VOL. 145 - NO.

12 SIDNEY, NEW YORK — THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 2011 SUGGESTED PRICE 75¢
Girl Scouting
Celebrates 99 Years
Page 2
Sidney School
Unites Against Bullying
Page 3
ROBO the Robot
To Visit Sidney Library
Page 6
Palmer, Bryden Win
TTN Doubles Tournament
Page 10
Dear Readers,
Included with this issue of the newspaper is a new weekly supplement titled
Valley Life. We have merged our nearly-year-old weekly publication, The Sports
Section, into the new supplement in an effort to give you, our valued readers, a
bigger and better newspaper.
Along with our coverage of the sports scene, hopefully you’ll find interesting
reading in the many new features every week in the Valley Life, and hopefully
you’ll get a chuckle from one of the comic strips.
As a new publication, Valley Life will be very much a “work in progress.”
We’ll be adding to – and subtracting from – its pages features, articles, comic
strips, puzzles, etc. that you tell us you want more of, or less of.
After you’ve had a chance to look through its pages, please send me an e-
mail with your comments about Valley Life to kspaden@tritownnews.com, then
try your hand at solving some of the many puzzles you’re going to find inside
Valley Life!
Thank you,
Kenneth S. Paden, Publisher
WINDING UP FOR A “CRAZY” WEEKEND in the Bainbridge Town Hall Theatre, the
Out of the Woodwork Players practice for performances of “Crazy For You”, the new
Gershwin musical. Curtain is at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, March 11 and 12, with
a 2 p.m. matinee on Sunday, March 13. For ticket information call 563-2582 or e-mail
owptheatre@yahoo.com. Pictured here(l-r) are: Rich Cooley, Paul Henderson, Evelyn
Iversen, Rich Cuthbertson and Jack Doyle.
Curtain Opens on “Crazy For You”
March 11, 12, 13 in Bainbridge
BAINBRIDGE - A color-
ful cast of cowboys, Follies
girls, financiers, producers and
directors will converge upon
the historic Town Hall Theatre
this weekend when the Out of
the Woodwork Players present,
Crazy for You, the new Gersh-
win musical.
Centered around the story
of banker Bobby Child (Dan
Spencer) whose dream of be-
ing a dancer drives him away
from fiancée Irene (Judy Pitel)
and his mother (Donna Cuyle),
Hitchcock Withdraws as Trustee Candidate
Matviak, Rose Seek Sidney Mayor’s Post
In Tri-Town Elections Tuesday, March 15
SIDNEY – A contest for Sid-
ney Village Mayor is the high-
light of general elections in the
tri-town communities. Trustee
Andrew (Andy) Matviak, who
has been serving as deputy
mayor, is being challenged by
Jacqlene Rose. The winner will
fill the four-year office currently
held by James Warren who is
not seeking re-election.
Both candidates are well-
known business people who
have played active roles in their
community.
Voters in Sidney will also
elect two trustees to fill seats
currently being held by Andrew
Matviak and Bruce Francisco.
Three names will appear on the
ballot, but only two candidates
are seeking the office. The two
candidates for the four-year
posts are John R. Redente and
Jason Woodyshek. Both are
newcomers to village office.
Gregory Hitchcock’s name
will also appear on the ballot,
but he has decided not to run for
office. In a statement to voters,
Hitchcock said, “I want to thank
all my supporters that signed
my petition to run for Village
of Sidney Trustee. You made it
possible for me to be put on the
ballot this year. Because of time
constraints and family commit-
ments I feel it would be impos-
sible for me at this time to meet
the demands of village trustee. I
was not able to remove myself
from the ballot on such short no-
tice, but I will not be running for
village trustee. The candidates
that are still on the ballet will
serve you well. I still believe
that with the right planning to
grow, and the right leadership
from the new mayor, along with
the trustees, much can be ac-
complished. Thank you for your
past support and hopefully, fu-
ture support.”
Voting in Sidney will take
place from noon to 9 p.m. in the
Civic Center, 21 Liberty St.
AFTON - In the Village of
Afton, voters will elect two
trustees. Current trustees Gloria
Harvey and Ronald Zablocki
are seeking re-election to four-
year terms.
Voting will take place from
noon to 9 p.m. in the Susque-
hanna Room in the Jack Bolster
Community Center, 105 Main
St., Afton
.
UNADILLA - There are two
trustee vacancies on the Unadil-
la Village Board. There is only
one candidate for a two-year
trustee seat. The positions open
are those currently held by John
Frascatore and Kevin Rickard.
John Frascatore received the
Republican nomination for an-
other term in office.
Voting will take place from
noon to 9 p.m. in the Unadilla
Public Library, Community
House, 193 Main St., Unadilla.
There is no election this year
in the Village of Bainbridge.
Wednesday, March 16 at Trackside
Sidney Chamber to Welcome
New Members at Coffee Hour
SIDNEY – New members of
the Sidney Chamber of Com-
merce and special guests will be
welcomed at the chamber’s an-
nual New Member Coffee Hour
Wednesday, March 16 at Track-
side Dining, Main St., Sidney.
From 7:30 to 9 a.m. there
will be free coffee and pastries.
There will also be a number of
door prizes given away.
New members and special
guests will receive written in-
vitations. All chamber members
are encouraged to take this op-
portunity to meet the new mem-
bers, and to network with each
other.
GET YOUR PANCAKES HERE, invites Jim Doig. Chef
Jim is ready to serve up stacks of pancakes at the
Sidney Rotary Pancake Day this Saturday, March 12. All
you can eat pancakes with maple syrup, eggs, sausage
and beverage will be served from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Sidney Fire Department Training Center. All proceeds
benefit Rotary’s community projects. In addition, the
Sidney Police Department will provide free finger print-
ing/photos for identification from 9 a.m. to noon.
Nex-T-New Asks
Donations Be Left
During Shop Hours
SIDNEY – Stealing and
trashing of bags in Nex-T-
New’s outside donation bin has
saddened those at the shop. To
prevent such actions in the fu-
ture, they are asking the public
to bring in their donations to the
shop during regular hours.
Nex-T-New is open Wednes-
days, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thurs-
days, 9 a.m. to 5 .m.; Fridays, 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Saturdays, 9
a.m. to 3 p.m.
If you need to bring items
in other hours, please call 563-
3434 to make arrangements.
Afton Village
Board To Hold
Special Meeting
AFTON - The Afton Village
Board of Trustees will be hold-
ing a Special Meeting at 5:50
p.m. on Monday, March 14, in
the Susquehanna Room at the
Jack D. Bolster Community
Center, 105 Main Street, Afton,
to begin budget discussion. The
regular meeting will be as usual
at 7 p.m.
Winter Returns to Dump
Heavy Snow Over Area
SIDNEY – The almost
spring-like weather that blessed
the early part of the weekend
reverted back to winter Sun-
day. The sleet and freezing rain
turned to snow by late afternoon.
By Monday morning Mother
Nature had dumped from a foot
to almost two feet of snow over
the area,
At 4:30 a.m. on Monday, the
Chenango Co. Board of Super-
visors issued a state of emer-
gency, closing all Chenango
Co. roads due to blowing and
drifting snow. The closing was
later continued until 1 p.m., and
a travel advisory was issued for
the remainder of Monday.
Similar road closings were is-
sued in Broome Co., and Dela-
ware Co. had travel advisories.
Road crews battled the blow-
ing and drifting snow as plows
fought to clear roads and high-
ways. Several noted it was the
most difficult storm this season,
and near record snow levels
were set in some areas.
All the schools in the tri-town
area were closed, and many ac-
tivities were cancelled.
By Tuesday, sunshine brought
some relief but snow was piled
high along the streets and roads,
and homeowners struggled to
clear sidewalks and driveways.
In some areas, more snow was
predicted for Wednesday night,
to be followed by rain.

Crazy For You combines cow-
boy crooning with a variety of
showtune styles.
Bobby does not appear to
stand a “ghost of a chance”
with Deadrock’s desert flower,
Polly, (Evelyn Iversen) until
her dream of saving the town’s
Victorian Theatre for her father
(Rich Cuthbertson) gives him a
way.
Lurking in the background
to block him at every pass is
surly saloon keeper, Lank (Rich
Cooley).
Capturing the very heart of
live theatre, Crazy For You fea-
tures such Gershwin favorites
as “I Got Rhythm,” “Someone
To Watch Over Me,” “They
Can’t Take That Away From
Me,” “Tonight’s The Night,”
“Embraceable You,” “Bidin’
My Time,” “Shall We Dance?,”
“Slap That Bass,” “Naughty
Baby” and “Stiff Upper Lip.”
Curtain is at 7:30 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, March 11 and 12
with a 2 p.m. matinee on Sun-
day, March 13, the day that day-
light savings time begins.
For information about tick-
ets, call 563-2582, 563-1311,
e-mail owptheatre@yahoo.com
or find us on facebook at Out of
the Woodwork Players, OWP.
Daylight Savings Time
Begins March 13
2 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
BAINBRIDGE – The 11
th

Annual corned beef and cab-
bage dinner with potatoes, car-
rots, homemade Irish soda bread
and cake will be held on Thurs-
day, March 17 from 5 p.m. until
gone at the Bainbridge Museum
(South Main St.). Take-outs
will be available in eco-friendly
containers. The dinner will ben-
efit the Bainbridge Historical
Society.
MORRIS – A corned beef &
cabbage dinner to benefit young
Ian Rehrmann and his fam-
ily will be held on Thursday,
March 17 at the Morris United
Methodist Church in Morris.
The dinner, which is being put
on by the church and the Morris
Fire Dept. Auxiliary, will begin
at 5 p.m. with take-out dinners
available from 4:30 p.m.
Dinner will include corned
beef, cabbage, potatoes, car-
rots, rolls, dessert, coffee, tea,
milk and green limeade. Presale
tickets will be available from
members of the church and
auxiliary.
Presale tickets are available
from any member of the Morris
Methodist Church Good News
Gals or Fire Dept. Auxiliary.
Phone 263-5796 or 263-5074.
GILBERTSVILLE – A
corned beef and cabbage din-
ner will be held on Thursday,
March 17 at the Gilbertsville
Baptist Church NLFH with
serving from 5-6:30 p.m. The
dinner will include corned beef,
cabbage, potatoes, carrots, rolls
and strawberry shortcake for
dessert.
SIDNEY - A St. Patrick’s
Day Ham/Corned Beef Boiled
Dinner will be held on Thurs-
day, March 17 from 4:30 to
6:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church, 25 River St., Sidney.
Tickets are available at the door.
Take-outs available.
SIDNEY – A Roast Beef Din-
ner will benefit the Jeremy Caw-
ley Memorial Bowling Tourna-
ment. The dinner will be held
Friday, March 18 at the Sidney
American Legion with Walter
Ray Williams, Jr. as special
guest. Contact Ernest E. Cawley
at 563-3993 for reservations.
GUILFORD – The Guilford
Fire Department will hold their
Annual Spaghetti Dinner Satur-
day, March 19 from 4 to 8 p.m.
at the Guilford Fire Station. The
menu will include spaghetti, a
salad bar, desserts and beverag-
es. Proceeds will benefit Linda
and Tim DuMond.

WINTER
SUPPERS
VOTE
JACQLENE
ROSE
for
SIDNEY
MAYOR
Tuesday,
March 15
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SUPPORT for the Sidney Recreation Commission from
the United Way of Sidney is in the form of a donation.
A check is presented to Paul Foote, Sidney Recreation
Commission director by Sheri Young, past president of
the United Way of Sidney.
United Way of Sidney Donates
To Recreation Commission
SIDNEY - The Sidney Rec-
reation Commission plans and
organizes recreational activities
for youth and adults in the tri
town community. Some of the
summer recreational programs
that the Sidney Recreation Com-
mission provides are swimming
lessons and recreational swim
times at the municipal pool. Last
year they offered nine different
levels of swimming instruction
for toddlers to adults with 400
participants. They also offered
numerous baseball and softball
leagues with 375 participants
and a morning gym activity for
youth in grades 5 through 12 for
a six-week period.
The Sidney Recreation Com-
mission provides activities in the
fall and winter, which include a
youth soccer program for chil-
dren K-6
th
grade. Last year they
had 150 youth on twelve teams
that played their games on Sun-
day. During the months of De-
cember through March there is
an open gym after school pro-
gram that runs daily from 3 to 5
p.m. for youth ages 5 to 16. Or-
ganized adult leagues are avail-
able at the Civic Center gym for
basketball and volleyball as well
as numerous pickup basketball
and volleyball games, which are
organized by the Sidney Recre-
ation Commission.
New activities were also
started such as adult beginning
swimming lessons, a new pony
league baseball travel team for
youth ages 13-16 and a mixed
slow pitch softball league.
The Sidney Recreation Com-
mission provides a healthy and
safe environment for all of their
participantes. All of the Sid-
ney Recreation Commission
youth programs are available
for anyone residing in the Sid-
ney Central School District free
of charge. Paul Foote, director,
thanks the United Way of Sid-
ney for their generous support
throughout the years.
The United Way of Sidney
is able to support organiza-
tions like the Sidney Recreation
Commission because of the
community’s generosity. The
United Way of Sidney thanks
you for your continued support.
From Project Lead the Way
Sidney High School Receives National
Certification for Engineering Program
SIDNEY – Sidney High
School announced that it has
received national certification
for the Project Lead The Way
program that it has been offer-
ing since 2006. Project Lead
The Way (PLTW), the nation’s
leading provider of science,
technology, engineering, and
math (STEM) education offers a
rigorous curriculum that allows
students to apply what they are
learning in math and science
class to real-life engineering and
technology projects. A National
Business Roundtable report
states that to remain competi-
tive in the global marketplace,
America needs to graduate
400,000 science, engineering,
mathematics and technical four-
year degrees annually, yet we
are currently graduating only
265,000. PLTW is providing
students with a foundation and
proven path to college and ca-
reer success in these areas.
The primary purposes of
the certification program are
to recognize schools that have
successfully demonstrated a
commitment to the quality na-
tional standards of the Pathway
To Engineering program and to
provide an opportunity for stu-
dents to apply for college credit
at PLTW affiliate Universities
for selected PLTW courses.
PLTW has over 35 affiliate col-
lege and university partners that
offer students credit for com-
pleting certain PLTW courses
in high school, including Roch-
ester Institute of Technology in
Rochester, NY.
Eben M. Bullock, principal
of Sidney High School, said,
“We’ve seen how the PLTW
program draws more students
to engineering and technology
courses and gets them thinking
about college and their career.
We are extremely proud to be
PLTW certified and ecstatic
that our students can continue
receiving college credits for
certain PLTW classes.”
Bullock and a team composed
of teachers, staff, students, and
members of the community
completed a self-assessment of
the school’s implementation of
the Pathway to Engineering™
program that culminated in a
site visit by a national PLTW
certification specialist. The cer-
tification team met with teach-
ers, administration, counselors,
students, community represen-
tatives and reviewed student
work.
“Sidney High School has
demonstrated its commitment to
the quality standards of PLTW’s
Pathway to Engineering pro-
gram and the real winners are
Sidney students,” said John
Lock, president and CEO of
PLTW. “Students are benefiting
from an innovative curriculum
that encourages creativity and
critical thinking and on top of
that, they can earn college credit
for some of these courses. We
congratulate the entire Sidney
community and look forward
to many more years of work-
ing together to prepare Sidney
students to become the most in-
novative and productive in the
world.”
Teachers are a critical com-
ponent of the success of the
PLTW program. All teachers
are required to complete an in-
tensive two-week professional
development course during the
summer before they can teach
a PLTW course. Students who
enroll in PLTW courses also
benefit from the organization’s
strong university and industry
relationships that allow students
to begin working toward their
college degree and gain valuable
experience through internships
and local business executives
who serve as mentors. Local
business support has included
Amphenol Corporation, Egli
Machine Company, MeadWest-
vaco, and Unison Industries.
Ms. Christine Smith, a PLTW
teacher, said “The beauty of
PLTW courses is that our kids
get to experience how a formula
they learned in math applies to
a real project. In class, there are
no lectures – kids are building,
developing and creating. That is
the kind of hands-on experience
that will engage more students
in fields that they might other-
wise never consider.”

Village Board
Meets March 15
BAINBRIDGE – The Village
of Bainbridge Board of Trustees
will hold their regularly sched-
uled monthly meeting on Tues-
day, March 15 at 6:30 p.m. in
the Village Clerk’s Office, 33
West Main Street, Bainbridge.
Girl Scouting Celebrates 99th Anniversary
JOHNSON CITY - Girl
Scouts of NYPENN Pathways,
Inc. joins Girl Scouts across
the country in celebrating Girl
Scout Week and the 99
th
an-
niversary of Girl Scouts from
March 6-12.
It was on March 12, 1912
that founder, Juliette Gordon
Low, assembled 18 girls from
Savannah, Georgia for a lo-
cal Girl Scout meeting. Low
believed that all girls should
be given the opportunity to de-
velop physically, mentally, and
spiritually. Within a few years
her dream for a girl-centered
organization was realized. To-
day, Girl Scouts of the USA has
a membership of over 3.2 mil-
lion girls and adults, including
nearly 19,000 girls locally.
As Girl Scouts of the USA
prepares to celebrate its cen-
tennial anniversary next year,
many activities and events are
being planned both locally and
nationally to celebrate the his-
tory of Girl Scouting and look
forward to the future.
A nationwide take action proj-
ect entitled Girl Scouts Forever
Green will allow Girl Scouts of
all ages, volunteers, and alum-
nae to participate in a meaning-
ful leadership experience that
makes a huge positive impact
on the environment. There will
also be a 100
th
anniversary cel-
ebration on the mall in Wash-
ington D.C. in June 2012. The
Girl Scouts of NYPENN Path-
ways is planning on offering a
bus trip to the celebration. Sto-
ries from alumnae are also be-
ing collected locally. To share
a story, visit www.gsnypenn.
org/AboutUs/OurLegacy.
To stay up to date on activities
or events leading up to the 100
th

anniversary, visit www.gsnypenn.
org. To join Girl Scouts contact
the Binghamton Service Center at
724-6572, visit www.gsnypenn.
org, become a fan on Facebook,
or follow @GSNYPENN on
Twitter for more information.
With Open House at Baker’s Maple
End of Winter Celebration
To Take Place in Bainbridge
BAINBRIDGE – As maple
season approaches, be ready to
enjoy a unique opportunity in
the community of Bainbridge on
Saturdays, March 19 and March
26 and Sundays, March 20 and
27. The sap house at Baker’s
Maple will be open from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. these days and you are
invited to come in and join us to
celebrate the end of winter.
Saturday, March 19 will begin
with a pancake breakfast at the
Bainbridge Museum on South
Main St., hosted by the Bain-
bridge Boy Scout Troop 52. They
will serve from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Saturday, March 26 will find
the Fifth Annual Maple Baking
Contest at the Sap House, begin-
ning at 11:30 a.m.
At the Sap House you will be
able to check out the syrup being
made, ask all the questions you
want about how syrup gets from
the tree to the table, sample a va-
riety of maple products including
jackwax, maple fluff and many
other maple goodies.
At the Baking Contest entries
can be brought to the sap house
between 11:30 a.m. and 12:45
p.m. Judging will begin at 1 p.m.
and coffee, tea and tasting avail-
able after the judging.
Also in the village on March
26, check out the gallery at the
Town Hall Theatre for a chance
to view the Student Art Show at 8
p.m. Plan to enjoy the Town Hall
Opry with Acoustic Blue on the
stage with some great bluegrass
music.
For more information, please
call 967-7229.
This Cutie
Celebrates
Sweet
16
March 9.
Wish Makenzie
a
Happy
Birthday!
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 3
SOUP
KITCHEN
ENJOY
PANCAKES!
SIDNEY – The Rotary Club
of Sidney, under the chairman-
ship of Kyle Westcott, is mak-
ing plans for their 58
th
Annual
Pancake Breakfast on Saturday,
March 12 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at the Sidney Firemen’s Train-
ing Center, River St., Sidney.
The breakfast will include all
you can eat pancakes with ma-
ple syrup, eggs, sausage and
beverage. Proceeds from the
event benefit Rotary’s commu-
nity projects.
SIDNEY CENTER – The
Sidney Center United Methodist
Church will sponsor a pancake
breakfast and bake sale on Sat-
urday, March 19 at the Mason-
ville Federated Church.
Serving will be from 7
– 10:30 a.m. and the cost will
be your donation. Menu will be
pancakes, maple syrup, sausage,
applesauce, eggs, homefries,
juice and beverage.
Many thanks to the Mason-
ville Church for letting us use
their facility. This will be the
last of the series of four break-
fasts that our two churches have
sponsored.
NINEVEH – A Pancake
Breakfast will be held at the
Nineveh Presbyterian Church
on Saturday, March 26 from 7
to 11 a.m. The breakfast will in-
clude all you can eat pancakes
with maple syrup, scrambled
eggs, sausage, home fries and
beverage. Proceeds will go to-
ward helping to pay for the new
Christian Education addition.

