. bridges. and unenclosed storage devices ■ Physical entities such as switches. can discover comprehensive information about network objects and manage storage in arrays. The explorers provided in the default installation of CommandCentral Storage can discover the following network elements: ■ Storage arrays. and switches ■ Provide detailed. and other devices ■ Logical groupings of entities such as enclosures. connected to the Management Server. host bus adapters (HBAs). zones. CommandCentral managed hosts Because information about your storage resources may not be visible to the host on which the Management Server is installed. granular data about file size and usage in file systems and mail servers ■ Monitor all discovered objects. and manage the allocation of storage for use by hosts and applications ■ Discover network objects including hosts. and application-specific objects such as database instances The Management Server also has a Web Engine component. Introducing CommandCentral Storage 25 About CommandCentral Storage components ■ Discover arrays and other storage devices. HBAs.

See the CommandCentral Installation Guide. To log into CommandCentral Storage 1 On a client system that has a network connection to the Management Server. you can view storage resources. or uninstall program code.26 Introducing CommandCentral Storage Logging into the CommandCentral Storage Console The managed host consists of several explorers that are also used by the Management Server. The utility provides you with access to managed hosts to install. The following tips can help make it easier to connect: ■ On Windows clients. and portNumber is the port through which you are connecting. you can create a shortcut using this URL to facilitate launching the CommandCentral Storage Console on the Windows Start menu. Example: https://myhost. upgrade. provision storage. administer zoning. Your browser must be configured to accept cookies. and launch third-party management tools. and devices managed over IP networks. generate reports. . Agent Push Install Utility The Agent Push Install Utility enables you to install and update program code on Windows managed hosts from one central location.com:8443/cc You can connect to any Management Server to which you have IP connectivity and for which your storage administrator has provided you with user credentials. either disable them or configure them to accept pop-ups from the Management Server. IP address. type the following URL and press Enter: https://HostName:portNumber/cc where HostName is the host name. which is called the Console.example. If you are using pop-up blockers. 2 In the browser’s address field. or fully qualified domain name of the host on which the Management Server is running. create and modify policies. invoke a Web browser. Logging into the CommandCentral Storage Console At the heart of CommandCentral Storage is a graphical user interface that displays information about network resources and events in a variety of easily navigable formats. including explorers that discover arrays. The default port number is 8443. Fibre Channel-capable switches. Using this interface.

2 After the Console disconnects from the CommandCentral Storage Management Server. Introducing CommandCentral Storage 27 Logging out of the CommandCentral Storage Console ■ See the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide for information about regenerating the CommandCentral Storage Web Engine keystore certificate to avoid receiving security alert warnings when you start the Console. use this procedure to exit it. ■ Type your user name and password in the respective fields. See “Changing your password” on page 27. Logging out of the CommandCentral Storage Console When you are finished using the Console. 3 In the drop-down list. do the following and click Login: ■ Click Storage in the Start In list. See “Logging out of the CommandCentral Storage Console” on page 27. click the domain in which your user name is defined. Example: cc_users@myhost. select (check) your user name. close your Web browser. click Edit User and click Go. See “Logging into the CommandCentral Storage Console” on page 26.example. To change the password with which you connect to the Management Server 1 In the Console. 2 In the Users table. ■ In the Domain list.com The CommandCentral Storage Console displays the Managing Summary pane for the Management Server to which you have connected. . 4 In the Edit User dialog box. See “Logging into the CommandCentral Storage Console” on page 26. do the following and click OK: ■ Click Change Password. 3 In the Login page. Changing your password We recommend that you periodically change the password with which you connect to the Management Server. To log out of CommandCentral Storage 1 Click Logout in the Console header. click Settings > Management Server > Users.

28 Introducing CommandCentral Storage Changing your password ■ In the Old Password field. The Management Server updates your password. type a new password. ■ In both the New Password and Re-type New Password fields. type your current password. .

a task pane. Chapter 2 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About the CommandCentral Storage Console ■ Installing security certificates in supported web browsers ■ Working with object views ■ Customizing views ■ Working with tables ■ Managing tasks ■ Customizing the Favorites list ■ Changing refresh settings ■ Accessing online help ■ Accessing CommandCentral Storage Change Manager from the CommandCentral Storage Console About the CommandCentral Storage Console The CommandCentral Storage Console displays in a Web browser and consists of a header. and the main content pane. . a set of tabs.

a series of tabs provide access to each major area of the CommandCentral Storage Console: ■ Managing: View objects in the storage network and perform management operations on them ■ Reporting: Create and view reports about network resources and storage usage ■ Monitoring: Monitor alerts and other events on the network ■ Topology: View graphical representations of the network ■ Task Status: View the status of operations that have been performed or are scheduled ■ Tools: Perform management operations on resources in the network . the header enables you to: ■ Click About to display version-level information about the CommandCentral Storage graphical user interface.30 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console About the CommandCentral Storage Console Figure 2-1 Elements of the CommandCentral Storage Console Header At the top of the Console window. ■ Click Logout to disconnect from the Management Server. ■ Click help to access CommandCentral Storage Console Help. Tabs Beneath the header.

define and manage user accounts Task pane On the left side of the CommandCentral Storage Console window. or content pane. The information displays in a variety of tabular and graphical formats. displays information about storage resources. and information) ■ Favorites list: Frequently used pages and tools For details about customizing the Favorites list to display the pages and tools you use most often: See “Customizing the Favorites list” on page 54. Two features at the top of the content pane help you navigate among the various views in the Console: ■ When you are in the Managing. In the main content pane. warning. error. a navigation path displays the hierarchy of views and allows you to move easily up and down the view hierarchy. ■ Click History to open a browser window listing the Console views you have visited recently. configure exploration. Click any of the links to redisplay that view in the original browser window. You can also perform tasks like exporting data to a file. and Monitoring sections of the Console. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 31 About the CommandCentral Storage Console ■ Settings: Customize the Management Server and managed hosts. the task pane gives you quick access to specific information and tools: ■ Alert summary: List alerts by severity (critical. For more information about the object view—the most common display in the content pane: See “Working with object views” on page 34. network performance. Figure 2-2 The navigation path for a switch port . Content pane The CommandCentral Storage Console’s main display area. Reporting. you can launch a variety of management tools (wizards) and third-party network management applications. and events. Use the Collapse/Expand icon between the task pane and the content pane to hide the task pane and restore it.

x 1 When you receive the security alert. click View Certificates. The certificate installs. 9 In the Security dialog box.32 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Installing security certificates in supported web browsers At the bottom of the content pane. To install the certificate in Internet Explorer 7. click Continue to this website (not recommended) 2 In the Security Warning dialog box. click Install Certificate. you may receive a certificate error message. click Yes. the certificate error message will not appear. 4 In the Certificate Store panel. You will need to do this for each Management Server to which you connect. click OK. click Certificate Error. click OK. To install the certificate in Internet Explorer 6. select one of the following and click Next: ■ Automatically select the certificate store based on the type of certificate ■ Place all certificates in the following store and then select Trusted Root Certification Authorities 5 In the Completing the Certificate Import Wizard panel. 7 In the Certificate Import Wizard dialog box. 3 In the Web browser's address bar.x. 5 In the Certificate dialog box. 2 In the Certificate dialog box. This occurs because the certificate is a self–signed certificate. click Next. click Yes. click Finish. The next time you log in to this Management Server with Internet Explorer 6.x 1 When you receive the security alert. 8 In the Certificate dialog box. Installing security certificates in supported web browsers When you attempt to log in to the CommandCentral Console with Internet Explorer or Firefox. 3 In the Welcome to the Certificate Import Wizard panel. 4 In the Certificate Invalid dialog box. 6 In the Security Warning dialog box. the Console displays the user name with which you are logged in. click Install Certificate. click Yes. You need to install the certificate in your web browser. . click View Certificate.

the certificate error message will not appear.x 1 When you receive the security alert. 11 In the Certificate dialog box. the certificate error message will not appear. click Or you can add an exception.com) or short name (for example. in the browser’s address bar. click Yes.symantecexample. the certificate error message will not appear. select one of the following and click Next: ■ Automatically select the certificate store based on the type of certificate ■ Place all certificates in the following store and then select Trusted Root Certification Authorities 8 In the Completing the Certificate Import Wizard panel. 2 Click Add Exception. 9 In the Security Warning dialog box. commandcentral. . When you log in. click OK. The certificate installs. 12 In the Security dialog box. in the Issued to field. 3 In the Add Security Exception dialog box.. commandcentral) of the Management Server.x 1 When you receive the security alert. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 33 Installing security certificates in supported web browsers 6 In the Welcome to the Certificate Import Wizard panel.x. do the following:. To install the certificate in Firefox 2. click Accept this certificate permanently. To install the certificate in Firefox 3. click Next. The certificate installs.. click OK. use either the fully qualified host name (for example. The next time you log in to this Management Server with Firefox 2. The next time you log in to this Management Server with Firefox 3. 7 In the Certificate Store panel. The next time you log in to this Management Server. verify if the name listed is the fully qualified host name of the Management Server or the short name of the Management Server. 10 In the Certificate Import Wizard dialog box. ■ Click Get Certificate ■ Click Confirm Security Exception The certificate installs. 2 Click OK. Then. as identified in step 11.. click Finish.x. click Yes.

and alerts. which display detailed information about an object or class of objects—for example hosts. information is presented as object views. arrays.) Figure 2-3 Example of an object view (for a host) Topics in this section describe some of the basic building blocks of object views and how to use them. ■ Displaying object view panes ■ Understanding icons ■ Interpreting graphs in tables ■ Saving graphs ■ Performing operations on objects ■ Launching another object view .34 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with object views Working with object views When you use the Managing and Monitoring sections of the CommandCentral Storage Console. (Object views that pertain to a class of objects are also known as summary views.

click Icon Legend. icons are used to represent object types and their states. and unzoned. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 35 Working with object views Displaying object view panes Object views for individual objects consist of an Overview pane and—in most cases—one or more additional panes. according to its manufacturer and model. Some EMC and Hitachi array objects have a RAID Groups pane. For example. there is an icon for storage arrays in their normal state—as well as icons for arrays that are undiscovered. The list of available panes varies according to the object type and. Understanding icons In summary views. Each pane displays information about a specific aspect of the object. but a LUN object does not. The icon legend displays in a separate browser window. Pane titles appear on tabs across the top of each object view. click a tab to display the pane. a storage array object has a Connectivity pane. . and the Topology Map. object views. Figure 2-4 Icons for storage arrays An icon legend lists all of the icons and their meanings. To view the icon legend ◆ In the Tools section of the Console. Some of the most common pane titles are: ■ Connectivity: Ports and port groups through which an object is connected to other objects ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the object and its connections to other objects ■ Monitoring: Alerts associated with the object ■ Attributes: Other characteristics of the object See “Managing attributes” on page 87. disconnected. in some cases. but other array objects do not. For example.

36 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with object views Interpreting graphs in tables Some table columns in the object views display data as a percentage. 2 In the Save dialog box.png). . green) helps you see at a glance which objects in the table are at or near thresholds at which you might want to take action. Color coding (red. you can save it to your local file system. In these instances. Performing operations on objects You can perform operations on a single object using the drop-down list at the top of its object view. To save the contents of a graph in an object view or report 1 Right-click the graph and click Save Picture As or Save Image As. The graph is saved as a graphic file on your computer. specify a directory path. manufacturer. ■ Edit Attribute: Change one the displayable characteristics for an object See “Managing attributes” on page 87. The list of operations you can perform varies depending on a number of factors including object type. Some of the most common operations are: ■ Create Attribute: Define displayable characteristics for an object See “Managing attributes” on page 87. the data is displayed as a bar graph in the table column. Figure 2-5 Bar graphs in a table (File Systems table in a host’s overview pane) Saving graphs When you are viewing a graph in an object view or a report. file name. and format (such as . for example the percentage of storage used in a host. You can perform operations on several objects at once by selecting them in a table and using the drop-down list at the top of the table. and model. yellow.

a tool or a dialog box displays to guide you through the rest of the operation. (Custom views that apply to all users are called global views. In most cases. clicking the name of a switch port launches a view for that port. 2 Check one or more objects in the table. click the operation—for example. A few operations. For example. 3 In the drop-down list at the top of the table. To select all objects. click an operation—for example. Launching another object view In most object views. To perform an operation on multiple objects in a table 1 Display a table in a summary view or in an object view. you can also select an object that is related but is not higher or lower in the hierarchy. In some instances. Depending on the access rights configured for your user ID. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 37 Customizing views ■ Add to Group: Group an object with other related objects See “About groups” on page 427. you can either modify views for your own user ID or regulate the way in which views display for all users. ■ Create Policy for Object: Define a new policy that monitors an object See “About policies” on page 323. Add to Group—and click Go. like Delete. To perform an operation on an object from its object view 1 Display any pane in the object’s object view. you can navigate to object views for associated objects. for example. 2 In the drop-down list at the top of the pane. ■ Add to Zone: Place an object into a zone See “Creating and modifying zones” on page 433.) Custom views afford the following advantages: . Customizing views CommandCentral Storage gives you the option to create custom Console views. check the checkbox in the upper left corner of the table. are run without displaying a dialog box. you can click the name of the host on which the database is running. in the object view for a database instance. Edit Attribute—and click Go. When you are in the object view for a switch.

You can customize any object view that is displayed in the Managing area of the Console. Topics in this section describe the kinds of custom views you can create and provide instructions for creating them. About custom views You can customize single panes in a view. Single custom panes When you customize a single pane in a view. ■ Views can be configured so that the most important information is displayed most prominently. because users are loading only the information they need. You can also create entire custom views in which multiple panes are customized. ■ You can standardize what users see across the enterprise so that displays are formatted consistently for all users. You can also control: ■ Whether to display or hide charts (graphs) in the pane ■ The top-to-bottom order in which they display ■ Whether charts display at all (suppressing the display of charts can improve performance) .38 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Customizing views ■ Views load faster into the Web browser. ■ About custom views ■ Customizing a single object view pane ■ Customizing a view for an object type ■ Creating a custom pane ■ Creating a custom table For information about customizing views on the Reporting tab: See “Customizing the display in a report” on page 299. you can create custom tables that display data not found in a single table in the default views. Each custom view applies to a specific object type. for example switches or array ports.

you can create custom panes to display any combination of tables and charts. until you customize the pane again. ■ If no user-defined view exists. The customized settings remain in effect whenever you log in with the current user ID. they are available for you to select in the lists of tables. ■ To reflect your changes in a global view that will display for all users. the following logic is used to determine what views display: ■ Display a custom view defined by the user. ■ To create a custom table: See “Creating a custom table” on page 41. For example. Customizing a single object view pane You can customize the pane currently displayed in the Console. display a global view. You can use Edit Table to modify them. ■ If no global view is defined. check Apply globally. The custom view will display for all users except those who have created their own custom views for this pane. 2 In the Edit Pane dialog box. If you have already created custom tables. Use Move Up and Move Down to specify the order of the panes. ■ Clear the Charting Enabled checkbox to suppress graphical displays normally associated with the pane. display the default view. To customize a single pane within a view 1 In any pane in the Managing and Monitoring sections of the Console. and the order in which they display ■ Whether to suppress the display of charts across all panes in the view What users see When a CommandCentral Storage user interacts with the Console. click Edit Current Pane in the drop-down list and click Go. do the following and then click OK: ■ Check items in the Available and Selected lists and then use the Add (>>) and Remove (<<) buttons to move them from list to list. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 39 Customizing views Custom views When you customize the entire set of panes in a view. the default Overview . You can also control: ■ Which panes display.

The custom view will display for all users except those who have created their own customized versions of this view. or HBAs) will contain the new pane as well. The object view refreshes with the customized settings in effect. An icon on the tab next to the pane name indicates that this is a customized pane. Use Move Up and Move Down to specify the order of the panes. If you have already created custom panes. specifying which panes display and the order in which they display. Turning it off can result in better performance. until you customize the view again. Charting is enabled by default. A custom pane can contain any combination of default tables. check Apply globally. The customized settings for this object type will remain in effect whenever you log in with the current user ID. until you customize the view again. and charts. Creating a custom pane You can create your own custom panes to display in object views. ■ To create a custom pane: See “Creating a custom pane” on page 40. or HBAs) will reflect the customized settings as well. . ■ To reflect your changes in a global view that will display for all users. To customize which panes display in a view 1 In any pane in the Managing and Monitoring sections of the Console. arrays. arrays. The object view refreshes with the customized settings in effect. The customized settings remain in effect whenever you log in with the current user ID. Customizing a view for an object type You can customize the entire object view for a given object type. Views for all objects of this type (for example switches. Views for all objects of this type (for example switches.40 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Customizing views pane for an array includes a bar chart summarizing how the array’s storage is apportioned. do the following and then click OK: ■ Check items in the Hidden Views and View Order lists and then use the Add (>>) and Remove (<<) buttons to move them from list to list. they are available for you to select in the Hidden Views list. click Edit Panes in the drop-down list and click Go. 2 In the Edit Pane for Object Type dialog box. custom tables.

do the following and then click OK: ■ Type a name for the pane in the Pane Name box. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. click Create Pane: 3 In the Create Pane dialog box. ■ Check one or more tables in the Available Tables list. 3 In the Create Table dialog box. do one of the following: ■ Click SQL Based and enter (or paste from your system clipboard) the text of your query in the SQL Query box. The object view refreshes with the new pane added. 4 In the Edit Pane for Object Type dialog box. ■ A simple list of attributes. click Edit Panes in the drop-down list and click Go. click Create Table. Creating a custom table You can create your own custom tables to display on object view panes. for the object type with which you are working. click Edit Current View in the drop-down list and click Go. 5 Click OK. 2 In the Edit Pane for Object Type dialog box. For information about the schemas to use when writing SQL queries for the CommandCentral Storage database. 2 In the Edit Current View dialog box. check the new pane in the View Order list and use Move Up and Move Down to place the pane where you want it. Your custom table can be one of two kinds: ■ The output of an SQL query that extracts data from the CommandCentral Storage database to create a mapping of attributes you select for a class of objects. Also see details about accessing the database using dbisql in the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide To create a custom table 1 In any pane in the Managing and Monitoring sections of the Console. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 41 Customizing views To create a custom pane 1 In any pane in the Managing and Monitoring sections of the Console. drawn from the database. The following controls are available to help you formulate your SQL query: .

check Apply table only to: Object Name. 5 In the Edit Current View dialog box. ■ To reflect your changes in a global view that will display for all users. check Apply globally. ■ Click Attribute Based and select from the list of attributes displayed for the object type with which you are working. For example. Add Object Key Inserts the object key for the current object into the SQL Query box. The object key is a text string that uniquely identifies the current object in the database. 4 In the Create Table dialog box. check the new table in the Selected list and use Move Up and Move Down to place the table where you want it. perform the following additional steps and then click OK: ■ Type a name for the table in the Table Name box. Because the object key does not normally display in the Console. You can work with tables to find the information that you need.42 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with tables Add Key Marker Inserts the text string objKeyMarker into the SQL Query box (in order to programmatically use the current object’s object key for the specified SQL expression). 6 Click OK. and a preview of what the output will look like. using Add Object Key is the best way to ensure that your SQL query refers to the object in the correct way. . you can search and filter in tables to display specific information. The object view refreshes with the new table added. rather than for all views of an object type. if any. Test Query Runs the SQL query and opens a new browser window to provide a list of SQL errors. ■ If you want to make the table available only in views for a specific object. Working with tables The CommandCentral Storage Console displays most information in tables. You can also print and save information in tables for future use.

Note: The dialog box lists only those columns currently defined for the table. click the Filter icon at the top of a table. To add or remove columns: See “Specifying rows and columns in tables” on page 48. the filtered table displays objects whose values match any of the filters. the list of clusters will refresh to display only online clusters. the filtered table displays only the objects whose values satisfy all of the specified filters. 4 Click AND or OR. When you click OR. . To filter the contents of a table 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. 2 In the Filter Table dialog box. For example. and other network elements. if you filter clusters by status ONLINE. Enabled is selected by default. When you click AND for two or more columns. you can select specific characteristics to filter when managing hardware devices. Your filters remain in effect until you change them. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 43 Working with tables Filtering the information displayed in tables If your storage network is large. These logical operators help determine the scope of the filter. applications. 3 Check the checkbox next to a column name.

[^root])+ displays all items except "root" ^(?=(Administrators|root)$)\w+$ displays items administrators OR root . Displays only EMC arrays with more than 500 GB capacity. This will exclude words such as HP-UX ^(. Solaris. such as Linux. regardless of order ■ Exact Phrase: Display only objects for which the column contains exactly what is typed in the Value field Example: not running matches objects with a state of NOT RUNNING. however. and display objects to which the expression applies Note: The Value text is case-sensitive. For example. ROOT will not display results that contain the string root. ■ Vendor Name = EMC OR LUN Capacity (GB) > 500. running matches objects with a state of either RUNNING or NOT RUNNING. such as Windows. Displays all EMC arrays plus all arrays with more than 500 GB capacity.44 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with tables Examples: ■ Vendor Name = EMC AND LUN Capacity (GB) > 500. You can choose matches based on any of the following criteria: ■ ANY Words: Display objects for which the column contains any of the words typed in the Value field ■ ALL Words: Display only objects for which the column contains all the words typed in the Value field. 5 For text attributes. See “Regular Expression Syntax” on page 45. or HP-UX (I|i)$* displays words that contains I or i. type text in the Value field and then click matching criteria in the drop-down list. LINUX or AIX. ■ Regular Exp: Interpret the Value field as a Java regular expression. AIX. Other regular expression examples include the following: ^(EMC|IBM) displays items that begins with either EMC or IBM (X|x)$ displays words that end in X or x.

The new template will be available for selecting whenever you open the Filter Table dialog for this table. and type a number in the text box. Then type a template name. Example: Between 10 and 20 7 For state attributes. click Save As in the Actions drop-down list and click Go. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 45 Working with tables ^(?!(Administrators|root)$)\w+$ displays items that are NOT administrator OR root ^(?=(VSAN))\w+$ displays items that contain VSAN ^(?!(VSAN))\w+$ excludes items that contain VSAN \w\w\w. a space. 9 If you want to save your settings as a template for future use. This will search for the following: three alphanumeric characters followed by a comma. =>. Examples: >=1. >) in the drop-down list. in response to the prompt. Example: Bound = Yes 8 To filter on additional columns. such as FilterByArrayVendor. \d\d \w\w\w \d\d\d\d Displays dates in the form. click OK. with filters applied. The table redisplays. three alphanumeric characters. <2. <=. =. The table lists only those items that meet the filtering criteria. Sun. !=900 ■ Click the bottom radio button to display objects whose numeric attributes fall within a certain range. . Regular Expression Syntax Table 2-1 provides the meta character syntax for regular expressions. !=. Click a mathematical operator (<. 10 When you are finished. The word Filtered displays next to the table’s name. two digits. another space. click the radio button corresponding to the value you want to filter. a space and finally four digits. do one of the following: ■ Click the top radio button to display objects whose numeric attributes satisfy a threshold. repeat step 3 through step 7. 6 For numeric attributes. 18 Jul 1982.

string "for the wise" but does not match "the" in "otherwise". use \$ matches the dollar sign it to treat the character that character ($) rather than the end follows it as an ordinary character. use the caret as the first character after the opening bracket. [c1-c2] Ranges of characters can be [0-9] matches any digit and specified by using a hyphen. \< \> Matches the beginning (\<) or end \<the matches on "the" in the (\>) or a word. and lowercase character.* matches any number of any of the character immediately characters preceding \ This is the quoting character. [^c1-c2] The regular expression [A-Za-z] [^269A-Z] matches any means match any uppercase or characters except 2. 6. and rut. between the brackets. character except those in the range.46 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with tables Table 2-1 Regular Expression Syntax Meta Character Description Example . . the complement range. Matches any single character r. [] Matches any one of the characters r[aou]t matches rat. Multiple ranges can be specified as well. of a line. To match any uppercase letters." ^ Matches the beginning of the line ^When matches "When in the course of human events" but not "What and When in the" * Matches zero or more occurrences . the expression \. r t. but not ret.t matches rat. but not root. 9. matches the period character rather than any single character. $ Matches the end of the line weasel$ matches the end of the string "He's a weasel" but not the string "They are a bunch of weasels. [a-zA-Z] matches any uppercase or lowercase characters. rot. Similarly.

but not WINXP \w Matches only one character. and fails otherwise. it succeeds if the followed by the word root.. (?!. \d Matches only one decimal digit.. WIN(\d)(\d)$ matches WIN98 this is equivalent to the class [0-9].) Negative lookahead assertion. belongs to him" and matches the line "it belongs to her" but does not match the line "it belongs to them. successfully matches at the current location. This group is called alphanumeric characters ([a-zA-Z0-9_]). system (?! root) matches the This is the opposite of the positive word system only when not assertion. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 47 Working with tables Table 2-1 Regular Expression Syntax (continued) Meta Character Description Example | Alternation. .. \w+ Matches whole words. of the character or regular expression immediately preceding. "\w" WIN(\w)(\w)$ matches WINXP.. character or regular expression bat but not flat immediately preceding.) Positive lookahead assertion." + Matches one or more occurrences 9+ matches 9.. or 999. (?=(system|root))(\w+) matches the words system or root. This system (?= root) matches the succeeds if the contained regular word system only when followed expression.. Matches 0 or 1 occurrence of the ?at matches the strings cat. 99. ?. (?=.. stands for any letter or the WIN98 but not WINDOWS underscore character. also called the OR (him|her) matches the line "it operator. contained expression doesn’t match at the current position in the string. rat. represented here by by the word root. .

Click Apply to All Tables if you want to apply this change to every table in the Console. 4 Click OK. 3 To specify the number of table rows. To specify the rows and columns to display in a table 1 Click the Table Settings icon at the top of a table. The table refreshes to reflect the specified settings. ■ Click column names in the Selected Columns list and then use Move Up and Move Down to change the order in which columns display. The settings remain in effect for your user account until you change them. a Go to Page bar will be provided to help you navigate through the entries. or remove them from. use the Sort drop-down list to specify a sort order (Up or Down) for the column. the Selected Columns list. See “Accessing multiple pages of data in tables” on page 49. 2 In the Table Settings dialog box. Sorting information in tables By default. click a value in the Rows Per Page drop-down list. ■ To sort the table by a particular column. specify table columns and sort order by doing one or all of the following: ■ Click column names and then use Add or Remove to add them to. you can choose which objects (rows) and which information (columns) to display. the table is sorted according to the left-most column specified. in alphabetical order or from largest to smallest. entries in tables are arranged in descending order according to the first column—in other words. Note: If you specify more than one column to sort. If any table contains more entries than the number of rows you specify. (There is an exception to this rule: tables that rank the smallest objects in a .48 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with tables Specifying rows and columns in tables In any table.

click the header again. Accessing multiple pages of data in tables When there is more data to display than a table has rows. To sort in descending order. click the double right arrow. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 49 Working with tables category. ■ To go to the previous page. are arranged from smallest to largest. click the page number. To access pages in a table 1 In a table with multiple pages. for example databases with the least available storage. 2 Do any of the following: ■ To go to a specific page. click the double left arrow. The table sorts the selected column in ascending order. ■ To go to the last page. click the right arrow. The table displays the selected page. ■ To go to the next page. To sort the information in a table ◆ In a table. For example. that is too wide to fit into the default width of the column. locate the Go to Page bar just below the table.) You can sort the information in a table. you can adjust the width of columns. the table will contain multiple pages. you can sort the contents in ascending or descending order. This can be useful when you view data. such as a display name. . The Go to Page bar helps you navigate to other pages in the table. click a column header. ■ To go to the first page. click the left arrow. Adjusting the width of table columns In a table.

2 Drag the edge of the column heading to the right or left. then click OK or Print. other columns become narrower or wider as needed. The data in the table queues to the printer that you specified. with only its title displayed. click the Print icon. . 2 In the Print dialog box. The table is hidden. The column width changes. To show a hidden table ◆ Click the Show/Hide control next to the table title. Showing and hiding tables To help you navigate more easily to information in an object view. A new browser window opens and displays the table in printer-friendly format. To accommodate the changed column width. The table is restored to the display. choose a printer and adjust printer settings as required. To print a table’s contents 1 At the top of a table. The Show/Hide control reverses direction and now points downward. Printing table contents You can print the contents of a table. you can hide tables you do not want to see. The table remains hidden until you click the Show/Hide control again or until you reconnect to the current Web Engine. click the edge of the column heading and hold the left mouse button down.50 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Working with tables To adjust the width of a table column 1 In a table. To hide a table in an object view ◆ Click the Show/Hide control next to the table title.

to configure a new device—CommandCentral Storage assigns the task a status. click the Save icon. The task may take a few minutes to complete. 3 In the Save As dialog box. ■ Queued: The task is waiting to be processed.csv) file. specify a path and name for the file and click OK. The data in the table saves to the location that you specified. to configure a new device—the task queues to the Management Server. 2 If the File Download dialog box appears. A task’s status can be any of the following: ■ Running: The Server is processing the task. ■ Scheduled: The task is scheduled to be performed later. . ■ Successful: The task completed successfully. About a task’s status After you submit a task—for example. pending the completion of other operations that affect the same storage resources. You can then use a standard text editor or spreadsheet program to work with the data. ■ Serialized: The task is waiting. depending on how long it takes for hardware resources like storage arrays and switches to complete their operations. To save a table’s contents to a file 1 At the top of a table. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 51 Managing tasks Saving table contents You can preserve the contents of a table by exporting it to a comma-separated (. Managing tasks When you submit a task—for example. ■ Failed: The task completed with errors. click Save to Disk.

Running a task again After a task runs. and it forces a SERIALIZED task to proceed regardless of the status of other operations. click Schedule Task and click Go. 3 In the drop-down list. This is useful in two situations: . The Tasks pane appears. the task may fail as a result. you can request that it run immediately.52 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Managing tasks Checking the status of tasks You can check the status of tasks that you submit. Status information displays about tasks that recently completed. click OK. select (check) a SCHEDULED task. click Run Serialized Task and click Go. you can request that it runs again. 2 In the Tasks Summary table. 3 In the drop-down list. 4 In the Schedule Task dialog box. Running a task immediately If a task is SCHEDULED or SERIALIZED. click OK. Caution: If other processes are using resources on which the task is dependent. click Task Status. The task runs immediately. click Task Status. To run a scheduled task immediately 1 In the Console. This request overrides the original date and time settings for a SCHEDULED task. click Task Status. 2 In the Tasks Summary table. or are scheduled for execution. To check the status of tasks ◆ In the Console. 4 In the Run Serialized Task dialog box. The task runs immediately. To run a serialized task immediately 1 In the Console. select (check) a SERIALIZED task. are currently running.

To retry tasks that have failed 1 In the Console. click Delete Task and click Go. The tasks run again. The tasks run again. 2 In the Tasks Summary table. click Task Status. try to correct any conditions that caused it to fail the first time. For example. ■ A task failed. select (check) one or more tasks with a SUCCESSFUL status. click Retry Task and click Go. click OK. You can also use the same operation to delete completed tasks from the Tasks Summary list. select (check) one or more tasks. 2 In the Tasks Summary table. or SERIALIZED—you can cancel it. . Before you retry the task. 3 In the drop-down list. click Task Status. and you want to retry it. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 53 Managing tasks ■ A task ran successfully. You cannot cancel or delete a task with a status of RUNNING. Cancelling a task If a task has not yet run—in other words. select (check) one or more tasks with a FAILED status. 3 In the drop-down list. 3 In the drop-down list. click OK. click Run Task Again and click Go. if its status is QUEUED. To run tasks again 1 In the Console. To cancel a task or delete it from the list 1 In the Console. SCHEDULED. and you want to create it again. you configured a new device for test purposes and then deleted it. and you want to repeat it. 4 In the Retry Task dialog box. 4 In the Run Task Again dialog box. click Task Status. 2 In the Tasks Summary table.

Customizing the Favorites list The Favorites list provides an easy way to access the views (pages) and tools that you use most often. 5 When an informational message appears. You can.54 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Customizing the Favorites list 4 In the Delete Task dialog box. You can customize the Favorites list by changing the selections in the list and the order in which they appear. therefore. SCHEDULED. There are several operations you can perform on your Favorites list. . Figure 2-6 The Favorites list The Favorites list affects only the user name with which you are logged in to CommandCentral Storage. click OK. click OK to confirm deletion. ■ Adding a tool to the Favorites List ■ Adding a view to the Favorites List ■ Changing items in the Favorites List ■ Deleting an item from the Favorites List All changes you make to the Favorites list persist across sessions. create unique Favorites lists if you use different user names or if you log in using different management servers. or SERIALIZED. CommandCentral Storage deletes tasks with a status of SUCCESSFUL or FAILED and cancels and deletes tasks with a status of QUEUED. and it displays only when you use the same management server to log in.

5 Click OK. The selected tools are added to the end of the Favorites list. Some common tools are Zone Builder. check an item. You may want to move this item to the top of the list. or accept the default name. To change items in the Favorites list 1 In the Favorites list. the item is added to the end of the list. Changing items in the Favorites List You can change the names of items in your list or you can move an item up or down the list. For example. when you add an item to your Favorites list. click the Add icon (plus sign). Group Builder. LUN Builder. which displays a list of items currently in the Favorites list. . navigate to the view you want to add. you might want a shortcut to the Storage Array Replication Summary Report or the Physical Inventory Summary Report. Adding a view to the Favorites List You can add shortcuts to views you commonly use. To select all tools in the list. 2 In the Favorites list. 4 Click OK. To add a tool to the Favorites list 1 In the Favorites list. click the Edit icon. 2 In the Add Favorites dialog box. click Add Page. 4 In the Name field. 2 In the Edit Favorites dialog box. For example. The name may consist of up to 32 characters. etc. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 55 Customizing the Favorites list Adding a tool to the Favorites List You can add shortcuts to a tool that you commonly use. type the name for the view as it will appear in the Favorites list. To add a view to the Favorites list 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. 3 In the Add Favorites dialog box. 3 Check one or more tools. click the Add icon (plus sign). click Add Tool. The selected view is added to the end of the Favorites list. check the checkbox in the upper left corner.

2 In the Edit Favorites dialog box. which displays a list of items currently in the Favorites list. You can delete these items from the list. and so forth. We recommend changing your refresh setting to Disabled when you plan to use the Console tools and wizards. The Favorites list redisplays with your changes made. your setting is retained on subsequent logins. storage usage fluctuates. To delete items from the Favorites list 1 In the Favorites list. the status of the storage network will probably change. 2 Click one of the following settings: .56 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Changing refresh settings 3 Do one or both of the following: ■ Click Move Up or Move Down as many times as needed until the item is where you want it in the Favorites list. check one or more items in the list. 4 Click OK. 4 Click OK. You can control whether. Deleting an item from the Favorites List There may be items in your Favorites list that you no longer need. As a result. the information in your Console display refreshes to reflect network events and changes to network resources. 3 Click Delete to delete the selected items from the list. To change refresh settings 1 At the top right corner of the Console. click the Refresh icon. Devices go online and offline. ■ To change the name of a pane or object view as it appears in the Favorites list. type a new name in the Name column. A Refresh icon near the top right corner of the Console window indicates the current refresh setting and the state of the information displayed in the Console. Your refresh setting is associated with the user ID you used to log in to the Management Server. Changing refresh settings As you use CommandCentral Storage. alerts are generated. The Favorites list redisplays with the items deleted. and how. click the Edit icon.

Auto Refresh Checks the CommandCentral Storage database at a regular interval and updates the Console if changes have taken place. Online help options There are several options that you can use to work with the online help. See “Online help options” on page 57. . Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 57 Accessing online help Table 2-2 CommandCentral Storage refresh settings Icon Refresh Setting Description Disabled Disables update notification. You can also access manual pages for help with CommandCentral Storage commands. click Help. (The default interval is 60 seconds. To access online help ◆ In the Console header or. For more information about manual pages. browser-based online help system. You can periodically use your browser’s refresh/reload button to synchronize your Console with the latest discovery data. Table 2-3 Online help options Option Icon Description Show in Contents Displays the table of contents location of the current help topic. This is the default setting. You can access the online help from anywhere in the CommandCentral Storage Console. refer to the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide.) Accessing online help CommandCentral Storage offers a cross-platform. The online help displays. in a dialog box or wizard. The following table describes those options.

the CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console loads in a new browser window and the Home pane (Dashboard) displays. To do this. The CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console loads in a new browser window. When you click this link. Next Moves from the current help topic to the previous help topic in the table of contents. you can use the following links: ■ Storage Change Manager—this link appears in the header of the CommandCentral Storage Console. ■ Change History—this link appears in the Overview pane for storage resources for which CommandCentral Storage Change Manager tracks the change history. When you click this link. click Storage Change Manager.58 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Accessing CommandCentral Storage Change Manager from the CommandCentral Storage Console Table 2-3 Online help options (continued) Option Icon Description Previous Moves from the current help topic to the next help topic in the table of contents. Accessing CommandCentral Storage Change Manager from the CommandCentral Storage Console If you enable CommandCentral Storage Change Manager on your Management Server. and filters the pane to display the change history for the specific storage resource. the CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console loads in a new browser window. . To use the Storage Change Manager link to access the CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console ◆ In the CommandCentral Storage Console header. Bookmark Adds the current help topic to your Web browser’s Favorites or Bookmarks list. displays the Changes pane. you can load the CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console from the CommandCentral Storage Console. Print Prints the current help topic.

4 In the storage resource’s Overview pane. storage arrays. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console 59 Accessing CommandCentral Storage Change Manager from the CommandCentral Storage Console To use the Change History link to access the CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. hosts. 2 In the Managing Summary pane. click Managing > Summary. and databases. 3 In the Display Name column. select a type of storage resource for which CommandCentral Storage Change Manager tracks the change history—for example. . The CommandCentral Storage Change Manager Console loads in a new browser window. click Change History. select a specific storage resource.

60 Using the CommandCentral Storage Console Accessing CommandCentral Storage Change Manager from the CommandCentral Storage Console .

About the Topology Map The Topology Map displays a graphical representation of objects in the storage network. and the physical connections . the objects to which they are connected. It also describes how authorized users can develop custom topology layouts that are tailored to their organization’s specific needs. This topic describes how to use the Topology Map and customize both its appearance and the objects it displays. Chapter 3 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About managing the storage network using the Topology Map ■ About the Topology Map ■ Using the Topology Map ■ Customizing the Topology Map display ■ Saving topology data About managing the storage network using the Topology Map The CommandCentral Storage Console’s Topology Map is designed to make it easy for you to visualize storage resources and find information about them.

You can also display maps for many individual objects in the network. The topology maps can provide visual cues about errors and faults throughout the infrastructure by changing the color of an object to indicate the severity level of the error or fault. your workstation must have at least Java 5 (version 1.5) installed. including—but not limited to—hosts. You can install the full version of Java 5 or just the Java Runtime Environment (JRE). You can display the global Topology Map. Figure 3-1 The Topology Map Use a global topology map also to see a VMware ESX virtualization server and its paths to virtual machines. To display the Topology Map in a Web browser. There are several ways to display the Topology Map: . by clicking the Console Topology tab. you can determine which servers are hosting ESX servers and show the storage path connectivity from virtualization server to virtual machines running guest operating systems. switches. This visual representation enables users. showing all objects in the network and their connections. among other things.62 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map About the Topology Map between them. including those on virtual machines. With the topology map. Detecting and correcting design errors like this helps users restore required application service levels. to detect design flaws such as single paths to storage. Further configure the topology map to display the I/O bandwidth for all data paths in the SAN to understand potential bottlenecks or SAN performance issues that could impact service levels critical to the availability of an application in the environment. arrays. and applications.

such as the host on which an Oracle database instance resides. such as an array. In this way. you can keep a view of the network’s topology on your desktop while you work with the different views in the Console. The topology for an object shows the object. objects to which it is directly connected. display the application’s object view and then display its Topology pane. you will see a default Topology Map unless a user with the proper permission has created a custom map on your Management Server. See “Saving topology data” on page 72. Managing the storage network using the Topology Map 63 Using the Topology Map ■ To display the global topology view. In each case. the global Topology Map appears showing all objects in the network and their connections. However. showing connections for the entire network. there may be times when you want a more detailed view of a particular object's topology. you can click the New Window icon to display the map in a new browser window. it will display when you launch the Topology Map. ■ To display the topology for objects associated with an application. If a custom map exists for a specific object type. and the connections themselves. see: ■ Switching between global and object topology maps ■ Viewing objects and their relationships to each other ■ Zooming and panning in the Topology Map ■ Changing the topology layout ■ Moving objects in the Topology Map ■ Customizing the Topology Map display Switching between global and object topology maps When you click the Console Topology tab. or display its Topology pane on the Console Managing tab. For details about each of these features. press the Alt key and click the object in any Topology Map display. This is useful if you want to view the entire network. or for the global view. When viewing the Topology Map. several features are available to help you navigate the map and find information about the resources you are interested in. ■ To display the topology for a physical object. click the Topology tab in the Console window. . Using the Topology Map When you display the Topology Map in your browser window.

Viewing objects and their relationships to each other Objects in the Topology Map are represented by icons that show the object type. 2 Hover your mouse over the object for which you want to view its topology map. The connection lines carry specific meanings depending on the color and condition of the line. and the connections themselves. Multiport connections and port bundles are shown by thick black lines. Dashed red lines indicate that one or both objects are undiscovered. the object’s name and key attributes. the objects to which is it directly connected. the name of the switch’s manufacturer. The icons representing individual objects within the Topology Map may have different background colors. Usually. Solid red lines indicate one or both ports is offline. Valid alert conditions are: Table 3-1 Alert conditions Background Alert Condition Color Blue Information Yellow Warning Orange Error Red Critical Lines represent connections between objects. (To view a list of the icons and their meanings. For example. Hover your mouse over a connection to display.) Hover your mouse over an object to display. 3 Hold down the Alt key and click on the object. its IP address. the names of the ports at each end of the connection.64 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map Using the Topology Map To display an object's topology map 1 Click the Console Topology tab. A global topology map appears showing you all objects in the network and their connections. in a ToolTip. The object's topology map appears showing the object. This is true for situations where multiport connections are shown as a . the lines between objects are solid black. in a ToolTip. the ToolTip for a switch displays the switch’s name. click Tools > Icon Legend. The background color of an icon indicates the alert status of the object. and port usage data.

Managing the storage network using the Topology Map 65 Using the Topology Map single line and for situations where multiport connections are not displayed as a single line. represented by the larger numbers. and thus gives you fine control over what objects display. use the zoom (magnifying glass) icons along the top of the Topology Map display. 5 To return the Topology Map to its default zoom level. a smaller portion of the map is visible and objects appear larger. Figure 3-2 Topology Map zoom controls Zoom levels are represented by numbers ranging from 1 to 200. Zooming enables you to control the precision of the Topology Map magnification. To zoom in or out rapidly 1 Right-click anywhere in the Topology Map. See “Panning” on page 66. You can use a context menu to zoom in or out rapidly. See “Zooming” on page 65. 4 Click OK. At the higher zoom levels. click the Zoom to Fit icon. Zooming and panning in the Topology Map Use the Topology Map zooming and panning features to get a close-up view of the network resources you are interested in. . Zooming To zoom in or out on the Topology Map. for example 42 or 200. specifying a specific zoom level. click Zoom > Custom Zoom. 2 In the context menu. 3 Type the zoom level in the text box.

Table 3-2 describes the layout controls: Table 3-2 Topology Map layout controls Icon Description The circular layout arranges storage objects in circular patterns that represent groups of objects connected to various ports on the switch. and devices of all kinds below the switches.66 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map Using the Topology Map Panning Use the panning (arrow) icons along the top of the Topology Map display to move the display to the left and right. . or up and down. The hierarchical layout (which is the default) stratifies the Topology Map according to object type. and should not be used to get a list of objects that reside in an arbitrated loop. these controls let you zero in on exactly the resources you want to display. or layouts. Paired with the zoom feature. within your web browser. The run layout returns all objects in the Topology Map to their default locations. This is useful after you move objects and want to return the display to its original state. with hosts at the top layer. according to the layout you are currently using. Use the icons along the top of the Topology Map to select a layout. Figure 3-3 Topology Map pan controls Changing the topology layout The Topology Map can display information in different predefined formats. however. The circles of objects do not represent arbitrated loops on the SAN. switches below them. The fan layout positions the switches at the top of the Topology Map and fans all devices and hosts out at a level below the switches in a symmetrical fashion.

