THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ ´

' THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ o
AN ENGINEER’S VIEW
Chris Reay
Chairman of the Working
Committee: Communications
(SA Institution of Mechanical
Engineering)
T
he major part is interfacing. with
employers and candidates. Work-
ing in the engine room so to speak
on a daily basis provides one with
up-to-date information, change patterns,
trends, behaviours and the supply and
demand dynamics directly affecting the
profession. So hopefully this is of some
value. My very limited story, in a note
form with comments, seems the most
appropriate way to set this out.
There are far too many agencies in the
recruitment space. Many are not more
than body shops, collecting CVs and sub-
mitting them out to all and sundry with
little care as to job and profile alignment.
Most claim to have expertise across many
varied professions and trades. Few do as
we do, focus only on the engineering profession
and provide guidelines and assistance to employ-
ers and candidates as Professional Engineers can
and should do. We supply the people part of the
engineering business, just as other experts provide
equipment.
HR does enormous harm to the process of procur-
ing Engineers. Employers who normally take great
care in specifying a product, seeking out reputable
suppliers, visiting their works and assisting the
technical buyers will somehow avoid involvement
and leave HR to do the work of handling dubi-
ously worded job specifications, at times we have
counted, up to 40 separate agencies for one post!
Why not align with selected specialist consultants
who know the product and the profession, par-
ticularly in pre-planning future needs?
1.
2.
A 24 year old recruiter in an agency will interview
a 53 year old Professional Engineer and advise
him he is too old for the job. It happens — if
that is not the height of insult then what is? Our
greatest engineering talent exists at this age and
beyond, and it is being neglected at great risk
of losing experiential skills.
A common feature is how many candidates simply
cannot spell, edit a CV, read the job specifications
and who will apply for a position shortly after
graduating that specifies 10-15 years experience
in an engineering management role. This “give
it a go” attitude can often comprise the bulk of
applications.
The time is past that employers, perhaps through
the naivety of HR, can expect Mr or Ms Perfect
to be standing on the street corner waiting for
their call. The good, experienced skills are in
short supply and fully employed, are interna-
tionally mobile and proving it, and demand high
remuneration to the surprise of the prospective
employers who claim the candidate to be out
of touch with the market. Well, I am not sure
where HR gets their “market levels”, but in-
variably they date from historic tables issued a
while ago with somewhat wide and unhelpful
margins and weak descriptors. The difference
is so evident that we are considering publishing
a real-time remuneration survey for interested
employers based on our own up to the minute
information for the engineering profession, a sort
of real-time remuneration survey.
Then we must take up some concerns with line
management. How many are really equipped to
make a valid judgment from a CV alone? Many
are so busy that they have not viewed them or
done so in such a hurry with no reverting ques-
tions and simply accept or reject them. I have
witnessed a small pump getting more adjudication
time than a senior engineering candidate!
Near-fit of candidate to the specified role does
not succeed. The belief that Mr or Ms Perfect
must be found is the only way. We have no
time to train up the near-fits. I am appalled at
the lack of training, mentoring and acceptance
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Stories From the Engine
Room…
I have decided to relate some experiences from my current
business activities that consist of a fair mix of recruitment and
placement of engineering resources, training, mentoring and
consulting assignments, and some services to the Institution
and the Engineering Council. All in all, it mixes pretty well,
with the common focus being on engineering skills acquisition,
evaluation, communication, collaboration, development and
the steady building of a large, live database of new graduates
of all disciplines and active and retired engineering resources.
A 24 year old recruiter in an agency will interview a 53
year old Professional Engineer and advise him he is too
old for the job
(continued on page 7)
4 THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ Advanced Materials Today September 2007 39
the society for
animals in distress
FOR AS LITTLE AS R50 A MONTH YOU CAN MAKE A
DIFFERENCE IN THEIR LIVES WITHOUT MAKING A
HOLE IN YOUR POCKET!
We thousands of animals in nine townships and informal settlements that we visit five days a week.
We their sickness both on-site and at our professionally-run animal hospital in Vorna Valley, Midrand.
We ignorance by educating in 50 underprivileged schools and in the field.
We communities through education, training, skills’ development and capacity building.
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.animalsindistress.org.za OR BETTER STILL, VISIT OUR PREMISES AT

PROTECT
HEAL
FIGHT
EMPOWER
“THE PADDOCKS”
PLOT 20, MOERDYK STREET
VORNA VALLEY, MIDRAND
BIG
TELEPHONE : 083 640 8825 OR 011-466-0261
FAX : 011-466-0262
ALTERNATE FAX : 086 626 5441
E-Mail : animals@animalsindistress.org.za
PO BOX 391164, BRAMLEY, 2018
BANKING DETAILS :
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BRAMLEY, CODE 252105
ACCOUNT NUMBER : 5147 0054 747
FUNDRAISING NO : 01 100326 0001; 001-249 NPO; PBO : 930012662
ANIMALS
Healing
their
IGNORANCE
Fighting
Empowering
OTHERS
To do
SICKNESS
THE SAME
Protecting
T
H
E
S
O
CIET
Y
F
O
R
A
N
I
M
A
L
S
I N D
I
S
T
R
E
S
S
CARING FOR DISADVANTAGED ANIMALS SINCE 1958
D IT OR ER D A ON NSTRUC ON EB D ON TI I TI
NAM : _____ __________ _________ _________ _________ __________ __________ _________ E ___ ___ ____ ____ ___ ___ ___
POST L DDRESS :_________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __________ ________ A A ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ___
E-MAI : _______ _________ _________ __ TELE HONE : ________ __________ _________ _____ L ___ ____ ____ P ___ ___ ____
BANK ________ _________ _________ __ BRA __________ __________ _________ _____ : ____ ____ ___ NCH : _ ___ ___ ____
RANCH CO : A UNT NO : B DE CCO
Y E OF ACCOU NT SAV S T AN MIS IO T P NT : CURRE ING R S S N
DATE OF IRS AY ENT : MONT LY NAT N MO : F T P M H DO IO A UNT

SIGNE __________ _________ _________ DAT : ______ _________ _________ ________ D : ___ ____ ___ E ____ ____ ___

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s l t e 50 m hat u com ta o d, can ak fference n m ’s l fe. A i tl as R a onth, or w ever yo can for bly aff r m e a di i an ani al i IG B
AMT Sept 07 zin.indd 39 2007/09/11 10:28:49 AM
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ o
Cover Story
8 Consistency in Welding
Monthly Column
11 A South African First
Pipes, Pumps and Valves
13 Local is Superior
15 The Devil is in the Detail
POWER GENERATION TODAY
19 Industrial Solar Geysers
23 Power Generation News
Compressors, Air Motors and
Vacuum pumps
25 Carefree Air, The Rental Option
27 Right from the Start
Oils and Lubtrication
29 Controlling Old Oil Disposal
31 Customising Lubes
Produced by:
PROMECH PUBLISHING,
P O Box 373, Pinegowrie, 2123
Republic of South Africa
Tel: (011) 781-1401, Fax: (011) 781-1403
Email: editorial@promech.co.za
Website: www.promech.co.za
Managing Editor Susan Custers
Editor Kowie Hamman
Advertising Louise Taylor
Circulation Catherine Macdiva
DTP Zinobia Docrat/Sean Bacher
Disclaimer
PROMECH Publishing and The South African Institution of Mechanical
Engineering as well as any other body do not take responsibility for
the opinions expressed by individuals.
Printed by: Typo Colour Printing, Tel: (011) 402-3468/9
Offcial Publication of
THE SA INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
and endorsed by:
 CORROSION INSTITUTE OF SA
 SA PUMP MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
 SA VALVE AND ACTUATORS MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
 THE SA INSTITUTE OF TRIBOLOGY
 NUCLEAR INSTITUTE
 SA INSTITUTE FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING
 NATIONAL SOCIETY OF BLACK ENGINEERS
 INSTITUTE FOR CERTIFICATED MECHANICAL AND
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS
 SOUTH AFRICAN ASSOCIATION OF CONSULTING ENGINEERS
 ASSOCIATION OF SOCIETIES FOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY
AND HEALTH
Regulars
3 An Engineer’s View
6 Institution News
18 Nuclear Institute (SA Branch)
32 Market Forum
38 On the Move
Contents
The monthly circulation is 4 242
Copyright
All rights reserved. No editorial
matter published in “SA Mechani-
cal Engineer” may be reproduced
in any form or language without
written permission of the publish-
ers. While every effort is made to
ensure accurate reproduction, the
editor, authors, publishers and
their employees or agents shall
not be responsible or in any way
liable for any errors, omissions or
inaccuracies in the publication,
whether arising from negligence or
otherwise or for any consequences
arising therefrom. The inclusion
or exclusion of any product does
not mean that the publisher or
editorial board advocates or rejects
its use either generally or in any
particular field or fields.
Februarv 'O´´ \O¦LMF o´ NLMEFF '
Featured on the cover:
Esab Welding & Cutting
Tel: (011) 608 8200
Email:
kim.brightwell@esab.co.za
Advanced Materials Today September 2007 39
the society for
animals in distress
FOR AS LITTLE AS R50 A MONTH YOU CAN MAKE A
DIFFERENCE IN THEIR LIVES WITHOUT MAKING A
HOLE IN YOUR POCKET!
We thousands of animals in nine townships and informal settlements that we visit five days a week.
We their sickness both on-site and at our professionally-run animal hospital in Vorna Valley, Midrand.
We ignorance by educating in 50 underprivileged schools and in the field.
We communities through education, training, skills’ development and capacity building.
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.animalsindistress.org.za OR BETTER STILL, VISIT OUR PREMISES AT

PROTECT
HEAL
FIGHT
EMPOWER
“THE PADDOCKS”
PLOT 20, MOERDYK STREET
VORNA VALLEY, MIDRAND
BIG
TELEPHONE : 083 640 8825 OR 011-466-0261
FAX : 011-466-0262
ALTERNATE FAX : 086 626 5441
E-Mail : animals@animalsindistress.org.za
PO BOX 391164, BRAMLEY, 2018
BANKING DETAILS :
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BRAMLEY, CODE 252105
ACCOUNT NUMBER : 5147 0054 747
FUNDRAISING NO : 01 100326 0001; 001-249 NPO; PBO : 930012662
ANIMALS
Healing
their
IGNORANCE
Fighting
Empowering
OTHERS
To do
SICKNESS
THE SAME
Protecting
T
H
E
S
O
CIET
Y
F
O
R
A
N
I
M
A
L
S
I N D
I
S
T
R
E
S
S
CARING FOR DISADVANTAGED ANIMALS SINCE 1958
D IT OR ER D A ON NSTRUC ON EB D ON TI I TI
NAM : _____ __________ _________ _________ _________ __________ __________ _________ E ___ ___ ____ ____ ___ ___ ___
POST L DDRESS :_________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __________ ________ A A ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ___
E-MAI : _______ _________ _________ __ TELE HONE : ________ __________ _________ _____ L ___ ____ ____ P ___ ___ ____
BANK ________ _________ _________ __ BRA __________ __________ _________ _____ : ____ ____ ___ NCH : _ ___ ___ ____
RANCH CO : A UNT NO : B DE CCO
Y E OF ACCOU NT SAV S T AN MIS IO T P NT : CURRE ING R S S N
DATE OF IRS AY ENT : MONT LY NAT N MO : F T P M H DO IO A UNT

SIGNE __________ _________ _________ DAT : ______ _________ _________ ________ D : ___ ____ ___ E ____ ____ ___

R
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T
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F
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s l t e 50 m hat u com ta o d, can ak fference n m ’s l fe. A i tl as R a onth, or w ever yo can for bly aff r m e a di i an ani al i IG B
AMT Sept 07 zin.indd 39 2007/09/11 10:28:49 AM
o THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
Council 2010/2011
Office Bearers
Presiden¦ .......................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C Earbic (Ceorce)
\ice Presiden¦ ............................ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... L Findeis (Lir¦)
Na¦iona¦ Treasurer ............................... ¦¦ Nvanconi (¦ud.ai)
Branch Chairpersons
Cen¦ra¦ ..................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M Cra·er (Mi¦e)
Fas¦ern Cape ................................................ \ Fa¦¦ (\i¦¦ia·)
¦wa/u¦u/Na¦a¦ ......................................... M E¦ac¦ (Ma¦co¦·)
Mpu·a¦anca Hicnve¦d.............................. ¦ Odendaa¦ (¦ouis)
\es¦ern Cape ........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pro¦ E Co¦¦ierFeed (Erandon)
Portfolios:
Co··unica¦ions/o¦ra¦ecic P¦anninc/
opecia¦is¦ Croup..................................................CL Feav (Cnris)
Fduca¦ion Lniversi¦ies................Pro¦ E Co¦¦ierFeed (Erandon)
Fduca¦ion. Lniversi¦ies o¦ Tecnno¦ocv............... F /awi¦s¦a (Fwa)
Me·bersnip .................................................... F /awi¦s¦a (Fwa)
Pro¦essiona¦ Leve¦op·en¦ Procra··e..........M E¦ac¦ (Ma¦co¦·)
Tecnno¦ocv Procra··e ................................. o/ Hrabar (o¦eve)
To be confirmed..................................................../ Foos (/ndre)
To be confirmed.........................................C Ear¦no¦o·ew (Ear¦)
Chief Executive Officer: \aucnan Fi·bau¦¦
National Office Manager: /nisa Nanabnav
PO Eo o´´. Eru·a. 'O'o
Te¦. (O´´) o´ooooO. Fa. (O´´) o88oooo
F·ai¦. in¦o(sai·ecne.orc..a
\ebsi¦e. www.sai·ecne.orc..a
Me·bersnip. Cen¦ra¦. Fas¦ern Cape o ¦/N.