CHICKEN
BBQS
SIDNEY – It’s a sign that
spring is near at hand when the
ABC Center for Performing
Arts schedules one of the first
chicken barbecues of the season.
The date is Saturday, March 12
in the parking lot of the Country
Store, Union St., Sidney. Deli-
cious barbecued chicken halves
will be available starting at 10
a.m. To complete your meal,
homemade salads and desserts
will also be available. Proceeds
will help the students with
workshop and competition fees.
Advance tickets are available at
ABC Studio, Dancers’ Paradise
and from members of the ABC
Performance Team and Meta-
morphosis Dance Co.
SOUP &
SANDWICH
AFTON – Celebrate the ap-
proach of spring with hot soup
and warm fellowship at Afton
United Methodist Church. All
are invited to our monthly soup
supper served on Saturday,
March 12 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in
Norby Fellowship Hall, Afton
UMC, Spring St., Afton.
This month your choices are
chicken noodle or corned beef
and cabbage soup with bologna
and cheese sandwich or Italian
bread and butter, along with
dessert and beverages. No will
go away hungry.
There is no cost for this meal
but donations are accepted.
Everyone is welcome to come
share a good hot meal in a warm
friendly atmosphere. We hope
to see you there.
GILBERTSVILLE - A Soup
and Sandwich luncheon will
be held on Saturday, March 19
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
NLFH of the Gilbertsville Bap-
tist Church. A variety of soups
and sandwiches with homemade
pies will be offered.
BAINBRIDGE – The Soup
Kitchen at the Bainbridge
Methodist Church will be open
this Saturday, March 12 from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. The menu choices
will be cream of broccoli or
vegetable soup; baked fish and
fiesta rice with green beans or
macaroni and cheese and tossed
salad. The sandwich choices
will be ham salad or corned beef
salad; and choice of dessert and
beverage.
SIDNEY – Soup, bread, and
beverages are served at St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church, 25 River St.,
Sidney, every Wednesday from
10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Two differ-
ent soups will be available for you
to choose from. All are welcome.
Vote
ANDY
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SHOWING A UNITED STAND against bullying are
members of the Sidney Elementary School staff. They
are wearing specially designed shirts to reflect their uni-
fied stand.
Sidney School District
Unites Against Bullying
SIDNEY - The Sidney Cen-
tral School district is taking a
united stand against bullying.
Students, staff, and families
have been given the option to
purchase “I Stand Against Bul-
lying” T-shirts in order to reflect
our unified stand. The proceeds
from t-shirt sales will be used
to bring more special speakers
to the district to have a positive
impact on our students.
Word about this fundraiser
has spread to other districts
in the area, like The Unatego
School District who has also
started selling t-shirts. We hope
that the combined funds will
allow both districts to reap the
benefit of having presenters
come in that individual districts
may not have been able to af-
ford on their own.
At Sidney Elementary
School, March is Bullying Pre-
vention Month. We have many
special activities planned to help
our students understand what
bullying is and how to effec-
tively handle it. We encourage
everyone to wear their “I Stand
Against Bullying” T-shirts or
another red shirt on Friday,
March 25, the day of our char-
acter education assembly.
Sidney Observatory to Hold
Viewing Session March 11

SIDNEY – The Sidney Cen-
tral Observatory will be open
Friday, March 11 from 7-8:30
p.m. for celestial viewing. The
featured object for the night
will be the first quarter moon.
The quarter moon provides
some of the best viewing of sur-
face features, particularly along
the boundary between day and
night (called “terminator”).
If seeing conditions allow,
we will also be viewing the Ori-
on nebula. We will have several
telescopes available for view-
ing, including the main scope
inside the dome. This event is
open to the public, and admis-
sion as always is free. Sidney
High School astronomy students
will be assisting in the operation
of the facility.
The observatory is located
behind the high school build-
ing. Please drive past the main
entrance of the high school
gymnasium and turn right past
the pool. Follow the road to the
lower back parking lot.

Unadilla C of C
To Meet Mar. 15
UNADILLA – The Unadilla
Chamber of Commerce will
meet on Tuesday, March 15 at 8
a.m. at Panni Pizzeria and Res-
taurant, Main Street, Unadilla.
Coffee and pastries will be
available. All directors and
members are urged to attend.
Afton School
Board to Meet

AFTON – The Afton Central
School Board of Education will
hold two special meetings dur-
ing the month of March. The
first will be held on Thursday,
March 17 at 7 p.m. The second
will be held on Monday, March
21 at 5:30 p.m. Both meetings
will be held in the board of edu-
cation room across from the dis-
trict office.
BBQ Chicken, Music March 26
Will Support Relay For Life
SIDNEY – On Saturday,
March 26 two Relay For Life
teams will come together to of-
fer great music and some of the
best BBQ chicken you’ll ever
eat. Team Ellie will have two
bands playing throughout the
evening, the first is Kenyon Hill
from the Deposit area and the
second is Sevensecond from the
Sidney area.
There will also be a bake sale,
hand made quilt raffle, Chinese
auction, crafts for all ages and
50/50 raffles throughout the
evening.
The chicken BBQ is being pro-
vided by team H.A.V. Hope. They
will be serving delicious chicken
halves, beans, salt potatoes and a
roll to eat in or take out.
The festivities start at 3 p.m.
at the Sidney Elks Club, River
St., Sidney on March 26, so
please come and have some
great food, music and fun for all
ages while helping to put an end
to cancers of all kinds.
Sidney Library Celebrates
National Nutrition Month
SIDNEY – The Sidney Me-
morial Public Library is cel-
ebrating National Nutrition
Month. Using funds received
from a Tri-Town Community
Wellness Grant through the
Bassett Healthcare Network, the
library was able to purchase sev-
eral new healthy cooking books
and added nutrition magazine
subscriptions.
Borrowing from the Ameri-
can Dietetic Association’s
theme Eat Right With Color, the
library will have health related
displays and giveaways, and a
healthy gift raffle compliments
of the Sidney Price Chopper.
Be sure to stop in during the
month of March and join the fun.

Nex-T-New To
Hold Bag Sale
March 23-26
SIDNEY – Nex-T-New will
hold a Spring Bag Sale Wednes-
day, March 23 through Satur-
day, March 26.
Come in and check out the
bargains, as we make room for
spring and summer items.
Nex-T-New is open Wednes-
days, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Thurs-
days, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Fridays,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Saturdays,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Apples and blueberries are
90 percent pollinated by
honeybees.
4 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
The Tri-Town News
P.O. Box 208, 5 Winkler Rd., Sidney, NY 13838
Telephone: (607) 561-3526 • FAX: (607) 563-8999
E-mail: ttnews@tritownnews.com
The Tri-Town News (UPSPS 618-740) is published
Thursdays for $29.00 per year in the counties of Broome,
Chenango, Delaware and Otsego and $34.00 elsewhere
by Paden Publishing, LLC, 5 Winkler Road, Sidney, NY,
13838. Periodical postage paid at Sidney, New York.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
THE TRI-TOWN NEWS
P.O. Box 208, Sidney, NY 13838
(The Sidney Record established 1882. The Sidney
Enterprise established 1895. The Bainbridge News and the
Bainbridge Republican established 1867. Combined as the
Sidney Record and Bainbridge News February 1959.)
Continuing the Unadilla Times (established 1854) October 4,
1967. Continuing the Afton Enterprise and Harpursville
Budget February 1969. Name changed to Tri-Town News,
February 1, 1968.
Kenneth S. Paden...................................Publisher
Nancy Sue Burns.........................................Editor
Anna Ritchey.......................Advertising Manager
A CHEERFUL
PROSPECT
BY AMY MARSLAND
If you have old photos you
would like to see in the
Tri-Town News, please
bring them by our offices in
the Sidney Industrial Park.
We can scan them while
you wait on Wednesday
afternoon or Friday, you can
leave them off to be mailed
back, or you can e-mail
copies (300 dpi) to us at
ttnews@tritownnews.com.
IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS
Daylight Saving Begins March 13
Change Batteries in Alarms
When Setting Clock Ahead
Senator Seward Urges Public
To Weigh In on State Budget
ALBANY - State Senator
James L. Seward announced
the launch of “Get the facts. Let
your voice be heard.” a compre-
hensive, interactive on-line tool
available on his website that
will allow concerned taxpayers
to review the governor’s state
budget proposal and provide
feedback on the spending plan.
“This new on-line initiative
provides the taxpayers with in-
depth information on the gov-
ernor’s budget proposal, expert
analysis of the plan and, most
importantly, an opportunity to
offer feedback on the state’s
financial future,” said Senator
Seward. “Not everyone has the
opportunity to travel to the Cap-
itol and speak at a budget hear-
ing, but through my website,
everyone can have a voice in the
financial future of our state.”
The special budget section
of Senator Seward’s website,
www.senatorjimseward.com,
includes links to:
· Joint Legislative Budget
Schedule – A timeline of
all of the major upcoming
milestones for adopting an
on-time budget;
· Senate Finance Committee
Majority Revenue Forecast
Report – An in-depth review
of the economic and rev-
enue projections contained
in the governor’s budget
proposal;
· Senate Majority Staff Anal-
ysis – An inside Albany
breakdown of how the gov-
ernor’s proposal could af-
fect various state programs
and services;
· Governor Cuomo’s Execu-
tive Budget Briefing Book
– Includes the budget di-
rector’s message, highlights
of major initiatives, and a
list of legislative proposals
needed to implement the
proposed budget.
Information is also available
on vital legislation already ap-
proved by the senate with Sena-
tor Seward’s support, including
the Job Creation and Taxpayer
Protection Act of 2011, a state
spending cap, and a property
tax cap coupled with mandate
relief for local governments and
school districts.
“Legislation that will provide
meaningful job creation incen-
tives, bring state spending un-
der control, cap property taxes
and provide local elected lead-
ers and school officials with the
tools they need to keep costs in
check by ending unfunded man-
dates has already been adopted
by the state senate. These bills
need to remain at the forefront
of the budget discussion and
must be included as part of the
final spending plan,” Seward
added.
Finally, the webpage includes
a feedback section where users
can submit comments, opinions
or suggestions regarding the
governor’s budget.
“The governor’s budget pro-
posal is a step in the right di-
rection; however, changes are
necessary to formulate a final
spending plan that meets the
needs and priorities of our up-
state families and businesses. I
encourage everyone to review
the governor’s budget proposal
and offer any relevant sugges-
tions that will help reduce taxes,
increase jobs and lead to posi-
tive economic growth,” Seward
concluded.
One more scientist now tells
us that teenagers can’t help
being idiots. Different parts of
their brains mature at different
times, and while their appetite
for pleasure grows, the warning
alarm about its dangers grows
more slowly. In more precise
terms, the “cognitive control
network” in the front of the brain
grows slowly but steadily from
childhood on, while the ventrum
striatum, a group of neurons near
the center of the brain, responds
in teens especially strongly to the
prospect of pleasure. Teenagers,
then, will take greater risks to
drive fast, get drunk, have sex,
and any number or other rash
delights, and our telling them
that science has proved their
brains are not working right is
probably not going to change
this much. In fact, the only
inhibitor I can think of that
might possibly work is, “If you
kill yourself, think what it will
do to your mother,” or “If you
get pregnant, think what it will
do to your father.”
And perhaps the new
“sin app” might have a little
influence. This enables you to
confess your sins on your iPad
or iPhone and get penance and
absolution. I was glad to see that
the app went into some detail
as to what sins you might have
committed, because I am not
sure a lot of people know what
a sin is any more. Accordingly,
I recommend this Catholic form
of confession to everybody to use
not only after, but before doing
something, so you can decide
whether it is a good thing to do
or not. And particularly useful
and convenient for teenagers
(see above). Unfortunately,
there are probably not enough
priests to go round.
The argument about
whether spending a lot of time
online is good for you or not
continues. One critic complains
that its seeming detachment
encourages us to express our
worst qualities, connecting you
to vices like gambling and sex
with strangers, cruelty, and – to
me the commonest and worst
fault – “luring you away from
the difficulties of real life.”
Your “e-personality” hasn’t
much shame.
On the other hand, one of its
defenders sees much good in
e-games: sociability, industry,
a love of rules. She favors
designing games in which the
good guys are favored, and
games that make us see the fun
side of work. Like her own game
of “Chore Wars,” which rewards
virtual housework. What I want
to know is, while the housewife
is playing “Chore Wars,” who is
doing the real housework?
A computer that takes on the
task, that’s what we want. And
robots are getting better all the
time. They even vacuum in the
corners now. Salesmen may
call.
A New York Times Sunday
commentator suggests that we
also take a good look at our
homes in view of what seems
to be the changing weather. In
view of snowfall in February
that was twice the average for
that month, while January and
December was 57 inches, 20
inches more than the norm, it
would certainly seem wise for
us to shorten our driveways and
make sure we are out of the way
of the water that is going to run
off the hills. Unluckily, this is
not so easy to do.
But cheer up: life can still
be funny. My TV captioner
recently interpreted a weather
report as “unusually cold air
dove into the dessert.” Baked
Alaska, I presume.
Here is a picture of Ray Hale
and Lew Bartholf, laying stone
for the stone wall along his
driveway at 22 Pineview Ter-
race. The wall is still there! Cir-
ca about 1944. I had just started
working for Ray and Dot at age
7 or 8. Violation of child labor
laws by today’s standards. Wish
we could have the same rules
we grew up with today.
NEW YORK – The Fire-
men’s Association of the State
of New York (FASNY) is re-
minding homeowners and rent-
ers to change the batteries in
their smoke alarms and carbon
monoxide (CO) detectors at
least once a year to ensure they
are working properly. This Sun-
day, March 13 at 2 a.m. we will
set our clocks ahead one hour.
FASNY urges New Yorkers to
use this reminder when it comes
to maintaining their home
detectors.
“For homeowners who did
not change the batteries in their
smoke alarms and carbon mon-
oxide detectors in the fall of last
year, it is critical they do so in
March,” said FASNY President
David Jacobowitz. “Smoke de-
tectors are the first line of de-
fense against the deadly effects
of fire. Install one on every floor
of your home, including the
basement, and in or near sleep-
ing areas. Make sure the detec-
tors are installed on ceilings or
high up on walls; and do not
install them near windows or
other ventilation sources, where
drafts may prevent them from
working properly.”
Last year, a new carbon
monoxide detector law called
“Amanda’s Law” went into ef-
fect. It requires that one-fam-
ily homes, two-family homes,
dwellings located in condo-
miniums or cooperatives, and
multiple dwellings have a CO
detector installed, regardless of
the date of construction or sale.
The detector must meet NYS
standards, and be installed in an
operable condition in dwellings
where there are appliances or
systems that may emit carbon
monoxide or have an attached
garage.
According to the U.S. Fire
Administration, every year, ap-
proximately 2,600 Americans
die in home fires. Over half of
these deaths (52%) occur be-
tween the hours of 10:00 p.m.
and 7:00 a.m., when residents
are typically sleeping. The risk
of dying from a fire in a home
without working smoke alarms
is twice as high as in a home
with working smoke alarms.
Safety tips provided by
FASNY & National Fire
Protection Association:
• Test smoke alarms/detectors
at least once a month by us-
ing detectors’ “test button.”
• Clean the units by vacuum-
ing or dusting in accordance
with the manufacturer’s
instructions.
• Install new batteries in all
smoke alarms/CO detectors
at least once a year on the
day you change your clocks
in the spring and fall.
• Install a smoke alarm and
CO detector near sleeping
areas, as well on every level
of the home, including the
basement.
• Do not paint smoke alarm/
CO detectors.
• Because smoke rises, alarms
should be mounted high on
walls or ceilings.
• Smoke alarms/CO detectors
should not be installed near
a window, door or forced-
air register where drafts
could interfere with their
operation.
• Notify your local fire de-
partment when your detec-
tor sounds. However, before
calling, make sure to identi-
fy whether or not the device
is simply sounding due to a
low battery.
• Read the detector’s pack-
aging and instructions to
understand the difference
between a true emergency
and a simple maintenance
issue of a dead battery or
an expired detector, as the
detector may emit different
sounds for each situation.
• If it is a real activation,
call 911 and evacuate
immediately.
• To avoid potential CO ex-
posure, do not warm a ve-
hicle in an enclosed garage
space. During and after a
snowstorm, make sure all
vents connected to stoves,
furnaces, and fireplaces
leading outside are clear.
For more information on
smoke detectors, carbon mon-
oxide detectors and other infor-
mation on fire safety and pre-
vention visit www.fasny.com
and www.nfpa.org.
SIDNEY
25 YEARS AGO
March 12, 1986
WCDO Radio has officially
been sold to new owners. The
transaction was finalized last
Friday. The station was sold
by Robert Raide of Penn Yan
to CDO Broadcasting, Inc. The
new owners are David Mance,
president, of Dansville, Jack
Clancy of Penn Yan and Craig
Stevens, station manager, of
Sidney.
A new, brick apartment
building, containing eight five-
room apartments, is scheduled
to be started about April 1 at
the corner of River and Union
Streets. Owners are Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas J. Mirabito, and
general contractor will be Folke
Berling.
Sidney High takes first at Re-
gional OM competition.
The Dance Arts Centre now
has its own studio facilities and
to boot can boast having four
certified dance teachers. Four-
teen years ago, Andrea Wake-
man opened her first rented
studio in Sidney. Over the next
ten years the studio moved to
larger quarters in what is now
the Montgomery Ward build-
ing, only to be forced to move
again when fire destroyed the
building. There were several
other locations in Sidney and
Unadilla, but last September
dancers moved into the 30 by
60 foot studio built by Andrea’s
husband, Dave, next to their
home on Rt. 7 between Sidney
and Unadilla.
Sarah Pressler is awarded
a pink Buick Regal by Mary
Kay.
SIDNEY
50 YEARS AGO
March 9, 1961
The Sidney Theatre marquee
has been painted a bright red
and yellow. Over 3,000 per-
sons have seen the film “Ben
Hur” in the Sidney Theatre and
it is being held over for extra
performances.
The Scintilla Gun Club Pistol
Team has won the champion-
ship of the Central Empire state
Rifle and Pistol League. The
team shot a new league record
Friday night when they fired
against the Oneonta team who
were champions last year. The
top scorers were: Jerry Greaves,
274; Art Mullings 272; James
MacLachlan, 271; and Bob
Benson, 266.
American Legion Convention
in Sidney on June 10.
BAINBRIDGE
25 YEARS AGO
March 12, 1986
Town of Bainbridge Supervi-
sor Hugh Kearney called a spe-
cial meeting of the town board
last week to announce his resig-
nation from the post he has held
for the past six years. Kearney
told the board that added job re-
sponsibilities as a project engi-
neer with Allied Corp. in Sidney
led to his decision to give up the
town supervisor’s position.
BAINBRIDGE
50 YEARS AGO
March 9, 1961
DAR names Debra Day good
citizen.
At the meeting of the village
board on March 7, the state was
authorized to use Pearl Street
as a temporary detour for two-
way traffic when work on the
elimination of the underpass on
Route 7 begins.
UNADILLA
25 YEARS AGO
March 12, 1986
Cue and Curtain, under the
direction of David Coons, will
present the musical “South Pa-
cific” this Thursday, Friday,
Saturday at Unatego School.
UNADILLA
55 YEARS AGO
March 9, 1956
William Bauer, son of Mrs.
Alida Bauer of Unadilla, has
recently been notified by the
Colorado School of Mines that
he has been selected on the basis
of high scholastic standing as a
graduate fellow in the College
of Mineral Engineering.

Nominations Due March 17
For Sidney C of C Honorees
SIDNEY - Be sure to get your
nominations for the 2010 Busi-
ness and Citizen of the Years
awards in to the Sidney Cham-
ber of Commerce office by
March 17. Forms are available
online at www.sidneychamber.
org, or by calling the office at
561-2642. Business nominees
must be a current Chamber
member. Mail your completed
form to: Sidney Chamber of
Commerce, PO Box 2295, Sid-
ney, NY 13838, or drop off at
the office at 24 River Street
during office hours (Tuesday-
Thursday, 9 am to 4 p.m.).
B-G Board
Meets March 17

BAINBRIDGE – The Bain-
bridge-Guilford Central School
will hold a board of education
meeting on Thursday, March
17 in the Guilford cafeteria. The
meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m.
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 5
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LICENSED AND INSURED
AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
116 South Main Street
Afton, NY 13730
THE AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
REMEMBERS
“THE WAY WE WERE”
HISTORICAL MINUTES NO. 920
by Charles J. Decker, Afton Town & Village Historian
March 2011
Leonora J. Weeks was a resident of the Town
of Colesville who kept a scrapbook in the early
20th century. The scrapbook was photocopied
by Helen Osborne, Town Historian of Windsor
and member of the Old Onaquaga Historical
Society. She gave me a copy of her photocopy.
Most of the clippings are for weddings and fu-
nerals. The obituaries are much different from
today’s lengthy ones which I clip and file from
the newspaper. The typical obituary from the
early 20th century contains only about 20 lines.
Information is scant, often listing only the day
of death, the place of death, the place of the
funeral, the presiding minister, and the place of
burial. Sometimes attendees of the funeral are given.
More prominent people had longer obituaries with details about the person’s life
and immediate survivors. No dear friends or pets are listed as in some modern obitu-
aries which might occupy two columns of the newspaper. Only occasionally is there
a picture. Now there is often a color photograph, sometimes taken years before.
Included among the obituaries in this scrapbook are those for three of my Hurd
relatives. The first is Adah Buell Hurd, mother of Daisy Hurd Decker. She died at her
home in Harpursville on March 7, 1907 at age 58. In her youth she had become quite
a musician and was talented in drawing. I have some of her pencil drawings and also
her journal written from 1873 to 1898. The second is Thayne Hurd, young brother of
my grandmother, Daisy. Although he was only 16, his obituary was longer as he died
in a tragic drowning in the Susquehanna River on July 14, 1908, just below the dam
at Ouaquaga. He was swimming with several other boys and stepped into a deep
hole where there was a strong current. Two friends almost drowned in an attempt
to save him. The third is Griffin S. Hurd, father of Daisy and Thayne and husband of
Adah. He died on September 12, 1914 at age 71 at the home of Daisy in Afton. He
still mourned the deaths of his son and wife. All are buried at the Pratt Cemetery near
Harpursville.
CORRECTION: The column Historical Minutes
was in error in the issue for March 3. Mistakenly,
the information for the article was taken from the
diary of Leroy Burr Farnsworth, son of Jonathan
Farnsworth. Everywhere that the name Jonathan is
used, the name Leroy should be substituted. Leroy
was also a Master of Afton Lodge No. 360 F. &
A.M., but in 1887. The biographical information for
Jonathan is correct.
Leroy B. Farns-
worth, son
of Jonathan
Far ns wor t h.
From picture in
Afton Masonic
Rooms. Afton
H i s t o r i c a l
Society.
Thane Hurd at age nine. Picture
from Daisy Hurd Decker.
ON THE STAGE following Sunday’s production of “Grease” are Tim and Kate
Sullivan with Lisa Graney, director and the cast. Matt and Chris are in the back with
“Grease” character Danny.
Director and Cast of B-G’s “Grease”
Welcome Special Audience Members
“There is currently a Na-
tional and Statewide cam-
paign to “Spread the Word, to
end the Word”, the “R” word
that is. (http://www.r-word.
org/r-word-news.aspx)
“As the parent of several
young adults with disabili-
ties, I wholeheartedly agree.
The “R” word is insulting and
demeaning. But the campaign
doesn’t go far enough. It will
not stop as a result of adver-
tisements and signs—it will
stop because of good example
and actions. I would like to re-
late one such action.
“I brought my four young
adults (who happen to have
Down syndrome) to see
“Grease” at the Bainbridge
High School on Sunday. It is
their favorite musical! We ar-
rived early to get a good seat.
We all thoroughly enjoyed
the first act and were enthu-
siastic fans. At intermission,
the director, Lisa Graney in-
vited the kids to join the cast
on stage after the curtain call
for a quick “meet and greet”
and a few pictures. They were
thrilled!
“The whole cast was wel-
coming as Lisa introduced the
kids to them. This one small
act of kindness made such
a difference to my family. It
was also a wonderful “model”
for the cast. The kids were
greeted with smiles and hugs...
it certainly highlighted the hu-
manity of each individual.
“This is the kind of thing
that will change the world, for
the better, one “act” at a time.
Lisa Graney, Bainbridge Dra-
ma Club...you rock!”
Algonquin Antique Auto Club
Looks at Logos to ID Club
BAINBRIDGE - The month-
ly meeting of the Algonquin
Antique Auto Club was held
on March 6, was devoted to
a presentation by Dana Munz
of Dana’s Designs, Harpurs-
ville on the club logo products
she could provide for those
that were interested. Orders
were taken for caps, shirts, and
jackets and she will have them
ready and bring them back for
the next meeting. At that time,
those who were not present will
be given an opportunity to place
their orders, if they desire. Un-
fortunately, after April 1, a tax
will need to be charged on those
orders. These items will be use-
ful in wearing not only to our
show but also to those attended
when showing our cars as a way
of identification.
Raffle tickets were received
from the National Association
and made available to anyone
wishing to purchase them.
The fee discussed at the pre-
vious meeting for local mem-
berships was voted out and
these people will just be con-
sidered as guests. We recognize
that a number of these people
are some of our best workers.
However, these people will not
receive the National magazine,
which is always attractive and
informative, and they won’t
be able to show their vehicles.
We are just reminded that we
need 15 members to be a recog-
nized club and so far we fit this
category.
Everyone was reminded that
the monthly articles regard-
ing the meetings are printed in
the Tri-Town News, and also
placed on the web site.
Some preparations were
made for the upcoming car show
on June 12. The flyers to be
mailed to previous participants
were prepared for mailing. Er-
nie Whitacre will be in charge
of the kitchen and will welcome
any offers for assistance.
Be sure to come and join us
for our next buffet/meeting on
Sunday, April 3 at 2 p.m. in the
Bainbridge Museum. New faces
are always welcome.