See “Saving topology data” on page 72. click the Run Layout icon. . Note: To return objects to their default positions. Managing the storage network using the Topology Map 67 Customizing the Topology Map display A user with the proper permission can modify one of the predefined layouts and save the result as a custom map. the lines connecting it with other objects in the display are redrawn accordingly. for example. storage devices. you can customize the Topology Map display for the current Console session. and other objects to reflect their actual physical locations with respect to each other. Customizing the Topology Map display To view the storage assets and the data in which you are most interested. When you move an object. A custom map arranges the topology to make it easier for users at your installation to view storage assets. or through a context menu accessed by right-clicking in the Topology Map. reposition hosts. Moving objects in the Topology Map Move objects in the Topology Map by dragging and dropping them with your mouse pointer. there are options to expand and collapse fabrics and to display grid lines. through other specialized icons. For example. You can. You can also control the ways in which the Topology Map displays connections between objects and whether it displays statistics about port utilization. You can customize the Topology Map display in the following ways: ■ Collapsing and expanding fabrics ■ Displaying multiple-port connections as single connections ■ Displaying port utilization statistics ■ Limiting the display of network paths ■ Repositioning the topology display using the Overview window ■ Updating alert status ■ Opening the Topology Map in a new browser window ■ Showing grid lines Customization options are available through the Settings icon.

if you change the settings for an array view. if you display other views such as the global topology view. For example. If you do not select this option. The option is selected by default. check Expand Fabrics. every connection is shown separately. click the Settings icon. however. collapsed object. . If you deselect this option. For example. 2 In the Topology Options dialog box. Displaying multiple-port connections as single connections You can collapse multiple-port connections between a switch and an object. so that each multiple-port connection displays as a single line. To expand fabrics in the Topology Map 1 In the Topology Map.68 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map Customizing the Topology Map display Figure 3-4 Topology Map customization icons Customized settings remain in effect for all Topology Map views of the same type. 3 Click OK. if a switch has two ports connected to HBA ports on host1. See “Changing the topology layout” on page 66. They will not be in effect. Similarly. Collapsing and expanding fabrics You can expand fabrics in the Topology Map to display each switch within a SAN fabric as a separate object. each port bundle displays as if it were a single port. with a single connection line rather than multiple lines. You can change the way objects are organized in the Topology Map (the layout). the connections display as a single connection line. the customized settings will remain in effect whenever you display an array view in the Topology Map. each fabric displays as a single.

the display shows the storage consumer. click the Settings icon. For storage objects—arrays and unenclosed storage—this setting limits the Topology Map display to the object and the storage consumers (hosts. check Combine Multi-Port Connections. For storage consumers—hosts. The information. utilization statistics do not display. unidentified adapters and applications) to which it has been provisioned. and the switches involved in the connections. 3 Click OK. the display shows the object. and applications—this setting limits the Topology Map display to the storage consumer and the storage provisioned to it. This is a good way to highlight the direct relationships between storage and the entities—such as hosts and applications—that use the storage. Displaying port utilization statistics You can set the Topology Map to show utilization statistics for switch ports. . ■ Limit the number of objects displayed in the Topology Map by showing accessible network paths only. If the setting is turned off. If the setting is turned off. Managing the storage network using the Topology Map 69 Customizing the Topology Map display To display multiple-port connections as single connections in the Topology Map 1 In the Topology Map. unidentified adapters. To display port utilization statistics in the Topology Map 1 In the Topology Map. and all switches involved in the connections. check Display Port Utilization. Limiting the display of network paths You can simplify the Topology Map’s appearance by limiting the number of network paths shown in the display. expressed as a percentage of total utilization. 2 In the Topology Options dialog box. click the Settings icon. all storage consumers connected to the fabric. 2 In the Topology Options dialog box. displays on the connection line next to each switch port in the display. There are two options for doing this: Note: These options are not available in the global topology view. all storage connected to it. its fabric. 3 Click OK. If you do not select this option.

it can be difficult to locate a particular object or area of the network. 2 Drag the Overview window to an unoccupied area of your desktop if it obstructs your view of any important elements. check Show Accessible Paths Only. click the Show Overview icon. 2 In the Topology Options dialog box. 3 Type a maximum hop count in the text box. is equal to or less than a specified number. Figure 3-5 Overview window (superimposed on Topology Map display) To navigate the Topology Editor using the overview window 1 In the Topology Map. To limit the display of network paths in the Topology Map 1 In the Topology Map. the Overview window provides a fast way to pan across the map and zoom in on particular objects or connections. or hops. You could use the horizontal and vertical slider bars to reposition the Topology Map display. click the Settings icon. if you specify a maximum hop count of 3. the Topology Map will no longer show network paths that contain four or more intermediate switches.70 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map Customizing the Topology Map display ■ Limit the display of network paths by showing only those paths for which the number of intermediate switches. 4 Click OK. . Repositioning the topology display using the Overview window When using the Topology Map to view a large network with many objects. For example. However.

The background color of an icon indicates the alert status of the object. ■ Drag the cursor diagonally out from its starting point. near the upper left corner. click the Refresh Alerts icon. 5 Click and hold your cursor within the box you have drawn. ■ Release the mouse button when the box is the size you want. 6 Click and hold your cursor on a corner of the box you have drawn. To open the Topology Map in a new browser window ◆ In the Topology Map. To update the alert status for objects in the Topology Map ◆ In the Topology Map. 4 Draw a box within the Overview window by doing the following: ■ Place the cursor within the Overview window. click the New Window icon. Managing the storage network using the Topology Map 71 Customizing the Topology Map display 3 Resize the Overview window according to your preference. Opening the Topology Map in a new browser window You can open the Topology Map in a new browser window. Dragging the box around pans the view across the Topology Map display. The box within the Overview window represents the area of the Topology Map visible within the browser window. Only the network elements within the Overview window are visible. for example red for critical and orange for error. and drag it around the Overview window. Resizing the box causes the display to zoom in and out as the box selects a larger or smaller area of the miniature map to fill the larger display. ■ Click and hold the left mouse button. you can keep the map open on your desktop while using the original browser window to do other tasks in the Console. . Updating alert status The icons representing individual objects within the Topology Map may have different background colors. by clicking and holding the cursor on a corner of the window. and then dragging the corner outward. By doing so. and resize it by dragging the corner out and in.

By placing a set of icons on vertical grid lines and then aligning them along a single horizontal grid line. the lines can help you arrange icons. any host. For example. you ensure that the icons will be evenly spaced and in a straight line in the Topology Map. You can also create a custom map for the global topology view. which displays the entire network. You can create a custom map for any object that has a Topology Map. tailored to your organization’s specific needs. switch. 2 Click Show Grid Lines to superimpose a grid on the Topology Map display.72 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map Saving topology data Showing grid lines Grid lines can help you define the layout of the Topology Map with greater precision. see: ■ Saving your customized Topology Map ■ Deleting a custom map . custom maps (also called custom graphs) can make it easier for all users to view storage assets. For example. right-click and click Hide Grid Lines. or application can have its own custom map. Saving topology data A user with the proper permission can create and modify custom maps. array. The Topology Map has icons for saving and deleting custom maps. To show grid lines in the Topology Map 1 Right-click anywhere in the Topology Map. Figure 3-6 Topology Map icons for saving and deleting custom maps For details about these features. By regulating the Topology Map’s appearance for all users who connect to a specific Management Server. 3 To turn off grid lines.

The custom map is deleted. and other users can no longer access it. remain available for use. Custom maps for other objects. . and all users who connect to the Management Server can access this custom map when they view the object’s Topology Map. Deleting a custom map When a custom map is no longer needed. To delete a custom map 1 Display the custom map for an object. The saved settings remain in effect until you save additional changes or delete this custom map. You can also save a customized version of the global Topology Map (accessed through the Console Topology tab) in the same way. Your customized settings are saved on the Management Server. Managing the storage network using the Topology Map 73 Saving topology data Saving your customized Topology Map If your user account is defined with the proper permission. you can click the Save icon while customizing the Topology Map display for a particular object. 2 Click the Delete Custom Map icon. a user with the appropriate privileges can delete it from the Management Server. in the Console. if any. or for the global Topology Map.

74 Managing the storage network using the Topology Map Saving topology data .

and you can manage those assets—for example. you can view detailed information about your storage assets on both physical and virtual machines. by defining attributes or by organizing them into groups and zones. Chapter 4 Viewing and managing storage resources This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About managing storage resources ■ Viewing information about storage resources ■ Managing storage resources ■ Viewing a resource's zone memberships ■ Viewing an object’s group memberships ■ Viewing application dependencies ■ Viewing reports for an object ■ Changing projection settings ■ Launching third-party applications in context ■ Checking explorer states and data ■ Using object views to monitor network resources ■ Managing attributes About managing storage resources In the Managing section of the CommandCentral Storage Console. .

you can view detailed information about your storage resources and their relationships to each other. . When you click the Managing tab. the Managing tab displays by default.76 Viewing and managing storage resources Viewing information about storage resources When you log in to the CommandCentral Management Server. for example by defining attributes or by organizing them into groups and zones. The following topics describe common operations you can perform on the Managing tab. and you can monitor alerts associated with them. Using the object views in this section of the Console. in a variety of formats. It is organized so that you can drill down from an enterprise-wide view of the storage network to specific information about any resource in the network. the Managing Summary pane displays an enterprise-level view of all of the storage-related assets in the enterprise. ■ Viewing information about storage resources ■ Managing storage resources ■ Viewing a resource's zone memberships ■ Viewing an object’s group memberships ■ Viewing application dependencies ■ Viewing reports for an object ■ Changing projection settings ■ Launching third-party applications in context Viewing information about storage resources The Managing section of the Console displays detailed information about all of your storage-related assets. You can also manage your resources.

This section also displays the number of virtualization servers and virtual machines in your environment. and files. or you can select an object category using the tabs at the top of the pane. for example hosts or switches. such as switches and fabrics. Click an alert icon to manage alerts for a specific object type. ■ Hosts and HBAs: host clusters. ■ SAN: network objects that connect users and applications with storage resources. Viewing and managing storage resources 77 Viewing information about storage resources Figure 4-1 The Managing Summary pane You can either click an object type. such as Arrays or Hosts. and device handles. ■ Databases: database objects in the network including details about database instances. storage that is directly attached to hosts (DAS storage). unenclosed storage. . and host bus adapters (HBAs). including details about the storage resources and network devices to which they are connected. The object categories are: ■ Storage: array enclosures. ■ Groups: storage assets grouped together to help organize and provision resources. ■ Applications: clusters and servers on which applications run. user-created enclosures. The Managing Summary pane also displays alert icons beside object types that have experienced alerts. individual hosts. containers. LUNs. unified storage devices.

to perform operations on them. ports to which the array is connected. you can create zones—sets of physical objects within a SAN fabric that can access each other. 2 In the Managing Summary pane. you can easily find information about the zones to which a resource belongs. See “Creating and modifying zones” on page 433. For example. click Summary. either click an object type. There you can access information about the array’s LUNs. and zones of which the array is a member. Clicking the name of an array displays a summary of information about that array. such as the total capacity for a LUN or the storage being used by a host. You can perform operations on single objects or on several different objects at once. click Arrays in the Managing Summary pane to display a list of every storage array in the network. ■ Jump to associated objects. you first visualize the objects that represent them. such as Arrays or Hosts. Managing storage resources To manage storage resources. or select an object category using the tabs at the top of the pane. Viewing a resource's zone memberships To help control access between resources on the storage network. Then you use a variety of tools. See “Working with object views” on page 34. ■ Perform operations on one or more objects. 3 Drill down through the object hierarchy to reach the object you want and then do any of the following things: ■ Display information about the object. . such as one of the LUNs associated with a host. In the Managing section of the Console. See “Performing operations on objects” on page 36. accessed by drop-down lists. See “Performing operations on objects” on page 36.78 Viewing and managing storage resources Managing storage resources To view information about storage resources 1 From the Managing tab.

Object dependency groups help you see which applications are affected when you plan updates to an object or when the object’s status changes as a result of an alert or other event. The Zoning pane displays the following lists: ■ Active zones of which the object is a member ■ Defined zones of which the object is a member ■ Zone aliases of which the object is a member Viewing an object’s group memberships For any object. virtual machines. click an object type. and other network objects associated with a particular application. 3 In the Remove from Group dialog box. 3 In the Overview pane for the object. for example Arrays or Hosts. Viewing application dependencies CommandCentral Storage uses object dependency groups to identify volumes. . For more information about groups. file systems. To view an object’s group memberships 1 In the Managing section of the Console. click Zoning. 4 Click Cancel to exit the dialog box without changing the object’s group memberships. See “About groups” on page 427. 2 Click the name of an object in the table. you can use its object view to see a list of the groups to which it belongs. Viewing and managing storage resources 79 Viewing an object’s group memberships To view a resource’s zone memberships 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click Remove from Group. display an object view for any object that can be a member of a group. view the list of groups to which the object belongs. 2 In the drop-down list.

DatabaseUsedSize ■ Sybase ASE . Viewing reports for an object In many object views. click the Object Dependency Group’s name. click an object type. 2 Drill down into the object's Overview pane. switch. the Reporting tab provides access to reports that are scoped to the object you are viewing. For example. Changing projection settings Some object views display projected data about storage usage or consumption.80 Viewing and managing storage resources Viewing reports for an object To see the objects associated with an object dependency group 1 In the Managing Summary pane.m. For information about the kinds of reports you can display. you can view projections of storage usage for a database or storage consumption for a host. the projections are based on at least three days’ worth of data collected from CommandCentral Storage managed hosts. By default. For more information about using reports in CommandCentral Storage. for example Arrays or Hosts.TablespaceUsedSize ■ DB2 . 3 In in the Overview pane for a host. See “Finding the reports you need” on page 229. Object dependency groups are created automatically by CommandCentral Storage. Projections are calculated once per day around 1 a. which must be enabled: ■ Oracle . See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. Because host and file system projections are based on capacity and used space from the HAL FS Explorer. This time is based on your Management Server’s clock. this explorer must be enabled.TablespaceUsedSize ■ Microsoft SQL .DatabaseUsedSize . or application. Database projections are based on the following monitoring collectors.

3 In the Edit Importer Settings dialog box. This number must be at least 5. To configure projection settings for object views 1 Click Settings > DM Configuration > Importer Settings. Viewing and managing storage resources 81 Changing projection settings Figure 4-2 Example of a projection display (Host Growth) To control the way in which CommandCentral Storage collects and displays projection data. meaning the Projections graph will show the last six values collected along with the four projected values. The default is 10. each seven days apart. ■ Number of historical points to use: The maximum number of collected values on which to base projections. of the projection interval. The default is 7. The default is 10. ■ Number of projection points to display: The number of values to show in each graph. meaning that projections are based on the last 10 values collected. meaning that each projection contains four values. 2 In the drop-down list on the DM Configuration page. . click Edit Projection Settings and click Go. you can change the settings in the Console. for a total span of four weeks. spaced according to this interval. change any or all of the following settings: ■ Number of days between projection points: The length. in days. Each projection consists of four data values. including projected values.

Note: To launch a third-party application from the Console. provided the applications are launched from a UNIX shell or a Windows command prompt. along with the object types associated with each one. manage. the application must be installed on the same machine as the Web browser with which you are accessing the Console. 4 When you have made your selections.82 Viewing and managing storage resources Launching third-party applications in context Note: Reducing this number will make your projections more susceptible to distortions caused by short-term variations ("spikes") in the data collected. the CommandCentral Storage Console serves as a central management point from which you can launch various third-party applications. The following table lists the applications you can launch by default. click OK. Your administrator can add more applications to this set. Launching third-party applications in context In addition to providing its own built-in tools. You launch each application by selecting a specific operation in the drop-down list in an object view. Your updated settings are saved. CommandCentral Storage ships with a set of common third-party applications that you can launch without configuration. Table 4-1 Default applications launched from the CommandCentral Storage Console Application and Purpose Object Type Browser (fabric view): Display configuration and status information Switch in a separate browser window Browser (host view): Connect to the host’s default port in a browser Host window Telnet: Interact with a network server remotely Host Brocade switch Cisco switch Cisco device manager: Configure. and troubleshoot Cisco Cisco switch switches .

■ Scan: Display a list of all managed resources visible to an explorer through either an in-band connection or a device manager. ■ Probe: Check to see whether explorers and resources are configured properly so that discovery can take place. Launch Telnet—and click Go. Each explorer is a software tool that uses a unique methodology to discover information about a particular kind of object on the network. click the appropriate operation—for example. Checking explorer states and data CommandCentral Storage ships with several explorers. See “Verifying that discovery can take place” on page 85. 2 In the drop-down list. ■ Rediscover: Update status information on the Management Server for the resources for which an explorer performs discovery. ■ Display explorer states: Display the discovery states for the various explorers that discover an object. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. . the GS explorer discovers information about switches and switch ports. For example. See “Displaying explorer states for a managed resource” on page 84. such as a host or cluster. See “Scanning the resources visible to an explorer” on page 84. To launch a management application in context 1 Display the summary pane for a specific object type. The Array Management explorer (also known as the SAL/VAIL bridge) discovers information about storage arrays. See “Updating discovery data” on page 84. The CommandCentral Storage Console has several tools for checking on the status of explorers and on the data they discover. Viewing and managing storage resources 83 Checking explorer states and data Table 4-1 Default applications launched from the CommandCentral Storage Console (continued) Application and Purpose Object Type Cisco fabric manager: Display and manage fabrics containing Cisco Cisco switch switches Fujitsu Eternus manager: Display and manage storage in Fujitsu arrays Fujitsu array Network Appliance Storage System View: Display and manage NetApp NetApp Storage unified storage devices System For more information about launching third-party applications.

In some cases. click the task name to display the results of the scan. To display a resource’s explorer states 1 Display an object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. A scan is also performed routinely whenever an in-band explorer executes. 2 Click the name of a host in the Managed Hosts list. a host's HBAs—also displays. For example. you can display the discovery states for the various explorers that discover the resource. for a device manager. you can verify that a resource is visible to it through either an in-band connection or a device manager. click Scan Device. Updating discovery data You can perform a rediscover operation to update discovery data about managed resources. 3 Click the name of an explorer in the Explorers list. you can verify the connection to an array being discovered by the EMC Symmetrix explorer on a managed host or the connections to a group of Hitachi arrays managed by a HiCommand server. click Settings > Managed Hosts. 8 In the Tasks Summary list. After the network configuration has changed. To display the connection between an explorer and a resource (scan) 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. 7 In the confirmation dialog box. Scanning the resources visible to an explorer For a given explorer. click OK to initiate the scan. The Console displays explorer states for the resource. or for an explorer. this is a good way to verify that resources can still be discovered as you expect them to be. The operation can be performed for a single resource. 2 In the drop-down list. 5 In the drop-down list. click View Explorer Status and click Go. 6 In the Scan Device dialog box. . information about explorers for subordinate objects—for example. click OK to display the Task Status window.84 Viewing and managing storage resources Checking explorer states and data Displaying explorer states for a managed resource For a given resource (or object). 4 Check a resource in the Configured Devices table.

3 In the drop-down list. 4 Check a resource in the Configured Devices table. you can check whether the GS explorer is configured with the proper login credentials to communicate with a particular switch. display a list of resources such as the Arrays Summary or the Switches Summary. 4 In the drop-down list. When the rediscovery completes. 3 Check one or more explorers in the Explorers list. 2 Click the name of a host in the Managed Hosts list. To rediscover a resource 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. Conversely. 5 In the confirmation dialog box. discovery data is updated for resources managed by the selected explorers. to validate whether all external and third-party tools needed by the explorer are properly installed. click Refresh Explorer. discovery data is updated for the selected resources. 3 Click the name of an explorer in the Explorers list. Verifying that discovery can take place For a given resource. click Settings > Managed Hosts. click OK. which displays the resource name and a list of explorers that discover the resource. 2 Click the name of a host in the Managed Hosts list. click Settings > Managed Hosts. 2 Check a resource in the list. you can perform a validation check to see whether the appropriate explorer is properly configured to gather data for the resource. To verify that discovery can take place (probe) 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. For example. 4 In the confirmation dialog box. This operation is sometimes referred to as a probe. you can perform a probe for an explorer. click OK to verify your request. When the rediscovery completes. Viewing and managing storage resources 85 Checking explorer states and data Rediscovery is useful when network operators have used third-party tools to change device configurations and you want to update the CommandCentral Storage database before the next regular discovery interval. click Rediscover. To rediscover resources managed by an explorer 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. .

click Verify Device Configuration. collectors. For example. Click Display Alerts for Descendants to display alerts for any children associated with the parent object. click the task name to display the results of the operation. Policies A listing of all policies associated with the object.86 Viewing and managing storage resources Using object views to monitor network resources 5 In the drop-down list. their values are integers or percentages. The information is organized into the following tables. 6 In the Verify Device Configuration dialog box. or both when certain events and conditions occur. automating responses. Using object views to monitor network resources Most object views have a Monitoring tab that displays information about the alerts. Policies are rules that help you manage your storage network by generating alerts. you can check one or more policies in the Policies table and then enable or disable them using the drop-down list. State Collectors A listing of the state collectors associated with the object. Numeric Collectors A listing of the numeric collectors associated with the object. 8 In the Tasks Summary list. For more information about viewing monitoring information and working with it. Alerts A listing of all alerts associated with the object. State collectors monitor the object’s state and usually have values like ONLINE or OFFLINE. Numeric collectors count things. click OK to display the Task Status window. 7 In the confirmation dialog box. click OK to initiate the verification. see the following topics: ■ About viewing and managing collectors ■ About viewing and managing policies ■ Viewing and managing alerts . Drop-down lists at the top of each table enable you to perform various tasks. and policies associated with a resource.

These user-created or custom attributes convey information that is meaningful to you but is not part of the object’s physical or software makeup. Terms like information or details are often used to describe these kinds of data. the attributes for a switch include its manufacturer (vendor). There is no way to create an attribute for a group of objects and set a default value for that attribute. change. An attribute is a piece of detailed information that pertains to a specific object type. zone memberships. . Explorers query every object on the storage network and retrieve a standard set of attributes for each object type. connectivity. firmware version. World Wide Name (WWN). Some commonly used custom attributes include: ■ Physical location of the object ■ Warranty date for the object ■ Date of purchase ■ Date of most recent service ■ Contact information for parties responsible for maintenance Note: Custom attributes are added on a per object basis. 3 Click the Monitoring tab. including events. The following topics describe how you can add. and out-of-band address. port count. Displaying object attributes You can display attributes for any object on the CommandCentral Storage Console Managing tab. For example. Managing attributes CommandCentral Storage discovers a great deal of data about your storage network. or delete customized attributes for an object. Some attributes contain relevant details that cannot be discovered by CommandCentral Storage or any other software application. click one of the object tabs. model number. 2 Drill down on a resource until you see the object's view. and more. Viewing and managing storage resources 87 Managing attributes To monitor network resources using object views 1 From the Managing tab.

For LUNs. for example. even when the CommandCentral Storage database is updated by the discovery process. Adding attributes for objects To help keep track of useful information about your storage resources. including renaming the object’s Display Name. For example. Editing user-defined attributes You can edit the value of any user-defined attribute. 2 In the drop-down list. and special characters are not valid. The attributes you can edit. click Create Attribute and click Go. Attribute names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. A table displays. you can also edit attributes in-context using the LUN Query Tool. punctuation marks.88 Viewing and managing storage resources Managing attributes To display an object’s attributes 1 In the Managing section of the Console. Note: For LUNs. ■ Type a value for the new attribute in the Attribute Value field. such as Display Name. 3 In the Create Attribute dialog box. . you can create new attributes for any object. change the attribute that refers to the object’s physical location. To add a new attribute for an object 1 In the Managing section of the Console. Unless you delete the attribute. You can. do the following and click OK: ■ Type the name of the new attribute in the Attribute Name field. you can create an attribute called Location and give it a value that tells where an object is physically located. Spaces. showing the object’s attributes and the meaning of each one. display an object view. it will continue to appear in the Attributes table for the object. are marked with a distinctive icon. display an object view. 2 Click Attributes. The new attribute retains its value. you can also create attributes in-context using the LUN Query Tool.

it is removed from the CommandCentral Storage database. 3 In the Edit Attribute dialog box. click Delete Attribute and click Go. and it no longer appears in the Console. display an object view. ■ Type a new value in the Attribute Value field. 3 In the Delete Attribute dialog box. it will reappear in the database the next time CommandCentral Storage successfully discovers the object. The Display Name attribute is an exception. Viewing and managing storage resources 89 Managing attributes See “Adding or editing LUN attributes” on page 391. To edit an object’s user-defined attributes 1 In the Managing section of the Console. When you delete a user-defined attribute. with a value that is assigned by default. you cannot permanently delete it. do the following and click OK: ■ Click the attribute you want to change in the drop-down list in the Attribute Name field. . display an object view. Although its value is user-defined. 2 In the drop-down list. check one or more attributes in the table and click OK. The attribute’s current value displays in the Attribute Value field. Deleting user-defined attributes You can delete the user-defined attributes for any object. 2 In the drop-down list. If you delete an object’s Display Name attribute. CommandCentral Storage automatically assigns this attribute to every object. The attributes are deleted. To delete an object’s user-defined attribute 1 In the Managing section of the Console. click Edit Attribute and click Go.

90 Viewing and managing storage resources Managing attributes .

storage attached directly to hosts (DAS storage). See “LUNs” on page 117. unenclosed storage. . Chapter 5 Viewing and managing storage This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About viewing and managing storage ■ Storage arrays and user-created enclosures ■ NetApp unified storage ■ Direct-attached storage ■ Unenclosed devices ■ LUNs ■ Device handles About viewing and managing storage You can view summary information about the storage in your network: arrays. See “Storage arrays and user-created enclosures” on page 92. See “NetApp unified storage” on page 108. You can view detailed information about storage and perform operations on it. user-created enclosures. This information appears in the Storage Summary pane. and unified storage devices. See “Unenclosed devices” on page 116. See “Direct-attached storage” on page 114.

Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Storage arrays are represented in the CommandCentral Storage Console as enclosures. ■ Viewing the Arrays Summary ■ Viewing an array's storage capacity graphs ■ Viewing deep mapping information ■ Viewing disks ■ Viewing enclosure ports ■ Viewing an array's raw storage volumes ■ Viewing an array's volumes and volume groups for the IBM DS6000 and DS8000 storage system enclosures ■ Viewing an array's extent pools and other objects for the IBM DS6000 and DS8000 storage system enclosures ■ Viewing an array's replication objects ■ Viewing an EMC CLARiiON array LUN's storage groups ■ Viewing a storage adapter's connectivity ■ Viewing Hitachi HiCommand array performance information ■ Viewing an array's special host connections . regardless of whether they actually reside in the same hardware device. (These enclosures are displayed in the Console as if they were storage arrays. Topics in this section describe how to view storage arrays and associated resources.) See “Creating enclosure objects” on page 198. ■ User-created enclosures that are created from individual storage devices such as JBODs. An enclosure is a method for visually grouping storage objects so that you can view them and perform operations on them as a single unit. and the operations you can perform on them. (NetApp storage devices are displayed in the Console using the special term NetApp unified storage. ) See “NetApp unified storage” on page 108.92 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures See “Device handles” on page 119. The Console also displays other types of enclosures: ■ NetApp storage devices and MultiStore Virtual Systems in either block mode or mixed mode.

a graphical representation of the available and used disk group storage as well as a table listing such vendor-specific objects as HP disk groups or IBM DS8000 array sites ■ Replication: For arrays using storage replication features. unknown LUNs. Tables in the Overview pane list associated applications and storage in the array that is claimed by hosts. and status for individual disks ■ Disk groups (the name of this pane depends on the array manufacturer and model): For disk arrays. Viewing and managing storage 93 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures ■ Performing operations on arrays Viewing the Arrays Summary You can view a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. the summary includes information about its storage and the hosts that use its storage. zone sets. and vendor-specific objects such as CLARiiON storage groups or Symmetrix devices ■ Raw storage volumes (the name of this pane depends on the array manufacturer and model): Graphical and tabular summaries of storage in RSVs including such vendor-specific objects such as EMC CLARiiON RAID groups. For each array. size. administrative LUNs. or IBM DS8000 extent pools ■ Disks: A graphical depiction of the array’s configured physical storage as well as information about physical disk capacity. replication LUNs. click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane. IBM DS4000 (FastT) volume arrays. Depending on the array type. the names of which depend on the array manufacturer and model): Claimed LUNs. . lists of replication objects and (for EMC arrays) remote array connections See “Viewing an array's replication objects” on page 100. hosts that have claimed storage on the array by writing device handles. and vendor-specific entities such as host storage domains ■ Zoning: The array’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. unallocated LUNs. ■ Connectivity: Network connections associated with the array including physical adapters and ports. The Overview pane displays a summary graph that depicts how the array’s storage is apportioned. and zone aliases” on page 186. In the summary list. LUNs currently reserved for provisioning tasks. unclaimed LUNs. you can display some or all of the following additional panes: ■ Volumes: A graphical depiction of how the volume storage is allocated in the array as well as lists of specific volumes and volume groups associated with the array ■ LUNs (one or two panes.

This happens so that CommandCentral Storage does not count the virtualized storage for both the virtualization array and the storage array whose storage is allocated to the virtualization array. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. and storage usage trends See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. performance data for disks and other resources (for certain array types). TagmaStore—the following columns do not include the storage that is allocated to the virtualization array: ■ Total Storage (GB) ■ LUN Capacity (GB) ■ Allocated LUN (GB) For example. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane. . 2 In the summary list. and policies associated with the array ■ Attributes: The array’s attributes See “About virtualized storage in the Arrays Summary table” on page 94. collectors. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the array and its host connections See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. no values display for the storage array’s logical capacities.94 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing storage allocation for the array. For storage arrays whose storage is allocated to a virtualization array—for example. To view arrays summary and details 1 In the Managing Summary pane. About virtualized storage in the Arrays Summary table The Arrays Summary table (Managing > Storage > Arrays) includes detailed information about virtualization arrays and the storage arrays whose storage is allocated to virtualization arrays. in the Arrays Summary table. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. if all of the logical storage from a storage array is allocated to a virtualization array.

Because of this. Hitachi Tuning Manager does not report monitoring information for RAID groups that are based on external storage. ■ When you use SANtricity Storage Manager to add a host or host group to the DefaultGroup. About the Array Host Groups table for SMI-S managed Engenio storage arrays When you view the Array Host Groups table (Managing > Storage > Arrays > select an array > Connectivity) for an SMI-S managed Engenio storage array. the following message displays: Monitoring is not available for this object . CommandCentral Storage displays the host in the Array Host Groups table. For a virtualization array that also includes physical storage. If that host belongs to a host group. the array host groups (storage views) that appear in the table may be different than what SANtricity Storage Manager reports. This occurs because of the following: ■ When you use SANtricity Storage Manager to grant exclusive access of volumes to a host rather than a host group. Viewing and managing storage 95 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures For a storage array whose storage is allocated to a virtualization array. About performance monitoring for RAID groups from Hitachi USP arrays For Hitachi USP arrays. CommandCentral Storage does not display the host or host group in the Array Host Groups table. you can identify its physical capacity by subtracting the total of the "External Raw Storage" column from the total of the "Total Storage (GB)" column. when you view the Monitoring tab for this type of RAID group in the CommandCentral Storage Console (Managing > Storage > Arrays > (select a Hitachi USP array) > RAID Groups > (select a RAID group from external storage) > Monitoring). you can view the following columns in the Arrays Summary table to determine how the storage array’s total storage capacity is apportioned—both the array’s physical storage and the storage allocated to a virtualization array: ■ Total Storage (GB) (w/ virtualizer source) ■ LUN Capacity (GB) (w/ virtualizer source) ■ Allocated LUN (GB) (w/ virtualizer source) See “Specifying rows and columns in tables” on page 48. CommandCentral Storage also displays that host group in the Array Host Groups table.

Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. and used by. you can view details about volume spaces in an IBM Shark array. hosts and applications. The exact information you can view depends on the array’s manufacturer and model. To view storage capacity graphs 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. the Overview pane also displays graphs that show one or more aspects of how the array’s total storage capacity is apportioned. Viewing deep mapping information By clicking highlighted text in object view panes. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. the allocated and unallocated capacities may be different than what HiCommand Device Manager reports. . which displays a storage capacity graph. and RAID group capacity. This is because of a difference in how CommandCentral Storage and HiCommand Device Manager define allocated and unallocated storage. 2 In the summary list. LUN capacity. or about RAID array groups in a Hitachi HiCommand array. about extent pools in an IBM DS8000 array. for example total physical capacity. For example.96 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Viewing an array's storage capacity graphs Depending on the array’s manufacturer and model. Note: When you view storage capacity graphs for Hitachi arrays. See “Logical storage” on page 469. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. you can drill down to find detailed information about the way in which enclosed storage is allocated to. The set of graphs displayed depends on the array’s manufacturer and model.

click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. An additional Attributes pane displays attributes. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. To view disks of an array 1 In the Managing Summary pane. The Connectivity pane lists the switches and switch ports to which the device port is connected. Viewing and managing storage 97 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures To view deep mapping information 1 In the Managing Summary pane. drive type. Viewing enclosure ports Click the name of a port in the Connectivity pane for a device (enclosure or unidentified adapter) to view the port’s Connectivity pane. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Overview: WWN. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. and zone aliases” on page 186. 3 In the object view pane. and tables listing LUNs and volumes. zone sets. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. click the highlighted text to display the deep mapping information. . click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane. 2 In the summary list. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. 2 In the summary list. click the Disks tab. whether the disk is spare (YES or NO). port status (ONLINE or OFFLINE) ■ Zoning: The port’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. click the name of a physical disk or disk group to view the following information: name. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. 3 In the resource's Overview pane. Viewing disks In the Disks pane for a disk array. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. disk model.

Viewing an array's raw storage volumes In the object view for an array. the RAID group. click the name of the raw storage volume to view its Overview pane. you can click the name of raw storage volume (such as a RAID group on an EMC or Hitachi array) to view its Overview pane. 4 In the Connectivity pane. the Volumes pane displays a list of volume groups and lists of claimed. and disks used by. To view raw storage volumes 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click the name of an individual array or enclosure. unknown. and . click the name of a port for a device (enclosure or unidentified adapter) to view the port's Connectivity pane. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. click the Connectivity tab. 2 In the summary list. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. 2 In the summary list. The Overview pane displays tables listing LUNs created from.98 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. 3 In the resource's Overview pane. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. collectors. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. Viewing an array's volumes and volume groups for the IBM DS6000 and DS8000 storage system enclosures For an IBM DS6000 or DS8000 storage system enclosure. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. and policies associated with the port ■ Attributes: The port’s attributes To view enclosure ports 1 In the Managing Summary pane. unclaimed. 3 In the resource's Overview pane. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. An additional Attributes pane displays attributes. click the name of an individual array or enclosure. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary.

After selecting a volume. the number of bound volume groups and masked ports display. ranks. and array sites. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. Viewing and managing storage 99 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures unallocated volumes. and file systems. You can also find associated LUNs along with the volume group’s attributes. Additional panes show associated LUNs along with the volume group's attributes. LUN masking characteristics. volumes. arrays. 2 In the summary list. You can determine whether the volume group is masked and whether it is sharable. and associated applications. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. masked hosts with no device handles. capacity. Viewing an array's extent pools and other objects for the IBM DS6000 and DS8000 storage system enclosures For an IBM DS6000 or DS8000 storage system enclosure. click the Volumes tab. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. vendor layout. For unclaimed and unknown volumes. device handles. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. 4 Click the name of a volume to see its details. you can view the following information: RAID level. click the name of a volume group. you can identify its extent pools. 5 To view a summary of whether the volume group is masked and whether it is sharable. binding and masking states. To view volumes and volume groups for the IBM DS6000 and DS8000 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Additional panes display zoning information along with the volume’s attributes. . 3 In the resource's Overview pane. click the name of an individual array or enclosure.

100 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures To view extent pools 1 In the Managing Summary pane. An additional Attributes pane displays the array’s attributes. disks. vendor layout. An additional Attributes pane displays the extent pool’s attributes. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. An additional Attributes pane displays the rank’s attributes. rank. volumes created. and array sites. click the name of an individual IBM DS6000 or DS8000 enclosure. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. Viewing an array's replication objects For many arrays. ■ Click the name of a rank to view lists of associated arrays and array sites. or in the enclosure’s Array Sites pane. click the name of an array site (physical disk group) to view its capacity. and associated array sites. vendor layout. 2 In the summary list. An additional Attributes pane displays the array site’s attributes. ■ Click the name of an array to view its physical capacity. you can review information about vendor-specific replication objects. as well as for NetApp storage devices. discovery state. 3 Do one of the following: ■ Click the name of an extent pool to view a summary of storage in the extent pool along with RAID level. RAID level. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. 4 In the object view for an extent pool or an array. The following list summarizes the replication objects discovered by CommandCentral Storage: .

Viewing and managing storage 101 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Table 5-1 Replication objects discovered by CommandCentral Storage Array type Replication objects EMC CLARiiON The following replication object's appear in the array's Replication tab: SnapView snapshot objects: ■ Snapshot ■ Session ■ Snapshot capabilities SnapView clone objects: ■ Snapshot ■ Clone group ■ Snapshot capabilities MirrorView objects: ■ Remote mirror ■ Image ■ Remote system connection EMC The following replication objects appear in the array's STD/BCV tab: Symmetrix/DMX Timefinder objects: ■ Replication capabilities ■ STD/BCV pair Hewlett-Packard The following replication object's appear in the array's Snapshots and EVA Virtual Disks tab: Local replication objects: ■ Snapshot ■ Vsnap ■ Snapclone Hitachi The following replication objects appear in the array's Shadow Images tab: Snapshot Shadow image .

discovery of replication features is available only for managed hosts that are configured for array management. 2 In the summary list. . click the name of an individual array or enclosure. To view replication objects 1 In the Managing Summary pane. See Table 5-1 for more information. The Overview pane displays whether the CLARiiON storage group is masked and shareable. see the CommandCentral Hardware and Software Compatibility List. 3 Click the tab in which the replication object appears.x. FlexClones are discovered only on NetApp storage devices with ONTAP 7. click the name of a CLARiiON storage group to view its Overview pane. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. Note: For EMC CLARiiON arrays. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. the Remote Array Connections table on the Replication pane displays remote enclosures when both of the arrays sharing the MirrorView link are discovered by the same explorer. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures.102 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Table 5-1 Replication objects discovered by CommandCentral Storage (continued) Array type Replication objects NetApp unified The following replication object's appear in the array's Replication storage tab and Volumes tab: SnapMirror Snapshot FlexClone For details about what replication objects are discovered for each array type and model. Viewing an EMC CLARiiON array LUN's storage groups In the object view for an EMC CLARiiON array LUN. and only when SICL monitoring is active on the managed host. Note: For NetApp unified storage devices.

device handles. 3 In the object view. . click the name of an adapter port to view the port’s Connectivity pane. The Connectivity pane displays a table showing the switches and switch ports to which the adapter is connected. collectors. and zone aliases” on page 186. click the name of a CLARiiON storage group. You can also identify the switches and switch ports to which the adapter is connected. and special connections—such as HBA port groups—to which the CLARiiON storage group is masked ■ Attributes: The CLARiiON storage group’s attributes To view EMC CLARiiON storage groups 1 In the Managing Summary pane. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. and policies associated with the storage adapter ■ Attributes: The storage adapter’s attributes In the Connectivity pane for a storage adapter. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ LUNs: LUNs owned by the storage adapter ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance data ■ Monitoring: Alerts. 2 In the summary list. Viewing and managing storage 103 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Additional panes contain the following information: ■ LUNs: LUNs belonging to the CLARiiON storage group. The storage adapter's Connectivity pane displays this information. click the name of an individual EMC CLARiiON array LUN. Viewing a storage adapter's connectivity You can view the connectivity information for a fibre-channel or iSCSI storage adapter. zone sets. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Overview: Port type and WWN ■ LUNs: Tables list LUN masking and port mappings for this adapter ■ Zoning: The adapter’s zoning characteristics See “Zones.

4 In the Connectivity pane. 5 In the adapter's Connectivity pane. 5 Click Monitoring or Reporting. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. 3 In the array's Overview pane. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. reads and writes per second. click the name of a fibre-channel or iSCSI storage adapter to view the adapter’s Connectivity pane. 2 In the summary list. Array performance information displays. 3 In the Array's Overview pane. and read and write cache hits. collectors. the Monitoring and Reporting tabs display values for read and write I/O requests. . click LDEVs or RAID Groups. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click the Connectivity tab. click the name of a Hitachi storage array that is monitored by the HiCommand Tuning Manager. 4 In the LDEVs or RAID Groups table. To view Hitachi HiCommand array performance information 1 In the Console. click the name of an LDEV or RAID Group. and policies associated with the adapter ■ Attributes: The adapter’s attributes To view storage adapters 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click Managing > Storage > Arrays. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary.104 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance data and alert history See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. 2 In the Arrays Summary table. click the name of the storage port to view the port's connectivity information. Viewing Hitachi HiCommand array performance information The CommandCentral Storage Console displays performance information from the HiCommand Tuning Manager (HTM) in object views for LDEVs and RAID groups on any Hitachi array that is monitored by HTM. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. In the object view for the LDEV or RAID group. click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane.

for example. a list of array enclosures in the enterprise. You can refresh the HDS subsystem in the CommandCentral Storage Console. click Arrays to view the Arrays Summary. The Overview pane of a special host connection displays information about the array and the host. . along with a table listing ports through which the connection is made. and host connections for IBM Shark arrays. click the name of a special host connection to view its Overview pane. you may need to refresh the HDS subsystem. 4 In the Connectivity pane for an array. click the name of an individual array or enclosure to view its Overview pane. 2 In the summary list. along with a table listing ports through which the connection is made. Note: To view a similar list for user-created enclosures. Viewing and managing storage 105 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Viewing an array's special host connections Many storage arrays allow special ways to define connections to hosts—including. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ LUNs: Array LUNs masked to the host ■ Attributes: The host connection’s attributes To view special host connections 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane. The Overview pane displays information about the array and the host. 3 In the array's Overview pane. Refreshing HDS subsystems After you perform a provisioning operation on an HDS array. You can view connectivity and special host connection information. initiator groups for NetApp storage devices. HBA port groups for many HP and EMC arrays. click the Connectivity tab.

depending on the array type: . 2 In the Arrays Summary table. Performing operations on arrays In the Arrays Summary. The HDS subsystem refreshes. click an HDS array. in the drop-down list. you can update the array and also perform some or all of the following additional operations. you can perform the following operations on one or more arrays: Table 5-2 Available operations in the Arrays Summary view Operation More information Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Remove LUN Unmasking array storage from host ports using the LUN Masking masking(s) wizard Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Delete Array Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database (undiscovered arrays only) Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In an array’s object view. 3 In the upper right of the pane. click Managing > Storage > Arrays.106 Viewing and managing storage Storage arrays and user-created enclosures To refresh an HDS subsystem 1 In the Console. click Go. click Refresh HDS Subsystem. Then.

Viewing and managing storage 107 Storage arrays and user-created enclosures Table 5-3 Available operations in array object views Operation More information Run LUN Query Finding LUNs using the LUN Query Tool Provision storage Providing access to storage Create RSVs and About making storage resources available to hosts LUNs Manage HBA port Creating logical groupings of resources for provisioning groups In the object view for an array port. such as an EMC CLARiiON RAID group or an IBM DS4000 array volume. you can perform some or all of the following operations: Table 5-5 Available operations in raw storage volume views Operation More information Expand RSV About making storage resources available to hosts Destroy RSV Returning storage to its original state Manage attributes Managing attributes Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status . you can perform the following operations on the port: Table 5-4 Available operations in array port views Operation More information Manage attributes Managing attributes Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status In the object view for a raw storage volume.

you can perform some or all of the following operations on one or more LUNs: Table 5-6 Available operations in enclosure or special host connection views Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Remove LUN Unmasking array storage from host ports using the LUN Masking masking(s) wizard Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Destroy LUN Returning storage to its original state Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group In the object view for any other enclosure-related object type. . such as a NetApp initiator group. such as an IBM DS8000 extent pool or a CLARiiON remote mirror. A NetApp unified storage system handles both SAN and NAS transactions and makes the specifics of each networked storage model (Fibre Channel SAN. iSCSI SAN. and NAS) transparent to the user. you can perform some or all of the following operations: Table 5-7 Available operations in other enclosure-related object type views Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes NetApp unified storage NetApp enterprise storage systems function as "unification engines" that simultaneously support both the SAN (Fibre Channel and IP) and NAS (network-attached) storage models.108 Viewing and managing storage NetApp unified storage In the object view for an enclosure or for a special host connection.

IP address. IP address. model number. summary of FlexClones including source and target volumes ■ Disks (Storage Systems only): Physical disk capacity. unknown LUNs. disks. BLOCK. model number. and hosts (HBA ports) to which the device is connected. status. and number of processors. summary of aggregates (for Storage Systems with ONTAP 7. and other attributes for individual disks ■ Replication (Storage Systems only): Status for source and destination SnapMirrors and associated snapshots See “Viewing an array's replication objects” on page 100. BLOCK. serial number. volumes. ■ For a MultiStore Virtual Systems: Display name. FlexClones. In the Overview pane of a NetApp Storage System or MultiStore Virtual System. including special connections like NetApp initiator groups ■ Zoning (Storagin Systems only): The device’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. number of volumes. . volumes. Tables in the Overview pane list shared drives. and zone aliases” on page 186. Note: Discovery of NetApp replication features is available only for managed hosts that are configured for array management. state. mode (FILE. and number of plexes. qtrees. cluster status. and (for a Storage System) licenses. unclaimed LUNs. cluster partner ID. claimed LUNs. Viewing and managing storage 109 NetApp unified storage Viewing NetApp unified storage devices You can view all NetApp unified storage devices in the enterprise. status. mode (FILE. disks. ■ Connectivity (Storage Systems only): Adapters.x only) including used and available capacity. hosting system. and associated MultiStore Virtual Systems. and number of qtrees. percent used. and unallocated LUNs ■ Volumes: Summary of volumes including capacity. and shared drives. and only when SICL monitoring is active on the managed host. and other attributes. ports. or MIXED). Additional panes contain the following information: ■ LUNs (Storage Systems in block and mixed modes only): LUN storage summary graph. quotas. physical memory size. and shared drives. or MIXED). type. you can view a graph that shows the capacity of the device’s physical disks and volumes. zone sets. size. RAID level. qtrees. ONTAP version. The following details also appear: ■ For a Storage System: Display name.

consisting of one or two plexes It can contain one traditional volume or multiple FlexVol volumes. point-in-time image of a flexible volume or another FlexClone volume. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing usage and aging data for files and directories and performance data (Storage Systems only) See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. click the name of a Storage System or MultiStore Virtual System to view its Overview pane. Zoning. click NetApp Unified Storage to view a list of all such devices in the enterprise. . For devices with ONTAP 7. Note: The default MultiStore Virtual System. and FlexClones In the Volumes pane for a NetApp storage device. vfiler0 has no object view and therefore is not selectable. and Topology panes display when an OM license is installed. Viewing NetApp volumes. ■ Topology (Storage Systems only): A Topology Map showing the device and its host connections See “About the Topology Map” on page 61.110 Viewing and managing storage NetApp unified storage ■ Projections: Projected storage consumption for the device See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. collectors.x. 2 In the NetApp Unified Storage Summary pane. Connectivity. To view NetApp unified storage devices 1 In the Managing Summary pane. ■ Monitoring (Storage Systems only): Alerts. the Volumes pane contains information about two additional kinds of volume objects: aggregates and FlexClones. ■ A FlexClone is a writable. It is used to capture changes and improvements without risking disruption to the production system. aggregates. click the name of a volume to view its Overview pane. and policies associated with the device ■ Attributes: The device’s attributes Note: The LUNs. ■ An aggregate is a manageable unit of RAID-protected storage. The Projections pane displays when a DM license is installed.

