A Welcome from the Encampment Commander

On behalf of Southeast Region Commander Col Matthew Sharkey, your respective Wing Commanders and the entire Senior and Cadet Staff, I would like to personally welcome you to the 2005-2006 Southeast Region Winter Encampment. This encampment is a basic introduction to the military way of life and an

opportunity to experience leadership from both a follower's and leader's point of view. It is an excellent way of meeting new cadets from around the Southeast Region and establishing an esprit de corps among the “next generation” of cadets. Work hard, listen to your cadet leaders, and, most importantly, do your best. Encampments are not meant to be easy. They are meant to challenge you physically and mentally so Force Auxiliary.

that, through hard work and discipline, you will be come a better cadet member of the United States Air

ROBERT MASIKER, Lt Col, CAP Encampment Commander 2005-2006 Southeast Region Winter Encampment

Welcome Letter from the Cadet Commander
Welcome to the 2005-2006 Southeast Region Winter Encampment! This week is going to be one of the of the military way of life, particularly the Air Force, and you will learn to be a better person, cadet, and future officer. This encampment may make you feel as though you want to quit and go home at the most challenging yet rewarding weeks of your life. You will leave next week with a greater understanding

beginning, but I promise if you stick with it and graduate from the encampment, you will look back on the experience and be glad you completed the challenge. While at Tyndall, you will have the opportunity to tour the F-15 and the new F-22A squadron. You will experience the Air Force lifestyle from dawn to dusk and will have the chance to become friends with cadets from all over the country at this encampment,

some of who you will know for years to come. I am still friends with cadets from my doolie encampment 5 years ago! Remember that all those who are on staff have been in the same position you are in now, and are here to help you learn and succeed. Have fun, stay alert, and listen to the cadet staff and seniors above you, and you will have a great encampment.

ANDREW ANDERSON, C/Lt Col, CAP Cadet Commander 2005-2006 Southeast Region Winter Encampment

ENCAMPMENT STAFF BIOGRAPHIES
Lt Col Robert Masiker
Encampment Commander
Lt Col Masiker joined Civil Air Patrol in 1964 while he was stationed at Pope AFB, North Carolina. He has served in the Florida Wing as Squadron Commander, Group Commander and as the Director of Cadet Programs. Out of all of his CAP experiences, he finds working with the cadets at the Squadron level is the most rewarding. Col Masiker spent his youth on a farm in Western New York State. He later went on to work on the C130 in the United States Air Force. Col Masiker is currently the Squadron Commander of Florida Wing’s Lantana Cadet Squadron and works as an electronic technician in Palm Beach County.

Capt Virginia Knudsen
Encampment Deputy Commander
Capt Knudsen presently serves as Commander of SER-FL-802, ASPIRA Leadership Cadet Squadron in Leisure City, FL. Once moving to Florida from New Jersey, she became an active Moral Leadership Officer with the Fort Lauderdale Composite Squadron and presently is ADY as squadron MLO, group 6 MLO and aircrew scanner. Capt Knudsen is a recipient of a Meritorious Award for her work as last year’s SER Winter Encampment DC, a Commander’s Commendation, and FLWG 2002 Moral Leadership Officer of the Year. Recently receiving the President’s Community Service Bronze Award, she holds a Master of Ministry, a Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies, and a Bachelor of Practical Ministry in Chaplaincy and Biblical Counseling. She holds Senior Ratings in Cadet Programs and Moral Leadership Specialty Tracks. Past Positions Held: SER Encampment Deputy Commander, 03-04, 04-05 FLWG Special Activities Selection Board Member, 2004 FLWG Conference Moral Leadership Presenter, 2003 2004 Group 6 Moral Leadership Officer Deputy Commander for Cadets, SER-FL-337 FLWG Homestead Winter Encampment MLO, 2003 Moral Leadership Officer, SER-FL-337 CAP Activities Attended: FLWG Glades Ranger School FLWG Ceremonial Guard SER Chaplain Service Staff College, 2004 Group 6 NCO Training Weekend Group 6 Curry Training Weekend FLWG Conference 2002-2004 Numerous Bivouacs and FTXs

