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Client_Name Project_Name
Citrix® XenServer™ 5 Design [Insert Date, 2008]
Prepared by: Project_Lead [Title] PartnerABC [Name] [Title] PartnerABC

Revision History
Revision Change Description Updated By Date

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How to use the Citrix XenServer 5 Design Template

This is just a template and should be modified as you see fit. That includes adding and/or removing sections and subsections to fit the needs of the client and project.

All text written in orange should be removed. Orange is used to provide the writer with tips and tricks and is information only. All text written in blue should be replaced with applicable verbiage. Blue is used to provide sample verbiage and should not be used as is. Before you are finished, please double check: • Properties of document (in particular, check custom tab) o Note: As stated on the cover page, several variable fields such as client and project are automatically entered based on the Properties entry. To automatically update all variable fields, click EditSelect All and F9. • Confirm that all reviewer changes and comments in Track Changes have been addressed • Update fields and page numbers in Table of Contents • Review all headers and footers o To update the footers with variable fields, highlight the footer text and press F9. Please note that there are two sets of footers in the document: one for the Table of Contents section and one for the main body of the document. • Review overall formatting • Remove all orange and blue text

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Deliverable Signoff The signatures below indicate Client_Name’s and PartnerABC’s agreement to the contents of the Citrix® XenServer™ 5 Design. Client_Name Name: Signature: Title: Date: PartnerABC Name: Signature: Title: Date: .iii - .

..................................................................................................................................................................................................2Terminology......................................................................9 4.4 2.........................................................................................................1Description.......................................................................................................................4 2..............................................................................8 4...........................................14 6.................................................................................................11 5.................................................................4Design...............................1Project Overview.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................25 8.............................3Key Decisions.............24 8.........................................................................................................................12 6...........................................................XenMotion & High Availability..................................................18 6.........................................................Executive Summary.............................1Overview..............................................................................................9Network Communications..............................................................................................................8XenServer IP Address Table.....................3Design ...................25 8.......................6 3.............1 1............................................5Boot Storage Configuration...................................Architectural Design..........................1Description.................................................................9 5..............................................................................1 1...........3 1.........................................................4 2......24 7.................2Key Decisions...................................................................................................3 2.............................................................2Key Decisions........................................................................1Description .....6Management Interface Configuration........................................................................25 8..........................................................................4 XENSERVER.............................................................................................................................................................................3Design..................................23 7.....3Design Concerns..................................3 1...26 ............................................2Design Summary...............Network Infrastructure.............................................................2Deliverable Overview...................................14 6.............................23 7....................................................................6 3............................4PartnerABC Resources...................................................iv - ...............................11 5...........................................................................8 4........11 5....................................................................14 6................................................21 7......................................................Storage Infrastructure...........................................................................Table of Contents 1...........................17 6........................................................................................................................................................................12 5..........................................................................................................................................2Terminology.............................................................3Design......................................................................................................................7 3..................3Key Decisions....................................2Key Decisions.................................................................................7Host Networks...................................................7 4....................................................................................................................................................3Design.................1Description......5Next Steps...................................20 7............16 6......................................................23 7............12 5....Resource Pools .............1Description.............................................................................17 6......................................................................................................................5Physical NIC Configuration..................................................................................................................21 7................................................................................2Key Decisions...........................................................1 1........22 7............1Description.....................6Virtual Disk Storage Configuration .................................Server Hardware Environment............................................................4Design.....................................6 3..........................................7ISO Library Configuration...........................4XenMotion Configuration.....................Host Configuration............................3Deliverable References....................5High Availability Configuration..22 7............................................................................................................5 3............................................................................................................................................................................4XenServer Host Parameters.................................................4Resource Pool Design....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................21 7...............................................................................................8 4......................................................................................................................................

.....................................................................5XenCenter Configuration.................................2Key Decisions..............................2Key Decisions............................5Aggregated Capacity.........1Description................................................................................34 11..............................................................29 9.............................5Virtual Machine Backup.....................35 11.......................................4XenCenter Hardware Requirements..27 SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT.................29 9.....................................................................................6Virtual Machine HA Configuration......................................................................................38 12.......3Design...................45 13....................................................................................1Description.....................33 10.32 10...............................................................................................34 11.....................29 9............................................. Searching and Tagging..........................48 14...........................................................................................................................................................................42 12............................4Server Hardware Configuration ...................................................49 -v- ..................................29 10....................Systems Management............................................................................................................................................................................................32 10.......................................................................................................36 11.........................................2Key Decisions........................9Software Updates..................................................................Security.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................48 14...........................................1Description..........3Design......................................42 13...............................28 9...7Workload Migration Process...........................................XenCenter Configuration...................3Design................................34 11.....................................................................................................................Backup and Recovery.............................................32 10...........................................45 13.........................................................................................................................................................................41 12.......................................................................................3Design.............................3Citrix Server Virtualization Assessment (SVA).......................................................................47 14.....................4Desktop Workload.................................................Virtual Machine Design...45 13...............................................................................................................................................................................................................39 12..................................................................................................4Virtual Machine Configuration.........................................................31 10...................7XenServer System Alert Configuration............6Email Notification Settings........30 10.......................31 10.......................................................Workload Matrix..........................................................2Key Decisions...........................................................................................6Virtual Machine Snapshots............................................................8...........................................39 12.........................................41 12.....................................................39 12.....................................48 14....................................................................1Description.....33 11.......................................................................................................7Disaster Recovery.......................................................................................................................................37 VIRTUAL MACHINES....................4Virtual Machine Metadata Backup ..................................................................................................40 12.................................................................................................45 13.........................................................................30 10..............................................................................................................................................................26 8........................................2Key Decisions.................3XenServer Host Backup .........30 10.....................................................................................................................2Key Decisions....................................................................................................8Custom Fields................................................................................46 SECURITY.....1Description......................................................................................................................5Virtual Machine Templates...................36 11..............................35 11......1Description.....................................................

......51 15..vi - ........................51 15.......................52 15............................................................................52 15.........................................................................................................4VLAN’s....................................1Internal Networks..................................................3Bonded Interfaces..Appendix A: XenServer Networking Explained..............................................................................................................51 15........................................................53 ..........................................................................................5Virtual Network Combinations..APPENDICES..................................................50 15.......................................2External Networks...................................................................................

. 1. .1 Project Overview Client_Name . XenMotion and High Availability (HA) options are defined. RAID types. virtual disk images (VDI) types and virtual machine storage are defined. . ISO library settings. High-level decisions are summarized as related to the overall architecture of the solution. Resource Pools XenMotion and High Availability Storage Infrastructure Network Infrastructure . and a local storage repository reserved for VMs. This section defines the planned architecture of the XenServer Resource Pool. VLAN information. networking.0 Design Section Executive Overview and Architectural Design XenServer Host Configuration This section defines the general configuration and installation parameters for the XenServer deployment. . It details the fundamental architecture of the new XenServer design. Currently. Executive Summary 1. VM templates. Based on those collaborative discussions. the architecture described within this document represents the design decisions made in conjunction with PartnerABC during the course of this engagement. The XenServer host consists of a Xen-enabled Linux operating system. the underlying disk sub-system. This section defines how the Resource Pool and respective XenServer hosts will be configured to accommodate XenMotion and High Availability (HA) features to provide availability and protection to the guest virtual machines. virtual switches and associated virtual machine networks. It includes information regarding XenMotion requirements. storage hardware. The business drivers for this effort revolve around . This Architectural Design is organized as follows: Citrix XenServer 5.1. dynamic multipathing. a management agent. . . including critical design considerations. and NIC bonding configuration used on XenServer hosts and virtual machines to enable networking. as well as HA protection levels. number of XenServer hosts. Within this section Resource Pools. This section defines the planned architecture for the storage infrastructure for individual XenServer hosts and the shared storage required for hosts configured in Resource Pools. Within this section. number of pools. Topics Covered This section provides an overview of the project. shared storage. This section defines the physical network interface cards (NICs).2 Deliverable Overview This Architectural Design document is the result of collaboration with .