The Overview pane displays a graph that summarizes how its storage is used. Example: 1-24/3:= match hour 1. Example: *:= match all possible legal values . ■ Days of Month lists the days in the month for which the schedule is set. Example: 1-30/7:= match day 1. and plexes. ■ Max Transfer Rate is in kilobytes per second. 19. Tables in the Overview pane list associated LUNs. collectors. Days of Week. and policies associated with the volume ■ Attributes: The volume’s attributes Here is a key to interpreting the data displayed for SnapMirror schedules in the Replication pane. FlexClone. associated snapshots See “Viewing an array's replication objects” on page 100. 8. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing usage and aging data for files and directories See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. Wed. If this field is blank. 3. 29 ■ Days of Week lists the days in the week for which the schedule is set. Hours. Fri) ■ Hours lists the hours in the day for which the schedule is set. and total physical capacity. the transfer rate is as fast as the filter can transfer. 15. qtrees. 26. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Replication: SnapMirror destinations. 5 (Tue. Viewing and managing storage 111 NetApp unified storage You can display information on an Overview pane for any of these objects (aggregate. 4. ■ Projections: Projected storage usage for the volume See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. Example: 2-5:= match day 2. and Minutes fields contain the schedule information in crontab-like form. status. disks. 10. ■ The Days of Month. 22 ■ Minutes lists the minutes in the hour for which the schedule is set. or traditional volume). and synchronous schedules. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. 4. Thu. 7. schedules. 22. 13. 0 represents Sunday and 6 represents Saturday. along with a list of attributes such as RAID level.

click the name of a Storage System or MultiStore Virtual System to view its Overview pane. 2 In the NetApp Unified Storage Summary pane. and FlexCones 1 In the Managing Summary pane. aggregates. or traditional volume to display its Overview pane. Viewing NetApp qtrees You can view the following information about a qtree associated with a volume on a NetApp Storage System: ■ Replication: SnapMirror destinations. click the Volumes tab. . 4 Click the name of an aggregate. 4 In the Volumes Overview pane. click the name of a Storage System or MultiStore Virtual System to view its Overview pane. Note: The default MultiStore Virtual System. click the name of a qtree. ■ Attributes: The qtree’s attributes For a key to interpreting the data displayed for SnapMirror schedules in the Replication pane. 3 In the NetApp Unified Storage Overview pane. click NetApp Unified Storage to view a list of all such devices in the enterprise. vfiler0 has no object view and therefore is not selectable. See “Viewing NetApp volumes. and synchronous schedules See “Viewing an array's replication objects” on page 100. and FlexClones” on page 110. vfiler0 has no object view and therefore is not selectable. 3 In the NetApp Unified Storage Overview pane. schedules.112 Viewing and managing storage NetApp unified storage To view NetApp volumes. aggregates. FlexCone. 2 In the NetApp Unified Storage Summary pane. click the Volumes tab. Note: The default MultiStore Virtual System. To view NetApp qtrees 1 In the Managing Summary paneclick NetApp Unified Storage to view a list of all such devices in the enterprise.

you can perform the following additional operations: . Performing operations on NetApp unified storage devices In the NetApp Unified Storage Summary. ■ Attributes: The disk’s attributes To view NetApp disks 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click NetApp Unified Storage to view a list of all such devices in the enterprise. Viewing and managing storage 113 NetApp unified storage Viewing NetApp disks In the Disks pane for a device or volume. 3 In the NetApp Unified Storage Overview pane. click the Disks tab. vfiler0 has no object view and therefore is not selectable. you can view the following information: name. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Reporting: A links to a report showing performance data for the disk See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. 4 Click the name of a disk to display its Overview pane. you can perform the following operations on one or more devices: Table 5-8 Available operations in the NetApp Unified Storage Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In a NetApp unified storage device’s object view. 2 In the NetApp Unified Storage Summary pane. RAID information for associated volumes. capacity and usage. size. Note: The default MultiStore Virtual System. click the name of a Storage System or MultiStore Virtual System to view its Overview pane.

FlexClone. for example. or volume views Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Direct-attached storage Direct-attached storage (DAS) refers to storage that resides in hosts on your storage network.114 Viewing and managing storage Direct-attached storage Table 5-9 Available operations in NetApp unified storage device object views Operation More information Launch Network Launching third-party applications in context Appliance FilerView Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Run LUN Query Finding LUNs using the LUN Query Tool Remove LUN Unmasking array storage from host ports using the LUN Masking masking(s) wizard Provision storage Providing access to storage Manage initiator Creating initiator groups on NetApp unified storage devices groups In the object view for a NetApp aggregate.example.com. it is represented by a directory path on the host in which it resides. you can perform the following operations: Table 5-10 Available operations in NetApp aggregate. /dev/directoryname@hostname. or volume. as opposed to storage that resides in devices like arrays and enclosures. FlexClone. When you view direct-attached storage in the CommandCentral Storage Console. .

the HBA and storage ports. HBA. host name. click the name of an individual DAS device to view its Overview pane. ■ Monitoring: Monitoring is not available for this object ■ Attributes: The device’s attributes To view direct-attached storage 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Viewing and managing storage 115 Direct-attached storage Viewing direct-attached storage You can view a list of all DAS devices in the enterprise. 2 In the Direct-Attached Storage Summary pane. Performing operations on direct-attached storage devices In the Direct-Attached Storage Summary. you can perform the following operations on one or more devices: Table 5-11 Available operations in the Direct-Attached Storage Summary view Operation More information Configure Making paths available to Volume Manager hosts multipathing Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes . The Overview pane displays the device's path and type. and the array. a list of all DAS devices in the enterprise. click Direct-Attached to view the Direct-Attached Storage Summary. DAS devices are listed according to their device handles. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Reporting: Links to a report showing the history of changes in status and other characteristics for network objects. along with their associated hosts and LUNs. LUN. You can select an individual DAS device to view its Overview pane.

In the Unenclosed Storage Devices Summary. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the device and its host connections See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. you can select an individual device to view its Overview pane. Performing operations on unenclosed storage devices In the Unenclosed Storage Devices Summary. . Additional panes contain the following information: ■ LUNs: Claimed storage and available LUNs ■ Connectivity: Switch ports to which the device is connected ■ Zoning: The device’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. click the name of an individual device to view its Overview pane. capacity. The Overview pane displays the device’s vendor name. WWN. zone sets. a list of all unenclosed storage devices in the enterprise.116 Viewing and managing storage Unenclosed devices Unenclosed devices Generic or unenclosed devices include disks and other storage devices that are not grouped into enclosures in the CommandCentral Storage Console. Viewing unenclosed storage devices You can view a list of all unenclosed storage devices in the enterprise. you can perform the following operations on one or more devices. ■ Attributes: The device’s attributes To view unenclosed storage devices 1 In the Managing Summary pane. and zone aliases” on page 186. 2 In the Unenclosed Storage Devices Summary. click Unenclosed Devices to view the Unenclosed Storage Devices Summary. and number of ports. for example disk storage devices and generic devices. Examples of unenclosed storage devices include JBODs and arrays that are not configured.

volumes. LUN maskings. RAID level. . The Overview pane displays information about the LUN such as capacity. Tables in the Overview pane list some or all of the following: Disks. LUNs are often known by different names depending on the array type. file systems and Snapshot Source/Target LUN. You can click the name of an individual LUN to view its Overview pane. Note: On CLARiiON arrays. FLARE LUNs. applications. LUNs are exposed to the outside world through an addressing scheme presented to the host as SCSI LUN numbers. the Overview pane may also display associated RAID groups. port mapping. and more. components. LUNs for an EMC Symmetrix array are called devices and LUNs for some Hitachi arrays are called LDEVs. Viewing and managing storage 117 LUNs Table 5-12 Available operations in the Unenclosed Storage Devices Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Add to enclosure Creating enclosure objects Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes LUNs A LUN (acronym for "logical unit number") is the basic building block of storage in the network. For example. These vendor-specific names are used on tabs in the array’s object view. masked LUNs with no device handles. Viewing LUNs You can view information about LUNs. Device handles. Each LUN has a unique device handle and represents a logical volume. and CLARiiON storage groups. Each LUN represents a unique and discrete addressable unit or logical volume that may reside inside one or more simple or array storage devices. masking and binding states.

click the name of an individual LUN to view its Overview pane. and zone aliases” on page 186. you can—depending on the LUN type and its status (for example. claimed)—perform some or all of the following operations: Table 5-13 Available operations in LUN object views Operation More information Manage attributes Managing attributes Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Provision storage Providing access to storage Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard Masking(s) Remove LUN Unmasking array storage from host ports using the LUN Masking masking(s) wizard Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Expand LUN About making storage resources available to hosts . zone sets. Performing operations on LUNs In a LUN’s object view.118 Viewing and managing storage LUNs Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Zoning: The LUN’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. and policies associated with the LUN ■ Attributes: The LUN’s attributes To view LUNs 1 Do one of the following: ■ In the object view for a storage device or enclosure. click the LUNs tab to display lists showing all LUNs defined for that device. 2 In the list of LUNs. ■ In a host’s object view. collectors. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance data for the LUN ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click the Storage tab to display a list of LUNs allocated to the host.

an active path to a storage resource has two device handles—one that Windows creates and one that CommandCentral Storage creates. The CommandCentral Storage Console displays the device handles that Windows creates—for example. collectors. Device handles are sometimes known as OS handles. as well as device handles for paths that EMC PowerPath hides. a database instance. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Monitoring: Alerts. \\. CommandCentral Storage monitors the device handle that it creates and not the device handle that Windows creates. system call) to access it. or a LUN. For example. Note: For Windows hosts with EMC PowerPath installed. but does not create device handles for paths that EMC PowerPath hides. Viewing device handles You can view information about a device handle for a host object or storage object. The device handle's Overview pane displays the name of the associated LUN and the storage device on which it resides.example. Windows creates device handles for active paths to storage resources.com Because of this. CommandCentral Storage also creates device handles for active paths to storage resources. and policies associated with the device handle ■ Attributes: The device handle’s attributes .com For Windows hosts with EMC PowerPath installed. a list of Sun disk slices (for Solaris hosts).example. and the correct means (driver. information about the host connection (iSCSI initiator and iSCSI port). Viewing and managing storage 119 Device handles Table 5-13 Available operations in LUN object views (continued) Operation More information Destroy LUN Returning storage to its original state Device handles A device handle is the name the operating system uses to identify a storage resource (known as an addressable unit or LUN). device handles for active and hidden paths that CommandCentral Storage creates may display in the Console as Port6Path1Target2Lun3@hostname. and a list of other device handles to the same storage device. for example an HBA.\PhysicalDrive4@hostname. For this type of device handle.

2 In the object type Summary pane. host. click on an object type (for example. you can perform the following operations: Table 5-14 Available operations in device handle object views Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes . HBA. database. Performing operations on device handles In a device handle’s object view. or LUN) to view a list of all such devices in the enterprise. click its device handle name to view the device handle's Overview pane. click the name of an individual object to view its Overview pane.120 Viewing and managing storage Device handles To view device handles 1 In the Managing Summary pane. 3 In the object's Overview pane.

and provides facilities for managing. Microsoft Exchange servers. This information appears in the Applications Summary pane. . Exchange servers CommandCentral Storage discovers information about. See “Performing operations on Exchange servers” on page 123. Chapter 6 Viewing and managing applications This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About viewing and managing applications ■ Exchange servers ■ Clustered services ■ NetBackup instances About viewing and managing applications You can view summary information about the clusters and servers on which applications run. See “Exchange servers” on page 121. See “NetBackup instances” on page 125. You can view detailed information about applications and perform operations on them. See “Clustered services” on page 124.

2 In the Exchange Summary. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click Exchange Servers to view the Exchange Summary. storage used. along with a table listing all files associated with this Exchange storage group. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the Exchange server and its connections to storage See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. Viewing Exchange storage groups You can view information about an Exchange storage group in its Overview pane. Note: Clustered applications are listed by service group name and application name. The Overview pane displays file sizes and paths. name. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Storage: LUNs and device handles (including information related to multipathing) ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance data related to the Exchange server as well as its alert history See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. These values are based on data collected by the Data Module (DM). A table in the Overview pane (labeled Exchange Summary) lists associated Exchange storage groups. You can view graphs showing the top ten mail systems. not the used capacity for the storage groups themselves. collectors. and mail boxes in the network. Note that the Used Capacity values displayed in this table represent the total size of the mailboxes in each storage group. and policies associated with the Exchange server ■ Attributes: The Exchange server’s attributes To view Exchange servers 1 In the Managing Summary pane. The Overview pane displays the server’s version. Additional columns display the host where the application is running and associated alerts. . click the name of an individual Exchange server to view its Overview pane. organizational information. mail stores. and object dependency group. You can also select an individual Exchange server to view its Overview pane. a list of all Exchange servers in the enterprise.122 Viewing and managing applications Exchange servers Viewing Exchange servers You can view a list of all Exchange servers in the enterprise.

a list of all Exchange servers in the enterprise. collectors. 3 In the Overview pane for an Exchange server or storage group. click the name of an individual Exchange server or storage group to view its Overview pane. click the name of an Exchange storage group to view its Overview pane. click Exchange Servers to view the Exchange Summary. Performing operations on Exchange servers In the Exchange Summary. click the name of an individual Exchange server to view its Overview pane. click Exchange Servers to view the Exchange Summary. and policies associated with the Exchange storage group ■ Attributes: The Exchange storage group’s attributes To view Exchange storage groups 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click the name of a file to view its Overview pane. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Attributes: The file’s attributes To view Exchange server files 1 In the Managing Summary pane. 2 In the Exchange Summary. you can perform the following operations on one or more servers: . Viewing Exchange server files You can view Exchange server files for an Exchange server or storage group in its Overview pane. The Overview pane displays LUNs and volumes associated with the file. 3 In the Overview pane for an Exchange server. Viewing and managing applications 123 Exchange servers Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Storage: LUNs and device handles (including information related to multipathing) ■ Monitoring: Alerts. 2 In the Exchange Summary. a list of all Exchange servers in the enterprise.

See “Viewing the Hosts Summary” on page 148. In the service group's Overview pane.124 Viewing and managing applications Clustered services Table 6-1 Available operations in the Exchange Summary view Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Clustered services A cluster is a set of hosts that share a set of disks and are connected by a set of redundant heartbeat networks. Viewing cluster nodes You can view information about the cluster nodes of a cluster or service group. collectors. Viewing clustered services You can view a list of all Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) and Microsoft Cluster Server service groups in the enterprise. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Device handles (including multipathing information). and policies associated with the service group ■ Attributes: The service group’s attributes To view clustered services 1 In the Managing Summary pane. . host clusters. array ports. click Clustered Services to view the Clustered Services Summary. a list of all Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) and Microsoft Cluster Server service groups in the enterprise. click the name of an individual service group to view its Overview pane. CommandCentral Storage discovers information about. you can also see the service group’s state (ONLINE or OFFLINE) along with tables listing associated resources—such as physical disks—and nodes. 2 In the Cluster Summary. and provides facilities for managing. and HBA ports to which the service group is connected ■ Monitoring: Alerts.

click the name of an individual cluster or service group to view its Overview pane. role. Viewing and managing applications 125 NetBackup instances To view cluster nodes 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Additional columns display the host where the application is running and associated alerts. master server name. 3 In the Overview pane for a cluster or service group. and provides facilities for managing. Performing operations on clustered services In the Clustered Services Summary. Note: Clustered applications are listed by service group name and application name. a list of all Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) and Microsoft Cluster Server service groups in the enterprise. click the name of a cluster node to view information about that node. Veritas NetBackup instances. along with a table listing allocated LUNs. Viewing NetBackup instances You can view a list of all NetBackup instances in the enterprise. you can perform the following operations on one or more clustered services: Table 6-2 Available operations in the Clustered Services Summary view Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes NetBackup instances CommandCentral Storage discovers information about. You can also view an individual instance in its Overview pane. 2 In the Cluster Summary. Additional panes contain the following information: . The Overview pane displays the instance’s host name. click Clustered Services to view the Clustered Services Summary.

click NetBackup to view the NetBackup Summary. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the NetBackup instance and its connections to storage See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. Performing operations on NetBackup instances In the NetBackup Summary and its accompanying ACSLS Summary. you can perform the following operations on one or more NetBackup instances: Table 6-3 Available operations in the NetBackup Summary view Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes . a list of all NetBackup instances in the enterprise. 2 In the NetBackup Summary pane. click the name of an individual instance to view its Overview pane.126 Viewing and managing applications NetBackup instances ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance data related to the NetBackup instance See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. ■ Attributes: The NetBackup instance’s attributes To view NetBackup instances 1 In the Managing Summary pane.

You can also view detailed information about database instances. See “Viewing MS-SQL database objects” on page 139. Chapter 7 Viewing and managing databases This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About viewing and managing databases ■ Viewing Oracle database objects ■ Viewing Sybase database objects ■ Viewing DB2 database objects ■ Viewing MS-SQL database objects About viewing and managing databases You can view summary information about the database objects in your network. containers. The following topics describe how to perform operations on these objects. Oracle database instances. See “Viewing DB2 database objects” on page 135. See “Viewing Oracle database objects” on page 127. and other objects. files. This information appears in the Databases Summary pane. Viewing Oracle database objects CommandCentral Storage discovers information about. . and provides facilities for managing. See “Viewing Sybase database objects” on page 130.

The summary pane also displays graphs showing the largest Oracle databases. Oracle version. Tables in the Overview pane list tablespaces and redo log files. you can select an individual Oracle instance and then drill down to view information about Oracle tablespaces and database files. for databases within the Oracle instance ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the Oracle instance’s storage growth See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. Viewing Oracle instances In the summary pane. Note: Clustered applications are listed by service group name and application name. In the Oracle Summary. a list of all Oracle instances in the enterprise. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Storage: Associated LUNs and device handles ■ Trending: A graph showing maximum capacity and average usage. The Overview pane displays host name. and the databases with the least available storage. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. the databases with the most available storage. click the name of an individual instance to view its Overview pane. collectors. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the Oracle instance and its connections to storage See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. 2 In the Oracle Summary pane.128 Viewing and managing databases Viewing Oracle database objects Viewing the Oracle Summary You can view a list of all Oracle instances in the enterprise in an Oracle Summary pane. you can select an individual Oracle instance to view its Overview pane. To view the Oracle Summary 1 In the Managing Summary pane. state (ONLINE or OFFLINE). over time. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. and policies associated with the Oracle instance ■ Attributes: The Oracle instance’s attributes . Additional columns display the host where the application is running and associated alerts. click Oracle Instances to view the Oracle Summary.

Viewing and managing databases 129
Viewing Oracle database objects

To view Oracle instances
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Oracle Instances to view the Oracle
Summary, a list of all Oracle instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Oracle Summary pane, click the name of an individual instance to view
its Overview pane.

Viewing Oracle tablespaces
You can view information about an Oracle tablespace in its Overview pane. The
Overview pane displays the instance name, state (ONLINE or OFFLINE), a graph
showing used and unused storage capacity, along with a table listing associated
files.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the tablespace
■ Projections: Projected storage consumption for the tablespace
See “Changing projection settings” on page 80.
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the tablespace’s storage growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the tablespace
■ Attributes: The tablespace’s attributes
To view Oracle tablespaces
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Oracle Instances to view the Oracle
Summary, a list of all Oracle instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Oracle Summary pane, click the name of an individual instance to view
its Overview pane.
3 In the Overview pane for an Oracle instance, click the name of a tablespace
to view its Overview pane.

Viewing Oracle database files
You can view Oracle database files associated with an Oracle instance or tablespace
in an Overview pane, which displays associated LUNs and volumes.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Attributes: The file’s attributes

130 Viewing and managing databases
Viewing Sybase database objects

To view Oracle database files
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Oracle Instances to view the Oracle
Summary, a list of all Oracle instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Oracle Summary pane, click the name of an individual instance to view
its Overview pane.
3 Do one of the following:
■ In the Overview pane for an Oracle instance, click the name of a file to
view its Overview pane.
■ In the Overview pane for an Oracle instance, click the name of a tablespace
to view its Overview pane. In the Overview pane for an Oracle tablespace,
click the name of a database file to view its Overview pane.

Performing operations on Oracle database objects
In the Oracle Summary, you can perform the following operations on one or more
Oracle instances:

Table 7-1 Available operations in the Oracle Summary view

Operation More information

Rediscover Updating discovery data

View explorer Checking explorer states and data
status

Manage attributes Managing attributes

Viewing Sybase database objects
CommandCentral Storage discovers information about, and provides facilities for
managing, Sybase database instances.

Viewing the Sybase Summary
You can view a list of all Sybase adaptive servers (instances) in the enterprise in
a Sybase Summary pane. The summary pane also displays graphs showing the
largest Sybase adaptive servers, the servers with the most available storage, and
the servers with the least available storage.

Viewing and managing databases 131
Viewing Sybase database objects

Note: Clustered applications are listed by service group name and application
name. Additional columns display the host where the application is running and
associated alerts.

In the Sybase Summary, you can select the name of an individual Sybase adaptive
server and then drill down to view information about Sybase databases, segments,
containers, and database files.
To view the Sybase Summary
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Sybase Adaptive Servers to view the
Sybase Summary, a list of all Sybase instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Sybase Summary pane, click the name of an individual instance to view
its Overview pane.

Viewing Sybase adaptive servers
In the summary pane, click the name of an individual Sybase adaptive server to
view its Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the host name, Sybase version,
page size, state (ONLINE or OFFLINE), and object dependency group (if any), along
with a table listing associated databases.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance and alert history data for
the Sybase adaptive server
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the Sybase instance and its connections
to storage
See “About the Topology Map” on page 61.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the Sybase instance
■ Attributes: The Sybase instance’s attributes
See “Viewing Sybase containers” on page 132.
See “Viewing Sybase database files” on page 134.
See “Performing operations on Sybase database objects” on page 135.
To view Sybase adaptive servers
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Sybase Adaptive Servers to view the
Sybase Summary, a list of all Sybase instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Sybase Summary pane, click the name of an individual adapter server
to view its Overview pane.

132 Viewing and managing databases
Viewing Sybase database objects

Viewing Sybase databases
For a Sybase adaptive server, you can view information about its databases in an
Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the associated host name, object
dependency group, and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. Tables
in the Overview pane list segments and transaction log files.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Trending: A graph showing maximum capacity and average usage, over time,
for the database
■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the database
■ Projections: Projected storage consumption for the database
See “Changing projection settings” on page 80.
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the database and its connections to storage
See “About the Topology Map” on page 61.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the database
■ Attributes: The database’s attributes
See “Viewing Sybase containers” on page 132.
See “Viewing Sybase database files” on page 134.
See “Performing operations on Sybase database objects” on page 135.
To view Sybase databases
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Sybase Adaptive Servers to view the
Sybase Summary, a list of all Sybase instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Sybase Summary pane, click the name of an individual adapter server
to view its Overview pane.
3 In the Overview pane for a Sybase adaptiver server, click the name of a
database to view its Overview pane.

Viewing Sybase containers
For a Sybase segment, you can select a container or storage unit—such as an
LDEV—to view its Overview pane. The Overview pane displays page range, volumes,
and LUNs, along with a table listing associated files.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth

Viewing and managing databases 133
Viewing Sybase database objects

See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the container
■ Attributes: The container’s attributes
See “Viewing Sybase database files” on page 134.
See “Performing operations on Sybase database objects” on page 135.
To view Sybase containers
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Sybase Adaptive Servers to view the
Sybase Summary, a list of all Sybase instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Sybase Summary pane, click the name of an individual adapter server
to view its Overview pane.
3 In the Overview pane for a Sybase adaptiver server, click the name of a
database to view its Overview pane.
4 In the Overview pane for a Sybase database, click the name of a segment to
view its Overview pane.
5 In the Overview pane for a Sybase segment, click the name of a container or
storage unit, such as an LDEV, to view its Overview pane.

Viewing Sybase segments
For a Sybase database, you can view its Sybase segments in an Overview pane.
The Overview pane displays the database name, number of used and unused pages,
and segment size along with a table listing storage units such as logical devices.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the segment
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the segment’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the segment
■ Attributes: The segment’s attributes
See “Viewing Sybase containers” on page 132.
See “Viewing Sybase database files” on page 134.
See “Performing operations on Sybase database objects” on page 135.

134 Viewing and managing databases
Viewing Sybase database objects

To view Sybase segments
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Sybase Adaptive Servers to view the
Sybase Summary, a list of all Sybase instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Sybase Summary pane, click the name of an individual adapter server
to view its Overview pane.
3 In the Overview pane for a Sybase adaptiver server, click the name of a
database to view its Overview pane.
4 In the Overview pane for a Sybase database, click the name of a segment to
view its Overview pane.

Viewing Sybase database files
For a Sybase container or storage unit, you can view LUNs and volumes associated
with a file in an Overview pane.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Attributes: The container’s attributes
See “Viewing Sybase containers” on page 132.
See “Performing operations on Sybase database objects” on page 135.
To view Sybase database files
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click Sybase Adaptive Servers to view the
Sybase Summary, a list of all Sybase instances in the enterprise.
2 In the Sybase Summary pane, click the name of an individual adapter server
to view its Overview pane.
3 In the Overview pane for a Sybase adaptiver server, click the name of a
database to view its Overview pane.
4 In the Overview pane for a Sybase database, click the name of a segment to
view its Overview pane.
5 In the Overview pane for a Sybase segment, click the name of a container or
storage unit, such as an LDEV, to view its Overview pane.
6 In the Overview pane for a Sybase container or storage unit, click the name
of a file to view LUNs and volumes associated with the file.

Viewing and managing databases 135
Viewing DB2 database objects

Performing operations on Sybase database objects
In the Sybase Summary, you can perform the following operations on one or more
Sybase instances

Table 7-2 Available operations in the Sybase Summary view

Operation More information

Rediscover Updating discovery data

View explorer Checking explorer states and data
status

Manage attributes Managing attributes

See “Viewing Sybase containers” on page 132.
See “Viewing Sybase database files” on page 134.

Viewing DB2 database objects
CommandCentral Storage discovers information about, and provides facilities for
managing, IBM DB2 database instances. (DB2 database instances are also known
as DB2 system managers.)

Viewing the DB2 Summary
You can view a list of all DB2 instances (system managers) in the enterprise. The
DB2 Summary pane displays graphs showing the largest DB2 databases, the
databases with the most available storage, and the databases with the least
available storage.

Note: Clustered applications are listed by service group name and application
name. Additional columns display the host where the application is running and
associated alerts.

You can also select an individual DB2 instance and then drill down to view
information about DB2 databases, tablespaces, containers, and database files.

136 Viewing and managing databases
Viewing DB2 database objects

To view the DB2 Summary
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click DB2 Instances to view the DB2
Summary, a list of all DB2 instances in the enterprise.
2 In the DB2 Summary pane, click the name of an individual DB2 instance and
then drill down to view information about DB2 databases, tablespaces,
containers, and database files.

Viewing DB2 instances
You can view information about an individual DB2 instance (system manager) in
an Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the name of the host on which
DB2 is running, the DB2 version and product name, state (ONLINE or OFFLINE),
and object dependency group, along with a table listing databases.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the database and its connections to storage
See “About the Topology Map” on page 61.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the DB2 instance
■ Attributes: The DB2 instance’s attributes
To view DB2 instances
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click DB2 Instances to view the DB2
Summary, a list of all DB2 instances in the enterprise.
2 In the DB2 Summary pane, click the name of an individual DB2 instance and
then drill down to view information about DB2 databases, tablespaces,
containers, and database files.

Viewing DB2 tablespaces
For a DB2 database, you can view information about a DB2 tablespace in its
Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the alias, tablespace type, host name,
state, and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity, along with a table
listing containers.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the tablespace
■ Projections: Projected storage consumption for the tablespace
See “Changing projection settings” on page 80.

Viewing and managing databases 137
Viewing DB2 database objects

■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the tablespace
■ Attributes: The tablespace’s attributes
To view DB2 tablespaces
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click DB2 Instances to view the DB2
Summary, a list of all DB2 instances in the enterprise.
2 In the DB2 Summary pane, click the name of an individual DB2 instance.
3 In the Overview pane for a DB2 instance, click the name of an individual DB2
database to view its Overview pane.
4 In the Overview pane for a DB2 database, click the name of a tablespace to
view its Overview pane.

Viewing DB2 databases
For a DB2 instance (system manager), you can select an individual DB2 database
and view its Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the name of the host on
which DB2 is running, buffer pool size, home directory, default extent size, object
dependency group, and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. Tables
in the Overview pane list tablespaces and transaction log files.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Trending: A graph showing maximum capacity and average usage, over time,
for the database
■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the DB2 database
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the database and its connections to storage
See “About the Topology Map” on page 61.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the DB2 database
■ Attributes: The database’s attributes

138 Viewing and managing databases
Viewing DB2 database objects

To view DB2 databases
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click DB2 Instances to view the DB2
Summary, a list of all DB2 instances in the enterprise.
2 In the DB2 Summary pane, click the name of an individual DB2 instance.
3 In the Overview pane for a DB2 instance, click the name of an individual DB2
database to view its Overview pane.

Viewing DB2 containers
For a DB2 tablespace, you can view information about a container or storage unit
in its Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the object’s name, state
(ACCESSIBLE or OFFLINE), and type, along with a table listing its files.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Monitoring: Alerts, collectors, and policies associated with the container
■ Attributes: The container’s attributes
To view DB2 containers
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click DB2 Instances to view the DB2
Summary, a list of all DB2 instances in the enterprise.
2 In the DB2 Summary pane, click the name of an individual DB2 instance.
3 In the Overview pane for a DB2 instance, click the name of an individual DB2
database to view its Overview pane.
4 In the Overview pane for a DB2 database, click the name of a tablespace to
view its Overview pane.
5 In the Overview pane for a DB2 tablespace, click the name of a container or
storage unit to view its Overview pane.

Viewing DB2 database files
For a DB2 container, you can select the name of a file to view LUNs and volumes
associated with the file.
Additional panes contain the following information:
■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth
See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.
■ Attributes: The file’s attributes

Viewing and managing databases 139
Viewing MS-SQL database objects

To view DB2 database files
1 In the Managing Summary pane, click DB2 Instances to view the DB2
Summary, a list of all DB2 instances in the enterprise.
2 In the DB2 Summary pane, click the name of an individual DB2 instance.
3 In the Overview pane for a DB2 instance, click the name of an individual DB2
database to view its Overview pane.
4 In the Overview pane for a DB2 database, click the name of a tablespace to
view its Overview pane.
5 In the Overview pane for a DB2 tablespace, click the name of a container or
storage unit to view its Overview pane.
6 In the Overview pane for a DB2 container, click the name of a file to view its
Overview pane.

Performing operations on DB2 database objects
In the DB2 Summary, you can perform the following operations on one or more
DB2 system managers (instances):

Table 7-3 Available operations in the DB2 Summary view

Operation More information

Rediscover Updating discovery data

View explorer Checking explorer states and data
status

Manage attributes Managing attributes

Viewing MS-SQL database objects
CommandCentral Storage discovers information about, and provides facilities for
managing, Microsoft MS-SQL Server database instances. (MS-SQL database
instances are also known as MS-SQL system managers.)

Viewing the MS-SQL Summary
You can view a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise. An MS-SQL Summary
pane displays graphs showing the largest MS-SQL databases, the databases with
the most available storage, and the databases with the least available storage.

file groups. click the name of an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance) and then drill down to view information about MS-SQL databases. click MS-SQL Instances to view the MS-SQL Summary. and object dependency group. click MS-SQL Instances to view the MS-SQL Summary. state (ONLINE or OFFLINE). file groups. 2 In the MS-SQL Summary pane. containers. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. file groups. containers. MS-SQL version and product name. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the database and its connections to storage See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. and policies associated with the MS-SQL system manager ■ Attributes: The MS-SQL system manager’s attributes To view MS-SQL instances 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click the name of an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance) and then drill down to view information about MS-SQL databases. The Overview pane displays the name of the host on which MS-SQL is running. containers. Additional columns display the host where the application is running and associated alerts. collectors. and database files. and database files. you can select an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance) and then drill down to view information about MS-SQL databases. Viewing MS-SQL instances You can view information about an individual MS-SQL instance in its Overview pane. .140 Viewing and managing databases Viewing MS-SQL database objects Note: Clustered applications are listed by service group name and application name. To view MS-SQL Summary 1 In the Managing Summary pane. and database files. a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise. along with a table listing databases. In the MS-SQL Summary. a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. 2 In the MS-SQL Summary pane.

you can view information about its database in its Overview pane. . Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the file group ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. Tables in the Overview pane list file groups and transaction log files. click MS-SQL Instances to view the MS-SQL Summary. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the database and its connections to storage See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. Viewing MS-SQL file groups For an MS-SQL database. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. click the name of an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance). size. object dependency group. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. database name. collectors. 2 In the MS-SQL Summary pane. The Overview pane displays the name of the host on which MS-SQL is running. and policies associated with the database ■ Attributes: The database’s attributes To view MS-SQL databases 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Viewing and managing databases 141 Viewing MS-SQL database objects Viewing MS-SQL databases For an MS-SQL instance. click the name of a database to view its Overview pane. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. 3 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL instance. along with a table listing containers (SQL files). a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise. for the database ■ Storage: LUNs and device handles associated with the database ■ Projections: Projected storage consumption for the database See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. over time. you can view information about a file group in its Overview pane. The Overview pane displays the host’s name. state (ONLINE or OFFLINE). Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Trending: A graph showing maximum capacity and average usage. and maximum size.

you can select a file and view LUNs and volumes associated with the file. click the name of a database to view its Overview pane. click the name of a file group to view its Overview pane. and policies associated with the file group ■ Attributes: The file group’s attributes To view MS-SQL file groups 1 In the Managing Summary pane. The Overview pane displays the container’s name and maximum size. 2 In the MS-SQL Summary pane. 3 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL instance. you can view information about a container (SQL file) in its Overview pane. click MS-SQL Instances to view the MS-SQL Summary. collectors. The information appears in the database file Overview pane. 3 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL instance. click the name of an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance). and LUNs. Tables in the Overview pane list files. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. and policies associated with the container ■ Attributes: The file group’s attributes To view MS-SQL containers 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click the name of an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance). click the name of a container (SQL file) to view its Overview pane. volumes. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. . a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise. 2 In the MS-SQL Summary pane. Viewing MS-SQL containers For an MS-SQL file group. 4 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL database. click MS-SQL Instances to view the MS-SQL Summary. Viewing MS-SQL database files For an MS-SQL container. handles. a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise.142 Viewing and managing databases Viewing MS-SQL database objects ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click the name of a database to view its Overview pane. 4 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL file group. collectors.

Viewing and managing databases 143 Viewing MS-SQL database objects Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the database’s growth See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. a list of all MS-SQL instances in the enterprise. click MS-SQL Instances to view the MS-SQL Summary. 4 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL file group. 3 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL instance. click the name of a file to view LUNs and volumes associated with the file. 2 In the MS-SQL Summary pane. you can perform the following operations on one or more MS-SQL system managers (instances): Table 7-4 Available operations in the MS-SQL Summary view Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes . ■ Attributes: The file group’s attributes To view MS-SQL database files 1 In the Managing Summary pane. 5 In the Overview pane for an MS-SQL container. click the name of a database to view its Overview pane. Performing operations on MS-SQL database objects In the MS-SQL Summary. click the name of an individual MS-SQL system manager (instance). click the name of a container (SQL file) to view its Overview pane.

144 Viewing and managing databases Viewing MS-SQL database objects .

as well as detailed information about the storage resources and network devices to which they are connected. and virtualization servers and how to perform operations on them. virtual hosts. Chapter 8 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About viewing and managing hosts and HBAs ■ Clusters ■ Hosts ■ Virtual hosts ■ Virtualization servers ■ Storage pools ■ Host bus adapters (HBAs) ■ iSCSI initiators ■ Unidentified adapters About viewing and managing hosts and HBAs The Hosts and HBAs Summary pane displays summary information about the host clusters. virtual hosts. HBAs. hosts. and virtualization servers in your storage network. The topics in this section describe how to view detailed information about clusters. host bus adapters (HBAs). individual hosts. .

The Overview pane contains tables listing the cluster’s nodes. . service groups. click the name of an individual cluster to view its Overview pane. click Clusters to view the Cluster Summary. service groups. a list of all clusters in the enterprise that are managed by either Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) or Microsoft Cluster Server. collectors.146 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Clusters Clusters A cluster is a set of hosts that share a set of disks and are connected by a set of redundant heartbeat networks. CommandCentral Storage discovers information about clusters and provides facilities for managing them. LUNs represented by the volumes ■ Reporting: Links to switch port. and file systems. and file systems. and change and alert history reports. resources. host performance. resources. Additional panes contain the following information pertaining to the cluster (not to hosts within the cluster): ■ Connectivity: Device handles and storage ports and HBA ports to which the cluster is connected ■ Storage: Associated LUNs and device handles ■ Volumes: Physical disk groups and sets. The Overview pane contains tables listing the cluster’s nodes. volumes. In the Cluster Summary. and policies associated with the cluster ■ Attributes: The cluster’s attributes For information about viewing and performing operations on clustered services. click the name of an individual cluster to view its Overview pane. See “Clustered services” on page 124. disks. 2 In the Cluster Summary. To view clusters 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Viewing clusters You can view a list of all clusters in the enterprise that are managed by either Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) or Microsoft Cluster Server. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. volume sets.

■ Logical storage structures (directories and files) which are mapped to physical storage resources on the network by means of LUN masking. Hosts can also be grouped into clusters. See “Performing operations on hosts” on page 153. . You can add virtualization servers to zones or groups. you can perform the same operations you would for any host. Hosts A host contains the central processing unit on which applications run and database transactions occur. See “Viewing direct-attached storage” on page 115. similar to what you do for other types of hosts. hosts provide access to storage in either of two ways: ■ Physical storage devices attached directly to the host. You can also view VMware deployments showing ESX virtualization servers. edit host information. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 147 Hosts Performing operations on clusters In the Cluster Summary. or add LUN masking. See “Viewing clustered services” on page 124. For information on how clusters are represented in the CommandCentral Storage Console. In a typical storage network. you can perform the following operations on one or more clusters: Table 8-1 Available operations in the Cluster Summary view Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In the object view for a cluster node. For information on how this storage is represented in the CommandCentral Storage Console.

Tables in the Overview pane list file systems. ■ Storage: LUNs allocated to the host. shared drives. whether the VM is installed. iSCSI initiators. host volumes. a list of virtualization applications—such as Veritas Volume Manager (VM)—installed on the host. and the hosts with the least available storage. ■ Zoning: The host’s zoning characteristics. ■ Volumes: Physical disk groups (Veritas Volume Manager) or disk sets (Solaris Volume Manager and DiskSuite). See “Viewing NetApp unified storage devices” on page 109. Note: Below the Hosts Summary is a list of unified storage devices in file mode or mixed mode. and file usage and aging data. The Overview pane displays the host’s information and IP address. and switch ports to which the host is connected. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. replication properties. the summary includes statistics about its storage usage and lists the enclosures on which the storage resides. masked LUNs with no device handles (LUNs masked to the host but not yet claimed). For each host. volume sets defined for the host. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. available LUNs. shares consumed. In the Hosts Summary. iSCSI initiator port groups. See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: The host’s HBAs. See “Zones. and zone aliases” on page 186. Note: Only RAID1 and RAID5 volumes can be associated with a hot spare pool. operating platform.148 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Hosts Viewing the Hosts Summary You can view the Hosts Summary. applications. HBA port groups. The summary also displays graphs showing the largest hosts. clusters in which the host is a member. available disks. ■ Projections: Projected storage consumption on the host. hot spare pools. device handles (including information about multipathing applications). zone sets. See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. and array virtual ports. fully qualified host names. the hosts with the most available storage. object dependency groups. . ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the host’s storage consumption. applications running on it. a list of all hosts in the enterprise.

See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. object dependency groups. 2 View usage and aging information for files in that object's scope. you can view usage and aging information for files associated with all hosts. 2 In the Hosts Summary. NetApp qtree. and policies associated with the host. NetApp unified storage device. NetApp qtrees. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. collectors. To view host file details 1 Click the Reporting tab in the object view for a host. fully qualified host names. The Overview pane displays the host’s information and IP address. The following tables display: ■ Applications ■ Volumes ■ Disks ■ LUNs ■ Device Handles For detailed descriptions of each of these tables and the data they display. See “File and directory reports” on page 261. ■ Attributes: The host’s attributes. Viewing host file details Because the Data Module (DM) discovers data at the file or file system level. To view hosts 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click Hosts to view the Hosts Summary. and NetApp shares. you can click the name of a file system to view its Overview pane. operating platform. host file systems. NetApp volume. mount point. . a list of all hosts in the enterprise. host file system. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 149 Hosts ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the host and its connections to storage. or NetApp share. whether the VM is installed. Viewing host file systems In the Overview pane for a host. NetApp unified storage devices. The Overview pane displays the file system’s type. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. NetApp volumes.

volumes. such as an Oracle tablespace. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. device path. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ File Details: Summaries of file types used in the file system and of file aging properties ■ Projections: Projected storage consumption in the file system See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. See “About viewing and managing applications” on page 121. click the name of an application object. volume sets. The Overview pane displays the file system’s type. click Hoststo view the Hosts Summary. to view application-specific information. click the name of a file system to view its Overview pane. Tables in the Overview pane list associated applications. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane.150 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Hosts device path. mount point. collectors. . Viewing host applications In the Overview pane for a host. disks. See “About viewing and managing databases” on page 127. To view a host's application 1 In the Managing Summary pane. 3 In the Overview pane for a host. click Hoststo view the Hosts Summary. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. a list of all hosts in the enterprise. such as an Oracle tablespace. and policies associated with the file system ■ Attributes: The file system’s attributes To view a host's file system 1 In the Managing Summary pane. a list of all hosts in the enterprise. 3 In the Overview pane for a host. 2 In the Hosts Summary. you can click the name of an application object. to view application-specific information. and capacity. LUNs. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing file usage and aging data See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. and device handles. and capacity. 2 In the Hosts Summary.

file system name. disk group name and version. 4 In the Volumes pane for a host. disks. volume sets. 3 Click the Volumes tab. Viewing host disks In the Volumes pane for a host. 2 In the Hosts Summary. mount point. you can click the name of a disk to view its details. and used and unused storage capacity. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Monitoring: Alerts. and snapshots. It also displays lists of associated applications. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Monitoring: Alerts. Tables in the Overview pane list associated applications. volumes. file systems. Veritas Volume Manager type. LUN ID. The Overview pane displays the disk’s host name. and policies associated with the volume ■ Attributes: The volume’s attributes For information about configuring volumes for multipathing. The Overview pane displays the associated host name. status. click the name of a volume to view its Overview pane. spare. disk group name. 2 In the Hosts Summary. Volume Manager version and type. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. and policies associated with the disk ■ Attributes: The disk’s attributes To view a host's disks 1 In the Managing Summary pane. LUNs. and volume layout. you can click the name of a volume to view its details. click Hoststo view the Hosts Summary. collectors. click Hosts to view the Hosts Summary. . and device handles. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 151 Hosts Viewing host volumes In the Volumes pane for a host. LUNs. To view a host's volumes 1 In the Managing Summary pane. See “Making paths available to Volume Manager hosts” on page 464. a list of all hosts in the enterprise. collectors. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. a list of all hosts in the enterprise. file systems. volume sets.

volume sets. You can display any of the following object types: ■ Sun disks ■ Sun disk sets ■ Sun disk slices . file systems. click the name of a Veritas Volume Manager disk group to view its Overview pane.152 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Hosts 3 Click the Volumes tab. you can click the name of a Solaris Volume Manager disk set to view the following information: host name. LUNs. volume sets. click the name of a disk to view its Overview pane. volumes. 2 In the Hosts Summary. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. An additional Attributes pane displays the disk set’s attributes. click Hoststo view the Hosts Summary. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. 4 In the Volumes pane. volumes. Veritas Volume Manager version and type. Click the name of a related object to view the Overview pane for that object. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Monitoring: Alerts. Tables in the Overview pane list associated applications. volume sets. Viewing Solaris Volume Manager disk sets and related objects In the Volumes pane for a host. and policies associated with the disk group ■ Attributes: The disk group’s attributes To view a host's disk groups 1 In the Managing Summary pane. disks. and lists of associated applications. file systems. and meta databases. used and unused storage capacity. 4 In the Volumes pane for a host. and meta databases. Volume Manager version and type. The Overview pane displays the associated host name. LUNs. Viewing Veritas Volume Manager disk groups In the Volumes pane for a host. a list of all hosts in the enterprise. volume sets. 3 Click the Volumes tab. disks. you can click the name of a Veritas Volume Manager disk group to view its Overview pane. collectors.

collectors. 4 In the Volumes pane for a host. you can perform the following operations on one or more hosts: Table 8-2 Available operations in the Hosts Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Edit host Editing user-created hosts (user-created hosts only) Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) . 3 Click the Volumes tab. 2 In the Hosts Summary. click the name of a Solaris Volume Manager disk set. Performing operations on hosts In the Hosts Summary. additional panes contain the following information: ■ Monitoring: Alerts. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 153 Hosts Note: To view a list of disk slices on a Sun host where Sun VM volumes are configured. click the name of an individual host to view its Overview pane. click Hoststo view the Hosts Summary. display the host’s Storage pane and click the name of a device handle. and policies associated with the object ■ Attributes: The object’s attributes To view a host's Solaris disk sets 1 In the Managing Summary pane. a list of all hosts in the enterprise. ■ Sun hot spare pools ■ Sun meta databases ■ Sun soft partitions For each object type.

and disks—you can perform the following operations: Table 8-4 Available operations in file system.154 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Hosts Table 8-2 Available operations in the Hosts Summary view (continued) Operation More information Remove LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Rescan device CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide handles Delete Host Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database (undiscovered hosts only) Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In a host’s object view. volumes. volume. you can perform the following additional operations: Table 8-3 Available operations in host object views Operation More information Launch browser or Launching third-party applications in context Telnet session Provision storage Providing access to storage In the object views for other host objects—such as file systems. and disk object views Operation More information Manage attributes Managing attributes Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status .

are assigned directly to a virtual machine without any other layer of virtualization. A virtual machine can be managed and can have a virtual host installed. it can run its own operating systems and applications as if it were a physical computer. a virtualization application. and SAN reporting. has several explorer processes enabled. Virtual hosts. also referred to as guest operating systems. From this central repository. A managed host can be a server hosting an Oracle® financial application or a Microsoft® Exchange mail application. The managed host. stores Management Server and managed host data. The virtualization server provides data about its virtual machines to the Management Server. by default. storage pool. The Management Server. monitoring. CommandCentral Storage virtualization features help you answer questions about virtual hosts such as: ■ What is the relationship between the virtual host servers and their parent ESX virtualization server? ■ Which operating systems are running on my virtual hosts? ■ Which virtual hosts use the most file system capacity? ■ Which virtual hosts have the most file system capacity available? See “Viewing virtual hosts ” on page 156. They can also analyze the virtualization infrastructure dependencies. storage. See “Performing operations on virtual hosts ” on page 157. and virtual machine. storage administrators can reclaim unused storage at the ESX virtualization server. CommandCentral Storage virtualization features provide visibility into the virtual hosts (guest OS servers) that users deploy to support applications or server consolidations. the central repository. . An ESX virtualization server can host multiple virtual machines with the help of VMware. With this visibility. policy administration. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 155 Virtual hosts Virtual hosts If virtualization servers and virtual hosts operate in your environment. alerting. CommandCentral Storage performs services such as automatic resource mapping. use CommandCentral Storage to discover and report on storage allocation across the virtualization infrastructure. Although a virtual machine does not physically exist. See “Viewing virtual host details” on page 156.

