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2010

Annual Report
A Community With a
Passion for Learning
As the second largest school system in Georgia,
the Cobb County School District is responsible for
educating more than 106,000 students in a diverse,
constantly changing suburban environment.
Our mission is to provide an academically rigorous,
caring and safe educational environment in partnership
with families, students and the community.
Our vision is a community with a passion for learning.

Fred Sanderson
Superintendent

Schools
Total Number of School Facilities......... 114
Elementary Schools............................... 69
The Cobb County District
Middle Schools....................................... 25 earned five-year re-accred-
High Schools........................................... 16 itation from the Southern Association of Colleges
Special Education Centers................... 2 and Schools (SACS) in November 2009, following
Adult Education Center....................... 1 a comprehensive evaluation.
Performance Learning Center............ 1

Table of Contents
1 A Community With a Passion For Learning 7 Operations
2 Board of Education 8 Communications
3 Students 9-10 Budget & Finance
4 Human Resources 11-12 SPLOST
5-6 Student Learning & Performance 13 Schools & Principals

1
Lynnda Eagle
Post 1
2010 Chair
Board of Education
The job of the Cobb County Board of Education is to represent the citizens and
taxpayers of Cobb County in determining and demanding appropriate organiza-
tional performance. The strength of the District’s strategic plan is rooted in the
academic priorities of the Board of Education:
Holli Cash
Post 2 Student Achievement
2010 Vice Chair • Measurable gains/growth as measured by national and state test scores
• Quality teaching and leadership
• Keep track of students through system
Stakeholder Involvement
• Utilize community in decision making
• Utilize resources and create sustainable partnerships
David Morgan
• Board member responsibility to communicate with community
Post 3
and local/state officials
Accountability
• Annual performance assessment of Superintendent/
Service Providers/Board to include an independent evaluation
• Follow board policy
• Responsible fiscal stewardship to include SPLOST management
Dr .John Abraham
Post 4
Strategic Plan
The improved performance of all students
and district alignment to support that
performance is guided by a strategic plan
that provides overall direction to the
David Banks school district and serves as the
Post 5
foundation for monitoring student
success and district accountability.

Dr. John Crooks


Post 6

New Board members elected in November 2011


Alison Bartlett
Post 7

Tim Stultz Kathleen Angelucci Scott Sweeney


Post 2 Post 4 Post 6 2
Students

Students 2009-10 End-of-Year Data


Enrollment as of October, 2010............ 107,315 End of the 2009-10 school year enrollment
• Second largest school system in Georgia Total student population (K-12).............................. 106,997
• 26th largest in United States Special education students....................................... 11,348
Gifted education students........................................ 13,072
Ethnic Breakdown of Students
White............................................................. 44.5% 2010 Graduates Who Received:
Black............................................................... 31.2% College Preparatory Diploma.................................. 4,793
Hispanic........................................................ 16.5% Technology/Career Diploma................................... 749
Asian.............................................................. 4.8% College Prep AND Tech/Career............................. 1,440
Multi-Racial.................................................. 2.7% Special Education Diploma...................................... 83
American Indian......................................... <1% Certificate of Attendance.......................................... 221
Total Graduates................................................... 7,253

Graduation Rate Percentage of Students Qualifying


Year Overall SWD ELL Econ. Disadv. For Free or Reduced Lunch Transiency Rate
2010 87.3 60.7 68.7 91.9 2009-10 43% 2009-10 24.2
2009 86.1 60.9 56.2 90.8 2008-09 41% 2008-09 22.7
2008 84.2 60.2 54.3 86.6 2007-08 35% 2007-08 25.7
2007 81.3 55.6 46.9 82.8 2006-07 34% 2006-07 26.5
2006 81.5 83.3 49.2 85.8 2005-06 34% 2005-06 29.7
SWD = Students With Disabilities ELL = English Language Learners

