SRDF with Celerra File Server

September 2000

and Symmetrix are registered trademarks and Celerra. EMC CORPORATION DISCLAIMS ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. without the prior written consent of EMC Corporation.Copyright © 2000 EMC Corporation. described in this document are furnished under a license. EMC2 (the EMC logo). by operation of law or otherwise. In no event will EMC Corporation be liable for (a) incidental. relating to this document. EMC either owns or has the right to license the computer software programs described in this document. special or consequential damages or (b) any damages whatsoever resulting from the loss of use. arising out of this document. All rights reserved. the products or the computer software programs described herein. EMC Corporation retains all rights. indirect. Printed September 7. . including but not limited to microcode. title and interest in the computer software programs. EMC Corporation makes no warranties. and where information lives are trademarks of EMC Corporation. All other trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners. 2000 No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means. TimeFinder. data or profits. The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. EMC. express or implied. and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license. EMC Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear. even if advised of the possibility of such damages. All computer software programs. SRDF. or stored in a database or retrieval system.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Using Celerra With SRDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Active-Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 SRDF With Celerra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Restoration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Active-Active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Active-Passive . . . . . . . .4 Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 SRDF Connectivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Active-Passive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 For More Information .

SRDF for the Celerra File Server adds an additional benefit by ensuring that the Celerra file service is continuously available. an important consideration for mission-critical applications. even if a Celerra is unavailable or not functioning. The SRDF feature is transparent to the host operating system and host applications. title of white paper goes here 1 . and SRDF does not require additional host software for duplicating data on the Symmetrix units at the geographically separate site(s).OVERVIEW SRDF for the Celerra File Server ensures that the file systems on a Celerra File server are continuously available to network users. This feature provides a secondary mirror copy of data for the following purposes: • Disaster Recovery • Data Center Migration • Data Center Decision Solutions SRDF for Celerra is based on proven Symmetrix Remote Data Facility (SRDF) technology. SRDF for Celerra ensures continuous network access to data.

In the uni-directional mode. Once the remote write operation is Figure 1. Write requests to each active disk are copied to the corresponding passive disk. The remote Symmetrix serves as a backup for each active Symmetrix systems. Once initiated. all source volumes reside one host-attached Symmetrix and all target volumes reside in another. The following sections provide more information about each of these modes. In this configuration. Data written to the source volumes as part of normal file system operations is copied to the target volumes on the remote Symmetrix. activation and restoration are automatic. SRDF Active-Active Mode Copy PRIMARY Acknowledge BACKUP Copy BACKUP Acknowledge PRIMARY Symmetrix R1 1 Symmetrix R2 Failover configuration. In an Active-Active configuration. the remote Symmetrix sends an acknowledgment to the local. activation. SRDF with Celerra File Server 2 . called active-passive in SRDF terminology. each Symmetrix can be partitioned into both active and passive areas. Active-Passive In an active-passive configuration. both Symmetrix systems are in production. and function both as the primary system and the remote backup. You can also add additional. the remote Symmetrix is only used as a hot standby.FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION SRDF transfers data between Symmetrix systems in either uni-directional or bi-directional mode. The local Symmetrix does not accept additional write requests until it receives the acknowledgment. Active-Active In an active-active configuration. SRDF Active-Passive Mode Write DATA Copy DATA PRIMARY Acknowledge BACKUP Symmetrix R1 Symmetrix R2 Figure 2. both source and target volumes reside in each Symmetrix. Data written to the source volumes in either Symmetrix is copied to the corresponding target volume in the remote Symmetrix. and restoration must all be explicitly initiated by the system administrator. two Symmetrix systems are set up in physically separate data centers. (There is a one-to-one relationship between active and passive disks). completed. In a bi-directional configuration. active Symmetrix units to this configuration. There are two communications links. each Symmetrix is being utilized as a production system and as a remote disaster-recovery standby. as shown in Figure 2. each connecting the active disks on one Symmetrix with their passive counterparts on the other Symmetrix. A disk write request received on the local Symmetrix is transmitted over a Symmetrix-to-Symmetrix communication link and copied on the remote Symmetrix. remotely located Symmetrix. unlike Active-Passive configurations where the remote Symmetrix is essentially a hot standby and thus unavailable for production operations until a failover is initiated. In this configuration. called active-active. as illustrated in Figure 1.