Tables in the Overview pane list file systems. operating platform. click Virtual Hosts to view the Virtual Hosts Summary. Viewing virtual host details You can view a specific virtual host’s information and IP address. whether the volume is installed. 2 In the Virtual Hosts Summary pane. virtualization applications. iSCSI initiator port groups. See “Virtualization servers” on page 158. iSCSI initiator port groups. object dependency groups. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Overview: Virtual machine. and a list of virtualization applications—such as Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM)—installed on the virtual host. which you can view from the Virtual Host Overview pane. parent ESX virtualization server. View their operating systems. and share paths. shares consumed. parent virtualization server. ■ Most used file system capacity ■ Most available file system capacity See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. . and any alerts associated with the virtual hosts. array virtual ports. raw device mapping (RDM) info. clusters in which the virtual host is a member. click the name of an individual virtual host to view its Overview pane. virtual ports. To display connectivity or zoning information for the virtual host. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. applications. port groups. a list of all virtual hosts in the enterprise.156 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Virtual hosts Viewing virtual hosts You can view a list of all virtual hosts in the enterprise. fully qualified host names. display its parent virtualization server. To view virtual hosts 1 In the Managing Summary pane. applications running on the virtual host. file systems. See “Viewing virtual host details” on page 156. object dependency group. which displays the virtual host's details. See “Performing operations on virtual hosts ” on page 157. Bar charts show the virtual hosts with the top 10 file system capacities: ■ Most total file system capacity: Both used and available file system capacity. clusters.

and % used capacity. ■ Attributes: The virtual host’s attributes. hot spare pools. device handles (including information about multipathing applications). replication properties. See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. available disks. See “Managing attributes” on page 87. LUNs allocated to the virtual host. click Virtual Hosts to view the Virtual Hosts Summary. and file usage and aging data. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 157 Virtual hosts ■ Storage: Virtual machine disks (which are associated by the current virtual host). virtual host volumes. and policies associated with the virtual host. applications running on it. the following fields display as N/A: storage capacity. ■ Volumes: Physical disk groups (Veritas Volume Manager) or disk sets (Solaris Volume Manager and DiskSuite). collectors. used capacity. Performing operations on virtual hosts In the Virtual Hosts Summary. and masked LUNs with no device handles (LUNs masked to the virtual host but not yet claimed). Note: Only RAID1 and RAID5 volumes can be associated with a hot spare pool. a list of all virtual hosts in the enterprise. See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the virtual host’s storage consumption. ■ Projections: Projected storage consumption on the virtual host. See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. volume sets defined for the virtual host. To display a virtual host's details 1 In the Managing Summary pane. you can perform the following operations on one or more virtual hosts: . available LUNs. available capacity. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. 2 Click the name of an individual virtual host to view its Overview pane. Note: For disk sets. which displays the virtual host's details.

The virtualization server provides data about its virtual machines to the Management Server. Using VMware features in CommandCentral Storage. a virtualization application. .158 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Virtualization servers Table 8-5 Available operations in the Virtual Hosts Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Add or remove LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Storage administrators can provide additional storage to a server. Virtualization servers An ESX virtualization server can host multiple virtual machines with the help of VMware. You can determine if the virtual disk that you are selecting is already masked to another consumer of the virtual disk. This option is not available for ESX virtualization servers that have been discovered automatically using either the out-of-band or in-band discovery processes. Delete host Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database In earlier versions of CommandCentral Storage. storage administrators can mask new storage to an ESX virtualization server. Rescan device CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide handles Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. you could manually create a host object around the HBA ports of a VMware ESX server. Users can delete these manually created host objects and leverage one or both of the native discovery processes.

are assigned directly to a virtual machine without any other layer of virtualization. also referred to as guest operating systems. raw device mapping (RDM) info. and virtual machine. IP addresses. storage administrators can reclaim unused storage at the ESX virtualization server. Virtual hosts. See “Viewing virtualization server details ” on page 160. A virtual machine can be managed and can have a virtual host installed. You can also view their operating systems. With this visibility. it can run its own operating systems and applications as if it were a physical computer. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 159 Virtualization servers Although a virtual machine does not physically exist. See “Performing operations on virtualization servers” on page 161. . storage pool. and storage pools associated with the server. See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. CommandCentral Storage virtualization features provide visibility into the virtual hosts (guest OS servers) that users deploy to support applications or server consolidations. Bar charts show the storage pools with the top 10 storage pool capacities: ■ Most total storage pool capacity: Both used and available storage pool capacity. Viewing virtualization servers You can view a list of all ESX virtualization servers and storage pools in the enterprise and their high level capacity utilization information. They can also analyze the virtualization infrastructure dependencies. ■ Most used storage pool capacity ■ Most available storage pool capacity See “Performing operations on virtualization servers” on page 161. CommandCentral Storage support for VMware helps answer questions about virtualization servers such as: ■ Which servers are hosting the various ESX servers? ■ Which servers are actually configured as guest OS servers? ■ How much storage do I have masked to my ESX servers? ■ What is the total storage for my ESX server? ■ What are the I/O paths between my ESX servers and physical storage? See “Viewing virtualization servers” on page 159.

available disks. a list of all ESX virtualization servers in the enterprise. This pane might help you see the need to allocate new storage to the ESX virtualization server. Tables in the Overview pane list storage pools. managed virtual hosts. replication properties. switch ports. applications. available LUNs. and % used capacity. masked LUNs with no device handles (LUNs masked to the virtualization server but not yet claimed). device handles (including information about multipathing applications). . click the name of an individual server to view its Overview pane. iSCSI initiators.160 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Virtualization servers To view virtualization servers 1 In the Managing Summary pane. whether the VM is installed. file systems. volume sets defined for the virtualization server. and a graph showing used and unused storage capacity. ■ Volumes: Physical disk groups (Veritas Volume Manager) or disk sets (Solaris Volume Manager and DiskSuite). which displays the virtualization server's details. See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. click Virtualization Servers to view the Virtualization Servers Summary. fully qualified host names. available capacity. the following fields display as N/A: storage capacity. zone sets. virtualization server volumes. See “Zones. when the server is not part of a zone where the storage is visible. virtual machines. Note: For disk sets. and zone aliases” on page 186. and hot spare pools. operating platform. virtual ports. ■ Zoning: The virtualization server's zoning characteristics. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: The virtualization server's HBAs. clusters in which the virtual host is a member. Viewing virtualization server details You can view a virtualization server's information and IP address. ■ Storage: LUNs allocated to the virtualization server. used capacity. object dependency groups. iSCSI initiator port groups. and a list of virtualization applications—such as Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM)—installed on the virtual host. 2 In the Virtualization Servers Summary pane. and host connections. shares consumed.

■ Monitoring: Alerts. See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. storage administrators can mask new storage to an ESX virtualization server. ■ Attributes: The virtualization server’s attributes. and policies associated with the virtualization server. You can determine if the virtual disk that you are selecting is already masked to another consumer of the virtual disk. which displays the virtualization server's details. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the virtualization server's storage consumption and applications running on it. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the virtualization server and its connections to storage. . click Virtualization Server to view the Virtualization Server Summary. collectors. To display a virtualization server's details 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 161 Virtualization servers Note: Only RAID1 and RAID5 volumes can be associated with a hot spare pool. See “Managing attributes” on page 87. Using VMware features in CommandCentral Storage. you can perform the following operations on one or more virtual hosts: Table 8-6 Available operations in the Virtualization Server Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Add or remove Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard LUN masking(s) Storage administrators can provide additional storage to a server. a list of all virtualization server in the enterprise. Performing operations on virtualization servers In the Virtualization Server Summary. 2 Click the name of an individual virtualization server to view its Overview pane.

See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. you could manually create a host object around the HBA ports of a VMware ESX server. This option is not available for ESX virtualization servers that have been discovered automatically using either the out-of-band or in-band discovery processes. Rescan device CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide handles Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Storage pools CommandCentral Storage shows information about the disks drives or volumes assigned to storage pools and shows storage pool capacity on virtualization servers. An ESX virtualization server can host multiple virtual machines with the help of VMware. CommandCentral Storage support for VMware helps answer questions about storage pools such as: ■ With which virtualization server is this storage pool associated? ■ What is the available and unallocated storage pool capacity in my virtualization environment? . Users can delete these manually created host objects and leverage one or both of the native discovery processes.162 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Storage pools Table 8-6 Available operations in the Virtualization Server Summary view (continued) Operation More information Delete host Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database In earlier versions of CommandCentral Storage. a virtualization application. The virtualization server provides virtualization data about its virtual machines to the Management Server.

Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Overview: The virtualization server storage usage. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 163 Storage pools ■ Which virtual machines associated with this storage pool have CommandCentral Storage managed host installations? See “Viewing storage pools” on page 163. virtual machine storage usage. See “Viewing storage pool details ” on page 163. IP address. and LUNs. You can view their virtualization server operating system. Tables in the Overview pane list the virtualization server associated with the storage pool. a list of all ESX virtualization servers in the enterprise. See “Performing operations on storage pools” on page 164. A bar chart shows the available and unallocated storage pool capacity for the virtualization server. raw device mapping (RDM) info. To view storage pools 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Bar charts show the top 10 storage pool capacities and consumption across all the virtualization servers. Viewing storage pools You can view a list of all storage pools in the virtualization enterprise and their high level capacity utilization information. which displays the storage pool's details. click the name of an individual storage pool to view its Overview pane. click Virtualization Servers to view the Virtualization Servers Summary. and storage allocated to this storage pool. and LUNs. 2 In the Virtualization Servers Summary pane. raw device mapping (RDM) info. virtual machine disks and storage usage. See “Virtual hosts” on page 155. See “Managing attributes” on page 87. . virtual machine disks. IP address. ■ Attributes: The storage pool’s attributes. and storage allocated to this storage pool. Viewing storage pool details View a storage pool's virtualization server operating system.

and firmware version. 2 Click the name of an individual storage pool to view its Overview pane. you can perform the following operations on one or more storage pools: Table 8-7 Available operations in the Storage Pool Summary view Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Host bus adapters (HBAs) A host bus adapter (HBA) is the point through which connections are defined between a host and objects on a Fibre Channel network. a list of all virtualization server in the enterprise. Tables in the Overview pane list device handles.164 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Host bus adapters (HBAs) To display a storage pool's details 1 In the Managing Summary pane. The Overview pane displays the HBA’s vendor name. Performing operations on storage pools In the Storage Pool Summary. HBA port groups. and zone aliases” on page 186. product name. associate host (source). For example. driver information. click Virtualization Server to view the Virtualization Server Summary. Then click the name of an individual HBA to view its Overview pane. Viewing HBAs Click HBAs in the Managing Summary pane to view the HBAs Summary. a list of all HBAs in the enterprise. and array virtual ports. an array LUN is masked to a host by establishing a connection between a port on the array and an HBA on the host. which displays the storage pool's details. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: HBA ports and the switch ports to which they are connected ■ Zoning: The HBA’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. zone sets. . WWN.

a list of all HBAs in the enterprise. port state (ONLINE or OFFLINE). Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 165 Host bus adapters (HBAs) ■ Attributes: The HBA’s attributes To view HBAs 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Overview: WWN. click the name of an HBA port to display its physical network connections (switches and switch ports). click HBAs to view the HBAs Summary. click the name of an individual HBA to view its Overview pane. HBA port groups to which the port belongs . you can perform the following operations on one or more HBAs: Table 8-8 Available operations in the HBAs Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Remove LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Viewing HBA ports In the Connectivity pane for an HBA. 2 In the HBAs Summary. physical connections. Performing operations on HBAs In the HBAs Summary.

and zone aliases” on page 186. 3 Click the Connectivity tab. click HBAs to view the HBAs Summary. a list of all HBAs in the enterprise. click the name of an individual HBA to view its Overview pane. ■ Monitoring: Monitoring is not available for this object. ■ Zoning: The port’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the HBA port's performance data and alert history. click the name of an HBA port to display its object view. Performing operations on HBA ports In the Connectivity pane for an HBA. in which you can perform the following operations: Table 8-9 Available operations in HBA port object views Operation More information Manage attributes Managing attributes Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Remove LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view . ■ Attributes: The port’s attributes To view an HBA's ports 1 In the Managing Summary pane.166 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Host bus adapters (HBAs) ■ Connectivity: HBA ports and the device ports to which they are connected. 4 In the Connectivity pane for an HBA. zone sets. 2 In the HBAs Summary. click the name of an HBA port to display its physical network connections (switches and switch ports).

and policies associated with the iSCSI initiator ■ Attributes: The iSCSI initiator’s attributes To view iSCSI initiators 1 In the Managing Summary pane. zone sets. driver information. Performing operations on iSCSI initiators In the iSCSI Initiators Summary. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. collectors. WWN. The Overview pane displays the iSCSI initiator’s associated host. iSCSI initiator port groups. and firmware version. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 167 iSCSI initiators iSCSI initiators An iSCSI initiator represents an iSCSI link that connects a host to storage in a NetApp Unified Storage device. click the name of an individual iSCSI initiator to view its Overview pane. Then click the name of an individual iSCSI initiator to view its Overview pane. Tables in the Overview pane list device handles. a list of all iSCSI initiators in the enterprise. and array virtual ports (storage views). Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: iSCSI initiator ports and the device ports to which they are connected ■ Zoning: The iSCSI initiator’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. Viewing iSCSI initiators Click iSCSI Initiators in the Managing Summary pane to view the iSCSI Initiators Summary. and zone aliases” on page 186. click iSCSI Initiators to view the iSCSI Initiators Summary. 2 In the iSCSI Initiators Summary. you can perform the following operations on one or more iSCSI initiators: Table 8-10 Available operations in the iSCSI Initiators Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Provision storage Providing access to storage . a list of all iSCSI initiators in the enterprise.

■ The object’s vendor (a discoverable attribute) is not known to be a storage vendor. You can take the necessary steps to correlate the unidentified adapter (HBA) to the host to which it connects. ■ The CommandCentral Storage managed host is not installed on the remote host to which the HBA is attached. See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202. ■ The switch name server does not provide enough information (that is. In such a case. the device displays in the Console as an unidentified adapter. ■ The HBA has an unsupported HBA card or driver version.168 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Unidentified adapters Table 8-10 Available operations in the iSCSI Initiators Summary view (continued) Operation More information Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Remove LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Unidentified adapters Sometimes CommandCentral Storage cannot completely discover an HBA or storage device that has logged into a Fibre Channel switch. This happens. when the device is zoned out of view of the host. ■ None of the device’s LUNs are visible to a CommandCentral Management Server or managed host. for example. . ■ The Management Server is not configured to communicate with the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) on the remote host to which the HBA is attached. This can occur under any of the following circumstances. a SCSI INQUIRY string) to determine whether a discovered adapter belongs to an HBA or a device.

The Overview pane displays the adapter’s vendor (manufacturer). click Unidentified Adapters to view the Unidentified Adapters Summary. 2 In the Unidentified Adapters Summary. Performing operations on unidentified adapters In the Unidentified Adapters Summary. and WWNs. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Switch port connections (click the name of an adapter port to view information about the port) See “Viewing enclosure ports” on page 97. zone sets. Typically. click the name of an individual unidentified adapter to view its Overview pane. ■ Zoning: The unidentified adapter’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. you can perform the following operations on one or more adapters. ■ Reporting: Reports are not available for unidentified adapters ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the unidentified adapter and its connections to storage See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. source. Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs 169 Unidentified adapters Viewing unidentified adapters Click Unidentified Adapters in the Managing Summary pane to view the Unidentified Adapters Summary. Then click the name of an individual adapter to view its Overview pane. a list of all unidentified adapters in the enterprise. a list of all unidentified adapters in the enterprise. you would do this so that the unidentified adapter is identified appropriately (as the correct kind of storage device) in the Console: Table 8-11 Available operations in the Unidentified Adapters Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group . and zone aliases” on page 186. ■ Attributes: The adapter’s attributes To view unidentified adapters 1 In the Managing Summary pane.

170 Viewing and managing hosts and HBAs Unidentified adapters Table 8-11 Available operations in the Unidentified Adapters Summary view (continued) Operation More information Add LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Remove LUN Masking array storage to host ports using the LUN Masking wizard masking(s) Build or edit About creating storage views (array virtual ports) for LUNs storage view Correlate Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts unidentified adapter to host Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes .

See “Switches” on page 174. zone sets. switches. See “Fabrics” on page 172. and zone aliases” on page 186. The topics in this section describe how to view detailed information about the network’s infrastructure and perform operations on it. zone sets. See “Zones. . Chapter 9 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About viewing and managing the storage infrastructure ■ Fabrics ■ Switches ■ Zones. and zone aliases ■ Hubs ■ Using port bundles to manage links About viewing and managing the storage infrastructure You can view summary information about network objects that connect users and applications with storage resources using the Storage Area Network (SAN) Summary pane. See “Hubs” on page 189. Examples of SAN objects include fabrics. See “Using port bundles to manage links” on page 190. and hubs.

intended to enable more efficient use of the SAN. Tables in the Overview pane list switches in the fabric and associated virtual fabrics. 2 In the Fabrics Summary pane. port usage. Every fabric contains at least one FC switch and may also contain zones. The Overview pane displays the vendor name for the switch on which the fabric is defined. The CommandCentral Storage Console lists physical fabrics and virtual fabrics together under a single "Fabrics" heading. click the name of an individual fabric. You can also view information about an individual fabric in its Overview pane. See “Creating and updating virtual fabrics” on page 451. zone sets. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the objects in the fabric See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Zoning: Active zones (zones that are members of the currently active zone set). defined zones. click Fabrics to view the Fabric Summary. and zone aliases associated with the fabric ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing physical resources in the fabric and performance data for switch ports See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227.172 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Fabrics Fabrics A fabric is a group of physical resources on a Storage Area Network (SAN) that are connected by a Fibre Channel (FC) switch. whether the switch is capable of supporting virtual fabrics. Viewing fabrics You can view a list of all fabrics in the enterprise. Performing operations on fabrics In the Fabrics Summary. For more information about virtual fabrics and their uses. ■ Attributes: The fabric’s attributes To view fabrics 1 In the Managing Summary pane. and Enabled Zone Set. A virtual fabric is an isolated grouping of switches and other objects within a physical fabric. a list of all fabrics in the enterprise. you can perform the following operations on one or more fabrics: .

Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 173 Fabrics Table 9-1 Available operations in the Fabrics Summary view Operation More information Manage zones and Creating and modifying zones zone sets Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In the object views for some fabrics—depending on their zoning configuration and on whether they are virtual fabrics—you can perform the following additional operations: Table 9-2 Available operations in fabric object views Operation More information Disable the active Enabling and disabling zone sets zone set Edit virtual fabric Creating and updating virtual fabrics Destroy virtual Deleting virtual fabrics fabric Manually assigning names to fabrics When CommandCentral Storage discovers switches in a fabric. Because all switches in the fabric share information such as zoning tables. . Then. it assigns the fabric the same name as its principal switch. CommandCentral Storage will designate a new principal switch—again. by default. If the principal switch is removed from the fabric. The name of the fabric will change as a result. the switch with the lowest WWN—when it discovers the fabric again. See “Editing user-defined attributes” on page 88. The Zoning explorer. For this reason. periodically rescans the fabric and updates zoning information based on the zone information it discovers for all of the switches in the fabric. it considers the switch with the lowest World Wide Name (WWN) to be the principal switch. you may want to assign names manually to a fabric by editing its Display Name attribute. a change in principal switch role does not cause a loss of information. for example.

3 From the drop-down task list. vendor (manufacturer). You can also view information about an individual switch in its Overview pane. these groupings are called port bundles. in the Attribute Name drop-down list. Depending on the switch type. 6 Click OK. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the switch and its connections to hosts and storage . Switches attach to other network nodes by means of either ports or slots (openings in the switch into which a printed circuit board can be inserted). and a graph showing port usage. select Display Name. See “Switches” on page 174. select Edit Attribute and click Go. 4 In the Edit Attribute pane. port bundles. See “Using port bundles to manage links” on page 190. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Switch port connections ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing performance data for switch ports See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. 2 In the Fabric Summary pane. WWN. IP addresses. type the new name. The Overview pane displays the fabric defined on the switch along with the switch’s model number. Switches A switch is a network device to which nodes attach and which provides high-speed switching of node connections via link-level addressing. firmware version. click Fabrics to view the Fabric Summary.174 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Switches For more information about switches and the kinds of information CommandCentral Storage discovers about them. check the box adjacent to an individual fabric. Viewing the Switches Summary You can view a list of all switches in the enterprise. To manually assign names to fabrics 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Switch ports can also be grouped. role. a list of all fabrics in the enterprise. object dependency group. 5 In the Attibute Value box. the Overview pane may also contain tables listing slots. and isolated switches.

they are listed in the switch’s Overview pane. Viewing switch slots If the switch contains slots. and port bundles. isolated switches. and policies associated with the switch ■ Attributes: The switch’s attributes In the Overview pane for a switch. The Overview pane displays the isolated switch’s model number. fabric. The Overview pane also shows the slot’s ID. You can also view information about a specific slot in its Overview pane. click the name of an individual switch to view its Overview pane. IP address. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Ports to which the switch is connected . a list of all switches in the enterprise. ■ Monitoring: Alerts. click the name of an individual switch to view its Overview pane. firmware version. collectors. WWN. they are listed in the switch’s Overview pane. vendor (manufacturer). and powered-on status. You can view information about an isolated switch in its Overview pane. 3 In the switch's Overview pane. role. click Switches to view the Switches Summary. click a specific object to view information about switches. a list of all switches in the enterprise. The Overview pane displays a graph showing port usage and a table listing associated modules. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 175 Switches See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. click Switches to view the Switches Summary. Viewing isolated switches If the switch contains isolated switches. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Ports to which the slot is connected ■ Attributes: The slot’s attributes To view switch slots 1 In the Managing Summary pane. and object dependency group. click the name of a slot to view its Overview pane. 2 In the Switches Summary pane. 2 In the Switches Summary pane. display name. To view the Switches Summary 1 In the Managing Summary pane.

See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. performance. 2 In the Switches Summary pane. and policies associated with the isolated switch ■ Attributes: The isolated switch’s attributes To view isolated switches 1 In the Managing Summary pane. and policies associated with the port ■ Attributes: The port’s attributes . a list of all switches in the enterprise. collectors. GBIC type. and alert history. collectors. and a table listing associated virtual fabrics ■ Zoning: The port’s zoning characteristics See “Zones. port type. This information appears in the port's Connectivity pane. click the name of an individual switch to view its Overview pane. state (ONLINE or OFFLINE). Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Overview: WWN. ■ Monitoring: Alerts.176 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Switches ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the port's usage. wire name. Viewing port bundles for switches See one of several references for information about viewing. click Switches to view the Switches Summary. Viewing switch ports You can view the devices and device ports to which the switch port is connected. and zone aliases” on page 186. zone sets. See “Using port bundles to manage links” on page 190. 3 In the switch's Overview pane. See “About managing storage and performance reports” on page 227. ■ Reporting: Links to reports showing the port's change and alert histories. click the name of an isolated switch to view its Overview pane. creating. and modifying port bundles. ■ Monitoring: Alerts.

Performing operations on switches In the Switches Summary. 3 Click the Connectivity tab. you can perform the following additional operations: Table 9-4 Available operations in switch object views Operation More information Launch Telnet Launching third-party applications in context session Save switch Saving and restoring Brocade switch configurations configuration (Brocade switches) . click Switches to view the Switches Summary. 2 In the Switches Summary pane. click the name of a port to view the port's Connectivity pane. click the name of an individual switch to view its Overview pane. 4 In the switch's Connectivity pane. a list of all switches in the enterprise. you can perform the following operations on one or more switches: Table 9-3 Available operations in the Switches Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Delete switch Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database (undiscovered switches only) Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In a switch’s object view. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 177 Switches To view switch ports 1 In the Managing Summary pane.

you can perform the following additional operations: . you can perform the following operations on one or more of its ports: Table 9-5 Available operations for one or more switch ports Operation More information Enable or disable Enabling and disabling switch ports Add to or remove Creating and updating virtual fabrics from virtual fabric (FC switches) Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In a switch port’s object view.178 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Switches Table 9-4 Available operations in switch object views (continued) Operation More information Restore switch Saving and restoring Brocade switch configurations configuration (Brocade switches) Launch Cisco MDS Launching third-party applications in context Device Manager (Cisco MDS switches) Launch Cisco MDS Launching third-party applications in context Fabric Manager (Cisco MDS switches) Create bundle Using port bundles to manage links (switches with Fibre Channel capability) Performing operations on switch ports Using the checkboxes in a switch’s Connectivity pane.

use the Connectivity pane in the switch’s object view. 2 Click Connectivity. To enable or disable a switch port. To enable a switch port 1 In the Managing section of the Console. display the object view for a switch. . port bundle. you can perform the following operations: Table 9-7 Available operations in slot. or isolated switch. and isolated switch object views Operation More information Destroy bundle Deleting port bundles (port bundles) Edit bundle (port Updating port bundles bundles) Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Enabling and disabling switch ports A switch port is enabled when it is online and disabled when it is offline. port bundle. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 179 Switches Table 9-6 Available operations in switch port object views Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and modifying zones from zone Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Manage Setting nicknames for McDATA switch connections nicknames (McDATA switches) Performing operations on other switch objects In the object view for a slot.

A request is submitted to enable the switch port connections. To disable a switch port 1 In the Managing section of the Console. . Saving and restoring Brocade switch configurations CommandCentral Storage provides an easy way to save configurations for Brocade switches. 3 In the Connectivity pane. The CommandCentral Storage Console—with information that you enter—instructs the switch to upload its configuration to a secure location on the host (Server or managed host) where the Brocade explorer runs. the switch configuration file does not contain switch credentials. Viewing performance data for switch ports You can view data about a port’s performance using a predefined report that ships with CommandCentral Storage. 5 In the Disable Switch Port dialog box. This is often helpful. which displays a list of the switch’s port connections. For information about using the Switch Port Performance Detail report. 2 Click Connectivity. including zoning configurations. which displays a list of the switch’s port connections. See “About Brocade switch credentials” on page 181. check one or more currently enabled port connections. A switch configuration file contains configuration settings for the switch. click Disable Switch Port and click Go. when you have identified a port as a potential bottleneck or need to verify whether the port is carrying an unusually high or low amount of traffic. However. 5 In the Enable Switch Port dialog box. display the object view for a switch port. check one or more port connections that are currently disabled. See “Switch Port Performance Detail report” on page 292. 4 In the drop-down list. A request is submitted to disable the switch port connections. for example.180 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Switches 3 In the Connectivity pane. click OK. click Enable Switch Port and click Go. 4 In the drop-down list. click OK.

See the CommandCentral Hardware and Software Configuration Guide. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 181 Switches Note: Some firmware versions do not support uploading and downloading of switch configurations. can trigger security monitors. . and enabling and disabling of switch ports. in turn. These failures. CommandCentral Storage can manage them with no input from the user. Check your vendor documentation to determine if your firmware version supports this feature. Saving Brocade switch configurations The Brocade switch configuration is saved as a file and by default is saved in one of the following locations: ■ UNIX— /var/VRTSccs/data/VRTShal/configSafe ■ Windows— \Program Files\Veritas\CommandCentral Storage Data\Data \HAL\ConfigSafe A user with the proper authorization can change this location by modifying the configuration for the Brocade explorer. About Brocade switch credentials CommandCentral Storage uses switch credentials to perform a number of different operations for Brocade switches. other operations will fail. These operations include out-of-band fabric exploration. Note: While a fabric can be explored by the GS Explorer (in-band) or SNMP (out-of-band) without switch credentials. For information about how to add credentials for Brocade switches. zoning discovery and management. Switch credentials are only used for Brocade switches and are only required if the switches have been changed from the default credentials. In the unlikely scenario where all of the switches use the default credentials. see the CommandCentral Hardware and Software Configuration Guide.

click the name of the Brocade switch whose configuration you want to restore. Restoring Brocade switch configurations Sometimes it is necessary to restore switch configuration settings for a malfunctioning switch. but it does not contain switch credentials. CommandCentral Storage provides an easy way to save and restore configurations for Brocade switches through the CommandCentral Storage Console. 4 In the Save Switch Configuration dialog box. A switch configuration file contains configuration settings for the switch. See “About Brocade switch credentials” on page 181. If you previously saved a switch configuration. Note: Some firmware versions do not support uploading and downloading of switch configurations. Check your vendor documentation to determine if your firmware version supports this feature. enter the name of a new file or choose an existing file in which to store the switch’s configuration. Your request is submitted as a task to CommandCentral Storage. click the name of the Brocade switch whose configuration you want to save. 5 Click OK. To restore the saved configuration for a Brocade switch 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. click Save Switch Configuration and click Go.182 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Switches To save the configuration for a Brocade switch 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. including zoning configurations. When the task completes. . display the Switches Summary (Managing > SAN > Switches. CommandCentral Storage writes to (and restores from) the switch configuration directory on the Management Server. display the Switches Summary (Managing > SAN > Switches. 3 In the drop-down list in the switch’s Overview pane.) 2 In the table. the Console—with information that you enter—instructs the switch to download its configuration file from a secure location and reconfigure the switch.) 2 In the table. your switch configuration will be saved on the host (Management Server or managed host) where the Brocade explorer runs.

6 Click OK. Settings such as zone assignments and membership in virtual fabrics can be preserved across restarts. There are two ways to save a Cisco switch configuration: ■ The Console Virtual Fabric Builder gives you the option of updating the switch configuration by checking Save Switch Configuration in the Confirm Selections panel. When the task completes. click Enter Filename and type the file name in the text box. When the switch configuration is not saved. do one of the following: ■ If the file containing the switch’s configuration is listed in the table. . Saving Cisco switch configurations When you perform operations involving Cisco switches. This is recommended because if you do not allow a restart. click Select Existing File and then click the radio button next to the file name in the table. CommandCentral Storage writes to—and restores from—the switch configuration directory on the host (Server or managed host) where the Brocade explorer runs. click Restore Switch Configuration and click Go. This ensures that the configuration is preserved when the switch is restarted. Your request is submitted as a task to CommandCentral Storage. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 183 Switches 3 In the drop-down list in the switch’s Overview pane. your switch configuration file will be restored to the specified Brocade switch. 5 To cause the switch to restart after the configuration is restored. ■ To specify a configuration file that is not listed in the table. CommandCentral Storage provides two ways to save the updated switch configuration into the switch’s NVRAM memory. see the Cisco documentation. 4 In the Restore Switch Configuration dialog box. For more information about using the Cisco MDS Device Manager. then the switch restore will fail. click Allow Reboot. the default configuration will be used whenever it is necessary to restart the switch. ■ You can invoke the Cisco MDS Device Manager using the following procedure. and some of the parameters to be changed require a restart.

4 When prompted about a change to the switch’s running configuration. click Cisco MDS Device Manager and click Go. or a port bundle. For more information about using the Cisco MDS Device Manager. To save a switch’s current running configuration using the Cisco MDS Device Manager 1 In the Managing section of the Console. such as adding it to a zone. the switch configuration will be saved in the switch’s NVRAM memory and will be preserved when the switch is restarted. click Yes to save the configuration. To save the configuration when performing an operation on a Cisco switch 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. Examples include creating or modifying a zone. a virtual fabric. Setting nicknames for McDATA switch connections You can configure CommandCentral Storage to recognize nicknames when discovering and displaying connections for McDATA switch ports. you can update the switch configuration by checking Save Switch Configuration in the Confirm Selections panel. 2 In the last panel in the wizard (Confirm Selections). 3 Log in to the Cisco MDS Device Manager application. 3 Click Finish to complete the operation.184 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Switches Saving Cisco configuration using the Cisco MDS Device Manager At any time. The updated configuration is saved. Your request is submitted as a task to CommandCentral Storage. nicknames replace standard 8-byte World Wide Names (WWNs). giving you a way to display more meaningful names for objects attached to switch ports. Updating Cisco switch configuration using Console tools When you perform an operation that involves a Cisco switch. check Save Switch Configuration to save the configuration to the switch. . see the Cisco documentation. When the task completes. perform an operation that updates the configuration for a Cisco switch. display the object view for a Cisco MDS switch or a virtual fabric. you can invoke the Cisco MDS Device Manager to save the switch’s current running configuration. 2 In the drop-down list. In networks managed by McDATA’s Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager (EFCM).

db2host Your request to create the nicknames is submitted. In networks managed by McDATA’s Enterprise Fabric Connectivity Manager (EFCM). 4 In the Delete Nickname dialog box. 3 In the drop-down list at the top of the table. check one or more switch ports that have nicknames. Your request to delete the nicknames is submitted. 2 In the Ports list. giving you a way to display more meaningful names for objects attached to switch ports. When the task is complete. click one or more device ports and click OK. type the nickname (32 characters or less) by which the device port will be known to the selected switch ports. ■ For each checked device port. the devices will be represented by their WWNs. click Create Nickname and click Go. When the task is complete. Examples: emcarray01. Instead. in the Connectivity pane for each of the selected switch ports. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 185 Switches To set a nickname for use by one or more McDATA switch ports 1 Display the Connectivity pane for a McDATA switch. . To delete a nickname used by one or more McDATA switch ports 1 Display the Connectivity pane for a McDATA switch. rather than by their WWNs. nicknames replace standard 8-byte World Wide Names (WWNs). 4 In the Create Nickname dialog box. 2 In the Ports list. 3 In the drop-down list at the top of the table. which lists all device ports having nicknames defined to the selected switch ports. click Delete Nickname and click Go. do the following and click OK: ■ Check one or more device ports. Deleting nicknames for McDATA switch connections You can configure CommandCentral Storage to recognize nicknames when discovering and displaying connections for McDATA switch ports. the attached devices will no longer be represented by their nicknames in the Connectivity pane for the selected switch ports. check one or more switch ports. which lists all the device ports (such as HBA and array ports) connected to the switch ports you selected in step 2. the attached devices will be represented by their nicknames.

■ Attributes: The object’s attributes . Depending on the object selected. zone sets. Viewing zones. zones offer an effective way to secure data from unwanted access. you can perform zoning operations on the alias instead of having to specify the individual ports and WWNs for the objects. zone sets. and zone aliases in the enterprise. Zone aliases simplify zone administration by eliminating the repetitive entry of World Wide Names (WWNs) or port numbers. zone set.186 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Zones. After assigning a zone alias to one or more objects. or zone alias See “About the Topology Map” on page 61. the Overview pane displays the name of the associated fabric along with the following tables: ■ Physical zone members: The actual zone members ■ Logical zone members: The host and/or array those physical zone members represent ■ Zone set membership (defined zones only): Defined zones belonging to the zone set ■ Defined zones (zone sets only): Zone sets to which the zone belongs Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Zoning (zone aliases only): Active and defined zones to which the zone alias belongs ■ Reporting: Reports not applicable for this object. As a result. A zone set is a collection of zone definitions for a Fibre Channel fabric. A zone alias is a name given to an object or set of objects for zoning purposes. and zone aliases A zone is a named set of nodes and ports on a single SAN fabric. and zone aliases Zones. ■ Topology: A Topology Map showing the members of the zone. Zone sets are useful for defining and enforcing access restrictions that change depending on changing conditions. zone sets. Zones can help improve the security and organization of your storage network because nodes in different zones are prevented from connecting to each other. and zone aliases You can view a Zones Summary. zone sets. which lists tables showing all active zones. You can then select an object and view its details in its Overview pane. defined zones.

For detailed information about how zones can help you allocate storage resources and manage security on your storage network. and zone aliases 1 In the Managing Summary pane. you can perform the following operations on one or more active (enabled) zones: Table 9-8 Available operations for active zones in the Zones Summary Operation More information Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In the Zones Summary. click Zones and Zone Sets to view the Zones Summary. zone sets. you can perform the following operations on one or more defined (inactive) zones: Table 9-9 Available operations for defined zones in the Zones Summary view Operation More information Destroy zone Removing zones Edit zone Modifying zones Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status . HBAs. a list of all zones in the enterprise. and zone aliases Note: You can also access this zoning information in the object views for fabrics on which zones are defined and in the object views for hosts. and storage objects that are members of zones. click the name of an individual object to view its Overview pane. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 187 Zones. To view zones. 2 In the Zones Summary pane. Performing operations on zone objects In the Zones Summary. zone sets. See “Creating and modifying zones” on page 433.

you can perform the following operations on one or more active zone aliases: Table 9-11 Available operations for active zone aliases in the Zones Summary Operation More information Destroy zone alias Removing zone aliases Edit zone alias Modifying zone aliases Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes . zone sets. and zone aliases Table 9-9 Available operations for defined zones in the Zones Summary view (continued) Operation More information Manage attributes Managing attributes In the Zones Summary. you can perform the following operations on one or more zone sets: Table 9-10 Available operations for zone sets in the Zones Summary view Operation More information Enable zone set Enabling and disabling zone sets Destroy zone set Removing zone sets Edit zone set Modifying zone sets Copy zone set Copying zone sets Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes In the Zones Summary.188 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Zones.

used ports. SNMP IP address. contain features an administrator can use to monitor and regulate the flow of traffic passing through the hub. You can also view information about an individual hub in its Overview pane. IP-managed and FC-managed hubs. See “Creating hub objects” on page 196. An unmanaged hub serves simply as a conduit for data. Performing operations on hubs In the Hubs Summary. The Overview pane displays the hub’s vendor (manufacturer). you can perform the following operations on one or more hubs: Table 9-12 Available operations in the Hubs Summary view Operation More information Add to or remove Creating and updating generic groups from group Create hub Creating hub objects . HTTP IP address. a list of all hubs (including virtual) in the enterprise. click the name of the individual hub to view its Overview pane. or FC-managed. IP-managed. model name. click User-created Hubs to view the Hubs Summary. CommandCentral Storage does not discover hubs. However. you can create hub objects manually. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 189 Hubs Hubs A hub is a device that provides a common connection point for devices in the storage network. moving the data from one storage resource to another. Hubs may be unmanaged. 2 In the Hubs Summary pane. however. and unused ports. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Switch ports and hosts (HBA ports) to which the hub is connected ■ Attributes: The hub’s attributes To view hubs 1 In the Managing Summary pane. Viewing hubs You can view a list of all hubs in the enterprise (including virtual hubs).

and display information about the bundle as if it were a single link. ■ Load balancing across multiple links. ■ High availability. Port bundles can help your SAN run more efficiently by providing higher aggregated bandwidth. load balancing. When you create a port bundle. Cisco MDS 9000 switches have FC capability. Port bundles offer the following functionality for Cisco Inter-Switch Links (ISLs): ■ Point-to-point connections. If one link fails.190 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Using port bundles to manage links Table 9-12 Available operations in the Hubs Summary view (continued) Operation More information Edit hub Creating hub objects Rediscover Updating discovery data View explorer Checking explorer states and data status Manage attributes Managing attributes Using port bundles to manage links A port bundle—or simply a bundle—is a logical grouping of up to 16 physical links. Port bundles can contain up to 16 physical links and can span multiple modules for added high availability.1. As your needs change. port bundles are shown under the physical switches with which they are associated. In CommandCentral Storage 5. Because a port bundle consists of any combination of a switch’s ports and slots. with up to 16 interfaces per bundle. the link is still there. you can add or remove links from a port bundle. Cisco MDS 9000 switches support 128 port bundles. traffic previously carried on this link is switched to the remaining links. although its bandwidth is diminished. CommandCentral Storage can discover. You can create port bundles for any switch that has Fibre Channel (FC) capability. ■ Increased aggregate bandwidth. and link redundancy. In the CommandCentral Storage Console. To the routing protocol. act upon. along with optimum utilization of bandwidth. Traffic is distributed among all functional links in the port bundle. you can combine multiple links into one port bundle. .

The Overview pane displays the bundle ID. and a table listing associated modules. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 191 Using port bundles to manage links Viewing port bundles Port bundles for a switch are listed in a switch’s Overview pane. 3 In the Modify Members panel. 2 In the Port Bundle Tool’s Select Fabric and Port Bundle panel. To create a port bundle 1 In the Tools section of the Console. You can select a port bundle to view its Overview pane. do the following and click Next: ■ In the drop-down lists. 2 In the Switch Summary pane. 3 In the switch's Overview pane. a graph showing port usage. do the following and click Next: ■ Click one or more ports or slots in the Available Objects list. do the following: . click the fabric and switch for which you want to create the new port bundle. Creating port bundles To create a port bundle. check objects that you do not want to include in the port bundle. a list of all swtiches in the enterprise. ■ Click Create New. Selected items are added to the Bundled Objects table on the right side of the panel. click the name of an individual switch to view its Overview pane. click Port Bundle Tool. click the name of a port bundle to view its Overview pane. You can create port bundles only for switches whose fabrics are in the discovered state. Then click Remove Object(s) in the drop-down list and click Go. Additional panes contain the following information: ■ Connectivity: Ports to which the port bundle is connected ■ Attributes: The port bundle’s attributes To view port bundles 1 In the Managing Summary pane. click Switches to view the Switch Summary. use the Port Bundle Tool. 4 In the Confirm Selections panel. ■ In the Bundled Objects table.

Your updates are reflected in the CommandCentral Storage database only until the next time the port bundle is discovered. the switch’s physical configuration remains unchanged. do the following and click : ■ Verify the name of the fabric and switch. 5 In the Modify Members panel of the Port Bundle Tool. If you do not choose this option. 3 In the Overview pane for the port bundle. click Edit Bundle in the drop-down list. Updating port bundles To update a port bundle by adding and removing ports. do the following: ■ Verify that your selections are correct.192 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Using port bundles to manage links ■ Verify that your selections are correct. 2 Click the name of a port bundle in the Port Bundles table. a port bundle 1 In the Managing section of the Console. ■ For switches on a Cisco fabric. Then click Remove Object(s) in the drop-down list and click Go. check Save Switch Configuration to save the port bundle configuration to the switch. To add ports to. ■ For switches on a Cisco fabric. 6 In the Confirm Selections panel. 4 In the Port Bundle Tool’s Select Fabric and Port Bundle panel. Selected items are added to the Bundled Objects table on the right side of the panel. the switch’s physical configuration remains unchanged. check Save Switch Configuration to save the port bundle configuration to the switch. ■ To remove ports from the bundle. or remove ports from. click them in the Available Objects list. . If you do not choose this option. use the Port Bundle Tool. display the Overview pane for a switch that has port bundles. check them in the Bundled Objects table. do one or both of the following and click : ■ To add ports to the bundle. Click Back if you need to go back and make changes. ■ Click Finish to confirm your selections and create the port bundle. ■ Click Edit Existing. Click Back if you need to go back and make changes.

This is known as destroying the port bundle. . clear the Save Switch Configuration After Bundle(s) Destroyed checkbox. Deleting port bundles If you do not want to see a port bundle in the CommandCentral Storage Console. 4 In the Destroy Bundle dialog box. ■ To destroy the port bundle. you can delete it permanently by updating the switch configuration. do one of the following and click OK: ■ To delete the port bundle from the database until the next discovery operation. The port bundle is deleted permanently from the switch configuration. To delete or destroy a port bundle 1 In the Managing section of the Console. Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure 193 Using port bundles to manage links ■ Click Finish to confirm your selections and modify the port bundle. When a port bundle is no longer needed. check Save Switch Configuration After Bundle(s) Destroyed. The switch configuration remains unchanged. 2 Click the name of a port bundle in the Port Bundles table. display the Overview pane for a switch that has port bundles. The port bundle will not display in the Console again until another discovery operation takes place. 3 In the Overview pane for the port bundle. you can delete it from the database. click Destroy Bundle in the drop-down list.

194 Viewing and managing the storage infrastructure Using port bundles to manage links .

you can create the following types of objects: ■ Hubs: CommandCentral Storage does not discover some routers. CommandCentral Storage neither discovers nor displays certain storage resources. In other cases. although a resource is not discoverable. and other intermediate devices. modifying. . hubs. you can manually create an object in the CommandCentral Storage database to represent that resource. Chapter 10 Creating. You can manually create a hub object to represent an undiscovered hub on your storage network. and deleting user-defined storage objects This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About user-defined objects ■ Creating hub objects ■ Creating enclosure objects ■ Editing user-created hosts ■ Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database About user-defined objects In some cases. Using the CommandCentral Storage Console. See “Creating hub objects” on page 196.

These HBA nodes appear in the Console as unidentified adapters. To create a hub object using the Hub Editor 1 In the Tools section of the Console. modifying. You can create an enclosure object and specify which devices it contains. Using the Hub Editor you can manually create a hub object to represent an undiscovered hub on your storage network. and perform operations on them. CommandCentral Storage discovers some enclosures automatically. CommandCentral Storage discovers only its HBA nodes. The ports are still listed individually with their switches. as if they were a single object. you can manage it using any of the following operations in the drop-down list in its object view: ■ Rename ■ Edit Creating hub objects CommandCentral Storage does not discover some routers. but in many cases it discovers only the individual storage devices inside the enclosure. If you delete the hub object later on. ■ Hosts: if a host on the storage network is not running the CommandCentral Management Server and is not a managed host. 2 In the Hub Editor’s Specify Hub Information panel. and other intermediate devices. After creating a user-defined object. After you create the host. do the following and Click Next: ■ Click Create New. ■ Type the number of ports on the hub in the Port count field. and they retain their zone memberships and other properties. See “Editing user-created hosts” on page 199. See “Creating enclosure objects” on page 198. . ■ Type the name of the hub in the Hub name field. click Hub Editor. hubs.196 Creating. this will not remove the hub ports from your storage configuration. See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202. you can edit it. You can create a host object to represent the physical host that contains the HBA nodes by correlating the unidentified adapter (HBA) to a host. and deleting user-defined storage objects Creating hub objects ■ Storage enclosures: a storage enclosure is a method of grouping storage objects together so that you can visualize them.

SNMP address. modifying.) To submit the task immediately. 5 In the Confirm Selections panel. . verify that your selections are correct. For example. HTTP address. define connections for the hub ports by doing the following: ■ Check one or more objects in the Available Objects list. CommandCentral Storage uses them to perform in-context launch of hub management tools. (Time is in 24-hour format. Then click Remove Object(s) and click Go. click Next. type the name of the hub vendor in the Vendor name field.10). and hub port 1 to connect to another hub port. ■ Optionally. 4 When you have defined connections for the hub. change the order of port connections using the drop-down lists in the Connected Hub Port column. ■ Optionally. if you check a switch.) All ports associated with the checked objects are added to the Hub Objects table on the right side of the panel. check their names in the table. ■ Click Finish to confirm your selections and create the new hub object. for example.100. check Schedule Task and use the drop-down lists to specify a date and time. and the number of ports in the Hub Objects table is less than or equal to the number of hub ports you specified in step 2. The task is submitted to CommandCentral Storage. Creating.10. For example. 3 In the Select Hub Port Members panel. ■ If you chose one of the managed hub subtypes. or both. all of its ports are added to the table. you might want to assign hub port 0 to connect to a specific switch port. the last three fields on this panel become active. clear Schedule Task. If you select either of the managed hub subtypes. ■ To defer the task until later. and deleting user-defined storage objects 197 Creating hub objects ■ Click the type of hub (Unmanaged. a browser. (You can expand an object’s branches and sub-branches to display individual nodes and ports. or click Back to go back and make changes. 21:00 means 9:00 p. IP Managed.m. Then do the following: ■ Optionally. type one or more of the following addresses in the appropriate fields: Telnet address. type the hub’s model number in the Model number field. Express each of these addresses as an IP address (for example 100. or FC Managed) in the Hub subtype drop-down list. ■ To remove unwanted ports from the Hub Objects table.