Ten-Year Enrollment History


Ethnicity
School Year Total
White Black Hispanic Asian Multi-Racial Am. Indian
2009-10 106,630 48,492 33,084 16,888 5,121 2,702 300
2008-09 105,956 48,949 32,377 15,302 4,940 4,180 208
2007-08 106,425 49,786 31,574 15,350 4,747 4,742 226
2006-07 106,997 51,447 31,564 14,889 4,472 4,378 217
2005-06 105,885 52,936 31,030 13,422 4,290 3,975 232
2004-05 103,447 54,260 29,386 12,032 3,994 3,537 238
2003-04 101,269 55,834 27,612 10,564 3,882 3,163 214
2002-03 100,119 57,831 26,136 9,230 3,801 2,865 256
2001-02 97,645 59,055 24,312 7,963 3,573 2,517 225
3 2000-01 95,911 60,694 22,610 6,882 3,297 2,221 207
Data source: Georgia Department of Education Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Data, spring semester FTE counts
Human Resources
With more than 14,000 employees, the School District is the Cobb County’s Largest Employer
largest employer in the county. The Human Resources division Number of Staff
is responsible for the recruitment, employment, retention and Certified........................................................ 8,568
support of Cobb’s teachers, administrators and support staff. Classified....................................................... 5,459
Having a Highly Performing Workforce is a major component of System Total.......................................... 14,027
the District’s Strategic Plan. 5,925 Classroom Teachers
1,540 Special Education Teachers
The struggling state and local economy continued to impact the
263 School Counselors
District throughout 2010, as declining revenue caused a $126.7 37 School Social Workers
million budget shortfall for the 2010-2011 school year. With 47 School Psychologists
nearly 90 percent of the budget committed to salaries for teachers 126 Media Specialists
and other staff, the Board approved increasing class sizes and a 1,333 Paraprofessionals
Reduction in Force (RIF) among the measures taken to address 126 School Nurses
352 School administrators
the budget gap. Five furlough days were implemented for all Dis-
1,101 Bus Drivers, Transportation
trict staff and salary step increases were frozen for half the year. 711 Maintenance, Operations
Following the Board’s approval of the Fiscal Year 2011 budget 1,047 Cafeteria, Food Service
in June 2010, a high attrition rate allowed the District to re-hire a 1,375 School Support, Other Staff
number of employees that lost positions due to the RIF. 44 Public Safety Staff

Percentage of faculty with advanced degrees............. 61%


Average years of faculty experience.............................. 11.6

2010 district teacher of the year


C hristopher James
osborne high school
Each year, the Cobb County School District recognizes its top educators with its
Teacher of the Year honors. Kathy O’Hara-Rosa of Clarkdale Elementary, Lisa Tatum of
Lost Mountain Middle and Christopher James of Osborne High School were named 2010
Teachers of the Year. Mr. James was chosen for the district-wide honor in August 2010.

“In my eyes, my greatest achievement is


helping students to succeed in school.”
Less than a decade ago, Christopher James left a career in the private sector and
found his true passion helping students achieve their own goals. James joined the staff at
SIATech Charter High School, an accelerated dropout recovery program supporting at-risk
students. “It was during my tenure at SIATech that I began to understand why education and
the need for good teachers were important,” said James.
Mr. James joined Osborne in 2006 as a special education teacher, where he co-developed
a successful study skills program to assist students with academic achievement, credit re-
covery, behavior and social skills. An Eagle Scout and graduate of Mississippi Valley State
University, Christopher James is also active in his church and with BOSS United, a charity 4
assisting in rehabilitation of young men and their families.
Student Learning & Performance
Through collaborative and continuous improvement efforts, the Cobb County School District has a long history of high stu-
dent performance. Annual testing and ongoing assessment results are used by the District to ensure that all students are learning
the required curriculum and are nationally competitive. Complete test scores and additional information on the District’s testing
program are available on the District Web site.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)


The Cobb County School District continues to adjust its instructional
programs to ensure it can meet the strict standards established by the
Federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2002. The law requires individual
schools, and the District as a whole, to meet specific measures of progress on standardized tests each year. In addition, individual
groups of students, as defined by ethnicity, language and disability, must also meet these measures.

At the elementary level, 99 percent of schools (67 of 68) met standards for adequate progress. Eighty-eight (88) percent of Cobb
middle schools (22 of 25), and 11 of 16 high schools made AYP in 2010. Cooper, Griffin, Smitha and Tapp middle schools and
Campbell High school were removed from ‘Needs Improvement’ status by making AYP for two consecutive years.

Percentage of Number of schools Number of schools in


schools making AYP: not making AYP: Needs Improvement status:
2010 - 91% (99 out of 110) 2010 - 9 2010 - 3
2009 - 95% (108 out of 114) 2009 - 6 2009 - 10
2008 - 86% (95 out of 111) 2008 - 16 2008 - 10

The state Dept. of Education will show a different total for 2010 AYP schools in Cobb County because the state requires four schools not under CCSD management to
be included with the District’s AYP results. Two schools, the Devereux Center and the IIA of Mableton, did not make AYP. Two other schools, Kennesaw Charter and
IIA of Smyrna, did make AYP. Also included in the state’s totals is Oakwood High School, which did not make AYP and was restructured for 2010-2011.