C/Lt Col Andrew Anderson
Encampment Cadet Commander
Colonel Anderson will be serving as this year’s Cadet Commander. Anderson, 20, joined Civil Air Patrol in November of 1998. He presently attends Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, FL in pursuit of a major in Aviation Management. Col Anderson currently works in Airport Flight Operations at Orlando-Sanford International Airport and is a multi-engine rated pilot. Past Positions Held: Flight Commander, FLWG Encampment 2001 Squadron Commander, SER Encampment 03-04 2005 Florida Wing Encampment Commander Cadet Commander, SER-FL-116 Group 4 CAC Vice-Chairman 2001 Group 4 CAC Chairman 2002 CAP Activities Attended: FLWG Winter Encampment 1999-2000 FLWG Summer Encampment 2001, 2005 SER Winter Encampments 2003, 2004 FLWG Color Guard Competition, 2001-2003 FLWG Special Activities Selection Board, 2000-2003 AFA Air Warfare Symposium, 2001-2004

C/Col Taylor Olson
RCLS Cadet Advisor to the Director

C/Col Taylor Olsen has been in Civil Air Patrol since September 1999 and is

originally from the Dakota Ridge Composite Squadron in Colorado. For the last year, C/Col Olsen has been focusing his attention to Colorado Wing activities and has served as a cadet commander at his home encampment. He was invited to attend RCLS through a CAP Florida Wing Member and is excited to receive such an values such as leadership and development.

opportunity. At RCLS he will teach classes focusing on teamwork and unit core

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SENIOR STAFF: Lt Col Robert Masiker, Commander Capt Virginia Knudsen, Deputy Commander Capt Linus Gomez, Commandant of Cadets Maj Chris Triana, Chief Tactical Officer Maj Margarita Mesones, Admin Officer 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco, Public Affairs Officer CADET EXECUTIVE STAFF: C/Lt Col Andrew Anderson, Cadet Commander C/Lt Col Elliot Korona, Cadet Deputy Commander C/Maj Chris Karbowiak, Cadet Executive Officer CADET SUPPORT STAFF: C/Maj Benjamin North, Stan/Eval C/2d Lt Matthew Abbott, Stan/Eval C/2d Lt Mark Todd, Stan/Eval C/CMSgt Chris Curtis, Stan/Eval C/Capt Christina Johnson, C/PAO C/Capt Dustin Corey, PAO C/1st Lt Autumn Owens, PAO C/2d Lt Katie Owens, PAO C/SSgt Thomas Durivou, PAO C/2d Lt Tiffani Sullivan, Admin CADET COMMAND STAFF: C/1st Lt Michael Staples, India Flight Commander

C/Capt Binoy Patel, Squadron 1 Commander

C/Lt Col Christopher Todd, Squadron 2 Commander C/1st Lt Kelly Weeks, Kilo Flight Commander C/Maj Steven Mellard, Squadron 3 Commander C/Capt Jena McGovern, Squadron 4 Commander C/CMSgt Troy Odierno, Squadron 1 1st Sergeant C/SMSgt Justin Sloate, Squadron 2 1st Sergeant C/SMSgt Jennifer Jay, Squadron 4 1st Sergeant C/Capt Tyler Hiatt, Alpha Flight Commander C/2d Lt Paul Owens, Bravo Flight Commander C/2d Lt Jamie Lane, Lima Flight Commander C/SSgt Robert Frisch, Bravo Flight Sergeant

C/CMSgt Curtis Hightower, Juliet Flight Commander

C/SSgt Adrian Amadiz, Alpha Flight Sergeant C/MSgt Joshua McCain, Charlie Flight Sergeant

C/CMSgt Matthew Keyes, Squadron 3 1st Sergeant

C/SMSgt Matthew Grason, Delta Flight Sergeant

C/MSgt Matthew Campbell, Echo Flight Sergeant C/MSgt George Sterner, Gulf Flight Sergeant

C/TSgt Thomas Teamoh, Foxtrot Flight Sergeant C/TSgt Thomas Lynch, Hotel Flight Sergeant

C/2d Lt Jeffrey Barnard, Charlie Flight Commander

C/CMSgt Matthew Abbott, Delta Flight Commander C/2d Lt Cory Kowall, Foxtrot Flight Commander C/2d Lt Patrick Griffith, Gulf Flight Commander

C/1st Lt Matthew Castriotta, Echo Flight Commander C/CMSgt Justus Carey, Juliet Flight Sergeant C/SMSgt Sara Umana, Kilo Flight Sergeant C/SSgt Christine Ortiz, Lima Flight Sergeant