Coin Show
Is March 13
In Oneonta
ONEONTA – A Coin Show
will be held on March 13 from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Elks
Lodge, 86 Chestnut St., Oneon-
ta. Admission is free.
Sponsored by the Otsego Nu-
mismatic Assn., this is the 21
st

Annual Coin, Cards and Col-
lectibles Show.
There will be over 30 tables
featuring coins, paper money,
sports cards, books and other
collectibles.
Quarter Auction
Mar. 18 to Benefit
Methodist Church
UNADILLA – A Quarter
Auction Fundraiser for the Un-
adilla Methodist Church will be
held Friday, March 18 at 6:30
p.m. at the church, Main St.,
Unadilla.
You may bid anywhere from
25 cents to one dollar on over
50 items from kitchen items, to
jewelry to gift certificates and
much more.
Doors open at 6 p.m. to view
the items. There is an admission
charge. Raid your piggy banks
and plan to come and have fun.

Piecemakers To
Display Quilts
In Walton Show
WALTON – The Walton His-
torical Society, 9 Townsend St.,
Walton will present the “James
Bryden Trunk Show” on Satur-
day, March 19 at 11 a.m.
On display will be over 60
quilts presented by the Sunday
Piecemakers Quilt Guild from
Masonville.
Watch next week’s Tri-Town
News for more details.
Tianderah DAR
To Hold Meeting
Luncheon Mar. 12
GILBERTSVILLE – Tian-
derah Chapter, Daughters of the
American Revolution, Gilberts-
ville, will gather for the annual
spring opening meeting and lun-
cheon on Saturday, March 12 at
12:30 p.m. a the Olive Branch in
Bainbridge.
Melinda McTaggart, Iro-
quiois Chapter, will address the
group. Melinda is a member of
the New York Committee for
Women’s Issues.
AnnMarie Hill and Virginia
Liddle will host the luncheon.

The following came in as a Letter to the Editor from Brigid Sullivan
of Morris. Because it had a photo included, we are publishing it as a
separate article.
6 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
Sidney Elementary
Application For
UPK are Available
SIDNEY – Children that
reside in the Sidney Central
School District and who will
be four years old before Dec.
1, 2011 are eligible for Sidney
Elementary School’s Universal
Pre-Kindergarten program. Par-
ents interested in having their
child attend UPK must call the
SES main office at 563-2135
ext. 4200 or 4202 and request
an application.
Applications will be mailed
to families requesting one. The
completed application and a
copy of the child’s birth certifi-
cate must be brought to the SES
main office by Friday, May 27
in order to be eligible for the lot-
tery drawing.
The class will be determined
by a lottery drawing held in the
SES lecture theater on Friday,
June 3.

Register Now For The
2011 Tri-Town
Business Expo &
Community Fair
Saturday, April 9
10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Sidney Fire Station Training Center, River St.
Registration Deadline Fri., March 18
$25 Any Sidney, Bainbridge, or Unadilla Chamber Members
$40 Non-Members — tables and chairs provided —
Reserve Today for Guaranteed Space
Call 561-2642 Tues.-Thurs. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. or visit www.sidneychamber.org to register
Sponsored by Bainbridge Chamber of Commerce, Unadilla Chamber of Commerce,
and Sidney Chamber of Commerce
Seeking businesses in the tri-county area to
showcase their products/services.
SIDNEY • 607-369-5601
rwwakemaninc@stny.rr.com
Ri c har d W. Wakeman, I nc .
Commer c i al Const r uc t i on
Richard W. Wakeman LLC
Authorized Butler Building Dealer
Oil & Stone Driveways
COIN SHOW
Sponsored by
Otsego Numismatic Association
21st Annual Coin, Cards & Collectibles Show
Sun., March 13
10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Elks Club
86 Chestnut St.,
Oneonta
Free Admission
Over 30 tables featuring coins, paper money,
sports cards, books, and other collectibles
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE!
Hearing Testing • Hearing Aid Sales & Repair
OPEN: Tues.–Wed.–Thurs. 9-5 • Evenings by Appt.
WAYNE TERRY, M.A. CCC-A
AUDIOLOGIST
OVER 30 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE
194 Main St., Unadilla, NY
607-369-3802 • TOLL FREE 1-866-892-5705
ROBO the Robot to Visit
The Sidney Library March 19

SIDNEY - On Saturday,
March 19 at 1 p.m. the Sidney
Memorial Public Library will
host the program “Go for the
Stars
TM
” presented by Gary T.
Pozzato, Aerospace Educator.
Traveling throughout New
England since 1992, Gary has
shared his knowledge of the
space program with numerous
schools, libraries, and civic
groups. He has worked closely
with NASA personnel on sev-
eral educational projects, was a
certified flight instructor and has
helped with the manufacture of
equipment for the NASA Space
Suit, Space Shuttle Orbiter, and
the International Space Station.
Meet ROBO the friendly
robot who talks, moves and in-
teracts with the audience. Learn
about living in space, micro-
gravity, rockets and more. Vol-
unteers from the audience will
perform live demonstrations
and experiments. This program
is free and open to all.
The program is a kick-off
to the Visions of the Universe:
Four Centuries of Discovery
exhibit that will be in the Smart
Community Room of the Sid-
ney Library March 17-May 20.
This NASA-funded self guided
exhibit uses drawings and dia-
grams from the time of Galileo
and dramatic contemporary im-
ages of planets, stars and galax-
ies made by the Hubble Space
Telescope and other NASA
missions to show how our un-
derstanding of the universe has
changed over the past four hun-
dred years.
The exhibit is part of a multi-
year global celebration of as-
tronomy, highlighted by the
400th anniversary of the first use
of an astronomical telescope by
Galileo. The Visions of the Uni-
verse exhibit covers many topic
related to the exploration of the
universe, from storms on the
sun to features on the surfaces
of Mars and the Moon, comets,
star birth, and distant galaxies,
and compares how astronomers
centuries ago viewed these phe-
nomenon with the discoveries
of modern day space scientists.
For further exhibit informa-
tion please call the library at
563-1200.
Visions of the Universe:
Four Centuries of Discov-
ery is presented by the Space
Telescope Science Institute,
Baltimore, Md., the Smithso-
nian Astrophysical Observa-
tory, Cambridge, Mass., and the
American Library Association,
Chicago, Ill., through funding
from the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration.
Spring into Gardening
At the Sidney Library
SIDNEY - Do you miss your
garden? Are you waiting for
spring? Join Becky and Ed Hill-
ick on a virtual tour of their in-
ternationally known garden blog,
Plants and Stones, at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 9, at the Sid-
ney Memorial Public Library.
They will tour their Stone Wall
Garden and go back in time to
spring and summer, plants and
flowers. Becky started Plants and
Stones as a garden journal. Using
her digital photos, while keep-
ing a garden journal for her own
satisfaction, seemed like fun. The
fact that her writing was available
for anyone to read made no im-
pression on her at the beginning.
Soon links were established, and
she has made contacts all over
the world. In 2009 the Hillicks
were shocked and thrilled to see
Plants and Stones listed as one
of the top twenty garden blogs in
Horticulture magazine. In 2011,
if all goes as planned, Plants and
Stones will be included in a book,
“Gardens of the World”, by Aus-
tralian author, Julia Gaw. It has
also been selected to be included
in topgardenblogs.com. Whether
you are longing for spring and
gardening, or would like to learn
about blogging in general, you
won’t want to miss this informa-
tive and entertaining presentation.
It’s free at your local library!
Bring the Kids
To Story Time
At Afton Library
AFTON - Children’s Story
Time at Afton Free Library
March 10, will feature “Runny
Babbit” by Shel Silverstein. This
is a book of poems about rabbits
with the words twisted around:
Runny Babbit (or bunny rabbit).
Listen to the words as they
are read and maybe you can un-
derstand the billy sook!
Our program will begin at
6:30 p.m.
TRI-TOWN’S OWN
STIMULUS PLAN
BY JOAN DICHIARA
Ways To Save Money
On Gasoline
Since gasoline has gone up
quite a lot there are ways that
we can save money on gasoline.
When driving, slow down, the
faster you go the more gasoline
you are using.
Make sure your tires are in-
flated to the right level. You
can purchase a digital pressure
gauge at your local auto parts
store and check your tires every
two weeks. You can find out
what your auto manufacturer
recommends by looking at the
label glued to the inside of the
driver’s side door. If you tires
are under inflated by 5 pounds
you will use 30% more gas.
Maintain your car such as oil
changes, changing air filters,
etc. Also read your car manual
for recommended maintenance
schedule. This will cost you
some money but in the end you
will have your car longer. If you
have extra things in your car re-
move these things because the
lighter the car the less gasoline
you will use. When the weather
is cold don’t warm your car up
too long as you will again use
more gas. Answer to this prob-
lem is dress warmer. Also start
to plan your errands so you are
not going out several times or
car pool with a friend or relative
to do grocery shopping. The
other alternative is walk if you
live close to the stores instead of
using your car.
Ways To Save Money On A
Cell Phone Bill
If you have had the same cell
phone provider for a number of
years this might be the time to
start checking out other provid-
ers for cell phone service. First
try calling your cell phone pro-
vider and see if you can reduce
your bill by checking to see if
there are features that you don’t
use which could reduce your
bill. Ask if they have any new
plans that would be cheaper for
you. Then start checking other
companies and compare. After
comparing, and if you find a
cheaper rate with another pro-
vider, go back to your provider
and tell them you are going to
leave due to a better promotion
with another company. Your
current provider might offer the
same promotion to keep you as
a customer.
Cable & Internet Service
Look over your cable and in-
ternet bill to see if there is a fea-
ture you do not need. Also start
checking different companies to
see if they can offer you a better
rate and even check with your
current company.
Credit Cards
If you have credit cards con-
sider just keeping one of them
for emergency and tear up the
rest which will help you get
out of debt. This is the time of
the year that most of our read-
ers are receiving income tax
refunds. If you have any credit
card debt this would be a good
time to pay off your balance
with your income tax refund. If
you are maintaining a balance
on your credit card pay more
than the minimum which will
help pay the account off sooner.
Call your credit card company,
if your account is in good stand-
ing, ask the company if they
will reduce the interest rate you
are paying. The worse thing the
company can say to you is that
they won’t do it but you tried.
If you call and they give you a
better interest rate you will pay
off your balance sooner.
Today it is about trying to
save money. Make a few phone
calls, you might be surprised
what the company might offer
you.
If you have any money sav-
ing tips or ideas please email me
at kay01267@gmail.com. Till
next time, have a great week.
Spring is just around the corner.

Rotary Club of Sidney to Host
Honor Society Banquet Mar. 15
SIDNEY – Each year the
Rotary Club of Sidney provides
a dinner and program honor-
ing the students of the Sidney
High School Honor Society and
their parents. The Rotary Club
of Sidney will be holding this
year’s Honor Society Banquet
at the high school cafeteria on
March 15 at 6 p.m.
The speakers for this year’s
banquet are District Governor
Orville “Orv” Wright and John
Mirabito, an alumni of Sidney
Central School District, class
of 1972 and the chairman of the
board of Mirabito Holdings Inc.
The banquet will be a regular
meeting of the Rotary Club and
the entire program will focus on
the Honor Society Students.
The dinner menu will be sal-
ad, manicotti, meatballs, veg-
etable, dessert, coffee and cake.
Rotarians please RSVP to Bob
Weitzman by March 8 by email
or phone at 563-2378.
Unadilla Class of 1961
To Hold 50
th
Reunion
UNADILLA - The Unadilla
Central School graduating class
of 1961 is planning a 50th re-
union this year. On Sunday,
June 19 the class is inviting all
classes particularly the classes,
from 1957 to 1969 for a chicken
barbeque picnic catered by Par-
son’s Catering at the Unadilla
Rod and Gun Club beginning
at noon.
Letters will be mailed by the
Alumni Association of the Un-
adilla Central School and Acad-
emy with their banquet being
held on Saturday, June 18 at the
Elks Club in Sidney. Informa-
tion on costs for both will be
forthcoming.
Save the dates and plan to
attend and reminisce with class-
mates and friends.
The class of l961 is looking
for information/address for Car-
lene Dykeman Renwick, please
call Anna Ritchey at 563-1104
or e-mail 755ritchey@frontier-
net.net.

Catskill Hospice Rep to Speak
To Pomona Grange March 12
WORCESTER – The Otsego
County Pomona Grange will
meet at the Worcester Grange
Hall, Route 7, Worcester on Sat-
urday, March 12 beginning at 11
a.m. Community Grange reports
will be given, with lunch served
at noon by the host grange.
The Family Activities com-
mittee will be holding the
Needlework and Woodworking
contest. The lecturer contest for
art and photography will also
be held with all entries for both
contests in place by 11 a.m.
At 1 p.m. guest speaker, Rod
Roberts, LCSW of Catskill Area
Hospice will present a power
point presentation of Camp For-
get-Me-Not. He is founder of
the two day camp held at Camp
Shankitunk in Delhi for school
age children/teens (K-12) in Ot-
sego, Delaware and Schoharie
Counties who have suffered the
loss of a loved one.
Any non-grangers/commu-
nity members interested in this
program are invited to come for
the presentation and learn more
about what Hospice offers.

Meeting Notice
HAMDEN - The Board of Di-
rectors of Cornell Cooperative
Extension of Delaware Co. will
meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, March
21, (snow date March 28) at the
Cooperative Extension Resource
Center, 34570 St. Hwy. 10, Ham-
den. The meeting is open to the
public with comments at the be-
ginning of the meeting.
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 7
MT. UPTON MEMORIES
www.mtuptoncentral.wordpress.com
Bill Walters
Phone 315-246-0025
e-mail: wwalters8@hc.rr.com
Creation of the mtuptoncentral.wordpress.com
website, was to develop and implement an
informational site to impact all viewers by giving
them a dynamic and interactive vivid picture of
Mt. Upton’s history.
Bassett Healthcare-Sidney
39 Pearl Street, Sidney, N.Y.
We accept most insurance plans
and offer 24-hour access to a
medical provider.
at the Sidney Health Center.
2`1O`Zb]\@cZSW\AWR\Sg
g]c¸dSU]bQ]\\SQbW]\a
Carlton Rule, MD, recently joined the staff of Julius Nagy, MD,
Ken DeMott, FNP and Kelly McLaughlin, PA,
and is accepting new patients.
Call for an appointment: 607.561.2021
Hours: Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
For more information, visit www.bassett.org.
Dr Rule is a well known Otsego County Family Practice Physician.
He has extensive knowledge and experience with patients of
all ages. Let Dr Rule help you achieve your optimum health!
GILBERTSVILLE NEWS
GEORGIANNA & ROBERTA HALBERT,
CORRESPONDENTS TELEPHONE 783-2445
MASONVILLE NEWS
ANNE SCOTT, CORRESPONDENT
TELEPHONE 265-3368
GMU English teacher Jan
Costello and student Alexis
Lanza attended the Pen-in-Hand
writer’s conference held in Little
Falls on March 4 and 5. One of
the presenting authors was local
resident Diane Gallo.
Judy and Dean Veenhof were
in Brownville, NY this past Sat-
urday for the surprise 85th birth-
day party for Marge Adams.
Marge was Judy’s first principal
when she started teaching for the
1966/67 school year on Staten
Island.
Doug Murphy (son of Arthur
and Marjorie) who lived, in the
50’s, where June and Bruce Hug-
gins currently reside, died Feb.
27 at the A.O.Fox Nursing Home.
The road was named after the
Murphy family.
Wallace and Helen Palen spent
a few days at State College, PA
attending the funeral services
of her brother Dr. Chauncey A.
Morehouse.
Roberta Halbert spent last Fri-
day afternoon visiting Deanne
Utter in Otego.
Last week, Ben Hill took his
mother Barb to East Hardwick,
VT to help at the Michaud house-
hold while Mommie (Crystal) is
staying at the hospital with baby
Hadley who was born Feb. 27.
John Rowe is recuperating at
home following knee surgery at
Chenango Memorial Hospital.
Mary Jane Schaeffer, Barbara
Butts, Arlene Daniels, Rose and
Glenn Foster, Roberta and Roger
Halbert attended the Presbyter
workshop held Saturday at the
Ninevah Presbyterian Church.
Sylvia (Smith) Lindbergh of
Burlington Flats recently spent
five days with her son Justin Wil-
liams and family at Ft Bragg, NC.
Justin is in Special Forces and
was being deployed to Afghani-
stan for a year.
Betty Fraley and Paul Tourtel-
lotte have been recent surgical
patients at Bassett Hospital.
Judy and Chuck Collier of
Unadilla announce the arrival of
a grandson, Grady Charles, born
March 3 to Tylor and Leslie Wie-
gand of Chenango Bridge.
Word has been received of the
death of Walter Ocepa on March
4 at Middletown. Arrangements
are pending at The Johnston Fu-
neral Home in Morris.
There will be a soup and sand-
wich lunch served Thursday,
March 19 from 11:30-1 at the
NLFH, offering a variety of soups
and sandwiches with pie for des-
sert. Free will offering.
Wednesday, March 16 at 7
p.m., see the GMU Pops Concert
in the GMU auditorium.
Friday, March 18 is Fam-
ily Movie Night at GMU. ‘Me-
gamind’ will be shown at 7 p.m.
in the auditorium. Free!
For all you snow birds - we
have snow and more snow!!!!
Most schools and some business
are closed as the result of the 12
plus inches of snow that started
falling Sunday afternoon.
Thought for the day: The only
person who likes change is a wet
baby. (Mark Twain)
Thank You
All that were involved in the
pancake breakfast at the Ma-
sonville Federated Church on
Saturday, March 5 would like to
thank the community for their
support and all who helped with
the serving preparing and donat-
ing for the breakfast. Your help
is sincerely appreciated. Keep
in mind the next breakfast,
which will be done by the Sid-
ney Center Methodist Church,
will be served at the Masonville
Federated Church on Saturday,
March 19 from 7 to 10:30 a.m.
School News
Reed Scott placed first at the
Sidney Youth Tournament on
Saturday, March 5 at the Sidney
Central School with the Sidney
team tying for second place
with Unatego. The Deposit,
Hancock team placed first. Con-
gratulations to all the wrestlers.
Don’t forget that Daylight Sav-
ing Time begins on Sunday,
March 13. Remember to set
your clocks ahead one hour be-
fore you retire for the evening
on Saturday.
Good luck to all students, your
third progress reports will be
mailed on Tuesday, March 15.
The Rotary Honor Society
banquet will be held at the high
school cafeteria at 6:30 p.m.
also on Tuesday.
Thursday, March 17 is St.
Patrick’s Day and there is one-
half day scheduled for a Staff
Development Day.
The All-County Spring Fes-
tival in Oxford will be Friday,
March 18 and Saturday, March
19 with the concert at 3 p.m.
There will also be no school
for a Parent Conference Day on
Friday, March 18.
Birthday Wishes
Birthday wishes this week
go out to Scott Gregory and Pat
Lent on March 13; Alexandrea
Sexton on March 15; Tanyo Jo
Scott and Ruth Huntington on
March 16; Jesse Kleingardner
on March 18; Beth McKown
on March 19; and Gabe Cod-
dington and Brian Hebbard on
March 20. Have a great day
everyone.
On Sunday, Feb. 20, Pecabo
Scott celebrated her 5
th
birthday
with lots of cousins and other
relatives at her home. All had a
good time playing and visiting
and Pecabo was very pleased to
have everyone come.
Church News
Interim Pastor Roger Davies
and the church are very excited
about the 40 Days of Purpose
event that is going on at the
church and in homes. If you are
interested in signing up for a
group study, call Pastor Roger
at 265-3774.
Church services are at 11
a.m. each Sunday. Sundays at
9:30 a.m. there will be member-
ship classes.
Thursday, March 10 at 6:30
p.m. there is a Bible Study. We
are studying 66 Love Letters
From God by Larry Crabb. We
will look at each book of the
Bible, come and share with us.
Sunday, March 13 Children’s
Sunday school will start again
during the service. Cheryl and
Mike Sherman will be the youth
leaders for this study. Please
invite all children you know, it
will be fun.
The Food Bank will be open
on March 11 from 10 a.m. to 12
p.m. in the dining area, people
can come and get items. If you
are unable to get to the church
for these hours, give Marie
Sherman a call at 265-3266 and
she will be glad to help you.
The Masonville Bicentennial
Committee met last week at the
church. The next meeting will
take place on Wednesday, April
6. All are welcome to attend.
Wow! Saturday a lot of snow
melted. Was spring going to
come soon? Then Wham! I was
driving home in the rain on Sun-
day and as I got nearer to home,
it turned into flakes. It snowed
all night, the wind was fierce
and Monday morning we looked
out on 16 inches of snow! Then
it stopped around noon and at 2
p.m. the sun was out. Most ac-
tivities were cancelled. We’ve
had a very strange winter.
Rescheduled Meetings
Chapter 179 of the Eastern
Star was postponed until Mon-
day, March 14 at 7:30 p.m.
The Wells Bridge Auxiliary
postponed to March 14 also.
Church News
The Sand Hill United Meth-
odist Church begins at 9:30 a.m.
each Sunday. The first Sunday
of each month is Communion
Sunday. Also, it is food pantry
Sunday. Patty Decker read from
2
nd
Peter, 1:16-21 and Psalm
99.
Prayer List
Ida Eden is going for surgery;
Doris Beckley had cataract sur-
gery on one eye and expects to
get the other done soon; Ruth
Searles, Joey Glover and others
in heart and mind need prayers,
especially all those in tornado
areas.
Alice Harageones and girls
visitesd Avis Terry at the Chest-
nut Street Nursing Home in
Oneonta on Sunday.
WELLS BRIDGE
NEWS
ALICE HARAGEONES
988-6641
Vendors Meeting Is March 14
For the 2011 Farmers Markets
SIDNEY - Cornell Coopera-
tive Extension sponsored three
Farmers’ Markets in 2010, one in
Walton, one in Sidney and one in
Deposit. Local producers are in-
vited to the organizational meet-
ing for the 2011 market season
scheduled for Monday, March 14,
at 1 p.m., at the Cornell Coopera-
tive Extension office in Hamden
(snow date March 21). The meet-
ing will focus on the 2011 Market
Schedule, WIC Check Opportu-
nity, the FMNP, Recruiting Ven-
dors, and Market Promotion.
This season, as we celebrate
the Centennial of Extension, we
would like to expand the number
of vendors in these three markets.
There is a great need in Delaware
County for markets that partici-
pate in the Farmers’ Market Nutri-
tion Program (FMNP), redeeming
produce coupons for WIC clients
and senior citizens. Although the
FMNP participants are the target
audience, Extension would like to
offer additional locally produced
foods and increase the number of
cash paying patrons as well.
Please contact Jeanne Darling
or Valerie Dudley at 865-6531 or
vsd22@cornell.edu to register to
attend or if you have any interest
in participating in one or all of
Extension’s market sites in 2011.
What’s Been Eating At
Our Golden Eagle Feeders?
ONEONTA - On Friday,
March 18, Tom Salo of The
Delaware-Otsego Audubon So-
ciety will present an educational
program on its efforts to docu-
ment the winter range of eastern
Golden Eagles. The program
will be at the Elm Park Method-
ist Church, 401 Chestnut Street,
Oneonta beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Refreshments will be served, and
all are welcome! More informa-
tion at tomsalo@localnet.com or
607-965-8232.
Salo, a DOAS Director and
co-Chair of the Franklin Moun-
tain Hawk Watch, will discuss
“What’s Been Eating at our
Golden Eagle Feeders?” showing
photographs from two seasons of
research using motion-sensitive
wildlife cameras. He has been a
leader in New York State for ef-
forts to define Golden Eagle mi-
gration corridors and the northern
limits of their winter range.
Road-killed deer carcasses
were used to bait sites in Dela-
ware and Otsego Counties to
monitor the local presence of
these rare birds.
A fascinating benefit from this
research is the ability to view
the variety and numbers of other
scavenging species.
SHOWING THEY CARE, students at the Afton Central
School made Valentine letters, cards and decorations
that were delivered to the New York State Veterans’
Home in Oxford Feb. 12. The students were learning
about veterans and how they help our country, and when
they heard about the Valentines for Vets program start-
ed by Ann Landers in 1989, they decided to do some-
thing for the local veterans. Since it started, over one
million valentines have been given to men and women
who have served in the military.
(Holiday Week – Friday 5 pm)
We Thank You For Your
Cooperation
MONDAY 5:00 PM
DEADLINES
All ads, news stories,
photos, etc. for
inclusion in the paper
must be in by
8 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
TO ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS,
PLEASE CALL 561-3526.
ASK FOR ANNA.
179 Main Street
Unadilla, NY
(607) 369-2391
JJJ The oyce
Funeral Home, Inc.
C. H. Landers Funeral Chapel
21 Main St. Sidney 563-3545
The sun will
shine again
When you lose a loved one you will
grieve and that is hard. Your grief
will have many stages, but all of
them will be healing. Little by little
you will begin to feel whole again.
You have family and friends who will
help you. We have assisted countless
families get through this challenging
time. Let our family help your family.
When you lose a loved one you will
grieve and that is hard. Your grief
will have many stages, but all of
them will be healing. Little by little
you will begin to feel whole again.
You have family and friends who will
help you. We have assisted countless
families get through this challenging
time. Let our family help your family.
Westcott Funeral Home, Inc.
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Locally Owned and Operated Since 1976
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“Serving As We Would Be Served”
James S. Westcott James C. Magee
Licensed Funeral Directors
OBITUARIES
IN MEMORIAM
IN MEMORY OF
PAUL NORTHRUP
Honey, it’s now twenty years
since we had to say good-bye.
That was the day that I lost not
only my husband, but my true
best friend.
We went through so much in
our thirty year marriage, but our
love got us through all of it.
I read that “marriage is not
a matter of counting years, but
making the years count” and I
think we did that.
We couldn’t do a lot of things
other couples could, but we
found pleasure in many of the
things we could do, such as our
fishing trips, going for rides on
old back roads and hunting.
You were a great friend,
husband and father and I was
so proud and happy to be your
wife. I love you very much and
I really miss you.
Love,
Rosalie
3-10(1w)p
Thomas L. and
Mary Lou Ball
COVENTRY - A memorial
service for Thomas L. and Mary
Lou Ball will be held Saturday,
April 9, from 10 a.m. to noon
at the Coventry Fire Station.
Family and friends are invited
to attend.

