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Copyright © 2010 by Michael Schwartz and JoAnn Cianciulli

Photographs copyright © 2010 by Ben Fink
All rights reserved.
Published in the United States by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, an imprint of
the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc., New York.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.clarksonpotter.com
CLARKSON POTTER is a trademark and POTTER with colophon is a
registered trademark of Random House, Inc.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Schwartz, Michael, 1964–
Michael’s genuine food / Michael Schwartz. — 1st ed.
p. cm.
Includes index.
1. Cookery, American. 2. Cookery, International.
3. Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink (Restaurant) I. Title.
TX715.S1457135 2010
61.5973—dc22
2010008560
ISBN 978-0-307-59137-1
Printed in China
Design by Stephanie Huntwork
Jacket design by Stephanie Huntwork
Jacket photographs by Ben Fink
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CLASSIC DEVILED EGGS
z Deviled eggs are a classic that doesn’t need to be
reinvented with all sorts of fancy ingredients. When it comes to making
hard-boiled eggs, the biggest problem is easily overcooking them, which
produces a nasty green ring around the yolk and a rubbery texture. The
explanation for boiling eggs may seem like overkill, but trust me, you will
have total success for the rest of your life.

MAKES 24 PIECES

1 dozen large eggs

1 teaspoon sweet smoked paprika

¼ cup Best Mayonnaise (page 246) or

½ teaspoon kosher salt

quality store-bought mayo
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
¼ bunch fresh chives, minced

Juice of ½ lemon
2 dashes Habañero Hot Sauce (page 244)
or store-bought hot sauce, or more to
taste

I NGR E DI E N T NO T E
eggs
Buy local eggs! More than ever, farmers’ markets are selling fresh eggs from heritage
chickens. Well-treated chickens that spend a lot of time on pasture, getting exercise
and fresh air, and eating green vegetables (which makes the yolk a deep orange color)
produce tasty eggs year round. They often come in a rainbow of shell colors that denote
the breed of chicken. The yolks of all should be bright orange and the white have body
and sit up on itself. Pastured eggs may cost more than conventional eggs, but they
deliver a lot more pleasure, are better for the environment, and leave you with a cleaner
conscience (you would not want to eat most mass-market eggs if you saw how they are
produced).

P

ut the eggs in a large wide pot, cover with 1 inch of cool water, and set over
medium-high heat. Starting with cold water and gently bringing the eggs to a
boil will help keep them from cracking. Once the water boils, turn off the
heat, cover the pot, and let the eggs sit in the hot water for 15 minutes.

(recipe continues)

snacks

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In the meantime, prepare an ice bath by filling a large bowl halfway with
water and adding a tray of ice cubes. The key here is to cool the eggs quickly.
Why? It’s the best way to prevent discoloration around the yolk and it makes
them easy to peel.
Using a strainer or slotted spoon, transfer the eggs to the ice bath. Allow
them to sit in the water for 5 minutes so they are completely cool down to the
center.
Give each egg a few gentle taps on the kitchen counter; you want to crack
the shell without damaging the white underneath. Gently roll the egg around
until the shell has small cracks all over it. Peel it off.
Using a paring knife, carefully trim off the ends of the eggs, so they will
stand upright when serving. Halve the eggs crosswise (not lengthwise like
you’re used to seeing) and pop the yolks out and into a food processor. Add the
mayonnaise, mustard, lemon juice, hot sauce, half of the paprika, the salt, and
pepper. Puree until completely smooth.
Spoon the yolk filling into a pastry bag or a plastic bag with the corner
snipped and pipe into the hollowed egg whites. Garnish the eggs with a sprinkle of the remaining paprika and the chives. Serve immediately or refrigerate,
covered loosely, for up to 1 day.

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SLOW-ROASTED
BONELESS SHORT RIBS with
romesco sauce
z Beef short ribs are commonly braised for hours. What is
slightly unusual and great about this recipe is that the short ribs are slowroasted until tender and then grilled to impart a smoky char. It may seem
like a difficult recipe, but I swear it’s not, and the delicious result is so worth
the time. The ribs need a day to marinate, so plan accordingly. After tasting
this dish, you’ll never braise a short rib again! Use any leftover meat to make
Short Rib and Fontina Cheese Panini with Tomato-Onion Chutney (page
120) or Pappardelle with Beef Sugo and Ricotta (page 111). This is a really
rich dish; all it needs to round it out is a simple green salad.
To make the spiced short ribs really sing, I prepare a version of Spanish
romesco sauce. Bold, tangy, and definitely habit-forming, romesco looks
ordinary enough but in one bite transforms the dish. When making the
sauce, it’s important to use a food processor and not a blender so it retains
a chunky texture. This recipe will make more than you need for the short ribs
and is a terrific go-to sauce to keep around. Try it with grilled vegetables and
seafood (it’s particularly awesome with shrimp), tossed with pasta, or as a
sandwich spread.