·e·bersnip(sai·ecne.orc..a
Me·bersnip. \es¦ern Cape. sai·ecne.wc(voda·ai¦.co..a
Company Af filiates
Alstom Power Service SA
Babcock Africa Limited
Bateman Engineered Technologies
Bosch Projects
Fluor SA
GEA Air-cooled Systems
Hansen Transmissions SA
Hatch Africa
Howden Power
Howden Projects
Industrial Water Cooling
MBE Minerals (SA) (Pty) Ltd
(previously KHD Humboldt
Wedag SA
Megchem Eng & Drafting Services
THE SA INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Osborn Engineered Products SA
Rotek Engineering
RSD a division of DCD-Dorbyl
S.A.M.E Water
Sasol Technologies
SEW Eurodrive
Siemens
SNC-Lavalin SA
Spicer Axle SA
Spirax Sarco SA
Thyssenkrupp Engineering
Transvaal Pressed Nuts & Bolts
Ultra-Flow Engineering Services
Vital Engineering
Weir Minerals Africa
Winder Controls
Members of SAIMechE will be saddened to
learn of the passing of Bob Baasch (83), a long
standing Member of the Institution since 1955,
a proud Past President, Branch Chairman and
Honorary Fellow.
Bob was a mechanical engineering graduate of
Natal University and then spent two years in
the UK with the British Oil Engines Group in
the days when graduate Engineers did a practi-
cal pupilage period as a matter of course. Bob
later obtained the GCC Mines and Works, was
employed at various mines in Gauteng and then
joined Wits University as a lecturer in the Dept
of Mechanical Engineering for two years.
He then joined Stewarts and Lloyds and during
that time was awarded an MSc (Eng) degree
for his original work on steam piping systems.
Resulting from this, he was offered a position
with Eskom in 1964 where he spent 27 years
as one of Eskom’s strong engineering team that
designed and built the modern 6-pack power
stations that enabled SA to become world leaders
in high ash coal stations. Bob was awarded the
Institution’s Silver Medal for the best research
paper in 1971, on the subject of the computer
analysis of waterhammer in power station cooling
water systems, written jointly with John Sheer
and Martin Gibbs.
Bob was an accomplished musician on the
piano and the mouth organ and joined several
choirs including the St Paul’s choir.
Bob retired in 1989 and was active with his
family, yoga, old cars and his music and nota-
bly attended every SAIMechE AGM and many
of the social events. He was a member for 55
years.
He was a dedicated family man and was married
to Clem whom he met at a music appreciation
society in 1955. Our condolences go to Clem
and Bob’s family and friends on the loss of a
person who was a role model to any family
and to every Engineer with whom he came
into contact. He was a true gentleman who
made a huge contribution over the years to
SAIMechE. We will miss his jovial presence at
our Institutional events.
Obituary:
Robert
Johannes
‘Bob’
Baasch
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ ¯
THE SA INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
SAIMechE Scheduled Training Events Calendar : from 20 February to 30 April 2011
Whilst every effort is made to ensure that events take place as scheduled, SAIMechE reserves the right to change the schedule
as circumstances dictate. A registration form and full terms and conditions may be obtained from Carey Evans on E-mail: carey@
saimeche.org.za or Tel. 031 764 7136. Also, detailed individual event programmes are available from Carey. Corporations wishing
to book In-House Workshops may contact Linda Robinson on E-mail: linda@saimeche.org.za or Tel: 031 764 7136.
Code Title Date Region
C5511 Rapid Prototyping Technologies Workshop 16-Mar-11 Cape Town
E5311 Refrigeration Installation Design Workshop 16-Mar-11 East Rand
C1311 Structured Problem Solving Techniques Workshop 23 – 24 Mar 11 Cape Town
A0211 Boiler House, Safety Valves Workshop 23 – 25 Mar 11 Durban
E3011 Root Cause Failure Analysis Workshop 30 - 31 Mar 11 East Rand
C4811 Mechanical Seals Workshop 1 - Reliability in centrifugal pumps with mechanical seals 01 Apr-11 Cape Town
E0211 Boiler House 06 - 8 Apr-11 East Rand
A5111 Practical Risk Assessment 08-Apr-11 Durban
C0211 Boiler House 13 – 15 Apr-11 Cape Town
A4811 Mechanical Seals Workshop 1 - Reliability in centrifugal pumps with mechanical seals 15-Apr-11 Durban
A5311 Refrigeration Installation Design 20-Apr-11 Durban
E5211 Mechatronics 20-Apr-11 East Rand
SAIMechE Launches the Following New Training Events
Title Durban East Rand Cape Town
Mechanical Seals 1 Workshop : Reliability in centrifugal pumps with mechanical seals 15 Apr 11 27 May 11 1 Apr 11
Mechanical Seals 2 Workshop: Pump QCP requirements for enhanced reliability, and seal
failure analysis
24 Jun 11 22 Jul 11 8 Jul 11
Practical Risk Assessment Workshop 8 Apr 11 27 Jul 11 22 Sep 11
Mechatronics / Factory Automation Principle and Practice Workshop 10 Feb 11 20 Apr 11 27 Jul 11
Rapid Prototyping Technologies Workshop 2 Feb 11 5 May 11 16 Mar 11
How to Get your Point Across Workshop – Successful verbal and written communication 12 May 11 23 Feb 11 16 Feb 11
Effective Delegation, Giving Instructions and How to be Assertive Workshop 18 May 11 24 Feb 11 18 Feb 11
Networking Tactics Workshop – Achieving professional success by establishing, sustaining
and expanding a business network
20 May 11 8 Sep 11 15 Sep 11
Refrigeration Installation Design Workshop 20 Apr 11 15 Mar 11 9 Jun 11
Air Conditioning Installation Design Workshop 30 Jun 11 7 Jul 11 13 Oct 11
of this within the crisis we face in scarce skills today.
Industry needs a major wake-up if it is collectively to be
in a position to manage a serious growth development
in the economy.
If our own South African Engineers knew the remuneration
that foreign expats are earning on our Eskom projects,
they would have a fit. And many of our own are equally
able to provide the skills and expertise.
As Engineer Placements, we are working closely with
Voluntary Associations and ECSA to develop structured
training and mentoring for the EIT programme required
after graduation. The intent is to seek out retired Engi-
neers to act as paid mentors with programmes endorsed
via the SAIMechE Professional Development Programme
with funding from the revised NSDS3 and industry. At
least Minister Ebrahim Patel, in his call to train 30 000
more Engineers, should be grateful and hopefully actively
supportive. Pigs may fly though.
8.
9.
(continued from page 3)
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
The best mix
I have been a reader of “SA Mechanical Engineer” for
the past 40 years in all its various forms, I believe that
Promech has now, at last reached the best mix.
Good print, nice presentation, easy reading and most
of all giving the companies presented a good crack at
the whip.
Reading Chris Reay is always a pleasure, please look
after him as he is an asset to the publication.
Maybe “SA Mechanical Engineer” could do a 2010
almanac of Chris Raey’s articles?
Thanks once again, and all the best for 2011.
Graham Pearson
8 THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
COVER STORY
A
lthough most welding machines feed the
wire at a constant rate, some more ad-
vanced machines can vary the feed rate
in response to the arc length and voltage.
Regardless of the rate, consistency of the feed is of
the utmost importance and this very factor is one of
the drawbacks of copper coated welding wire.
Special coating
“SA Mechanical Engineer” speaks to Kim Brightwell,
product manager of welding consumables at Esab
Africa Welding & Cutting about their solution to this
problem. “Particles of copper tend to dislodge from
the wire as it passes through the feeding system.
These particles then clog the liners and the contact
tip of the welding gun, especially if the tip is not
cleaned properly on a regular basis,” he explains.
“This affects the consistency of the wire feed by
causing vibration in the wire which then results in
erratic feeding and ultimately an inconsistent weld
due to an unstable arc.
“We now have a unique product, the AristoRod
range, which does not have a copper coating, but
is covered with a thin layer of material specially
developed to enhance feed characteristics,” Kim
elaborates. “Unlike the typical shiny copper ap-
A unique product which does not have a copper coating
to enhance feed characteristics
Consistency in Welding
Gas metal arc welding is a semi-automatic or automatic arc
welding process in which a continuous wire electrode and a
shielding gas is fed through a welding gun. This electrode wire
is commonly a copper coated wire fed through at a consistent
speed in order to achieve a consistent weld.
Kim Brightwell of Esab Africa Welding & Cutting
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ O
ening the side walls on sugar cane crushing rolls
in order to reduce sugar cane slippage increasing
throughput. The OK 84.76 electrode deposits small,
hard and highly wear resistant globules. “Deposition
can be done during maintenance periods when the
roll is free of cane or it can even be carried out when
it’s running,” says Kim. “The OK Tubrodur 1400
is a hard-surfacing alloy with high chromium and
carbon content. It’s wear-resistant properties are
retained at temperatures up to 680 ºC and deposits
take a high polish which do not gall or seize when
subjected to metal-to-metal wear.
“Both these methods of recovering worn parts
can be applied through stick welding or through
normal continuous flux coredwelding,” adds Kim.
“Although the hardening layer is built up with a
normal welding machine using thick wires, there
is a special way of going about it which we can
train our customers on at our new demonstration
facility. This product is also available in bulk form
in our Marathon Pac container.
Supply chain
Esab now has a presence throughout Southern
Africa. “We have a unique distribution network
that enables us to react quickly to changing market
demands by offering a seamless supply of products
to the market,” Kim says in conclusion. “With our
business partners, often referred to as distributors,
we have the geographical coverage and presence
to support all the needs of all southern African
fabricators.”
Kim Brightwell, Esab Africa Welding & Cutting, Tel: (011)
608.8200, Email: kim.brightwell@esab.co.za
pearance of standard copper
coated MIG welding wire, this
wire looks like a plain steel wire
due to the colour of the layer of
chemical compound it is coated
with. When originally launched,
this electrode wire was used
mainly for normal carbon steel
MIG (metal inert gas) welding,
but we’ve now also introduced it
in different tensile strengths for
various other applications such
as low alloy steel welding.”
Advantages
These advanced surface coatings
(ASC) on our MIG wires have
proved to deliver significant
savings to welders across the
globe. “This next generation of
MIG wires could replace the
old technology of copper-coated
wires within the next decade,”
Kim predicts. “Already much of
Europe has moved away from the old copper-coated
wire technology.“
Advantages of the AristoRod wire include low contact
tip wear which means fewer replacement stops,
and consistent feedability which means improved
production speed. In addition, a lower feed force
is required for long distance feeding of the wire.
“There are also fewer maintenance stoppages due
to absence of dust and flakes in liners,” adds Kim.
“There is much less spatter due to better arc stability
in general and overall, the welding quality delivered
is much higher.” These products are also available
in bulk packs called Marathon Pac. The Marathon
Pac wire delivery system offers non-stop production
in robot applications, meaning zero downtime for
spool changes and zero downtime for drum changes
when using the endless wire set-up.”
Surface hardening
Esab has just moved into new premises in Long-
meadow Business Park near Johannesburg which
housed both a warehouse and demo centre where
clients can experience machine and consumables
applications first hand. One of the technologies
customers can witness firsthand is the recovery of
worn parts on mills and earthmoving equipment.