Robert P. Dawson
AFTON - Heaven has be-
come a better place to be, today,
March 3, 2011, Robert Pierre
Dawson, 68 years old, passed
at his home surrounded by his
family.
Robert had a remarkable life
and has left a wonderful legacy.
He was born in Hot Springs,
Ark. and lived in both Florida
and N.Y. Robert served in the
US Air Force, was a sales man-
ager for Southern Bell and man-
aged a movie theatre in Pa. He
was a member of the PGA and
officiated at many PGA tourna-
ments. He took over the Afton
Golf Club with his brothers,
Guy and David in 1985.
Robert was a 10 year cancer
survivor being treated at Moffitt
Cancer Center in Fla. He had a
passion for golf and developed
the same passion for watercolor
painting and won many awards
for his paintings. Above all, his
greatest passion was his family.
He is survived by his wife
of 40 years, Joan; his daughter,
Tami and son-in-law, Bryan;
his beloved grandchildren and
twinkle in his eyes, Ava and
Jake; his brothers, Pat, David
and Guy and their families; sis-
ters, Debby and Raphael and
their families; and many dear
old friends.
He is predeceased by his son,
Robert.
A funeral Mass was offered
at St. Agnes Church, Spring
Street, Afton on Monday, March
7 by Rev. Mark Gantley, Pas-
tor. Burial will be in Glenwood
Cemetery, Afton in the spring.
The family requests, in lieu
of flowers, donations may be
made to Moffitt Cancer Center
at www.moffitt.org.
Arrangements by the Os-
terhoudt-Madden Funeral
Home, 69-71 Maple Street,
Harpursville.
On-line condolences and ex-
pressions of sympathy may be
made at: www.omaddenfh.com.

LaVerne D. Furman, Sr.
OPELIKA, ALA: LaVerne
D. Furman Sr., 65, of Opelika,
Ala., formerly of Endicott. Our
beloved brother, husband, father
and grandfather passed away in
Auburn, Ala., with his loving
family by his side on March 1,
2011.
He was predeceased by his
parents, Everett and Myrtle
(Bergman) Furman; sister, Belle
(Furman) Sprague; and by his
brother, Frank Furman.
LaVerne is survived by his
loving wife of 46 years, Linda
S. (Peterson) Furman; three sons
and daughters-in-law, LaVerne
(Al) and Kathy Furman, Les
and Christina Furman, both of
Opelika, Ala., Brian and Penny
Furman of Harpursville; daugh-
ter and son-in-law, Wendy and
Christopher Folyton of Endi-
cott; five grandchildren, Frank-
lin and Nicholas Furman, Kath-
erine Furman, Steven and Tyler
Folyton; three sisters and two
brothers-in-law, Bernice and
Carlton Rockwell of Greene,
Betty Lou and Dennis Bates of
Norwich, Beatrice Brown of
Greene; brother and sister-in-
law, Phillip and Darlene (Dolly)
Furman of Endicott; brother-in-
law and sister-in-law, Larry and
Rebecca Peterson of Owego;
several nieces, nephews, cous-
ins and friends in New York and
Alabama.
LaVerne lived life to the full-
est. He enjoyed going to the
Camp in McDonough, hunting,
fishing and spending time with
family and friends. He was a
member of West Corners Fire
Department and a member of
Universal Twenty Year Club.
He retired from Universal in
1997 and moved to Opelika,
Ala. and worked at Rexnord-
Falk until his second retirement
in 2009.
Funeral services were held
Monday, March 7 at Root Fu-
neral Home, 23 N. Chenango
Street, Greene. Rev Amy
Gregory, pastor of First United
Methodist Church, Greene of-
ficiated. Burial will be in Willet
Cemetery in the spring.
Condolences may be sent to
the family at www.rootfh.com.

Vernon Guinn
NORWICH – Vernon E.
Guinn, 77, life long Norwich
resident and well known area
contractor, passed away Sunday
morning, March 6, 2011, in the
Chenango Memorial Hospital.
Vern was born in Norwich in
May of 1933 and was the son
of Ralph and Jessie Keplinger
Guinn. He grew up in Norwich
where he attended the Norwich
schools and was a 1951 gradu-
ate of the Norwich High School.
In March of 1953, Vern entered
the United States Army where
he served his country in Korea
and Hawaii and was honorably
discharged in March of 1955.
Returning home he gained em-
ployment with the Norwich
Pharmacal Co. where he worked
for a period of five years. In
1960 he began his own contract-
ing business, Vernon E. Guinn
Contracting, and soon became a
well known and respected con-
tractor. Over the years Vern was
responsible for many construc-
tion projects throughout the
area. Even though he officially
retired in the late 1990s, he still
remained active in the business
until his health declined.
Vern’s family and home al-
ways came first. His sense of
humor and keen wit always
kept people on their toes and he
could never sit idle. He could
often be found building one
of his many bird houses. One
of his most memorable times
was when he had 60 donkeys
shipped from Death Valley in
a project known as “Save The
Donkeys.” To this day Vern still
had two of the donkeys at home,
which he cared for on a daily
basis. He was a member of the
Norwich Elk’s Club, B.P.O.E.
#1222 where he enjoyed many
pitch games over the years.
On Aug. 18, 1990, in Nor-
wich, he married Virginia Frink.
Besides his wife Ginny; Vern is
survived by his daughter, Ka-
trina Guinn of Gilbertsville; his
sisters, Anna Mae Quincy and
Donna Guinn both of Norwich;
his brothers, James Guinn and
his wife Linda of Norwich and
Roy Guinn and his wife Phyllis
of Cincinnatus; his grandchil-
dren, Eric Guinn of Wagram,
N.C., Kim Dixon of Philadel-
phia, Pa., Stacey Flanagan of
Colorado Springs, and Jason
and Courtney Flanagan of Ox-
ford; two great-grandchildren,
Haven and Manna Guinn. Vern
is also survived by his two sis-
ter-in-laws, Charlotte Guinn of
Norwich and Shirley Guinn of
Florida; as well as many nieces,
nephews and cousins.
Besides his parents, Ralph and
Jessie; Vern was predeceased by
his sister, Bessie Brown; and his
brothers, Robert, Carl and Wil-
liam Guinn.
Funeral services for Vern
will be held at 1 p.m. Thursday,
March 10 from the R.J. Fahy
Funeral Home. The Rev. David
Spiegel Sr., pastor of the First
Baptist Church of Norwich,
will officiate. Interment with
full military rites will be held at
a later date from the Mt. Hope
Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, please con-
sider memorial contributions to
the Norwich Fire Dept., EMS
Program, c/o Chief Chawgo, 31
East Main St., Norwich, N.Y.
13815 or to the Norwich Food
Closet, c/o Emmanuel Episco-
pal Church, West Main St., Nor-
wich, N.Y. 13815 with checks
made payable to the Norwich
Food Closet.

Anna Hiller
OTEGO - Anna Hiller, 82,
of Otego, passed away on Tues-
day, March 1, 2011, at home
surrounded by her family.
She was born Nov. 13, 1928,
in Fairfield, Conn., the daughter
of the late Matias and Virginia
(Diaz) Arbas.
She moved from Connecti-
cut to Otego with her husband
Ignaz in 1960, together they ran
a dairy farm. Anna’s love for
gardening has been enjoyed by
family and friends with her nu-
merous flower beds.
Anna is survived by her sons,
Dave, Michael, Thomas, Ed-
ward and Frank; her daughters,
Donna and Mary; brothers,
James and Herman Arbas; and
numerous grandchildren.
She was predeceased by her
husband of 50 years, Ignaz
Hiller; her sister, Josephine
(Fifi) Colagrossi; goddaughter
and niece, Joanne Colagros-
si; and nephew, Pasquale M.
Colagrossi.
A memorial service will be
held in July.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
Catskill Area Hospice and Palli-
ative Care, 1 Birchwood Drive,
Oneonta, N.Y. 13820.
To light a candle or send an
online condolence please visit
www.bookhoutfuneralhome.
com. Arrangements are being
handled by Bookhout Funeral
Home, Otego.

Carol A. King
UNADILLA - Carol A. King,
55, of Unadilla, entered into rest
Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011, at Bassett
Medical Center, Cooperstown.
She was born April 25, 1955,
in Chester, Pa., the daugh-
ter of the late Frank and Mary
(Greene) Wise.
Carol was a former employee
of Mead-Westvaco in Sidney,
and was a resident of the tri-
town area for many years.
There will be no calling
hours. A memorial service was
held Sunday, March 6, at the
Westcott Funeral Home, Un-
adilla with the Rev. Fred Albre-
cht officiating.
Arrangements by the Westcott
Funeral Home Inc., Unadilla.

Anna Myers
AFTON - Our Beloved Mom,
Grandma and Great Grandma,
Anna M. Myers, passed away
on February 11, 2011 at the Wil-
lowpoint Nursing Home in Ves-
tal, NY. She was predeceased
by her parents Ray and Marion
Livingston and her husbands;
Ike Beardsley and R. Lyman
Stevens. She is survived by her
sons; Carl and Ruth Beardsley,
Robert and Peg Beardsley and
David and Jan Beardsley, her
grandchildren; Carl and Tracy
Beardsley, Jolenne and Derek
Friedman, Jamie Beardsley,
Carrie Martel and Tim White,
Josh and Jen Beardsley, Rock-
sand and Don Atkinson, Burt
and Dottie Archer, Jamie and
Mike Bean, Jessica and Suren
Vis and Joni and Travis John-
son, her great grandchildren;
Nathan, Nicholas, Max, Noah,
Ethan, Dominick, Autumn,
Annalisa, Matt, Shawn, Tif-
fany, Robin, Buddie, Jazmynn,
Hailey, Megan, Alaura, Ty and
Trevor. She is also survived by
her close friend Jerri Bush and
her favorite cat, Mr. Whiskers.
Anna grew up in Afton and
lived all of her life in the Bing-
hamton, Cortland and Oneonta
areas. She retired from the
Raymond Corporation, enjoyed
traveling and working on Gene-
alogy. But most of all she loved
her family. She was a blessing
to all of us and we will forever
miss her and cherish our memo-
ries of her.
Special thanks to the staff at
the Willowpoint Nursing Home
who took Mom on trips, gave
her the best care and in the end
stood by her. We are forever
grateful for all of you.
There will be a Memorial
Service on Saturday March 12,
2011 at 4 P.M. at the First United
Methodist Church in Chenango
Bridge. Friends may call at the
church from 3 P.M. until the
time of the service. Burial will
be in the spring at the Glenwood
Cemetery in Afton.

Walter J. Ocepa
UNADILLA - Walter J. Oce-
pa, 82, of Unadilla, passed away
on Friday, March 4, 2011, sur-
rounded by his family.
He was born on March 31,
1928, in Kulpmont, Pa., to the
late Walter E. Ocepa and Adella
(O’Brick) Ocepa.
Walter married the love of his
life, the late Shirley Ocepa on
May 12, 1956. Walter served in
the United States Navy and was
a Korean War veteran. He was
a Nassau County Policeman for
30 years, and had his own re-
frigeration and air conditioning
business.
Walter moved to Unadilla in
1984, and became active in the
Gilbertsville Grange and was
Town Justice. He was a mem-
ber of Holy Cross R.C. Church
of Morris and the Gilbertsville
American Legion Post #1339.
Surviving family are three
daughters and six grandchildren,
Barbara Ann and Louis Tutone,
and son Michael of Benbrook,
Texas; Jean Attolino and sons,
Dominick and Eugene of New
Hampton; Denise and Richard
Rosalia and sons, Richard, Mat-
thew and daughter, Julia Ann of
Vero Beach, Fla.; and brother,
John of Long Island.
Calling hours will be from 2
to 7 p.m. Friday, March 11, at
the Johnston Funeral Home in
Morris.
A Mass of Christian burial
will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
Saturday, March 12, at Holy
Cross R.C. Church in Morris
with the Rev. Jeffrey L’Arche
officiating.
Committal services with mil-
itary honors will be held in the
spring in Brookside Cemetery
in Gilbertsville.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily suggests donations may be
made in his memory to the But-
ternut Valley Grange, P.O. Box
321, Gilbertsville, N.Y. 13776.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at www.john-
stonfh.com. Funeral arrange-
ments are by the Johnston Fu-
neral Home in Morris.

Anna J. Powers

AFTON - Our mother, Anna
J. Powers, so missed her hus-
band and youngest son, Paul
Christopher, that she went to
be with them peacefully with
her loving family by her side on
Thursday, March 3, 2011.
Though unexpected, we know
in our hearts they are together
once again. Anna was born on
March 31, 1937, in Old Forge,
Pa., to the late Vito and Raffa-
ela Be. Educated in Pennsylva-
nia, she met the love of her life,
Paul F. Powers, in April 1959,
and on Sept. 12, 1959, married
him at Chapel #1, Shaw AFB,
S.C. Their undying love and
devotion has brought them to-
(Continued from Page 8)
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 9
OBITUARIES
(Continued from Page 8)

several nieces and nephews.
In addition to her son, Paul
Christopher; and her husband,
Paul Francis, Anna was prede-
ceased by her brothers, Anthony
Be and Peter Be; and a sister,
Theresa Montione.
Friends were invited to call
from on Sunday, March 6, at
C.H. Landers Funeral Chapel,
21 Main St., Sidney. A Mass
of Christian Burial was held on
Monday, March 7 at St. Agnes
Church, Spring St. Afton. Com-
mittal will take place in the
spring at Glenwood Cemetery,
Afton.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be directed
to St. Agnes and St. John’s
Churches, 34 South Main St.
Bainbridge, N.Y. 13733. Con-
dolences may be sent to the
family online at www.landersfh.
com.
The family wishes to send
their heartfelt thanks and un-
ending support to Dr. Stephen
Dygert, Alice Burnett and his
staff. Arrangements are under
the direction of C.H. Landers
Funeral Chapel, 21 Main St.,
Sidney.

Margette Rolls
BINGHAMTON – Margette
Rolls, 68, died on Sunday March
6, 2011 at Lourdes Hospital.
She was predeceased by her
husband, Patrick; and brother,
Charles.
She is survived by her two
sons and daughters-in-law,
Christopher Rolls of New
Paltz, Timothy Rolls and Hilary
Shepard of Hays, Kan.; sister
and brother-in-law, Charlene
and Joe Brill of Binghamton;
mother-in-law, Frances Rolls
of Binghamton; sister-in-law,
Marie Stocks of Binghamton;
brother-in-law and sister-in-
law, John and Nancy Rolls of
Guilford; also several nephews.
A funeral service will be
gether in heaven again after 52
years of marriage. As with our
dad, our mom’s greatest joy was
her grandchildren. The baths in
the sink, swimming in the kid-
die pool, trips to McDonald’s
and the Dollar Store, all are
memories they will cherish a
lifetime. Her best gift to them,
besides her love, was her knack
of sewing. Her “cuzzies” (blan-
kets) will forever be held by her
granddaughters. A hairstylist
by trade, Anna’s biggest love
was raising her children, along
with her extended family in the
neighborhood. The door was al-
ways open and “her house was
your house” where you would
find homemade cinnamon buns
and white pizza. Anna, also
known as “meatball mamma”
was very active with Marriage
Encounter, Teen Seminar and
was a member of the Secular
Franciscans. The countless, lov-
ing friendships formed will for-
ever touch our family.
Anna is survived by her
children, Brian Powers of Ar-
lington, Texas; Denise and Mi-
chael Belmont of New Hartford,
N.Y.; Marie and Mark Lowe of
Nineveh, and Kathleen and Pat-
rick McNeill of Johnson City;
as well as Tom Natale, who
was like a son. We graciously
acknowledge Brittany Paige
Hulbert and Elizabeth “Betsy”
Pluta, who mom loved as her
own. She is also survived by her
loving grandchildren, Ashley
Belmont, Malayia and Makenna
Lowe and Erin McNeill, all who
adored their “mommo.” She
is also survived by her sisters-
in-law, Charlette Be, Roberta
Be, and Phyllis Powers; her
nephews and their wives, Leon-
ard and Maryann Montione of
Mass., and Charlie and Maryann
Montione of Fla., together with
held on Thursday, March 10 at
11 a.m. at the Barber Memorial
Home, Inc., 428 Main Street,
Johnson City. The Rev. Robert
Peak will officiate. Burial will
be in Vestal Hills Memorial
Park.
The family will receive
friends on Thursday, March 10
at 10 a.m. until the time of the
service at the Barber Memo-
rial Home. Donations in her
memory may be made to the
American Heart Association, 59
Court Street, Binghamton, N.Y.
13901.