Criterion Reference Competency Test (CRCT)


CRCT District scores for the CRCT, administered in the
100 Mathematics - Comparison of Students spring of 2010, show that most Cobb students are learn-
Meeting or Exceeding Standards ing the curriculum and meeting required standards. Cobb
students surpassed state mean scores in every academic
90 area tested, and the percentage of Cobb students meet-
90 88 88 88
86 86 ing or exceeding standards was equal to or higher than the
85
82 83 state at every grade level. Students in grades 1 – 8 were
82
81
80 tested in the areas of Reading, English/Language Arts, and
80 79
77 Mathematics, while students in grades 3 – 8 also were test-
75
74 ed in Science and Social Studies.
The CRCT measures students in three performance cat-
70 egories that show the percentage of students “Not Meet-
ing” the standards, those “Meeting” the standards, and
those “Exceeding” the standards. These indicators show
60 the progress that the system and individual schools are
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
5 Grade Level
making in identifying where to target critical instruction
and academic interventions.
Cobb Georgia
ACT
Cobb high school students posted their sixth consecu-
tive composite-score increase on the 2010 ACT. The 2010
24
ACT
seniors posted an average composite score of 22.2 (out of Composite Scores (2006-2010)
a possible 36), slightly higher than last year’s score of 22.1. 23
The composite average was 1.5 points higher than the state

Avg. Composite Score


22.1 22.2
average (20.7), and 1.2 points higher than the national av- 22.0 Cobb
21.9
erage (21.0). Cobb students also broadened their lead over 22
21.5
the national average, which dropped a tenth of a point. 21.2
21.1 21.1 21.1 21.0 Naonal
Across the subject areas tested, Cobb students topped the
21 20.7
national averages in English (+1.3), Math (+1.3), Reading 20.6 20.6
20.3 Georgia
(+1.1), and Science Reasoning (+0.9). By topping state and 20.2
national averages in all four subject areas, Cobb gradu- 20
ates indicated they are well prepared for college or career 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
choices.

Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT)


GHSGT
Cobb County 11th graders continued to outperform Regular Program, Grade 11 - 1st Time Test Takers - 2010
their peers on each content area of the statewide Georgia Percentage meeting passing standard
High School Graduation Test (GHSGT). Scores dipped 100
in Math and Social Studies, improved in Science, and re-
mained unchanged in English-Language Arts. 95 94% 94%
92%
Cobb’s mean scale score of 246 in English-Language Arts 90% 91% 90%
is eight points higher than the state average of 238, and 90
five points higher than the metro Atlanta system average 84%
85
of 241. Scale scores dropped slightly in Math (from 542 to
540), but remain six points above the state (534) and four
points higher than scores for metro Atlanta systems (536).
80 78%
Science and Social Studies scores also topped both state 75
scores and those of the metro peer group. English/ Social
Math Science
Lang. Arts Studies
Cobb Georgia

SAT
Cobb County’s senior class of 2010 continued to out-

1600 SAT perform their state and national peers on the SAT test for
college readiness, despite a decrease of 11 points in the av-
2006-2010 erage score. 2010’s graduating class had an overall average
1550 score of 1522 (Reading, Math, Writing), besting the state
1538 1534 1534
1523 1522 Cobb average by 80 points and the national average by 25 points.
1506 Cobb students’ scores decreased marginally in each
SAT Avg. Total Score

1495 1495 1493 1497


1500 Naonal of the three academic areas of the test - four points in
1468 Reading, two points in Math and five points in Writing.
1458 1453 The overall state scores reflected similar decreases in all
1450
1450 1442 Georgia three areas. National SAT scores in Math improved by one
point, held steady in Reading and decreased by one point