“We have a range of products for surface hardening
on wear parts that we’re specifically targeting at
the sugar industry in Africa this year,” says Kim.
“These products are particularly suitable for the
hardening of wear surfaces on crushing hammers
in mills and squeezing rollers used in the sugar
industry. These parts are usually re-surfaced on
a weekly basis and our products have specifically
been developed for these applications.”
The products
One of them is a special purpose electrode for rough-
Welding quality delivered is much higher
COVER STORY
Februarv 'O´´ O
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Cofferdam technology can be effectively used on oil rig structures
MONTHLY COLUMN
T
he principle, dating back from Venetian
times, has been liberally applied in civil
construction applications for centuries, and
has only recently come to the fore as a solu-
tion to undertake ship repairs without the need for
the vessel to go into costly dry docking. Dormac,
a marine engineering company based in Durban
harbour, used the cofferdam principle to develop
a perfect and patented ship repair technology they
call the C-Dam.
The C-Dam
“SA Mechanical Engineer” speaks to Gary Pulford,
international marketing and sales manager about C-
Dam and its variations. “This technology is absolutely
unique to shipping in that we can repair a rudder,
work on a hull or replace stern tube seals on a ship
afloat, eliminating the need to go into a dry dock,”
he says. “We’re the only company in the world to
The only company in the world to offer this service
offer this service which is fully approved by all the
international ship classification societies.
“Any problems on the rudder, rudder stock, bear-
ings or pintles can be dealt with immediately with
permanent repairs that can be done quickly without
having to wait till a dry dock becomes available,”
says Gary. “This innovation has been warmly re-
ceived by ship owners and managers around the
world due to the cost saving and the convenience
of loading or discharging while the repairs are be-
ing done. It has also brought more work to South
African shores that would otherwise have gone to
ship yards elsewhere in the world.”
Evolution
Since undertaking the first project, this technique
has evolved into four distinct technologies for dif-
ferent types of repairs which would previously have
necessitated dry docking. These are Spade-type
rudder repairs, Skeg-type rudder repairs, Hull-side
repairs and Stern Tube repairs. “The spade type
C-Dam was our original design and is the simplest
and quickest to use,” explains Gary.
“This C-Dam is a ‘drum’ design and thus lends
itself to almost all repairs on the spade type rud-
der. The drum is submerged into the water, where
it is brought under the rudder and once verified
by divers, it is brought to the surface using chain-
blocks. The C-Dam is then secured into position
A South
African First
By definition, a cofferdam is an enclosure within a water
environment constructed to allow water to be pumped out to
create a dry work environment. Commonly used for oil rig
construction and repair, bridge and dam work, the cofferdam
is usually a welded steel structure that is temporary and is
typically dismantled after work is completed.
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MONTHLY COLUMN
Class-approved repair at a fraction of the cost of the
conventional dry dock method of repair
and pumped dry so engineers can inspect and work
on the rudder.”
Skeg type
The skeg type C-Dam with a ‘front door’ is a bit
more complex. The C-Dam is positioned aft of the
rudder by a crane and then brought into position by
the use of chain-blocks. A diver then rigs and bolts
the ‘door’ into place. Thereafter a sealer is inserted
around the skeg to ensure dry working conditions
with supporting steel members that are fitted to the
stern in order to release the upright thrust pressure
and prevent it from damaging the skeg.
“One of our projects with this type of C-Dam was
on the ‘Harare’, a vessel that would have had to
wait six weeks just to get into the dry dock purely
for inspection purposes,” says Gary. “We convinced
the owner that it could be done within seven days
with our system. They agreed and when we got
down there we found large cracks which could
then be repaired before the inspection actually
took place”
Fixing hulls
With the hull side C-Dam, permanent repairs can
be done without the need to dry-dock the vessel.
“This variation has been designed to replace shell
plating on most types of vessels under the water-
line,” Gary elaborates. “The C-Dam is designed to
form a watertight pocket on the side of the vessel
so that repair teams can go all the way down the
hull to carry out repairs in dry conditions. One of
the largest we’ve built measures 15 metres x 2
metres and is made from 25mm thick steel plate,
reaching 12 metres below the waterline.”
This technique was applied to the ‘Africa Star’, a
17 610-tonne vessel which incurred serious dam-
age after it collided with an unknown object when
leaving the Port of Cotonou in Benin, West Africa.
“The vessel continued on her scheduled voyage
and on arrival in Durban, our diving team carried
out an underwater survey. Extensive damage was
found to 35 square metres of shell plating including
a nine metre long tear.
Fraction of the cost
“Typically, for a repair of this nature, the vessel
would have had to discharge its entire cargo and
go into dry docking, a huge expense both in terms
of time and stevedoring,” continues
Gary. “With our C-Dam we could offer
a permanent, class-approved repair at a
fraction of the cost of the conventional
dry dock method of repair.”
The cofferdam was constructed in two
sections with the main chamber being
15.6 metres long, 3.0 metres wide and
2.4 metres high. This one also had a shaft
to provide access for men and materi-
als. It measured 13.6 metres high, 2.4
metres long with a breadth of 1.5 metres
at a total weight of 36 tonnes.
Stern repairs
The final type of cofferdam, the stern
tube C-Dam, is fitted in two sections
around the stern tube with the use of a
shore-side crane and the assistance of
the Dormac diving division. “A sealing
method developed in-house is used to
create a watertight seal around the tail
shaft,” explains Gary.
“The cofferdam is then pumped dry and
inspected by engineers, classification
society surveyors and representatives
of the owners before we get down to the business
of removing the damaged seals and fitting new
seals by means of bonding. The seal box is then
closed and reassembled before pressure tests are
carried out on the seals. Thereafter, the rope guard
is welded back into position in a dry environment
and the cofferdam is flooded and removed.”
A lot more work
“Apart from South Africa’s perfect location for this
kind of work, we have proved over the past couple
of years that we can do it to world class standards
and at attractive pricing,” says Gary in conclusion.
“Our opposition is up in Asia and if we can save
an owner in terms of towing costs, production time
and quick repair time, we can attract a lot more
work to South African ports.
Gary Pulford, Dormac, Tel: (031) 274-1500. Email: gary@
dormac.net
A typical C-Dam rigged to work on the rudder of a ship
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mining, from
gold to plati-
num, chrome
and even iron
ore.
“Thi s repre-
sents the full
range of slurry
media and over
the years has
given us the
opportunity to develop these valves, together with
the various mines, specifically for each media,”
elaborates Pat. “This is a continuous process where
we listen to the problems they have on the mines
and then we add or chop and change to meet the
demands out there. In short, the product ranges
have all been tried and tested to specific South
African conditions and processing methods.
“Many of the mining engineers who know our valves
as very reliable South African developed products,
are now working on mines elsewhere in the world
and they’ve started specifying our valves there
too,” says Pat with a broad smile. “In this context
the ‘brain drain’ has proved to have some benefits
for our business.”
Linings
As an example of tested and tried technology, Pat
talks about rubber linings. “Any valve that has a
rubber lining produced in South Africa is likely to
out-perform a lining coming from elsewhere in the
world,” he says. “They simply don’t have the slur-
ries that we do and the linings are therefore not
tested with the right media. We, for instance, have
our own rubber facility where we can mix our own
compounds to develop suitable protection against
specific types of slurries. This has helped in creating
solid brands that are well respected.”
One of the products that stand out in this regard is
the SKG flanged valve. “It’s a slurry knife-gate valve
developed over many years in close co-operation
with mining engineers from a number of mines,”
explains Pat.
“This valve has outperformed any other slurry valve
we, or anybody else, has ever manufactured. The
design has gone through many development phases
over the years as end-users provide feed-back. For
example, today you’ll find indicators on the valve
as a standard feature while locking devices in open
and closed positions are also standard.”
Well established in all mining industries
Local is Superior
Pat Stander, managing director of
DFC Mining
The Insamcor
knife-gate
valve
A
valve manufacturing company that not
only practises this principle, but has also
extended its product range in recent years
to offer a comprehensive range of valves,
is DFC Mining in Sebenza near Johannesburg.
“SA Mechanical Engineer” speaks to Pat Stander,
managing director, about the latest developments
in the local valve industry. “Since buying out Ins-
amcor, a local manufacturer of knife-gate valves,
we’ve also acquired an American company, RF
Technologies, known worldwide for their range of
pinch valves,” he says.
“This acquisition includes RF Tech-
nologies’ Finnish subsid-
iary and extends
our product line
to include the well-
known aiRFlex and
RF valve brands, allow-
ing us to now offer the
South African market
the most comprehensive
range of high quality
branded slurry valves
available anywhere,” adds
Pat. “Although this range
will be imported for now,
the intention, like with
most of our other valves,
is to manufacture this
product locally in the near
future.”
Established products
The well-known Insamcor
range of knife-gate valves
are manufactured in Sebenza
where DFC Mining has now
established its headquarters
while manufacturing of the
Saunders diaphragm valves
and the SKG series of valves
will remain at the Benoni
facility. “The great thing about
these products is that they’re
well established in all mining
industries,” says Pat. “In a ra-
dius of 350 kilometres around
Johannesburg we have all types of
PIPES, PUMPS & VALVES
Valve manufacturers, who know their products and their applications inside
out, should be the springboard for engineers seeking guidance in choosing
the right product.
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Features
Valves for slurry should preferably have a full bore
design to allow a continuous uninterrupted flow path.
The SKG’s heavy duty, full port elastomer, double
sleeve design therefore makes it ideal for slurries.
“In terms of seating, the SKG design utilises two
elastomer sleeves, which not only fully line the bore
of the valve, but also act as the seat of the valve in
both the closed and open position. This eliminates
any dead space or pockets associated with other
knife gate valves,” elaborates Pat.
“As far as the body is concerned, the bonnet-less
design of this valve eliminates the need for a gland
or a stuffing box. Bonnet cavities, where solids tend
to collect, have also been eliminated.”
Getting what you’ve paid for
South Africans are increasingly looking at the total
cost of ownership rather than pure purchase price,
in this respect DFC Mining’s premium products have
made a permanent mark in the mining industry. “It’s
a fact of life that downtime costs a lot of money,
so obviously it needs to be reduced to an absolute
minimum,” Pat says in conclusion.
“Hence it’s crucial to choose a competent valve
manufacturer in the first place and secondly to opt
for products that are proven and will provide long
term service. The mining industry spends a lot of
money on valves, more often than not, they don’t
get what they’ve paid for.”
Pat Stander, DFC Mining, Tel: (011) 609-8610, Email:
pats@dfc.co.za
This valve has outperformed any other
slurry valve we, or anybody else, has
ever manufactured
The Saunders diaphragm valve
The well-know SKG valve de-
veloped specifically for local
conditions
PIPES, PUMPS & VALVES
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T
hese net works
are consequently
engineered with
specialised pipes,
pumps and valves, to resist
abrasion from the solids
transferred through the
system. It is therefore not
surprising to find compa-
nies who specialise purely
in the manufacture of dedi-
cated slurry conveyance
equipment. To learn more
“SA Mechanical Engineer”
visits Fluid Power Valve Technologies based in
Edenvale to speak to Director, Mike Warder, about
this highly specialised field of manufacturing.
Special valves
“The SGV Polyline standard range of knife gate
valves comes in sizes from 50mm in diameter
through to 600mm, but we have manufactured
special sizes for applications up to 1.2 metres in
diameter. Standard valves are stocked and are able
to be supplied with various actuators within
days,” Mike says.
“Compared with conventional knife gate
valves, this range comes complete with some
unique features, it has proved to actually work
exceptionally well in slurry applications and
has become the specified knife gate valve on
several steel processing and mining plants
in South Africa,” says Mike.
“In fact, our product is so successful that
an American company is now technically
evaluating the product for the US market,”
Mike adds. “This arrangement is likely to
be finalised in the following months, we are
extremely confident and excited regarding
these prospects.
Subtle differences
Features on this valve include a unique single
piece body construction which allows for a
full Polyline-Urethane wear-resistant lining
this fundamentally is a technical advantage
that extends the life of the valve. “The Polyline-
Urethane comes in both the 100 and 200 grades,”
says Mike. “Polyline 100 is ideal for dry and short
term wet applications requiring high cut and wear
properties while the Polyline 200 is used in long
term wet applications that require excellent abra-
sion and hydrolysis resistance with good dynamic
properties.
“Our design has subtle differences from most other
valves and it’s in these differences that make it a
superior valve and one that has been widely welcomed
by end-users in the mining industry,” Mike adds.