Marjorie L. Snyder
SOUTH GILBOA - Marjorie
L. Snyder, 90, passed away at
her daughter’s home in Wells
Bridge on Tuesday, March
1, 2011, surrounded by her
family.
She was born in Maplecrest
on Oct. 5, 1920, the daughter of
Lewis H. and Margaret (Wal-
lace) Irish.
Marjorie was married to
Charles N. Snyder on May 16,
1938, in Hobart. She resided in
South Gilboa for more than 85
years.
She was employed as an as-
sembler by Astrocom Electron-
ics in Colliersville for 15 years
retiring in 1983, thereafter, she
worked at the Hunter Mountain
Ski Complex for several years.
She was predeceased by her
husband, Charles, in 1968; sons,
Joseph and Lewis; sisters, Mil-
dred Rhoades, Geraldine Plan-
kenhorn, Genevive Johnson;
and brother, Clifford Harris.
Marjorie will be remem-
bered with love by her daugh-
ters, Patricia (Paul) Clark of
Unadilla, and Lynda (James)
Crawford of Wells Bridge;
and nine grandchildren; 13
great-grandchildren; and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Friends called Friday, March
4, 2011, at the Hall-Tari Funeral
Home, 40 Main St., Stamford,
with Pastor Sally Soltysiak of
the Stamford United Methodist
Church, officiating. Interment
will be at a later date.
Condolences may be left at
the funeral home website hall-
tarifh.com. Funeral arrange-
ments have been entrusted to
the Hall-Tari Funeral Home,
Stamford, under the direction of
William A. Tari.

John L. Turner, Jr.
BINGHAMTON - John L.
Turner, Jr., 82, of Binghamton,
passed away unexpectedly on
March 1, 2011 at Yuma Re-
gional Medical Center in Yuma
Ariz. while visiting his youngest
daughter.
He was predeceased by his
parents, John and Nina Turner;
and wife, Margaret D. Turner.
He is survived by his very dear
sister, Evelyn Hazlett of Endi-
cott; his children, Eric J. Turner
and wife Barbara of Palm Coast,
Fla.; Linda Peloso and husband
Martin of Bainbridge, and Pa-
tricia Morris and husband Dana
of Yuma, Ariz.; along with nine
grandchildren, Joshua Youngs,
Jessica Youngs, Michael De-
leon, Michelle Deleon, Nathan
Turner, Ryan Turner, Erica
Turner, Michelle Davenport and
Scott Morris; and eight great-
grandchildren, nieces, nephews
and dear friends.
He proudly served his coun-
try in the United States Army
and was a long time member of
the Elks Club in Sidney. He was
an avid fisherman, volunteered
for a local theater group and en-
joyed building model airplanes.
Most of all he enjoyed spending
time with his loving family and
friends. Since New Years Eve,
he was able to visit all his chil-
dren, grandchildren and great
grandchildren.
A celebration of life service
was held at Christ the Redeemer
Church in Yuma Ariz. Grave
side committal service will be
held at Chenango Valley Cem-
etery in Hillcrest (Binghamton),
in the spring.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made in his name to the
charity of your choice.

Extended Hours at
Transfer Station;
Electronics No Cost
COOPERSTOWN - The
Northern Transfer Station in Coo-
perstown now has extended hours
Monday – Saturday 7 am – 3 pm
for County residents to dispose
of their household garbage and
recyclables. The Cooperstown
Transfer station is located 1 mile
North of Cooperstown on Rt
28/80 heading toward Fly Creek.
MOSA is now accepting un-
wanted electronics free of charge
at both the Oneonta and Cooper-
stown MOSA transfer stations
during regular operating hours
Monday thru Saturdays, 7 a.m.
– 3 p.m. The Oneonta MOSA
transfer station is located on Silas
Lane off I-88 Exit 13, adjacent to
the Oneonta waste-water treat-
ment plant.
Electronics accepted free of
charge include:
TV’s & TV Consoles, Com-
puter Monitors, CPU’s & Serv-
ers, Household Batteries, Cell
Phones, Telephones and Misc.
Electronics including Keyboard-
Mouse Speakers, Scanner-Print-
er-Fax Machines, Copier-Type-
writers, VCR-CD-DVD Players,
Gaming Equipment and Audio/
Video Equipment.
For more information on recy-
cling in Otsego County, call the
County Solid Waste Department
at 547-4225 or visit www.otse-
gocounty.com/solidwaste or the
Montgomery Otsego Schoharie
MOSA Authority at 518-518-
296-8884 or visit www.mosainfo.
org.
No Charge For
Obituaries
There are no charges for
obituaries placed in The Tri-
Town News. We do reserve
the right to edit them
to fit our standards and
request that only obituaries
for people with local
connections be submitted.
Our deadline is Monday
at 5 p.m. You may submit
obituaries to ttnews@
tritownnews.com or mail
them to PO Box 208,
Sidney, NY 13838. Inquiries
about In Memoriam
advertisements may be
directed to Anna Ritchey at
607-561-3526.
In 1939, Frank W. Cyr, a professor
at Columbia University’s
Teachers College, organized a
national conference on student
transportation. It resulted in the
adoption of standards for the
nation’s school buses, including the
shade of yellow.
10 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
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20
th
Century Lanes 36 44
Ermeti’s Tavern 36 44
Two Doughboys 34 46
High Single: B. MacPherson,
256. High Triple: B. MacPher-
son, 706.
Honor Games: C. Null, 217;
L. Rowe, 236; K. Davie, 206;
D. Finch, 232; P. Jones, 247;
S. Martin, 213; D. Nages, 247;
T. Beers, 202; M. Gray, 209; C.
Cawley, 229; B. MacPherson,
237, 256, 213; J. Cole, 203, 225;
K. Macumber, 211, 219, 205; A.
Charron, 213; S. Simonds, 226;
J. Halbert, 202.
L. Rowe, 602; P. Jones, 624;
B. MacPherson, 706; J. Cole,
627; K. Macumber, 635.

20
th
Century Lanes
Mon. Morn. Coffee
Rosebuds 128 72
YoYos 120 80
Four on Floor 109 91
The Foxes 108 92
Curtis Cuties 100 100
Country Girls 95 105
Ladybugs 90 110
Friends 87 113
Hustlers 83 117
Mutts & Jeff 80 120
Honor Games: R. Gregory,
191, 178, 241; C. Lafever, 176,
177; A. Wilber, 174; S. Beames,
160; W. Bookhout, 183, 163,
195; R. Tietjen, 179, 170; J.
Ruling, 161; G. Lindroth, 178;
C. Jackowski, 202; M. Marti-
nez, 171; T. Cottell, 167, 178;
B. Labelle, 168; R. Curtis, 175,
168; S. Cutting, 172; L. Grego-
ry, 172; J. Roof, 162.
Honor Series: R. G regory,
610; C. Lafever, 472; W. Book-
hout, 541, R. Tietjen, 506; G.
Lindroth, 492; T. Cottell, 477;
R. Curtis, 499; S. Cutting, 477;
L. Gregory, 460.

Galaxy Bowl-2/24/11
Thurs. Morn. Winter
Gutter Dusters 122 70
Pin Pals 118 74
Up & Coming 112 80
Pinseekers 84 108
Ups&Downs 76 116
The Babes 64 128
High Single: D. Fritzsch, 231.
High Triple: D. Fritzsch, 517.
Honor Games: D. Fritzsch,
231; C. Pletl, 173; B. Bulter,
153, 159; J. Stevens, 159; S.
Titus, 174; J. Adams, 164; L.
Craig, 174, 150, 160; G. Lin-
droth, 185, 168; C. Daughtrey,
161, 178; M. Whitmore, 172; D.
Christiance, 150; P. VanLoan,
152; A. Wilber, 159.
Honor Series: D. Fritzsch,
517; B. Butler, 457; L. Craig,
484; G. Lindroth, 491; C.
Daughtrey, 470; M. Whitmore,
454.

Galaxy Bowl-3/2/11
Wed. Night Earlybirds
SFCU 119 73
Peanut Gallery 105 87
Sipples Farm 102 90
Upturn Ind. 95 97
B Busters 93 99
Trash Mashers 91 101
Wives Gone AWOL 90 102
Bruning Ent. 73 119
High Single: M. Mott, 247cg.
High Triple: M. Mott, 673.
Honor Games: D. Armstrong,
200; D. Carr, 187; L. Noble,
183; K. Bruning, 202, 180; S.
Gifford, 192cg; T. Stanton, 191;
M. Mott, 192, 234, 247cg.
Honor Series: L. Noble, 534;
K. Bruning, 536; T. Stanton,
527; M. Mott, 673.

Galaxy Bowl
Sun. Night Allstars
Harmon & Bird 64 16
Tallmadge & Mott 50 30
Shelton & Ciborowski 49 31
Bruning & Haynes 42 38
Team 4 39 41
Liberatore & Mot 38 42
Wicks & Hurd 36 44
Gray & Shelton 32 48
Anderson & Taylor 28 52
Ireland & Jones 22 58
High Single: B. Tallmadge,
290cg; M. Mott, 211cg. High
Triple: M. Anderson, 773; K.
Bruning, 659.
Honor Games: L. Seeley,
180; M. Burlison, 236, 247cg,
213; M. Anderson, 278cg,
256cg, 239cg; E. Tallmadge,
197; M. Mott, 211cg, 182; B.
Tallmadge, 290cg, 236cg; P.
Jones, 217, 247cg; D. Ireland,
247, 213, 214; D. Ciborowski,
201;B. Shelton, 237cg, 236,
226; K. Bruning, 186, 205; R.
Bruning, 213; F. Haynes Jr.,
207, 217.
Honor Series: L. Seeley, 510;
M. Mott, 541; K. Bruning, 559;
M. Burlison, 696; P. Jones, 649;
D. Ireland, 674; B. Shelton, 699;
F. Haynes Jr., 650; M. Ander-
son, 773; B. Tallmadge, 712.

Independent Bowling League
Week 25, 3/1/11
Sidney Typo 100.5 69.5
Wagner Nineveh 86 84
Kam Auto 84.5 85.5
Team 2 69 101
Scratch Game: B. Tallmadge,
235. Scratch Series: B. Tall-
madge, 659. Hdcp Game. A.
Locke, 261. Hdcp Series: B.
Tallmadge, 716.
Honor Games: B. Tallmadge,
235, 226; A. Locke, 229; R.
Johnson, 215; T. Harmon, 204.
Honor Series: B. Tallmadge,
659; R. Johnson, 603.
Monday Night
Golf Club
Meets Mar. 28
SIDNEY – Monday Night
Sidney Golf Club meeting will
be held on Monday, March 28 at
5 p.m. at the Sidney Golf Club.
For information, call 563-7431.
JIM SLOANE bowled
a 300 and an 800 at
Galaxy Bowl Feb. 24.
He was bowling in the
Thursday Night Men’
League on the Butts
Concrete Team. His
team mates were Denny
Smith, Lynn Warner,
Barry MacPherson and
Teddy Boice. His scores
were 258-260-300
(9)=818 (3).
Palmer-Bryden Crowned as Champions
in Tri-Town Doubles Tournament
ROSEMARY GREGORY, center, director of the Tri-Town News/Sidney Favorite Printing
bowling tournament, presents the $600 first-place check to Steve Palmer and Mark
Bryden. The two have been in the tournament all 23 years and were presented the first-
place prize for the first time on Sunday afternoon at 20
th
Century Lanes in Sidney.
SIDNEY - The long time
partners of Steve Palmer and
Mark Bryden walked away with
the first place check this year,
after bowling together in the
Tri-Town News/Sidney Favor-
ite Printing Doubles Bowling
Tournament since its inception.
Now that I’ve given away the
most important information,
let’s backtrack to find out how
we got there.
Five teams showed up on
Saturday, March 5, to bowl in
the semi-finals. The scores were
either really high, or quite low;
there was no in-between, and
only four teams were going to
return on Sunday for the finals.
April Mazzarella and Jamie
Walker were high for the day
with 1,355. April had her per-
sonal best series of 523 with
games of 160, 184 and 179. Ja-
mie had a 621 series with games
of 191, 237cg and 193. Right
behind them with 1,339 was
Steve Palmer and Mark Bryden.
Steve had a high game of 190
and a 491 series. Mark bowled
excellently, knocking out games
of 209, 204 and 222 for 635.
Also with a 1,300, 1,303 to be
exact, was Michael Aylesworth
and Alan Rowe. Michael had a
high game of 248cg with a 586
series. Alan started slow with
a 180 game, but finished with
256cg and 214 for 650. The last
team to sneak in for a slot in the
finals was Lisa Boice and Lydia
Gregory with 1,189. Lisa had a
474 and Lydia had a 463. Not
their best performance in the
tournament, but just enough to
advance, which is okay! Not ad-
vancing was the team of Carrie
Hewlett and Thomas Hall who
finished with 1,178. Their fifth
place finish was awarded with
$150.
The final four teams returned
at high noon on Sunday, March
6. The teams bowled two sets of
three games: the first set for po-
sition, the second set for place.
On lanes five and six were
Aylesworth-Rowe and Boice-
Gregory. Michael had a rough
morning, only rolling 536 the
first set. His partner, Alan, had
589 with high games of 221 and
217. They rolled 1,192. Lisa had
a 491 series with a high game of
181. Lydia had a 532 series with
a high game of 191. Their total
was 1,275. On lanes seven and
eight were Palmer-Bryden and
Mazzarella-Walker. Steve had
a great second game of 236cg
finishing with 592. Mark pulled
his weight in the semi-finals, so
he took it easy the first set, only
finishing with a 498 series (181
high game). They finished with
1,303. April had a high game
of 165 for 448. Jamie had a 657
series with games of 210, 222cg
and 225. They finished with
1,316.
The score sheets were
checked leaving the standings
as such: on lanes one and two,
Aylesworth-Rowe and Boice-
Gregory would be bowling
head-to-head battling for third
and fourth place, and on lanes
third and fourth, Palmer-Bryden
and Mazzarella-Walker would
be facing off for first and sec-
ond place. Finishing in fourth
place with 1,154 was Michael
Aylesworth and Alan Rowe.
Alan brought in a 629 series
with games of 218, 216 and 195.
Fourth place took home $200.
Taking third place then, was
Lisa Boice and Lydia Gregory.
Together, they shot 1,228. Lisa
banged out a 509 series with a
high game of 212. Lydia strug-
gled, but managed a high game
of 172 and a 467 series. Third
place was worth $250.
Taking second place, and
the prize of $300, was April
Mazzarella and Jamie Walker
who rolled 1,282. April topped
her personal best from the day
prior with a 546 with a high
game of 236! Nice bowling
April! Jamie used all his shots
up in the first set, only finish-
ing with a 525 series (194 high
game). You all know that Steve
Palmer and Mark Bryden won,
but you probably don’t quite
understand, they came to win
this year. Steve and Mark have
probably placed more in the his-
tory of the Tri-Town Doubles
than any other team, but were
never quite able to take home
first until this year. Out to win
they were, and they did it in im-
pressive fashion, bringing down
the house during the place set
with a 1,411, the highest series
rolled in this year’s tournament.
Steve had games of 177, 179
and 232 for a 588 series. Mark
came to life the second set, roll-
ing games of 205, 177 and 228
for 610. Nice bowling gentle-
men, you deserve the win! First
place paid out $600. In addition
to the cash prizes, the top four
places received plaques donated
by 20th Century Lanes.
Making a tournament like this
come together takes the involve-
ment of many, so acknowledge-
ments must be made! Although
I’ve stated it every single week, I
need to give another huge shout
out to this year’s sponsors, for
without them, this tournament
wouldn’t be possible: Tri-Town
News and Sidney Favorite
Printing, Fastenal, Mang Insur-
ance, Mirabito Energy Products,
Smith Insurance Agency, The
Tax Professionals, B.K. Coffee,
C.H. Landers Funeral Chapel,
Huff Ice Cream, J&M Trophies
and Superior Heating & Air
Duct Cleaning, thank you all for
your support! Thanks to Uncle
Jeff and Aunt Lynne Mazzarella
for running the bowling end of
things at 20th Century, espe-
cially when I couldn’t be there.
Many thanks and hugs to Grand-
ma Rose for her diligent work in
doing the score sheets and recap
sheets for each week’s bowl-
ing; you are a Godsend. Thanks
to the members of the Sidney
Varsity Bowling Team and the
Greenhorn Junior Bowlers for
volunteering to keep score. And
finally, thanks to all the teams
who came out and participated
in this year’s competition, you
are the reason this tournament
runs! Until next time, we’ll see
you at the alleys!
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 11
EASTERN BROOME
SENIOR CENTER
27 GOLDEN LANE
HARPURSVILLE, NY
693-2069
ALGONQUIN
SENIOR CENTER
BAINBRIDGE • 967-8960
SPONSORED BY AREA
AGENCY ON THE AGING
SIDNEY
SENIOR MEALS
SITE MGR.: Joanne Gill
PHONE 563-2212
WINDY HILL
SENIOR CENTER
COVENTRY • 656-8602
MONDAY, MARCH 14
Chicken fricasse, rice pilaf,
pineapple juice, mixed
vegetables, cranberry sauce,
whole wheat bread, brownie
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
Beef patty, peppers, onions,
mashed potatoes, peas, whole
wheat bread, iced yellow cake
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16
Stuffed shells, seamed spinach,
tossed salad, garlic bread,
mandarin oranges
THURSDAY, MARCH 17
Corned beef and cabbage,
boiled potatoes, cranberry juice,
dinner roll, fruited green Jello
FRIDAY, MARCH 18
Crab topped tilapia, Greek oven
fries, Italian blend vegetables,
carrot raisin salad, whole wheat
bread, tapioca pudding
FRIDAY, MARCH 11
Macaroni and cheese, tomato
zucchini casserole, green beans,
fruit juice, whole wheat bread,
molasses cookie
MONDAY, MARCH 14
Shepherd’s pie, oriental blend
vegetables, winter squash,
whole wheat bread, apricot
halves
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16
CELEBRATE ST.
PATRICK’S DAY
Corned beef and cabbage,
parsley potatoes, peas and
carrots, oatmeal bread,
pistachio pudding
FRIDAY, MARCH 18
Vegetable lasagna, stewed
tomatoes, spinach, fruit juice,
warmed garlic bread (Centers
Only), Italian bread (HDM
Only), lemon meringue pie,
lemon pudding (HDM Only)
THURSDAY, MARCH 10
Bologna and cheese sandwich
with lettuce and tomato,
roasted potato medley, chicken
vegetable soup with crackers,
oatmeal bread, fruit cocktail
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
Turkey Divan, egg noodles,
California blend vegetables,
multigrain bread, peanut butter
cookie
THURSDAY, MARCH 17
ST. PATRICK’S DAY
Corned beef and cabbage,
parsley potatoes, peas and
carrots, rye bread, pistachio
pudding with cherry and
topping
Sat., March 12
River St. Fire Station Training Center, Sidney
7 a.m.–1 p.m.
The 58th Annual
SIDNEY
ROTARY
PANCAKE DAY
FREE
CHILD FINGERPRINTING
& PHOTO ID
BY SIDNEY POLICE DEPT.
9 A.M. TO NOON
• ALL YOU CAN EAT•
Pancakes, Maple Syrup,
Sausage, Eggs and Beverage
Adults $6.00 • Children 7-12 $3.00
• 6 and under Our Guests
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
PRE-ST. PADDY’S
THURSDAY
March 17th
IRISH BUFFET
$11.95
featuring: corned beef, ham,
cabbage, red potatoes, carrots,
onions, plus salad bar & much more
— REGULAR MENU ALSO AVAILABLE —
TAKE-OUTS
AVAILABLE
JERRY’S INN
18 West Main St. Bainbridge ~ 967-5008
Restaurant Hours: Mon. thru Sat. 11 am-10 pm;
Sun. Bar Menu Noon-8 pm
Bar Hours: Mon. thru Thurs. til 1 am;
Fri. and Sat. til 3 am; Sun. Noon-9 pm
SERVING
11 AM – 10 PM
ALL-YOU-
CAN-EAT
TRADITIONAL
IRISH DINNER
SPECIAL $11.95
plus regular menu with
LIVE IRISH MUSIC
6 – 8 PM
SERVING
5 – 9 PM
Annual Spaghetti Dinner
Salad Bar,
Desserts,
Beverages All
Included
Donations:
Adults $7.50,
Children 12-5 $5,
4 & Under Free
Guilford Fire Department’s
Proceeds to benefit Linda and Tim Dumond
Saturday, March 19 from 4-8 p.m.
at Guilford Fire Station - Dinner Served Downstairs
Acoustic Bluegrass
& Country Jam
NEXT JAM
APRIL 8
Corned Beef & Cabbage
D I N N E R
Bainbridge Museum
(South Main Street)
Thursday, March 17
5:00 pm ‘til gone
TAKE-OUTS
AVAILABLE
in eco-friendly
containers
$
10
00
PER PERSON
with potatoes, carrots,
homemade Irish soda bread,
and cake for dessert
11
th
ANNUAL
Benefit Bainbridge Historical Society
You’re Invited to a
QUARTER AUCTION
Friday, March 18
6 p.m. - Doors Open; 6:30 p.m. - Auction
Main St., Unadilla
Over 50 Items
$5 Admission Includes:
2 Paddles, Refreshments, Door Prize Tickets
Fundraiser for
Unadilla Methodist Church
FRIDAY, MARCH 11
Fish Florentine with tarter sauce
or roast pork with gravy, baked
potato with margarine, Brussels
sprouts and strawberry pudding
MONDAY, MARCH 14
Sloppy Joe sandwich, seasoned
potato wedges, cream of broccoli
soup and chocolate drop cookie
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
Sweet and sour pork over brown
rice, oriental blend vegetables,
tossed salad with l.f. balsamic
vinaigrette, and apricot halves
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16
Breaded fish with tarter sauce or
grandma’s meatloaf with gravy,
macaroni and cheese, French cut
green beans and apple cobbler
THURSDAY, MARCH 17
ST. PATRICK’S DAY
Corned beef, cabbage and
carrots, whole baby potatoes with
parsley and Shamrock cookie
FRIDAY, MARCH 18
Broccoli and cheese, fish with
tarter sauce or chicken riblet,
mashed potatoes with gravy,
winter squash and chilled pears

The Cawley Family
Thanks Sponsors
For Their Support
BAINBRIDGE – The Caw-
ley family would like to thank
Walter Ray Williams Jr. for at-
tending and bowling in the Jer-
emy Cawley Memorial Bowling
Tournament.
Thanks to our loyal sponsors
including: Jess F. Howes, Inc.,
Sidney Center; Fred’s Body
Shop, Walton; Peck Inc., Un-
adilla; Catalog Outlet, Unadilla;
Butler Auto Sales, Sidney; Sid-
ney Federal Credit Union, Sid-
ney; Mead Westvaco, Sidney;
S&S Auto, Sidney; Alan Steere,
Schyler Lake; John’s Garage,
Bainbridge; JC Pro Shop, Nor-
wich; Mark and Beth Zimme-
rian, Hartwick; Royal Chrysler,
Oneonta; Track Side Dinning,
Sidney; D&D Trophies, Afton;
RC Sales, Sidney; Chambers
& O’Hara, Sidney; Kris and
Earnest Cawley, Franklin; Bob
Fink, Sidney; Video Entertain-
ment, Sidney; Sidney Auto
Body, Sidney; Deb Ostrander,
Sidney; Jakes Deli, Otego; Gal-
axy Bowl, Bainbridge; and Two
Doughboys, Sidney.
We will be having the results
of our tournament at the end of
March in the Tri-Town News.
As always, we thank all our
sponsors, without them we could
not put this tournament on.
PITCH RESULTS
Olive Branch at Jericho
Thursday Pitch League
Week 8
Judy & David 33 15
Colleen & Cindy 30 18
Janette & Nancy 28 20
Cindy & Jay 27 21
Ron & Mark 27 21
Pat & Fred 26 22
Lee & Jason 26 22
Pat & Bob 26 22
Dawn & Roni 25 23
Craig & Jim 25 23
Sharon & Jim 24 24
Mike & Marty 23 25
Dave & Sam 23 25
Linda & Wendy 22 26
Christal & Dawn 21 27
Debbie & Randy 21 27
Freida & Eddie 20 18
Susan & Kathy 18 30
Megan & Terri 18 30
Joyce & Martha 17 31
DALE SMITH bowled
his first 300 Feb. 25 at
Galaxy Bowl. He was
bowling on the Friday
Night Mixed League.
His team was Hang
Ten Team, and his
team mates were Steve
Survilla, Sue Smith and
Lisa Jaindl. His scores
were 178-226-300=704.
Senior Center
To Celebrate
March Birthdays

HARPURSVILLE – Come in
and enjoy our monthly birthday
party with Bob Jensen at 11 a.m.
on Monday, March 14. He’ll be
playing the guitar and singing
our favorites. Then enjoy home-
made birthday cake for all and a
gift lunch coupon for all March
birthday folks present.
Monday’s hot lunch will be
sloppy Joe sandwich, seasoned
potato wedges, cream of broc-
coli soup and chocolate drop
cookie.
Please call to reserve your
meal no later than noon on Fri-
day, March 11 at 693-2069.