C/TSgt Bejamin Hovies, India Flight Sergeant

Tomorrow’s Menu
BREAKFAST LUNCH Not provided Hamburgers Mashed potatoes w/gravy Carrots Toss salad Apples, Red Bananas BBQ Beef Cubes Corn Steamed Rice Gravy Toss Salad Apples, Red Bananas

MEDICAL OFFICER’S CORNER
Hydration: The number one cause for a trip to the medical officer is dehydration. All cadets must remember to drink frequently. It is important to monitor the color of your urine. A hydrated person’s urine will be clear. Anything darker and you are not drinking enough water. Balanced Diet: The prearranged meal in the mess hall has been designed to provide you with a healthy, well-balanced diet. When possible, cadets should remember to eat foods high in fiber in order to maintain the normal digestive process and avoid constipation and stomach pains. Proper Wear of Boots: Your boots should be worn tight enough to support the ankle and prevent the rubbing of your socks against the boot causing blisters. Boots that are too tight can restrict circulation.

DINNER

About Tyndall AFB
Tyndall Air Force Base, the "Home of Air Dominance", is housing one of the most powerful fighter jets on the face of the earth, the F-22A Raptor. Tyndall is home of the 325th Fighter Wing of the 1st Air Force and, is the base is operated under the Air Education and Training Command of the United States Air Force. The 1st, 2nd, and 95th operate the F-15C and D; the 43rd operates the F-22A. It is quite an opportunity for us to be able to train at a restricted AFB. Remember, while you are training at encampment, right next door, new Air Force pilots are training as well. Only a select few are stationed on a restricted Air Force Base, and an even smaller amount actually get to see the F-22A. You will not be disappointed by staying at Tyndall Air Force Base.

The “Daily Doolie” is the official publication of the Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region Winter Encampment 05-06 SER Winter Encampment 05-06 PAO Staff: 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco C/Capt Chrissie Johnson C/Capt Dustin Corey C/1st Lt Autumn Owens C/2d Lt Katie Owens C/SSgt Thomas Durivou

Doolies on the Doorstep
check-in procedures. During check in, Doolies received their number one tool: the Basic Cadet Operating Instruction booklet. The BCOI contains basic, need-to-know information such as the cadet oath and chain of command. At the luggage check, Doolies heard one common phrase: “Do you have any chewing gum, food, an iPod, walkman or pointy objects?” After lunch, the senior staff welcomed the Doolies to Encampment and briefed them on a few key points. Issues included safety while on base, personal hygiene, and the At 0900, the NCO Academy opened its doors to what appeared to be a never-ending line of cadets. Cadets (a.k.a. Doolies) were geared with luggage from head to toe as they moved over the threshold to be greeted by the support staff. The support staff instructed Doolies on signing-in, and updated them on the proper

importance of listening to their cadet staff. In his welcome letter, Cadet Commander C/Lt Col Andrew Anderson assured the cadets that by the time they graduated from the encampment, they would leave with the knowledge of how to be a better person, cadet and future officer. With over 250 CAP personnel at this year’s event, the SER Winter Encampment has grown to be one of CAP’s most anticipated experiences.

Hair Force
Yesterday in their common room, the staff of Squadron 4 had a grooming class. Flight Sergeant Umana, along with the rest of the Squadron 4 cadet staff, taught their cadets how to properly fix and maintain their hair. The class was interactive, with the staff serving as instructional hair stylists…the CAP way. CAPM 39-1 states, “Hair will be neatly arranged and shaped to present a conservative feminine appearance. Hair in the back may touch, but not fall below, the bottom edge of the collar.” By doing the Doolies’ hair according to regulation, Sgt Umana and the staff of Squadron 4 have gone the extra mile to ensure that their cadets portray an image of professionalism. Doolie Ashley Grayson from Juliet flight said, “I liked it, I didn’t know how to do my hair and they taught me.”