SERVES 4

2 tablespoons sweet smoked paprika

3 cups assorted mixed greens

2 tablespoons ground ginger

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

2 tablespoons chili powder

½ cup Romesco Sauce (recipe follows)

3 garlic cloves, minced

2 tablespoons skinned hazelnuts, toasted

¼ cup canola oil

(see Note, page 54) and chopped

Kosher salt and freshly ground black

2 tablespoons whole almonds, toasted

pepper

(see Note, page 54), and chopped

6 pounds boneless beef short ribs

1 lemon, cut into wedges

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus
more for drizzling

(recipe continues)

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I

n a small bowl, combine the paprika, ginger, chili powder, garlic, canola
oil, and 1 tablespoon each of salt and pepper; stir thoroughly to combine. Rub
the spice mixture all over the short ribs to evenly coat the meat. Transfer the
ribs to a large resealable plastic bag and refrigerate for 12 to 24 hours.
Preheat the oven to 300°F.
Arrange the short ribs on a wire rack set on top of a baking pan. Bake for
1½ hours, to render the fat. Remove the ribs and the rack, discard the fat, and
return the ribs to the pan (without the rack). Cover with foil and bake until
tender, about 1½ hours. Allow the ribs to cool to room temperature, then
cover and chill completely in the fridge for at least 1 hour. All of this can be
knocked out a day or two in advance.
Preheat an outdoor grill or a grill pan to medium-high heat. Cut the ribs
against the grain into 1-inch strips, reserving the scraps. Drizzle the ribs with
olive oil. Working in batches, grill the cut side of the ribs for 2 to 3 minutes on
each side, until nicely charred.
In a mixing bowl, toss the salad greens with the olive oil and lemon juice
and season with salt and pepper.
To serve, divide the ribs among 4 plates and arrange a handful of salad
greens next to them. Spoon the romesco sauce over the meat, sprinkle with the
nuts, and garnish with lemon wedges.

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THYME-SMOKED FOUR-INCH
PORTERHOUSE STEAK
 So you feel like steak? This one is a monster! For all of
the card-carrying carnivores out there, this dish will turn you on. Porterhouse
is a great cut because it’s like two for one—on one side of the steak you
have the tender filet and on the other, the firm New York strip. Grilling with
wood chips is a common way to infuse flavor into meat, but for extra oomph,
I turn to herb-infused smoke instead. Tossing damp woody herbs like thyme
(rosemary would work here as well) directly onto the fire lends a distinctive
earthy essence. The intoxicating smell makes your belly grumble and always
has a “wow factor” with guests. Serve with Roasted Garlic (page 238) and/
or Porcini Worcestershire Sauce (page 242).
SERVE S 6 TO 8

One 3- to 4-pound porterhouse steak,
3 to 4 inches thick

remaining soaked thyme directly on the fire. Turn over the steak and cook for
8 minutes, rotate, and cook for 8 minutes more. Check the internal temperature of the steak with an instant-read thermometer; it should be about 125°F
for medium-rare.
Transfer the steak to a cutting board and allow to rest for 10 minutes so
the juices can settle before carving.
To serve, cut the meat away from the bone and set the bone on a serving
platter. Cut the steak into ¼-inch-thick slices. Shingle the slices around the
bone. Scatter the remaining thyme sprigs on top.

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus

1 big bunch (¼ pound) fresh thyme

more for the grill

2 tablespoons kosher salt

L

et the steak stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Take 6 sprigs of
the thyme and strip the leaves from the stems. Finely chop the leaves; you
should have about 1 tablespoon. Set aside. Put half of the remaining thyme
sprigs in a small bowl. Cover with cool water and soak for 10 minutes while
heating the grill.
Preheat a gas or charcoal grill to medium-low. Pat the steak dry and
rub both sides with the chopped thyme, salt, and pepper, pressing to adhere.
Drizzle both sides of the steak with the oil and rub the grill grates with oil to
prevent sticking. Put the steak on the grill, close the lid, and grill for 8 minutes for medium-rare. Open the lid and, using tongs, carefully lift up the grill
grate and toss half of the soaked thyme sprigs directly onto the gas burner or
coals so they smolder, imparting an amazing aroma and flavor. Rotate the
steak a quarter turn to “mark” it. Close the lid and cook the steak for another
8 minutes. Open the lid and again, carefully lift up the grill grate and set the