Using the Enclosure Editor. The devices are still listed individually in the Unenclosed Devices table (Managing > Storage > Unenclosed Devices). which displays a list of all devices not currently contained within an enclosure. for example. and they retain their zone memberships and other properties. To create a new enclosure using the Enclosure Editor 1 In the Tools section of the Console. you can manually create a representation of the enclosure object in the CommandCentral Storage database. 21:00 means 9:00 p. you define properties for the enclosure. The name may consist of alphanumeric characters and underscores. check Schedule Task and use the drop-down lists to specify a date and time. modifying. type the name of the enclosure’s vendor in the Vendor name field. do the following and click Next: ■ Expand the objects in the list on the left side of the panel. If you delete the enclosure object later on. ■ Optionally.m. 2 In the Specify Name and Type panel. ■ Click Finish to confirm your selections and create the new enclosure. and specify which devices are contained within it. ■ To remove one or more devices. ■ Optionally. click Enclosure Editor. or click Back to go back and make changes. and deleting user-defined storage objects Creating enclosure objects Creating enclosure objects Many storage enclosures (groups of storage devices) are discovered automatically by CommandCentral Storage. 3 In the Specify Enclosure Devices panel. 4 In the Confirm Selections panel. Then do the following: ■ To defer the task until later. ■ Type a name for the new enclosure in the Display name field. For enclosures that are not discoverable. Selected objects are added to the table of enclosure devices on the right side of the panel. this will not remove the devices contained in the enclosure from your storage configuration. verify that your selections are correct. check their names in the table. (Time is in 24-hour format. such as its name.) To submit the task immediately. do the following and click Next: ■ Click Create New. . clear Schedule Task.198 Creating. type the model of the enclosure in the Model number field. and check every device you want to add to the new enclosure. Then click Remove Object(s) and click Go.

Then. Then. (Time is in 24-hour format. 2 In the Hosts Summary table. check Schedule Task and use the drop-down lists to specify a date and time. select (check) any additional HBAs that you want to include in the host object. clear Schedule Task. click the user-created enclosure to which you want to add the device(s). . To add an unenclosed device to an existing user-created enclosure 1 In the Unenclosed Storage Devices summary. click Edit Host. Then click OK. click User-created Enclosures in the Managing Summary pane to view the user-created enclosure in the Console. and click Go. click Next. click Go. click Managing > Hosts and HBAs > Hosts. 2 Click Add to Enclosure in the drop-down list at the top of the table. 4 In the Specify Host Information panel. type the host's operating system or other information. modifying. Creating. The task is submitted to CommandCentral Storage. 3 In the drop-down list. Then. You can edit the host's IP address and operating system and the HBAs to which the host connects. ■ In the Operating System/Version field. When the task completes.) To submit the task immediately. and deleting user-defined storage objects 199 Editing user-created hosts The task is submitted to CommandCentral Storage. 6 In the Confirm Selections panel.m. when you create a host to correlate an unidentified adapter (HBA)—you can edit that host. type the host’s IP address. To edit a user-created host 1 In the Console. verify that your selections are correct. select (check) a user-created host. for example. 3 In the Add to Enclosure dialog box. 5 In the Select HBA Nodes panel. 21:00 means 9:00 p. Editing user-created hosts After you create a host—for example. edit any the following fields and click Next: ■ In the IP Address field. check the name of one or more devices. do the following: ■ To defer the task until later.

4 In the Delete dialog box. and deleting user-defined storage objects Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database ■ Click Finish to confirm your selections and create the new enclosure. Shares. it does not change the way in which hardware is configured. Filesystems. you can remove it from the CommandCentral Storage database using a delete operation. deleting a zone does not update the physical configuration of the switch for the fabric associated with the zone. 2 Check one or more undiscovered objects (distinguished by a gray icon) in the table. host. or switch—is in the undiscovered state. directories. Deleting the following types of objects will also result in the unavailability of the files. the Hosts Summary. Deleting an object causes the object to stop displaying in the Console. it will be added back to the database the next time an explorer successfully discovers it. 3 In the drop-down list. Note: Deleting an object in CommandCentral Storage only affects the object's discovery status. or the Switches Summary. NetApp VFilers. click OK to confirm the delete operation. MS Exchange. or click Back to go back and make changes. CommandCentral Storage retains zone and group membership information about deleted objects. click Delete Object Type and click Go. users and projection reports related to the objects until the next DM scan is completed: Hosts. For example. A task is submitted to delete the object from the database. display either the Arrays Summary. A destroy operation is required to modify the hardware configuration.200 Creating. and it automatically restores those memberships the next time the object is discovered. To delete objects from the CommandCentral Storage database 1 In the Console. Similarly. . If the deleted object is discoverable. You can also delete user-created hosts. Deleting objects from the CommandCentral Storage database When a high-level object—an array. Note: You can also delete a single object using Delete Object Type in the drop-down list in its object view. NetApp Filers. MS Clusters and VCS Clusters. modifying. a deleted LUN continues to exist on its storage device even though it is no longer discovered.

Chapter 11 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts This chapter includes the following topics: ■ How the Management Server discovers storage resources through agentless capabilities ■ Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts ■ Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts ■ Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts How the Management Server discovers storage resources through agentless capabilities When you install the managed host on hosts in your storage network. the Management Server can discover information about those hosts and the storage resources to which they connect through agentless capabilities. You can then log in to the Console and view information about these storage resources. the Management Server does not directly discover information about those hosts and the storage resources to which they connect. the managed host sends this information to the Management Server. the managed host discovers information about that host and the storage resources to which the host connects. CommandCentral . the Management Server discovers the HBAs to which the host connects. The process for agentless discovery is as follows. Because there is no information about the host to which the HBA connects to. However. If a host connects to a fabric that the Management Server discovers. If you don’t install the managed host on hosts in your storage network. Then.

CommandCentral Storage associates the HBA to the host and discovers more information about that host and its connections to storage resources. it automatically detects the host to which it connects. When CommandCentral Storage cannot completely discover an HBA. After you do this. CommandCentral Storage discovers information about the host and the storage resources to which it connects. when CommandCentral Storage discovers the unidentified adapter. For a comparison of the storage resources that CommandCentral Storage can discover through agentless capabilities and with a managed host. See “Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 205. you can correlate the unidentified adapter (HBA) to the host to which it connects. the HBA appears in the Console as an unidentified adapter. . You can also specify if you want to approve the correlations yourself or if you want CommandCentral Storage to automatically approve them. You do this by correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts. you monitor the Unidentified Adapters pane for new unidentified adapters. ■ Automatically—with this process. Then. For more information about correlating an unidentified adapter to a host. See “Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 217. The information that the Management Server discovers through agentless discovery is not as comprehensive as the information that a managed host discovers. refer to the following topic: See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202. you initially upload a master CSV file or define rules for zone names or zone aliases. After you do this. You can run the correlation process in the following ways: ■ Manually—with this process. Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts You can set up agentless discovery of the hosts in your storage network. you use any of the three correlation methods to correlate the unidentified adapters to the hosts to which they connect.202 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Storage identifies these HBAs as unidentified adapters. Then. see the CommandCentral Installation Guide. When this happens. To associate an unidentified adapter with the host to which it connects. run the correlation process. You can then associate these unidentified adapters (HBAs) with the hosts to which they connect.

The following figure provides an overview of the process that you can use to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts. This method is not available for the automatic correlation process. You can do any of the following: ■ Match patterns in the name of the zone or zone alias to which the HBA is associated—choose this method if you consistently include a host name in the names of zones or zone aliases. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 203 Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts When you choose the manual or automatic process. Typically. ■ Specify host information for each unidentified adapter—choose this method if you want to manually supply CommandCentral Storage with the host name associated with each unidentified adapter. . you can use several methods to correlate an unidentified adapter to a host. you might use this method to quickly correlate a few unidentified adapters or if either of the first two methods do not apply. ■ Import a CSV file that contains details about hosts and HBAs—choose this method if you maintain a spreadsheet that contains the mapping information between an HBA and a host.

204 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Figure 11-1 Correlation process Choose to run the correlation process manually or automatically Manually Automatically Choose a Choose an correlation method automation mode Specify host Match patterns in information for Automatically the name of the Import a CSV file Ask for approval each unidentified correlate zone or zone alias adapter Choose one or more correlation methods Match patterns in Match patterns in the name of the the name of the Import a CSV file zone zone alias If you chose to If you chose to ask for approval automatically correlate View the list of Approve the adapters that correlations that CommandCentral CommandCentral automatically detects correlated .

Table 11-1 Manual process to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts Action More information Identify if there are any See “Viewing unidentified adapters” on page 169. Typically. decide which method(s) (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202. you . unidentified adapters that you need to correlate. You can also enable CommandCentral Storage to automatically detect and approve correlations. Then. CommandCentral Storage discovers more information about that host and its connections to storage resources. See “Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by importing a CSV file” on page 213. you will use to correlate the unidentified adapters to hosts. for each unidentified adapter. you would type the name of the hosts to which the unidentified adapters connect. If there are unidentified adapters See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters present. Table 11-1 outlines the process that you can use to manually correlate unidentified adapters to hosts. For example. you can manually correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts so that CommandCentral Storage associates the unidentified adapter to the host to which it connects. Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by specifying host information You can correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts by supplying information about the host to which the HBA connects. For more information. See “Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by specifying host information” on page 205. See “Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by matching patterns in zone names or zone aliases” on page 208. refer to the following topic: See “Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 217. if you want to correlate nine unidentified adapters. Correlate the unidentified Choose one of the following methods: adapters to hosts. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 205 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Using agentless capabilities.

To correlate unidentified adapters to hosts by supplying information about the host to which the HBA connects 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. For more information about the other correlation methods. the table updates with that information. 4 In the Add host information for adapters panel. Then. enter the required information for each unidentified adapter. In this column. 5 In the Review actions to be performed panel. See “Add host information for adapters panel options” on page 206.206 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts might use this method to correlate a few unidentified adapters. verify that your selections are correct. CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. See “Review actions to be performed panel options” on page 207. click Add Adapters to Hosts Manually. . 3 In the drop-down list. Then. After you add information for an unidentified adapter. Add host information for adapters panel options Use this panel to supply CommandCentral Storage with information about the host to which each unidentified adapter connects. Or. Additionally. CommandCentral Storage updates the Action column to specify the required action for that unidentified adapter. ■ Correlate—Appears when CommandCentral Storage currently discovers this host. click Next. defer the task to a later time. The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. You must specify host information for each unidentified adapter before you can proceed to the next panel. you might use this correlation method if neither of the other two correlation methods apply. CommandCentral Storage will create a new host and associate the unidentified adapter with this host. refer to the following: See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202. one of the following actions appears: ■ Create host—Appears when CommandCentral Storage does not currently discover this host. CommandCentral Storage will correlate the unidentified adapter to this host. click Managing > Hosts and HBAs > Unidentified Adapters. Optionally. select (check) one or more unidentified adapters. click Finish. 2 In the Unidentified Adapters Summary table.

CommandCentral Storage does not correlate the unidentified adapter to a host. the host name field updates with the host’s fully qualified host name and the IP address field updates with the host’s IP address. . You can select these hosts. Validate host name Click to have CommandCentral Storage validate the host name that you typed in the host name field. Cancel Click to cancel the information entered for this unidentified adapter. This field is read–only. If the host name is valid. Table 11-3 Review actions to be performed panel options Field Description Schedule Task Select (check) to defer the task until a later date and time. IP address (Optional) Type the host’s IP address. As you type a host name. Host name Type a name for the host. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 207 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-2 Add host information for adapters panel options Field Description Unidentified Adapter The unidentified adapter’s WWN. Operating (Optional) Type the host’s operating system—for example. Remove Click to remove the selected unidentified adapter from the table. When you do this. The host name may consist of alphanumeric characters and underscores. Date Use the drop-down lists to specify the date that you want the task to run. Review actions to be performed panel options Use this panel to verify that your selections are correct and to (optionally) defer the task until a later date and time. CommandCentral Storage lists current discovered and user–created hosts whose host name matches what you type in the text box. Update Click to save the information. System/Version Windows.

click Add Adapters to Hosts Using Pattern. select (check) the unidentified adapters for which you want to approve correlations. CommandCentral Storage can then correlate the unidentified adapter (HBA) associated with that zone or zone alias to the host. 21:00 means 9:00 p. Then. 4 In the Define and select zone name rules to run panel. select a correlation method. click Next. click Managing > Hosts and HBAs > Unidentified Adapters. refer to the following: See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202.xyz_cx500a where abc. Time is in 24-hour format—for example. click Next and proceed to step 6. Then. enter the required information. For example. See “Select correlation method panel options” on page 209. do one of the following: ■ To edit the details of the hosts. 5 In the Approve correlations panel. you can create a rule that extracts the host name from the name of the zone. If you do not consistently include a host name in the names of zones or zone aliases. In CommandCentral Storage. See “Define and select zone name rules to run panel options” on page 209. Use this method if you consistently include a host name in the names of zones or zone aliases. . 2 In the drop-down list. Then.xyz is the name of the host. To correlate unidentified adapters to hosts by matching patterns in zone names or zone aliases 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. For more information about the other correlation methods.208 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-3 Review actions to be performed panel options (continued) Field Description Time Use the drop-down lists to specify the time that you want the task to run. you might name a zone as follows: brocade4100_abc. Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by matching patterns in zone names or zone aliases You can correlate unidentified adapters to hosts by matching patterns in the names of zones or zone aliases. 3 In the Select correlation method panel.m. you can use other methods to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts. click Next.

CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. 6 In the Edit host information for adapters panel. Define and select zone name rules to run panel options Use this panel to create and update pattern matching rules. The rules define how CommandCentral Storage extracts host names from zone names or zone aliases associated with unidentified adapters (HBAs). defer the task to a later time. (semi-colon) ' (single quote) " (double quote) . CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. See “Review actions to be performed panel options” on page 207. See “Edit host information for adapters panel options” on page 212. Table 11-4 Select correlation method panel options Field Description Zone Name Select to extract the host name from the zone name associated with the unidentified adapter (HBA). The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. Optionally. 7 In the Review actions to be performed panel. Select correlation method panel options Use this panel to specify the source that you want to extract the host name from. The following characters are not allowed: . edit the details of any of the hosts. verify that your selections are correct. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 209 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts ■ To approve the actions. Zone Alias Select to extract the host name from the zone alias associated with the unidentified adapter (HBA). click Finish. Then. click Finish. Table 11-5 Define and select zone name rules to run panel options Field Description Create rule Click to create a new rule. (comma) . Rule name Type a name for the rule. The maximum number of characters is 50. Then. The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. click Next.

The following characters are not allowed: . Click Advanced Options to display this field. (semi-colon) ' (single quote) " (double quote) Pattern Based on your selections. The maximum number of characters is 255. (comma) . Fabric Select (check) one or more fabrics to which the rule applies. type string them here.210 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-5 Define and select zone name rules to run panel options (continued) Field Description Rule description (Optional) Type a description for the rule. The following characters are not allowed: . type them string here. Perform NS lookup to (Optional) Select (check) so that CommandCentral Storage validate host name discovers the host’s IP address. If you enable this option. (comma) . . as well as the following characters are not allowed: . HH indicates the location of the host name. fully qualified host name. (comma) . and operating system during the correlation process. Host name prefix (Optional) If you include characters before the host name. (semi-colon) ' (single quote) " (double quote) Host name suffix (Optional) If you include characters after the host name. (semi-colon) ' (single quote) " (double quote) Host name position Use the drop-down lists to specify the location of the host name in the name of the zone or zone alias. (comma) . the correlation process may run longer. The following characters are not allowed: . (semi-colon) ' (single quote) " (double quote) Delimiter Type the delimiter that you use in the name of the zone or zone alias—for example an _ (underscore). This field is read–only. this field displays the pattern of the zone name or zone alias. Spaces.

Cancel Click to cancel the changes that you have made to the rule. Click Advanced Options to display this field. Note: To proceed. Add New Rule Click to add the new rule.com. Update Rule Click to save the rule that you are modifying.com Click Advanced Options to display this field. When CommandCentral Storage runs the rule and extracts a host name—for example.g. to specify that all host names extracted with this rule should include the domain name symantecexample. beatles—it appends the host name with symantecexample. .com" Click Advanced Options to display this field.symantecexample. extracted host name For example."domain_name" expression For example."symantecexample. type the following: $_=$1. Specify Perl regular (Optional) Type a Perl regular expression to match the pattern of expression the name for the zone or zone alias. Perform additional (Optional) Select (check) to enable the option to specify the domain post-processing on the name for each host name that CommandCentral Storage extracts. you must enable at least one rule. (e.com. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 211 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-5 Define and select zone name rules to run panel options (continued) Field Description Use a Perl regular (Optional) Select (check) to enable the option to use a Perl regular expression to extract expression to match the pattern of the name for the zone or zone the host name alias. "\A([^_]+)_") Click Advanced Options to display this field. Specify (Optional) Use the following format to specify the host’s domain post–processing name: $_=$1. Enabled for running? Select (check) to enable the rule for the correlation process.com so that it appears as follows: beatles. Delete rule Click to delete the selected rule. If you enable this option. you can specify that CommandCentral Storage appends all host names with the domain name symantecexample. the pattern defined in the Rule properties tab no longer applies.

CommandCentral Storage will create a new host and associate the unidentified adapter with this host. the host name field updates with the host’s fully qualified host name and the IP address field updates with the host’s IP address. System/Version Windows. Validate host name Click to have CommandCentral Storage validate the host name that you typed in the host name field. the Action column specifies the action that CommandCentral Storage will take. As you type a host name. If the host name is valid. The host name may consist of alphanumeric characters and underscores. Update Click to save the information. You can select these hosts. In this panel.212 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Edit host information for adapters panel options Use this panel to edit the details of a host. CommandCentral Storage will correlate the unidentified adapter to this host. You can use this panel to edit the information that CommandCentral Storage discovered. Host name Type a name for the host. ■ Correlate—Appears when CommandCentral Storage currently discovers this host. and operating system. IP address. CommandCentral Storage lists current discovered and user–created hosts whose name matches what you type in the text box. For each host. you can modify its name. When you run the correlation process. CommandCentral Storage discovers information about hosts based on the method that you chose. Operating (Optional) Type the host’s operating system—for example. In the Action column. . one of the following actions appears: ■ Create host—Appears when CommandCentral Storage does not currently discover this host. Cancel Click to cancel the information entered for this unidentified adapter. IP address (Optional) Type the host’s IP address. This field is read–only. Table 11-6 Edit host information for adapters panel options Field Description Unidentified Adapter The unidentified adapter’s WWN.

. 3 In the CSV file upload panel. click Finish. When you do this. CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. click Add Adapters to Hosts Using CSV. ■ To approve the actions. Then. click Next and proceed to step 5. do one of the following: ■ To edit the details of the hosts. For more information about the other correlation methods. click Next. 4 In the Approve correlations panel. To correlate unidentified adapters to hosts by importing a CSV file 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. an entry in the CSV file lists a host’s information (host name. Then. For example. click Managing > Hosts and HBAs > Unidentified Adapters. 2 In the drop-down list. select (check) the unidentified adapters for which you want to approve the correlations. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 213 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-6 Edit host information for adapters panel options (continued) Field Description Remove Click to remove the selected unidentified adapter from the table. CommandCentral Storage does not correlate the unidentified adapter to a host. If you do not maintain a spreadsheet that identifies the connections between hosts and HBAs. The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. This method is useful if you maintain a spreadsheet that identifies the connections between hosts and HBAs. fully qualified host name. refer to the following: See “Deciding how to correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 202. See “About the format of CSV files that you use to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts” on page 215. Correlating unidentified adapters to hosts by importing a CSV file You can correlate unidentified adapters to hosts by importing a CSV file. See “CSV file upload panel options” on page 214. you can use other methods to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts. IP address. upload a CSV file. and operating system) and the WWN of the HBA to which it connects.

that data displays in the table. This record will not be used. See “Edit host information for adapters panel options” on page 212. Optionally. ■ Unusable—CommandCentral Storage has not yet discovered the HBA. edit the details of any of the hosts. ■ Used—CommandCentral Storage has discovered the HBA and it is already associated with a host. If you previously uploaded a CSV file. Then. After you upload a file. click Next. The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. refer to the following topic: See “Error messages that might appear when you upload a CSV file to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts” on page 216. CSV file upload panel options Use this panel to upload a CSV file that contains mapping information between unidentified adapters (HBAs) and hosts. Upload Click to upload the information from the CSV file. . click Finish.214 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts 5 In the Edit host information for adapters panel. in the table. These are the HBAs that you can correlate to hosts. verify that your selections are correct. CommandCentral Storage retains the information about this HBA so that you can correlate it at a later time should CommandCentral Storage discover the HBA. Any of the following may display in the Status column: ■ Usable—CommandCentral Storage has discovered the HBA. If you receive an error message when you upload the CSV file. See “Review actions to be performed panel options” on page 207. Table 11-7 CSV file upload panel options Field Description Browse Click to select the CSV file that you want to upload. the Status column identifies if CommandCentral Storage can use each record in the file. CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. You can upload data from more than one CSV file. 6 In the Review actions to be performed panel. Then. defer the task to a later time. but it is not yet associated with a host.

Windows 2000.192.250.168.250 You can enter multiple IP addresses. the unidentified adapter (HBA) to. Use semi-colon’s to separate them.251 Fully qualified The fully qualified host name of The fully qualified host name can host name the host that you want to correlate contain alphanumeric characters.168.250. the contents of the file must follow a specific format.myhost. Example: myhost.<IP address>.symantecexample.168.254. Table 11-8 Format of fields in the CSV file Field Description Format Host name The name of the host that you The host name can contain want to correlate the unidentified alphanumeric characters.192. Example: myhost IP address The host’s IP address.2000000C987845FG The following table details the format for each field.<Adapter WWN> For example: myhost. The order of these fields is as follows: <host name>. include spaces. The IP address must contain numbers in the range of 1 to 255. when you upload a CSV file.symantecexample. Do not adapter (HBA) to.254.com. Example: 192.<OS type>. Type the IP address as an IPv4 address in the dot-decimal notation.<fully qualified host name>.255. Example: 192.168.com . Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 215 Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts About the format of CSV files that you use to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts In the Add Adapters to Hosts Using CSV wizard.254. Each record in the CSV file must contain five fields.

Example: Windows 2000 Adapter WWN The WWN of the unidentified The WWN must contain 16 adapter (HBA) that you want to hexadecimal digits. The OS type can contain alphanumeric characters.216 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-8 Format of fields in the CSV file (continued) Field Description Format OS type The host’s operating system. Blank space in host name The host name contains a space. when you upload a CSV file. colons. See “About the format of CSV files that you use to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts” on page 215. See “About the format of CSV files that you use to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts” on page 215. For example. Invalid WWN The WWN does not contain 16 characters. you may receive an error message that states the CSV file is not in the correct format. The following table describes the error messages that you may receive. Example: 2000000C987845FG Error messages that might appear when you upload a CSV file to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts In the Add Adapters to Hosts Using CSV wizard. the following is incorrect: my host The following is correct: myhost Invalid IP address The IP address is not in the correct format. Table 11-9 Descriptions of error messages that appear in the Add Adapters to Hosts Using CSV wizard Error message Description No. of columns are less than A record in the CSV file does not contain the five required 5 fields. . See “CSV file upload panel options” on page 214. Do not include correlate to a host.

Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 217 Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Using agentless capabilities. Table 11-10 outlines the process that you can use to automatically correlate unidentified adapters to hosts. Enable the automatic correlation See “Enabling the automatic correlation process” process on page 218. If you do not want CommandCentral Storage to automatically correlate unidentified adapters to hosts. ■ Approve the correlations that See “Viewing the list unidentified adapters that were CommandCentral Storage automatically correlated” on page 225. refer to the following topic: See “Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 205. See “Editing zone alias naming patterns for the automatic correlation process” on page 221. See “Editing zone naming patterns for the automatic correlation process” on page 220. (Optional) Start the automatic See “Starting the automatic correlation process” correlation process on page 223. you can run the process yourself. modify any of the See “Editing the master CSV for the automatic correlation methods correlation process” on page 219. For more information. you can set up CommandCentral Storage to automatically correlate unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts. Then. Depending on the correlation See “Approving the correlations that CommandCentral settings. do one of the following: Storage detects” on page 224. detects ■ View the unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage automatically correlated . Table 11-10 Automatic process to correlate unidentified adapters to hosts Action More information If needed. CommandCentral Storage discovers more information about that host and its connections to storage resources.

See “Agentless Settings options” on page 218. To enable the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. When you automate the correlation process. periodically using the methods specified below Ask for user approval Select (check) so that after CommandCentral Storage detects new before correlating associations between unidentified adapters and hosts. select (check) Detect new correlations periodically using the methods specified below. Table 11-11 Agentless Settings options Field Description Detect new Select (check) to enable the automation process for correlating correlations unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts. If you created zone name or zone alias rules or if you imported a CSV file in the Unidentified Adapters pane. hosts .218 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Enabling the automatic correlation process You can automate the correlation of unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts. Then. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings. it adapters (HBAs) to automatically correlates the unidentified adapters to hosts. 3 Click Save. your unidentified adapters approval is required to correlate the unidentified adapters to hosts. select your options for the correlation process. CommandCentral Storage enables the correlation process. Automating the correlation process is helpful if you use naming patterns for zones and zone aliases or if you maintain a master CSV file. you can use that information to automate the process. (HBAs) to hosts Automatically Select (check) so that after CommandCentral Storage detects new correlate unidentified associations between unidentified adapters and hosts. CommandCentral Storage automatically detects correlations and then either asks for your approval or automatically approves the correlations. Agentless Settings options Use these settings to automate the correlation of unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts.

Reset Click to cancel your changes. See “Editing the master CSV for the automatic correlation process” on page 219. To use this option. Zone Alias Pattern Select (check) this option for CommandCentral Storage to detect correlations based on any enabled rules for zone alias naming patterns. If you don't use this option. To use this option. fully qualified host name. Editing the master CSV for the automatic correlation process When you enable the automatic correlation process. you need to have at least one enabled rule. you need to have at least one enabled rule. IP address. . For example. One of the methods that you can choose is Master CSV. This method is useful if you maintain a spreadsheet that identifies the connections between hosts and HBAs. an entry in the CSV file would list a host’s information (host name. See “Editing zone alias naming patterns for the automatic correlation process” on page 221. See “Editing zone naming patterns for the automatic correlation process” on page 220. and operating system) and the WWN of the HBA to which it connects. you need to upload data from a CSV file. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 219 Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Table 11-11 Agentless Settings options (continued) Field Description Master CSV Select (check) this option for CommandCentral Storage to detect correlations based on the information from the uploaded CSV file. you must choose at least one of three correlation methods. then CommandCentral Storage runs the process at the following intervals: ■ When switch explorers detect events ■ Every 12 hours Save Click to save your changes. Detect Now Click to have CommandCentral Storage immediately detect correlations based on the specified settings. To use this option. Zone Names Pattern Select (check) this option for CommandCentral Storage to detect correlations based on any enabled rules for zone naming patterns.

xyz is the name of the host. To enable the zone naming pattern method for the automatic correlation process. for Master CSV.xyz_cx500a where abc. Then. review the list of unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage can correlate. To edit the master CSV for the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. The data from the CSV file saves to the Management Server. See “CSV file upload panel options” on page 214. click Edit. ■ To save the information and exit the wizard. Use this method if you consistently include a host name in the names of zones. enter the required information. Editing zone naming patterns for the automatic correlation process When you enable the automatic correlation process. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. that data appears in the Agentless Settings pane. If you previously used the manual process and uploaded data from the Unidentified Adapters pane. you can create a rule that extracts the host name from the name of the zone.220 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts To enable the master CSV method for the automatic correlation process. You can edit the master CSV method to add new data or remove data that you previously uploaded. 5 In the Verify correlations detections panel. to save the information. click Next. You can edit zone naming patterns by creating. editing. you must upload data. you must choose at least one of three correlation methods. or deleting rules. you must create and then enable one or more rules. click Finish. those rules appear in the Agentless Settings pane. For example. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings. click Finish. The data from the CSV file saves to the Management Server. you might name a zone as follows: brocade4100_abc. under Correlation Methods. do one of the following: ■ To preview the list of unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage can correlate. One of the methods that you can choose is Zone Names Pattern. If you previously used the manual process and created rules in the Unidentified Adapters pane. CommandCentral Storage can then correlate the unidentified adapter (HBA) associated with that zone to the host. . 3 In the CSV file upload panel. In CommandCentral Storage. 4 Then.

do one of the following: ■ To run the enabled rules so that you preview the list of unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage can correlate. you must choose at least one of three correlation methods. click Next and proceed to step 5. If you previously used the manual process and created rules in the Unidentified Adapters pane. For example. create. The rules save. You can edit zone naming patterns by creating. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. for Zone Names Pattern. 3 In the Define and select zone name rules to run panel. 4 Then. 5 In the Verify correlations detections panel. . In CommandCentral Storage. you might name a zone alias as follows: host_qlogic9000 where host is the name of the host. CommandCentral Storage can then correlate the unidentified adapter (HBA) associated with that zone alias to the host. To enable the zone alias naming pattern method for the automatic correlation process. See “Define and select zone name rules to run panel options” on page 209. or delete a rule. edit. those rules appear in the Agentless Settings pane. click Finish. under Correlation Methods. you must create and then enable one or more rules. to save the information. Use this method if you consistently include a host name in the names of zone aliases. or deleting rules. Then. Editing zone alias naming patterns for the automatic correlation process When you enable the automatic correlation process. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 221 Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts To edit zone naming patterns for the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. ■ To save the rules and exit the wizard. The rules save. editing. One of the methods that you can choose is Zone Alias Pattern. click Edit. click Finish. review the list of unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage can correlate. you can create a rule that extracts the host name from the name of the zone alias.

3 In the Define and select zone alias names rules to run panel. Then. Enabling zone name and zone alias rules for the automatic correlation process When you enable the automatic correlation process and select either of the correlation methods Zone Names Pattern or Zone Alias Pattern. for Zone Alias Pattern. If you have not yet created a rule. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings. click Edit. 4 Then. See “Editing zone alias naming patterns for the automatic correlation process” on page 221. click Finish. click Next and proceed to step 5. See “Define and select zone name rules to run panel options” on page 209. 5 In the Verify correlations detections panel. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. under Correlation Methods. . click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings.222 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts To edit zone alias patterns for the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. edit. ■ To save the rules and exit the wizard. click Finish. The rules save. review the list of unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage can correlate. create. to save the information. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. do one of the following: ■ To run the enabled rules so that you can preview the list of unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage can correlate. click Edit. the methods must include one or more enabled rules. To enable rules for the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. or delete a rule. refer to the following topics: See “Editing zone naming patterns for the automatic correlation process” on page 220. The rules save. for Zone Names Pattern or Zone Alias Pattern.

click Edit. CommandCentral Storage disables the rule(s). select (uncheck) the rules that you want to disable for the automatic correlation process. When you do this. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings. in the Defined rules table. for Zone Names Pattern or Zone Alias Pattern. 4 Click Finish. in the Enabled for auto mode? column. Starting the automatic correlation process After you enable the automatic correlation process. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. you can disable that rule. CommandCentral Storage enables the rule(s). the process runs at the following intervals: ■ When switch explorers detect events ■ Every 12 hours If you want the automatic correlation process to run immediately. in the Defined rules table. 4 Click Finish. in the Enabled for auto mode? column. select (check) the rules that you want to enable for the automatic correlation process. 3 In the Define and select zone name rules to run panel. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 223 Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts 3 In the Define and select zone name rules to run panel. at least one rule must be enabled. . CommandCentral Storage no longer uses that rule to detect the correlation of unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts. you can manually start the process. To disable rules for the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. Note: To use either method. Disabling zone name and zone alias rules for the automatic correlation process If you do not want CommandCentral Storage to use a zone name or zone alias rule for the automatic correlation process.

select (check) the unidentified adapters for which you want to approve correlations. Then. ■ To approve the actions. See “Edit host information for adapters panel options” on page 212. click Next and proceed to step 3. Then. click Adapters requiring approval to correlate. The automatic correlation process starts. Approving the correlations that CommandCentral Storage detects When you automate the correlation process. defer the task to a later time. verify that your selections are correct. Then. CommandCentral Storage waits for you to approve the correlations that it detects. click Next. do one of the following: ■ To edit the details of the hosts. verify the methods that you want to use are correct. Optionally. in the left pane. 4 In the Review actions to be performed panel. click Detect Now. CommandCentral Storage associates the HBA to the host and discovers more information about that host and its connections to storage resources. 3 In the Edit host information for adapters panel. See “Review actions to be performed panel options” on page 207. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings.224 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts To start the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. CommandCentral Storage automatically detects new correlations. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. click Finish. click Next. Then. 2 In the Approve correlations panel. CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. After you do this. click Finish. edit the details of any of the hosts. 3 In the Automatic correlation dialog box. The unidentified adapters now appear as HBAs in the Console. in the Tasks panel. . CommandCentral Storage correlates the unidentified adapters to the specified hosts. To approve the correlation of unidentified adapters to hosts 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. If you select the option for user approval of those correlations.

click Adapters automatically correlated. If you select the option for CommandCentral Storage to automatically approve the correlation that it detects. click Save. click Cancel. To view unidentified adapters that were automatically correlated ◆ In the CommandCentral Storage Console. 4 In the confirmation box. . The Unidentified adapters automatically correlated dialog box identifies those unidentified adapters (HBAs) that CommandCentral Storage correlated to hosts. you can disable the automatic correlation process. 2 In the Agentless Settings pane. do one of the following: ■ To delete the list of unidentified adapters that require your approval to correlate. click Settings > Management Server > Agentless Settings. you can view details about the unidentified adapters that were automatically correlated. 3 In the Agentless Settings pane. select (uncheck) Detect new correlations periodically using the methods specified below. CommandCentral Storage automatically detects associations between unidentified adapters (HBAs) and hosts. After you disable the automatic correlation process. you will need to manually correlate the unidentified adapters that CommandCentral Storage discovers. in the left pane. in the Tasks panel. click OK. Configuring agentless discovery of hosts 225 Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts Viewing the list unidentified adapters that were automatically correlated When you automate the correlation process. See “Manually correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts” on page 205. Disabling the automatic correlation process If you do not want CommandCentral Storage to automatically detect the hosts to which unidentified adapters (HBAs) belong. ■ To keep the list of unidentified adapters that require your approval to correlate. CommandCentral Storage disables the automatic correlation process. To disable the automatic correlation process 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console.

226 Configuring agentless discovery of hosts Automatically correlating unidentified adapters (HBAs) to hosts .

You can view reports at any time when working within the CommandCentral Storage Console and connected to a CommandCentral Management Server. monitor activity on the network. If you display reports in more than one window. the tasks available in the drop-down task lists may not work properly. Note: Display the reports in only one browser window at a time. and make decisions about the best way to use your storage resources. Chapter 12 Using CommandCentral Storage reports This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About managing storage and performance reports ■ Viewing reports for the whole network ■ Viewing reports for an object ■ Finding the reports you need ■ About summary and detail reports ■ Preserving report data ■ Getting help about reports About managing storage and performance reports CommandCentral Storage includes several default or "out-of-the-box" reports with which you can see what storage is available and how it is allocated. .

See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. you can narrow its scope to encompass a subset of resources in the network. click the Reporting tab.228 Using CommandCentral Storage reports Viewing reports for the whole network Viewing reports for the whole network By default. To view a report that encompasses all resources in the network 1 In the CommandCentral Storage Console. and database instances. switches. you can display a Physical Inventory Summary report for objects on a specific fabric. 2 Select a report category by clicking one of the subtabs. This applies to a number of different object types including (but not limited to) hosts. Viewing reports for an object You can access reports geared to an individual object from the Managing section of the Console. arrays. Reports are organized into the following categories: ■ Storage Storage reports ■ Files and File and directory reports directories ■ Users User Reports ■ Resources Resource reports ■ Performance Performance reports ■ History History reports ■ Custom About creating custom reports and notification ■ Archive Archiving reports 3 Within a category. 4 For most reports. click the name of the report you want to view. the CommandCentral Storage reports display information for all resources in the network. you can click one of the following: ■ Summary—Provides aggregate data about a class of objects or events ■ Detail—Provides detailed data about specific objects or events After you open the report. For example. .

Table 12-1 Storage use considerations To answer this question Use this report What physical storage has Online Storage Capacity Summary report not yet been configured (apportioned into LUNs)? What LUNs have not been Storage Consumption Summary report allocated to hosts? What LUNs are allocated but Online Storage Capacity Summary report not claimed? How much excess capacity Online Storage Capacity Detail report does an array have? Which hosts have not Storage Consumption Summary report claimed (created device handles for) storage allocated to them? Which hosts have claimed Storage Consumption Detail report storage but are not using it? . when you launch the Storage Consumption Summary report from a host’s object view. Finding the reports you need CommandCentral Storage includes several default or "out-of-the-box" reports. For example. 2 Click the Reporting tab within the object view. the report displays storage data for that particular host. click the name of a report. When the report displays. it is scoped to the object you were viewing. Using CommandCentral Storage reports 229 Finding the reports you need To view a report for an individual object 1 Display an object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. 3 In the Reporting pane. Efficient use of storage Table 12-1 provides several questions administrators might ask when setting up their storage systems. These reports may be useful to you as your setting up your storage access network.

230 Using CommandCentral Storage reports Finding the reports you need Table 12-1 Storage use considerations (continued) To answer this question Use this report What storage is either Online Storage Capacity Summary report underutilized or unusable? Stale Files report Stale Directories report What array storage is Storage Consumption Summary report potentially being wasted? On which hosts is storage Storage Consumption Summary report possibly being wasted? Duplicate Files report Which volumes contain used Storage Consumption Detail report and unused storage? Is replication storage being Storage Array Replication Summary report used efficiently? Storage consumption Table 12-2 provides several questions administrators might ask when determining their storage consumption. Table 12-2 Storage consumption considerations To answer this question Use this report Which databases and Software Inventory Summary report applications are consuming storage? Which databases and file Storage Consumption Detail report systems are not using the storage allocated to them? Which hosts are using the Storage Consumption Summary report most storage? Which files are using the File Usage report most storage? Which users are responsible File Usage by User report for files that use the most storage? .

enclosures. Table 12-3 Resource inventory considerations To answer this question Use this report What is the overall Physical Inventory Summary report distribution of storage resources (arrays. Using CommandCentral Storage reports 231 Finding the reports you need Table 12-2 Storage consumption considerations (continued) To answer this question Use this report What file systems are closest Storage Consumption Detail report to capacity? At what rate is storage usage Application Growth Summary report growing? Storage Array Capacity Trend Summary report Resource inventory Table 12-3 provides several questions administrators might ask when determining their resource inventory. and hosts)? What connections exist Physical Inventory Summary report between storage resources and the hosts and applications that consume storage? Which databases and Software Inventory Summary report applications are running in the network? What switches have available Switch Port Usage Summary report ports? How many available ports Switch Port Usage Summary report are on a given fabric? Performance and trends Table 12-4 provides several questions administrators might ask when determining their resource inventory. .

CommandCentral Storage displays two kinds of predefined reports: summary reports and detail reports.232 Using CommandCentral Storage reports About summary and detail reports Table 12-4 Performance and trends considerations To answer this question Use this report Which switch ports are Switch Port Performance Summary report carrying the most traffic? Which storage devices are Array Performance Summary report experiencing problems Unified Storage Performance Summary report sending or receiving data? At what rate is storage usage Application Growth Summary report growing? Storage Array Capacity Trend Summary report What user-initiated changes Audit History Summary report have taken place? Which devices are Alert Summary report experiencing the most alerts? Monitoring the network Table 12-5 provides several questions administrators might ask when monitoring their network. . Table 12-5 Network monitoring considerations To answer this question Use this report What are the busiest ports on Switch Port Performance Summary report the network? Switch Port Performance Detail report Which ports are experiencing Alert Summary report the most errors? What errors is a specific port Alert Detail report experiencing during a specified time frame? About summary and detail reports For most report types.

Using CommandCentral Storage reports 233
About summary and detail reports

Summary reports
Summary reports display high-level information about a class of storage resources.
For example, the Application Inventory Summary Report displays information
about how various kinds of applications are distributed across the entire network.
Summary reports display information in the form of tables or graphs, for example
pie charts and bar graphs. In both cases the information displayed is static; you
cannot change the appearance of the display.
In many of the graphs, you can click To Table if you would prefer to view the
detailed data in table format.

Note: To view the precise numerical data on which a graph is based, move your
mouse pointer over a point on the graph. The numerical data displays in a ToolTip.

In a summary report, you can drill down to a detail report by clicking an object
or object type. For example, by clicking the Brocade portion in a graph in the
Physical Inventory Summary report, you can display the Switch Inventory table
in the Physical Inventory Detail report, filtered to show data for Brocade switches.
The example below illustrates the format of a summary report.

Figure 12-1 CommandCentral Storage report format (Physical Inventory
Summary report)

234 Using CommandCentral Storage reports
About summary and detail reports

Detail reports
Detail reports display high-level information about a single object or object type.
You can access them using the Details tab or by clicking a specific object, object
type, or data point in a summary report.
Most detail reports display information in the form of tables. Some display
information in the form of graphs, for example pie charts and bar graphs. In both
cases the information displayed is static; you cannot change the appearance of
the display.
In tables, the first column typically lists objects such as applications or LUNs.
Other columns display data for each object.
In many of the graphs, you can click To Table if you would prefer to view the
detailed data in table format.
When you are viewing a detail report, you can drill down to an object view (on the
Managing tab) by clicking an object or object type. For example, by clicking a
Brocade switch in the Hardware Inventory Detail report, you can display the
switch’s object view.
The example below illustrates the format of a detail report.

Figure 12-2 CommandCentral Storage report format (Physical Inventory Detail)

You can modify the predefined detail reports to create your own custom reports.
See “Viewing and managing custom reports” on page 305.

Using CommandCentral Storage reports 235
Preserving report data

When you are viewing a detail report, you can change its appearance and control
the amount of information displayed.
See “Customizing the display in a report” on page 299.

Preserving report data
When you display a report in the CommandCentral Storage Console, you can
preserve the report’s contents in any of the following ways:
■ Archive the report to be retrieved and displayed later
See “Archiving reports” on page 235.
■ Export the report data to a comma-separated (.csv) file, which can be opened
in a standard text editor or spreadsheet program
See “Exporting report data to a file” on page 238.
■ Print the report
See “Printing reports” on page 238.
■ Save a graphic image to your local file system
See “Saving graphs” on page 36.

Archiving reports
Archived reports represent the state of the network at a precise moment in time.
For example, an operator can archive a report showing performance data at
midnight, to be viewed by a system administrator the next morning.
Archived reports are stored on the CommandCentral Management Server, in a
location you can specify. You can display them in the Console and send them to
other users by email.

Creating archive reports
You can archive the contents of a report for viewing later. The data displayed in
the archived report represents the state of the network at the time the report was
created.

236 Using CommandCentral Storage reports
Preserving report data

To archive a report
1 Display a report in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 In the drop-down list at the top of the report, click Archive Report and click
Go.
3 In the Archive Report dialog box, type a name for the archived report or
accept the default name provided. Then click OK.

Note: Because the report will be saved in an HTML file, its name cannot contain
any of the following characters: & < > , (comma) \ / : ? | % # = ‘ (single quote)
‘’ (double quote)

The report is archived on the Management Server.

Specifying a directory for archived reports
You can specify a directory into which CommandCentral Storage archives reports.
In this way, you can save the archived reports to a well-known location, such as
a shared drive, that users can access easily.
To specify the directory in which archived reports are saved
1 Click Settings > Management Server > Web Engine Settings.
2 In the drop-down list, click Edit Settings. Then, click Go.
3 In the Edit Settings dialog box, in the Archive Report Base Directory field,
type a directory path.
Examples:
■ Solaris:

/opt/VRTSweb/Veritas/spc/archive

■ Windows:

C:\Program Files\Veritas\VRTSweb\Veritas\spc\archive

4 Click OK.
New archived reports will save to the specified directory on the Management
Server. Note that previously archived reports do not move to this
directory—they remain in the directory where they were originally saved.

Using CommandCentral Storage reports 237
Preserving report data

Displaying archived reports
In addition to posting archived reports in a common directory, you can display
them in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
To display an archived report
1 Click Reporting > Archive in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 In the Archived Reports table, click the name of the report you want to display.
The selected report displays in a new browser window.

Sending archived reports by email
In addition to posting archived reports in a common directory or displaying them
in the Console, you can send them by email. This is useful, for example, for
providing operators or administrators with information they need for
troubleshooting.

Note: Before you can send report data by email, an SMTP server must be configured
for this purpose. For details on specifying an SMTP server for emailing reports,
see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide.

To send an archived report by email
1 Click Reporting > Archive in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 In the Archived Reports table, check a report.
3 In the drop-down list, click Email Archived Report and click Go.
4 In the Email Report dialog box, do the following and click OK:
■ Type (or paste from your system clipboard) a list of recipients’ email
addresses in the SendTo field. Use semicolons to separate addresses in
the list, for example:

reggie@example.com;mark@example.com;sammy@example.com

■ Optionally, type (or paste) a similar list of addresses in the SendCC: field.
■ Type a subject in the Subject field, or accept the default provided.
■ Type a valid email address in the Sender field, or accept the default
provided.
The archived report is sent by email to the recipients you named.

238 Using CommandCentral Storage reports
Preserving report data

Deleting archived reports
When you no longer need archived reports, you can delete them.
To delete archived reports
1 Click Reporting > Archive in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 In the Archived Reports table, check the reports you want to delete.
3 In the drop-down list, click Delete Archived Report and click Go.
4 Click OK to confirm deletion.
The selected archived reports are deleted from the Management Server.