disk. NICs.Citrix XenServer 5. • -2- . Client_Name can use the decision matrices as quick reference guides to identify settings and configuration decisions to be implemented in the environment. Within this section. The Virtual Machine section defines the guest virtual machines which will be hosted in the XenServer infrastructure.0 Design Server Hardware Environment This section defines the underlying server hardware platform for the XenServer host. software updates. This subsection provides justification and additional information related to the Key Decisions and discusses their relevance to Client_Name’s virtual desktop environment. will also be discussed. Systems Management Systems Management XenCenter Configuration Backup and Recovery Virtual Machines Virtual Machine Design Workload Matrix Security Security Section Approach Each design topic is organized into three subsections: • • Overview. host bus adapters (HBAs) and the aggregate server capacity within the XenServer Resource Pool are defined. Information gathered as a result of the Citrix Server Virtualization Assessment. Resource Pool requirements. email notifications. The selection of appropriate management tools. This subsection provides an overview of the key concepts within the Key Decisions and Design Sections. client requirements. This section details the planned desktop and server workloads that will be hosted as guest virtual machine on the XenServer infrastructure. Physical server security. alerts and monitoring requirements. high availability protection levels and P2V methodology are discussed. Backup and recovery procedures and technologies implemented are also defined to ensure the XenServer environment is protected. including virtual hardware configuration. and snapshotting and guest virtual machine metadata. template configuration. if it was conducted. Key Decisions. home server settings. Design. This section discusses design decisions related to managing the XenServer environment. This subsection provides a decision matrix for Client_Name based on line items. searching and tagging. characteristics of the virtual machines. memory. delegation of tasks based upon user and group assignment and security of available management tools are all discussed. This section discusses the security related aspects of the XenServer design. This section describes the backup and recovery requirements for the XenServer environment including XenServer host backup. Within this section. along with encryption and enclave networking are analyzed. hardware configuration such as CPU. This section defines the configuration settings for the XenCenter management console.

. All of these documents are available from the Document Center or online Citrix Knowledge Base.email@email. articles. it does not provide step-bystep instructions on how to install the components discussed. 1.1. .5 Next Steps Based on the Statement of Work dated xx xx. PartnerABC recommends that administrators involved in the implementation review the following documents.3 Deliverable References The deliverable provides guidelines for the implementation. -3- . . this document represents the architectural design for the Citrix XenServer environment.com Staff Consultant Title Address Tel: Mobile: Email. and guides prior to building and implementing the production environment.email@email. 2008. Following this. However.com 1.4 PartnerABC Resources The following PartnerABC associates contributed to this project: PartnerABC Project_Lead Title Address Tel: Mobile: Email. • • • Citrix XenServer Administrators guide Citrix XenServer Installation Guide Citrix XenServer Virtual Machine Installation Guide The following icons will be used throughout the document in order to highlight important information: Symbol Description This icon indicates that a decision is required based on the environment specific information. This icon indicates important notes that need to be considered as part of the further planning process. Therefore.

the PartnerABC team found the following items to be risks or unknown factors associated with this project and therefore represent concerns that may impact success: • • • [Item1] [Item2] [Item3] -4- . Architectural Design This section provides a high-level description of the proposed implementation based on requirements and risks identified as part of the Server Virtualization Assessment. This design takes into account .2.2 Design Summary In summation.3 Design Concerns During the preceding assessment. The following diagram depicts the planned environment for . . as well as the information gathered during the course of the design discussions. this design is based on the following components designated as follows: XenServer XenCenter Virtual Machines 2. [Include Visio diagram detailing the XenServer architecture] 2. 2. . . as well as the development of this design. . .1 Overview The architecture for the Citrix XenServer environment that has been designed . .

XenServer -5- .

Windows Virtual Machines (VMs) can be created only on XenServer hosts equipped with 64-bit Intel VT-enabled or AMD-V CPUs.0 Enterprise Platinum OEM List hotfixes here New Upgrade CD HTTP…. XenServer is the platform virtualization solution which enables the creation of virtual x86 guest computers running on Xen.2 Key Decisions Decision Point XenServer Version XenServer Edition Hotfix Level Type of Deployment Deployment Scenario Deployment Location Naming Convention Server Hardware Specifications Storage Configuration Networking Configuration NIC Bonding Number of XenServer Hosts Design Decision 4. The XenServer host consists of a Xen-enabled Linux operating system.etc Justification Server naming convention Overview of server specs… Type of storage used locally. and a local storage repository reserved for VMs. VM Support. Host Configuration This section defines the general configuration and installation parameters for the XenServer deployment.1 5. VM templates. the open-source paravirtualizing hypervisor with near-native performance.1 Description • Citrix XenServer. SAN.3. • 3. 3. iSCSI. NFS…etc Management Virtual machine networking -6- . Linux VMs do not require XenServer hosts that are equipped with Intel VT-enabled or AMD-V CPUs. a management agent.

. include screen shots. US New Install Upgrade Pre-installed (OEM) Enabled Disabled CD HTTP or FTP NFS USB (OEM) Yes or No /dev/hda Size in GB eth1 MAC Address NIC Type/Model Static DHCP IP Address details Hardware Virtualization Assist Installation Source Linux Pack enabled Root Password Primary Disk Management Interface Networking Configuration Hostname Configuration DNS Configuration Time Zone System Time Configuration NTP Server/s Australia | Sydney Using NTP Manual Time Entry NTP Server 1 NTP Server 2 NTP Server 3 -7- . appended. Where possible. you should explain any details that require additional verbiage. or deleted as necessary. or graphical depictions to explain the design.3 Design The configuration settings of XenServer are detailed below. Within this section. it is not necessary to simply restate any items that are contained within the Design Decisions table unless it is a lead-in to a more detailed explanation. Configuration Option Keyboard Mapping Installation type Value Qwerty. but these should be modified.000 words (and reads a lot easier)! There are some tables included for your convenience.3. These settings….4 XenServer Host Parameters This section details the XenServer deployment parameters required during the server installation process. Remember that blue text is sample text only! 3. diagrams. tables. A picture is worth 1.

number of guests…etc -8- . it is not a member of an existing resource pool its clock is synchronized to the same time source as the pool master (for example. via NTP) it has no shared storage configured there are no running or suspended VMs on the XenServer host which is joining there are no active operations on the VMs in progress. number of XenServer hosts. Features which provide guest availability and resiliency such as XenMotion and HA are only available through a XenServer Resource Pool. XenMotion and High Availability (HA) options are defined. shared storage.4. number of pools.1 Description A resource pool comprises multiple XenServer host installations.2 Key Decisions Decision Point Number of Resource Pools Number of XenServers per Resource Pool Decision for separate pools Resource Pool Locations Dedicated Pool Master Design Decision Justification Administration point. such as one shutting down the management NIC of the XenServer host which is joining is not part of a NIC bond In addition to being homogeneous. networking. Within this section Resource Pools. an individual XenServer host can only join a resource pool if: 4. A resource pool is an aggregate of one or more homogeneous XenServer hosts. up to a maximum of 16. The definition of homogeneous is: • • • • • • • • • • • • each CPU is from the same vendor (in particular AMD-V and Intel VT CPUs cannot be mixed) each CPU is the same model (except for stepping) each CPU has the same feature flags all hosts are running the same version of XenServer software an Enterprise license is installed on the host it has a static IP address (either manually assigned or via DHCP). bound together into a single managed entity which can host VMs. 4. Resource Pools This section defines the planned architecture of the XenServer Resource Pool.