“The one piece body design, for example, eliminates
leaks in the valve during valve cycling.” In addition,
the smoothness of the Polyline-Urethane lining en-
sures that the body is free of cavities, consequently
preventing slurry build-up or blockages in the valve
whilst reducing head-loss and turbulence.
The robust cast iron design includes a built in de-
flector wear cone with two flush-out corners on the
downstream side for improved flow. The stainless
steel blade can be activated by all types of actua-
tors; electric, hydraulic, pneumatic, gearbox and
or hand wheel operation.
Case study
“Although we’re expecting to see quite a large piece
of equipment considering its heavy duty features,
It has proved to work exceptionally well and has become
the specified knife gate valve on several plants in South
Africa
The Devil is in the
Detail
Regardless of the type of mine, slurries are probably the most aggressive
corrosive material ported through a network of pumps, pipes and valves.
Not only in terms of the abrasiveness of the media being conveyed, but also
because of the chemical composition of the media.
PIPES, PUMPS & VALVES
Mike Warder
A 600mm valve example
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the valve is relatively lightweight and small in size
compared with other conventional knife gate valves,
Our design has subtle differences from most other valves
PIPES, PUMPS & VALVES
CNC Machining for precision engineering of valve components
particularly in the larger sizes.
“A client approached us to try
and a solve a problem they had
with large 600mm diameter
valves that was springing
leaks,” relates Mike.
“On site we found this huge
valve costing around R150
000 which required the cli-
ent to gouge out a hole in his
concrete floor to allow it to
fit it into the space available,
obviously hampering proper
alignment and installation. Our
valve of the same capacity,
at 55% of the price, fitted
perfectly and they’ve never
had a problem since. This
is a substantial saving if you
consider that they have 32 of
these valves on the mine.”
Control valves
A fairly new addition to
the company is a division
that deals specifically with control valves for
slurry applications. “The prospective number of
projects on the horizon looks promising and we
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Components for the valves being manufactured
believe this area of our business will grow rapidly in the
coming months,” says Mike.
Control valves – clean media
“A further addition to our product range is to cater for the
control valve sector whereby ball, butterfly, metal seated disc
and globe valves are used. Valves are sized and selected
to offer proper control where process conditions choked
flow and cavitation are carefully evaluated.
Engineered solutions
On our walk through the stores and the manufacturing fa-
cility we see valves of all sizes being made and fitted onto
different base designs. Judging from the stockholding of
spare parts for the assembly line, it’s clear that you wouldn’t
have to wait long to get a valve built or repaired.
Mike says in conclusion. “Our valve design was developed
from practical experience honed by tackling problems that
exist in the field. Wherever there is a problem with knife gate
valves, we can assist in providing the correct solution.”
Mike Warder, Fluid Power Valve Technologies, Tel: (011) 452-8795,
Email: fpowervt@iafrica.com
Our design has subtle differences from most
other valves and it’s in these differences that
make it superior
PIPES, PUMPS & VALVES
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NUCLEAR INSTITUTE (SA BRANCH)
John Walmsley
The MIT Study
D
uring the course there were
several respectful mentions
of ‘the MIT study’. Grieved
that I was unaware of any
such study I consulted Google. ‘MIT
nuclear future’ threw up several reports
starting in 2003 with ‘The future
of nuclear power’ together with an
update in 2009. There are similar
reports specifically on the nuclear
fuel cycle. So far, I’ve looked at the
nuclear power reports.
Disconcertingly, the tone of the 2003
and 2009 reports suggest only grudg-
ing and heavily qualified support for
nuclear. The several MIT professors
who authored this ‘interdisciplinary study’ accept
the need to reduce world CO
2
emission. There is
nothing in the reports to suggest any doubt that
man-made CO
2
is driving global warming. Without
great enthusiasm they concede that nuclear is needed
to help knock down CO
2
. One interesting comment
is that the public opinion survey conducted for
the 2003 report showed no correlation between
concern regarding CO
2
and support for nuclear. In
other words, the great American public does not
see nuclear as a possible answer to CO
2
. I’m sure
this is true in South Africa also.
Retained as an option
MIT sees four ways of cutting CO
2
: economise on
electricity, expand renewables, apply carbon cap-
ture and storage (CCS) and go nuclear. Drawbacks
notwithstanding, according to MIT, nuclear must
be retained as an option.
In my own view, the public will never accept nuclear
generation while it believes that renewables alone
can do the job. The MIT reports do nothing to suggest
they can not. It is surely obvious that intermittent
energy sources can by no means supply all our
electrical energy – whereas, as in France, nuclear
could. The recent report ‘Generating the future’ by
the UK Royal Academy of Engineering suggests that
the tolerable limit for renewable energy generated,
after massive expenditure to renovate and smarten
the grid, could be 25%.
Meanwhile, WWF is all over the newspapers telling
us that renewables can do 95% of total energy!
It is surely vital that we establish for South Africa
that there is a limit and what it is. The tedious
nuclear vs renewables argument would then largely
fall away.
The problems threatening a nuclear future as per-
ceived by MIT are capital cost, perceived safety
problems, real weapons proliferation problems (at
least in respect of a closed fuel cycle), and nuclear
waste. MIT believes that for nuclear to have a fu-
ture these issues must be resolved. In 2003 they
made recommendations to DOE and IAEA on how
to deal with each of them. In 2009 they deplore
lack of progress.
The MIT authors do not support the closed fuel
cycle, ie, reprocessing. They believe that costly
enrichment and reprocessing activities open the door
to the diversion or theft of weapons-grade material
to an extent that is not justified by the economics
or by any diminution of long-term waste disposal
problems. They calculate that there is enough
cheap uranium to support the thousand 1000MW
thermal reactors (or equivalent) they expect to be
in operation in the world by 2050. That’s about
enough to maintain the world’s current 16% share
of nuclear generation.
Thereafter, they reconcile themselves to a switch
to advanced breeder reactor systems. By that time,
however, they expect better proliferation resistant
processes, particularly for reprocessing, to have
been developed. They support the use of coal with
CCS but, in 2009, comment on lack of progress
in that area also.
The 2009 update reaffirms the panel’s faith in the
safety of light water reactors subject, as always, to
competent operation. Ironically, bearing in mind the
fate of the PBMR, the panel enthuses over the high
temperature reactor system. It also notes lack of
progress in resolving the high level waste issue.
Back in South Africa, at the time of writing, we
await the revised IRP2010 report. If, presum-
ably, the report retains the 6 x 1600MW nuclear
fleet, the pro/anti argument will go on. Learning
from MIT, we should establish the tolerable limit
on the grid for intermittent renewable energy, we
should establish nuclear in the public mind as an
answer to CO
2
and, above all, we should work to
establish the safety of geological disposal of high
level waste.
John Walmsley
Last October, courtesy of NIASA, I attended the local World
Nuclear University five-day course entitled ‘Key Issues in the
World Nuclear Industry today’. Highly recommended. Many of
the papers presented are to be found on www.NIASA.co.za.
Given sufficient support, the course will be run again later this
year.
The tedious nuclear vs renewables argument would then
largely fall away
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POWER GENERATION
Produced by:
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Email: editorial@promech.co.za
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Managing Editor Susan Custers
Editor Kowie Hamman
Advertising Louise Taylor
Circulation Catherine Macdiva
DTP Zinobia Docrat/Sean Bacher
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All rights reserved. No edi-
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not be responsible or in any
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The inclusion or exclusion of
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board advocates or rejects its
use either generally or in any
particular field or fields.
Industrial
Solar Geysers
T
he first
s y s -
t e ms
i m -
ported i nto
South Africa
weren’ t de-
signed for our
weather con-
ditions with
our extreme
variations of
temperature.
Moreover, there weren’t any official stan-
dards against which to test and certify these
systems, never mind trained people who
knew how to install it correctly.
Standards in place
But things have changed a lot in the last two
years and those South Africans interested in
going the solar water heater (SWH) route,
can now rest assure that they can choose
a product which has been duly tested and
approved by the SABS. Installers are also
ensuring that they are getting the necessary
certification as accredited installers in an at-
tempt to support the ever increasing demand
in the SWH industry. “SA Mechanical Engi-
neer” speaks to Theo Rautenbach, director
of Nast Environmental Projects, trading as
Nastep Solar, about the latest developments
in this market.
“Solar water heating is pretty much virgin
territory for most South Africans,” he says.
“However, over the last two years we’ve
gone through all the steps to ensure we’re
putting a tried and tested product into a
market where the demand is growing by
the day.”
Understanding the concept
“The general public and even the industrial
sector in South Africa does not fully under-
stand solar heating as yet,” explains Theo.
“For example, the first question many people
still ask is; How does the system generate
electricity? And secondly; What happens
when the sun does not shine?
“The answer to the first question is that
SWH does not generate electricity but rather
heats water up thermally in order to save
you using electricity to do so. Secondly,
these systems have electric elements to
heat water electrically when there isn’t
enough radiation from the sun to heat the
water sufficiently, or when needed at night.
This is used in conjunction with an auto-
matic electronic control system to ensure
that warm water supply is consistent and
that the maximum saving of electricity is
guaranteed.”
Industrial Applications
Industry also often suffers from the misper-
ception that solar water heating is just for
residential applications, but it can in fact
be applied to large industrial applications
as well where big hot water tanks or boil-
ers can be heated through the use of our
solar heat collectors. “We own the sole
distribution rights for products from the
Himin Solar Energy Group, arguably the
Many people in South Africa have burnt their fingers with solar water heating.
In good faith they tried to do the right thing to save energy, but come a hail
storm or the freezing winter and the system fails miserably, smashing the prod-
uct together with any confidence people might have had in solar water heating.
Theo Rautenbach
Demand is growing by the day
'O THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
leading solar thermal water heater manufacturer in
the world,” says Theo.
“They produce in excess of 1.5 million SWH’s per
year and have re-designed their product range to suit
the South African market, not only for our unique
conditions, but also to conform to the SABS standards
that are now in place. We can now design systems
suitable for commercial, industrial and residential use
according to each specific individual requirement.”
Hail damage
The foremost critical factor for the South African
market, especially on the Highveld, are hail damage.
The first solar systems that came into the country
were particularly prone to destruction by hail, but
the SABS developed suitable hail tests for the glass
tubes which are utilised in the heat collectors and
evacuated SWH’s.
“Not only did Himin specially redevelop the tubes for
our conditions, but we also had to look at changing
other features of the SWH’s such as plastic caps
and other components to survive our harsh African
weather conditions.” explains Theo.
The technology
The evacuated glass tubes are the key component
of thermal solar collectors and SWH’s. The evacu-
ated tube is similar to a congenital Dewar flask
and consists of two borosilicate glass tubes. The
outer tube is manufactured to be chemical and hail
resistant. The outer side of the inner tube is elec-
troplated with a special coating containing mainly
aluminium, copper and stainless steel, as well as
other secret ingredients. The coated inner tube is
closed at one end and sealed at the other end to the
outer tube. The space between the outer and inner
tube is evacuated to virtually eliminate heat loss
by conduction and convection. The special coating
“collects” the radiation from the sun and transfers it
into the centre of the tube. Low pressure solar water
heaters utilises the tubes by transferring the heat into
POWER GENERATION
Various types of SWH’s are available on the market
South Africa does not fully understand
solar heating as yet
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ '´
Himin installations overseas
People should spend a bit of time to make sure they’re
getting a system that was designed to operate properly
in our South African conditions
POWER GENERATION
The systerm is configurable to inidivdual requirements
the water which flows directly into the tubes
when the SWH tank is filled. High pressure
units make use of heat pipes to transfer the
heat into the water. A heat pipe is a vacuum
tube as described above, but instead of water, a
thin copper pipe filled with a glycol mix which
has an evaporation temperature of around 190
degrees Celsius is held in the centre of the tube
with the help of an aluminium fin. The copper
pipe stands proud of the tube and fits onto
the SWH tank where it acts as the “element”
or “heat exchanger”. In both low and high
pressure instances, a natural thermo siphon
process causes the heated water or glycol mix
to move upwards and into the “geyser” tank
and in doing so, heating the water.
Various types of SWH’s are available on the
market. These vary from integrated low pres-
sure and high pressure units which consists of
a tank, a solar collector and a stand all in one,
to split systems where the solar collector and
the tank is installed separate from one another
in order that the items could be installed in
such a manner that the tank can be located
at a different place than the collector, such as
inside the roof, or on the side of a building.