Exporting report data to a file
When you export a report, the report data is captured on your computer in a
comma-separated (.csv) file format. You can then open the file using either a
spreadsheet program or a text editor.
To preserve report data in a comma-separated file
1 Display a report in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 In the drop-down list at the top of the report, click Export Report Data and
click Go.
3 In the File Download dialog box, click Save.
4 In the Save As dialog box, specify the directory and file name to which you
want to save the data.
5 Click Save.
The report data is saved to a file in .csv format.

Printing reports
You can print the report that is currently displayed in the Console window.

Using CommandCentral Storage reports 239
Preserving report data

To print a report
1 Display a report in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 Click the Print icon at the top of a table in the report.

3 In the Print dialog box, select a printer and adjust printer settings as required,
then click Print.
The data in the table is queued to the printer you specify.

Saving graphical reports
Many reports—for example, the Storage Consumption Summary—display
information in graphical formats like bar graphs and pie charts. You can save
these graphical reports to your local file system.
See “Saving graphs” on page 36.

Adjusting a report’s time frame
You can adjust the time frame for performance and history reports to narrow or
broaden the number and scope of collector values presented in the report display.
When you use the Time drop-down list to adjust a report’s time interval, you are
specifying an absolute time frame. An absolute time frame has specific starting
and ending times.
Here are two examples:
■ Start: 08 01 2005 12:00 End: 08 08 2005 12:00
■ Last 7 days

In the first example, you specify both the beginning and ending times for the
reporting interval. In the second example, the ending time is assumed to be the
time the report is run. You are specifying the beginning time, which is defined in
terms of the ending time. It is still an absolute time frame, however, because if
you archived the report and then ran it again, you would see the same results
every time.
You can also define custom reports with relative time frames, which are based on
the time the report is run.
See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303.

240 Using CommandCentral Storage reports
Getting help about reports

Note: Your collector aging and alert aging settings determine how much historical
data is available for reports. CommandCentral Storage cannot generate reports
for a time frame for which the required data has already been aged out of the
CommandCentral Storage database. Therefore, the database must contain collector
data for the full duration of your report’s time frame.

See “Configuring data retention for collector and alert data” on page 368.
To adjust the time frame for a report
1 Display any performance or history report in the CommandCentral Storage
Console. The report’s time frame displays at the top of the report.
2 In the Time drop-down list, do one of the following:
■ Select the time frame you want and click Go.
Examples: Last 24 hours, Last 7 days
The report refreshes, showing data for the specified time frame.
■ To set a time frame other than the default choices, click Custom Time
Frame and click Go.
Then continue with step 3.
3 In the Edit Timeframe dialog box, use the drop-down lists to specify a starting
date, starting time, ending date, and ending time in 24-hour format (for
example, 21 00 equals 9:00 p.m.). Then click OK.
The report refreshes, showing data for the specified time frame.

Getting help about reports
Each predefined report in CommandCentral Storage includes a brief description
of what is displayed in the report.
You can access two additional kinds of help when you are viewing a report:
■ Detailed information about the report
■ Short descriptions of the columns in a detail report table
To display detailed information about a report
1 Display a report in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 Click Help.
A help window opens, displaying a full description of the report you are
viewing.

Using CommandCentral Storage reports 241
Getting help about reports

To display a short description for a column in a detail report table
1 Display a detail report in the CommandCentral Storage Console.
2 Hover your mouse cursor over a column header.
A ToolTip displays a brief description of the column’s contents.

242 Using CommandCentral Storage reports
Getting help about reports

Chapter 13
Using the default reports
This chapter includes the following topics:

■ About default reports

■ Storage reports

■ File and directory reports

■ User Reports

■ Resource reports

■ Performance reports

■ History reports

About default reports
CommandCentral Storage provides predefined default reports that enable you to
analyze your storage network and the resources in the network. Using these
reports, you can see what storage is available and how it is allocated, monitor
activity on the network, and make decisions about the best way to use your storage
resources.
You can also use these reports to create custom reports that are specifically tailored
to the needs of your enterprise.
See “About creating custom reports and notification” on page 299.
Some tables and charts within the reports are hidden by default. To display a
hidden table or chart, select it in the Customize and Save dialog box.
See “Selecting which tables and graphs display” on page 303.

See “Storage Array Capacity Trend Summary report” on page 257. The storage in an object is included until the object is deleted permanently from the database. or user-deleted. See “Application Growth Summary report” on page 256. unified storage devices. ■ The Storage Array Capacity Trend report displays usage data for array storage over a period of time. and applications. The trend data promotes storage requirements planning. See “Storage Array Replication Detail report” on page 256. for example. See “Online Storage Capacity Summary report” on page 245. and JBODs. how much storage is allocated.244 Using the default reports Storage reports Storage reports Storage reports show how storage is allocated and used in your enterprise: ■ Online Storage Capacity reports display the ways in which storage resources are being utilized. in terms of the amount of storage they use. . ■ Storage Consumption reports show the ways in which storage is being used by host file systems. or how much total storage capacity is contained within arrays. generic storage devices. ■ Storage Array Replication Capacity reports show capacity and usage information about replicated storage on arrays ■ The Application Growth report shows the fastest growing databases and applications. See “Storage Array Replication Summary report” on page 255. See “Storage Consumption Detail report” on page 254. ■ Host Virtualization Storage reports provide an enterprise summary about the host virtualization environment and the storage allocation and consumption for managed virtual hosts and virtual machines. Note: The storage reports display data for all objects in the CommandCentral Storage database—including those that are discovered. missing. See “Online Storage Capacity Detail report” on page 248. CommandCentral Storage includes several storage reports. volumes. See “Storage Consumption Summary report” on page 250. ■ The Virtualization Server Capacity Trending report enables storage operators to analyze storage utilization trends and identify opportunities for efficient capacity use.

they do not include offline storage such as tape devices. ■ Available Capacity — the sum of the free capacity of the storage pool and the virtual disks. which are not assigned to any virtual machine. You can also use this information to identify where storage can be used more efficiently. You can use this information to find where storage is available for the users and applications that need it. This total capacity is . ■ Managed virtual host claimed — includes LUNs that are claimed by virtual managed hosts. Online Storage Capacity Summary report Online storage capacity reports display information about how online storage is distributed at the enterprise or group levels. The Online Storage Capacity Summary report displays charts that show the following information: ■ Total Online Storage ■ Total Unified Storage ■ Distribution of Storage by Interface ■ Distribution of Storage by Classification ■ Allocation of Array Storage by Vendor ■ Distribution of Storage by RAID Level This report separates data on the physical LUNs from storage allocated to a guest operating system on a virtual machine. ■ Virtual M/C claimed — includes the virtual disks assigned to virtual machines (M/Cs) that do not have the guest operating system installed or that do not have the managed host installed on the guest operating system. See “Virtualization Server Capacity Trending report” on page 260. See “Host Virtualization Summary Report ” on page 258. See “Host Virtualization Detail Report” on page 260. These reports include all of the online storage discovered by CommandCentral Storage. ■ Administration/Other — the sum of overhead capacity of the storage pools and the LUNs claimed by the virtualization servers. The Server Virtualization Allocation bar includes the following capacities: ■ Managed host claimed — includes LUNs that are claimed only by physical hosts. Using the default reports 245 Storage reports See “Storage Array Capacity Trend Detail report ” on page 258.

See details about the meaning of each classification and descriptions of how values are calculated. starting with physical storage in arrays and enclosures. the amount masked and bound to specific hosts. NAS. but does include it in other bars within the report. However. In the chart. Because the storage pool includes NAS storage. Total Online Storage This chart presents all of the online storage in the enterprise (SAN. RAID Overhead. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467. Consumption. and the amount claimed by hosts. only Physical and Logical storage bars will display. if you create user-created hosts). Allocation. Snapshot Reserve. and Application Usage. Note: If you discover hosts through agentless discovery (in other words. and breaks it down into progressively smaller classifications. The Logical stack bar includes WAFL Spares. If all of the NetApp devices are purely in File Mode. . Host Usage. and DAS). Total Unified Storage This chart displays the storage contained in NetApp unified storage devices. Because of this. For example. the Claimed Status bar only includes the capacity of LUN storage—it does not include the capacity from NAS storage. CommandCentral Storage may report a larger amount of total claimed storage in the following bars than it reports in the Claimed Status bar: Server Virt. Click a region in any chart to display the associated table in the Online Storage Capacity Detail report. and NAS Used.246 Using the default reports Storage reports deducted by the sum of the Total Storage Pool Capacity and the Total of Raw Device Mapping (RDM) Disk Capacity. other bars within the report may include the capacity from NAS storage. the LUN capacity allocated to this host displays as Unknown. the LUNs table displays with its contents filtered to show only the LUNs that have been claimed by hosts. when you click the Claimed by Host region in the Total Online Storage chart. CommandCentral Storage does not count the NAS storage in the Claimed Status bar. broken down into progressively smaller classifications: the amount allocated for provisioning to hosts. This occurs when you have an NFS based storage pool.

and how much is reserved for administrative overhead. Note: This chart is hidden by default. how much is available for provisioning to hosts. how much is masked and bound to specific hosts. how much is claimed by hosts. how much is contained in arrays manufactured by specific vendors. . Distribution of Storage by Classification A pie chart showing how much block storage is contained in arrays and unified storage devices. Total Array Storage This chart dispalys information for storage in arrays: how much is configured for use (logical storage). For each vendor. how much is allocated for provisioning to hosts. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467. Using the default reports 247 Storage reports See details about the meaning of each classification and descriptions of how values are calculated. Allocation of Array Storage by Vendor Of the storage contained in arrays. Distribution of Storage by Interface A pie chart showing how much storage is attached in each of four different ways: ■ Directly attached to the host through a SCSI interface ■ Attached through SAN devices like switches (Fibre-channel attached) ■ Attached using an Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) interface ■ Attached using an iSCSI interface This report includes offline storage on IDE disks. See details about the meaning of each classification and descriptions of how values are calculated. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467. the chart shows how much storage is allocated to hosts. how much block storage is contained in generic (unclassified) storage devices. The graph also shows how much storage is represented as logical virtualizer source capacity on Hitachi Tagma arrays. and how much is being used. and how much storage is exposed as NAS storage.

masked and bound to hosts. such as JBODs. . available. masked and bound to hosts. The "unprotected" portion refers to storage for which no RAID level has been assigned. masked and bound to hosts. To view a storage array's total storage capacity—both the array's physical capacity and the storage allocated to a virtualization array—view the columns “Physical Capacity (GB)(w/virtualizer source)” and “Configured Storage (GB)(w/virtualizer source). WAFL Spares. Claimed means that a host has created a device handle for a LUN. and claimed by hosts. and claimed by hosts. TagmaStore—the columns “Physical Capacity (GB)” and “Configured Storage (GB)” do not include the storage that is allocated to the virtualization array.” User-Created Enclosure Storage Information about storage contained in user-created enclosures. RAID Overhead. Note: This table is hidden by default. Online Storage Capacity Detail report The Online Storage Capacity Detail report displays tables showing an inventory of all storage discovered by CommandCentral Storage.248 Using the default reports Storage reports Distribution of Storage by RAID Level A pie chart showing how much storage is assigned for each RAID level. and claimed by hosts. Array Storage Information about arrays. Snapshot Reserve. Data includes the percentage of storage that is apportioned into LUNs (configured). available. available. Claimed means that a host has created a device handle for a LUN. Other information in the table includes Volume. This happens so that the virtualized storage is not counted for both the virtualization array and the physical array. For storage arrays whose storage is allocated to a virtualization array—for example. LUN. including the percentage of array that is apportioned into LUNs (configured). Unified Storage Information about NetApp unified storage devices. including the percentage of array storage that is apportioned into LUNs (configured). Click the name of a device. and NAS Used. or other entity to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console.

view the columns ""Physical Capacity (GB) (w/external or segment)". SCSI-attached LUNs. LUNs Information about LUNs in arrays. and host name. and "Available (GB) (w/external or segment). Includes whether the LUN is bound and masked. or LUNs allocated to a VMware guest operating system." This avoids double counting in the totals for all RSVs. "LUN (GB) (w/external or segment)". This happens so that the storage is not counted for both the physical LUN and virtual LUN. whether it is a source LUN or target LUN (where applicable). whether it is a virtual LUN. or LUNs allocated to a VMware guest operating system. Note: This table is hidden by default. LUNs allocated to a virtualization array. and claimed by hosts. To view the capacity of virtual LUNs. Note: This table is hidden by default. . path by which the storage is identified on the host. To find the capacities for this type of RSV. available. because the storage from an RSV based on an external array is counted for the RSVs from the physical array. Raw Storage Volume (RSVs) Information about storage contained in RSVs or RAID groups. For virtual LUNs. masked and bound to hosts. The report also indicates whether each RSV is based on an external array. "Overhead (GB) (w/external or segment)". then values do not display in the columns "Physical Capacity (GB)". and whether a host has created a device handle for the LUN (claimed). including the percentage of storage that is apportioned into LUNs (configured). whether it is based on an external array. Note: This table is hidden by default. iSCSI-attached LUNs. a flex volume in a NetApp unified storage device). you can display the column "Capacity (GB) (w/virtualizer source or virtual or GOS). a value does not display in the column "Capacity (GB)". "LUN (GB)". so that the virtualized storage is not counted for both the virtualization array and the physical array. and so that the storage is not counted for both the VMware ESX server and VMware guest operating system. Using the default reports 249 Storage reports Direct-Attached Storage Information about storage that is directly attached to hosts. "Overhead (GB)". including capacity. If an RSV is based on an external storage array or is a segment (for example. and "Available (GB). LUNs allocated to a virtualization array. and IDE-attached LUNs.

Note: This table is hidden by default. you can decide how best to assign storage resources to meet current or emerging capacity needs." To view these values. values do not display in the columns "Capacity (GB)" and "Configured (GB). when you click the Oracle section in the Storage Usage by Application chart. Based on this information. Click an area in a chart to display the associated table in the Storage Consumption Detail report. Note: This table is hidden by default. the Application Usage by Host table displays with its contents filtered to show only the hosts on which storage is allocated to Oracle. The Storage Consumption Summary report displays charts showing storage consumption by volumes. For example. file systems.250 Using the default reports Storage reports Physical Disks Information about each physical disk in arrays. display the columns "Capacity (GB) (w/external)" and "Configured (GB) (w/external). including whether the disk is configured (apportioned into LUNs). Storage Consumption Summary report Storage consumption reports display information about the way storage is being used in your enterprise and about the applications that are using it: ■ How storage is allocated across the network ■ How much storage is being used by file systems and applications ■ Where to find available storage You can use these reports to identify usage patterns and trends. Shares/Exports An inventory of storage in NetApp Unified Storage devices that is designated for shared drives and exports. and whether the disk is spare (reserved for backup purposes). and applications. For disks based on external arrays. whether the disk is based on an external array. The report separates physical storage data from data collected from virtual machines in the following ways: ■ The charts exclude data from LUNs on virtual machines .

database applications. Host Consumption Distribution A pie chart showing—out of all storage allocated to hosts. all of the charts and tables in the report do not display data. how much is owned by disk groups and how much is available for disk groups ■ Of the storage owned by disk groups. and file systems. With a user-created host. The Storage Consumption Summary report may not display data in the following situations: ■ If you scope the report to a user-created (agentless) host. This is often wasted storage. and file systems. Potential Wasted Storage A breakdown of storage that has been designated for use by hosts. This information makes it easy to identify storage that may be wasted because it has been designated for a particular use but is not yet being used. Using the default reports 251 Storage reports ■ You can filter the report by virtualization server. volumes. while it excludes data about the virtualization server itself. Because of this. or application that is not supported by CommandCentral Storage. how much is claimed by hosts and how much is unclaimed ■ Of the storage assigned to volume managers. the report includes data from LUNs on virtual machines only if the virtualization server is excluded from the scope of the report. file systems. Unknown Assignment refers to storage that is allocated to a volume manager. ■ If you scope the report on a generic group that does not include a host. and file systems—the proportion assigned to volume managers. along with storage for which device handles are not being used. The report then shows information about all virtual hosts associated with the selected virtualization server. CommandCentral Storage cannot not discover information about the host's applications. except for the Potential Wasted Storage chart which displays only the Unknown capacity slice. and volumes. The bar graphs show: ■ Of all allocated storage. file system. volumes. In the Host Consumption Distribution pie chart. how much is owned by volumes and how much is available for volumes . ■ If you filter the report by host. the Unknown Assignment excludes data from LUNs on virtual machines.

. In the Potential Wasted Storage chart. Note: This chart is hidden by default. Used storage is defined as storage to which data has been written. Unlike the Highest Percentage Used Hosts graph. This information can help you identify hosts that might be close to running out of storage.252 Using the default reports Storage reports Storage that displays as unclaimed or available is potentially wasted storage. this graph shows the absolute amount of storage used. the Claimed slice of the Allocated Storage bar excludes data from LUNs on virtual machines. This information can help you identify hosts that might be close to running out of storage. Hosts with Highest File System Used Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts with the most used file system storage (storage to which data has been written). Used storage is defined as storage to which data has been written. Note: This chart is hidden by default. in gigabytes (GB). Note: This chart is hidden by default. Hosts with Lowest File System Unused Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts with the lowest percentage of unused file system capacity. Unused storage is defined as storage to which data has not been written. in which used storage is shown as a percentage of total storage. This information identifies the hosts that are used most heavily. in gigabytes (GB). Hosts with Highest Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts with the most total storage. Hosts with Highest Percentage of File System Used Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts with the highest percentage of used file systems. File Systems with Highest Percentage of Used Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts containing file systems with the highest percentage of used storage. Note: This chart is hidden by default.

Storage Usage by Database Bar graphs showing. Note: This chart is hidden by default. in which used storage is shown as a percentage of total storage. Used storage is defined as storage to which data has been written. this graph shows the absolute amount of storage used. for each file system. This information identifies the biggest file systems. File Systems with Highest Used Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts containing the file systems with the most used storage (storage to which data has been written). Unlike the Highest Percentage Used File Systems graph. Note: This chart is hidden by default. File Systems with Lowest Unused Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts containing file systems with the lowest percentage of unused file system capacity. Sybase. the amount of storage being used by the application and the amount . for each type of database application (Oracle. Current File System Usage A pie chart showing. for all storage allocated to host file systems. Note: This chart is hidden by default. in gigabytes (GB). in gigabytes (GB). File Systems with Highest Capacity A bar graph showing the hosts containing file systems with the most total storage. and MS-SQL). Unused storage is defined as storage to which data has not been written. Using the default reports 253 Storage reports This information can help you identify file systems that might be close to running out of storage. This information can help you identify file systems that might be close to running out of storage. Note: This chart is hidden by default. the amount that is used and unused. DB2.

Allocated Fibre Attached (GB). and Unknown Claimed (GB). Table columns show how the storage is attached (Fibre-channel.) Starting with CommandCentral Storage version 5. all of the capacity columns display as zero. in the Host Storage Usage table. databases. and unused.1. The Storage Consumption Detail report may not display data if you scope the report on a generic group that does not include a host. including the percentage of storage allocated to volume managers. Note: The total of used and unused file system capacity is represented differently on Windows and UNIX. except for the following columns: Allocated (GB).254 Using the default reports Storage reports of storage that is allocated to the application but not being used. Click the name of a host or database to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. Storage Consumption Detail report The Storage Consumption Detail report displays tables showing how hosts and database applications are using storage on the network. Because of this. CommandCentral Storage does not discover information about the host's applications. the total is represented by the value in File System Non-Super User Capacity. With a user-created host. this report includes offline storage on Integrated Drive Electronics (IDE) disks. file systems. Host Storage Usage For each host. and file systems. The Storage Consumption Detail report may display zero capacities if you scope the report to a user-created (agentless) host. Volume Manager Usage For each host. or iSCSI) and how much of it is claimed and unclaimed. On Windows hosts. (Claimed means that a host has created a device handle for a LUN. used. however. and volumes. the total is represented by the value in the Filesystem Capacity column. . The table shows the percentage of storage allocated to disk groups and how much capacity is claimed. SCSI. information about all physical and virtual storage used on the host. Used storage is defined as storage to which data has been written. the total storage capacity allocated to volumes or Veritas File System volume sets owned by the host. On UNIX hosts.

click a region to display a table showing detailed information about LUNs that are being used as target LUNs for replication. the total is represented by the value in the Filesystem Capacity column. Replication storage includes source and target LUNs represented by the following object types: ■ EMC Symmetrix/DMX Timefinder objects ■ EMC Clariion SnapView snapshots. the storage capacity allocated. given current usage trends. the total is represented by the value in File System Non-Super User Capacity. File System Usage For each host. used. and Mirrorview objects ■ Hitachi shadow images In any chart. for example Oracle or Microsoft Exchange. To configure the way in which the projections display. The table displays file system capacity and the proportion of used and unused file system storage space. Note: The total of used and unused file system capacity is represented differently on Windows and UNIX. and unused by databases and applications. Other table columns show where the storage resides (LUNs or volumes) and how much of it is used and unused. however. The table contains . Database/Application Usage by Host For each host. Using the default reports 255 Storage reports Note: This table is hidden by default. Click the Table Settings icon to add or remove columns that pertain each database and application type. Storage Array Replication Summary report The Storage Array Replication Summary report displays pie charts summarizing the relationship between production storage and replication storage on arrays. See “Changing projection settings” on page 80. Note: This table is hidden by default. On Windows hosts. SnapView clones. On UNIX hosts. the total storage capacity allocated to file systems. The table also shows projections for when storage will be used up.

replication type. SnapView clones. with replication state. and host. measured by the percentage increase in the amount of storage they use. Application Growth Summary report The Application Growth Summary report provides an overview of the fastest growing database applications in the enterprise.256 Using the default reports Storage reports information about each target LUN and its corresponding source LUN: name. Replication storage includes source and target LUNs represented by the following object types: ■ EMC Symmetrix/DMX Timefinder objects ■ EMC Clariion SnapView snapshots. . capacity. enclosure. capacity. and unknown (masked to undiscovered hosts). replication target LUNs. Total storage distribution A summary of all storage that has been apportioned into LUNs. unallocated (available for provisioning). showing the proportion of production storage in replication source LUNs. and host. and enclosure vendor. Replication LUN allocation A summary of all storage in LUNs that are being used as replication targets: how much is claimed (having device handles). and Mirrorview objects ■ Hitachi shadow images Click the name of an array or LUN to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. Replication capacity by vendor A summary of replicated production storage in arrays. and non-replication storage. sorted by vendor. Storage Array Replication Detail report The Storage Array Replication Detail report displays a table showing detailed information about LUNs that are being used as target LUNs for replication. enclosure. and enclosure vendor. The table contains information about each target LUN and its corresponding source LUN: name. with replication state. replication type. unclaimed (not having device handles).

LUN storage ready to be allocated to hosts. allocated storage. how much is apportioned into LUNs and ready for allocating to hosts. you can easily see trends—for example. and how much is devoted to RAID (logical) overhead. The graphs display trends for: ■ Overall array capacity usage: Storage consumption for all storage in arrays. Use the Time Frame drop-down list to view a longer or shorter time period. the report displays a graph showing trending data for the five fastest growing database instances or tablespaces. If you do not use scoping. you can display data for any combination of the following: ■ Oracle databases ■ Oracle tablespaces ■ DB2 databases ■ DB2 tablespaces ■ Sybase databases (adaptive servers) ■ Sybase segments ■ MSSQL databases For each application type you select. Note: If you discover hosts through agentless discovery (in other words. ■ Configured storage distribution: The total amount of physical storage that is configured. and claimed storage. as well as consumption for configured storage. Using the default reports 257 Storage reports Using Customize and Save. unallocated storage. By default. how much is available for apportioning into new LUNs. overall growth or decline in usage and times of peak usage. With the graphs. if you create user-created hosts). Storage Array Capacity Trend Summary report The Storage Array Capacity Trend Summary report displays graphs showing usage data for three kinds of array storage. the report displays data covering the entire enterprise. this report does not include information about the applications on that host. the graphs show growth over the most recent three-month period. .

Because of this.1. such as configured storage and allocated storage. Use the Time drop-down list to set a longer or shorter time period. you can change the report scope so that it shows data for a specific set of arrays or for the whole enterprise. Use the Time drop-down list to set a longer or shorter time period. for storage arrays that have spare disks available at the array level.1.258 Using the default reports Storage reports Note: In previous versions of CommandCentral Storage. and how much is allocated to hosts. For definitions of the various storage categories. Click on a trend line in the summary report to display an individual Array Capacity Usage Trend chart for a selected capacity. ■ LUN storage distribution: How much LUN storage is used by administrative LUNs. Storage Array Capacity Trend Detail report The Storage Array Capacity Trend Detail report displays comprehensive charts that track array storage usage over time for selected capacities. the graphs show trends over the most recent three-month period. By default. Using Customize and Save. when you view the Configured Storage Distribution Trend chart. Starting in CommandCentral Storage 5. These Array Capacity Usage Trend charts help to pinpoint individual array trends and provide insights into sudden changes in usage. you can change the report scope so that it shows data for a specific set of arrays or for the whole enterprise. Host Virtualization Summary Report The Host Virtualization Summary Report provides an enterprise summary about host virtualization. a storage array’s spare capacity was categorized as configured storage. By default. how much is used by replication-specific LUNs. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467. the graphs show trends over the most recent three-month period. the array’s spare capacity is categorized as physical storage rather than configured storage. the configured capacity may be lower after you upgrade to CommandCentral Storage 5. The report shows storage allocation and consumption in managed virtual hosts and virtual machines and summarizes the data for storage allocated to the virtualization server. Using Customize and Save. .

determine what storage could be reclaimed at every level (claimed storage. Use this report to determine how storage is being allocated to the virtualization server. Because of this. on which the virtual hosts are running. The SP/RDM Utilization bar may be smaller than the Logical SP/RDM bar if you have an NFS based Storage Pool. However. The report displays the following charts: ■ Host Virtualization Storage Summary bar chart: Displays aggregate information for the storage allocated to the virtualization servers and virtual hosts (in the first three bars) and information about storage consumption by the virtual machines and virtual hosts (in the last three bars). With this information. such as Linux and Windows. ■ Virtualization Server Storage Distribution by Interface pie chart: Out of the total configured storage. ■ Virtual Machine Distribution pie chart: Displays how many of the virtual machines have virtual hosts installed on them and how many do not have any virtual hosts installed. or just generic groups. Using the default reports 259 Storage reports This report helps you to analyze storage utilization in a virtualization environment. logical storage. just the Virtualization Server. CommandCentral Storage does not count the NAS storage in the Claimed Status bar. In the chart. and SAN devices like switches (Fibre). Click a region in any chart to display the associated table in the Host Virtualization Detail report. the rest of the bars in the chart do include the capacity from NAS storage. ■ Virtual Machine Storage Usage pie chart: Displays storage distribution on virtual machines. ■ Managed Virtual Host Storage Usage by Platform pie chart: Displays storage distribution on managed virtual hosts. You can customize the scope of the report by choosing to view data for the enterprise. Because the storage pool includes NAS storage. CommandCentral Storage may report a larger amount of total claimed storage in the other bars than it reports in the Claimed Status bar. or storage on a virtual machine). This occurs when you have an NFS based storage pool. ■ Virtual Machine Distribution by Platform pie chart: Displays storage distribution based on platforms on which the virtual hosts are running. IDE and iSCSI interfaces. ■ Virtual Machine Storage Usage by Platform pie chart: Displays storage distribution based on the platforms. but does include it in all other bars. the Claimed Status bar only includes the capacity of LUN storage—it does not include the capacity from NAS storage. displays how much is attached directly to the host through a SCSI interface. .

You can customize the scope of the report by choosing to view data for the enterprise. Host Virtualization Detail Report The Host Virtualization Detail Report provides enterprise details about host virtualization. or just generic groups. Use this report to analyze how virtualization server storage and its utilization have changed over time in your enterprise. You can review the definitions of the bar slices on this report. just the Virtualization Server. 7 days. Also.260 Using the default reports Storage reports To view definitions of the data on this report. just the Virtualization Server. you can plan for capacity growth requirements. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467. You can customize the scope of the report by choosing to view data for the enterprise. see the following topic about storage terms. To view definitions of the data on this report. or just generic groups. if the capacity value at the beginning of the report time frame is 0. You can also customize the time frame for the report by choosing the last one or three months. Clicking on a storage resource in the report displays additional detail. . see the following topic about storage terms. This report helps you to analyze storage utilization in a virtualization environment. The report shows storage allocation and consumption in managed virtual hosts and virtual machines and shows the storage allocated to the virtualization server. or 24 hours or you can edit the time frame to specific start and end dates and times. the report could show that the total physical capacity in your storage network increased by 5. Percent values in the report legend indicate the percentage by which the capacity has changed during the report time frame. For example. Virtualization Server Capacity Trending report The Virtualization Server Capacity Trending report displays storage consumption trends for all virtualization servers. the percentage value appears as NA.40% between January 13 and May 10. With storage trending information. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467.

1. At the top of each report. The file and directory reports are based on data gathered by the Data Module (DM) component. refer to the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. ■ The Duplicate Files reports identify duplicate files. the Virtualization Server Capacity Trending report will be blank. and aging data. host. ■ The File Aging. See “About storage terms used in CommandCentral Storage” on page 467. To determine whether a report uses the logical size or physical size. unified storage array. and the storage they use. file type usage. File Type Usage. and last accessed. For summary reports that report on directory size. CommandCentral Storage displays the file’s size based on the file’s logical size or physical size. unified storage volume. File and directory reports File and directory reports display information about files. For more information about changing Data Module settings. The following reports are available: ■ The File Usage. read the report’s description. Then. To change how the reports display a file’s size. share. The file and directory reports can be scoped to include the entire enterprise or by any of the following resource types: array. file type usage. For detail reports that report on directory size. and Directory Usage reports display information about files and directories according to the amount of storage they consume. you can modify the Data Module Importer’s global setting or you can change the associated file scanning or NetApp rule. directories. you might use Enterprise . both a file’s logical size and physical size display. File Type Aging. and Directory Aging reports display information about when files and directories were created. This allows you to compare the difference between logical and physical size. the Batch keyword displays the date and time of the DM job (scan or import) from which the report data is generated. and aging data. managed directory. perform another scan. last modified. Using the default reports 261 File and directory reports Note: After upgrading to CommandCentral Storage 5. ■ The Stale Files and Stale Directories reports identify files and directories that are not being used. Collector values for the trending report need an initial 48 hours to collect the data for the report to be populated. file system. which often indicate where storage is being wasted. For example.

see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). To display the file and directory reports. size. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. last modified date. For information about enabling rollup scans. you need to enable rollup scans. . Click a file type to display a list of the largest files having that type. When you compare the file’s logical size and physical size. it lists the number of files and the total amount of storage the files occupy. along with creation date (Windows) or inode modification date (UNIX). the file owner.CommandCentral Storage determines the file’s physical size as the size of the stubbed file and the file’s logical size as the size of the original file before it was archived. you can determine the effectiveness of the archive. click Reporting > Files and Directories in the CommandCentral Storage Console. During a file scan. along with creation date (Windows) or inode modification date (UNIX). When you do this. For every file type (file extension) being used.262 Using the default reports File and directory reports Vault to archive a file. File Usage report The File Usage report lists the files on network hosts that use the most storage. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. The file type [None] refers to files with no extension. and owner. directory location. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. name. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. and size. The Top Largest Files table lists each file’s name. last modified date. last accessed date. and last accessed date. For information about scheduling scans. It shows each file’s location (host and directory path). Enterprise Vault archives the file into a stubbed file. For information about scheduling scans. File Type Usage report The File Type Usage report displays file types (extensions) that occupy the most storage. and the last time the report was run.

The pie charts display statistics for the following parameters: ■ Elapsed time since creation date (Windows) or last modified date (UNIX) ■ Elapsed time since the files were last accessed ■ Elapsed time since the files were last modified . File Aging Summary report The File Aging Summary report displays pie charts with cumulative information about file aging across the network. 3 to 6 months. and so on. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. you need to enable rollup scans. You can find these settings under Settings > DM Configuration > Importer Settings > Edit Aging Settings. Using the default reports 263 File and directory reports If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. For information about enabling rollup scans. The information allows you to assess quickly and visually the ratio of useful to stale files within your storage environment. such as 0 to 3 months. For information about scheduling scans. The age groupings for the scan. Each pie chart in this report includes all available age intervals—0 to 3 months. For information about enabling rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. Data for the aging reports is collected during the Data Module (DM) file scans. File Aging Count Pie charts that display aggregate file statistics for files on all managed hosts. The pie chart is a graphical representation of two values for each age interval: the number of files and the total file size. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Click on an interval in the pie chart to display detailed information about a host's file utilization during that interval. A file’s age is measured by the elapsed time since the file was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since its inode was last modified (on UNIX). are determined at the time each scan takes place. you need to enable rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide.

see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. and so on—and displays two values for each interval: the number of files and the total file size. For information about scheduling scans. 3 to 6 months.By Last Accessed Date A table displaying aggregate file statistics for files on managed hosts. you can click the name of a host to display the File Aging Details report for a specific host. showing the elapsed time since the files were last accessed. The pie charts display statistics for the following parameters: ■ Elapsed time since creation date (Windows) or last modified date (UNIX) ■ Elapsed time since the files were last accessed ■ Elapsed time since the files were last modified File Aging Detail report The File Aging Detail report displays information about files on each host in the network in a tabular format. By default. which lists file aging data for each file system on the host.264 Using the default reports File and directory reports File Aging Size Pie charts that display aggregate file statistics for files on all managed hosts. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. File Aging . This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. You can find these settings under Settings > DM Configuration > Importer Settings > Edit Aging Settings. Data for the aging reports is collected during the Data Module (DM) file scans. are determined at the time each scan takes place. the table is sorted by host name. such as 0 to 3 months. When the report scope is set to All Hosts and NetApps. Each table in this report lists several age intervals—0 to 3 months. The information helps you monitor file aging and identify the patterns with which users are accessing and updating files. The age groupings for the scan. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). . For information about enabling rollup scans. you need to enable rollup scans.

The default groupings for the aging report groupings (such as 0 to 3 months) are established by the default DM file scanning rule in effect at the time each scan took place. and so on—and displays two values for each interval: the number of files and the total file size. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. Each table in this report lists several age intervals—0 to 3 months. showing the files' ages. showing the elapsed time since the files were last modified.By Creation Date (Windows)/Inode Modified Date (UNIX) A table displaying aggregate file statistics for files on managed hosts. You can change groupings under Settings > DM Configuration > Importer Settings > Edit Aging Settings. For information about scheduling scans. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. By default. 3 to 6 months. The information helps you monitor file aging and identify the patterns with which users are accessing and updating files. . File Type Aging report The File Type Aging report displays information about file types on each host in the network. Data for the Files reports is provided by means of Data Module (DM) scans. the table is sorted by host name. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. Using the default reports 265 File and directory reports File Aging . showing the elapsed time since the files were last accessed. A file’s age is measured by the elapsed time since the file was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since its inode was last modified (on UNIX). see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. you need to enable rollup scans. File types are listed in alphabetical order. For information about enabling rollup scans. File Type Aging . the table is sorted by host name. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).By Last Modified Date A table displaying aggregate file statistics for files on managed hosts. File Aging .By Last Accessed Date A table displaying aggregate file statistics for each file type (extension) used in the enterprise. By default.

By Last Modified Date A table displaying aggregate file statistics for each file type (extension) used in the enterprise. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. For information about enabling rollup scans. File types are listed in alphabetical order. owner. Note: The detailed information may be incomplete unless a full file system scan has been performed on all hosts connected to the CommandCentral Management Server. A file’s age is measured by the elapsed time since the file was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since its inode was last modified (on UNIX). The summary table lists. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans.266 Using the default reports File and directory reports File Type Aging . For information about scheduling scans. extension. Click the name of a file to display detailed information about every instance of the file including its location. . you need to enable rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. showing the elapsed time since the files were last modified. for every duplicate file. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. The information helps you monitor problems and identify potentially wasted storage.By Creation Date (Windows)/Inode Modified Date (UNIX) A table displaying aggregate file statistics for each file type (extension) used in the enterprise. the number of instances that exist and the total amount of storage occupied by all instances. size. and size. showing how long the files have existed. File Type Aging . A duplicate file is defined as the condition in which two or more files have the same name. and file aging data (dates and times are GMT). File types are listed in alphabetical order. Duplicate Files report The Duplicate Files report displays information about files that may not be needed because they are duplicated elsewhere in the enterprise.

see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. owner. You can display this report by clicking the name of a file in the Duplicate Files Summary report. The table also displays the dates when the file was last accessed and when data was last reported. For information about scheduling scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. name. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The information helps you monitor problems and identify potentially wasted storage. the last time the file was accessed or modified. Stale File Summary . you need to enable rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. The report lists the oldest files in three separate tables. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. For information about enabling rollup scans. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. Files are listed according to how long it has been since they were accessed. For information about enabling rollup scans. Using the default reports 267 File and directory reports Duplicate File Details report The Duplicate File Details report displays the location (host and directory path) and owner for each instance of a duplicate file. For information about scheduling scans. Stale Files report The Stale Files report displays information about files that may no longer be needed. size. you need to enable rollup scans. . and the creation date (Windows) or inode modifcation date (UNIX).By Last Accessed Date A table listing the files that have gone the longest without being accessed by a user or application. The table shows each file’s location (host and directory path).

268 Using the default reports File and directory reports Stale File Summary . name. For information about enabling rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. last time the file was accessed or modified. Managed Directory and Shares Usage Summary A table listing managed directories within the report scope. its owner. you need to enable rollup scans. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Stale File Summary . and the creation date (Windows) or inode modification date (UNIX). The table shows each file’s location (host and directory path). Directories are ranked by the amount of storage they use. Directory Usage report The Directory Usage Summary report displays information about individual directories and shares on network hosts. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. the table lists the host on which it resides. and when data was last reported. name. For each directory. the number of . its owner. last time the file was accessed or modified. the table lists the host on which it resides. Files are listed according to how long it has been since they were modified. and the creation date (Windows) or inode modification date (UNIX). owner. owner. For information about scheduling scans. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. the number of files in the directory and its subdirectories. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. size.By Last Modified Date A table listing the files that have gone the longest without being modified by a user or application. Directory Usage Summary A table listing directories within the report scope. size.By Creation Date (Windows)/Inode Modified Date (UNIX) A table listing the files that have existed the longest. A file’s age is measured by the elapsed time since the file was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since its inode was last modified (on UNIX). The table shows each file’s location (host and directory path). For each managed directory.

Using the default reports 269 File and directory reports files in the directory and its subdirectories. are determined at the time each scan takes place. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. 3 to 6 months. The pie chart is a graphical representation of two values for each interval: the number of files and the total file size. Directory Aging Summary report The Directory Aging Summary report displays pie charts with cumulative information about directory aging across the network. you need to enable rollup scans. Each pie chart in this report includes all available age intervals—0 to 3 months. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. You can find these settings under Settings > DM Configuration > Importer Settings > Edit Aging Settings. and when data was last reported. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. For information about scheduling scans. such as 0 to 3 months. The age groupings for the scan. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. Directory Aging Count Pie charts that display the total number of directories for all managed hosts. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The information allows you to assess quickly and visually the ratio of useful to stale directories within your storage environment. A directory’s age is measured by the elapsed time since it was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since the last time an inode was modified for the directory or for a file within the directory tree (on UNIX). The pie charts display statistics for the following parameters: ■ Elapsed time since creation date (Windows) or last modified date (UNIX) ■ Elapsed time since the directories were last accessed ■ Elapsed time since the directories were last modified . For information about enabling rollup scans. Directories are ranked by the amount of storage they use. Data for the aging reports is collected during the Data Module (DM) file scans. and so on.

You can find these settings under Settings > DM Configuration > Importer Settings > Edit Aging Settings. The pie charts display statistics for the following parameters: ■ Elapsed time since creation date (Windows) or last modified date (UNIX) ■ Elapsed time since the directories were last accessed ■ Elapsed time since the directories were last modified Directory Aging Detail report The Directory Aging Detail report displays information about directories on each host in the network in a tabular format. 3 to 6 months. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). and so on—and displays two values for each interval: the number of files and the total file size. For information about scheduling scans. organized by file system. such as 0 to 3 months. Each table in this report lists several age intervals—0 to 3 months. This report lists directory aging data. you can click the name of a host to display the Directory Aging Details report for that host. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. When the report scope is set to All Hosts and NetApps. . If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. For information about enabling rollup scans. A directory’s age is measured by the elapsed time since it was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since the last time an inode was modified for the directory or for a file within the directory tree (on UNIX). The age groupings for the scan.270 Using the default reports File and directory reports Directory Aging Size Pie charts that display directory size for all managed hosts. are determined at the time each scan takes place. Data for the aging reports is collected during the Data Module (DM) file scans. The information helps you monitor directory aging and identify the patterns with which users are accessing and updating directories. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. you need to enable rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide.

By default. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. By default. The information helps you monitor problems and identify potentially wasted storage. Directory Aging . including the elapsed time since the directories were last modified. including the directories’ ages. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. tables are sorted by host name. tables are sorted by host name. For information about enabling rollup scans. Stale Directory Summary . For information about scheduling scans. By default.By Last Accessed Date A table displaying aggregate directory statistics for each managed host. you need to enable rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide.By Last Modified Date A table displaying aggregate directory statistics for each managed host. tables are sorted by host name. Directory Aging . The table shows each directory’s location (host and . Stale Directories report The Stale Directories report displays information about directories that may no longer be needed. including the elapsed time since the directories were last accessed. The report lists the oldest directories in three separate tables. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).By Creation Date (Windows)/Inode Modified Date (UNIX) A table displaying aggregate directory statistics for each managed host. A directory’s age is measured by the elapsed time since it was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since the last time an inode was modified for the directory or for a file within the directory tree (on UNIX).By Last Accessed Date A table listing the directories that have gone the longest without being accessed by a user or application. Using the default reports 271 File and directory reports Directory Aging . This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans.

file system. organized by user. and owner. The user reports are based on data gathered by the Data Module (DM) component. and owner. click Reporting > Users in the CommandCentral Storage Console. For more information about changing Data Module settings. To determine whether a report uses the logical size or physical size. managed directory. The table shows each directory’s location (host and directory path). The table shows each directory’s location (host and directory path). At the top of each report. share. . read the report’s description.By Creation Date (Windows)/Inode Modified Date (UNIX) A table listing the directories by age. name. unified storage volume.By Last Modified Date A table listing the directories that have gone the longest without being modified by a user or application.272 Using the default reports User Reports directory path). To change how the reports display a file’s size. Stale Directory Summary . the Batch keyword displays the date and time of the DM job (scan or import) from which the report data is generated. User Reports User reports display data about files in the enterprise. name. size. name. size. refer to the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. perform another scan. For user reports. Stale Directory Summary . unified storage array. and owner. CommandCentral Storage displays a file’s size based on the file’s logical size or physical size. you can modify the Data Module Importer’s global setting or you can change the associated file scanning or NetApp rule. Directories are listed according to how long it has been since they were modified. size. Then. To display the user reports. The user reports can be scoped to include the entire enterprise or by any of the following resource types: host. Directories are listed according to how long it has been since they were accessed. A directory’s age is measured by the elapsed time since it was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since the last time an inode was modified for the directory or for a file within the directory tree (on UNIX).

For each user. Click a user name to display the File System Details report. listed alphabetically. the table displays its location. you need to enable rollup scans. . the table shows the number of files owned and the total amount of storage the files occupy. listed by file type (extension). For information about enabling rollup scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. The report will display the total number of TOP-n file types and their total size. and the total amount of storage used. the total number of files. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. Click a value in the File Type Count column to display a list of files owned by this user. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. number of files. The report is limited to the 100 largest file types. File Type Usage by User report The File Type Usage by User report displays more detailed information about the file types that each user owns. ranked by amount of storage used. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. For information about scheduling scans. The report helps you identify those user accounts that are placing the most burden on your storage resources. The report displays a table listing all user accounts in the enterprise. size. For each file system. which displays information about file systems that contain files owned by an individual user account. and when the data was last reported. you need to enable rollup scans. For information about scheduling scans. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. Using the default reports 273 User Reports File Usage by User report The File Usage by User report displays information about users and the storage being used by files they own. For information about enabling rollup scans. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps.

The default groupings for the aging report groupings (such as 0 to 3 months) are established by the default Data Module file scanning rule. For information about scheduling scans. Data for this report is provided by means of Data Module (DM) scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. A user with the appropriate privileges can change the groupings using the Aging and Directory Scan Depth panel in the default Data Module file scan Rule.By Last Accessed Date Files for each user. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. Each table in this report lists several age intervals—0 to 3 months. For information about scheduling scans. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. and the number of files. Each entry shows the number of files and the total size of the files. sorted by elapsed time since they were last accessed. 3 to 6 months. you need to enable rollup scans. For information about enabling rollup scans. This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. For each domain. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. the total amount of storage occupied by files in the domain. File Aging by User report The File Aging by User report displays information about files owned by individual user accounts. For information about enabling rollup scans. . This report may not contain data if you have not scheduled scans. and so on—and displays two values for each interval: the number of files and the total file size. The information helps you monitor file aging and identify the patterns with which users are accessing and updating files.274 Using the default reports User Reports File Usage by Domain report The File Usage by Domain report lists all domains in the enterprise in alphabetic order. File Aging by User . you need to enable rollup scans. the table shows the owning user. If you set the scope of the report to All Hosts and NetApps. All times and dates displayed in the report are Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

By Last Modified Date Files for each user. Resource reports Resource reports provide inventory information about the various resources in your enterprise and the ways in which they use storage: ■ Unified storage inventory reports display information about NetApp unified storage devices. sorted according to the age of the files. Each entry shows the number of files and the total size of the files. ■ Physical inventory reports display information about physical resources on the storage network.By Creation Date (Windows)/Inode Modified Date (UNIX) Files for each user. The Unified Storage Inventory Summary report consists of an Inventory table. click Reporting > Resources in the CommandCentral Storage Console. Click a resource type in the table to display details about the corresponding resources in the Unified Storage Inventory Detail report. ■ Software inventory reports display information about applications to which storage is allocated. Resource types include: ■ NetApp unified storage devices See “Unified Storage Detail” on page 276. Using the default reports 275 Resource reports File Aging by User . ■ The Switch Port Usage Trend report displays switch port usage over a specified time frame. A file’s age is measured by the elapsed time since the file was created on this file system (on Windows systems) or since its inode was last modified (on UNIX). File Aging by User . sorted by elapsed time since they were last modified. ■ Switch port usage reports display data about switch port connections and the ways in which the ports are being used. To display the resource reports. Unified Storage Inventory Summary report Unified storage inventory reports display summary information about NetApp unified storage devices in the enterprise. .

volume name. shares. qtrees. Qtree Detail Properties for each qtree including ID. volumes. Quota Detail Properties for each quota including type.x) aggregate volumes. and volumes. disk and file limits. and target. model and firmware version. associated storage device. volume name. associated storage device. shares. and status. Unified Storage Detail Properties for each unified storage device including physical and virtual storage capacity. source and destination locations. . MultiStore(R) virtual systems Properties for each MultiStore(R) virtual systems including virtual storage capacity and number of quotas. availability. ■ SnapMirrors See “SnapMirrors” on page 276. disks and files used. ■ Snapshots See “Snapshots” on page 277. state. Unified Storage Inventory Detail report The Unified Storage Inventory Detail report displays tables showing display names and other attributes for each type of unified storage resource found within the report scope. Click the name of an object to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. SnapMirrors Properties for each SnapMirror including name. ■ Qtrees See “Qtree Detail” on page 276. qtrees. and number of quotas. and security style. and (for storage devices with ONTAP 7.276 Using the default reports Resource reports ■ Quotas See “Quota Detail” on page 276.