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THYME-SMOKED FOUR-INCH
PORTERHOUSE STEAK
 So you feel like steak? This one is a monster! For all of
the card-carrying carnivores out there, this dish will turn you on. Porterhouse
is a great cut because it’s like two for one—on one side of the steak you
have the tender filet and on the other, the firm New York strip. Grilling with
wood chips is a common way to infuse flavor into meat, but for extra oomph,
I turn to herb-infused smoke instead. Tossing damp woody herbs like thyme
(rosemary would work here as well) directly onto the fire lends a distinctive
earthy essence. The intoxicating smell makes your belly grumble and always
has a “wow factor” with guests. Serve with Roasted Garlic (page 238) and/
or Porcini Worcestershire Sauce (page 242).
SERVE S 6 TO 8

One 3- to 4-pound porterhouse steak,
3 to 4 inches thick

remaining soaked thyme directly on the fire. Turn over the steak and cook for
8 minutes, rotate, and cook for 8 minutes more. Check the internal temperature of the steak with an instant-read thermometer; it should be about 125°F
for medium-rare.
Transfer the steak to a cutting board and allow to rest for 10 minutes so
the juices can settle before carving.
To serve, cut the meat away from the bone and set the bone on a serving
platter. Cut the steak into ¼-inch-thick slices. Shingle the slices around the
bone. Scatter the remaining thyme sprigs on top.

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus

1 big bunch (¼ pound) fresh thyme

more for the grill

2 tablespoons kosher salt

L

et the steak stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Take 6 sprigs of
the thyme and strip the leaves from the stems. Finely chop the leaves; you
should have about 1 tablespoon. Set aside. Put half of the remaining thyme
sprigs in a small bowl. Cover with cool water and soak for 10 minutes while
heating the grill.
Preheat a gas or charcoal grill to medium-low. Pat the steak dry and
rub both sides with the chopped thyme, salt, and pepper, pressing to adhere.
Drizzle both sides of the steak with the oil and rub the grill grates with oil to
prevent sticking. Put the steak on the grill, close the lid, and grill for 8 minutes for medium-rare. Open the lid and, using tongs, carefully lift up the grill
grate and toss half of the soaked thyme sprigs directly onto the gas burner or
coals so they smolder, imparting an amazing aroma and flavor. Rotate the
steak a quarter turn to “mark” it. Close the lid and cook the steak for another
8 minutes. Open the lid and again, carefully lift up the grill grate and set the

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BANANA TOFFEE PANINI
z I totally owe this one to the brilliant simplicity of Hedy
Goldsmith. A dessert panini? Why didn’t I think of that?! Now, dessert
panini might not be your first thought, but this recipe brings a sweet new
definition to the sandwich, tasting like a warm banana split in a cocoon of
rich bread. If you own a panini press, then you already know that it invariably
turns a regular sandwich into something irresistible. The texture contrast
between the crunchy exterior and the soft, gooey interior is a big part of
the sex appeal. The fleur de sel makes this dish; without the salty balance it
would be way too sweet. This panini also rocks for brunch.

SERVES 4

3 tablespoons granulated sugar

½ cup crushed toffee pieces, such as

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter,

Heath
4 pinches of fleur de sel or other coarse

at room temperature

sea salt

Eight ¾-inch slices brioche or challah

2 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk

2 tablespoons dulce de leche or caramel

Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

sauce

1 cup Chocolate Sauce (recipe follows)

4 very ripe bananas, halved lengthwise
and crosswise

P

reheat a sandwich press according to the manufacturer’s instructions. If
you don’t have an electric press, place a grill pan or heavy skillet over mediumhigh heat.
When building the sandwiches, make sure to distribute the ingredients
evenly across the bread so the sandwiches press flat. First, combine the sugar
and cinnamon in a small bowl. Spread butter on one side of each slice of bread
and sprinkle with the cinnamon sugar. Flip the bread over and spread with
dulce de leche on the other side.
Arrange 4 slices of banana on top of the dulce de leche on 4 of the slices
of bread, then sprinkle with toffee pieces and salt. Drizzle sweetened condensed milk on top. Cover each with the remaining 4 slices of bread, dulce de
leche side down, to make 4 sandwiches.
(recipe continues)

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Put the sandwiches in the panini maker or grill pan. Close the press (or, if
using a pan, place another heavy pan on top of the sandwich to press it down).
Grill until the brioche is crisp on both sides and the cinnamon sugar caramelizes, about 2 minutes. (If you’re cooking the sandwich in a pan on the stove,
after 3 minutes flip it over with a spatula to crisp the other side for a couple of
minutes.)
Transfer the panini to a cutting board and cut into quarters. Dust with
confectioners’ sugar and serve with chocolate sauce on the side for dipping.

C HOCOL AT E S AUC E z
1 cup heavy cream
1 tablespoon unsalted butter

MAKES ABOUT 2 CUPS

½ pound semisweet chocolate,
chopped into chunks (about
1¾ cups)

H

eat the cream and butter in a pot over medium heat. Once steam rises
from the surface, add the chocolate, and stir until it’s melted and smooth.
Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. You can store the
sauce in a covered container in the fridge for up to 10 days. Rewarm before
serving.

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