Nastep promotes vacuum tube technology. “Flat plate
solar collectors” is the other technology utilised in
SWH’s. It works on the same principal in the sense
that it makes use of a solar collector to heat the water
or glycol which is in turn used to heat the water in
the solar tank. The main difference between vacuum
tubes and flat panels is the fact that vacuum tubes
are more effective than flat panels in cloudy weather
as vacuum tubes utilise the ultra violet rays from
the sun to create the hot water where flat plates
rely more on actual sunlight and the heat from the
sun to generate the necessary heat.
Clear illustration
To illustrate how hot this copper pipe protruding from
the top of the vacuum tube becomes, Theo pulls one
of the glass tubes from a high pressure integrated
display unit in the office and places it outside in
'' THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
the sun for 10 minutes. We could
not touch the copper pipe when it
came back inside, it was sizzling
hot which clearly illustrates how
it acts as the ‘element’ that heats
up water inside the tank.
Beware!
There are still pitfalls in the market
in terms of SWH products that
simply don’t make the grade and
people should spend a bit of time
to make sure they’re getting a
system that was designed to oper-
ate properly in our South African
conditions, and that the system
is supported by a company which
can provide a solid track record. I
would advise the public to conduct
their own research with regards
to the origin of the product or the components
on offer to ensure that it is supported by a well
known international brand while the South African
manufacturing scene is still finding its feet.” Theo
says in conclusion.
The Nastep system is available in two options, hi low pressure
“Apart from a five-year guarantee backed up by
Himin, all our Eskom accredited products, are
SABS approved. In addition, all our installations
are undertaken by experienced installers who have
specifically been certified to install SWH’s. This is
a vital criterion to check on when considering the
purchasing of a solar heating system.”
Theo Rautenbach, Nastep, Tel: (011) 678-9030, Email:
theo@nastep.co.za
SWHs such as integrated low pressure and high
pressure units are available
POWER GENERATION
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POWER GENERATION NEWS
POWER GENERATION NEWS
Expansion for solar
Since launching in
Cape Town in late
2009, the South
African subsidiary
of French parent
company Solaire-
direct has been
focused primarily
on large scale grid
connected projects
of more than one
megawatt.
Following an initial
start-up phase, during which the company established and
trained a technical team, Solairedirect Southern Africa now
offers a complete technical package to the specifier market,
such as consulting engineers, builders and architects.
“After a successful introductory year to the local market we
are ready to tackle the increased demand for solar power
in a broader context,” says Solairedirect Southern Africa
managing director Ryan Hammond. “Solairedirect South-
ern Africa is now able to provide a full product design and
operating service to all market sectors, mirroring our sister
companies around the world in countries such as France,
Peace of mind
Heavy lifting, transportation and plant installation special-
ist, Vanguard has received high praise for the successful
completion of a project for Eskom’s Koeberg Nuclear Power
Station in Cape Town. The company was contracted to
provide the required rigging and transportation support dur-
ing Outage 118 at Africa’s only nuclear power station.
Negating the need for a prime mover, a self-propelled
modular trailer (SPMT) and three modular axles were
selected by the company to transport three existing 170t
LP rotors, three 20t LP rotor covers and a 200t generator
from the turbine hall to a temporary storage facility.
“The SPMT was particularly suited to this application due
to the short transport distance and on-site work,” says
Dennis Scholfield, Cape Town Branch Manager, Vanguard.
The SPMT’s turning axles also competently navigate sharp
corners, providing additional flexibility on site.
The entire project extended over a period of two months
and the old rotors were removed one at a time, as the
new ones arrived on site. At the storage area, a 400t
hydraulic gantry system and four 50t slings were utilised
to lift each rotor off the SPMT and lower it to the ground.
Dennis says: “This eliminated the need for mobile cranes
– a cost-cutting exercise that helped us to secure the
contract in the first place.” To control the ambient tem-
peratures of the rotors, the rotor covers were placed on
top as a final step.
Due to the nature of the facility and the strict safety
standards, all staff members had to undergo a week of
induction and police clearance prior to the commence-
ment of the project. In addition, the gantries had to be
load tested before and after every lift.
Vanguard, Bryan Hodgkinson, Tel: (011) 616 1800
Fax: (011) 615 1012, E-mail: bryanh@vanguard.co.za
Sensing technology
ABB has made a strategic investment in Pentalum Technolo-
gies, an Israel-based company developing advanced wind
sensing technology for control and optimization of wind
turbines and wind farms.
Pentalum is developing an innovative LIDAR (light detection
and ranging) technology that remotely senses the wind vector
in front of wind turbines in order to optimally align them to
incoming wind flow. Pentalum’s system is also applicable
to wind forecasting and site assessment, and is designed to
significantly increase wind farm efficiency at a lower cost
per site than existing measurement technologies.
The investment was made through ABB Technology Ventures,
ABB’s venture capital arm, which invests in early and growth
stage companies with technologies of strategic importance
to the industry segments the company serves. Other partici-
pants in funding for Pentalum included Cedar Fund, which
led the round; and Evergreen Venture Partners, both from
Israel; and Draper Fischer Jurvetson from the US.
“Cost and complexity issues are hampering the widespread
adoption of optimisation systems for wind power,” said Girish
Nadkarni, head of ABB Technology Ventures. “We have
invested in Pentalum because we believe their technical ap-
proach will significantly improve profitability for developers
and operators of this important renewable energy source.”
ABB, John Mousaw, Tel: +41 43 317 4708, Email: media.relations@
ch.abb.com
Ryan Hammond
'4 THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
POWER GENERATION NEWS
Morocco, Chile and India. Our business model has evolved
to non-grid connected systems where we design, build and
operate smaller solar power projects for a variety of smaller
commercial and industrial customers.”
A vertically integrated solar power company generating elec-
tricity using solar photovoltaic technology, the Solairedirect
Group not only offers a complete technical design, build and
operate service but also manufactures solar photovoltaic
modules at their facility in Bellville, Cape Town, where the
Group’s manufacturing subsidiary, Solairedirect Technologies,
has been operating since 2009.
“We are just as encouraged by the demand for smaller, non-
grid connected systems and again we intend to be a leader
in the provision of such systems across Southern Africa.”
Solairedirect Southern Africa, Ryan Hammond, Tel: (021) 953-6000
Fax: (021) 951-2840, Email: rhammond@solairedirect.co.za
New markets
Elquip Solutions will soon be making new inroads into
the local generator market. This it plans to do through
a distributorship agreement with Deep Sea Electronics
UK (DSE), manufacturers of specialised solutions for the
power generation industry.
Elquip Solutions will also be joining forces with Hagar
Marketing to bring Deep Sea’s extensive product range of
battery chargers and modules to South African industry.
“It could not be a better time for us to expand into the
power generation industry”, Mike Cronin, managing
director of Elquip Solutions, says. “With the demand
for electricity outstripping supply, especially in Africa,
there is a growing need not only for generators, but also
for the kind of control products and modules that Deep
Sea makes. We are thrilled to be partnering with such a
dynamic and experienced company.”
Deep Sea, established in 1975, designs and manufactures
a range of control modules for generator sets, from basic
manual and auto start modules, through to comprehen-
sive load share modules designed to synchronise multiple
generating sets.
The company manufactures in excess of 200,000 mod-
ules per year, distributing to over 60 countries worldwide
from its UK-based headquarters, including into Africa
and South Africa.
Product Development Manager John Ruddock says that,
although Deep Sea has existing clients in South Africa,
the company is looking forward to the partnership with
Elquip Solutions and Hagar to reach new markets.
Elquip Solutions, Mike Cronin, Tel: (011) 826-7117
Fax: (011) 826-7118, Email: mike@elquip.co.za, Website: www.
elquip.co.za
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COMPRESSORS, AIR MOTORS & VACUUM PUMPS
S
A Mechanical Engineer”
meets with Louwrens
Erasmus, general man-
ager of Rand-Air in
Wadeville, to get the low down
on the compressor rental busi-
ness. “We offer a unique rental
concept called Industrial Plant
Rental (IPR), introduced to the
market in the late nineties,”
he says. “Today we have ten
branches spread throughout
southern Africa and our fleet
has grown to over 600 com-
pressors and generators with
no fewer than 14 compressor models to
choose from, all fully portable with a wheeled
chassis to ensure mobility on site.”
Throughout southern Africa
Many specialised products have been
developed for the construction, mining,
quarrying, petrochemical, heavy engineer-
ing, manufacturing industries. “Besides
offering the latest compressor technology
by upgrading our machines continuously,
our main focus is customer service,” says
Louwrens. “Very often companies approach
us with a unique problem which we’ll
try our best to solve. If we don’t have a
machine for a specific need, we’ll first try
and source one and only then refer the
client to a company which may be better
suited to help.
“For example, we now have low pressure
compressors as low as 2.5 bar, specifically
for water reticulation application,” adds
Louwrens. “These machines are also portable
and available in either diesel or electric
versions. At the other end of the scale, our
high pressure machines now go all the way
Companies approach us with a unique problem
which we’ll try our best to solve
up to 35 bar for those customers who are upgrading drill
rigs, for example, to high pressure ones.”
Specialised units
A growing compressed air market for the company is the
oil and gas exploration fields along the west coast of Africa.
“We’ve started gearing up for this Zone 2 market specifi-
cally,” says Louwrens. “It’s not a very active sector in South
Africa, but all the way up to Angola, Nigeria and Ghana the
oil rig platforms use these specialised tier-two compressors
on both a temporary and permanent basis. The Atlas Copco
PTS 916 is a diesel driven compressor in this class.
“In terms of pipelines locally, we’ve developed a special
solution for the dewatering and cleaning of pipelines like the
Mozambique line and the one currently being built between
Johannesburg and Durban,” Louwrens adds. “Apart from
testing the pipe for leakages, our compressor system is
also used to push the pig through the line to remove all the
water and dirt from the line. Whether pushing the pig one
or a thousand kilometres, we calculate the specific needs
such as low-pressure or high-pressure requirements, pipe
length and diameter and then work out a tailor-made solu-
tion to carry the work out effectively. Also, this dehydration
system does not require specially trained operators and can
be operated by the client’s people on site.”
Specs
The dehydration system is environmentally friendly and de-
signed to prevent any spillage or contamination. “The system
consists of one or more oil-free compressors with specially
sized air-drying equipment capable of achieving a dew point
ranging between -40ºC to -70ºC,” says Louwrens. “This
system is manufactured by us and has earned a worldwide
reputation for dependability and the minimum maintenance.
An ideal machine for this application is the Atlas Copco PTS
916, a diesel driven compressor and currently the best-in-
class of our range of oil-free compressors.”
Apart from general compressor units for the construction
industry and associated projects, Rand-Air is increasingly
servicing the mining industry and also focuses on the air
needs of the petrochemical industry, especially during
planned shutdowns. “We have a thorough understanding of
the distinct requirements of the petrochemical and refinery
industries,” Louwrens says. “Logistically we’re geared up
to handle large multi-unit projects without interrupting
day-to-day operations.
Carefree Air,
The Rental
Option
Many companies prefer to hire compres-
sors rather than buying, because there
are many advantages in renting. Firstly,
companies don’t have to fork out the pur-
chase price and more importantly, they
don’t have to worry about maintenance
and hiring the necessary technicians to
service the machinery regularly and cor-
rectly. Renting also provides the end user
with the choice of hiring different size
machines for specific jobs or upgrading to
larger machines without busting the bank.
Louwrens Erasmus
'o THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
Contingencies
“For critical processes such as catalyst
regeneration and main air blowers, for
example, where an unexpected failure
could cost the company dearly, we
work closely with the customers to
develop and implement a contingency
plan,” he explains. “We’ll determine
the exact equipment and specifications
which may be needed on short notice,
thereby reducing the downtime of criti-
cal installations to the minimum in the
event of a failure.”
Whether a planned outage or when
compressors and dryers go down unex-
pectedly, the mobility of the company’s
fleet of compressors allows them to
react swiftly. “Just the other day we
had a frantic call from a contractor on
a mining project who had to wait ten
days for his failed air system to be fixed,”
recalls Louwrens in closing.
“To meet the minimum capacity required
We’ve developed a special solution for the
dewatering and cleaning of pipelines
COMPRESSORS, AIR MOTORS & VACUUM PUMPS
A 500 kVa generator being tranported to site on a trailer
Generator sets are also hired out
All compressors are fully portable
The oil-free compressors Rand Air hires out
to continue operations, eight compressors were needed, the
first of which was delivered to site that very afternoon. We
scrambled to source compressors from various depots which
our service team installed in a very limited space available, but
that same evening the last two arrived and we could restore
the client’s air supply while they waited ten days for their
machines to be repaired.”