. For example. when you click the Solaris region within the Distribution of Host by OS chart. The Physical Inventory Summary report displays the following information: ■ Physical Inventory Count ■ Distribution of Arrays by Vendor ■ Distribution of Switch Ports by Vendor ■ Distribution of Switches by Vendor ■ Distribution of Hosts by OS ■ Distribution of HBA by Vendor Click an area in any of the charts to display the associated table in the Physical Inventory Detail report. including: ■ Enclosures and arrays ■ Hosts ■ Switches ■ Host bus adapters (HBAs) and iSCSI initiators You can use this information to monitor the physical resources in the network and identify usage patterns and trends. This information can help you make decisions about the network configuration and plan for future growth. Physical Inventory Summary report Physical inventory reports—based on information from the CommandCentral Storage database—display summary information about the hardware resources in the enterprise. the Host Inventory table displays with its contents filtered to show only the hosts that are running Solaris. When you click Switches in the Physical Inventory Count table. Using the default reports 277 Resource reports Snapshots Properties for each snapshot including name. arrays. Click an item in the table to display the Physical Inventory Detail report for that resource type. size in blocks. and other resource types within the report scope. and percentage of volume reserved. switches. Physical Inventory Count A summary table displaying the total number of hosts. volume. associated storage device. the Switch Inventory table displays. blocks reserved.

for example Solaris or Windows. IP address. for example Hitachi. amount apportioned into LUNs.278 Using the default reports Resource reports Distribution of Arrays by Vendor A pie chart showing the proportion of array storage by vendor. for example Brocade. physical disks. Distribution of Switches by Vendor A pie chart showing the proportion of switches by vendor. number of HBA ports. or IBM. McDATA. Compaq. Distribution of Hosts by OS A pie chart showing the proportion of hosts by operating-system platform. for example Emulex. Distribution of HBA by Vendor A pie chart showing the proportion of HBAs by vendor. or EMC. McDATA. or Cisco. for example Brocade. Distribution of Switch Ports by Vendor A pie chart showing the proportion of switch ports by vendor. The chart represents the number of arrays. Click the name of a device to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. and host info. cluster name. as well as the total amount of storage. and amount allocated for use by hosts. Physical Inventory Detail report The Physical Inventory Detail report displays tables showing display names and other attributes for each type of hardware resource found within the report scope. . Array Inventory Properties for each array including vendor name and model. and raw storage volumes (RSVs). or Cisco. not the storage capacity contained in the arrays. Host Inventory Properties for each host including OS type. QLogic. number of LUNs that can be addressed by hosts.

Unenclosed Device Inventory Properties for each unenclosed storage device including vendor name. the host on which it resides. type of device. the host on which the HBA resides. number of ports. iSCSI Initiator Inventory Properties for iSCSI initiators including the driver on which it runs. and the number of HBA ports. status (ONLINE or OFFLINE) and Sub Type. and number of processors. number of slots. product name. status (ONLINE or OFFLINE). and WWN. and port speed. . Virtualization Server Inventory Properties for each host including amount of memory. port count. the driver running on the HBA. number of HBA ports. and the number of initiator ports. Switch Port Detail Properties for each switch port including port type. and total storage capacity. fabric name. Using the default reports 279 Resource reports Switch Inventory Properties for each switch including vendor name and model. and port usage statistics. port state. switch port. fabric. HBA Inventory Properties for each HBA including the vendor. firmware version. switch name. Tape Drive Inventory Properties for each tape-drive device including vendor name. firmware version. Hub Inventory Properties for each hub including vendor name and model. Unidentified Adapter Inventory Properties for each hot unidentified adapter including vendor name.

for each application type.280 Using the default reports Resource reports Virtual Host Inventory Properties for each host including amount of memory. Click the name of an application instance or server to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. Click an item in the table to display the Application Inventory Detail report for that application type. whether the instance is running. the percent of storage designated for the Oracle instance. and the database block size. this report does not include information about the applications on that host. Applications Count A table that shows. Software Inventory Detail report The Software Inventory Detail report displays tables showing display names and other attributes for each application that has at least one instance on the network. the number of online instances. storage usage. Oracle Inventory Properties for each Oracle instance including version. the number of tablespaces in the instance. which contains additional information about the object. . Click the name of an object to connect to its detail report. Software Inventory Summary report Application inventory reports—based on information from the CommandCentral Storage database—display summary information about the storage used by online applications. Note: If you discover hosts through agentless discovery (in other words. and number of processors. number of HBA ports. You can use this information to monitor storage usage patterns and trends for databases and other types of applications This information can help you make decisions about the network configuration and plan for future growth. if you create user-created hosts). total amount of LUN storage that has been designated for use. the home directory in which Oracle is installed.

the home directory in which DB2 is installed. status (ONLINE or OFFLINE). Veritas Cluster Server Inventory Properties for each Veritas Cluster Server (VCS) cluster including storage usage. the number of files and storage groups on the server. number of clients. Sybase Inventory Properties for each Sybase instance including version. the host on which it resides. status (ONLINE or OFFLINE). storage usage. the version. the home directory in which Sybase is installed. and the host on which it resides. NetBackup Inventory Properties for each Veritas NetBackup Server host including its role (master server or client). the number of service groups in the cluster. storage usage. and number of media servers (if the host is a master server). and the number of hosts in the cluster. . and the version. MS-SQL Inventory Properties for each MS-SQL instance including storage usage. the number of service groups in the cluster. Exchange Inventory Properties for each Microsoft Exchange Server including version. Microsoft Cluster Server Inventory Properties for each Microsoft Cluster Server cluster including storage usage. the state (ONLINE or OFFLINE) and whether the instance is running. the number of databases and file groups in the instance. the owner. the locations for key files (such as the error log). and the host on which it resides. and whether the instance is multi-partitioned. product name. whether the instance is running. the number of databases and tablespaces in the instance. the home directory in which MS-SQL is installed. the number of hosts in the cluster. the number of databases and tablespaces in the instance. the error log location. Using the default reports 281 Resource reports DB2 Inventory Properties for each DB2 system manager instance including storage usage.

. Use these reports in conjunction with performance reports to obtain a thorough understanding of how ports are being used. Switch Port Usage by Top Physical Fabrics For the top ten physical fabrics. Distribution of Used Switch Ports by Connection A pie chart showing the proportion of used switch ports connected to Cisco inter-switch link (ISL) ports. and counts for each type of resource (disk groups. Switch Port Usage Summary report Switch port usage reports provide the following information about the usage. For example. ranked by total number of switch ports. You can use this information to monitor the efficiency of port usage and plan adjustments that will improve efficiency. volumes. ranked by total number of switch ports. and status of switch ports in your enterprise. the Used Port table displays with its contents filtered to show only the ports that are connected to HBA ports. connectivity.282 Using the default reports Resource reports Volume Manager Inventory Properties for volume managers such as Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM). Switch Port Usage by Top Virtual Fabrics For the top ten virtual fabrics. and disks) it manages. HBA ports. Click an area in a chart to display the associated table in the Switch Port Usage Detail report. and array ports. See “Performance reports” on page 284. For each volume manager. the host on which it runs and the host's information. Distribution of Switch Port Usage A pie chart showing the proportion of used and unused switch ports within the report scope. The Switch Port Usage Summary report displays charts showing switch port usage and connectivity. when you click the HBA port region within the Used Switch Ports by Connection chart. bar graphs showing the proportion of used and unused ports. bar graphs showing the proportion of used and unused ports. the table lists its type and version.

If the port was previously in use. Switch Port Usage Detail report The Switch Ports Usage Detail report displays tables showing the following information. Click the name of a switch or switch port to display its object view in the CommandCentral Storage Console. whether it is physical or virtual. E port or F port). and connection data. Unused Switch Ports Properties for each unused switch port including its associated fabric. Using the default reports 283 Resource reports Note: This graph is hidden by default. type (for example. number of used ports. total number of ports. Port Usage by Switch Properties for each switch including its associated fabric. time offline. this could indicate that service is needed. its associated fabric. They show how much time has passed since the last time the port was online. and percentage of used and unused ports. The table indicates whether the interval is continuous (without interruptions) or discrete (with interruptions). Note: This table is hidden by default. and whether it was previously in use. number of unused ports. . the name of the port bundle (if any) to which the port belongs. Top Offline Switch Ports A table showing offline switch ports with the highest percentage of time offline over the interval indicated by the timestamp. Switch Port Usage Trend report The Switch Port Usage Trend report includes a graph that charts used and unused ports over a specified time frame. The Time Offline columns apply to ports that are currently offline. Used Switch Ports Properties for each used switch port including the name of the switch's the port is on. percentage of the port’s capacity currently being used.

How performance reports use collectors Performance reports are based on the same collector information that is monitored by the CommandCentral Storage Alert Manager. They can also help you pinpoint problem areas—paths that are generating an unusual number of errors. Note: The data collection can occur as frequently as every five minutes. physical disks. Note: To ensure that performance reports display accurate data when you are connected to a Solaris Management Server host. and raw storage volumes (RSVs) in arrays. adapters. To display the performance reports. You cannot scope this report. Performance reports make it easy for you to identify bottlenecks in the network as well as paths that are underutilized. for example TZ=US/Eastern or TZ=Europe. Performance summary reports display data in tables. ■ Host performance reports display information about read and write operations for host volumes and for HBA ports. controllers. See “Setting the scope when customizing a performance detail report” on page 302. set the TZ (time zone) environment variable to the appropriate region.284 Using the default reports Performance reports Note: The report includes all switch ports in the enterprise. detailed data displays in the form of a graph. depending on how logging is configured for each collector. cache. ■ Array performance reports display trending information for LUNs. Performance reports Performance reports provide traffic and performance information about different components of the storage network: ■ Unified storage performance reports display trending information for NetApp unified storage devices. Each performance report can . click Reporting > Performance in the CommandCentral Storage Console. When you select an object or value in a table. performance and error trends for switch ports. ■ Switch port performance reports display traffic. You can also control the scope and time frame for the performance reports.

and NetCached URLs for each unified storage device ■ Performance for FC Controller/Storage Adapter: information about controller performance. FCP. you might need to adjust default table settings or customize a default report. iSCSI) ■ Performance for CPUs: the number of CPUs. DAFS.) The reports show minimum. HTTP. or if the Alert Manager becomes unavailable. For more information about collectors and their role in providing data for reports. the performance reports will be unavailable. and iSCSI—and for streaming packets ■ Performance for Operations: the number of operations per second for various protocols (NFS. and average values of various collectors over a specified period of time. Unified Storage Performance Summary report The Unified Storage Performance Summary report provides performance data for NetApp unified storage devices.) Note: To generate performance reports based on the data from a certain collector. turn on logging for that collector. (If for some reason the host you connect to is not policy-enabled. CIFS. Use the drop-down list at the top of the report to change the time frame. Using the default reports 285 Performance reports display all relevant collectors for a specific object type. The report consists of the following tables: ■ Performance for Disk/Tape: read and write traffic for disk and tape devices ■ Performance for Cache: cache age. By default. Click a value in a table to display the corresponding detail report. hits. See “Policies and collectors” on page 318. including inbound and outbound traffic for different connection types—Fibre Channel (FC). . average CPU busy percentage. current CPU busy percentage. showing that value’s fluctuations over time. (To display values for a particular collector. the data covers the last 24 hours. and the total percentage of time the CPU has been busy ■ Other performance statistics: additional data (this table is empty and is not displayed by default) Click the name of a device to display data for that device in the Unified Storage Performance Detail report. network. CommandCentral Storage ships with logging turned on for all collectors by default. maximum.

or underutilized. HTTP. The default time frame is 24 hours. Each graph shows fluctuations in a specific collector value. and iSCSI—and for streaming packets ■ Current CPU utilization ■ Data read and written for tape devices ■ Number of operations per second for various protocols (NFS. The graphs displayed depend on the context in which you access this report. For example. network. The following graphs are available for display: ■ Data read and written for disk devices ■ Controller performance. Host Performance Summary report The Host Performance Summary report displays a table showing average performance data for the volumes on each host within the report scope. You can also identify time periods in which resources are over. if you click a device name in the operations table of the Unified Storage Performance Summary report. including inbound and outbound traffic for different connection types—Fibre Channel (FC). adapters. such as disk utilization. DAFS. at intervals over the report time frame. FCP. this report displays graphs showing the number of operations for various network protocols. tape drives. iSCSI) ■ Additional CPU utilization information ■ Cache age and cache hits Use the Customize Report selection at the top of the report to display additional graphs and to control the time frame used for each graph. See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. and operations associated with a particular NetApp unified storage device.286 Using the default reports Performance reports Unified Storage Performance Detail report The Unified Storage Performance Detail report displays line graphs showing performance data for the disks. Using the data shown in these graphs. CIFS. cache. See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. Click a host name to display the Host Performance Detail report for the host. you can quickly pinpoint instances in which the volume or duration for read/write operations is higher than expected. .

. For each chart in this report. this report does not include information about the volumes on that host. That report displays a line graph showing the value’s fluctuations over time. Host Performance Detail report The Host Performance Detail report displays line graphs showing performance data for the volumes associated with an individual host. cluster. at daily or hourly intervals over the report time frame. application. click the name of a volume object. Click a value in the table to display the Host Performance Detail report. You can also identify time periods in which HBA ports and device ports are over. if you create user-created hosts).or under-utilized. See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. or group that accesses the volume. See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. Note: If you discover hosts through agentless discovery (in other words. you can modify the scope to show data for each volume. you can quickly pinpoint instances in which the volume or duration for read/write operations is higher than expected. Using the default reports 287 Performance reports Note: CommandCentral Storage monitors volume and disk statistics only for UNIX hosts on which Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM) is installed. Each graph shows fluctuations in a specific value. such as read operations or write operations. Using the data shown in this report. You can display individual graphs with information about: ■ Volume read and write operations ■ HBA utilization ■ Device utilization To display graphs for all of these values in the Host Performance Detail report.

such as one hour. Read Operations A line graph showing the number of read operations performed by volumes on the selected host. HBA Receive Utilization A line graph showing the amount of data received through HBA ports through which the selected host accesses storage. such as one hour. Each point on the graph shows the percentage of total capacity used over a specific interval. . Each point on the graph shows the percentage of total capacity used over a specific interval.288 Using the default reports Performance reports Figure 13-1 Host Performance Detail report (Average Read Time graph) HBA Transmit Utilization A line graph showing the amount of data transmitted through HBA ports through which the selected host accesses storage. such as one hour. Each point on the graph shows the number of read operations over a specific interval.

Each point on the graph shows the number of write operations over a specific interval. Array Performance Detail report The Array Performance Detail reports consist of line graphs showing performance data for the disks. in which a line graph shows the value’s fluctuations over time. at daily or hourly intervals over the report time frame. Using the default reports 289 Performance reports Write Operations A line graph showing the number of write operations performed by volumes on the selected host. adapters. and DMX ■ Hitachi HDS The report consists of the following tables: ■ Average Performance for Virtual Disk/LUN: performance data for read and write operations on virtual array disks ■ Average Performance for Physical Disk: performance data for read and write operations on physical disks ■ Average Performance for Array/Cache: performance and error data for read and write operations involving cached storage in arrays ■ Average Performance for FC Controller/Storage Adapter: performance and error data for read and write operations involving Fibre Channel (FC) controllers and storage adapters on arrays ■ Average Performance for FC Adapter/Storage Port: performance and error data for read and write operations involving Fibre Channel (FC) adapters and storage ports on arrays ■ Average Performance for RAID Group/RSV: performance and error data for read and write operations on arrays that contain RAID groups or other raw storage volumes (RSVs) Click a value in a table to display the corresponding Array Performance Detail report. such as one hour. By default. . Use the drop-down list at the top of the report to change the time frame. Each graph shows fluctuations in a specific value. such as total read or write operations. Symmetrix. and ports associated with a particular array. data in the Array Performance Summary report covers the last 24 hours. Array Performance Summary report The Array Performance Summary report provides average performance data for disks and other array resources on the following array types: ■ EMC CLARiiON.

To display all of the data. filter the contents of the drafts. See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. this report displays graphs showing information about read and write operations for each of the array’s physical disks. you can quickly pinpoint instances in which the volume or duration for read/write operations is higher than expected. Use the Customize Report selection at the top of the report to display graphs selectively. if you click an array name in the Average Performance for Physical Disk table of the Array Performance Summary report. For example.or underutilized. The following graphs are available for display: ■ Percentage of cache pages containing errors ■ Ratio of hits to total read/write operations ■ Blocks read and blocks written by hosts and applications ■ Read/write operations per second ■ Proportion of successful read/write operations to failed operations ■ Total number of read/write operations requested ■ Errors associated with hardware failures and not associated with hardware failures ■ Number of successful cached read and write operations ■ Number of unsuccessful cached read operations ■ Number of times cache was flushed ■ Average amount of data. and control the report time frame. You can also identify time periods in which array resources are over. it is necessary to click Customize Report and then specify that all tables be displayed. See the CommandCentral Hardware and Software Configuration Guide for more information about configuring HiCommand arrays for displaying performance data.290 Using the default reports Performance reports Using the data shown in these graphs. See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. . read and written per second ■ Percentage of time in which read and write operations were taking place The report can also include performance data for Hitachi arrays managed by the HiCommand Tuning Manager (HTM). The graphs displayed depend on the context in which you access this report. in kilobytes.

Click the name of a port. if you click switch1. and the name of the array. See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. average utilization (throughput as a percentage of capacity). the switch's name and it's associated fabric. The values in the tables represent aggregate data collected at regular intervals over the report time frame. total number of frames transmitted and total throughput over the report time frame. . depending on how logging is configured for each collector. that tracks the value over time. and the switch's name and it's associated fabric. Switch Ports Connected To HBA Ports A table showing the information for switch ports that are connected directly to HBA ports: connections. The ports are grouped according to their connections. the name of the array port to which the switch port is connected. and the name of the HBA port to which the switch port is connected. total number of frames transmitted and received. Switch Ports Connected To Switch Ports A table showing the information for switch ports that are connected to other switch ports: connections. the graph displays performance information for all ports on switch1. or fabric in a table to display detailed performance graphs for that object in the Switch Port Performance Detail report. total throughput over the report time frame. the name of the host to which the switch is connected. Note: The data collection can occur as frequently as every five minutes. Switch Ports Connected To Array Ports A table showing the information for switch ports that are connected directly to array ports: connections. You can filter the report to display data by switch or fabric. Click a value to display a graph. in the Switch Port Performance Detail report. average utilization (throughput as a percentage of capacity). For example. total number of frames transmitted and total throughput over the report time frame. switch. Using the default reports 291 Performance reports Switch Port Performance Summary report The Switch Port Performance Summary report displays tables showing performance data for switch ports within the report scope. the name of the switch and its associated fabric. average utilization (throughput as a percentage of capacity).

specify a scope that includes 16 ports or fewer. and the switch's name and its associated fabric. For best results. depending on how logging is configured for each collector. Each graph tracks a particular value at regular intervals over the report time frame. move your mouse pointer over a point on the graph. Note: The data collection can occur as frequently as every five minutes.292 Using the default reports Performance reports Switch Ports Connected To Other Devices A table showing the information for switch ports that are connected to other devices. and error data for individual switch ports within the report scope. The numerical data displays in a ToolTip. average utilization (throughput as a percentage of capacity). Switch Port Performance Detail report The Switch Port Performance Detail report displays graphs showing utilization. total number of frames transmitted and total throughput over the report time frame. such as unenclosed or direct-attached storage devices: connections. performance (throughput). To view the precise numerical data on which the graph is based. Figure 13-2 Switch Port Performance Detail report (Port Throughput graph) showing data for three ports .

(This is the default setting. A number of other graphs are available through the Customize Report selection at the top of the report. By default. or fabric in the Switch Port Performance Summary report. History reports History reports provide historical data about events on the storage network: ■ Alert history reports display alerts received over a specified time period. expressed as a percentage of the port’s capacity ■ Throughput. the Management Server must have policy auditing enabled. the following graphs display: ■ Port utilization. and frames rejected Note: The Monitoring pane in the switch’s object view displays a list of all collectors that are in use for the switch. Using the default reports 293 History reports If you reached this report by clicking a value in the Switch Port Performance Summary report. either on the whole network or from a specified set of storage resources ■ Audit history reports display lists of change requests made by users Displaying the history reports requires that certain settings be made on the CommandCentral Management Server: ■ To display history reports related to performance or alerts. frames truncated. See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. in bits per second ■ Total frames transmitted and received ■ Errors. . switch. such as invalid transmission words. If you reached this report from a port’s object view or by clicking a port. it displays only the graph or graphs that are associated with the value you selected. it displays a set of graphs based on the collectors defined for the switch. See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303.) See “Audit History Detail report” on page 297.

) Note: Editing or disabling a policy clears any active alerts associated with that policy. The Alert Summary report contains the general breakdown of alert activity over the report time frame. the number of alerts currently active for the network in the four alert categories: critical. (If for some reason the host you connect to is not policy-enabled. and minimum duration. a report will show the alert as cleared although the clear condition was never met. having active critical alerts for the longest total duration. By narrowing or widening the time frame covered by your alert reports. . Top Critical Objects by Alert Count A table showing the objects for which the greatest number of critical alerts were generated over the specified time frame.294 Using the default reports History reports Alert Summary report CommandCentral Storage generates alerts when a policy threshold is crossed. error. Top Critical Objects by Alert Duration A table showing the objects. in minutes. and informational. Alert reports are based on the same collector information that is monitored by the CommandCentral Storage Alert Manager. warning. you can analyze where and when alerts are occurring on your network. It displays tables showing which objects and object types are generating the most alerts. error. and informational. Data is shown for each of the four alert categories: critical. Total Active Alerts Count A table showing. over the specified time frame. Total Alert Duration A table showing the average. for all alerts. These alerts are designed to keep you informed as to the condition and state of resources in the network. for each object type. Click an object in a table to display the Alert Detail report for that object. or if the Alert Manager becomes unavailable. you will not be able to view alert reports. warning. maximum. These are the resources most likely to have persistent or long-term problems. When this happens. along with data showing how fast alerts are being acknowledged and cleared.

Alert Detail report The Alert Detail report displays tabular and graphic information about alerts. Data is shown for each of the four alert categories: critical. warning. having the most total time with active error alerts. warning. over the specified time frame. Acknowledge to Clear Duration A table showing the average. error. and informational. Top Error Objects by Alert Duration A table showing the objects. maximum. in minutes. Top Warning Objects by Alert Count A table showing the objects for which the greatest number of warning alerts were generated over the specified time frame. from the time alerts were created until they were acknowledged. Data is shown for each of the four alert categories: critical. Top Informational Objects by Alert Count A table showing the objects for which the greatest number of informational alerts were generated over the specified time frame. having the most total time with active warning alerts. Top Warning Objects by Alert Duration A table showing the objects. over the specified time frame. error. and informational. Top Error Objects by Alert Count A table showing the objects with the greatest number of error alerts over the specified time frame. in minutes. having the most total time with active informational alerts. . Using the default reports 295 History reports Time to Acknowledge Duration A table showing the average. from the time alerts were acknowledged until they were cleared. and minimum duration. and minimum duration. over the specified time frame. maximum. Top Informational Objects by Alert Duration A table showing the objects.

the user who acknowledged the alert. By default. Alert Life History A graphical time line showing changes in the severity or status for alerts affecting a single object. domain. Audit History Summary report The Audit History Summary report displays charts summarizing the following events: ■ Add. Use the drop-down list at the top of the report to change the time frame. and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network Click an area in a chart to display the Audit History Detail report. and severity. See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. the data covers the last 24 hours. or event type. including the object affected. the policy that issued the alert. filtered by the selected user. edit. You can change the time frame for this report. . If you access this report from another report. time created. and delete users ■ User-initiated events including login attempts. Alert History A table showing historical information about alerts. time acknowledged.296 Using the default reports History reports If you access this report from an object view. time cleared. it displays information about all alerts—not just those associated with a specific object. logout attempts. Requests by Event Type A bar graph summarizing user-initiated events—login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network—organized by event type. it displays information about alerts associated with the object. Requests by User A bar graph summarizing user-initiated events—login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network—organized by user.

the top five ranked by domain of origin. and scheduled. . Top 5 Change Requests A bar graph showing. out of all user-initiated events (login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network). status. running. event. Top 5 Requests from Domain A bar graph showing. Using the default reports 297 History reports Distribution of Tasks by Status A pie chart showing the status of user-initiated events: login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network. originating user and domain. out of all user-initiated events (login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network). object affected. and a link to more details. out of all user-initiated events (login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network). Top 5 Requests from User A bar graph showing. Audit History Detail report The Audit History Detail report displays a table listing all user-initiated login attempts and requests to change the status or configuration of objects in the network. For each action the table includes the time. the top five ranked by user. Click the Details link in the table to view the details about an event. the top five ranked by request type. the user’s host and Web server. Typical states include successful (completed). failed.

298 Using the default reports History reports .

. Chapter 14 Creating custom reports and using them for notification This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About creating custom reports and notification ■ Customizing the display in a report ■ Viewing and managing custom reports ■ Using custom reports for notification ■ Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) About creating custom reports and notification In addition to using the reports that come packaged with CommandCentral Storage. you can create custom reports to display information that is specifically tailored to your installation and to the needs of your enterprise. scope. and precision of reports to suit your own particular needs. Customizing the display in a report The predefined reports in CommandCentral Storage are formatted to make data easy to view and retrieve. There are ways to customize the appearance.

See “Selecting which tables and graphs display” on page 303.300 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Customizing the display in a report Changing the display in the default reports There are several ways to customize the way data is displayed in the default CommandCentral Storage reports: ■ Increase or decrease report precision See “Setting report precision” on page 304. Creating custom reports Users with the appropriate privileges can create custom reports in which changes to the report display. ■ Filter individual report tables—for example. 3 In the Customize and Save dialog box. for example the last 24 hours or the last 1 week. See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. do the following: ■ Give the custom report a name and. To create a custom report 1 Display a storage. ■ Set the custom report’s scope. as well as its scope and time frame. resource. click Customize and Save and click Go. You can also filter information within individual displays. ■ Set the relative time frame for a performance or history report. The following topics describe how to create custom reports using the Customize and Save dialog box. . or performance report in the CommandCentral Storage Console. ■ Select which displays (tables and graphs) should appear in the custom report. See “Naming and classifying a custom report” on page 301. See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. are saved permanently. ■ Change the relative time frame for performance and history reports See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. 2 In the drop-down list at the top of the report. to display data for switches located in a specific fabric or manufactured by a particular vendor See “Working with tables” on page 42. optionally. choose a directory in which to store it.

The custom report is saved to the specified directory. use the following controls to name and classify your custom report. For information about creating custom report directories. click Preview to preview the customized report. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 301 Customizing the display in a report ■ Optionally. or use the name provided. The corresponding detail reports. the changes apply only to that report. The Customize and Save dialog box offers a variety of filtering options based on the type of report you are using and the number of objects included in the report. Setting the custom report scope If your storage network is large. 4 Click Save. . or directories. and the Console displays the newly created custom report. Naming and classifying a custom report Every custom report you create should have a distinctive name. you can limit the amount of data displayed in some reports by limiting their scope. storage or performance). you can choose to display data for a particular host or for a few switches. use the Directory Name drop-down list to select a custom report directory into which the report will be saved. ■ Check Save as Default to add the custom report to the list of default reports that displays on the Reporting tab that corresponds to the report category (for example. your changes are applied to the default CommandCentral Storage report with that name. if any. In the Customize and Save dialog box. You can also classify custom reports by storing them in groups. Note that when you change the scope for a predefined summary report. or click Create Directory to create a new directory. For example. retain the default scope. ■ Optionally. Note: If you use the name provided. See “Grouping custom reports” on page 307. The default is to display data for the entire enterprise. ■ Type a name for the custom report in the Report Name field.

for example fabrics or switches. For example. then use a table to select individual ports on brocade1. you can use a drop-down list to select a switch called brocade1. with which you can select objects to include in the report. one or more lists display. Note: By filtering a report. Depending on the object type selected. In the Customize and Save dialog box for a custom report based on one of these performance detail reports. you control which objects appear in the report display and which objects are omitted. use the following controls to narrow the scope: . use the Scope drop-down list to define the custom report’s scope. you can pinpoint time periods in which the average or maximum value for a collector exceeded a certain threshold for one or more objects. This is not the same as changing the settings for report tables.302 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Customizing the display in a report Additional filtering capabilities are available for performance detail reports. Setting the scope for any custom report In the Customize and Save dialog box. which alters the appearance of the tables but does not alter their contents. Figure 14-1 Controls for defining a custom report’s scope Setting the scope when customizing a performance detail report Some performance detail reports have their own scoping controls in addition to those available for limiting scope for any report. you can configure the Switch Port Performance Detail report to display data only for switch ports that are connected to array ports. For example. For example.

you are setting a relative time frame. For details about all of the controls you can use to sort and filter data in tables. to HBA ports. For each statistic you select. you can perform additional filtering using the table settings and filter icons. . rather than on a specific time interval. use the checkboxes to narrow the scope to ports that are connected to other switch ports. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 303 Customizing the display in a report ■ In the Include ports connected to list. use the following controls to configure the displays in your custom report. for each tabular display in the Selected Report Displays list. click either Average or Maximum to specify whether the data displayed should represent the average values or the maximum values recorded for each interval. ■ Under Value to use. Setting the time frame for a report You can adjust time frames to narrow or broaden the number and scope of collector values presented in performance and alert reports. See “Working with tables” on page 42. or to other ports. select which statistics should display. ■ Optionally. and you can also sort and hide information within the displays. to array ports. Because relative time frames are based on the time at which the report is run. In the Customize and Save dialog box. ■ In the Statistics table. running the same report at different times will most likely produce different results. ■ Check items in the Available Report Displays and Selected Report Displays lists and then use the Add (>>) and Remove (<<) buttons to move them from list to list. Selecting which tables and graphs display You can hide specific displays (tables and graphs) from a custom report if you do not want to see them. you can also specify a minimum value and a time interval (duration) in hours. When you set the time frame for a report.

48 percent or 15. the database must contain collector data for the full duration of your report’s time frame. If you require more or less precision. Setting report precision By default. you can configure the number of decimal places for all reports displayed in the CommandCentral Storage Console.4837 percent. click Edit Settings. 4 Click OK. . To set the relative time frame when defining or modifying a custom report. click a value in the Numeric Precision drop-down list. 3 In the Edit Settings dialog box. ■ If the relative time frame is expressed in hours. When you are viewing a default report in the CommandCentral Storage Console. for example 79. Example: 4 displays report data to 4 decimal places. To set the precision of report displays 1 Click Settings > Management Server > Web Engine Settings. The Console displays report data with the specified precision. choose a Logging interval—the frequency with which statistics are collected: either hours and days. See “Configuring data retention for collector and alert data” on page 368.304 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Customizing the display in a report Note: Your collector aging and alert aging settings determine how much historical data is available for reports. Last 24 hours. CommandCentral Storage cannot generate reports for a time frame for which the required data has already been aged out of the CommandCentral Storage database. Therefore. CommandCentral Storage reports display numbers rounded to two decimal places. The setting remains in effect until you change it. for example 79.5 percent. for example 79. you can use the Time frame drop-down list to adjust the relative time frame. 2 In the drop-down list on the Management Server page. use the following controls in the Customize and Save dialog box: ■ Use the Relative Timeframe controls to specify a relative time interval—for example. Example: 1 displays report data to 1 decimal place.29 GB of storage. or minutes.

■ SAN Storage Report: Details array and host utilization of SAN storage and also the shared claimed capacity between hosts. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 305 Viewing and managing custom reports Viewing and managing custom reports The custom report summary in the CommandCentral Storage Console lists all the user-defined custom reports on this CommandCentral Management Server. About sample ad hoc reports CommandCentral Storage ships with the following sample ad hoc reports: ■ Application Access Path Inventory Report: Presents all the combinations of end-to-end access path inventory (for the logical objects) from application to the LUN (and the associated array). sent as email. The Custom Reports Summary is your starting point for viewing custom reports. The list also shows which reports have been scheduled to be archived. and organizing them into custom report directories. and you can save or email the results. . Viewing custom reports You can view custom reports using the Custom Reports Summary. Note: You cannot edit these sample ad hoc reports. managing them (modify or delete). ■ Fibre Attached Storage Consumption Report: Displays information about fibre attached storage given to hosts and how that capacity is utilized by the file systems. or both. See “Scheduling reports for notification” on page 308. refer to the following: See “Viewing and managing custom reports” on page 305. For information about viewing these sample reports. ■ Local vs Remote Replication Report: Depicts how much of the primary (source) capacity is replicated locally vs replicated remotely. ■ NetApp Quota Over-Provisioning Report: Provides details about quota allocation on a NetApp volume and the % over-provisioning.

and the results display in the CommandCentral Storage Console. To modify a custom report 1 Click Reporting > Custom. The custom report executes. do one or more of the following: ■ Change one or more report properties. modify it. ■ Change the displays (tables and graphs) See “Selecting which tables and graphs display” on page 303. click Customize and Save and click Go. Deleting custom reports When you no longer need a custom report. The custom report is saved with the specified changes. you can select a report. 5 Optionally. 3 In the drop-down list. check one or more custom reports. To delete custom reports 1 Click Reporting > Custom. click the name of a custom report. . 2 In the Custom Reports Summary.Change the scope See “Setting the custom report scope” on page 301. you can delete it. 2 In the Custom Reports Summary. click Preview to preview the customized report.306 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Viewing and managing custom reports To view custom reports 1 Click Reporting > Custom. display a custom report by clicking its name. 4 In the Customize and Save dialog box. Modifying custom reports When you display the Custom Reports Summary. 6 Click Save. 2 In the Custom Reports Summary. ■ Change the time frame for a performance or history report See “Setting the time frame for a report” on page 303. and save the changes.

check the custom reports you want to group together. you can click the Directory column header to group the reports by directory. To organize custom reports into directories 1 Click Reporting > Custom. type a name for the directory in the Directory Name field and click OK. Using custom reports for notification After you create and save custom reports. 4 When a confirmation message displays. This is useful for providing status updates at regular intervals. . Creating custom reports and using them for notification 307 Using custom reports for notification 3 In the drop-down list. To delete custom report directories 1 Click Reporting > Custom. 2 In the drop-down list at the top of the Custom Reports Summary. click Delete Custom Report Directory and click Go. click the name of a directory in the drop-down list and click OK. 3 In the Delete Custom Report Directory dialog box. The selected reports are deleted. click Create Custom Report Directory and click Go. 4 In the Custom Reports Summary. Grouping custom reports You can organize custom reports into directories to make them easier to retrieve in the Custom Reports Summary. click Move to Directory and click Go. The reports are moved to the custom report directory you specified. The custom report directory—along with all of the reports in it—is deleted. if any. click OK. when you are viewing the Custom Reports Summary. click Delete Custom Report and click Go. 2 In the drop-down list at the top of the Custom Reports Summary. are also deleted. click the name of a directory in the drop-down list and click OK. 5 In the drop-down list. Their scheduled notifications. and well as for sending information on a one-time basis. 6 In the Move to Directory dialog box. 3 In the Create Custom Report Directory dialog box. Then. you can use them to notify users by email about conditions on the network.

click Add/Edit Schedule and click Go. every day and send the results by email. ■ Optionally. 2 Click Reporting > Custom. Scheduling regular report notification Setting up regular report-based notification requires two basic steps: setting the schedule and specifying what to do with the report output (archive. To view a list of reports that are already scheduled. To schedule report notification at regular intervals 1 Create and save a custom report. See “Customizing the display in a report” on page 299. check Archive to save a copy of the report data at the scheduled time. you can generate a daily status update for network operators by having a performance report run at 9:00 p. for example MyReport-1August.308 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Using custom reports for notification Scheduling reports for notification You can arrange for custom reports to collect data at regular intervals and then either: ■ Send the formatted results to users by email ■ Archive the results For example. or both). you or your product’s administrator must configure an SMTP server for this purpose. 4 In the drop-down list at the top of the table. The column is sortable. For details on specifying an SMTP server for emailing reports. . 5 In the Schedule Report dialog box. 3 In the Custom Reports Summary. results will be sent as an email attachment with the specified name and format. type a name for the file to contain the report data Archived report results are saved in a file with the specified name and format.m. check a custom report.html. For email notifications. click Reporting > Custom and see the Schedule column in the Custom Reports table. do the following and click OK: ■ In the File Name field. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. send by email. Note: Before you can send report data by email.

then type recipients’ names in the Send To field (or paste them from your system clipboard). CSV For archiving report data or sending it by email. data in tables renders as tables. For example. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 309 Using custom reports for notification ■ Optionally. Click Monthly. For example. Example: reggie@example. and graphical data in pie charts renders as pie charts. or overwrite. Time is in 24-hour format. in certain email applications such as Outlook. . ■ Check Overwrite the files on recurrence to replace. or both. Email. MyReport_30Jan. Clear this option to save a new file each time. or by using the JScript development tools provided by Microsoft.mark@example. then click a date in the drop-down list. you can schedule data to be sent on Monday. check Email to send a copy of the data to a list of recipients. This format (comma-separated) is compatible with spreadsheet programs and with email programs that do not support Microsoft Jscript format. separated by semicolons. The report data in the email looks the same as it does in the CommandCentral Storage Console. 21:00 is equivalent to 9:00 p. For example.html) each time the report is run.com. the data file (for example. The format you choose depends on how you want the data to be displayed and manipulated. Click one of the following formats: HTML For sending report data by email in Microsoft JScript format.com.) The report will be run according to the schedule you specified. For example. ■ In the Schedule Task area. Users who receive the email can display the report data in a Web browser. and Friday at the time specified in the Schedule Task area. The Send To field should contain one or more email addresses. you can schedule data to be sent on the first day of every month at the time specified in the Schedule Task area. then check one or more days of the week.com You must check either Archive. (The default is to overwrite. Wednesday.m.sammy@example. Example: Date: 2005 August 1 Time: 21:00 ■ Check Recurrence Pattern and then do one of the following: Click Daily. use the drop-down lists to specify a date and time for executing the report the first time. ■ Click a file format.

Sending data from a single report by email You can send report data by email for any report that you run in the Console. 4 When a confirmation message displays. To delete a report schedule 1 Click Reporting > Custom. in email applications such as Lotus Notes or Microsoft Outlook. 3 In the drop-down list at the top of the table. or in any application that can read PNG or JPEG. 3 In the drop-down list at the top of the table. To modify a report’s schedule 1 Click Reporting > Custom. The selected report is no longer scheduled for archiving or emailing. For information about changing the report image format. 2 In the Custom Reports Summary. . The report still appears in the Custom Reports Summary and can be rescheduled later. check a custom report. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. click Delete Schedule and click Go. click Add/Edit Schedule and click Go. This is useful.310 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Using custom reports for notification Changing the schedule for report notification You can change the schedule for report-based notification. check a custom report. Users who receive the email can display the report data in a Web browser. The report’s schedule is updated. click OK. 2 In the Custom Reports Summary. change the schedule and then click OK. Report data is attached to email messages in either of two formats: PNG or JPEG. for providing operators or administrators with information they need for troubleshooting. You can specify which format to use. Cancelling report notification When you no longer need to archive or send a report at scheduled intervals. 4 In the Schedule Report dialog box. you can delete the schedule. for example.

Use semicolons to separate addresses in the list.com ■ Optionally. you can quickly and easily get information that is tailored to your enterprise’s operating environment. Note: Before you can send report data by email. To send the contents of a report by email 1 Display a report in the CommandCentral Storage Console. click Email Report and click Go. data in tables renders as tables. 3 In the Email Report dialog box. ■ Type a valid email address in the Sender field. 2 In the drop-down list at the top of the report.com. you or your product’s administrator must configure an SMTP server for this purpose. or accept the default provided. for example: reggie@example. Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) Use ad hoc reports to create and run custom queries of information about objects and events stored in the CommandCentral Storage database. The report is sent by email to the recipients you named. do the following and click OK: ■ Type (or paste from your system clipboard) a list of recipients’ email addresses in the Send To field. ■ Type a subject in the Subject field.mark@example. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. type (or paste) a similar list of addresses in the Send CC: field. or accept the default provided. and graphical data in pie charts renders as pie charts. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 311 Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) The report data in the email looks the same as it does in the CommandCentral Storage Console. Creating and saving an ad hoc report Use the Create Ad Hoc Report dialog box to create and save SQL database queries you plan to run frequently. For example. The following procedures describe how to use and manage custom database queries. .sammy@example.com. In this way. For details on specifying an SMTP server for emailing reports.

which represents data as percentages. chart. You can display data as a pie chart. Grid Produces a graph. type (or paste from your system clipboard) the text of your query. or type the name of a new directory in the Add New Directory box and click Add. do the following. Chart Produces a graph.312 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) To create and save an ad hoc report 1 Click Reporting > Custom. or grid) by doing the following: ■ Type a title and description for the display. such as a pie chart or a stacked bar chart. See “Grouping custom reports” on page 307. then click Next: ■ Type a name for the report (up to 100 characters long) in the Name field. You can sort and filter data in the table as you would with other tables in the CommandCentral Storage Console. and Stack Bar—specify chart-specific parameters data as follows: . 2 In the drop-down list at the top of the Custom Reports Summary. ■ Use the Directory Name drop-down list to select a custom report directory into which the report will be saved. click Create Ad Hoc Report and click Go. queries containing Insert. or Delete statements are not allowed. See “Sample queries for ad hoc reports” on page 313. or in other formats—like plots or bar graphs—which represent data using absolute numbers. ■ For certain chart subtypes—Plot. such as a pie chart or a stacked bar chart. 4 In the second Create Ad Hoc Report dialog box. create a report display (table. click the chart subtype in the list. Update. ■ If you selected Chart. Bar. ■ Click a display type for the report output: Table Produces output in tabular format. As a result. Note: Access to the CommandCentral Storage database is read-only. 3 In the first Create Ad Hoc Report dialog box. ■ In the SQL Query field.

Vendor. such as [1]. .hal_storagearray array [2] key join halchm.AdvisoryDisplayName.displayName. an entry in the graph might display as 4000 MB. check its name in the list and use the Modify and Remove buttons. Sample queries for ad hoc reports This topic contains sample SQL queries to illustrate how you can use them to construct ad hoc reports. for example GB Example: If you specify units in MB. so that you can execute it again from the Custom Reports Summary. 7 To modify or remove a display. array. obj. Ad hoc report sample 1: Table The following SQL query displays a three-column table showing a list of arrays with the vendor name and storage capacity for each: Note: Numbers in brackets. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 313 Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) X-Axis caption A label for the horizontal (X) axis Y-Axis caption A label for the vertical (Y) axis Y-Axis unit Units to use for counting data.totalrawstorage/1024/1024/1024 as 'Physical(GB)' from halchm. 6 Repeat step 3 to add more displays to the report. the same entry would display as 4 GB.objectlink obj Ad hoc report sample 2: Bar chart or pie chart The following SQL query displays LUN capacity by vendor in a graphical format. 5 Click Add to add the new display to the report. array. The report is also saved as a custom report. click Finish. are line numbers and are not part of the SQL queries. If you specify GB. [1] select COALESCE(obj. 8 When you are done. and the results display in the Console. The ad hoc report executes.objectkey) as Name. obj.

0) as unmaskedCapacity from [2] ( [3] (select vendor maskVendor. such as [1]. With display type Chart and subtype Pie selected.size/1024/1024/1024) from halchm. COALESCE(unmasked. the same query produces a pie chart.0) as maskedCapacity. such as [1].hal_disk where maskingstatus = 1 [7] group by vendor) as unmasked . Note: Numbers in brackets. are line numbers and are not part of the SQL queries.COALESCE(masked. sum(size)/1024/1024/1024 as maskedCap from halchm. unmasked. sum(size)/1024/1024/1024 as unmaskedCap from halchm. [1] select vendor.hal_disk where maskingstatus = 3 [4] group by vendor) [5] as masked full outer join [6] (select vendor unmaskVendor.maskVendor.unmaskedCap. This query can produce either a stack bar chart or a plot chart. are line numbers and are not part of the SQL queries. Note: Numbers in brackets. the query produces a bar chart. depending on which one you specify in the Create Ad Hoc Report dialogs. sum(lun.314 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) With display type Chart and subtype Bar selected. [1] select COALESCE(masked.unmaskVendor) as vendor.maskedCap.hal_disk lun [2] where vendor is not null [3] group by vendor Ad hoc report sample 3: Stack bar or plot chart The following SQL query shows LUN status (masked or unmasked) by vendor.

3 In the drop-down list. and the results display in the Console. The updated report is also saved as a custom report. . change report properties. 2 In the Custom Reports Summary. Creating custom reports and using them for notification 315 Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) [8] on unmasked. click Edit Custom Report and click Go. 5 Click Finish. See “Creating and saving an ad hoc report” on page 311. 4 In the Create Ad Hoc Report dialog boxes. The ad hoc report executes.maskVendor) Modifying an ad hoc report You can modify an ad hoc report by selecting it in the Custom Reports Summary. To modify an ad hoc report 1 Click Reporting > Custom.unmaskVendor=masked. so that you can execute it again from the Custom Reports Summary. check an ad hoc report or click its name to display it in the Console.

316 Creating custom reports and using them for notification Generating ad hoc reports (SQL queries) .

It also monitors alerts generated by devices on the network. in more detail. the monitoring methods used by CommandCentral Storage. This section provides an overview of monitoring features. . CommandCentral Storage uses collectors to gather information about conditions on the network. and the ways in which they are related to each other. The following topics describe policies and collectors. This data helps you detect conditions such as traffic bottlenecks or hardware failures. Policies—both predefined and user-defined—perform actions or generate notifications based on data received from the network through collectors and alerts. Chapter 15 Monitoring the storage network This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About CommandCentral Storage monitoring features ■ Methods used by CommandCentral Storage to gather data ■ Displaying monitoring data in the CommandCentral Storage Console About CommandCentral Storage monitoring features CommandCentral Storage incorporates monitoring technology that you can use to detect conditions such as traffic bottlenecks or hardware failures. The CommandCentral Storage Console also provides several ways for you to interact with the data. and what you need to monitor objects on your storage network. including their uses. CommandCentral Storage monitors conditions on your storage network by constantly gathering data from the hardware and software on the network.