Encampment has a Roommate
Of course we all know we are gathered here this week to attend the SER Winter Encampment but did you know that we are not alone? Next door to the Doolies and hiding behind the walls or around the corners are the cadets attending the 2005 Region Cadet Leadership School. The RCLS program teaches the cadets core values like integrity, volunteer service, excellence and respect. They are being instructed by Maj Hugh Sloan and Maj Michael Goblet who believe that their students are attending this course because they have “hopes and dreams” and are here to “grow and learn”. The RCLS course is difficult and challenging, and it gives cadets the chance to grow as officers and individuals, as well as a team. In a class taught earlier by Maj Goblet, the question was “what does integrity mean to you?” Various cadets raised their hands with partial answers and by the end of the lesson, the cadets were enlightened that their previous views of integrity and what it means did not equate to a proper definition. Major Goblet stated that any definition of integrity is not a proper definition unless it contained the word “honor”. Honor is a quality that no one can take away from someone; however, it is a quality that must be surrendered. This was just the beginning of the new ideas that will be presented to these cadets during the 2005 RCLS.

DAY ONE AWARDS Doolie of the Day NCO of the Day Officer of the Day Flight of the Day Squadron of the Day Spirit Flight of the Day Best Inspection Brian Tignor, Foxtrot Flight C/MSgt Adrian Amadiz C/2d Lt Jamie Lane Golf Flight Squadron 4 Juliet Flight Squadron 3

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Bed Time!
Yesterday after check-in, Doolies were assigned with the task of moving beds and other sleeping materials. The amount of attendees at encampment this year is so large that Doolies had to move additional sleeping gear into the barracks. Although this might not seem like such a memorable event to some, these Doolies used this time to apply a very essential tool—teamwork. While moving the beds, the cadets got just a taste of the teamwork that will be required of them this encampment.

Menu for tomorrow
BREAKFAST Scrambled Eggs Baked Sausage Hash Browns Oatmeal Cereal Red Apples Bananas

LUNCH

Tuna and Noodles Succotash Steamed Rice Gravy Toss salad Red Apples Bananas

There are four E’s in excellence but only one in ECHO!

Encampment Population
Cadets in Flight: Cadet Staff: RCLS Cadets: Guests: TOTAL: 162 42 57 2 287

DINNER

Spaghetti w/meat sauce Calico corn Steamed rice Gravy Toss Salad Red Apples Bananas

The “Daily Doolie” is the official publication of the Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region Winter Encampment 05-06 SER Winter Encampment 05-06 PAO Staff: 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco Capt Michelle Becker C/Capt Chrissie Johnson C/Capt Dustin Corey C/1st Lt Autumn Owens C/2d Lt Katie Owens C/SSgt Thomas Durivou

Tyndall Tours
Yesterday, Doolies arrived at various locations around Tyndall to tour Southeast Air Defense Sector (SEADS), The F-15 Hangar and the First Fighter Squadron. Major Connor Blackwood, USAF, led a group of Doolies around an F-15 and inside its maintenance hangar for a presentation of the jet’s components. Doolies learned that the F-15 contains two engines, ten-foot long afterburners, and a gun that can hold Capt Brad Funk of the USAF 1st Fighter Squadron invited Doolies to take a seat in his classroom to imagine themselves as student pilots. Then he went straight into a “hack,” the Air Force way to sequence pilots’ watches. He then explained the protocol of the air mission. The speech created a mental picture of what it is like to take off and undergo the ACM (dogfight) procedure. Throughout the tour, Doolies took in lots of information from our Air Force hosts. The F-15 is truly an impressive and inspiring aircraft and the tour will surely be an experience not soon forgotten. 940 rounds of ammunition. Cadet A1C Ben Arthur from Tennessee said that the tour was “Pretty good. I forgot that F-15s were so big and…the size of a tennis court!” Doolies also met a host of USAF speakers including SrA Barr and SSgt Slater who hold the responsibility of scheduling F-15 maintenance checks and repair work. F15s are not usually kept inside hangars unless a hurricane threatens their safety or maintenance work is needed. “I found the maintenance part the most interesting because I’m just generally interested in maintenance. might end Since up my doing alongside brother wants to be a pilot, I maintenance

[him],” said C/Amn Brennan McGinley, Mississippi.