Configuration Option Pool Name Pool Description Location Number of XenServer Hosts Assigned Pool Master Server Pool Slave/Member Servers Value XEN Pool 1 Sydney 16 (Maximum number of hosts) Yes XEN01 XEN02 XEN03 ….. 11 Number of guest VMs hosted -9- .Decision Point Number of Guest Virtual Machines Resource Pool Storage Design Decision Justification 4..3 Design The configuration settings of XenServer Resource Pools are detailed below. 100 Number of guest VMs hosted Guest OS types Assigned Storage Repositories Assigned Pool Networks XenMotion Enabled HA Enabled Yes Yes The following section defines the settings for Resource Pool 2.4 Resource Pool Design The following section defines the settings for Resource Pool 1. These settings…. Multiple Resource Pools are required because…. 4. Configuration Option Pool Name Pool Description Location Number of XenServer Hosts Assigned Pool Master Server Pool Slave/Member Servers Value XEN Pool 2 Sydney 16 (Maximum number of hosts) Yes XEN01 XEN02 XEN03 ….

Configuration Option Guest OS types Assigned Storage Repositories Assigned Pool Networks XenMotion Enabled HA Enabled Value Windows XP Windows 2003 Server Yes Yes .10 - .

including the following…. A Resource Pool combined with shared storage enables VMs to be dynamically migrated on any host. HA includes dynamic fail-over planning based on available resources to help ensure that VMs are restarted on the appropriate physical server. High Availability (HA). HA Heartbeat.5. XenMotion & High Availability This section defines how the Resource Pool and respective XenServer hosts will be configured to accommodate XenMotion and High Availability (HA) features to provide availability and protection to the guest virtual machines.11 - . XenServer adds automated high availability (HA) with resourcebased placement of VMs in the event of host server failures. • • 5.1 Description • XenMotion. XenMotion is the live migration of guest VMs across different XenServer hosts without any noticeable downtime. XenServer HA utilizes a storage and network heartbeat mechanism to check and absolutely guarantee that a host is unreachable. as well as HA protection levels. Justification HA Storage Heartbeat HA Protection Levels Unprotected VMs . 5. It includes information regarding XenMotion requirements..2 Key Decisions Decision Point XenMotion Enabled Resource Pool/s HA Enabled Resource Pool/s HA Network Heartbeat Design Decision All XenServer Pools will be XenMotion enabled HA enabled pools include Pool1 and Pool2 only Management interface will be bonded for redundancy An FC based SR will provide as storage SR Servers will be protected with differing priorities while desktops will be set to Best Effort level only The remaining VMs will be unprotected.

XenServer Host XEN01 XEN02 XEN03 XEN10 XEN20 XEN30 XEN40 Resource Pool Pool1 Pool1 Pool1 Pool2 Pool2 Stand-alone Host Stand-alone Host XenMotion Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Not Configured Not Configured 5. Configuration Option Resource Pool Name Resource Pool Master Server Resource Pool Member Servers Value ..Decision Point HA Capacity Design Decision The planned HA capacity will provide up to 2 XenServer host failures as per the server hardware design Justification 5.4 XenMotion Configuration Using XenMotion Live Relocation. XenServer continually monitors the health of the host servers in the pool. For more detail on each VMs HA restart priority. you can move a running virtual machine from one server to another server in the same Resource Pool with no service interruption.5 High Availability Configuration With the XenServer HA feature enabled.12 - . HA selects another host to take over the master role automatically. The following table defines the Resource Pool and the respective XenServer hosts configured with XenMotion. if the host that fails is the master. Additionally. A VM can only be migrated if it is using shared storage resources within the pool. refer to Section 11. The following table illustrates the HA configuration settings available on….3 Design XenMotion has been configured…… HA has been configured…. Virtual Machine HA Configuration. 5. The HA mechanism automatically moves protected VMs to a healthy host if the current XenServer host fails.

13 - .Configuration Option HA Enabled Heartbeat Storage Repository Heartbeat SR Type Heartbeat SR Size HA Protection Levels Value Yes No Shared storage limited to iSCSI LUN or FC LUN 400MB (Minimum size is 356MB) Protected Priority 1: Server 1 to 3 Priority 2: VM 11 to VM20. 2 and 3 Best-effort Do not restart .etc Priority 3: Priority Level: 1.

XenServer Acronym SR Explanation Storage Repository Description A container where VDIs are stored. for NFS it contains the IP address of FQDN of the NFS server and the export path that gets mounted by the XenServer host. and FC. ISO Library.14 - . A shared SR is required for Resource Pool creation and XenMotion functionality. PBD Physical Block Device VBD Virtual Block Device . RAID types. PBDs store device configuration information used to connect to a storage system. SCSI. Shared Storage. The ISO files can them be mounted o the guest virtual machines and used during the operating installation. dynamic multipathing. A PBD is basically a connector that attaches an SR to a XenServer host. They also provide for QoS for a given VDI. Virtual Disk Images (VDIs). A XenServer host defines a container called a Storage Repository to describe a particular storage target. virtual disk images (VDI) types and virtual machine storage are defined. Shared SR includes the following storage types: iSCSI.2 Terminology Citrix XenServer uses specific terminology to define various aspects of the storage architecture. Fibre Channel and NFS storage. the following table explains this terminology. SATA on Local disks. which is used throughout the remainder of the document. For example. VBDs map VDIs to VMs. 6. NFS and iSCSI on shared storage. Within this section.1 Description • Storage Repository (SR). storage hardware. in which Virtual Disk Images (VDIs) are stored.6. Storage Infrastructure This section defines the planned architecture for the storage infrastructure for individual XenServer hosts and the shared storage required for hosts configured in Resource Pools. CD and DVD image files represented as ISO files can be stored on CIFS or NFS based storage repositories. Storage Repositories are storage targets containing homogeneous virtual disks. SAS. • • • 6. A VDI is an on-disk representation of a virtual disk provided to a VM and is the fundamental unit of virtualized storage in XenServer. The interface between the VDI and the virtual machines. The SR types supported are IDE. The interface between the Storage Repository and the physical host. the underlying disk sub-system. ISO library settings. A XenServer host can have access to multiple SR types.

. NetApp and EqualLogic Managed LUNs. and are hosted on a Network Appliance device running a version of ONTAP 7. Via the XenCenter GUI. The VHD format is a Microsoft open format for virtual disk storage. The four VDI Types can be defined as follows: • VHD: This format can be used with local disk on top of an ext3 file system or over NFS. LUNs are allocated and mapped dynamically to the host via the XenServer host management framework. its split into multiple Logical Volumes each of which will store a VDI.15 - . • NetApp: Managed NetApp LUNs are accessible via the NetApp SR driver type.0 or greater. each VM can be configured with up to 8 Virtual Disks including the CDROM. The difference between Logical Volume Manager and NetApp/EqualLogic Managed LUNs is that LUNs are put under Linux LVM control whereas NetApp and EqualLogic Managed LUNs are not. When a LUN is put under LVM control. LUNs are allocated and mapped dynamically to the host via the XenServer host management framework. In XenServer terms. VDIs stored on VHDs by default are thin provisioned. and are hosted on an EqualLogic storage array. VHD files are sparse and extended in 2Mb chunks. There are 4 VDI types: VHD. • LVM: This format can be used with local disk or shared storage. VHD files can also be chained.XenServer Acronym VDI Explanation Virtual Disk Description A VDI is a disk abstraction where the contents of virtual disks are stored. • EqualLogic: EqualLogic storage is accessible via the EqualLogic SR driver type. This can be extended to 24 via the command line. Logical Volume Manager. a VHD file can only be used on ext3 or NFS storage. VHD Virtual Hard Disk The following diagram shows a graphical overview of storage repositories and related objects.