Louwrens Erasmus, Rand-Air, Tel: (011) 345-0749, Email: louwrens.
erasmus@za.atlascopco.com
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A
llen Cockfield of Artic Driers
visits compressor installa-
tions all over the country
on a daily basis where he
comes across a host of basic mistakes
made in terms of air system design
that hampers efficient compressed
air production to varying degrees.
“SA Mechanical Engineer” speaks
to him about his ever-growing list
of faults people make.
Booklet
“About five years ago we started
compiling lists of the errors made in
compressor houses. This list contin-
ues to grow together with the list of
our suggestions on how to solve the problems,” he
says. “It has now ended up being about 80 pages
long which has prompted us to produce a booklet as
a guideline on proper compressor system design.
“We won’t be selling it, but it will be distributed to
qualifying clients who really want to make a serious
effort about saving energy, not only to save money,
but also because they care for the environment,”
Allen says. “Besides energy-saving design sugges-
tions, we also cover oil, waste water management
and even fire suppression systems for a compressor
house in the booklet.”
Savings
Inadequate design and the selection of ancillary
equipment can inflict huge costs on a company
during the life of a compressor installation. “These
costs are hidden and can add up to hundreds of
thousands, deflating a company’s profits,” says
Allen. “In addition, these costs escalate along with
the cost of electricity every year. We’ve proven over
and over that it pays to consult with a professional
supplier at the design stage of a compressor sys-
tem to ensure that pitfalls are avoided right from
the start.”
Just recently, an Artic Driers audit of a compressor
house proved that the company in fact did not need
to buy an extra compressor as they were about to
do. “They were about to spend nearly two million
on a new compressor, but after our audit showed
a high waste percentage in the system, they ad-
dressed the leakages first and in the end they could
carry on without having to install an additional
new machine.
“A pressure drop of 1 bar in an air system is equal
to a wasted power cost of R23,777 per annum
when operating a 28 m³/min, 185 kW air
compressor,” Allen explains. “This value does
not include the cost of maintenance and it’s
worth remembering that power costs are set
to increase dramatically in the coming years.
We find that leakages in plants vary between
2% and 50% which amounts to a considerable
amount if you consider some compressor houses
have anything between 6 to 18 compressors
installed.”
Pipelines
The correct size and installation of pipeline that
conveys the compressed air to various work
stations is as important as buying the right
compressor for an application. “A very com-
mon problem occurs when people assume the
entire pipeline should be 50mm in diameter, for
example, just because the compressor comes
out with that size outlet,” explains Allen. “The
piping system then chokes the air flow and the
Inadequate design and the selection of ancillary
equipment can inflict huge costs
COMPRESSORS, AIR MOTORS & VACUUM PUMPS
Right from the Start
Compressors are energy guzzlers in the first place, but if the compressed air system as a whole is not de-
signed properly, it could easily double the running costs of a compressor system. This is not only due to the
general wastage in a poorly designed system, but also because the system’s efficiency has a direct influence
on the effective performance of the compressor itself.
Allen Cockfield of Artic Dryers
'8 THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
compressor then off-loads. While the outlets are
in fact starved of air pressure. The diameter of the
compressor outlet must not to be used as a guide
for pipeline design as compressor manufacturers
often select very tight discharge ports.
“The selection of the compressor house air main
piping to feed the plant should be designed to
achieve an air pipeline speed of 3m/sec,” adds Allen.
“This will ensure that compressors do not offload
prematurely due to pipeline pressure restrictions.
It is common to find an excess of air compressors
running in idle mode as they are unable to deliver
the air to the plant due to undersized and restrictive
compressor hose piping.”
New plant
When setting up a new compressor plant it is im-
perative, prior to buying the new compressor, to
have a professional compressed air audit done in
order to determine the plant’s actual air consump-
tion thereby avoiding over or under sizing of the
new compressor and drying equipment. “When
selecting air compressors for specific volumes
and quality requirements, it may be well worth
considering variable speed drives,” adds Allen. “By
the same token, VSD isn’t necessarily the answer
to all situations.”
Over specification can lead to increased long term
running costs
COMPRESSORS, AIR MOTORS & VACUUM PUMPS
Filters and dryers
Another area where people tend to make the wrong
choices regards filters and air dryers. “When select-
ing air filters and an energy efficient air dryer that
provides the required dew point with minimal air
pressure losses, people often make the mistake of
simply buying the dryer with the lowest dew point
when it’s not necessarily suitable for a specific ap-
plication,” Allen explains. “Over specification can
lead to increased long term running costs while de-
centralised air drying, with different types of dryers,
might be considered to reduce energy wastage.
“If low dew points are required, for example minus
40ºC, consider dew point controllers for dryers
with capacities greater than 14m³/min. Above
21m³/min, heat regenerative dryers, also with dew
point controllers, should be mandatory as these
have lower purge air requirements and the ensuing
power savings are enormous. The recovery of the
extra capital expenditure is often under one year
and then it’s a continuous payback for the rest of
the life of dryer.”
It’s best practice to change out dirty filter elements
that are blocked and showing high differential
pressures. “The use of power efficient OEM filter
cartridges, especially those with a pleated con-
struction, is crucial to energy saving,” says Allen.
“These filters normally have a lower initial Δp and
will inflict a lower pressure loss while providing
longer service intervals when compared with a
simple wound cartridge.”
Ventilation
Allen’s list goes on, but to conclude he touches
on a very important aspect of a compressor
system, the design of the compressor house
itself. “The design of the compressor house
should take cognisance of good ventilation and
the efficient re-use of waste heat from the com-
pressors to provide heating for washrooms or
nearby processes within the plant,” he says.
“A 1ºC rise in the inlet temperature to the com-
pressor will decrease the compressor’s output
capacity by 1%. It is also good practice to split
the compressor house’s power supply, ideally
from two separate transformers to minimise
compressed air disruption in the event of a
transformer failure. It is equally wise to install
an emergency air supply treatment system to
ensure that air dryers are able handle to the
air from a temporary hot and oil contaminated
diesel compressor. This could mean extra after
coolers and filters have to be installed but never
is the saying more true than in our industry:
“forewarned is forearmed.” With professional
and thorough pre-planning, your compressed
air system should be a boon a not a bane to
your business.”
Allen Cockfeld, Artic Dryers International, Tel: (011)
425-3484, Email: allen@articdriers.co.za
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OILS & LUBRICATION
A
ccording to a report by the Rose Founda-
tion, it is estimated that approximately 10
million used oil filters are generated every
year in South Africa. Most of these find
their way onto our landfill sites. As they constitute
hazardous waste product, they should be collected
and recycled, not just thrown away.
We’re all responsible
The Waste Act stipulates that generators of used
motor oil are now legally obliged to properly collect,
store and manage used oil. In the South African
motor industry, the formal workshops are largely
compliant, but the informal sector and DIY motor
mechanics pose ongoing challenges when it comes
to reinforcing environmentally-responsible used oil
recovery and recycling.
Section 24 of The South African Constitution states
that ‘everyone has the right to an environment that
is not harmful to their health or well being and to
have their environment protected through reason-
able legislative measures’.
In this regard the government has passed the Waste
Act No 59 of 2008. This ground-breaking legisla-
tion places the responsibility on all South Africans
to avoid, minimise, re-use, recycle, treat and, as
a last resort, dispose of their waste.
On home turf
In support of this legislation, the Rose Foundation is
focusing its attention on driving compliance in the
informal motor mechanic industry in South Africa
as well as amongst DIY motor enthusiasts.
The size of the informal sector is estimated to be
responsible for generating approximately 20 to 30
million litres of used oil every year. Motor vehicle
statistics in South Africa show that more than 50%
of cars on the roads are older than 10 years. These
vehicles are serviced approximately once a year by
informal mechanics or DIY enthusiasts.
The problem is that these informal mechanics often
lack suitable premises and many cars are serviced
on the side of the road or wherever there is a de-
mand – an illegal practice that often results in the
used motor oil, which has been drained from the
vehicle, being dumped directly onto the ground or
in the storm water system.
Roadside business
Polokwane is an example where informal mechan-
ics were servicing cars on the side of a busy main
road and dumping their used oil on the pavement.
A concerned business owner in the area contacted
the Rose Foundation who mobilised the local
municipality into cleaning up this dumped oil and
fining the mechanics.
“Although these mechanics were fined and the streets
sprayed with chemicals, the practice is continuing to
this day. If the municipality doesn’t want to prevent
this practice they should be accountable for the
cleaning and rehabilitation of the polluted area. I
appreciate your interest in this matter and the action
the municipality took to prevent this practice but
it seems to be futile,” the concerned businessman
and resident wrote to the Foundation.
Controlling Old Oil
Disposal
Industry alone isn’t to blame for the pollution of the underground
water, it’s the responsibility of each individual, however small the
contribution, to make sure they don’t add to the threat of con-
taminating the environment. Every oil spill, even in your backyard
or in the veld behind your factory, adds to the contamination of
underground water.
Automotive Waste Management staff busy crushing filters at the
FFs at the refiners branch in Chloorkop
Collector audits being conducted by WSP Environmental at Old
Oil Man in Chamdor, Krugersdorp
The Waste Act stipulates that generators of used motor
oil are now legally obliged manage it
oO THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
OILS & LUBRICATION
Store rather than dump
“Unfortunately, this is a difficult practice to manage
and we have seen an ongoing trend towards illegal
kerbside servicing,” says Raj Lochan, CEO of the
Rose Foundation. “As part of our campaign focused
on this sector, we plan to conduct a series of site
visits and encourage the use of Sumpies to promote
the responsible collection and storage of used oil
among DIY mechanics. At the same time we will
drive the educational aspect on why they need to
store this oil rather than dump it.”
“It is often a case of a lack of knowledge of the
harmful effects of used oil on our environment,
rather than disregard, which leads to situations
such as these,” adds Raj.
Unaccounted for
“We are extremely concerned about the huge
amounts of used oil that are being generated by
the informal and DIY mechanics, and not being
recycled.” It is estimated that South Africa gener-
ates approximately 120 million litres of used oil a
year. Of this, 80 million litres is being recovered
for recycling – which means that about 40 million
litres are unaccounted for!
“We, therefore, appeal to all mechanics and anyone
who does work on their cars to please think twice
before dumping their used oil. Not only does it damage
our environment but it is also now an illegal practice,
thanks to the Waste Act,” concludes Raj.
Rose Foundation Tel: 021 448 7492, Fax: 021 448 7563
E-mail: usedoil@iafrica.com, Website: www.rosefounda-
tion.org.za
Power Indaba
Power projects in Africa are increasingly viewed
as attractive investments by foreign and African
investors says Nicole Smith, project director
of the Power Indaba Summit which is taking
place from 14-16 March 2011 at the CTICC in
Cape Town, South Africa. Development finance
organisations, multi-lateral financiers, private
investors, fund managers as well as government
and utility delegations will be attending this
high-level summit, particularly from countries
in the SADC and COMESA regions and further
afield from West African power houses Nigeria
and Ghana.
Power Indaba lends itself to one-to-one meeting
sessions that will offer unparalleled discussions
between financiers, project developers and utility
and government delegations.
Power Indaba runs parallel to the African Utility
Week conference and exhibition which features
Eskom’s CEO Brian Dames and the South African
Minister of Energy, Elizabeth Dipuo Peters as
headline speakers.Communications manager:
Annemarie Roodbol, Tel: (021) 700 3558, Email:
annemarie.roodbol@clarionevents.com
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ o´
T
o adapt to market requirements
and growing demand, Fuchs
Lubricants South Africa is in
the process of expanding and
upgrading their laboratory, manufacturing
and warehousing facility in Isando. “SA
Mechanical Engineer” gets in touch with
Mitch Launspach, inland sales manager.
“Three years ago we closed down the
manufacturing plant in Durban and
moved it up here,” he says. “The one
extended blending plant in Isando now
produces more than the two did together
in the past. Durban now operates purely as a sales
office, as does our branch in Welkom.
Quality control
Most importantly, the laboratories, where blending
and quality control is managed, have also been
extended and modernised with new equipment to
ensure consistency in production. “As the biggest
independent lubrication manufacturer in the world, all
Fuchs products are developed and formulated
in Germany, but we can
now also
fine-tune a lubricant in our local laboratory to
individual specific requirements when required,”
says Mitch.
Food grades
Apart from offering various ranges of greases and
oils for mining and industrial applications, including
a full range of products for the automotive industry,
Fuchs is now reaching out to the food processing
industry. “In South Africa, food grade oils and greases
have always been a niche market, but since the
Fuchs group bought out the entire Shell food grade
lubricants division a couple of months ago, we’ll
increase our marketing drive of the Cassida range
of lubricants locally,” explains Mitch.