Revised Chain of Command
SENIOR STAFF: Lt Col Robert Masiker, Commander Capt Virginia Knudsen, Deputy Commander Capt Linus Gomez, Commandant of Cadets Maj Chris Triana, Chief Tactical Officer Maj Margarita Mesones, Admin Officer 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco, Public Affairs Officer Capt Margaret Merkich, Senior Medical Officer Maj Emily Matthews, Medical Officer 1st Lt William Ryan, Medical Officer CADET EXECUTIVE STAFF: C/Lt Col Andrew Anderson, Cadet Commander C/Lt Col Elliott Korona, Cadet Deputy Commander C/Maj Chris Karbowiak, Cadet Executive Officer CADET SUPPORT STAFF: C/Maj Benjamin North, Stan/Eval OIC C/2d Lt Matthew Abbott, Stan/Eval C/Capt Christina Johnson, PAO OIC C/Capt Dustin Corey, PAO C/1st Lt Autumn Owens, PAO C/2d Lt Katie Owens, PAO C/SSgt Thomas Durivou, PAO C/2d Lt Tiffani Sullivan, Admin CADET COMMAND STAFF: C/Capt Binoy Patel, Squadron 1 Commander C/Lt Col Christopher Todd, Squadron 2 Commander C/2d Lt Curtis Hightower, India Flight Commander C/1st Lt Christina Zarrilli, Juliet Flight Commander C/Maj Steven Mellard, Squadron 3 Commander C/Capt Jena McGovern, Squadron 4 Commander C/CMSgt Troy Odierno, Squadron 1 1st Sergeant C/SMSgt Justin Sloate, Squadron 2 1st Sergeant C/SMSgt Jennifer Jay, Squadron 4 1st Sergeant C/Capt Tyler Hiatt, Alpha Flight Commander C/2d Lt Paul Owens, Bravo Flight Commander C/1st Lt Jamie Lane, Kilo Flight Commander C/TSgt Robert Frisch, Bravo Flight Sergeant C/SSgt Adrian Amadiz, Alpha Flight Sergeant C/CMSgt Joshua McCain, Charlie Flight Sergeant C/TSgt Thomas Teamoh, Echo Flight Sergeant C/Capt Ryan McCord, Hotel Flight Commander

C/CMSgt Matthew Keyes, Squadron 3 1st Sergeant

C/MSgt Matthew Campbell, Delta Flight Sergeant C/MSgt George Sterner, Foxtrot Flight Sergeant C/SMSgt Matthew Grason, Gulf Flight Sergeant C/TSgt Benjamin Hovies, Hotel Flight Sergeant

C/2d Lt Jeffrey Barnard, Charlie Flight Commander

C/CMSgt Matthew Abbott, Delta Flight Commander

C/1st Lt Matthew Castriotta, Echo Flight Commander C/CMSgt Justus Carey, India Flight Sergeant C/SMSgt Sara Umana, Juliet Flight Sergeant C/2d Lt Cory Kowall, Foxtrot Flight Commander C/2d Lt Mark Todd, Golf Flight Commander C/SSgt Christine Ortiz, Kilo Flight Sergeant

Doolies “Take to the Skies”
Yesterday, as cadets toured the 1st Fighter Squadron and its aircraft, a small, select group of Doolies were taken to experience an awesome joyride. These Doolies “took to the sky” in F-15C Flight Simulators. When these Doolies arrived at the Sims, they began with a preflight briefing with current F-15 pilots who explained different procedures that can be done during the ride in the F-15. Then after their briefing, it was time to leave the ground, “virtually”. Doolies began lining up by the doors to the Sims. Inside these F-15s were fully functional, replica cockpits with a full, 360° view around them. As soon as the order was given, the Doolies were airborne. Shortly after the cadets left the ground, the urge to demonstrate the F-15S weapons capability became apparent. Repeatedly, these cadets took down the opposing aircraft. After all the Doolies cycled through, the F-15 pilots went up in a mock-up of a real dogfight. The pilots demonstrated some of the maneuvers that they discussed earlier. Doolies left with big smiles on their faces, asking to have an F-15 Sim installed in their homes.