000 rpm Local Shared Justification Local Storage Configuration Virtual Machine Storage Shared Storage Configuration VDI Type SAN Storage Details HBA Type Dynamic Multipathing Heartbeat SR Virtual Machine Metadata VHD LVM NetApp EqualLogic EMC CX300 Hardware Software Enabled across QLogic HBAs iSCSI LUN FC LUN .3 Key Decisions Decision Point XenServer Boot Storage Local Storage Design Decision Local Boot from SAN IDE SCSI SATA SAS USB RAID-1 across 2 x 72GB disks @ 15.6.16 - .

Decision Point ISO Library Settings Virtual Disk QoS Data Deduplicaton Thin Provisioning Design Decision CIFS share on Windows 2003 server FNP01 Enabled for…. The virtual machines disk images…. The shared storage configured for the XenServer Resource Pools will leverage…. Server virtual machines will reside on SR X which is backed on RAID-10 FC LUNs…… Desktop virtual machines will reside on SRY which is backed on RAID-5 FC LUNs…..000 RPM RAID-1 (Mirror) Local Shared Storage Local Shared Storage Number of Disks Disk Size Disk Speed RAID Configuration Crash Dump SR Suspend SR .. Enabled Enabled Justification 6.5 Boot Storage Configuration The following section defines the storage configuration of the XenServer boot volume which will be used for the Xen OS binary installation..4 Design The XenServer OS will be installed on…. [Insert Visio diagram detailing the Boot Storage configuration] Configuration Option Boot Volume Storage Type Value IDE SCSI SATA SAS Boot from SAN USB 2 72GB 15. The Storage Repository…. [Insert Visio diagram detailing the overall storage configuration.17 - . logical and/or physical connections] 6.

6 Virtual Disk Storage Configuration The guest virtual machine disk files represented as VDIs will be stored using ….000 rpm SCSI disks. [Insert Visio diagram detailing the SR and VDI configuration] Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Storage Repository Name VDI Type Local Storage Configuration Value Local Storage EXT VHD 5 x 72GB 15.6. RAID-5 Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Hosts Attached Storage Repository Name NFS Path Advanced Options NFS Storage Vendor NFS Storage Model Value NFS Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Hosts Attached SR Name Target Host iSCSI Port CHAP Enabled Value iSCSI 3260 Yes/No CHAP User CHAP Secret Enabled Disabled Target IQN Dynamic Multipathing Number of Paths iSCSI Storage Vendor iSCSI Storage Model Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Hosts Attached Value NetApp .18 - .

2.Configuration Option SR Name NetApp Filer IP Address Username Password CHAP Enabled Value Number of FlexVols in SR Aggregate FAS Thin Provisioning FAS Deduplicaton Dynamic Multipathing Number of Paths FAS Model Ontap Version FAS Storage Capacity Yes/No CHAP User CHAP Secret 8 (default) Enabled Disabled Enabled Disabled Enabled Disabled NetApp FAS3020c 7.19 - .2 Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Hosts Attached SR Name HBA Type HBA Vendor HBA Model Password CHAP Enabled Value Hardware HBA FC iSCSI Yes/No CHAP User CHAP Secret Enabled Disabled Enabled Disabled Enabled Disabled Number of FlexVols FAS Thin Provisioning FAS Deduplicaton Dynamic Multipathing Number of Paths Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Value Dell EqualLogic .

20 - .Configuration Option Storage Repository Size Hosts Attached SR Name Dell EqualLogic Filer IP Address Username Password CHAP Enabled Value Yes/No CHAP User CHAP Secret Enabled Disabled Enabled Disabled Storage Pool Name Thin Provisioning Dynamic Multipathing Number of Paths Dell Storage Model Dell Storage Capacity 6. Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Name Share Name CIFS Authentication User name Password Advanced Options Available ISO files Value CIFS Configuration Option Storage Repository Type Storage Repository Size Name NFS Path Advanced Options Available ISO files Value NFS .7 ISO Library Configuration The following section details the storage repository configuration of the ISO library.

XenServer Acronym PIF Explanation Physical Interface Description A PIF represents a physical network interface on a XenServer host. Host networks can include the network switch allocated for management or guest virtual machine traffic. and NIC bonding configuration used on XenServer hosts and virtual machines to enable networking. the parameters of the NIC that they represent. VIF Virtual Interface Network Further details are described in Appendix A: XenServer Networking Explained. a globally unique UUID. NIC bonds can improve XenServer host resiliency by using two PIFs as if they were one.21 - . and the network and VM they are connected to. a globally unique UUID. NIC bonds work in an active/active mode. and the collection of VIFs and PIFs connected to them. PIF objects have a name and description. A PIF represents a physical network interface on a XenServer host. Network Infrastructure This section defines the physical network interface cards (NICs).7. PIF objects have a name and description. A VIF represents a virtual interface on a Virtual Machine. A host network is a virtual Ethernet switch on a XenServer host. The following table explains this terminology. with traffic balanced between the bonded NICs. the parameters of the NIC that they represent. NIC bonds. and the collection of VIFs and PIFs connected to them. VIF objects have a name and description. • • • 7. and the network and server they are connected to. a globally unique UUID. VLAN information. Network objects have a name and description. and the network and VM they are connected to. VIF objects have a name and description. and the network and server they are connected to. Host Network. Network objects have a name and description. which is used throughout the remainder of the document. If one NIC within the bond fails the host's network traffic will automatically be routed over the second NIC. virtual switches and associated virtual machine networks. . Virtual Interface (VIF). a globally unique UUID. A VIF represents a virtual interface on a Virtual Machine.1 Description • Physical Interface (PIF). a globally unique UUID. The term network is used to describe a virtual Ethernet switch (vSwitch) on a XenServer host. 7. a globally unique UUID.2 Terminology Citrix XenServer uses specific terminology to define various aspects of the network architecture.

. Dual Cisco 24-port managed switch with hardcoded speeds Refer to IP address table…. A dedicated Storage Interface will be used for …….etc Bonded Management NIC for redundancy NA Justification Enabled on DMZ network Enabled for….4 Design Each of the XenServer hosts will be configured with ….. . The Virtual Machine network include….3 Key Decisions Decision Point Number of Physical NICS per Host NIC Configuration NIC Bonding Configuration External Networks Internal Networks VLAN Configuration Management Interface Configuration Storage Network Interface Promiscuous Mode Virtual Switch QoS Physical Switch Details Design Decision XS supports up to 6 physical NICs or 6 pairs of bonds Broadcom 1Gbit Full-Duplex Active/Active Bonds Production DMZ Test/Dev NA Production (VLAN1) …. NIC bonding will be configured to provide network redundancy …… VLAN tagging at the virtual switch is used …. IP Address Settings DNS Configuration DMZ Configuration 7.7.22 - . The Management Interface used for XenCenter and XenMotion traffic will be …..