Senior Center
To Hold St. Pat’s
Party March 17

HARPURSVILLE – We in-
vite you to celebrate St. Pat’s at
the Eastern Broome Senior Cen-
ter on Thursday, March 17. We
look forward to Rebecah Kilbury
playing Irish music on piano.
Come a bit early and enjoy our
green morning goodies served at
10:30 a.m. Then stay for a hot
meal of corned beef, cabbage and
carrots, whole baby potatoes and
for dessert, Shamrock cookie.
After lunch we will have fun
with a scavenger hunt for Lep-
rechauns. Please call to reserve
your hot meal no later then noon
on Wednesday, March, 16.
Tai-Chi Classes to be Offered
At Tri-Town Regional Hospital
SIDNEY - A new series of
classes in Tai Chi Easy are
starting at Tri-Town Regional
Hospital in Sidney March 26
from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Tai Chi has
been described as “meditation in
motion” but might better be de-
scribed as a mind-body practice
that is more like “medication in
motion.”
Tai Chi is a low-impact and
slow motion form of movement
that focuses your attention on
breathing deeply and naturally.
The movements are natural, gen-
tle, and can be easily adapted for
almost anyone including people
who are very fit and even people
who are confined to wheelchairs
or recovering from surgery.
There is a growing body of
scientific research that Tai Chi
reduces pain and fatigue and
may improve mobility and sleep
in individuals with fibromyal-
gia. In other studies Tai Chi has
been shown to improve balance,
reduce blood pressure, relieve
pain and improve immunity.
There is minimal stress placed
on joints and muscle with Tai
Chi so there is less risk of injury
or soreness following its prac-
tice. You need no special equip-
ment and Tai Chi can even be
practiced alone once the proper
techniques have been learned.
Tai Chi is widely accepted as a
useful aid in reducing stress and
improving the ability to move
and maintain one’s balance, an
important factor in preventing
falls especially as we age.
There is a small fee ($5 per
class) payable to the instructor.
Please call 561-7961 for more
information or to register for the
class.
Tap Dancing For Adults Returns
To Tri-Town Regional hospital
SIDNEY - If you have always
wished that you knew how to
tap dance but never had the op-
portunity to take a class before,
this may be the opportunity you
have been waiting for! Lori
White is returning to Tri-Town
Regional Hospital March 23 at 6
p.m. with her very popular class
for adults. Last fall, a group of
enthusiastic dancers learned a
variety of steps and routines and
had a wonderful time tapping
their hearts out! Now, those tap
dancers will be returning for the
next phase of learning while a
brand new group of beginners
has the opportunity to become
tap dancers as well.
It is not necessary to have
any past dancing experience.
You only need to come com-
fortably dressed and ready to
try something new and fun. This
class will get your feet moving
and give you the opportunity to
shake off the winter doldrums
while having a great time with
an enthusiastic instructor and a
fun group of fellow dancers.
Taps and/or shoes can be pur-
chased if you so desire. A $5 fee
for each class to the instructor is
payable at the beginning of each
class. Please call Elaine at 561-
7961 to sign up for either the
beginners’ or the experienced
beginners’ classes, or for more
information.

12 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011

HIGHER GROUND CHRISTIAN
CHURCH
96 E. Main St., Afton • 639-3746
Joe Funaro, Pastor
Tuesday
7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting.
Friday
7 p.m. - Mid-week Service.
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Sunday Worship
Children’s Ministries available during service. Afton
Healing House open 10 - 2 Tues. & Thurs.

ST. AGNES CATHOLIC
CHURCH OF AFTON
Fr. Mark Gantley
Web: kofcsidney.org
18 Spring Street • 967-4481
Sundays
8:30 a.m. - Mass

AFTON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Academy St., Afton • 639-2121
Rev. Lynn Shepard • 829-2531
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Choir Practice;
11 a.m. - Worship Service
GILBERTSVILLE
GILBERTSVILLE BAPTIST
CHURCH
Commercial & Elm Sts.
(607)783-2993 Church
Rev. Kurt Funke, Interim Minister
859-2436
Thursday, March 10
7 p.m.-Choir Practice at Presbyterian
Church
Sunday, March 13
9:30 a.m.-Morning Worship; Sunday
School; Jr. Worship Pre-K-2; Kids
Worship 3-6 grades
Tuesday, March 15
9-10 am-Coffee/tea with Pastor; 11
a.m. Bible Study, book of Matthew
Wednesday, March 16
6 p.m.-Junior Youth Group; 6:30 p.m.
Ash Wed. Service
Thursday, March 17
5:30-6:30 p.m. St. Patrick’s Day Sup-
per - NLFH; 7 p.m.-Choir Practice at
Presbyterian Church

CHRIST CHURCH
38 Marion Ave., Gilbertsville
783-2267
christchurchgville@frontiernet.net
Joseph Acanfora, Pastor
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday school; 10 a.m.
- Adults & children service, Holy
Communion; 4:30 p.m.- Service of
Christian Healing

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Gilbertsville • 783-2867
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship Service.
The church is handicapped accessible.
BAINBRIDGE
BAINBRIDGE UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
27 N. Main St., Bainbridge • 967-2782
Rev. Dolly L. Tarreto, Pastor
Sunday Services
9 a.m. - Worship Service;
9:15 a.m. - Sunday School; coffee &
fellowship following service
Assisted listening system for those with special
hearing needs.

ST. PETER’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
On the Park Bainbridge • 967-3441
The church with the red doors.
Rev. Marilyn M. Sanders, Rector
Sunday Services
8 a.m. and 11 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE EVANGELIST
CATHOLIC CHURCH
32 S. Main St., Bainbridge • 967-4481
Fr. Mark Gantley
Web: kofcsidney.org
Saturdays
4:30 p.m. - Reconciliation
5:15 p.m. - Vigil Mass
Sundays
11 a.m. - Mass

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
12 S. Main St., Bainbridge
967-8034 • www.bainbridgefbc.com
Pastor: Rev. John Koopman
Clerk: Mrs. Secrest
Church is handicapped accessible through the
back door. Pastor is in when the frog is on the door.
Mail newsletter articles to jkoopman@stny.rr.com
or drop in the church box.
Sunday, March 13
8:45 a.m. - Sunday school for all
ages; 10 a.m.- Service with Com-
munion, Sermon Title “Do We Really
Listen?”
Coming March 21
Board Meetings
Wednesdays
Noon - Midweek Bible Study, if there
is no school there is no meeting

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
- BAINBRIDGE
Rev. Diarmuid O’Hara, Pastor
967-8021
www.ChristianChurchesOnline.com/
firstpresbyterianbainbridge
Sunday, March 13
9:45 a.m. - Sunday School for all
ages; 11 a.m. - Worship
We are handicap accessible.

GRACE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
563-9755
Roman Kauffman, Pastor
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Worship.
Wednesday
7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting.
OTEGO
OTEGO PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
18 River Street • 988-2861
Sunday
9 a.m. - Worship including Children’s
Conversation and Children’s Sunday
School; 10 a.m. - Coffee Hour; 10:30
a.m. - Adult Sunday School.
Buildings are ramp accessible.

OTEGO UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
8 Church Street • 988-2866
Pastor Lisa Jo Bezner
Sunday
11 a.m.- Worship
Elevator Access to all levels.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
OF OTEGO
W. Branch, Otsdawa Rd.,
Co. Rt. 6, Otego • 988-7144
Pastor Bill Allen
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday Morning Service;
10:45 a.m. - Sunday school
FRANKLIN
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Dr. John Hill • 895-9917
Sunday
10:45 a.m. - Worship Service.

ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Corner of Main & Institute Sts.
The Rev’d Jim Shevlin, FHC Rector
624-1470
Sunday
9 a.m. - Service followed by coffee
and fellowship.
1st Sunday of Month
1:30 p.m. - Holy Communion

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH
25 Center St., Franklin • 829-5471
Dr. Walt Schlundt, Pastor
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship Service.
AREA
UNATEGO COMMUNITY CHURCH
Brian Cutting, Pastor
Office: 369-7425
unatego-church@live.com
Sundays
10:30 a.m. - Worship at Otego
building (290 Main St.); nursery and
junior church available for children
Tuesdays
6:30-8:30 p.m. - Sr. High YFC Club
at Unadilla building, 16 Watson St.
Wednesdays
5:30 p.m. Gospel Community at
Otego building, 290 Main St.
Thursdays
6:30-8:30 p.m. - Jr. High YFC Club
at Unadilla Building

WELLS BRIDGE BAPTIST
David Steensma, Pastor
7 Church St., Wells Bridge
607-988-7090
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. - Social Time (Coffee); 11
a.m. - Morning Worship Service
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Prayer and Bible Study

MOUNT UPTON
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Peggi Eller, Pastor
Sunday
11 a.m. - Worship Service.
First Sunday: Holy Communion
Third Sunday: Prayers for Healing.
Emerg. Food Pantry 764-8365.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF
MOUNT UPTON
Gerald K. Bovee, Pastor • 764-8361
Wednesday
7 p.m. - Midweek Prayer and Bible
Study Service.
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:45 a.m. - Worship Service;
6 p.m. - Evening Service.

HARPURSVILLE
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sue Shields, Pastor
222-3175
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School;
11 a.m. - Morning Worship

HARPURSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH
41 Cumber Rd. • 693-2422
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Prayer Service;
Teen Scene
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School;
10:45 a.m. - Morning Worship;
6:30 p.m. - Evening Service.

NINEVEH PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Rte. 7, Nineveh • 693-1919
Rev. Emrys Tyler
Thursday
6:30 p.m. - Bible Study
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Morning Worship; 10:45
a.m. - Sunday School
Tuesday
1-5 p.m. - Pastoral office hours;
Wednesday
9 a.m. - Bible Study
7 p.m. - Adult Choir Rehearsal

THREE PINES
COMMUNITY CHAPEL
E. Windsor Road (Doraville)
Nineveh • 693-1897
Harold Lefler, Pastor • 693-2193
Sunday
10 a.m. - Sunday School;
11 a.m. - Morning Worship;
6 p.m. - Evening Worship.
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Prayer Meeting.

TROUT CREEK
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Pastor Judy Travis
Sunday
9 a.m. - Sunday School;
10 a.m. - Worship Service;
11 a.m. - Fellowship

SIDNEY CENTER
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Rachel Barnhart, Pastor
369-2052
Until Further Notice Worship Ser-
vices will be at the Fire Hall
Sunday
11:00 a.m.- Worship Service

SIDNEY CENTER
BAPTIST CHURCH
10440 Main St. • 369-9571
Pastor Dennis Murray
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Praise and Bible Study;
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship
Service
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Midweek Prayer and
Bible Study

NAKSIBENDI HAKKANI
MUSLIM CENTER
1663 Wheat Hill Rd.,
Sidney Center • 607-369-4816
Sheykh Abdul Kerim Al-Kibrisi
Five Prayers Daily
Thursday
Evening Program
Friday
1 p.m. - Jummah

MASONVILLE FEDERATED
CHURCH
Sunday
10 a.m. - Adult Sunday School;
11 a.m. - Worship Service, Children’s
Sunday School.

SAND HILL
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Rev. Lisa Jo Bezner, Pastor
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Morning Worship

UNION VALLEY
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Lay Pastor Andrew Doyle
607-316-7546
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship &
Sunday School. Coffee and Fellow-
ship follows.

GUILFORD UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Rev. Peggi Eller, Pastor
Sunday
9:15 a.m. - Worship Service.
Community Emergency Food Bank
Call 895-6822.

COVENTRY UNITED METHODIST
Lay Pastor Andrew Doyle
607-316-7546
Sunday
9 a.m. - Morning Worship and Sun-
day School, young family friendly;
fellowship and coffee hour follows.

COVENTRYVILLE
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UCC
Pastor Joyce Besemer
113 Co. Rt. 27, Bainbridge
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship and Sunday
School; coffee hour
Wednesday
6:30 p.m. - Bible study; Quilt Group
Friday
6:30 p.m. - Quilt Group

SIDNEY
SACRED HEART CHURCH
Liberty Street, Sidney
Saturday Mass: 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 & 10:30 a.m.
Mon. - Fri.: Daily Mass at 9 a.m.
Confessions Saturday:
4:30-5 p.m. or by appointment, call
563-1591 from 9 a.m.- noon

FAITH COMMUNITY CHURCH
32 West Main & Adams Sts., Sidney
Jim Ingalls, Pastor • 967-8167
Sunday
10 a.m. - Noon. - Bible Study;
6 p.m. - Worship Service.
Wednesday
6 p.m. - Bible Study.

CHURCH OF CHRIST
26 Cartwright Ave., Sidney
Larry Bailey, Preacher • 563-9695
Sunday
Radio Program: Bible Truth - WCHN,
7:45 - 8 a.m., 970 AM; WCDO, 8:15
- 8:30 a.m., 1490 AM, 101 FM;
10 a.m. - Bible Class; 11 a.m. - Wor-
ship Assembly.
Wednesday
10 - 11 a.m. - Bible Study;
7 - 8 p.m. - Bible Study/Worship.

ST. PAUL’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
25 River St., Sidney • 563-3391
The Rev’d Jim Shevlin, FHC Rector
624-1470
Sundays
10 a.m. - Adult & Children
Sunday School; 10:45 a.m. - Holy
Communion, and Anointing for
Healing in Jesus’ Name - followed by
coffee and fellowship.
Tuesdays
11 a.m. - Bible Study (bring bag
lunch)

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
28 River St., Sidney
Kenneth Southworth, Pastor
Church Office: 563-8456
Parsonage: 563-1166
firstbaptistchrc@stny.rr.com
Sunday, March 13
9:30 a.m. -Sunday School; 10:45
a.m. - Gathered Worship; Flock
Groups as designated; 5 p.m.
- Youth Group; 6 p.m. - Informal
Evening Service
Monday, March 14
6 p.m. - First Place meeting
Wednesday, March 16
9 a.m.- Men’s Breakfast/Bible Study;
6 p.m. - TeamKids Club; 6:30 p.m.
- Gathered Prayer

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
1 Bridge St., Sidney • 563-1329
(across from library)
Pat Robinson, Pastor
Church Office: Tues., Thurs., Fri.
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 10
2 p.m. - Diaconate; 7 p.m. - Choir
Saturday, March 12
8 a.m.- 1 p.m. - Bloodmobile at First
Congregational Church
Sunday, March 13
9:30 a.m. - Bible Study; 10:30 a.m.
- Worship and Sunday School; 11:30
a.m. - Coffee Hour
Tuesday, March 15
9-10:30 a.m. - Men’s Book Group
(guest minister will speak on his
mission to Haiti)

SIDNEY ASSEMBLY OF GOD
Plankenhorn Rd., Sidney, 563-8247
(1st road on left after Del. Co. Humane Society)
Rev. Bernard Knutsen, Pastor
Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Sunday School, all ages;
10:45 a.m. - Morning Worship; 6 p.m.
- Evening Worship Service
Monday
1 p.m. - Intercessory Prayer Meeting
Tuesday
6:45 p.m. - Adult Bible Study; Royal
Rangers for boys grades 3-6; Girls’
Ministries for girls grades 3-5

CIRCLE DRIVE ALLIANCE CHURCH
6 Circle Drive, Sidney
Rev. Robert Goldenberg, Sr. Pastor
Kelvin McKnight, Asst. Pastor
Church Office: 563-1120
www.cdaconline.org
Saturday
6:30 p.m. - Saturday Night Alive!
Contemporary Worship Service
w/nursery & children’s ministries.
Sunday
10 a.m.- Contemporary Worship
Services with nursery and children’s
ministries.
Wednesday
7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting and Youth
Bible Study.

SIDNEY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
12 Liberty St., Sidney • 563-1921
Rev. Dr. Susan Heafield
Thursday, March 10
1:30 p.m. - UMW meeting, Dorcas
Room
Saturday, March 12
10 a.m. - Anyone who plays a musi-
cal instrument join a rehearsal for
worship songs in sanctuary
Sunday, March 13
9 a.m. - Sunday School, Holy
Grounds Café; 9:45 - Chancel Choir;
10:15 a.m. - Worship service fol-
lowed by fellowship and youth choir
Wednesday, March 16
6 p.m. - Bell Choir; 7 p.m. - Chancel
Choir

ST. LUKE’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
W. Main St., Sidney • 563-1806
Transitional Pastor Tom Olson
373-3244
Friday, March 11
11:30 a.m. - Rotary
Saturday, March 12
9 a.m. - Weight Watchers
Sunday, March 13
9 a.m. - Christian Education; 10
a.m. - Traditional Service; 11 a.m.
- Fellowship & coffee; Men’s Bake
Auction during Fellowship
Every Wednesday
11 a.m. - Study Group;
7 p.m. - Choir rehearsal

SIDNEY BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH
27 Division St., Sidney
Pastor Frank Donnelly
607-334-6206
Sundays
10 a.m. - Sunday School; 11 a.m.
- Worship; 6 p.m. - Evening Service
Wednesdays
6:30 p.m. - Prayer Meeting

GUILFORD CENTER
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF EAST GUILFORD
Rev. Patty Wolff, Pastor
563-1083 or 369-4630
Corner of State Rt. 8 and Co. 35,
East Guilford, 2.5 miles from Sidney
www.eastguilfordpc.org
Sunday
9 a.m. - Worship
Tuesday
6:30 a.m. - Men’s breakfast and Bible
study
UNADILLA
FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH
1050 Covered Bridge Rd., Unadilla
Pastor R. Michael Amos • 369-2754
Handicapped Accessible. Nursery Available.
Sundays
10 a.m. - Sunday School for all ages;
11 a.m. - Morning Worship; 6:30 p.m.
- Evening Praise and Worship hour
Tuesday
10 a.m. - Ladies’ Bible Study
Wednesday
7 p.m. - Bible Study and Prayer/Teen
Time

UNADILLA FRIENDS CHURCH
Rogers Hollow, Unadilla
Benjamin Shaw, Pastor •563-2266
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
170 Main Street, Unadilla • 369-2052
Rev. Rachel Barnhart, Pastor
Every Thursday
7 p.m. - AA & Al-anon meet
Every Sunday
9:30 a.m. - Worship Service followed
by coffee & fellowship; 10 a.m.
Sunday school
Monday, Friday and Saturday
11 a.m. - Noon - Food Pantry and
Clothing Pantry
Every Monday
7 p.m. - Bible Study
Every Tuesday
7 p.m. - Grieving Support Group
Second Thursday of the Month
7 p.m. - Administrative Council
Monday, Friday, Saturday
11-12 noon - Food Pantry open
Handicap Accessible

UNADILLA CENTER
UNITED METHODIST
Rev. Norman Tiffany
1203 Butternut Rd., Unadilla
Regular Sunday Services
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service;
Sunday School.

ST. MATTHEW’S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
240 Main St., Unadilla • 369-3081
Rev. Scott Garno, Rector
Wardens: William Goodrich &
Mark Jones
Sunday
9 a.m. Christian Education (all ages);
10 a.m. - Holy Communion.
Wednesday
12 p.m. - Holy Communion
Handicapped accessible.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Church and Main Sts., Unadilla
(Handicapped accessible/
Child Care available)
Rev. Patty Wolff, Pastor • 369-4630
Sunday
9:45 a.m. - Sunday School; 11 a.m.-
Worship followed by coffee hour;
12:15 p.m. - Choir practice; 1 p.m.
Roast Pork Dinner & JAARS benefit
at EG
Tuesday
6:30 a.m. - Men’s Breakfast and Bible
Study; 1 p.m. - Harmony Circle at
Agnes Hoffman’s
Coming Thursday, March 17
4:30-7 p.m. - St. Patrick’s Day Dinner
in the flelowship hall. Menu includes
corned beef, cabbage, onions, car-
rots, potatoes, dessert and beverage.
Take-outs available. Fundraiser for
building fund and mission outreach.
Call Sharon Havens at 610-4033 or
Louise Lesh at 369-9579 for info.
AFTON
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
34 Spring St., Afton • 639-2082
Rev. Dolly L. Tarreto, Pastor
Sunday
10:45 a.m. - Morning Worship;
coffee & fellowship following

AFTON BAPTIST CHURCH
30 Caswell St., Afton • 639-1030
Christopher Prezorski, Pastor
www.fbcafton.org
Thursday
6-7:30 p.m. - Praise Band Practice
Friday
7:30-10 p.m. - Youth Group
Sunday
9:30 a.m.-11 a.m. - Morning Worship,
Lord’s Table, Children’s Worship;
11 a.m. - noon - Children’s Sunday
School groups; 11 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
- Teen & Adult Fellowship; 11:15 a.m.
- noon - Teen & Adult Sunday School
Groups; 5:30-7 p.m. - Youth Core;
6-7 p.m. - R12 Session #4
Tuesday
7 p.m. - Mission Board meeting
Wednesday
6:15 a.m., 8:15 a.m.; 2 p.m.- Prayer/
Bible Study; 6:30-8 p.m. - WOL &
Gopher Club; Teen Bible Study at
Paul’s; 6:45-8 p.m. - Prayer/Bible
Study

NORTH AFTON
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Co. Rd. 17, Afton, NY
Rev. Brandilynne Craver, Pastor
656-7908
Sunday
10:30 a.m. - Worship.