DAY THREE AWARDS Doolie of the Day Officer of the Day NCO of the Day Flight of the Day Squadron of the Day Spirit Flight of the Day Best Inspection TACO of the Day Alejandro Lopez, Hotel Flight C/1st Lt Curtis Hightower Flight Sgt Christine Ortiz Bravo Flight Squadron Four India Flight Hotel Flight Lt Joshua Garay

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5 P’s
Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance. Doolies hear the 5 P’s being preached all throughout the day. The question that often remains is, “When will I ever use the 5 P’s?” The RCLS cadets have the answer to that question…as long as you are a leader. Yesterday, they went through an enlightening class on how to run Unit Meetings. Each cadet is expected to turn in an essay on the way in which their squadron is currently running their meetings. They are to bring out the weaknesses and the strengths in their squadron, and provide possible methods for repairing and sustaining the respective areas. The essay should not only point out strengths and weaknesses of the unit and the possible ways of making progress, but also present a way for them to use the 5 P’s, prior planning prevents poor performance, which is the subliminal message in this RCLS class. Remember that the 5 P’s are not just another thing to regurgitate to the staff when asked, but are words for leaders to live by.

Menu for tomorrow
BREAKFAST Scrambled Eggs Baked Sausage Hash Browns Oatmeal Cereal Red Apples Bananas

MEDICAL OFFICER’S CORNER
If you are having any problems with your feet, please immediately notify your TACO and visit one of the medical officers. The main cause of foot ailments are oversized boots. To prevent rubbing, try wearing two pairs of socks. This will provide extra cushioning to your feet and provide a closer, more comfortable fit. We’d like to congratulate Golf Flight as the healthiest flight of the encampment so far. Congratulations to their cadet staff for taking good care of the doolies under their command.

LUNCH

Savory Baked Chicken Steamed Carrots Steamed Rice Gravy Toss Salad Red Apples Banana Baked Ham Mashed Potatoes Green Beans Gravy Toss Salad Red Apples Bananas

DINNER

Recently, the niece of one of my co-workers wrote a very special poem. It made a significant impact on me and I would now like to pass her writings on to you. Enjoy! Lt Col Robert Masiker. I read of a reverend who stood to speak at the funeral of his friend…he referred to the dates on her tombstone from the beginning…to the end. He noted that first came the date of her birth and spoke of the following date with tears, but he said what mattered most of all was the dash between those years. For that dash represents all the time that she spent alive on earth…And now only those who loved her know what that little line is worth. For it matters not, how much we own; the cars…the house…the cash. What matters is how we live and love and how we spend our dash. So think about this long and hard…are there things you’d like to change? For you never know how much time is left. (You could be at “dash mid-range,”) If we could just slow down enough to consider what’s true and real and always try to understand the way other people feel. And be less quick to anger, and show appreciation more and love the people in our lives…like we’ve never loved before. If we treat each other with respect, and more often wear a smile…remembering that this special dash might only last a little while. So, when your eulogy’s being read with your life’s action to rehash…would you be proud of the things they say about how you spent your dash?

It’s How We Spend Our Dash…

- Linda Ellis “Linda’s Lyrics”

The “Daily Doolie” is the official publication of the Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region Winter Encampment 05-06 SER Winter Encampment 05-06 PAO Staff: 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco Capt Michelle Becker C/Capt Chrissie Johnson C/Capt Dustin Corey C/1st Lt Autumn Owens C/2d Lt Katie Owens C/SSgt Thomas Durivou

Banquet Highlights

Last night, at The Tyndall AFB Enlisted Club, guests arrived in droves for the SER Winter Encampment Banquet. From the Doolies to the SER Commander, Col Matthew Sharkey, the Banquet was packed for a night no one would soon forget. Guests were served turkey, mashed potatoes, vegetables and gravy and always kept their glasses charged. Deputy Cadet Commander, C/Lt Col Korona served as Mr. Vice for the dining-in. Col Korona opened the mess, introduced the Grog and the rules of the mess. The Grog is a concoction of substances that most humans wouldn’t normally consume at one time. Highlights at the Grog included C/Col Olson’s “Grogging” by PAO Staff, C/Capt Matthew Castriotta’s meeting of the ladies, and Cadet Executive Officer C/Maj Christopher Karbowiak singing of “You’ve lost that loving feeling.” After the Grog was closed, Col Matthew Sharkey presented Commanders Commendations, Meritorious Service Awards and presented Lt Col Robert Masiker, Encampment Commander, with an Exceptional Service Award. To close the

banquet, Doolies had a chance to perform skits they created in front of the mess. Skits ranged from imitating encampment scenarios, impersonating staff members and home videos of pure entertainment by the executive staff. C/Lt Col Anderson, Encampment Cadet Commander, left Doolies with a few encouraging to do well in the program. Overall, The Southeast Region Winter Encampment Banquet was an extravagant event.