“The range will be marketed in the Shell container
until such time as our new food grade production
plant is completed and it becomes one of our branded
products. Apart from having a whole new product on
board, we expect to gain access to a wider spectrum
of companies who we’ve not dealt with before in
terms of general industrial lubricants.
Mitch Launspach, Fuchs Lubricants, Tel: (011) 565-9613,
Email: mitchl@fuchsoil.co.za
We can now also fine-tune a lubricant in our local
laboratory to individual specific requirements
Customising Lubes
The new warehouse at Fuchs’ new site
Mitch Launspach
Lubrication requirements specified by OEMs have been refined to such an extent today that the same engine
will often have different requirements from one country to the next, based, for example, on the quality of the
fuel available in each country.
OILS & LUBRICATION
o' THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
New compressors for South Africa
Dalgakiran Kompresör, is one of the leading firms in the
Turkish machine manufacturing sector and made their mark
in the industry by starting with a Samandira factory in 1965
in a 100sqm workshop. To this day Dalgakiran continues
production in this area. In 2004, the established manufac-
turing capacity was increased twofold and the closed area
was increased to 30 000 square meters comprising of three
factories. Today, Dalgakiran Kompresör has reached the
capacity of producing 5 000 screw compressors and 5 000
piston compressors in established operations in Russia, the
Ukraine, Germany and the UK. The company exports to over
60 countries through more than 35 distributors worldwide,
to become a world renowned compressor manufacturer and
supplier. The range of productas is now also available to
the South African industry through Compressor Valves and
Accessories, the sole supplier of Dalgakiranör in Southern
Africa.
The product range includes the DVK series of screw compres-
sors, the Tidy range screw compressors and a full range of
air dryers and filters.
Compressor Valves & Accessories (Pty) Ltd, Tel: (011) 908-6580
Fax: (011) 908-6581, Email: eddie.cva@telkomsa.net
Market Forum
Supplier of choice
The largest locally designed and manufactured
mixer drives for a mining project in the DRC was
supplied by industrial gear technology specialist,
Hansen Transmissions South Africa.
“These 5 QVPN3 gearboxes were the first and
largest mixer drive units as well as the first of
this type to be manufactured in South Africa
and our local engineering team therefore had to
design the units from scratch,” explains Hansen
Transmissions managing director, Fritz Fourie.
The order called for one off 260kW motor
- 180.3 kW absorbed (90/1 ratio), two off
300kW motor - 238 kW absorbed (90/1 ratio)
and two off 220kW motor - 176 kW absorbed
(80/1 ratio). The gearboxes drive vertical mixers
with very long shafts attached to the vertical
output shaft which has a mixer paddle attached
to the end for stirring liquid material. No design
modifications were required.
“We received the order via an Australian based company and,
although we have dealt with the South African company for
a number of years, this was the first time that the Australian
office placed a direct order with us. The fact that Hansen
Transmissions South Africa has stacked up many years of
experience in the mining industry, made us the supplier of
choice”, says Fritz.
Hansen Transmissions SA, Fritz Fourie, Managing Director, Tel: (011)
397-2495, Fax: (011) 397 2585, Email: ffourie@hansentransmissions.
com, Web: www.hansen.co.za
Potentially disastrous consequences
“One of our global key customers did not hesitate to call me
when two of the plants experienced persistent early failures
of Large Sized Bearings, (LSBs).” Says SKF Senior Applica-
tion Engineer, Darren Chetty
“I visited the site at the beginning of this year, inspected the
store, determined that the supposedly SKF branded LSBs
were in fact not SKF bearings and immediately quarantined
the bearings to prevent them from being put into production
and we informed our customer that the counterfeit bearings
could cause damage to plant and equipment if they were
put into service,” explains Darren.
He explains that it was a fairly long process to get the case
started when taking prosecution, statements, attorneys, the
customer’s group legal department, SKF’s input, etc, into
consideration. “In fact we are all involved and we had to
make sure that everything was in place and that the correct
legal procedures were followed to allow both the customer
and SKF to successfully pursue the investigations.
Once the bearings were identified as counterfeit and quar-
antined, the internal investigation of the customer’s group
legal department revealed the source of the bearings and
immediately made the information, including invoices,
available to SKF.”
Darren says that the potentially disastrous consequences of
using counterfeit products and the damages these products
can do to the customer’s expensive equipment and the all
important bottom line, can never be over emphasised
SKF South Africa (Pty) Ltd, Samantha Joubert, Tel: (011) 821-3500,
Fax: (011) 821-3501, Email: samantha.joubert@skf.com, Website:
www.skf.co.za
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ oo
Market Forum
No skidding
Cooper’s new split tapered roller bearings, with a significantly
higher axial load capacity than the conventional 02 series
bearing, have been successfully trialed for 12 months on an
underground booster fan operating in a coal mine.
Matthew Tyler of Bearings International (BI) says the trial
was initiated after the mine experienced repeated failures
on the fan’s drive end bearing, creating costly unscheduled
downtime. Cooper taper bearings have also been success-
fully installed on a cooling fan at Lafarge Cement, with no
performance issues arising to date.
“The Cooper split tapered bearing is intended for the ‘fixed’
bearing position of shafts where there is both radial and axial
loading and where our ‘GR’ cylindrical bearing is unsuitable,”
says Matthew. “It’s constructed with two opposed rows of
rollers to take axial loading in either direction.”
Another new Cooper design is the 100 series developed
for the fan industry, which has opened up an entirely new
market for the company. The new series, also suitable for
blowers and materials handling systems, features a lower
base to centre height, which makes for a compact and lighter
design that eliminates the skidding potential of conventional
roller bearings.
Bearings International, Matthew Tyler, Tel: (011) 345-8000
Repair right now
DPI Plastics product manager Mike De Villiers
notes that the recently-launched Durolok Internal
Restraint Joint for PVCU and PVCM pipes can
cast a ray of light on the country’s water-logged
infrastructure, as the product requires no additional
tools or specialised expertise for installation.
“A major challenge facing municipalities at the mo-
ment is that permanent repairs to infrastructure
damage can only take place after the water levels
have subsided and the moisture content of the soil
has returned to an acceptable level,” he explains.
“In the case of pipelines, however, Durolok Piping
can be used in both temporary and permanent repairs, as
the system does not rely on support from backfill or thrust
blocks for the containment of end-thrust. The final result is
considerable time savings in terms of the re-instatement of
pipeline services, and the prevention of premature failure
in future flooding events.”
Mike notes, “The internal restraint system eliminates the
need for trained operators to fit the restraint device, and also
cuts out the inherent risk of human errors, which include
over-tightening of the clamps and tie bars in traditional
systems,” he concludes.
DPI Plastics Contact , Martine Goodchild , Tel: (011) 345-5600
Fax: (011) 866-2230, Email: mgoodchild@dpiplastics.co.za, Web:
www.dpiplastics.co.za
Additive and blend controller
Honeywell has introduced the Fusion4 single stream con-
troller (SSC), designed for companies in the petroleum and
petrochemical refining, storage and distribution sectors. The
solution is the first integrated additive and blend controller
to comply with the EU’s Measuring Instruments Directive
(MID). It features a unique blending algorithm that helps
companies achieve the highest blending accuracy to reduce
off-spec blends and the costs associated with waste.
“The fuels marketing industry has become more and more
focused on the precision of the systems they use to create
petrochemical product combinations,” says Henri Tausch,
vice president and general manager, Honeywell Field Solu-
o4 THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
Filter houses
Rand Technical Services (RTS) has constructed three
filter houses at Shaft 16 at platinum giant Impala
Platinum’s (Implats’s) Rustenburg site, for the purpose
of providing clean air for large compressors.
RTS marketing manager Richard Cooper explains that the
new 16 Shaft site is coming in operation, and require com-
pressed air for underground drilling purposes.
“The air from the atmosphere is of poor quality and filter-
ing it is necessary, therefore three filter houses have been
constructed next to the compressor building,” Richard says.
He adds that each filter house has a pipe duct to feed air
into each compressor.
The construction took approximately nine months and
involved installing a first stage of spin filters across each
filter house. After passing through the first stage the air is
directed through a second stage consisting of pocket filters,
from where it is ducted to the compressors
“Many filtration methods require costly maintenance and
filter membrane replacement on an ongoing basis, but RTS’s
systems do not need specialised maintenance, saving costs
and ensuring a reduced downtime. Furthermore, the filter
houses protect the compressors against the elements, which
they are vulnerable to in the often harsh mining environ-
ment,” notes Cooper.
Rand Technical Services, Richard Cooper, Tel: (012) 993-9620
Email: richard@rtsafrica.co.za, Website: www.rts@edx.co.za
Market Forum
First deliveries
Ecochem’s new slurry pumps, currently available ex-stock,
are identical in all respects to centrifugal models installed
at many mines across South Africa.
tions. “The petroleum and petrochemical industries can
now benefit from a smart controller that not only increases
their accuracy but is also faster and easier to configure and
maintain.”
The Fusion4 SSC helps increase accuracy as it reduces
calibration times by up to 25% compared with manual
calibration. A calibration wizard automatically captures
every device calibration transaction, including time
stamp, calibration volumes and meter serial numbers.
A simple dashboard displays complete device hardware
diagnostics on a single screen to reduce the time spent
on fault finding by up to 25%.
Honeywell, Debbie Rae, Tel: (011) 695-8000, Email: has@
honeywell.com
The pumps are manufactured in China utilising capacity made
redundant by decreased global demand and an agreement
terminated by a North American firm. The Chinese have
been manufacturing the range since 1990.
The range comprises both horizontal and vertical spindle
models in capacities from 3,5 to 1500 litres per second,
and backed by a complete line of spare parts. Ecochem is
claiming to be able to meet any order within ten weeks in
case of an out-of-stock situation.
Prices are comparable with those of commonly available
equivalents, and a distribution agreement with Becker Engi-
neering ensures prompt consultation and delivery throughout
South Africa.
Ecochem Pumps (Pty) Ltd, Ed Lemke, Tel: (011) 455-5710
Fax: (011) 455-5842, E-mail: ed@ecochempumps.co.za
Ecochem Pumps’ managing director Ed Lemke (left) and technical
sales manager Corné Kleyn with first deliveries of the company’s
new, imported centrifugal slurry pump range
Phenomenal in taste
Stettyn Cellar, nestled in the eastern foothills of the Klein
Drakenstein Mountains, supplies millions of litres of wine
to First Cape for export. Stettyn selected an Atlas Copco NG
nitrogen generator to deliver pure nitrogen to two of the main
applications in the wine making process.
Wines produced by Stettyn are bottled and sold overseas
under the popular brand of First Cape, and despite the global
recession, Stettyn has sustained a steady 60% growth rate
over the past four years. “We supply approximately 10% of
an estimated 32 million litres of wine exported by the well
known First Cape, where we also have a 7% share holding,”
Cellar wine master Treurnicht Albie elaborates.
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ oo
Market Forum
World’s first ethylene
tetramerisation unit
Sasol has announced plans to construct the
world’s first commercial ethylene tetramerisa-
tion unit, capable of producing over 100000
tons per year of combined 1-octene and 1-
hexene, at its Lake Charles production site, in
Louisiana, USA.
The unit will utilise Sasol’s proprietary technology to con-
vert ethylene to 1-octene and 1-hexene. This process was
developed in Sasol’s R&D laboratories in South Africa, and
selectively produces alpha olefins required for the high growth
polymer markets. Construction will commence in 2011, and
the plant will reach beneficial operation in mid-2013.
André de Ruyter, Senior Group Executive Operations of Sasol,
said: “The additional capacity to be built at Lake Charles
When Stettyn Cellar were involved in an expansion project in
2009, Albie, a wine maker with 30 years of practical wine
making experience under his belt, had occasion to taste wine
produced purely under a nitrogen blanket.
“These wines could only be described as phenomenal in taste,
colour and flavour, characteristics prized by any wine maker
- a clear indication that investing in a NG nitrogen generator
to deliver nitrogen would enhance our wine quality as well as
our well reputation and we agreed to install a NG nitrogen
generator in specific key areas,” continues Albie.
Enquiries for a supplier of a quality nitrogen generator unit
went ahead and, with a reputation for designing, engineer-
ing and manufacturing a range of class leading NG Nitrogen
generators, Atlas Copco South Africa emerged
as a clear winner.