6 Management Interface Configuration This section defines the Management Interface settings and configuration types used for each XenServer host.0.11 NA VLAN VLAN1 VLAN10 Comments Used for XenCenter and XenMotion traffic Used for iSCSI storage traffic 7.7 Host Networks This section details the host networks configured on the XenServer hosts and Resource Pool to allow the guest virtual machine network connectivity. Physical NIC NIC0 NIC1 NIC2 NIC3 Host Network mgmt_ xenmotion iscsi prod_lan prod_lan NIC Bonding No No Yes Yes Speed/ Duplex 1Gigabit/FullDuplex 1Gigabit/FullDuplex 1Gigabit/FullDuplex 1Gigabit/FullDuplex Vendor Intel Intel Intel Intel Device 8254 Gigabit Adapter 8254 Gigabit Adapter 8254 Gigabit Adapter 8254 Gigabit Adapter [Insert Visio diagram detailing physical network connections and actual physical ports on the XenServer server hardware] 7.1 192.0.0.5 Physical NIC Configuration This section defines the physical network interfaces and the associated host networks configured on each of the XenServer hosts.0. Type Management Interface Storage interface Host Network mgmt_ xenmotion iscsi NICs NIC 0 NIC4 IP Address 10.1 DNS Settings 10.23 - .0.0. Host Network Management Network Type External NIC NIC 0 VLAN 1 Auto Connected No Comments Used for XenCenter and XenMotion traffic Used for Production DMZ Bonded External External NIC 2 NIC 3 NIC 4 NA 99 Yes No .10 10.2. Dedicated storage network interfaces used for NFS or iSCSI storage repositories are also defined below.[Insert Visio diagram detailing XenServer physical and logical network connections] 7.168.

0.0.0.24 - .0 Gateway 10.254 DNS1 DNS2 10. Resource Pool Pool 1 Pool 2 Hostname XEN01 XEN99 IP Address 10.9 Network Communications This section details the commutation traffic between the different components of the XenServer architecture.8 XenServer IP Address Table This section details the IP address settings for each f the XenServer hosts configured for the Resource Pools.0.1 Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0.7. Purpose SSH – XenCenter to XenServer HTTPS – XenCenter to XenServer RDP – XenCenter to VM (Windows) VNC – XenCenter to VM (Linux) Default port number TCP 22 TCP 443 TCP 3389 TCP 5900 Port Number to be Used Default Default Default Default .0.10 Location Sydney Melbourne 7. [Insert Visio diagram detailing network communications and associated ports] The following table describes the TCP port configurations for the Citrix XenServer environment.

2 Key Decisions Decision Point Server Hardware Vendor Server Model Number of CPUs Number of Cores Total Server Memory Number of NICs Local Storage Host Bus Adapters Shared Storage Design Decision Dell HP IBM ProLiant 380 Server 2 sockets Quad-Core Intel at 2GHz 64GB 8 x Gbit NICs 2 x 72GB SCSI disks RAID-1 QLogic xxx EMC CX300 SAN with FC SCSI disks at RAID-10 shared LUN presented to XenServer hosts Yes. Within this section. This machine runs a stripped-down Linux operating system with a Xen-enabled kernel which controls the interaction between the virtualized devices seen by VMs and the physical hardware. host bus adapters (HBAs) and the aggregate server capacity within the XenServer Resource Pool are defined. • • • 8. NICs.25 - . One or more 64-bit x86 CPUs at 1. A minimum of 1GB memory. At least two 100 Mbit/seconds or faster network interface card (NIC) for redundancy.5 GHz minimum. memory. Server Hardware Environment This section defines the underlying server hardware platform for the XenServer host. SATA or SCSI. Locally attached storage including IDE. 2 GB or more is recommended Storage. The following are the system requirements for the XenServer host: • CPU.8. hardware configuration such as CPU. with at least 16GB of disk space. however a Gigabit NIC is recommended for faster P2V migrations and export/import data transfers and for live relocation of VMs. Windows VMs can be created only on XenServer hosts equipped with Intel VT-enabled or AMD-V CPUs Memory. PATA. 60GB of disk space is recommended. Network.1 Description The XenServer host is a 64-bit x86 server-class machine devoted to hosting multiple VMs. two PSUs cabled to separate power rails Justification Redundant Power Supply Nits . 8. 2 GHz or a faster multi-core CPU is recommended. disk.

26 - . Manual installation from CD Justification 8. [Insert Visio diagrams displaying the front and back views of the server hardware platform detailing the disks.Decision Point Aggregated Capacity Server Build Process Design Decision 16 x XenServer Hosts thereby a total of ….. enabled . NIC ports.3 Design The server hardware platform that will be used for the XenServer…… CPU…. The physical memory configured …. Shared storage will be configured using …. Redundant components will be configured to provide….4 Server Hardware Configuration The following section details the hardware specifics of the XenServer hosts for the solution. Hardware Hardware Vendor Server Model Hardware Virtualization Support CPU Number of CPU Sockets Number of Cores per Socket Total number of CPUs CPU Vendor CPU Model CPU Speed Memory Allocated RAM Server RAM Capacity Type of RAM Network Number of NICs NIC Speed Total number of network interfaces Value Yes. FC cabling to FC switches…etc – more detail the better or use multiple diagrams to depict different hardware components] 8.

onboard NIC2 – PCI slot 1 NIC2 – PCI slot 2 Refer to Visio diagram Local Storage Number of Disks Disk Size Disk Speed Disk Type RAID Card RAID Type Shared Storage Host Bus Adapter (HBA)Type HBA Vendor HBA Model Number of HBAs Fibre Channel Switches iSCSI FC QLogic 2 configured for multipathing Brocade Silkworm FC Refer to Visio diagram for FC physical connections Other Devices CD/DVD-ROM Number of Power Supply Units (PSU) 2 x Redundant PSUs patched to separate power rails 8.onboard NIC1 .hosts. Resource Pool Pool 1 Number of XenServer Hosts 10 Total CPU (MHz) 10GHz Total Memory (GB) 640GB Total Storage (TB) 2TB of SAN Storage available Total Network (Gbps) .27 - .Hardware Onboard/PCI Slot Value NIC0 .5 Aggregated Capacity The below table illustrated the aggregated XenServer capacity available from the configured Resource Pool compromising of ….

28 - .Systems Management .

This should help to ensure that each administrative task results in a predictable outcome. Port 443 needs to be open to allow general console access while 3389 and 5900 are required for RDP and VNC access to virtual machines. launch and connect to servers using unauthorized copies of support tools should be minimized wherever possible. Delegation of Administrative Processes. delegation of tasks based upon user and group assignment and security of available management tools are all discussed.3 Design . Management Tool Security. 9. As each XenServer host will typically run several concurrent virtual workloads. Justification 9. intentional or otherwise. Management Tool Access. can be avoided. • Management Tool Selection. The ability to download.29 - . • • • 9. The design should provide an overview of the common management tasks which need to be undertaken in a typical XenServer environment. which could affect the stability of both physical and virtual hosts and the associated cost of resulting systems outage.2 Key Decisions Decision Point Administrative Tools Administrative Security Design Decision XenCenter Trust based. optimizing the stability of the XenServer environment. Systems Management The Systems Management section discusses design decisions related to managing the XenServer environment. The design will need to focus on the proposed management and support structure for the XenServer environment in order to recommend an effective administrative model. The selection of appropriate management tools.9. The use of XenCenter where firewall traversal is necessary requires specific thought. Ensuring that each administrative tier is available only to authorized personnel will ensure that unauthorized changes.1 Description Designing and implementing a structured systems management solution for Citrix XenServer will help to maintain the consistency and reliability of the XenServer infrastructure. Selecting the most appropriate tool for each management process will ensure that common tasks are carried out in a consistent manner. discuss the most appropriate toolset for each task and make recommendations regarding how administrative tasks should be delegated. Selected tools should only be made available to relevant personnel. the impact of an administrative error which results in a systems outage will be magnified.