ES 101
By now, most Doolies probably know Civil Air Patrol’s three main ; missions; Aerospace Education, Cadet Programs, and Emergency Services. Yesterday, the Doolies were able to get a better understanding of Emergency Services through a class taught by Capt Susan D’Aries. Throughout this life-saving class, Doolies were able to learn first-hand the skills that will benefit them through out their dealings with Emergency Services. The first topic that was addressed was compass work. Doolies learned the basics of compass work, hands-on. As the class progressed, Doolies made tents out of the survival kits previously given to them by Capt D’Aries. “Almost everything you take you wear,” commented Capt D’Aries, “less is more.” By using various materials, Doolies were able to make water filtration systems. “Making the tents and water filter[s] was fun,” commented a Doolie from squadron one, “that was my favorite part; it really pushed teamwork with my group.” The class taught the Doolies the very basics of Emergency Services in a way which they will not soon forget.

Cut to the Core
The Core Values are the essential qualities by which the United States Air Force operates by. The RCLS cadets learned just that in the class they had yesterday. What are the Core Values? They are integrity first, volunteer service and excellence in all we do. Integrity first holds the characteristics of honesty, trustworthiness, dependability and loyalty. Volunteer service starts with the membership agreement of CAP and USAF, and goes throughout your entire Civil Air Patrol career. Excellence in all we do. This is the aspect of the core values in which your best effort is to be put forth. As important as the Core Values are, they are quite overlooked. “Probably the most overlooked aspect of a cadet’s career,” commented C/Capt Brian McGinley from Mississippi Wing.

DAY FOUR AWARDS Doolie of the Day Officer of the Day NCO of the Day Flight of the Day Squadron of the Day Spirit Flight of the Day Best Inspection TACO of the Day Skits, 1st Place Skits, 2nd Place Skits, 3rd Place Skits, Platinum Award Katherine Jones, Kilo Flight C/1st Lt Patrick Griffith C/CMSgt Sara Umana Kilo Flight Squadron 1 Golf Flight Juliet Flight 2d Lt Charles Campbell India Flight Juliet Flight Squadron 4 Staff Cadet Executive Staff

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Volleyball Tournament
1st Place: Foxtrot Flight

2nd Place: Alpha Flight

3rd Place: Charlie Flight

Menu for tomorrow
BREAKFAST Scrambled Eggs Baked Sausage Hash Browns Oatmeal Cereal Red Apples Bananas Caribbean Jerk Chicken Peas Mashed Potatoes Gravy Toss Salad Red Apples Banana BBQ Spareribs Mixed Vegetables Steamed Rice Gravy Toss Salad Red Apples Banana

LUNCH

DINNER

A special thank you to all of our Air Force liaisons who have made this incredible experience possible. @ The Doolies and Staff of the 05-06 S E R Winter Encampment

What does it mean to be a wingman? By Lt Col Lawrence O. Roche 27th Intelligence Support Squadron commander The Romans, while not the first to understand the central principle behind having "wingmen," were some of the first to document the importance of the wing position. The most basic Roman battle lines were arranged with the infantry in the center and cavalry on the wings. The main purpose of the cavalry was to protect the center from being outflanked. For the Army to succeed, it was imperative that the infantry and cavalry understood and followed a pre-arranged plan and moved with a single purpose. Separately, neither the infantry nor the cavalry stood much chance at defeating an opponent, but together, watching out for each other, they were a formidable force. The Roman Empire and its lasting contributions to the civilized world would not have been possible without a well-disciplined Army and sound principles. The weapons used to wage war have changed dramatically since the Romans, but the principles guiding their employment have not. Today, one of the most important and trusted positions in a formation aircraft belongs to the wingman. While we have exchanged horses for F-15s, the wingman's job remains the same; to protect the lead aircraft. So what does any of this have to do with us? As Airmen we are all part of a much larger team. The combined effect of individual efforts and skills make our Air Force the most powerful air force in the world. None of us could do our jobs without the support of others. We count on our teammates to do their part so we can do ours. We share a common purpose and we know when we need help, our teammates will be there to pitch in and make the mission a success. All of us need a wingman to succeed. Being a good wingman is a 24-hour a day job. The principles apply both on and off duty and are anchored in personal commitment. Good wingmen have many important qualities. First, they have a moral compass that always points true north. They know the right thing to do and they take action to do it. Second, they "keep their head on a swivel," searching the horizon for any sign of trouble and then stepping in to prevent it. Third, good wingmen learn to lead just as well as follow. We all must be prepared to step up and lead when required, just as we must all be ready to follow once a decision is made.