the remote system cannot be utilized for production operations because all of its Data Movers are dedicated to SRDF standby operations.SRDF Connectivity Celerra with SRDF enables the Symmetrix units attached to the Celerra File Servers in a campus environment to be located up to 37 miles (60 km) apart. This implementation supports both uni-directional and bi-directional SRDF configurations. initiates a automated callback event to report any problems that could require attention by either on-site or EMC personnel. Active-Passive In this configuration.R2 Acknowledge Symmetrix R1 Symmetrix R2 Symmetrix R1 Symmetrix R2 SRDF with Celerra File Server 3 . For Celerra with SRDF. For example.R1 001 . Normal mirroring between the Symmetrix systems is carried out. Each logical volume defined in the Celerra volume database is comprised of two physical volumes. while two attached Symmetrix systems are connected via SRDF-compatible links. Celerra with SRDF requires that each Symmetrix Figure 3: Celerra Volume Configuration for SRDF Celerra Figure 4. the Data Movers on the standby have no access to the file systems. Figure 4 shows a Celerra Active-Passive configuration similar to the Symmetrix Active-Passive configuration in Figure 1. if the local Symmetrix is unavailable. volume 001. would be comprised of 001-R1 (the local disk) and 001-R2 (the remote disk). becoming available if and only if the local Celerra becomes unavailable. the remote is powered up and its Control Station available on the network. it continually monitors its internal hardware status and. the Celerra configuration is modified with respect to the traditional Celerra. with the remote devices mirroring the data on the local devices. This section describes the basic configurations that are supported. shown in Figure 4. two Celerras communicate over LAN or WAN links. while the Celerra remains on standby. Any Celerra file systems actually reside on both disk volumes. Celerra with Active-Passive SRDF LAN/WAN Links Primary Celerra R1 Celerra R2 Primary Backup Volume 001 Copy 001 . Celerra with SRDF implements SRDF disaster recovery capabilities using at least two Celerra File Server and at least two Symmetrix systems. a typical Symmetrix volume. SRDF WITH CELERRA You can combine SRDF and Celerra to ensure continuity of data access across a Celerra-based network and/or across long-distances. Celerra network users have access to data from the local Symmetrix or. if properly configured. Celerra with SRDF does not support SRDF semi-synchronous or adaptive copy modes. However. the SRDF link must be synchronous. While in standby mode. As with any Celerra system. including read-only access. With the SRDF link that connects the Symmetrix systems. The active-passive configuration provides complete Celerra redundancy. the remote Symmetrix. To implement Celerra with SRDF. using fiber optic links. be set up with the correct SRDF communications links as required. However. one on the local Symmetrix and one on the remote Symmetrix.

After a successful failover. Should either of the Celerra File Servers become unavailable. Figure 5 shows a typical Celerra active-active configuration. the surviving Celerra provides connectivity for users and access to all file systems. “local” refers to the Celerra itself and the production volumes on the attached Symmetrix. Active-Active In this configuration. 4 SRDF with Celerra File Server . remote Celerra) during a failover. • Prompts you to define certain Celerra Data Movers as RDF standby units. however. • Identifies the backup Celerra that is paired with the primary Celerra. the system administrator can initiate a failover1. This may have a performance impact during normal mirrored operation. This command performs the following actions: • Configures the Celerra Control Station to use SRDF. using Telnet to access the remote administration account. while “remote” refers to the remotely located Celerra and the mirrored volumes on its attached Symmetrix. Each Celerra can communicate with the other through the Control Stations using LAN or WAN links. where every write request must be acknowledged. the devices that support the production volumes of the other. no direct SCSI connection between the local Celerra and the remote Symmetrix.Figure 5: Celerra with Active-Active SRDF USING CELERRA WITH SRDF The Celerra system software enables the Celerra File Server to recognize the SRDF relationship between the two Symmetrix systems. This SRDF link must be in synchronous mode. Once this command is executed. the two Symmetrix systems are partitioned into active and passive segments. SRDF communications hardware is installed to enable the Symmetrix systems to communicate with each other. • Prompts you to create a remote administration account on the Control Station that you use to manage the R2 devices (that is. the remote Celerra stands ready to provide full file system access and functionality in the event of a system failure. There is a one-toone relationship between primary and SRDF standby Data Movers. That is. Should either Celerra (including the attached Symmetrix) become unavailable. both its own primary file systems through its primary Data Movers and the mirrored file systems on the RDF standby Data Movers. Each Celerra functions as both the primary production system and a remote mirror for the other Celerra. The standby Data Movers enable users to access the mirrored file systems on the backup Celerra if the primary Celerra becomes unavailable. identifying which system is “local” depends upon your point of reference. an SRDF standby Data Mover can serve as a standby for only one primary Data Mover. you execute an initialization command on the Control Station. • Identifies the volume mapping on the Symmetrix and matches active (also called R1) volumes with their passive (R2) counterparts. for example. including IP and MAC addresses. With active-active configurations. the remote Celerra can take over ownership of the failed Celerra’s file systems and network identity. shown in Figure 4. There is. In addition. For any operational Celerra. LAN/WAN Links Celerra R1 Failover Primary Celerra R2 Backup Transfers role/ functionality Copy R1 Acknowledge R2 Copy Initialization R2 Acknowledge R1 Symmetrix R1 Symmetrix R2 To initialize an active-active SRDF relationship between two attached Celerra-Symmetrix pairs.