The generator was delivered on time,
unpacked and installed without any
hitches by our cellar staff that has had
no formal engineering training. This is
yet another major cost saving as we
did not have pay for nor rely on spe-
cialised artisans to do the job. The
system runs every day and has been
operating seamlessly and efficiently
since the day we installed the unit.”
Atlas Copco, Charl Ackerman, Philip Herselman, Tel: (011) 821-
9113,, Fax: (011) 525-9847, Email: charl.ackerman@za.atlacopco.
com, Philip.herselman@za.atlascopco.com
Stettyn Cellar produces 6 500 tons of grapes per annnum
Significant increase
The acquisition by the Watson-Marlow Pumps group of the
MasoSine sinusoidal pump range strengthens its position
in the positive displacement pump market. It significantly
increases the company’s flow rate range, as well as enabling
it to handle much higher viscosities, while maintaining the
important low whole life cost.
“MasoSine positive displacement
pumps are the result
of more than 25
years of engineer-
ing innovation and
product development,” says Watson-Mar-
low Bredel SA general manager, Nico van
Schalkwyk.
“The MasoSine pump’s exclusive sinusoidal rotor over-
comes the limitations of conventional rotary lobe pumps
to produce powerful suction with low shear, low pulsation,
and gentle handling. They are also simple to use and easy
to maintain. Food customers can be confident that they are
certified to 3-A Sanitary Standards, Inc. (3-A SSI), the industry
standard for food sanitation and hygiene,” he adds.
MasoSine’s exclusive single shaft and single
sinusoidal rotor overcomes the need for the
complex timing gears and multiple seals associ-
ated with conventional rotary lobe pumps. The
pumps are used in a wide variety of applications
across industry, including: Dairy, Curd, Prepared
Foods, Meat & Poultry, Bakery, Confectionary,
Beverage, Cosmetics, Pharmaceuticals and
Industrial.
Watson-Marlow Bredel SA, Nico van Schalkwyk, Tel:
(011) 796-2960
oo THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
Breaking systems
Dellner Brakes recently appointed Voith Turbo South Africa
as exclusive distributor of its range of brakes on the African
continent.
Dellner Brakes AB, based in Falun, Sweden and part of the
Dellner Group, was established in 1947 and is a global
leader in the manufacture and supply of braking systems
to diverse industries including marine, cranes and winches,
energy (wind and wave power), etc. The company has pro-
duced disc brakes for industrial applications since the mid
60´s. During the early years, the brakes were incorporated
in machines which were designed by Dellner Brakes but
other markets seeking a robust and reliable brake design
soon discovered those products. Reliability and safety are
Dellner watchwords as the brakes are increasingly utilised
in emergency shutdowns, stopping and parking brake sys-
tems. Voith Turbo (Pty) Ltd, Roy Webster, Tel: (011) 418-4036,
Fax : (011) 418-4080, Email : roy.webster@voith.com, Website :
www.rsa.voithturbo.com
Market Forum
will help Sasol’s global customer base achieve its long-term
polymer and elastomer growth prospects, and the invest-
ment reflects our confidence in the competiveness of the US
petrochemicals industry”.
Sasol, Jacqui O’Sullivan, Tel: (011) 441-3252, Email: jacqui.osul-
livan@sasol.com, Website: www.sasol.com
Reduce costs
Magnet, specialists in the design and installation of the lat-
est energy efficiency systems used in industrial, commercial
and residential applications, supplies a range of heat pumps
designed to reduce conventional heating costs.
“These heat pumps are ideal for any situation where hot
water or other fluids, are required at temperatures at or
Magnet supplies a range of heat pumps designed to reduce
conventional heating costs. For user convenience, these heat
pumps connect easily to existing systems.
below 60°C. The operating system is based on removing
heat from the air and transferring the energy to water or
other liquid, which become hotter,” says Brian Howarth,
Magnet’s managing director. “The by-product of the heat
pump system is cold air or water, which may be ducted for
air-conditioning in larger industrial applications.
“The costs of heating water will be reduced by about 70%
if electricity is the current energy source. An important
feature of these heat pumps is they can be connected to
an existing geyser, replacing the standard 3 kW electric
element heater.”
Typical applications for heat pumps include industrial ablution
blocks, hospitals, offices, schools, hotels and homes.
Magnet, Brian Howarth, Managing Director, Tel: (031) 274 1096,
Email: brianh@magnetgroup.co.za, Web: www.magnetgroup.co.za
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ o¯
Recent acquisition
BMG has extended its interests in the electronics sector, with
the recent acquisition of Velo Control, specialists in drives
and instrumentation.
“Although electronic and software based control products
are not new to BMG’s extensive portfolio of engineering
components and systems, the investment in Velo Control
strengthens the company’s position in the local electronics
industry,” says Gavin Pelser, director of BMG - Bearing Man
Group - part of Invicta Holdings Limited.
“Velo Control, which distributes and services the full range
of Danfoss electronic variable speed drive systems, now
forms part of the BMG Drives division and will provide a
sales, training, repair, maintenance and spare parts service
throughout Southern Africa.”
BMG – Bearing Man Group, Veronique Bezuidenhout, Tel: (031)
576-6221, Fax: (031) 576-6383, Email veroniqueb@bmgworld.net ,
Web www.bmgworld.net
Market Forum
BMG acquires Velo Control
Network grows
The Weir Minerals Africa pump rental store in Middelburg
celebrated its first anniversary by achieving R1 million
turnover in its twelfth month of operation.
Ian Farquhar, product manager dewatering at Weir Minerals
Africa, says this remarkable achievement can be attributed
to having the appropriate pump stock for customer applica-
tions in that region coupled with the necessary people skills.
“Since this pump rental store opened its doors in October
2009, it has grown from strength to strength and to date
has achieved well in excess of its original target.”
The pump rental store has a solid customer focus, and its
pump stockholding was purposefully selected in accordance
with the pumping needs of customers in the Middelburg/
Witbank coalfields, but Howard Jones, rental and submers-
ible manager at Weir Minerals Africa, is quick to point out
that this is not just about mining operations but also other
companies who need pumps and ancillary equipment.
Weir Minerals Africa (Pty) Ltd, Rene Calitz, Tel: (011) 929 2622,
Website: www.weirminerals.com
Commended for ‘job well done’
Actom Air Pollution Control (MikroPul) recently completed
one of the largest gas-cleaning contracts it has ever un-
dertaken. The turnkey contract, worth over R100-million,
was for Assmang’s Cato Ridge Works near Durban, where
actom Air Pollution Control provided a system for capturing
fumes generated by the tapping operations of the plant’s
six furnaces.
The contract, awarded by Assmang in mid-2008 and completed
in July 2010, included civils and the supply and installation
of electrical and automated control systems.
The secondary gas-cleaning system, which complements
Cato Ridge’s primary fume-extraction system, comprises a
large eight-module reverse pulse filter baghouse covering
a ground area of 1200 m2, plus ancillary equipment that
includes extensive ducting and extraction hoods attached to
jib cranes that swing the hoods into position at the furnaces
during tapping operations.
The filtration plant, with an extraction capacity of 775 000
m3/hr, is designed to serve tapping operations of up to four
furnaces simultaneously. Emissions are guaranteed at well
below 15 mg/Nm
3
.
Actom Air Pollution Control, Des Tuck, Tel (011) 478-0456, Fax (011)
478-0371, E-mail des.tuck@mikropul.co.za
o8 THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
Index to Advertisers
Please fax us if you wish to subscribe to “SA Mechanical En-
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Subscription
On The Move
Artic Driers 30
AST Pyroshield Inside Front Cover
Atlas Copco Outside Back Cover
Ceccato 14
Clyde Bergemann 16
Compressor Valves 37
EMS 24
Esab Outside Front Cover
Ingersoll Rand 20
Kaeser 17
Mulit Alloys 20
Producut 26
Rand Air 10
Weir Minerals Inside Back Cover
SAID 4
Yellotec 30, 36
Zest 22
Danielle Badenhorst has been appointed as Communica-
tions and Administration Manager of the Southern African
Association for Energy Efficiency (SAEE).
Edith Kikonyogo has been elected as Chairperson of
the Mining and Industrial Energy Optimization (MIEO)
Executive Committee for the 2011/2012 term. Edith is
also Consulting Services Manager at ABB.
Neil Stander has been appointed as the new Regional
Sales Manager for Honeywell.
Ludowici Africa has appointed Fanie Swart as General
Manager for the African region.
Golder has appointed Adam Bennett into the company’s
newly formed Air Quality Management Division.
James Dubber has been appointed as Junior Project
Engineer at SEW Eurodrive.
Bosch Projects has appointed Norman Hind, senior project
cost engineer and Kobus Nel, drawing office manager.
Danielle Badenhorst Edith Kikonyogot
James Dubber Kobus Nel Norman Hind
Neil Stander
Adam Bennett Fanie Swart
ExcellehL
Miherals
SoluLiohs
1RVKOKUGQRGTCVKQPUCPFOKPKOKUG
FQYPVKOGYKVJVJG9GKT/KPGTCNU/KNN
%KTEWKV5QNWVKQP
WhaL qoes ih musL qo ouL. SwifL. SLeady. No
boLLlehecks. 1he Weir Mill CircuiL SoluLioh - Lhe mosL
durable equipmehL for your mosL criLical processes -
delivers lohqeviLy, capaciLy ahd operaLihq efȨciehcy.
AL a lower 1CO, Weir's superior hydraulic desiqh ahd
Lhe combihaLioh of Ȩve performahce leadihq brahds
ehsures cohsLahL plahL LhrouqhpuL. 8ecause we khow
iL's more Lhah |usL your asseL oh Lhe lihe.
lor furLher ihformaLioh, please cohLacL us oh:
+27 (0)11 º2º 2ó00
WARMAN
'
CehLrifuqal Slurry lumps
ENVIROTECH
'
DewaLerihq CehLrifuqal lumps
VULCO
'
Wear kesisLahL Lihihqs
CAVEX
'
Hydrocyclohes
ISOGATE
'
Slurry valves
1HkO
lS ¥OÜk
DECkEASlNC?
Ü
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1
Mill Circuit Solution.indd 1 2010/05/19 07:55:34 AM
THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´ oO
ExcellehL
Miherals
SoluLiohs
1RVKOKUGQRGTCVKQPUCPFOKPKOKUG
FQYPVKOGYKVJVJG9GKT/KPGTCNU/KNN
%KTEWKV5QNWVKQP
WhaL qoes ih musL qo ouL. SwifL. SLeady. No
boLLlehecks. 1he Weir Mill CircuiL SoluLioh - Lhe mosL
durable equipmehL for your mosL criLical processes -
delivers lohqeviLy, capaciLy ahd operaLihq efȨciehcy.
AL a lower 1CO, Weir's superior hydraulic desiqh ahd
Lhe combihaLioh of Ȩve performahce leadihq brahds
ehsures cohsLahL plahL LhrouqhpuL. 8ecause we khow
iL's more Lhah |usL your asseL oh Lhe lihe.
lor furLher ihformaLioh, please cohLacL us oh:
+27 (0)11 º2º 2ó00
WARMAN
'
CehLrifuqal Slurry lumps
ENVIROTECH
'
DewaLerihq CehLrifuqal lumps
VULCO
'
Wear kesisLahL Lihihqs
CAVEX
'
Hydrocyclohes
ISOGATE
'
Slurry valves
1HkO
lS ¥OÜk
DECkEASlNC?
Ü
l
C
Ü
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1
Mill Circuit Solution.indd 1 2010/05/19 07:55:34 AM
4O THF oOLTH /FF¦C/N MFCH/N¦C/¦ FNC¦NFFF \O¦ o´ Februarv 'O´´
Together we make the Difference.
Clean Energy Efficient Air - for Every Industry and our Planet.
Incomparable Compressed Air Efficiency, Quality, Reliability,
Power & Diversity - for every Application.
Atlas Copco South Africa (Pty) Ltd
P O Box 14110, Witfield 1467
Tel: (011) 821 9000, Fax: (011) 821 9106/7
E-Mail: air.compressors@za.atlascopco.com
www.atlascopco.com
www.atlascopco.co.za
Atlas Copco is a leading manufacturer of fully comprehensive, technologically advanced air packages
as well as their own range of fully compatible filters and dryers. The right solution for every application.
Legendary customer care & after sales service. Full range of generators with super silent options also available.
•Dryers •Filters •After Coolers
•Water Separators •Automatic Drains
•Compressors (oil-free & oil-injected) •Scroll
•Tooth •Rotary Screw •Centrifugal
•Portable Air Compressors
•Power Generators

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