The “Daily Doolie” is the official publication of the Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region Winter Encampment 05-06 SER Winter Encampment 05-06 PAO Staff: 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco Capt Michelle Becker C/Capt Chrissie Johnson C/Capt Dustin Corey C/1st Lt Autumn Owens C/2d Lt Katie Owens C/SSgt Thomas Durivou

Military Careers
Lt Col Eugene Becker, C/Lt Col Elliott Korona, Capt Michael Garman, SFO Carl Godbee, and Maj Christopher Triana taught Doolies in the NCO Academy Auditorium about careers in the United States Armed Forces. Lt Col Eugene Becker, C/Lt Col Korona, Capt Garman, all on loan to Encampment from the US Air Force, spoke to the Doolies about how to obtain scholarships for school. C/Lt Col Korona also leveled with Doolies about his experiences in AFROTC and informed cadets on the process of becoming an Air Force Officer. SFO Godbee, previous Spaatz Cadet, gave a presentation on his career in the US Marine Corps. SFO Godbee showed a special video presentation to the Doolies that covered the concept of what training is like to become a Marine. By the end of the presentation, Doolies had tons of questions to ask SFO Godbee. One Doolie asked “What does it take to be a Marine?” and SFO Godbee answered with “…it’s not as much physical to make it as it is [mental] because they really try to get in your head…” On completion of the presentation, C/Amn Guimaraes from Florida Wing commented “I’m sticking to the Air Force, but [SFO] Godbee’s class was good, it had a lot of information in it.” Then, later in the evening, Maj Triana led an Army presentation that provided the Doolies with lots of facts. Some of these facts included monthly wages, health and dental benefits and that there are over 150 jobs for potential Army personnel to choose from.

Ultimate Doolie Frisbee
Yesterday evening, the entire encampment came together at the track field for an exciting game of Ultimate Frisbee. The First Sergeants opened the activity by leading the encampment in stretching exercises, jumping jacks and other warm-ups. Unlike most encampment activities, Doolies and staff members were given the opportunity to have some good ole’ fashion fun. With squadron commanders serving as referees, and our very own C/Lt Col Andrew Anderson calling the shots from the mic, the game headed off in the right direction. As the game progressed, members of squadron four motivated the other flights by serving as “cheerleaders”. Doolies were dancing to the music, playing their air guitars, and doing the wave. On the side lines, there were push-up wars and running races taking place. After awhile, C/Maj Chris Karbowiak had live interviews from Doolie McGinley, “Yoda” and C/1st Lt Christina Zarilli. In the end, Ultimate Frisbee was a nice ending to 2005 for the Doolies and staff.

PAGE 3

DAY FIVE AWARDS
Doolie of the Day Officer of the Day NCO of the Day Flight of the Day Squadron of the Day Spirit Flight of the Day Best Inspection TACOs of the Day Isaiah Tamblingson, Delta Flight C/Capt Jena McGovern C/CMSgt Jennifer Jay Kilo Flight Squadron 1 Juliet Flight Alpha Flight Lt Col Gene Becker Capt Michael Garman 2d Lt Robin Wheeless SFO Carl Godbee

Menu for tomorrow
BREAKFAST Scrambled Eggs Baked Sausage Hash Browns Oatmeal Cereal Red Apples Bananas

ADDITIONAL IMAGES AND COPIES OF EACH DAILY DOOLIE CAN BE FOUND ON THE ENCAMPMENT WEBSITE: www.mbcscap.com/ser2k5

The “Daily Doolie” is the official publication of the Civil Air Patrol Southeast Region Winter Encampment 05-06 SER Winter Encampment 05-06 PAO Staff: 2d Lt Nicholas Sacco Capt Michelle Becker C/Capt Chrissie Johnson C/Capt Dustin Corey C/1st Lt Autumn Owens C/2d Lt Katie Owens C/SSgt Thomas Durivou

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