You are on page 1of 33

World Water Council

Conseil mondial de l’eau


Consejo mundial del agua
In the 20th century the world population tripled
–while water use multiplied six-fold!
3000

Assessment
2500
Cons um ption, k m 3 /ye ar

2000 Agriculture
Forecast Industry
1500
Municipal
needs
Reservoir
1000

500

0
1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 2020 2040

Water Consumption - after Shiklomanov 2000


Water scarcity
Business as usual scenario, 2025

Limited investments in new water infrastructure reduce irrigation


expansion and prevent water scarcity– but food scarcity is the result.

Physical water Economic water Production scarcity No water scarcity Not analysed
scarcity scarcity
Water scarcity
Technology, economics, and private sector scenario,
2025
Emphasis on technology and investments increases primary water
supply by 24%. China and India are water short due to irrigation
expansion. Many countries face economic water scarcity.

Physical water Economic water Production scarcity No water scarcity Not analysed
scarcity scarcity
Water scarcity
Values and lifestyles scenario, 2025

Development focuses on low-income countries that face economic


water scarcity. Water and food scarcity is limited.

Physical water Economic water Production scarcity No water scarcity Not analysed
scarcity scarcity
…a highly consultative process…...

….ten thousand people participated in


over one hundred Vision meetings in
January - August 1999….

….many
comment on
Vision messages….
KWWSZDWHUYLVLRQRUJ
The Vision Projected coverage for
sanitation and drinking water

Popu latio n in billio ns


8
7
6
5
4

In 2025 almost every woman and 3


2
man, girl and boy in the world’s
1
cities, towns, and villages knows 0
1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030
the importance of hygiene and Year
enjoys safe and adequate water Deve loping co untr y population
Wate r supply - served
and sanitation. Sani tation - served
Wate r supply - unserved
Sani tation - un served
Agriculture produces enough food so
that no one need go hungry….
With people everywhere living in
clean and healthy environments,
communities and governments benefit
from stronger economic development
and better health.
At local levels the empowerment of
women, traditional ethnic groups, and
poor and marginalised women and
men has started to make local
communities and weak nations
stronger, more peaceful, and more
capable of responding to social and
environmental needs.
How did the world make so much progress in 25
years? Five adjustments were crucial:

• The water crisis became widely recognized.


How did the world make so much progress in 25 years?
Five adjustments were crucial:

• The water crisis became widely recognized.


• Land and water resource management became
• Land and water resource managem ent became integrated—
with full stakeholder representation.
integrated—
• Water services became subject to full-cost pricing.
with full stakeholder representation.
• Innovation and public funding for research increased.

• And cooperation in international basins grew.

• Water services became subject to full-cost pricing.

• Innovation and public funding for research increased.

• And cooperation in international basins grew.


•Pilot Environmental Sustainability Index

•World Water Development Report


Pilot Environmental Sustainability
Index

(Global Leaders for To-morrow


Environment Task Force - Davos - 2000)
Components

• Environmental Systems
• Environmental Stresses and Risks
• Human Vulnerability to Environmental Impacts
• Social and Institutional Capacity
• Global Stewardship
Environmental Systems

An economy is environmentally sustainable to


the extent that its vital environmental systems
are maintained at healthy levels, and to the
extent to which levels are improving rather than
deteriorating.
Environmental Stresses and Risks

An economy is environmentally sustainable if


the levels of anthropogenic stress are low
enough to engender no demonstrable harm to
environmental systems.
Human Vulnerability to Environmental
Impacts

An economy is environmentally sustainable to


the extent that people and social systems are not
vulnerable (in the way of health impacts,
economic losses, etc.) to environmental
disturbances; becoming less vulnerable is a sign
that an economy is on the track to greater
sustainability.
Social and Institutional Capacity

An economy is environmentally sustainable to


the extent that it has in place political
institutions and underlying social patterns of
skills, attitudes and networks that foster
effective responses to environmental
challenges.
Global Stewardship

An economy is environmentally sustainable if it


cooperates with other countries to manage
common environmental problems, and if it
reduces negative environmental impacts on
other countries to levels that cause no serious
harm.
Indicators used to report on a transition toward
sustainability are likely to be biased, incorrect,
inadequate, and indispensable. Getting the
indicators right is likely to be impossible in the
short term. But not trying to get the indicators
right will surely compound the difficulty of
enabling people to navigate through the
transition to sustainability.

(National Research Council (NRC), Our Common Journey: A


transition toward sustainability. Washington: National
Academy Press. 1999
World Water Development
Report: Methodological Framework

Assessing The State of The


World’s Freshwater
WWDR Contents

• Volume 1 : The State of the World’s Freshwater


Resources and their Use

• Volume 2 : Methodologies

• Volume 3 : Case Studies


WWDR Components

Ability to cope with


water-related stress

Methodology

Water uses, needs, Water availability


and demands
Methodological Elements

• Develop appropriate indices / indicators

• Data collation, data


analysis and processing

• Evaluation using indices / indicators


at appropriate scales
Putting The Elements Together

Data Analyzed/
Processed

Evaluation Using Developed


Indices / Indicators

Local Global
Scale Scale
Data: Sources and Systems

• UN Databases

• National Agency Databases

• Data from Research Institutions


and Universities, and Commercial Sources

• Integration of Analysis Tools with Database


Management Systems
Indices and Indicators: Local/Global
Index to measure human and ecological dimensions
in relation to water
Ecosystems Hydrology

Infrastructure Water Quality

Socio-economic
Evaluation: Local/Global Scales
• Global scale hydrologic models - water availability at global and at local
scales (regional, national, river basin, or appropriate hydrologic or
hydrogeological unit)

• Local scale models to compute water availability,


water requirements, use, and demands

• Models to address specific issues - water and


security in terms of food, health and the environment

• Coupling and comparison of models


We are all stakeholders when it
comes to water. If each of us
assumes the responsibility to act, we
will start a movement to bring
about our Vision
Rio plus Ten . . .

“ None of this will happen


without public awareness
and mobilisation campaigns,
to bring home to people the
extent and the causes of the
current and impending
water crisis” (Kofi A. Annan)