Custom Fields. Tags are like keywords or labels. The built-in Search box within XenCenter enables the administrator to search and locate resources quickly. HA (high availability) status alerts and software update alerts. XenCenter also includes some powerful tools for searching.1 Description Apart from being the management console for a single stand-alone XenServer host to multiple Resource Pools. searching and tagging.com Port 8080 Local Remote Default alerts configured Justification Proxy Server Settings Log Destination Email Alerts and Monitoring . memory and network I/O usage is monitored by XenCenter. Email notification is sent to the administrator when a preconfigured system event is triggered. 10. Alerts may be generated to keep you informed of system events including performance alerts. System Alerts.30 - .10.domian. alerts and monitoring requirements. XenCenter Configuration This section defines the configuration settings for the XenCenter management console.0. software updates. Custom fields can be added to any of the resources within XenCenter which can then be used in building search queries. Tags can be added to your managed resources to help you organize them. and they allow you to rearrange your view of resources within XenCenter depending on criteria such as purpose or geographic location. • • • • 10. Searching. email notifications.0 Build 10918 NA Pool1 Pool2 Server01 Same datacenter as XenServers Limited to Domain Administrators Group proxy. sorting and grouping your resources. Performance data from the XenServer hosts and individual guest virtual machines such as CPU. • Tags.2 Key Decisions Decision Point XenCenter Version Build Number Software Patches Applied Configured Pools Management Computer Management Computer Location Authorized Users of Management Computer Design Decision 5. client requirements. Monitoring server performance.

.Decision Point SMTP Server Custom Fields Automatic Software Updates Design Decision mail1. or Windows Vista Software. Access to the XenCenter management computer located at the datacentre s limited to ….4 XenCenter Hardware Requirements The XenCenter application for managing the XenServer host and Resource Pools can be installed and run on desktops.0 192.255.0 or above CPU. 1GHz or faster is recommended Memory.168.31 - .168.com NA Enabled Justification 10. XenCenter with respect to data center locations and connections] 10. 2GB or more is recommended Storage. 100Mb NIC or faster Configuration Computer Name (FQDN) Hardware Type Function IP Address Details Management Network CPU Memory NIC Operating System Software Installed Value ManagementPC.domain.domain.com HP Desktop Dedicated management terminal 192. Minimum of 750MHz. Minimum of 100MB Network. XenCenter will be configured with …… Default XenCenter alerts and event notifications will be delivered via SMTP using….Microsoft NET Framework version 2.254 A separate VLAN for management traffic exists on VLAN1 Single Intel 2GB 1 x Gigabit NIC Windows XP Pro .2.. Minimum of 1GB. laptops or servers which satisfy the following requirements: • • • • • • Operating system. Windows XP.5 .NET Framework Version 3.255.3 Design XenCenter will be installed on …. Windows Server 2003.100 255. [Insert Visio diagram detailing the location of the XenServer hosts.2.

10.5 XenCenter Configuration
The following section defines the configuration parameters for the XenCenter client. Configuration XenCenter Version Build Number Management Computer Authorized Users/Groups Proxy Server Connection Value

Graphic Console Type Connection Timeout Performance Graphs Log Destination SSH Enabled Console Auto-Logout Timeout

Don’t use proxy server Use proxy settings from IE Use specific proxy server Windows VMs – VNC or RDP Linux – vncterm (text) or VNC 20 seconds (Default) Area Line Local Remote 5 minutes (default)

10.6 Email Notification Settings
Email notifications will be sent when system alerts are generated from the servers and the VMs configured within the resource pools or hosted on the stand-alone XenServer. The following settings defined the email notification parameters for XenCenter. Configuration Email alert notification enabled Email Address SMTP Server SMTP Port Performance Graphs Value Yes/No xenalert@domain.com Mail.domain.com 25 (Default) Area Line

10.7 XenServer System Alert Configuration
XenServer and XenCenter provide access to alerts that are generated when noteworthy events happen. XenCenter provides various mechanisms of grouping and maintaining metadata about managed VMs, hosts, storage repositories, and other actions. The following settings defined the system alert configuration settings for XenCenter. Configuration Alert Repeat Interval CPU Usage Alerts Value 60 minutes (default) Monitored XenServers XEN01

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Configuration CPU Threshold Sustained Usage Network Usage Alerts Network Threshold Sustained Usage

Value 50% (default) 1 minute (default) 100 Bytes/second (default) 1 minute (default)

Monitored XenServers

10.8 Custom Fields, Searching and Tagging
XenCenter supports the creation of tags and custom fields, which allows for organization and quick searching of VMs, storage, network and other objects. XenCenter supports the creation of customized searches. Searches can be exported and imported, and the results of a search can be displayed in the navigation pane. The following section defines the customer fields and searches that will be implemented on XenCenter. Add list of custom fields here…

10.9 Software Updates
XenCenter is configured by default to periodically check for XenServer updates. The automatic update searches out and allows you to download new versions and patches for XenServer and XenCenter. Updates to the XenServer product family, including critical updates, hotfixes, and security updates can be downloaded automatically and quickly deployed to specific pools or servers. Configuration Check for new versions of XenServer Check for XenServer updates Check for new XenCenter versions Value Enabled Enabled Enabled

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11. Backup and Recovery
This section describes the backup and recovery requirements for the XenServer environment including XenServer host backup, Resource Pool requirements, snapshotting, and guest virtual machine metadata. Backup and recovery procedures and technologies implemented are also defined to ensure the XenServer environment is protected.

11.1 Description
• • XenServer Host Backup. The XenServer host configuration data specific to the host is required for a stand-alone server recovery process. Resource Pool Backup. A backup of pool meta-data using command line tools is possible; however this is a manual process. Individual storage repositories can be restored to new pools if portable SR’s are used, this process can be automated. Exporting/Importing Virtual Machines. A complete copy of a virtual machine including disk images can be stored in a single file for backup or for migration purposes, with a .xva file extension Portable Storage Repository. A Portable SR is a Local, NFS, FC or ISCSI based storage repository which contains all of the information necessary to recreate all the guest virtual machines with Virtual Disk Image (VDIs) in the XenServer environment. Virtual Machine Backup. Although Virtual Machine virtual disk (VDI) data and configuration meta-data can be backed up as part of a XenServer backup process, the application data on each guest also needs to be backed up. Traditional backup practices can be followed for each virtual workload but the impact of backing up multiple workloads on a single standalone host needs to be quantified.

11.2 Key Decisions
Decision Point Backup Software Backup Media Used Frequency XenServer Host Backup Frequency of Pool Data Backup Frequency of VM Backups Frequency of Data Backups Design Decision Symantec NetBackup version…. Backup to Disk then to Tape Monthly Justification

Weekly

Weekly File data is backed up using Agent based backups using tape media FNP01.domain \\FNP01\VMExport

File Server for VM Export File Share for VM Exports

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This VDI has an ext3 file-system which stores the following versioned backups: • • • A full pool-database backup. When a metadata backup is first taken.4 Virtual Machine Metadata Backup XenServer hosts use a per-host database to store metadata about VMs and associated resources such as storage and networking. When combined with storage repositories. Configuration Backup Schedule Backup Storage Repository Location Value Daily Weekly Monthly Never Local Storage Shared Storage . this database forms the complete view of all VMs available across the pool.Decision Point SAN Replication VM Cloning or Snapshotting Frequency of Data Restorations Disaster Recovery Plan Hardware Support Design Decision FC backed LUNS are replicated using EMC SRM Crash consistent backups of VMs using SAN level cloning is performed Every 3 months Justification No DR plan at this stage HP 24/7 Support Agreement 11.3 XenServer Host Backup The section below details the configuration details of the XenServer backup and associated schedule.35 - . Individual VM metadata backups. SR-level metadata which can be used to recreate the SR description when the storage is reattached. a special backup VDI is created on a SR. partitioned by the SRs in which the VM has disks. Configuration Backup Server Backup File path Backup Frequency Value 11.