you insure the Symmetrix attached to the failed Celerra is powered up. log in to the backup Celerra using the remote administration account. • Each Data Mover on the failed Celerra is rebooted and re-acquires the IP address and file system control from the corresponding standby Data Mover on the remote Celerra. Limitations If any of the Data Movers on the primary have failed over to another Data Mover under the traditional internal Data Mover to Data Mover failover capability. If. you insure the primary Celerra is halted. SRDF with Celerra File Server 5 . the failure of one Data Mover to fail over does not affect the failover of the remaining Data Movers.Activation To initiate an SRDF failover from the primary Celerra to the backup. the SRDF failover of server_9 would not occur2. and the remote Celerra stands ready to provide failover capability in the event of another system problem. • The RDF standby Data Movers are rebooted into standby mode. log in to the remote Celerra using a remote administration account. 2 For More Information For more information about using Celerra with SRDF. refer to the Celerra File Server Commandline Interface System Administrator’s Guide. When the primary Celerra is restored. an SRDF standby configured to support server_4 (which had internally failed over prior to the SRDF failover) would remain dormant. the results of an SRDF failover may be different than expected. Once this command is executed. This command option is executed at the administrator’s discretion and performs the following actions: • Sets each R1 volume on the local Celerra (the one failing over) as read-only. Because each Data Mover failover is an independent event. provided they have network access to the remote Celerra site. In this simplistic example. server_4 remains dormant until restored trough the normal Data Mover restoration process. in such a scenario. P/N 300-501-550. the system administrator may have configured an SRDF standby for server_4 but not server_9. In the configuration process. server_9 has been configured with a remote standby. This command option is executed on the remote Celerra at your discretion and performs the following actions: • The data on each R2 volume on the remote Celerra. is copied to the corresponding R1 volume on the failed Celerra. the SRDF failover would occur as expected. and issue the activation command. users should not notice a difference in terms of network file access. Except for the period of interruption during the failover. which contains any changes to the file system that occurred during the failover period. server_9 must have an SRDF standby configured on the remote Celerra for any subsequent SRDF failover on this Data Mover to succeed. • The R2 devices resume mirroring of the R1 devices. users have full access to the restored file systems on the restored local Celerra. and issue the restore command. however. users have access to the same file systems using the same network addresses as they did on the failed Celerra. Note that. Restoration To restore a Celerra after a failover. and sets each R2 volume on the remote Celerra (the standby that is being activated) as read-write. if server_4 fails over to server_9 (as an internal Data Mover to Data Mover failover). • Configures each RDF standby Data Mover on the remote Celerra to acquire the following characteristics of its counterpart: Network identity The IP and MAC addresses of all NICs in the failed Data Mover Storage identity The file systems controlled by the failed Data Mover Service identity The mount and export characteristics of the file systems (such as CIFS lock and access control policies) controlled by the failed Data Mover Once the failover is activated. For example. server_9 returns to service as the internal standby for server_4.