ST. ANN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
125 S. Main St., PO Box 22, Afton
www.stannsaftonny.org
Supply Clergy:
Rev. Ralph G. Groskoph;
David Hanselman, Lay Pastoral
Leader
Handicapped accessible.
Sunday Service
9:15 a.m. - 1st & 3rd Sundays Holy
Eucharist; 2nd & 4th & 5th Sundays
Morning Prayer
Each Tuesday
6:30 p.m.- SERTOMA, Parish Hall
Each Thursday
8 p.m. - Alcoholics Anonymous
closed meeting, Parish Hall
Each Sunday
8 p.m. - Alcoholics Anonymous

MERCY FELLOWSHIP
967 Rt. 41 (1.2 miles) N. of Rt. 7, Afton
John Snel, Pastor
Church: 639-1964 • Study: 693-3692
Sundays
10 a.m. - Worship Service
Fridays
7 p.m. - Prayer Meeting and Bible
Study

HOPE CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
129 Main St., Afton • 639-4237
Rev. Maryann Palmetier
Rev. George Geres
Sundays
9 a.m. - Coffee Time; 9:30 a.m. -
Morning Worship (Children’s Sunday
School during worship); 10:30 a.m.
- Fellowship Hour (fourth Sunday
of each month, brunch following
worship.)
CHURCHES
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 13
Please e-mail
all Pastor’s Pen
articles to ttnews@
tritownnews.com by
noon on Friday.
Church listings run from
Thursday to Thursday.
Please have all changes
to church notices to
our offices by Monday
at noon. Send your
changes to Tri-Town
News, 5 Winkler Road,
Sidney, NY 13838 or
ttnews@tritownnews.
com, attn.: Church
Listing.
Filled & Connected
By Pastor Brian Cutting – Unatego Community Church
My sons have an educational toy called “Snap Circuits” that enables
them to learn about electricity and try some fun projects. They can set
these circuits up to run a small fan, turn on a small light or make all
kinds of sounds, songs, and funky alarms depending on which parts
you put on the board and how you set them up. A few things are needed
to make this work. You must set up the circuits in the proper order so
that the electricity can flow freely to accomplish what you want. You
must have a power source - batteries. But it is not enough to have the
batteries on the board, they must be properly connected and the switch
opened to receive the power. When the circuits are properly connected
to good batteries and the channel opened for the electricity to flow then,
and only then, will stuff happen: lights, sounds etc.
The Holy Spirit is like the power source in the life of the believer and
follower of Jesus Christ. Unlike electricity, He is not just an impersonal
‘force’ but a person, a divine member of the Trinity – One God, Three
Persons: Father, Son & Spirit. The Bible teaches us that the Holy Spirit
takes up residence in the life of any true believer and follower of Jesus.
The Holy Spirit is our power source. If we are going to live the Chris-
tian life that God is calling us to live, we must be properly connected
to the Holy Spirit. He must fill our lives like that electricity from the
battery fills the circuits. Without the Holy Spirit you and I cannot do
anything that matters spiritually or eternally. If you know Jesus person-
ally you have the Holy Spirit in you, just like the Snap Circuit board
has batteries mounted on it. But even though the batteries are there, the
wires still have to be connected properly to that power source and the
switch open, for anything to happen. Many Christians are like a Snap
Circuit set with batteries but no power, nothing happening because we
have forgotten to stay connected to our power source (I know that is the
story of my life far too often). We have the Holy Spirit, but we must
stay connected and filled with His power. Then and only then will we
be effective in obeying God, serving God, loving other people, and
reaching people who do not yet know Jesus as their Savior.
Ephesians 5:18 says “And do not get drunk with wine... but be filled
with the Spirit.” The person who is intoxicated with alcohol loses con-
trol of themselves. They lose control of their tongues, say all kinds of
outrageous things. They also lose control of their bodies – unable to
walk a straight line. They lose control of their minds, stumbling over
simple questions. They have no control over their emotions, becoming
fearful, angry or silly. This is the illustration the Scripture uses for be-
ing filled with the Spirit. We are influenced, controlled, overwhelmed
and directed by God. It is a positive thing instead of a negative but it is
still a loss of control. We yield ourselves to the control of God’s Spirit
and doing so impacts the things we say, what we do with our bodies,
what our mind dwells on and even helps determines our emotions. Our
lives become directed and empowered by God in very positive ways
for us and for others.
But for this to happen we must be connected to the Spirit. We must
keep the circuits open by not grieving Him (sin) or quenching him (not
doing good things He is calling us to do). We have to cease living life
in our own strength, under our own direction and for our own purposes.
We must wake up each day asking God to fill us and to remove any-
thing that hinders that from happening. Throughout the day when we
get off track we repent and seek to be filled again. When we are prop-
erly connected to the Spirit His power is free to guide us, embolden us,
increase our sense of intimacy and security in God by reminding us that
we are God’s children, and use us for His great kingdom purposes. Are
you connected and filled by the power source?
Masonville Church to Begin
40 Days of Purpose Mar. 12
MASONVILLE - Interim Pas-
tor Roger Davies of the Federated
Church in Masonville is organiz-
ing a six-week event called “40
Days of Purpose.” It is a world-
wide observed, spiritual move-
ment, based on the best selling
book “The Purpose Driven Life”
by Rick Warren.
Warren’s book, which has
spent 36 weeks on the New York
Times’ best seller list, contains
40 short chapters addressing five
purposes: worship, fellowship,
discipleship, ministry and mis-
sions. Warren believes God wants
individuals to adhere to those five
purposes, and his movement is
spreading throughout the Chris-
tian world. This spirit of revival
event will help individuals seek
to understand what our purpose
in life is.
The Prayer vigil is Saturday,
March 12 at 6:30 p.m. Our kick-
off service begins on Sunday,
March 13 and the sermons run
through April 22.
.
During the
week there will be small indi-
vidual study groups available
to attend around the Masonville
area for adults. Day and evening
classes are available. Children’s
classes will be every Sunday
at 9:30 am at the church, from
March 12-April 22. All materials
are free.
If you’ve ever asked “Why
am I here” or “What am I sup-
posed to do,” 40 Days of Purpose
seeks to answer these questions.
Answers are based on the Bible,
but phrased in a way we can all
understand.
Call Pastor Roger, at 265-
3774, to sign up for a study group,
or come to the first service, Satur-
day, March 12 at 6:30 p.m., at the
Masonville Church, to see if it’s
something you’re interested in.
FROM THE
PASTOR’S PEN
Every Girl Has a Story To Tell!
What is Your Story?
The Girl Scout Leadership Experience helps girls discover
themselves and their values, connect with others and
take action to improve their communities and the world.
Join the Girl Scouts and have the
journey of your life!
Girl Scout Daisies (Grades K-1)
Five Flowers, Four Stories, Three Cheers
for Animals. Girls learn howto care for
animals as well as themselves.
Girl Scout Brownies (Grades 2-3)
A World of Girls. In this journey, girls
explore the different clues that can be
found in stories and how those clues can
help them change the world.
Girl Scout Juniors (Grades 4-6)
aMuse. Girls learn about some of the
different roles that they can have in their
lives, and tell those stories.
Girl Scout Cadettes (Grades 6-8)
MEdia. Exciting media challenges, real-life
stories, lets girls remake media to match
the reality of their lives.
Girl Scout Seniors (Grades 9-10)
Mission: Sisterhood. Girls are on a mission
to see how sisterhood starts with them-
selves and then spirals out to change the
world.
Girl Scout Ambassadors (Grades 11-12)
Bliss: Live it. On this leadership journey,
girls realize that helping others reach for
their dreams is as BLISSful as reaching
their own.
www.gsnypenn.org
March 12, 2011, we celebrate
the 99th anniversary of the
Girl Scout Movement
in the UnitedStates.
info@gsnypenn.org
This celebration of 99 years of building girls of courage, confidence and character
has been brought to you by the following advertisers:
Do you like to tell stories? Check out our latest Journey –It’s Your Story. Tell It!
AFTON-BAINBRIDGE - SIDNEY
1-800-628-2265 • WWW.NBTBANK.COM
The Tri-Town News
607-561-3526
www.tritownnews.com
Sidney Favorite Printing
607-561-3515
Serving the Area for Over 100 Years
Council of Churches Sponsors
Lenten Study Starting March 14
BAINBRIDGE – The Bain-
bridge Council of Churches is
sponsoring a Lenten study for
all denominations starting on
Monday, March 14 at the Bap-
tist Church fellowship room
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The Bap-
tist Church is next to the Credit
Union on South Main St. Every
person in the community is in-
vited to attend.
Blessing of the Cross invites
you to explore God’s hope and
presence presented in the scrip-
ture reading for Lent and Easter.
Key Bible readings call us to
praise God as we contemplate
God’s redemption and new cre-
ation through the crucifixion
and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
Through readings we hear the
call to celebrate the blessings of
new life offered through Jesus
Christ.
The six-week study will help
you understand, appreciate and
participate in prayerful reflec-
tion and celebration of Lent
and Easter as well as inspire
you to live each day with God’s
blessings of life and salvation
through Jesus Christ.
St. Joseph Church
Celebrates
With Feast Day
OXFORD - This year St. Jo-
seph Church Oxford, the oldest
Catholic Church in Chenango
County, will be celebrating 163
years of Parish life with a Feast
Day on Saturday, March 19.
There will be the usual church
vigil service at 5:45 p.m. with
religious education students
participating and a youth choir
singing. Following the service
(at approx.. 7 p.m.) there will be
a celebration in the Parish Hall
featuring a St. Joseph Table
constructed according to ancient
Sicilian custom and laden with
delicious authentic St. Joseph
breads and pastries. In addition
to viewing an historic exhibit,
we will be enjoying various fin-
ger foods and specialties from
our St. Joseph Table.
People from neighboring Par-
ishes as well as the Oxford/Nor-
wich communities, are invited
to join us as we celebrate our
long history from a seven-fam-
ily group in Smithville in 1834,
to the Flannagan farm, to a log
house in Oxford and eventually
the current Church in 1849. For
more information call Cathy
Rood at 843-8785.
FRI DAY, MARCH 11
LAP-SIT STORY TIME FOR BABIES – Sidney Memorial
Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m., ages 0-18 mos.
AA MEETING – Bainbridge Episcopal Church by gazebo,
7-8 pm. Old and young very welcome
ROTARY CLUB OF SIDNEY - Noon, St. Luke’s Lutheran
Church, West Main St., Sidney
OWP MUSICAL “CRAZY FOR YOU” - 7:30 p.m.,
Bainbridge Town Hall Theatre, tickets available at the door
SATURDAY, MARCH 12
UNADILLA HISTORICAL MUSEUM – 131 Main St., 1-4
p.m. To tour the museum at other times call Polly Judd,
369-2605.
BINGO – 7 p.m., Sidney Fire Dept. Training Center,
BAINBRIDGE AA GROUP – Open AA meeting; 7 p.m., St.
John’s Catholic Church
OWP MUSICAL “CRAZY FOR YOU” - 7:30 p.m.,
Bainbridge Town Hall Theatre, tickets available at the door
SUNDAY, MARCH 13
UNADILLA HISTORICAL MUSEUM – 131 Main St., 1:00-
4:00 pm. To tour the museum at other times, call
Polly Judd, 369-2605
AFTON AA GROUP – Open meeting, St. Ann’s Episcopal
Church, 8:00 pm.
BAINBRIDGE MUSEUM – Open by appointment. Call Mary
Drachler at 967-8546 or Gary Darling 967-7159
OWP MUSICAL “CRAZY FOR YOU” - 2 p.m., Bainbridge
Town Hall Theatre, tickets available at the door
COIN SHOW - Elks Club, 86 Chestnut St., Oneonta, free
admission, sponsored by the Otsego Numismatic Assn.
MONDAY, MARCH 14
BINGO – Sidney Moose Lodge, 6:45 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS – Sidney United Methodist
Church, Liberty St., Sidney, 7:00 p.m.
AFTERSCHOOL STORY TIME – Sidney Memorial Public
Library, 4-4:45 p.m., ages 5-7
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
OPEN AA MEETING – 7 a.m., Grace Christian Fellowship,
112 Dingman Hill Road, Bainbridge
TEEN CRAFTS – Sidney Memorial Public Library,
4-5:30 p.m., ages 12-20
CHILDREN’S STORY TIME AND CRAFTS –
Gilbertsville Free Library, 10 a.m.
SIDNEY TOPS – Civic Center, 3 p.m. Info: Peggy 563-1055.
BAINBRIDGE AA GROUP – Closed discussion,
St. John’s Catholic Church, 8 p.m.
AFTON SENIOR CLUBHOUSE – Afton United Methodist
Church, 9:30 a.m.
SENIOR STRETCH EXERCISE CLASS – With Val LaClair,
8:45-9:30 a.m., Eastern Broome Sr. Center, Harpursville
MAYWOOD HISTORICAL GROUP – The Depot, Sidney
Center, 7:00 pm.
BAINBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEETING –
Bob’s Diner, 7:30 pm.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16
TRI-COUNTY KIWANIS CLUB OF SIDNEY – 7 a.m.,
Trackside Dinner
TOPS OF UNADILLA #618 – Methodist Church,
9 a.m. Info: 563-2690.
OPEN VOLLEYBALL – Sidney Civic Center, 9-11 am.
OTEGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM – 6 River St.,
Otego, 1-4 p.m. www.otegohistoricalsociety.org
UNADILLA ROTARY CLUB – 6 p.m., Unadilla Community
Center, Main St., Unadilla
AL-ANON – Meetings at Sacred Heart Church
(old church), Sidney, 7 p.m. Info: 369-5966.
SIDNEY AA GROUP – Closed discussion meeting at
Sacred Heart Church, Liberty St., 7 p.m.
BAINBRIDGE NA GROUP – 7 pm, open meeting,
St. Peter’s Episcopal Church (on the square).
Contact 226-4315
EASTERN BROOME CRAFT GROUP – Eastern Broome
Senior Center, 27 Golden Lane, Harpursville, 9-11 a.m.
TRI-TOWN DANCE CLUB – Sidney VFW, 6-10 p.m.
Snacks and drink available
AFTER SCHOOL CRAFT CLUB - Sidney Memorial Public
Library, 4-4:45 p.m., Ages 8-11
SIDNEY SENIOR CITIZEN CLUB – Sidney Civic Center,
Room 202, 10:00 am.
HAPPY HELPING HANDS – Sidney Memorial Public
Library Community Room, 1:00-3:00 pm.
HILL & VALLEY GARDEN CLUB – Sidney Memorial Public
Library Community Room, 6:30 pm.
THURSDAY, MARCH 17
ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASS – With Fran Bromley, 9-11
a.m., Eastern Broome Sr. Center, Harpursville
BAINBRIDGE ROTARY CLUB – Parson’s Place,
Noon to 1:00 pm.
BAINBRIDGE AA GROUP – Open discussion, Chen-
del-ot Apartments, community room, yellow building,
60 South Main Street, Noon.
AL-ANON – Meetings at Unadilla United Methodist Church,
7:00 pm, side door. Info: 369-5966.
AFTON AA GROUP – Closed meeting, St. Ann’s Episcopal
Church, 8:00 pm.
OPEN AA MEETING – 7 a.m., Grace Christian Fellowship,
112 Dingman Hill Road, Bainbridge
BINGO - Elks Lodge #2175, 7 p.m., River St., Sidney
OPEN VOLLEYBALL - 7-9 p.m., Sidney Civic Center, for
adults 18 and up
CHILDREN’S STORY TIME - 6:30-7 p.m., Afton Free Library
AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY – Afton Museum,
7:30 pm, March-October or call 639-2363 for information
DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS CHAPTER 200 – 279
Chestnut St., Oneonta. 607-764-8134.
MONDAYS & WEDNESDAYS
AFTON ECUMENICAL FOOD PANTRY – Afton United
Methodist Church, 24 Spring St., Mon. 5-7 p.m.,
Wed. 9-11 a.m.
MONDAYS & THURSDAYS
BAINBRIDGE COUNCIL OF CHURCHES
FOOD PANTRY – Bainbridge United Methodist Church
back entrance, 8-10 a.m.
SIDNEY COMMUNITY FOOD BANK – Sidney United
Methodist Church, Liberty St., 9:30-11:30 am.
Last Thursday of the month 5:30-6:30
MONDAYS, FRI DAYS, & SATURDAYS
UNADILLA COMMUNITY FOOD BANK –
Unadilla Methodist Church, 11 a.m. to Noon.
TUESDAYS, WEDNESDAYS & THURSDAYS
PRESCHOOL STORIES AND CRAFTS – Tues. & Thurs.
9:30-10:15 a.m.; Wed. 1-1:45 p.m., Sidney Memorial Public
Library
WEDNESDAYS & THURSDAYS
SIDNEY HISTORICAL ROOM – Civic Center, Room 218;
open Wed. 4-6 p.m., Thurs. 9-11:30 a.m. or by appointment,
call Jolene 563-1425.
BY APPOI NTMENT
AFTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM – Open by
appointment only. Contact Charles Decker 639-2720.
COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD
14 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
BUY IT • SELL IT • FIND IT
CLASSIFIEDS
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
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this newspaper is subject to
the Fair Housing Act which
makes it illegal to advertise
“any preference limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status, or
national origin, or an
intention to make any such
preference.” Familial status
includes children under the
age of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians, pregnant
women, and people securing
custody of children under the
age of 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper
are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimination
call HUD toll-free at 1-800-
669-9777. The toll-free
telephone number for the
hearing impaired is 1-800-
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5¢ for each word over 20 words
Fill out and mail this coupon with your payment to the
Classified Department, PO Box 208, Sidney, NY 13838, or
call us at 561-3526 to place an ad. All ads must be in our
hands by Monday at 5 p.m. for Thursday’s paper.
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THE COUNTRY MOTEL
- Rt. 7, Sidney, offers clean
and comfortable extended stay
rooms at reasonable rates. All
rooms have microwaves and
refrigerators. Sorry no pets. Call
563-1035. 10-15tfc

VINYL REPLACEMENT
WINDOWS - Are you tired of
those old windows? Think you
can’t afford new windows? Call
Madison Vinyl for a Free Es-
timate on Vinyl Replacement
Windows or Siding and we’ll
make your day! 607-967-4323.
25wtfc

WANTED TO BUY
HURLBURT COIN AND
PAPER - Buying old U.S. gold,
silver and copper coins, paper
currency. Also buying antique
fishing lures, gold & silver
pocket watches. Cash offers.
Appraisals. Ken - 607-693-
4818. 12-4wtfc

FOR SALE
VEHICLES FOR SALE
GA. CAR - 2003 Grand Am,
black, never driven in snow,
motor/trans. very strong, 3.4L,
129k, new cat. and exhaust
system, new tires, brakes, rotor
and fuel pump. All new eng.
emission parts, 30 m.p.g., fully
loaded, asking $4,300 o.b.o.
Call (770) 861-3224 or (404)
317-9348. 12-16tfnc
DEER PARK APTS.
SIDNEY CIRCLE DRIVE
xSpacious 3 & 4 Bedroom
Apartments
x Walking Distance to School
x Wall to Wall Carpeting
x Carports
x Renovated Laundry Room
w/latest models w/d
563-1859 11-20WTFB
FOR RENT
GIRLS CLOTHES – 20
shirts- most girls’ large, some
women’s XS, 3 pairs sz. 0 jeans,
3 sweatshirts, 3 skirts,. Most
Old Navy, some Aeropastel.
$20 o.b.o. for all. Will sell sepa-
rately if interested. 639-3169.
1-6tfnc
We Print Almost
Everything!
•Letterhead •Business
Cards •Résumés


Newsletters •Forms
•Brochures •Programs


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And More!
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(607) 561-3515
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attn: LEGAL NOTICE by Monday at 5 p.m.
$25 DOWN PAYMENT
PLAN gets your $100 new piece
of furniture home that same day.
New, floor model, antique and
pre-owned all in one place. Just
in! New warrantied mattress sets
$199, double sided for twice the
life! Pete’s Furniture Barn, Rt. 7
Unadilla. Lowest prices around.
607-369 2458 or 607-434-0334.
www.petesfurniturebarn.com
3-30(8w)c