NetApp or Dell EqualLogic storage. There are tow type of snapshots which can be used: • • Regular Snapshots.5 Virtual Machine Backup The section below defines the backup configuration for Virtual Machines and the file data residing within the guest operating systems. . the Citrix Tools for Virtual Machines need to be installed on the VM. These snapshots take advantage of the Windows Volume Shadow Service (VSS) for services that support it to allow the application to flush data to disk prior to taking a snapshot.0 provides a convenient snapshotting mechanism that can take a snapshot of a VM's storage and metadata at a given time provided the underlying Virtual Disk Image Storage Repository is based on NFS.0.Configuration Portable Storage Repository Value Local NFS iSCSI FC VDI_Backup_SR iSCSI LUN at 100GB replicated to DR site All VMs Portable Storage Repository Type Protected Virtual Machines 11.6 Virtual Machine Snapshots XenServer 5. These snapshots are crash consistent and can be performed on all types of VMs including Linux Quiesced Snapshots. As a requirement.36 - . Configuration File Data Backup Type Value Synthetic full agent based backup using Symantec NetBackup Client Crash-consistent VM snapshot using… NetApp FAS3020 snapshotting at the array level Symantec for file-based backups NetApp for VM snapshots Weekly All VMs are backed up of a regular basis Full Virtual Machine Backup Virtual Machine Snapshots Backup Vendor Backup Schedule Protected Virtual Machines 11.

length of replication.Configuration Storage Repository Type Citrix Tools for VMs VM Operating System Types Microsoft VSS Number of snapshot to maintain Value NFS NetApp EqualLogic Installed on all guest VMs Windows Exchange 2003 Supported by guest application 7 daily rotating snapshots with 1 weekly snapshot 11.37 - . Elaborate on how the backup and recovery process would be conducted including but not limited to the following items: Portable SRs for full VM metadata and pool copy combined with VDI backup Export and Import of VMs as a DR plan SAN replication to DR site – how is this replicated.7 Disaster Recovery Provide details of the DR plan if it exists. RPO and RTOs. replication schedules. which LUNs are replicated DR Recovery process – defines the step-by-step recovery scenario DR testing procedures .

Virtual Machines .38 - .

Within this section. memory.12. 12. VM Optimization Setting . characteristics of the virtual machines. home server settings. Virtual Machine Design The Virtual Machine section defines the guest virtual machines which will be hosted in the XenServer infrastructure. 12. and operating system requirements. No XenApp servers deployed. including virtual hardware configuration. high availability protection levels and P2V methodology are discussed.1 Description Guest virtual machine configuration from a CPU. intended machine usage. disk and network perspective should be correctly sized in line with the existing standard operating environment. template configuration.2 Key Decisions Decision Point Type of VMs Hosted Total Number of VMs VM Operating Systems Design Decision Desktop and Servers 120 VMs in total Windows XP Pro SP2 and SP3 Windows 2003 R2 No Linux VMs installed Installed using ISO then converted to a template Microsoft SysPrep Justification VM Deployment Strategy VM Guest Operating System Initialization Virtual CPU Configuration Virtual Memory Configuration All VMs will have default vCPU priority settings 512MB for Desktops 1024MB for Servers All VMs will have general Use optimization settings. Virtual machine templates can facilitate rapid deployment of new guests by leveraging predefined and optimized settings.39 - .

domain.3 Design The XenServer infrastructure will support up to…. Server VMs will be configured with….. P2V (Physical-toVirtual) Conversion Tools Machines identified for P2V Migration Citrix XenConvert PlateSpin PowerConvert The following servers will be P2V migrated: APP01 APP02 12...Decision Point Boot Order Design Decision All VMs will default boot from DVDROM. .. Justification Virtual NIC Configuration Virtual Disk Image Configuration Home Server Setting HA Protection Configuration Configured Virtual Machine Templates Default NTP Server Alert Configuration Sync all VM time with DC1.. All VMs will be based on Windows….local Desktop VMs will be configured with CPU…. Network…. The default VM configuration is based on …. The following desktop VMs will be streamed with PVS and will default boot from Network….40 - . Disk….

.domain. Templates make it possible to rapidly deploy new virtual machines in XenCenter. Alerts settings will be…… 12. and with the optimum storage. Each template contains installation metadata and the setup information needed to create a new VM with a specific guest operating system. Configuration Item Number of vCPUs vMemory Number of vNICs Virtual Disk Size DVDROM Host Network NTP Server Operating System Citrix Tools for Virtual Machines Microsoft VSS Driver Enabled Desktops 1 512MB 1 10GB Empty prod_lan DC1.domain. CPU.4 Virtual Machine Configuration The table below illustrates the default virtual machine configuration.41 - . The following section details the configuration settings of the templates that will be implemented in the XenServer environment. Hardware General Name Description Operating System Application Installed Function XenServer Tools Installed Virtual Storage CD/DVD-ROM Virtual Disk Name Virtual Disk Size Virtual Network Interfaces Number of Virtual NICs Host Network IP Settings Network Limit Template 1 GoldXPDesktop Template XP XP Pro SP3 Office 2003 Desktop SOE Yes Disabled XP1 10GB 1 prod_lan DHCP NA Template 2 Template n .HA protection levels for desktops and servers ….local Windows XP Pro Installed No Servers 1 1024MB 1 40GB Empty prod_lan DC1.local Windows Server 2003 R2 Installed Yes 12.5 Virtual Machine Templates A template is a virtual machine encapsulated into a file. memory and virtual network configuration.

and started as a VM on the XenServer Host. . configuration is cast into a virtualized instance of the same operating system and file system. Resource Pool Protected: Priority 1 DC1 DNS1 Exchange1 Protected: Priority 2 SQL1 WEB1 HA Protection Level Protected: Priority 3 WEB1 APP1 Best Effort XP1 XP2 ….7 Workload Migration Process The Workload Conversion is the process by which an existing operating system on a physical or virtual machine .6 Virtual Machine HA Configuration The table below defines the HA protection levels for the guest virtual machines in the XenServer infrastructure. 2 or 3 Best Effort Do No Restart Additional Configuration Customizations 12.Hardware Virtual Memory and CPU Settings Virtual Memory Number of Virtual CPUs Virtual CPU Priority Startup Options Boot Order Template 1 Template 2 Template n 512MB 1 NA Network DVD-Drive Hard Disk No Auto-start VM on server boot Alerts Configuration CPU Usage Alerts Network Usage Alerts Disk Usage Alerts Optimization Optimization Type Shadow Memory Multiplier High Availability HA Protection Level General Use NA Protected Priority 1. instantiated.its file system.42 - . transferred..etc Do Not Restart Al other servers Pool 1 Pool 2 Pool 3 12.