Policy-based monitoring in CommandCentral Storage enables you to monitor conditions on your storage network and respond quickly when problems occur. Each collector is associated with the following: . shell scripts and command files. You can also create and configure your own policies. See “Administration policies” on page 479.318 Monitoring the storage network About CommandCentral Storage monitoring features Policy-based monitoring As it monitors activity on your network. to detect and monitor network conditions and traps. CommandCentral Storage ships with many collectors—one collector per unit of data per object. switches. By default. sending an email message to a network administrator—and running specific applications or scripts. and logging for reporting purposes. for each object that can be monitored. policies can initiate two kinds of actions: notifying—for example. The Alert Manager uses collector values to trigger policy actions such as SMTP mail. Policies and collectors Policies rely on collectors: metrics representing specific states or numerical values that CommandCentral Storage periodically collects for objects on the storage network. In addition to generating alerts on the Console. all of these predefined policies send alerts to the CommandCentral Storage Console. and disk arrays? ■ What errors is the storage network generating? ■ Which ports and switches are unavailable on my fabric? ■ How much space remains available in file systems on the storage network? CommandCentral Storage provides a number of predefined. CommandCentral Storage can perform actions in response to predefined conditions. console alerts. providing answers to the kinds of questions storage administrators typically ask: ■ What is the traffic on my storage network? ■ What is the environment status of hosts. The mechanism by which these actions are performed is known as a policy. including vendor-supplied SNMP management information bases (MIBs). See “About policies” on page 323. The conditions that CommandCentral Storage monitors fall into several different categories. The collectors. out-of-the-box policies to help you streamline the management of your network immediately. in turn. gather input from various means.

Monitoring the storage network 319 Methods used by CommandCentral Storage to gather data ■ One or more object types. SNMP polling provides the majority of information that CommandCentral Storage uses to monitor the storage network. dropped frames. are not polled. these objects send traps—unsolicited SNMP messages—to the CommandCentral Management Server. All of these collector values form a data stream with which users can monitor network conditions. Polling is performed by a predefined set of collectors. such as a host or a Cisco switch port ■ A type of data. When events take place. The Simple Instrumentation Collection Layer (SICL) also gathers data and converts that data into collector values. each one of which is designed to detect and monitor properties such as switch port status. however. SNMP polling Many policies and collectors in CommandCentral Storage are based on polling: the Alarm Service sends a poll (a GET request) to SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) agents residing on your network devices and listens for a response. CommandCentral Storage periodically polls most SNMP-enabled network objects to retrieve the current values of the properties defined in their vendor-supplied SNMP management information bases (MIBs). Because traps are asynchronous (the communication is one-way). the possible values (such as ONLINE and OFFLINE) ■ Help text that appears in the CommandCentral Storage Console As the Alarm Service constantly polls resources in the storage network and monitors traps coming from the network. either textual state or numeric threshold ■ If a textual state collector. link failures. it updates collector values at regular intervals. Collector data is stored in the CommandCentral Storage database and used to generate historical reports about the network. some . Methods used by CommandCentral Storage to gather data CommandCentral Storage uses several methods to monitor conditions on a storage network. and so on. See “How performance reports use collectors” on page 284. SNMP traps Some objects. disk temperature.

some collectors will not function and others will not be able to provide updated data when conditions change on the network. For more information about configuring devices for traps. When HAL receives a trap. This process is illustrated in the following diagram. it starts another exploration sweep of your storage network. . Within the Server. refer to the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. Otherwise. When the Trap Processor receives a trap it recognizes. consult your device vendor documentation. The appropriate collector streams this trap information to the Alert Manager on which certain alerts. For information about configuring CommandCentral Storage for SNMP. reports. Figure 15-1 Flow of trap data from storage resources to the CommandCentral Storage Console Storage Resources Traps Trap Processor (vxtrapd) Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) Alarm Service Explorers Alarm Manager Management Server Notifications Console To take advantage of trap-based collectors and trap-based exploration sweeps. you must configure your storage network to send traps to the Management Server. You must also ensure that the Trap Processor is running. and live charts are based. the Trap Processor (vxtrapd) listens for certain SNMP traps from devices on your storage network. it informs both the Alarm Service and the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL).320 Monitoring the storage network Methods used by CommandCentral Storage to gather data CommandCentral Storage policies and collectors depend on the trap sender to report when a condition changes by sending additional traps.

For more information about these tools. file systems. clusters. SICL can be configured to run on the CommandCentral Management Server or on hosts managed by CommandCentral Storage. SICL parses the command-line output it receives and converts it into collector values for the Alert Manager. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. In addition. HAL maintains a real-time topology of the storage network. Monitoring the storage network 321 Methods used by CommandCentral Storage to gather data The Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) The Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) is one of several discovery components of the CommandCentral Management Server. such as when a host cannot be contacted. and databases. These alerts are displayed on both the Managing and Monitoring tabs. SICL is also used for all other non-SNMP monitoring. This includes the monitoring of volume managers. . In each instance. SICL communicates with EMC arrays using Navisphere command-line interface (CLI) and Symmetrix CLI tools. Array-specific monitoring tools CommandCentral Storage uses vendor-specific tools to monitor certain storage arrays including ONTAPI for NetApp storage devices and HiCommand Tuning Manager for Hitachi HDS arrays. For more information about configuring monitoring with SICL. see the vendor documentation. HAL also generates alerts to notify you of exception conditions. We recommend that the hosts discovering the arrays also monitor them. HAL also interacts directly with switches and storage arrays to control access to storage resources. By discovering objects and their relationships to each other. Collector data about file systems and volume managers is also obtained through HAL. The Simple Instrumentation Collection Layer (SICL) CommandCentral Storage monitors certain storage arrays with the Simple Instrumentation Collection Layer (SICL). It also includes the monitoring of data used for array trending and the monitoring of CommandCentral Storage itself. The data collected by HAL is reflected in the information displayed on the CommandCentral Storage Console Managing tab.

maximum.) For example." This requires the Alert Manager to monitor the current value of the PortUtilization collector over a two-minute period. retaining the values in a buffer long enough to determine whether a policy threshold has been met. you will interact with three different features that make use of collector data. . The values in this database are the minimum. See “The way policies work” on page 325.322 Monitoring the storage network Displaying monitoring data in the CommandCentral Storage Console Displaying monitoring data in the CommandCentral Storage Console As you use CommandCentral Storage. The reports use this data to generate historical records of network performance over a period of time that you specify. Policies and the Alert Manager The Alert Manager uses current collector values from the data stream. and average values of each collector over the logging period set for the collector. See “Performance reports” on page 284. You can define policies to automate responses to certain events and conditions as they are monitored by the Alert Manager. the Alert Manager performs whatever action is prescribed by that policy. Collector information in CommandCentral Storage reports The CommandCentral Storage reports use historical collector values from the CommandCentral Storage database. a policy threshold may be defined as "switch port utilization greater than eighty percent for two minutes. When the threshold condition is met. (A number of policies also come prepackaged with CommandCentral Storage.

. CommandCentral Storage provides a number of policies. You can construct the rules not only to detect when something goes wrong but also to anticipate and handle problems before they occur. See “Administration policies” on page 479. or both when certain events and conditions occur. automating responses. To help streamline the management of your network. Chapter 16 Monitoring storage resources using policies This chapter includes the following topics: ■ About policies ■ Editing policies ■ Copying policies ■ Creating policies ■ Disabling and enabling policies ■ Deleting policies ■ Defining and managing notification ■ Distributing policies among multiple systems About policies Policies are rules that help you manage your storage network by generating alerts.

. and it has a special set of additional policies that monitor it. disk arrays. The condition may be either a quantitative evaluation (for example. whenever the condition you specify is detected. using a series of dialog boxes. less or more than a certain percentage of available disk space) or a textual value (such as whether a switch’s status is OFFLINE or ONLINE). invoking a command or script. CommandCentral Storage triggers an alert and the alarm instance is added to a list of active alerts. switch ports. then post a critical alert to the Console and send email to the administrator. Actions can also involve sending a trap.324 Monitoring storage resources using policies About policies You will probably find that you can automate many operations simply by customizing (editing) the predefined policies to fit your particular situation. The host on which the CommandCentral Management Server runs is also an object. or saving the data in a database for report generation. You can also create and configure your own policies. send an email to the system administrator. Policy rules may be expressed in ordinary language. or sending email notification to a responsible party. or other network objects that usually have SNMP agents. ■ One or more actions to be taken when this condition is detected Actions may include posting an alert to the Console. The examples are grouped by type of policy condition: ■ Threshold condition with an action If port utilization > 90% of capacity for 1 minute. The elements of a policy Every policy consists of three types of information: ■ A particular object that you want to monitor Objects include switches." After you define a policy and enable it. logging the incident to a file. for example: "If port utilization exceeds 90% of its total bandwidth for more than sixty seconds. Examples of policies Following are some examples of policies. ■ A description of the condition you want to monitor on that object This condition is based on the value of a collector that represents the type of data you want to monitor for the object.

post an alert to the Console with severity Warning and send email to the administrator. If a specified host’s status changes to UnreachableViaIP. send email to the administrator. and launch array management application ABC from the command line with arguments X. For example. These data types are represented by collectors. or below threshold value. it determines which collectors apply to those objects and registers the relevant collectors with the Alert Manager. The role of alerts An alert is a signal generated by a policy when the condition specified in the policy is detected or evaluated as true. ■ Text Comparison condition with an action If a specified port’s status changes to portTesting. post an alert to the Console with severity Critical. If port utilization <= 75% for 1 minute. there is a collector that counts how much data is being read on a specific storage array. and another that monitors whether a switch port is online or offline. When an alert is triggered. Each policy is based on a particular type of data for a particular object or type of object. When the alert condition for a particular policy is met. All alerts in CommandCentral Storage are dynamic—the alert resets itself automatically when . If a specified array’s environment status changes to Serious. It also provides a way to reset the alert when the value being monitored returns to a normal. You supply both conditions while defining the condition. post an alert to the Console with severity Information. The way policies work The CommandCentral Storage Alert Manager carries out the instructions described in all policies enabled on the storage network. the Alert Manager performs the actions described in the policy. Y and Z. The Alert Manager then receives a stream of real-time collector data and compares data values with the conditions described in its policies. then clear the critical alert. When CommandCentral Storage initially discovers the objects on the storage network. we refer to that alert as active. Monitoring storage resources using policies 325 About policies This type of condition generates an alert when a threshold is reached or crossed.

The collector on which a text comparison condition is based provides data as any of several possible textual states defined for that collector. you can specify one or more actions to be taken in response to an alert. a new corresponding alert replaces the existing alert. if a user specifies "unreachable by SNMP" as an alarm state for a monitored condition." .326 Monitoring storage resources using policies About policies the condition monitored by the policy returns to its specified clear state. For information about viewing. The following table describes the two categories of policy conditions: Table 16-1 General categories of policy conditions Category Description Numeric Monitors when one or more numeric thresholds are reached and Multi-Threshold sustained for a configurable period of time. monitoring. In addition. At any given time. only the most severe alert is active. The clear condition resets the alert when the value being monitored returns to an acceptable. or below-threshold value. There are many possible conditions for various resources managed by CommandCentral Storage. Types of policy conditions The policy conditions available to you depend on the type of resource you are monitoring. You can define up to four threshold values. by default. The clear state of a text comparison condition is automatically assigned by CommandCentral Storage and is the opposite of the alarm state specified by the user. then the clear state for the condition is automatically set to "NOT unreachable by SNMP. Each of these conditions falls into one of two general categories. The thresholds you supply become the values at which an alert is triggered. The collector on which a threshold condition is based provides data as numbered units such as a percentage or a number of bytes. every alert is listed in the Alerts Summary pane. For example. When you create a policy. A single persistence value applies to all four thresholds as well as the clear condition. When a new threshold is met. each with its own severity. An example of a textual state is the port status of a switch as ONLINE or OFFLINE. See “About viewing and managing collectors” on page 363. and acknowledging alerts. Text Comparison Evaluates a textual state to determine the status or condition of the object.

you can configure one or more actions to be taken when the specified condition is detected. Monitoring storage resources using policies 327 About policies Types of policy actions For every policy. . Resources you can manage with policies You can monitor any object for which CommandCentral Storage provides at least one collector: ■ Switches and switch ports ■ Disk arrays (supported models only) ■ Applications ■ Fabrics ■ Hosts ■ File systems Establishing your own policies The most common way of establishing your own policies is by editing policies—or copies of policies—that already exist. See “Administration policies” on page 479. The following table describes the types of actions you can configure for policies: Table 16-2 General types of policy actions Action Type Description Notification CommandCentral Storage provides four types of notification: ■ Alerts to the CommandCentral Storage Console. Actions can perform a corrective or notification function. Perl scripts. script Wsh scripts. and UNIX shell scripts. with user-configurable levels of severity ■ Email to one or more specified recipients ■ Traps to SNMP-capable recipients ■ Entries to the system log Command or CommandCentral Storage can run batch files. executables. and create output files for the commands run. For a list of the policies provided with CommandCentral Storage.

See “Disabling policies” on page 351. Editing policies You can streamline network operation by developing a set of policies tailored to the unique characteristics and needs of your storage environment. copy it to a new policy. The easiest way to do this is to edit existing policies—either predefined policies or policies you created. For example. See “Editing policies” on page 328. you can change anything about the policy except the collector it uses. To edit a policy 1 Disable the policy. See “Copying policies” on page 344. such as port utilization. ■ Creating policies summarizes the process for creating policies. Note: When you edit a policy. any active alerts associated with the policy are cleared. see the CommandCentral Installation Guide. To define a policy that monitors a different object or uses a different collector. . When you edit a policy. or you may want to configure an additional action besides posting an alert to the Console. For information about backing up and restoring policies. See “Copying policies” on page 344. ■ Copying policies summarizes the process for defining a new policy by copying an existing policy. 2 Back up the policy. you may need to adjust the threshold value for a monitored condition. as it is defined in an existing policy.328 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies You can also create policies from scratch using a series of dialog boxes in the CommandCentral Storage Console. See “Creating policies” on page 346. The following sections contain details about how to establish your own policies: ■ Editing policies summarizes the process for editing policies and describes the things you should consider when specifying policy conditions and actions.

Editing the policy scope You can change the policy’s scope: whether it monitors a specific object. 5 In the policy’s detail view. See “Defining error log notifications for policies” on page 336. commands. Monitoring storage resources using policies 329 Editing policies 3 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. See “Defining trap notifications for policies” on page 337. . 4 In the Policies Summary. See “Enabling policies” on page 352. See “Using variable data in notifications and alerts” on page 339. enable it. See “Editing the policy scope” on page 329. or both—that the policy performs when the condition is met. 6 When you are done editing the policy. See Viewing an object’s group memberships See Editing policies based on textual state conditions See Editing global conditions for policies ■ Specify actions—notifications. See “Defining command actions initiated by policies” on page 338. See “Editing the policy’s alert message” on page 343. click the name of the policy you want to edit. or all objects of a certain type. ■ Change the condition or threshold being evaluated. See “Defining email notifications sent when policy conditions occur” on page 335. See “Enabling an Alarm Manager-initiated executable to interact with the Windows desktop” on page 339. all objects with a certain collector. edit the policy using one or more of the following procedures: ■ Change the policy’s scope so that it monitors all objects affected by a certain collector or all objects of a certain type. See “Editing the policy name and description” on page 342. ■ Change the policy’s name or description. ■ Change the information that is sent when the policy issues an alert.

3 Click OK. whenever the collector detects a value that meets the defined thresholds. For a numeric condition. click the object type in the drop-down list. The policy’s scope is updated. and the updated information appears in the policy’s detail view. Editing policies based on numeric conditions For policies based on numeric collectors. If you want the policy to apply to an object type. click Scope. you are also defining the policy's clear state. use the radio buttons to specify whether the policy applies to all objects affected by a certain collector or to all objects of a certain type. the clear state is met when the value being monitored returns to a value below the lowest threshold you specified. For example. then the clear state is automatically set to <=2. at the specified severity level. . if the alarm state is >2. When you specify policy conditions. the policy will issue an alert. use the Edit Condition dialog box to set the threshold that the policy is monitoring. When you have finished. 2 In the Edit dialog box.330 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies To edit a policy’s scope 1 In the policy’s detail view.

Error. 4 For the selected severity level. or Information. Instead. >. you cannot specify >=2 for both the Error and Warning levels. . <=. Monitoring storage resources using policies 331 Editing policies Figure 16-1 The edit condition dialog box (numeric collector) To edit a policy’s numeric condition 1 Display the policy’s detail view. =) and a number. 2 Click a numeric condition in the Conditions table. 3 In the Edit Condition dialog box. check an alert severity level: Critical. For example. for example >=1 or <2. select one or two thresholds that define the condition or conditions monitored. you could specify >=2 for the Error level and >=1 and <2 for the Warning level. !=. Warning. Thresholds for different severity levels cannot overlap. <. Each threshold consists of a mathematical operator (>=.

6 When you have defined conditions for the severity levels you want. click OK When the collector’s value passes any of the thresholds you have set. use the Edit Condition dialog box to define the conditions that will generate an alert." Figure 16-2 The edit condition dialog box (textual state collector) . For example. for example. when any of the states in the Selected Values list is true. When you specify policy conditions. the policy will generate an alert with the specified severity level. Editing policies based on textual state conditions For policies based on textual state collectors. When you have finished. if the alarm state is "unreachable by SNMP." then the clear state is automatically set to "NOT unreachable by SNMP. the policy will not issue alerts at that level. the policy will issue an alert.332 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies 5 Repeat step 3 and step 4 for other alert severity levels. For a textual state condition. at the specified severity level. the clear state is the opposite of the alarm state you specified. If you leave a severity level unchecked. you are also defining the policy's clear state.

which take actions in response to alerts. The Edit Condition dialog box displays. cleared. use the Edit Condition dialog box to define what actions the policy should take in response to alerts. 4 To make the policy ignore certain collector values. click OK. 5 Repeat step 3 and step 4 for other collector values. 2 Click a textual state condition in the Conditions table. the policy will generate an alert with the specified severity level. 3 In the Edit Condition dialog box. Error. Editing global conditions for policies For global policies. first remove the value from the Selected Values list and then add it back it with the desired severity level. ■ Click Add to move the checked values to the Selected Values list. add values to the policy by doing the following: ■ Check one or more values in the Available Values list. ■ In the drop-down list. Values currently being used are in the Selected Values list. 6 When you have defined conditions for the severity levels you want. When the collector’s value matches one of the values in the Selected Values list. if desired. showing all possible values for the collector that is associated with the policy. check a severity level: Critical. Collector values not currently being used by the policy are in the Available Values list. To reassign a severity level to a value. or Information. Monitoring storage resources using policies 333 Editing policies To edit a policy’s textual state condition 1 Display the policy’s detail view. the policy will initiate actions whenever alerts are created. Warning. When you have finished. . check the values in the Selected Values list and click Remove. or changed at the specified severity levels.

4 When you have defined conditions for the severity levels you want. When you click a condition (created. . and Information) are checked by default. check cleared with severity. ■ To initiate policy actions when alert severity levels change. or changed). all four severity levels (Critical.334 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies Figure 16-3 The edit global condition dialog box To edit a policy’s global condition 1 Display the detail view for a global policy. Error. check created with severity. check changed its severity to. 2 Click a condition in the Conditions table. then clear the severity levels for which you do not want to initiate actions. click OK. ■ To initiate policy actions when alerts are cleared. Warning. cleared. then clear the severity levels for which you do not want to initiate actions. then clear the severity levels for which you do not want to initiate actions. 3 In the Edit Global Condition dialog box do one or all of the following: ■ To initiate policy actions when alerts are created.

or both. The procedure for configuring the SMTP email server is described in the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. by typing over existing text in the appropriate text boxes. click Add Email and click Go. To insert variable data. To define email notification for a policy 1 Display a policy’s detail view. . the SMTP email server must first be configured. do the following and click OK: ■ Modify the email subject. Before you can use email notification. 3 In the Email Action for Policy dialog box. 2 In the drop-down list. Monitoring storage resources using policies 335 Editing policies Defining email notifications sent when policy conditions occur You can configure policies so that they send email notifications when the policy condition is met. body. such as an object name or alert ID. click a substitution token in the list box and then click one of the Add buttons.

■ If you select the Clear condition. a description for that token displays below the Body text box. check each user or group who should receive the email notification. When the alert is cleared for any other reason. For example. To define log notification for a policy 1 Display a policy’s detail view. . see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide.336 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies When you click a substitution token. 2 In the drop-down list. For more information about defining email recipients and updating the definitions. optionally check the checkbox to have an email notification sent only when the alert is cleared as the result of a changed collector value. ■ In the Recipients area. the list of conditions does not apply. Warning. Error. See “Defining email notifications sent when policy conditions occur” on page 335. click Add Syslog and click Go. type the person’s name and email address in the appropriate text boxes (or paste from the clipboard) and then click Add. cut. the notification will not be sent. or Clear) for which you want to send the email notification. Defining error log notifications for policies You can configure policies to write events in the CommandCentral Storage system log (syslog) on the active Server. paste) to cut down on repetitive typing. ■ Check boxes corresponding to the conditions (Critical. such as the server being rebooted. you might configure the policy to notify a network operator when a Warning condition is met and to notify a system administrator when a Critical condition is met. For information about changing the default email sender name. Use your system’s clipboard features (copy. The substitution tokens available to you depend on which collector is associated with the policy.For global policies. Information. See “Using variable data in notifications and alerts” on page 339. To add a new recipient. Email notification is configured for the selected recipients. 4 Repeat step 3 for each condition for which you want to define a separate email notification.

) To insert variable data. Information. click a substitution token in the list box and then click Add. type the host port number in the Port field. paste—to reduce repetitive typing. The substitution tokens available to you depend on which collector is associated with the policy. optionally check the checkbox to generate a log entry only when the alert is cleared as the result of a changed collector value. (You can use your system’s clipboard features—copy. a description for that token displays below the Syslog message text box. ■ Check the checkboxes corresponding to conditions (Critical. and click Add. To define trap notification for a policy 1 Display a policy’s detail view. such as the server being rebooted. See “Using variable data in notifications and alerts” on page 339. click Add Trap and click Go. no log entry is generated. For global policies. Warning. or Clear) for which you want to generate the log entry. Defining trap notifications for policies You can configure policies to send traps to selected trap recipients (hosts and groups). or Clear) for which you want to define the trap . To add a new recipient. such as an object name or alert ID. check each host or group that should receive the trap. See “Defining trap notifications for policies” on page 337. ■ Check boxes corresponding to one or more conditions (Critical. When you click a token. 3 In the Trap Action for Policy dialog box. do the following and click OK: ■ Modify the text of the log entry by typing over existing text in the Syslog message text box. Warning. 2 In the drop-down list. the list of conditions does not apply. do the following and click OK: ■ In the Recipients area. 4 The policy is configured to write events to the system log. Information. ■ If you select the Clear condition. Error. type the name of a host or group in the appropriate text boxes (or paste from the clipboard). Error. Monitoring storage resources using policies 337 Editing policies 3 In the Syslog Action for Policy dialog box. When the alert is cleared for any other reason. cut.

■ In the Working Directory field. For example. and UNIX shell scripts.) To insert variable data into the command string. Wsh scripts. click a substitution token in the list box and then click Add. At runtime.exe /c /s on Windows. Perl scripts. type the full directory path for the command you want to invoke. Defining command actions initiated by policies You can configure policies to run any of the following types of commands: batch files. When the alert is cleared for any other reason. (You can use your system’s clipboard features (copy. . the following prefixes are added automatically: /bin/sh -c on UNIX platforms and cms. All commands must reside on the connected CommandCentral Management Server. 4 Repeat step 3 for each separate condition for which you want to generate a trap. executables. click Add Command and click Go.338 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies notification. When you click a token. To specify a command for a policy to run 1 Display a policy’s detail view. For global policies. ■ If you select the Clear condition. or modify an existing command string. the list of conditions does not apply. do the following and click OK: ■ Type the command string. Type the path as it exists on the Management Server host. The policy is configured to send traps to the specified hosts and groups. no trap is sent. See “Using variable data in notifications and alerts” on page 339. paste) to cut down on repetitive typing. The substitution tokens available to you depend on which collector is associated with the policy. such as an object name or alert ID. such as the server being rebooted. in the Command Line Details text box. You need not supply operating system-specific prefixes. optionally check the checkbox to have the trap sent only when the alert is cleared as the result of a changed collector value. you might configure the policy to notify one set of trap recipients when a Warning condition is met and to notify another set of recipients when a Critical condition is met. cut. 3 In the Command Action for Policy dialog box. a description for that token displays below the Command Line Details text box. 2 In the drop-down list.

Information. such as the server being rebooted. any executable invoked by the CommandCentral Storage Alarm Manager on Windows 2000 runs in the background. 6 Click OK. you can insert the name and severity of an alert into the subject line of a notification email. the list of conditions does not apply. ■ If you select the Clear condition. you might configure the policy to run one command when a Warning condition is met and another command when a Critical condition is met. click Services and Applications. To enable the Alarm Manager to interact with the Windows 2000 desktop 1 Right-click My Computer on your Windows 2000 desktop and click Manage on the in-context menu. 3 In the list of services. The policy is configured to run the specified commands. the command will not run. Monitoring storage resources using policies 339 Editing policies ■ Check boxes corresponding to one or more conditions (Critical. or Clear) for which you want to run the command. For global policies. 4 In the Veritas Alarm Manager Properties dialog box. 5 Check Allow service to interact with desktop. 4 Repeat step 3 for each separate condition for which you want to run a command. Enabling an Alarm Manager-initiated executable to interact with the Windows desktop By default. Error. For example. . 2 In the Tree pane. click the Log On tab. Warning. right-click Veritas Alarm Manager and then click Properties. users will not see the GUI unless you first configure the Alarm Manager to interact with the Windows 2000 desktop. optionally check the checkbox to run the command only when the alert is cleared as the result of a changed collector value. When the alert is cleared for any other reason.exe). If the executable has a graphical user interface (GUI) that must be displayed (such as notepad. Using variable data in notifications and alerts You can use substitution tokens to provide variable data in policy-based notifications and alerts. For example.

provides an attribute identifying a particular state. numeric threshold policies include attributes that identify the threshold value that is crossed and how many minutes the condition persisted before CommandCentral Storage generated the alert. $AgentModuleVersion$ Version of the module named in $AgentModule$. The types of tokens available for a message vary with the type of collector on which the policy is based. For example. In a notification or alert message.) $AlertDescription$ Description text defined for the alert. A textual state policy. a user can manage the alert.) $AlertId$ Identifier of the alert. such as ONLINE or OFFLINE. for example.340 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies Each token is based on an attribute of the policy condition. $AlertCreateTime$ Date and time when the alert was generated. $AlertSeverity$ Severity associated with the alert. however. $AlertStatus$ Status of the alert: ACTIVE. Following are the substitution tokens available for providing variable data in policy actions. . or CLEARED. (Based on the alert create sequence number. $AgentModule$ Module connected to the managed host that caused the alert to be triggered. UNKNOWN. (Pre-substituted during history insertion. $AgentHost$ Managed system that caused the alert to be triggered. $ActionPolicyName$ Name of the policy that is performing an action based on the alert message. $ActionPolicyVersion$ Version of the policy named in $ActionPolicyName$. sorted alphabetically: Table 16-3 Substitution tokens for variable data in notification and alert messages Token Description $ActionPolicyId$ Identifier of the policy that is performing an action based on the alert message. you can use this value as part of a selectable URL with which. $ActionPolicyTopic$ Description of the policy named in $ActionPolicyName$.

" (Pre-substituted during history insertion.) $CollectorUnits$ Units measured by the collector on which the policy condition is based. consisting of the collector and state or collector value. Following are two examples: "PortStatus is Online" and "LinkResetsTransmitted is 10 resets. $CollectorValue$ Collector value at the time the alert was triggered. $Application$ The names of one or more applications possibly affected by the alert. $ManagedObject$ Name of the managed system (host. Monitoring storage resources using policies 341 Editing policies Table 16-3 Substitution tokens for variable data in notification and alert messages (continued) Token Description $AlertSummary$ Description of the condition that triggered the alert. $ObjectDisplayName$ Display name of the object that the policy monitors. $CollectorDescription$ Description of the collector on which the policy condition is based.) $ALERT_URL$ URL for the alert’s detail view. array or switch) that caused the alert to be triggered. $ConditionPersistence$ (Threshold condition only) Number of minutes the collector remained in the alert condition before CommandCentral Storage generated the alert. or blank if the alert is not associated with a host. an alert might have been generated when an object’s Switch Status attribute changed to OFFLINE. $Impacted$ Names of the application or applications associated with the alert. $ObjectAttributeName$ Name of the attribute that triggered the alert. (Based on the alert last update sequence number. array. or switch. For example. for example ONLINE or OFFLINE. for example frames received. (Based on the alert’s associated collector.) $AlertUpdateTime$ Date and time when the alert was last updated. $ObjectName$ Name of the object that the policy monitors. . $CollectorName$ Name of the collector on which the policy condition is based. $AssignedUserName$ The login name of the user who acknowledged the alert.

for example. where AttrName is the attribute name.<Location>$ $PolicyId$ Identifier of the policy. $POLICY_URL$ URL for the policy’s detail view. Example: $Object. the policy’s name displays in the Alerts Summary pane. $PolicyTopic$ Description of the policy named in $PolicyName$. Required to enable the $ALERT_URL$ and $POLICY_URL$ tokens. $Object. In a notification or alert message. $ServerHost$ Name of the host for the Alert Manager that manages this policy and the object it monitors. When the policy triggers an alert. $PolicyVersion$ Version of the policy named in $PolicyName$. . and specify whether alerts from the policy are displayed in the Console. enable or disable the policy. $ServerPortNumber$ Port number through which the Alert Manager host communicates with the CommandCentral Storage Management Server.342 Monitoring storage resources using policies Editing policies Table 16-3 Substitution tokens for variable data in notification and alert messages (continued) Token Description $ObjectType$ Type of object that the policy monitors. whereas the object is the actual port. $WebServerHost$ Host name of the CommandCentral Storage Web Engine that manages this policy and the object it monitors. $WebServerPortNumber$ Port number through which the CommandCentral Storage Web Engine communicates with the CommandCentral Storage Management Server. you can use this value as part of a selectable URL with which. Required to enable the $ALERT_URL$ and $POLICY_URL$ tokens. BrocadePort is a type of object.<AttrName>$ Any user-defined custom attribute for an object. $PolicyName$ Name of the policy that triggered the alert message. Editing the policy name and description Use controls in the CommandCentral Storage Console to edit the policy’s name and description. a user can view details about the policy.

■ If you are finished editing the policy. and the updated information appears in the policy’s detail view. click an alert summary. The alert summary appears in subject lines of email notifications. by typing over existing text in the appropriate text boxes in the Edit Alert Text dialog box. The alert description contains more detailed information and appears in the bodies of email notifications. or both. See “Using variable data in notifications and alerts” on page 339. The policy’s name and description are updated. description. the description. clear the checkbox. To edit a policy’s alert message 1 In the Conditions table in the policy’s detail view. When you click a token. click Description. Spaces. ■ Check Hide alerts for this policy from the console if you do not want alerts from the policy to be displayed in the Console. do the following and click OK: ■ Modify the policy’s name. 2 In the Edit dialog box. Policy names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. such as an object name or alert ID. The substitution tokens available to you depend on which collector is associated with the policy. and the Alerts Summary pane. check Enable policy to re-enable the policy at the time your changes are committed. The following tools are available to help you: ■ To insert variable data. By customizing the message you can provide more meaningful information to the recipients of your email message or to the administrator who monitors alerts. clear the checkbox. . a description for that token displays below the Alert Description text box. Monitoring storage resources using policies 343 Editing policies To edit a policy’s name and description 1 In the policy’s detail view. If you want the alerts displayed. or both by typing over existing text in the Name and Description fields. If you do not want the policy to be enabled. click a substitution token in the list box and then click one of the Add buttons. system log entries. Editing the policy’s alert message You can customize the message that the policy issues when its condition or threshold is met. punctuation marks. and special characters are not valid. 2 Modify the alert summary.

You can copy an existing policy to create a policy for a single object in either of the following ways: ■ Copy a policy that applies to a different object. See Copying a policy and applying it to a single object Both features allow you to make one or two changes to a policy but otherwise retain the basic definition. click Copy Policy and click Go. click the name of a policy. and narrow its scope to a single object within the class. cut. you can create policies that apply to single objects. you can copy the policy. For example. Copying policies Many of the policies that ship with CommandCentral Storage are defined for "all objects with collector x. Both the policy and the object to which you copy the policy must have the same collector." If you require policies with narrower scopes. and then modify the information that is unique to the object. you would not be able to copy the port utilization policy to the switch on which the port resides because the switch does not have the collector that the policy monitors. 3 In the drop-down list in the policy’s detail view.344 Monitoring storage resources using policies Copying policies Use your system’s clipboard features (copy. Copying a policy for a different object You can copy a policy and then edit the copied policy to change its scope to a different object. and you want to have an identical policy for Port 3. paste) to cut down on repetitive typing. See Copying a policy for a different object ■ Copy a policy that applies to a class of objects (for example. To copy a policy for a different object 1 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. . 3 Click OK. make other changes as appropriate (such as actions). 2 In the Policies Summary. all Brocade switches). and save the new policy with the name of the new port. In this example. if you have a policy that monitors port utilization for Ports 1 and 2 on a switch. change its scope to Port 3.

See “Editing policies” on page 328. and special characters are not valid. click OK. check the policy you want to copy. The copied policy’s detail view displays. 5 Return to the Policy Summary and click the name of the copied policy. 2 Click Monitoring. 6 Return to the Policies table (for example Monitoring > Policies > All Policies) and click the name of the copied policy. See “Editing policies” on page 328. . future attempts to copy PolicyName will fail until you rename or delete the copy. you can give the policy a more meaningful name and modify its other properties. 3 In the Policies table. 7 Optionally. The copied policy’s detail view displays. 5 In the Copy Policy for Object dialog box. To copy a policy and narrow its scope to a single object 1 In the Managing section of the Console. A copy of the policy is saved as Copy of PolicyName. where PolicyName was the name of the original policy. a Brocade switch. display the object view for the object to which the policy will apply. Spaces. 4 In the drop-down list above the Policies table. Copying a policy and applying it to a single object You can copy a policy and then narrow the copied policy’s scope so that it applies to a single object. avoid keeping policies named Copy of PolicyName around. for example. Monitoring storage resources using policies 345 Copying policies 4 In the Copy Policy dialog box. punctuation marks. click Copy Policy for Object and click Go. When such a policy exists. Policy names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. You can modify the copied policy. type a name for the copy in the Save Policy as field and click OK. Note: After performing this task.

The policy applies to all objects that the collector monitors. 3 In the drop-down list. click Create Collector Policy and click Go.346 Monitoring storage resources using policies Creating policies Creating policies In CommandCentral Storage. For example. To create a policy based on a specific collector 1 Click Monitoring > Collectors > All. See “Creating a global policy” on page 350. or an object type for which at least one collector exists. you can create policies that trigger an alert when the PortStatus collector detects a problem anywhere in the network. See “Creating a policy by selecting a collector from a list” on page 347. Alternatively. you might find it easier to copy the existing policy and then edit it. Creating a policy based on a specific collector Collector-based policies take action whenever a specific collector reports certain conditions or reaches certain threshold values. policies monitor collectors and take action when a specified condition is met or a specified threshold is reached. or with any Brocade switch port. you can customize it. See “Customizing a new policy” on page 351. 2 In the Collectors Summary. you can start from the Collectors Summary. If you are creating a policy that is similar to an existing policy. an individual object. After creating the policy. check a collector. you can create policies that report when PortStatus detects problems with a specific switch port. You can create a policy to monitor a collector. changed. or cleared. See “Creating a policy based on a specific collector” on page 346. See “Creating a policy for a specific object” on page 348. You can also create global policies to take action whenever alerts are generated. See “Creating a policy for an object type” on page 349. See “Copying policies” on page 344. If you know which collector you want to use as the basis for the new policy. .

If you are not certain which collector to use as the basis for the new policy. The collector’s description displays to the right of the collector list. If you want the alerts displayed. To create a collector-based policy by choosing from a list of collectors 1 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. you can customize it. check Enable policy to enable the policy immediately. . define the conditions that will trigger the policy action and click Next. do the following and click OK: ■ Type the policy’s name in the Name field. See “Customizing a new policy” on page 351. clear the checkbox. ■ Type a description of the policy in the Description field. Monitoring storage resources using policies 347 Creating policies 4 In the Edit Condition dialog box. and its detail view displays. You can select only one collector. Spaces. 2 In the drop-down list on the Policies Summary pane. The description should distinguish this policy from other polices. click the collector on which the policy will be based and click Next. ■ If you do not plan to customize the policy. 3 In the Select a Collector dialog box. The policy applies to all objects that the collector monitors. The policy is created. you can start from the Policies Summary and then select the collector from a list. and it can contain any information that might be helpful to your local users. 5 In the Edit dialog box. Policy names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. Creating a policy by selecting a collector from a list Collector-based policies take action whenever a specific collector reports certain conditions or reaches certain threshold values. click Create Collector Policy and click Go. punctuation marks. After creating the policy. ■ Check Hide alerts for this policy from the console if you do not want alerts from the policy to be displayed in the Console. See “Editing policies based on numeric conditions” on page 330. and special characters are not valid.

click Create Policy for Object and click Go. such as an array or switch port. punctuation marks. do the following and click OK: ■ Type the policy’s name in the Name field. Policy names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. you can broaden its scope to apply to all objects of a certain type. . Then. ■ Type a description of the policy in the Description field. and special characters are not valid. then click Next. 5 In the Edit Policy dialog box. Spaces. The description should distinguish this policy from other polices. 3 In the drop-down list above the Policies table. check Enable policy to enable the policy immediately. and it can contain any information that might be helpful to your local users. See “Creating a policy for an object type” on page 349. Creating a policy for a specific object You can create a policy for a specific object. define the conditions that will trigger the policy action. 2 Click Monitoring. To create a policy for a specific object 1 In the Managing section of the Console. See “Editing policies based on numeric conditions” on page 330. it is a good practice to begin by creating the policy for a single object. provided at least one collector exists for the object. If you want the alerts displayed. After creating and testing the policy. display an object view. ■ If you do not plan to customize the policy. clear the checkbox. See “Customizing a new policy” on page 351. ■ Check Hide alerts for this policy from the console if you do not want alerts from the policy to be displayed in the Console. you can customize it.348 Monitoring storage resources using policies Creating policies 4 In the Edit Condition dialog box. When you are developing a new policy. after thoroughly testing the policy.

See “Editing policies based on numeric conditions” on page 330. and it can contain any information that might be helpful to your local users. The collector’s description displays to the right of the collector list. You can select only one collector. you can customize it. then click Next. clear the checkbox. do the following and click OK: . click Scope. See “Resources you can manage with policies” on page 327. To create a policy for an object type 1 Create a collector-based policy. ■ Check Hide alerts for this policy from the console if you do not want alerts from the policy to be displayed in the Console. ■ If you do not plan to customize the policy. clear the checkbox. After creating the policy. such as arrays or switch ports. if at least one collector exists for the object type. 5 In the Edit CollectorName dialog box. define the conditions that will trigger the policy action. ■ Type a description of the policy in the Description field. Spaces. See “Creating a policy based on a specific collector” on page 346. Policy names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. 3 In the Edit dialog box. then click Next. do the following and click OK: ■ Type the policy’s name in the Name field. See “Creating a policy by selecting a collector from a list” on page 347. and special characters are not valid. 6 In the Edit Policy dialog box. Creating a policy for an object type You can create a policy for an object type. The resulting policy will apply to all discovered objects of that type. If you want the alerts displayed. See “Customizing a new policy” on page 351. check Enable policy to enable the policy immediately. 2 In the policy’s detail view. If you do not want the policy to be enabled. punctuation marks. click the collector on which the policy will be based. The description should distinguish this policy from other polices. Monitoring storage resources using policies 349 Creating policies 4 In the Select a Collector dialog box.

showing the new scope. you can customize it. The description should distinguish this policy from other polices. The policy’s detail view displays again. ■ If you do not plan to customize the policy. do the following and click OK: ■ Type the policy’s name in the Name field. you might define your policy to take action whenever a CRITICAL or ERROR alert is cleared and whenever an alert’s severity is changed to CRITICAL or ERROR. Brocade switch—in the drop-down list. For example. The policy is created. 3 In the Edit Global Condition dialog box. Spaces. Creating a global policy Global policies take action in response to alerts. do the following and click Next: ■ Use checkboxes to specify the conditions that will trigger the policy. 2 In the drop-down list on the Policies Summary pane. and its detail view displays. and special characters are not valid. You can select any or all of these conditions: An alert is created An alert is cleared An alert’s severity is changed ■ For each condition you selected. or cleared. After creating the policy. To create a global policy 1 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. check one or more severity levels that will trigger the policy action. punctuation marks. ■ Click the object type—for example. and it can contain any information that might be helpful to your local users. Policy names must consist of alphanumeric characters and/or the underscore (_) mark. changed. See “Customizing a new policy” on page 351. ■ Type a description of the policy in the Description field. You can create global policies to monitor when alerts are generated. 4 In the Edit dialog box.350 Monitoring storage resources using policies Creating policies ■ Click All objects of object type. click Create Global Policy and click Go. check Enable policy to enable the policy immediately. .

you could not disable the default policy "Availability: Host is unreachable via IP" for a single host on the network. Disabling a policy disables it for all objects within its defined scope. 3 Specify the information that is sent when the policy issues a message or an alert. you can edit it at any time to change its scope. Follow this procedure to disable one or more policies. or when you expect its objects. are active or enabled. or both—that the policy performs when the condition is met. however. including those that ship with CommandCentral Storage. conditions. conditions. Monitoring storage resources using policies 351 Disabling and enabling policies Customizing a new policy Follow these steps to customize a policy you create. Even after the policy has been deployed. To customize a policy 1 In the Monitoring section of the Console. Disabling and enabling policies Most policies. You may need to disable a policy. when you plan to edit it. . however. 2 Specify actions—notifications. You should disable a policy. Many of the policies that ship with CommandCentral Storage are defined for "all objects with collector x". or actions to be temporarily unavailable. See “Enabling policies” on page 352. See “Editing the policy’s alert message” on page 343. In such cases. and notifications. See “Editing policies” on page 328. it is impossible to disable the policy for only one object. conditions. policies normally will be enabled. display a policy’s detail view. when you need to edit the policy or when its objects. 4 Enable the policy. See “Defining email notifications sent when policy conditions occur” on page 335. or actions are not available. For example. Disabling policies During day-to-day operations. commands.

click Disable and click Go. click Delete and click Go. and active alerts associated with the policy are cleared. click Enable and click Go. 2 In the Policies Summary. Follow this procedure to enable one or more policies. The selected policies are disabled. To disable one or more policies 1 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. 2 In the Policies Summary. if the object it is monitoring is removed or unavailable—you must delete it manually. When a policy becomes obsolete—for example. The Status column in the Policies Summary is updated accordingly. Deleting policies Policies have no time limitation and are not dependent on their respective resources. 2 In the Policies Summary. check policies you want to enable. any active alerts associated with the policy are cleared. you must enable it again. 4 Click OK to confirm deletion. 3 In the drop-down list. check policies you want to delete. . The selected policies are disabled. The policy is deleted. 3 In the drop-down list. To enable one or more policies 1 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. To delete a policy associated with an object 1 Click Monitoring > Policies > All Policies. Enabling policies After you disable a policy and edit it. The Status column in the Policies Summary is updated accordingly.352 Monitoring storage resources using policies Deleting policies Note: When you disable a policy. 3 In the drop-down list. check policies you want to disable.

Note: If you have not yet configured your SMTP email server. Defining a new notification email recipient CommandCentral Storage sends notifications to people in the form of email messages. and others. Tivoli TME. For information about changing the default email sender name. . See the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. CommandCentral Storage gives you that opportunity when you click OK in step 3. Your policy can send notification to any of three types of recipients: ■ Email recipient: a person who receives notifications by email ■ Trap recipient: a host computer that receives traps ■ Group: a combination of people. you define the person as a email recipient and provide that recipient’s notification information. For each person who will be notified when alerts are triggered by policies. which displays lists of all recipients defined on the Server and provides a launching point from which you can add. You can configure the CommandCentral Storage Alert Manager to send traps as notifications to network management platform applications such as Hewlett-Packard OpenView Network Node Manager. or other groups Click Monitoring > Recipients in the CommandCentral Storage Console to view the Recipients Summary. The application can then handle Alert Manager traps in the same way it handles other traps. one of your most important tasks is deciding what recipients will be notified when the policy generates an alert. Monitoring storage resources using policies 353 Defining and managing notification Defining and managing notification When you define or update a policy. delete. and modify recipients. you must define an email recipient and specify that recipient’s characteristics. hosts. see the CommandCentral Administrator’s Guide. If you want a person to receive notification.

or days). For information about changing the default email sender name. or days) has elapsed. the circuit breaker stops additional notifications from being sent. it will reset after this count after much time (minutes. . do the following and click OK: ■ In the Name field. click Create Recipient and click Go. ■ To ensure that the recipient is not flooded with email messages. you must define an email recipient and specify that recipient’s characteristics. ■ Check Active to enable notification for this recipient. ■ For confirmation purposes. Example: 20 messages within 10 minute(s) Reset the message When the circuit breaker is invoked. type the person’s name. 2 In the drop-down list above the Email Recipients table.354 Monitoring storage resources using policies Defining and managing notification To define a new email recipient 1 Click Monitoring > Recipients. Example: 1 hour(s) The person is now available as a recipient for SMTP mail. This person can be added to any of your defined person groups. For each person who will be notified when alerts are triggered by policies. 3 In the Create Email Recipient dialog box. Check Enable Delivery Limit and fill in the following fields: Delivery Limit When the number of notifications reaches this threshold within the specified time period (minutes. hours. click Test Recipient to send a test email to the newly defined recipient. type the person’s email address. you can activate a circuit breaker that limits the number of messages sent within a specified time interval. Editing notification information about email recipients CommandCentral Storage sends notifications to peopl