SERVICES OFFERED
561-3526
Puts you
in the
classifieds!
Send your classified ad by
Monday at 5 p.m. to
Tri-Town News, 5 Winkler
Road, Sidney, NY 13838 or
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LEGAL NOTICE
THE AFTON GLENWOOD
CEMETERY ASSOCIATION,
INC. will hold its annual meet-
ing at the home of Charles J.
Decker, Route 41, Afton, N.Y.
13730 on March 13, 2011 at
2:00 p.m.
Ellen Holdredge,
Secretary 3-10(2w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
STATE OF NEW YORK
SUPREME COURT:
COUNTY OF CHENANGO
RICHARD B. CORDES
4 Haynes Boulevard
Sidney, NY 13838
Petitioner
vs.
FRED W. ELDER, deceased
HEDWIG M. ELDER,
deceased
MARIE E. SEJERSEN, address
unknown
SHIRLEY E. MOIS, address
unknown
ELIZABETH E. PANICCA,
address unknown
Respondents
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
Index No. 2011X103
RJI No. 2011-0033-M
Notice is hereby given to the
above named Respondents, be-
lieved to be the heirs at law and
next of kin of Fred W. Elder and
Hedwig M. Elder that, upon the
Petition of Richard B. Cordes an
Order to Show Cause has been
granted requiring the above Re-
spondents to show cause before
the Supreme Court of the State
of New York County of Chenan-
go, at a Special Term thereof to
be held at the Chenango County
Courthouse in the City of Nor-
wich, State of New York on the
29th day of April, 2011, why an
Order should not be made by the
Court canceling and discharging
the Mortgage made by Richard
B. Cordes and Bernadine C.
Cordes to Fred W. Elder and
Hedwig M. Elder in the sum
of Fourteen Thousand Dollars
($14,000) dated February 24,
1979 and recorded February 26,
1979 in Liber 460 of Mortgages
at page 826; and directing the
Clerk in whose office the said
Mortgage has been recorded to
mark the same upon his records
as cancelled and discharged,
and further ordering and direct-
ing that the debts or obligations
secured by said Mortgage be
cancelled.
Signed at Norwich,
New York
February 14, 2011
Hon. Kevin M. Dowd
Justice of the Supreme Court
3-24(4w)c
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME STUDENT PO-
SITION Evenings and weekends
at the Sidney Library. Accepting
applications through March 16.
3-10(1w)c
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that: Pursuant to provisions of the
New York State Real Property Tax Law, Article 11, that a list will
be filed in the County Clerk’s Office of any unpaid taxes as of April
1, 2011. The Filing of that List will create a Notice of Pendency
against that parcel.
Name Address Amount
Aaron, Robert 3-5 Knapp St. 909.75
Air Tight Builders, LLC 2 DeForest Lane 806.43
American Country Realty 17 West Main St. 260.31
American Country Realty 17 West Main St. 1,894.63
Antonesco, Jennifer Cherry St. 164.75
Approbato, Peter F. 10 Orchard St. 787.22
Armstrong, Esther 107 River St. 411.88
Ashby, Jonathan 19 Pineview Ter. 1,078.11
Ballard, Raymond 9 Winegard St. 795.56
Ballard, Raymond 8 Oak Ave. 164.75
Bargher, Robert E. Jr. 89 West Main St. 1,491.05
Bonacci, Debbie 16 Pineview Ter. 692.43
Bonacci, Debbie L.. 64-66 Main St. 3,742.71
Branick, Joseph J. 267-269 Johnston Cr. 840.87
Branick, Joseph J. 266 Johnston Cr. 545.49
Branick, Joseph J. 208 Bird Ave. 612.52
Butler, Kevin L. 11 Knapp St. 736.64
Cajthaml, Christine A. 87 West Main St. 937.59
Cajthaml, Christine A. West Main St. 164.75
Copeland, William R. 16 Delaware Ave. 901.04
Costanzo, Michael 21 Division St. 3,212.63
Costanzo, Michael Clinton St. 260.31
County of Delaware 8 Bates Ter. 1,176.13
Cunningham, Iva C. 6 Pineview Ter. 1,072.52
D’Angelo, Michael A. 47 Cartwright Ave. 261.95
D’Angelo, Michael A. 43 Cartwright Ave. 1,161.72
Darling, Suzanne 7-9 Main St. 1,416.85
DeLay, David 18 Glen Ave. 1,368.42
Derrick, Virginia 3 DeWitt Drive 679.27
Dexheimer, Christine 3 Prospect Dr. 1,640.91
Doane, Charles W. 8 Ritton St. 870.21
DPA Equities of Fox St. 21,317.04
Duffy, William J. 32-34 Bridge St. 1,562.15
Duvall, Kevin 248 Bird Ave. 1,187.37
Ficarotta, Thomas 11 River St. 663.23
Fritzsch, Craig R. 53 Cartwright Ave. 1,164.64
Fritzsch, Diane P. 2 New St. 545.32
Gauthier, Daniel G. 154-156 Johnston Cr. 1,076.46
Haarway Improvement, LLC 18 Overlook Drive 1,040.33
Haynes, Heather A. 9 Maple Ave. 897.54
Hoag, Adelbert E. 55 Willow St. 413.18
J.D. Properties, LLC 24 Liberty St. 1,145.29
Jewell, Elizabeth J. 12 Willow St. 938.73
Jocius. Lisa M. 58 Pearl St. 1,271.63
Kabot, John R. Jr. 23 Willow St. 713.02
Lane, John W. Jr. 215-221 Bird Ave. 868.23
Light, Diane M. 5 Adams St. 1,093.13
Magro, Giuseppe 9-11 Smith St. 1,187.85
Magro, Giuseppe 57-63 Main St. 2,388.88
Mann, Peter G. 13 Lincoln Ave. 893.44
Melendez, May 29 Pearl St. 975.32
Mercurio, Michael A. 14 Ritton St. 1,206.28
Miketta, Michael G. 235 Johnston Circle 875.32
Nachshon, Sandra 43-45 Bridge St. 1,159.49
Nachshon, Sandra 5 Clinton St. 1,050.39
Nachshon, Sandra 19 Sherman Ave. 243.83
Nachshon, Sandra 17 Sherman Ave. 985.77
Northrop, Joan 2 Bennett St. 999.27
Orinski, Edward J. 10 Smith St. 1,225.74
Packard, Wendy A. 51 Pearl St. 865.42
Paden, Kenneth Sr. 5 Winkler Road 3,626.15
Platt, Thomas C. 18 East Main St. 1,542.94
Pope, John A. 38 River St. 581.22
Redouane, Katherine 71 Campmeeting St. 1,182.01
Richter, Carol 8 Webb Ave. 82.38
Richter, Carol 10 Webb Ave. 641.87
Rivers, Charles C. Jr. 74 Pearl St. 1,036.28
Robbins, Sharon M. 12 Division St. 1,705.37
Ruff, Robert L. 1 Bates Terrace 1,083.71
Sangvic, Eric 6 Delaware Ave. 855.37
Santana Emilio J. III 43 Pleasant St. 1,480.96
Savino, Benjamin A. 9 Keith St. 965.37
Seancony, L.P. 3 Mang Drive 5,097.37
Simonds, Tracy A. 1 Sunset Ave. 1,210.91
Smith, Steve Ian 222 Bird Ave. 164.75
Taormina, John 55-57 Pleasant St. 989.43
Taormina, John 8 Smith St. 1,007.56
Taormina, John 8 Adams St. 1,056.49
Thomson, Ann Marie 6 Secor St. 920.77
Ulmer, Donald L. 12 Camp St. 1,059.20
Vaughn, Patrick S. 22 Manatee Ave. 1,486.36
Ward, Mark 7A Sunset Ave. 1,981.60
Watson, Jonathan J. Sr. 17 Avery St. 4,169.28
White, Steven 91 River St. 1,408.27
Wilber, Robert E. 24 River St. 823.75
Wilber, Robert E. 24 River St. 245.48
Wilber, Robert E. 22 River St. 2,234.01
Wren, Timothy J. Sr. & 53 Pleasant St. 961.05
120,613.60
LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
that the Annual Financial Re-
port for the Town of Bainbridge
for fiscal year 2010 has been
completed and filed with the
Office of State Comptroller. A
copy of this report is available
for inspection during regular
office hours at the Bainbridge
Town Clerk’s Office, 15 North
Main Street, Bainbridge.
Dated March 2, 2011
Deborah Hromada,
Town Clerk 3-10(1w)c
LEGAL NOTICE
The Sidney Central School
District Audit Committee will
hold its next meeting on March
14, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. in the Dis-
trict Office Conference Room.
There is no open forum at this
meeting. 3-10(1w)c
Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011 — 15
REACH 12,000 READERS EACH WEEK!
Run the same business directory ad in The Tri-Town News and our sister publications Chenango American,
Oxford Review-Times and Whitney Point Reporter.
Business & Service Directory
SEWING MACHINES
If we can’t fix it, throw it away
Sewing
Machines
Eureka
Vacuum
Cleaners
EXCAVATING EXCAVATING
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Sept ics, Driveways, Fill, Gravel, Top Soil
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Call Lee Yager
at 607-656-7195
COUNSELING
Anxious, Frustrated, Depressed?
Without Peace Of Mind?
Norman R. Kanzer,
M.A., M.Ed.
Christ-Centered Christian Counselor
Serving individuals, couples, and families.
Consultations and Psychological Evaluations for
academic and behavioral problems
Located Near Downtown Sidney
Call For Appt.:
607- 316-6636
Reasonable Fees
BATTERIES NEW & USED
1364 St. Hwy. 7, Afton
Mon.-Fri. 8-4
607-639-1833
1-800-
CRANKIT
The Largest Selection of Batteries in the Area
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC Used Batteries starting at $30.00
Special Orders upon Request
LEAD BATTERY
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CENTER
TROPHIES
D & D Trophies
140 Main St., Afton
Trophies, Plaques,
Medals, Ribbons,
Specialty Gifts
Call/Fax 639-2828
SATELLITE SYSTEMS
PECK ENTERPRISES
229 Main St., Unadilla
(between Brown’s Pharmacy & Village Variety)
607-369-5700 or
Toll Free 1-877-661-1093
FLORIST
Serving all the
Tri-Town Area and
Funeral Homes
967-7111
The Village Florist
5 East Main St., Bainbridge
Mon.-Fri. 9-5; Sat. 9-1
AC & APPLIANCES
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F
R
E
E
E
le
c
tro
n
ic
Ta
x

F
ilin
g
O
ver 65 Years of C
om
bined
Experience
Enjoy Spaghetti
Dinner March 26
At Senior Center

HARPURSVILLE – How
does a nice hot spaghetti and
meatball dinner on a chilly
March afternoon sound? Our
“chefs” are some of the best,
so come on over to the East-
ern Broome Senior Center in
Harpursville on Saturday, March
26 between 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.
for a delicious home-made
meal. Our sauce will include
meatballs and Italian sausage.
Your dinner will be complete
with the entrée, a tossed salad,
Italian bread, beverages and a
home-made dessert.
The proceeds will benefit the
seniors at the center and in the
community through activities,
entertainment and outreach ef-
forts. For your convenience,
we will be offering take-outs,
or you may enjoy visiting with
your friends and family in the
community as you share a meal
together or in our dining room.
Relax and enjoy the music
from the Bluestone Creek Ram-
blers. What a great way to spend
an afternoon. We hope you will
take this opportunity to “tour”
your local senior center and
see what this wonderful facility
has to offer. If you would like
further information, please call
693-2069.
VIP PAYROLL AND
TAX SERVICES
Bookkeeping, Fax and Copy Service Also Available
• FAST AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE •
1 North Main St., Bainbridge
607-967-5627 • Fax: 607-967-3863
Qualified To Handle All Your
Personal and Business Needs
Individual • Corporation • Partnership • E-File
M-F 9-5,
Sat. 9-Noon
Are Your Social Security Benefits
Taxable? IRS Tax Tips 2011-26
The Social Security benefits you received in 2010 may be taxable. You should receive a Form SSA1099
which will show the total amount of your benefits. The information provided on this statement along with
the following seven facts from the IRS will help you determine whether or not your benefits are taxable.
1. How much – if any – of your Social Security benefits are taxable depends on your total income and
marital status.
2. Generally, if Social Security benefits were your only income for 2010, your benefits are not taxable
and you probably do not need to file a federal income tax return.
3. If you received income from other sources, your benefits will not be taxed unless your modified
adjusted gross income is more than the base amount for your filing status.
4. Your taxable benefits and modified adjusted gross income are figured on a worksheet in the Form
1040A or Form 1040 Instruction booklet.
5. You can do the following quick computation to determine whether some of your benefits may be
taxable: First, add one-half of the total Social Security benefits you received to all your other income,
including any tax exempt interest and other exclusions from income. Then, compare this total to the base
amount for your filing status. If the total is more than your base amount, some of your benefits may be
taxable.
6. The 2010 base amounts are: $32,000 for married couples filing jointly. $25,000 for single, head of
household, qualifying widow/widower with a dependent child, or married individuals filing separately
who did not live with their spouses at any time during the year. $0 for married persons filing separately
who lived together during the year.
7. For additional information on the taxability of Social Security benefits, see IRS Publication 915,
Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits. Publication 915 is available at http://www.
irs.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).
Otego Man Arrested for DWI
OTSEGO – On March 2,
Trooper William Franz Jr., SP
Oneonta arrested Calvin L.
Whitaker Sr., 40, of Otego, for
driving while intoxicated with
a BAC result of .15%. The ar-
rest resulted from a motor ve-
hicle accident on State Route 7
in Otego. Whitaker was issued
tickets returnable to the Town of
Otego Court on March 10.
POLICE BLOTTER
16 — Tri-Town News — Thursday, March 10, 2011
ON THE
ROAD AGAIN
BY NANCY SUE BURNS
The Blue Ridge Parkway Offers a Scenic Adventure
In last week’s column we
left you leaving Luray, Va. and
heading for the Blue Ridge Park-
way. We welcome you along as
we continue our adventure.
We first take Rt. 211 and then
340 to where we will pick up the
Blue Ridge Parkway, which is ac-
cessible from a number of points
on the major highway. We see
many large barns and open fields
along these pretty country roads.
Always the mountains are in the
background with their rounded
tops and just a bit of color.
Up ahead are two large build-
ings and a sign that reads Page
Valley Flea Market. While I
generally hate shopping, some-
times it’s fun to poke through
boxes and tables of miscella-
neous – yes, junk – to see what
one might turn up. I collect
snowmen and I find several for
50 cents each.
An older lady pushing a gro-
cery cart full of her “treasures”
comes by, commenting on my
finds. “Ed has some real valu-
able stuff here,” she assures me.
“You just have to hunt for ‘em,”
Ray says I have hunted long
enough and it’s time to get back
on the road.
Now we see wide valleys,
bounded by the beautiful moun-
tains. Partway up the mountains
we can spot a number of cabins.
We pass over the Shenandoah
River, the same river portrayed
in a familiar old song.
While the surrounding land
appears devoid of bright colors
there is something attractive
about the rich brown soil. There
seems to be an abundance of
lovely little rural churches along
this road, some built with old-
fashioned steeples, and others
with a solid look that says they
have successfully withstood
time. Fields of dried corn stalks
sit side by side the green fields
that have obviously had the ben-
efit of irrigation. The banks of
mountains in the distance ap-
pear to be layered, one on top of
another.
We arrive at Waynesboro
where we can get on the Blue
Ridge Parkway. The parkway
travels along the world’s oldest
mountain range, so says the liter-
ature. It passes through the many
coves and forests that make up
Southern Appalachia. Called
America’s favorite drive, the 469
miles goes from the Shenandoah
National Park in the north, south
to the Great Smoky Mt. National
Park. Authorization to build the
parkway came in the 1930s as a
Depression public works proj-
ect. It was the nation’s first and
longest rural parkway.
We are following the guide-
post markers, which provide
information on the sights and
some historical background.
Stopping at Humpback Rocks,
we are looking at the Shenando-
ah Valley to the west and Rock-
fish Valley to the east. We have
quite a view of the Appalachian
hardwood forests. This area was
once cleared for agriculture,
trade routes, timber harvesting
and subsistence living. Looking
at what now appears to be a vast
wilderness that would not be
very accessible to man; it gives
one an insight into the difficul-
ties that faced those who opened
up this area.
Information along the way
points out that this outcropping
was once a landmark that guided
wagon trains over the Howards-
ville Turnpike in the 1840s. It
was a major route across the
narrow ridge until the railroad
came. The railroad is credited
with really opening up this area.
Adjacent to the visitor’s cen-
ter is a farm museum. While the
buildings that were once here are
gone, the single room cabin and
outbuildings represent those in
the early days. A waning garden
still looks healthy, even in the
fall season, and we see tobacco
hanging to dry. Close your eyes,
imagine life here, and the hard
work necessary just to keep your
family fed and a roof over their
heads.
Several gentlemen are on
hand demonstrating use of the
farming implements. “See this
knife,” says one man, picking
up a knife off the wooden table.
“It had to be very sharp to do its
job. Even young boys knew had
to use it. ” And I’m thinking, you
had to be pretty skillful or you
could loose a finger.
We can’t help but notice the
blue color and haze that hangs
over the mountains. The man
playing the part of the farmer
says some of it is from the
mountain’s rich vegetation but
unfortunately today a lot of it is
from pollution in the eastern half
of the United States, Over 75 per
cent of the pollutants come from
coal fired power sources.
The beautiful Blue Ridge
Parkway is considered to be one
of the most ecologically diverse
areas in the world. There’s infor-
mation that says on the parkway
lands you can pick up to a gallon
of nuts, berries, fruit and mush-
rooms for your personal use.
All other natural features are
protected.
We see many motorcycles
on the road. It must make for a
beautiful and thrilling ride. We
often pull over to let them pass,
and we usually get a friendly
wave.
We stop at another rock area,
and read a sign that tells us in
the months of June and July, the
cliff we are looking at served
the White Rock community as a
timepiece. Twenty minutes after
sunlight strikes the rock’s face,
dark falls in the valley below.
In the higher areas, we can
see that fall has arrived. Yellow
is prominent and there is some
rust, but little red.
At Yankee Horse Ridge we
see evidence of an old logging
railroad. Early in the 20
th
cen-
tury a lumber company built a
narrow gage railroad into the
mountains. Fifty miles long, the
railroad moved more than 100
million board feet of logs to the
mill.
Mountains now at a lower el-
evation resemble green-carpeted
steps. The roads, however, have
a carpet of dried rust colored
leaves that crunch as we walk.
We pass through Bluff Mt.
tunnel and down the road stop
at the visitor’s center on the
James River. The sign tells us
that the river flows from the
mountains through Lynchburg
and Richmond to the coast. It
is Virginia’s longest river and
is considered the state’s most
important corridor. Before the
Civil War, investors built a canal
from Richmond to Buchanan.
River transportation was consid-
ered very reliable. Tow barges
and packet boats carried wheat,
pig iron and dry goods. Regular
runs were made up and down
the James River until expansion
of the railroad made the canal
obsolete. We take a walk down
under the bridge that spans the
river to get a look at the restored
locks.
We have traveled only 60
miles on the parkway, but it is
late in the afternoon and soon
will be dark. We must find our
way back to a “speedier” high-
way. We exit onto Rt. 501, which
turns out to be a winding road.
We find ourselves twisting and
turning down off the mountain
on what a sign says is the Lee
Jackson Memorial Highway.
Tomorrow we will be on our
way to Tennessee, but we are
glad we took the time to explore
this area along the way. There
are so many adventures out
there. You never know what’s
around the next corner!
www.uhs.net
Free Seminar
Weight Loss Surgery
Dr. Christian D. Tvetenstrand
Southern Tier Surgical Clinic
Surgery performed at
UHS Wilson Medical Center
If you have been, or are currently concerned about
your excess weight, find out if Bariatric Surgery is
right for you.
Learn some important facts that
could save your life!
We’re right in your neighborhood!
Come to our FREE Seminar to learn more:
Date: Wednesday, March 16, 2011
Time: 6pm–8pm
Location: UHS Wilson Medical Center
Johnson City, NY
Building: Picciano Building, 4th Floor
Room 5B & 5C (enter through
40 Arch Street entrance)
Space is limited, so reserve your seat by calling
(607) 763-8205 or register online at www.uhs.net
(look for Bariatric Seminar).
Guns & Fi shi ng
Location: Lambrecht Auction Facility, 2698 County Highway 47, Walton, NY.
Monday, Mar ch 14, 2011 @6 pm
Guns: Winchester Models: Many Mo. 94 & 94AE 30-30s ~ Mo. 1200 mag 12 ga ~
Mo. 12 16 ga ~ Mo. 50 12 ga ~ Mo. 74 .22 ~ Mo. 1911 S.L. 12 ga Marlin Models:
Mo. 1893 30-30, octagon barrel ~ Many Mo. 336 30-30s ~ Mo. 55 “goose gun” 12
ga ~ Mo. 55 12 ga ~ Mo. 80 .22 ~ Mo. 200 12 ga Remington Models: Mo. 700
bdl 30-06 (NIB) ~ Mo. 740 30-06 semi ~ Mo. 870 mag 12 ga ~ Mo. 31 20 ga ~ Mo.
572 .22 pump ~ Mo. 12 .22 ~ Mo. 11 12 ga ~ Mo. 6 .22 Browning Models: Mo.
A-5 “Buck Special” 12 ga semi Savage Models: Mo. 93R17 .17HMR, scope, ss
barrel (nice) ~ Mo. 24 .22/410 over under ~ 94B 12 ga ~ Mo. 720 semi 12 ga ~
Mo. 340 30-30 Ithaca Models: Mo. 870 20 ga, rifle sights ~ Mo. 37 12 ga Other
Models: Mossberg Mo. 146B .22 ~ Rossi 410/.22 ~ Enfield 1871 Mark III .577 cal
~ Glenfied Mo. 30 30-30 ~ New England Tracker II 12 ga ~ Traditions .50, fluted ss
barrel ~ New England Sidekick .50, scope ~ Hopkins & Allen “Forehand” 12 ga ~
Ranger SxS 12 ga ~ German Rifle Mo. 1888 8mm ~ CVA Mo. 720 12 ga ~ Stevens
Mo. 820E 12 ga We will start the Auction with the guns. Make sure you are
not late, or you will miss them! All gun buyers (except FFL Dealers) will be
required to pass NICS check.
Fishing: Fantastic selection of top quality fishing equipment from ultra light to
heavy. Rods, reels, lure, clothing, and many other fishing related items. Manufac-
turers like: Shakespeare ~ Berkeley ~ Okuma ~ South Bend ~ Zebco ~ Eagle Claw
~ Abu Garcia ~ Mitchell ~ Johnson ~ Shimano ~ and More!
Tools: A large assortment of brand new guaranteed tools! DeWalt ~ Bosch ~ Skil
~ Bostitch ~ Delta ~ Milwaukee. Air compressors ~ Air Nailers ~ Miter Saws ~ and
many more construction and hand tools!
General Merchandise: Electronics ~ Seasonal Goods ~ Household items ~ Sports-
wear ~ laptop computers ~ a variety of closeout merchandise ~ Expect surprises!!
Note: This Auction will have something for everyone from professional to amateur.
There is always a large selection of fishing equipment
Preview: 3 pm Auction Day
Terms: Cash or Good checks, VISA, M/C, Amex, Dis-
cover. 13% Buyers Premium, 3% discount for check or
cash.
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A FARM MUSEUM on the Blue Ridge Parkway pro-
vides a realistic look at the past. The single room cabin
(above) is typical of those that once housed farm fami-
lies. People versed in the area’s history (below) are on
hand to talk with visitors

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