For large scale migrations. This can be taken as an opportunity to rationalize and simplify the workload configuration. Where P2V tools do not exist or do not work for the current virtualization platform. or P2P migration can be ‘emulated’ to achieve a similar result. All relevant staff must be trained in the use of the new toolset. Many P2V migrations can be performed in the time it would take to complete a single manual migration. A P2V tool must be identified. making the purchase or use of an automated migration tool unnecessary. Unless closely managed. Consistency. Consistency. a P2V process is the only rational option. Once the parameters for the migration are supplied it proceeds automatically. Disadvantages: o o o • Physical to Virtual (P2V). maintaining consistency can be challenging when migration tasks are managed manually. Application owners must be involved in the migration process to be sure that such changes are identified before each workload is released into production. Consistency. This option might also be taken for advanced migrations of physical workloads with complex requirements such as bespoke option cards. Physical to Virtual migrations are typically undertaken using bespoke migration tools which integrate closely with the virtualization platform to deliver fast and consistent results. Rationalization. subtle problems can be quickly introduced into large numbers of newly migrated workload. peripherals or extremely complex storage requirements. a virtual server is created which is used to emulate . similar servers will always be built consistently. Advantages: o o Optimization. Advantages: o Speed. Inconsistent or badly managed migrations can cause application inconsistency and reliability issues following the migration. o o Disadvantages: o o • Physical to Physical (P2P). A manual process is very time consuming and best suited to small or complex migrations. a Physical to Physical. This migration type would typically be used if there were very few migrations to be performed. All unnecessary application data (temporary files and log files etc) is removed. Workloads are ‘refreshed’. As P2V migrations are parameter based. Speed. tested and selected. Integration.There are many methods which can be employed to perform a workload migration. For a large number of migrations. such as the installation of relevant paravirtualization tools. Most P2V tools integrate closely with the virtualization platform being used ensuring that virtual workload optimizations. such as disk structure and storage requirements. workload is optimized. The tool must support the virtualization platform being used and be capable of handling the majority of the physical workloads to be migrated. For example. Reliability.43 - . these are detailed as follows: • Manual Migration. forms part of the migration process. Toolset.

Disadvantages: o The key to a successful migration strategy is in understanding in fine detail the physical estate which needs to be migrated. as detailed above. time should be invested in analyzing and understanding that it meets a large percentage of the migration requirements of the physical infrastructure. If a third party toolset is to be used.44 - . Integration.the destination physical server. the migration is then performed as though both source and destination hosts are physical.] . [Describe the P2V process and how each of the VMs targeted for P2V will be migrated using the P2V tool specified …. none of the optimizations are performed which would normally be done on a destination host which is a virtual machine. Most of the advantages are similar to a P2V migration. Once the requirements of the workloads are understood it is easier to identify the best toolset and process to use migrating each environment. Advantages: o Speed/Consistency/Repeatability. As the destination host is perceived to be a physical server.

if it was conducted. Workload Matrix This section details the planned desktop and server workloads that will be hosted as guest virtual machine on the XenServer infrastructure. will also be discussed.2 Key Decisions Decision Point Expected VM capacity Number of Guest Desktop VMs Number of Guest Server VMs Citrix SVA Conducted Expected Host Utilisation Acceptable Number of Host Failures Design Decision 120 VMs 80 desktop VMs Justification 40 server VMs No 60% CPU and Memory utilisation Up to 2 XenServer host failures can be sustained Scale-out. XenServer Scalability Model 13. additional server resource should be deployed as best practice to provide as buffer for unexpected utilisation peaks or server failures. . a total of X XenServers will be required to support y number of VMs The infrastructure is capable of sustaining two XenServer failures….. This is critical in maintaining an acceptable level of end user experience and virtual machine performance. 13. Information gathered as a result of the Citrix Server Virtualization Assessment.3 Citrix Server Virtualization Assessment (SVA) The SVA results indicate the following …… Based on the SVA results.45 - . 13.13. Additional hosts will be added to the pool to increase VM density.1 Description Individual server capacity and aggregated Resource Pool capacity with respect to virtual machine utilisation should be considered as part of the hosting infrastructure design to ensure the environment and servers are not overcommitted. In any cases.

46 - .4 Desktop Workload The following table is the expected virtual desktop and virtual server workload that will be hosted on the XenServer Resource Pool consisting of XenServers based on SERVER HARDWARE MODEL servers. Resource Pool Name XenServer Host Resource Pool Role Type of Guest VMs # Guest VMs Guest VMs Comments .13.

47 - .Security .

14. Root password for all servers will be given only to support personnel with specific requirements. compromise of a single system can result in outage for many business systems. Physical server security. or equivalent root level accounts. as the root account and password. The design process should follow these corporate guidelines and make recommendations regarding how the XenServer design can meet these security requirements. As each XenServer will typically host several virtual workloads. Dom0 passwords should be secured at the highest level.2 Key Decisions Decision Point Physical Server Security Design Decision All servers will be located in a secure data centre with restricted access. Security for storage should be given serious thought as compromise of a storage repository could result in the corruption or deletion of its contents and the subsequent failure of all virtual workloads which share the SR. must be used for both console and XenServer access XenCenter. • • • • • 14. The following topics are considered during the design process: • Physical Server Security. Justification Resource Pool (Dom0) passwords . Citrix XenServers should be deployed in a secure location where only controlled access is permitted. anti-spyware and firewall software.14. Dom0 Password. Dom0 is the first VM created on every XenServer and enables management of all other VM’s. Security of virtual workloads can be implemented using traditional methods such as leveraging the security features of Active Directory and using standard anti-virus. Restricting access to the Dom0 password will reduce the risk of unauthorized personnel from running and connecting via the XenCenter console. By default XenCenter uses SSL to encrypt all communications with each resource pool. The XenServer hypervisor is not generally prone to attack. If the servers are deployed on internal networks. Virtual Machine Security. XenCenter is used to manage most aspects of a XenServer deployment.48 - . there is very little likelihood of compromise at this level. Security This section discusses the security related aspects of the XenServer design. along with encryption and enclave networking are analyzed. Storage Security. Hypervisor Security.1 Description Corporate security policy should already provide guidelines which dictate how each tier of the XenServer architecture is secured.

No restrictions will be placed on access to XenCenter Justification 14.3 Design .49 - .Decision Point Storage Security Virtual Machine Security XenCenter Design Decision CompanyABC will use FC-SAN shared storage and will use standard zoning and masking to provide basic security. All virtual workloads are Windows servers which are AD domain members.

50 - .Appendices .

whilst the other is logically connected to two separate network segments. This network is only available to a single XenServer host and cannot be assigned to other pooled hosts. One VM makes use of a single virtual network. Appendix A: XenServer Networking Explained This section details the XenServer Networking and provides insights into each network type that can be used in a XenServer implementation. two physical network cards are available. . 15. VM’s which are connected to internal only networks cannot be migrated between pooled hosts.1 Internal Networks The simplest network configuration is an internal network. In this example. In this example. No PIF is required as there is no logical connection to a physical network adapter and therefore no external connectivity.2 External Networks The creation of an external network which uses a physical adapter will create the necessary PIF’s required.15. 15. and therefore the physical network adapter: Here multiple physical network interfaces are present. more complex virtual networking is possible. two VM’s each with their own VIF are attached to the same virtual switch which in turn is logically connected to the PIF.51 - . VM’s on a common XenServer can share this type of network in order to isolate specific traffic.

15. In the example. two VM’s are connected to the same network segment via this bond. . 15. VLAN’s are introduced which subsume the network bond. Separate vSwitches are created for each VLAN and in the following example. three VM’s are logically connected to separate VLAN’s via the same physical network card. Two physical network cards which are connected to the same network segment are used to create a bond for resilience and additional throughput.3 Bonded Interfaces The next example shows the introduction of a network bond.52 - .4 VLAN’s Finally.

. This example shows a XenServer with 3 NIC’s.15.53 - . single virtual machine. seen by XenServer as eth2 provides a non-resilient network which is used by a fifth. A third NIC. three of them attach to different VLAN’s which leverage the bond for resilience and a further two attach directly to the bond itself.5 Virtual Network Combinations Many combinations of the above examples are possible in order to achieve a configuration which meets with the requirements of the design. eth0 and eth1 are bonded for resilience and this bonded network is used by 5 virtual machines.

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