1400
in Writing, but the SAT average of Cobb students still sur- 6
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 passed the national average by 25 points.
Operations
Transportation
Transportation Services provides safe, reliable transportation for 75 percent of the
District’s students (78,000) to and from school on a daily basis. Cobb has established
a high standard for safety, meeting and exceeding all federal, state and local guid-
lines for transporting students. In 2010, Transportation implemented its Telematics
Information Management System for the District’s fleet of school buses and service
vehicles. The system includes on-board GPS, which helps the division improve
routing efficiency and instantly track the precise locations of Cobb’s 900+ buses.
In 2011, Transportation will also launch an upgraded payroll system integrated with
the telematics framework.
The District transports more than 78,000
students to and from schools each day.
Transportation Services continued to expand the Safe Rider program, a student
behavior management program designed to promote safety and accountability for
unsafe behavior. All Cobb middle schools have implemented the program, as well as 40 elementary schools and two high schools.
Safe Rider has resulted in a 75 percent reduction in bus-related discipline referrals for schools where the program is in place.
Transportation services expects to continue rollout of Safe Rider into more schools in 2011, as part of the District’s Strategic Plan.

Food Services
The Food and Nutrition Services department operates 109 cafeterias (plus two satellite facilities) that provide meals meeting state
and Federal requirements. More than 101,553 lunches, 16,826 breakfasts, and 2,305 after school snacks are served to students
daily, with more than 15 million total meals served during the 2009-10 school year.

Food and Nutrition Services received a Best Practices award in 2010 for its healthy vending pilot program. Pairs of vending
machines were installed at Wheeler and Campbell high schools to gauge student interest in quick, healthy options for lunch and
snacks. Stocked with sub sandwiches, salads, fruit and juices, the machines are designed to accommodate students’ on-the-go
schedules and offer alternatives to the usual fare. With the inital success of the healthy vending program, Food & Nutrition Ser-
vices has expanded into a total of seven schools, with 10 machines serving students.

Technology
Throughout 2010, the District continued to implement a number of important
technology improvements and infrastructure upgrades. The new Cobb Student
Information System (CSIS) was custom-programmed to best handle the
District’s student data and reporting needs. Genesis course scheduling soft-
ware was rolled out for high schools to help make student scheduling more
efficient. The technology refreshment cycle for obsolete workstations, teacher
laptops, printers and copiers remains ongoing throughout the five years of
SPLOST III.

Students at Green Acres Elementary work on lessonsOn the horizon, the District is scheduled to roll out a new Human Resources
using a laptop computer lab.
management and payroll system and migrate its network platform from Novell
to Microsoft in 2011. Pending approval from the Board of Education, the Pinnacle grading system in place for high and middle
7 schools will also be implemented for elementary schools later in the year.
Building & Sustaining Relationships
With Effective Communication
Community Connections
The District’s relationship with the Cobb Chamber of Commerce has yielded a variety of programs supporting students and
teachers. The Partners in Education program pairs local businesses with schools in need of community support. In 2010, more
than 1,000 local businesses committed to partnerships with Cobb’s 114 schools through the Partners in Education program.
Here are just a few of the ways the community showed its support for public education in Cobb in 2010:
- The Chamber of Commerce continued its 22-year tradition of celebrating
educators during ‘Give Our Schools A Hand’ week. Teachers of the Year from
each Cobb County school were recognized at a community pep rally and Dis-
trict Teacher of the Year Christopher James handprints were unveiled on the
Teacher Walk of Fame at Marietta Square.
- Kennesaw State University student-athletes launched the Junior Owls Read-
ing Program in five Cobb elementary schools, encouraging and challenging
students to read.

Partner Wells Fargo showed its support for the Project 2400
- The Project 2400 SAT preparation program received a $20,000 grant from
SAT preparation program with a $20,000 grant. Wells Fargo bank. The grant will allow the District to continue offering the
course for students during their junior year of high school.
- Credit Union of Georgia, Spectrum K-12 and Cobb EMC sponsored the 2010-11 student folder, used to contain all of the
important materials sent home with every CCSD student during the first week of school.
Cobb schools also take pride in giving back to the community. Student groups from more than 20 schools pitched in for the ‘Great
American Cleanup,’ volunteering their weekend time for cleanup, recycling and beautification projects. The ‘Shop with A Hero’
program in place at many Cobb high schools pairs older students with students from nearby feeder schools to shop for families in
need during the holiday season. A number of schools have also started extracurricular service clubs and held school-wide days of
service, all focused on serving others.

Telling Our Story


Providing clear, concise and timely communication between students, parents, staff, and community is essential to the success of
Cobb County Schools. The District embraced the instant connectivity of social networking in 2010, using Facebook and Twitter to
deliver information and announcements directly to thousands of users. More than 30,000 subscribers opt to receive the District’s
regular e-mail communications, including monthly updates from the Board of Education and ‘good news’ briefs. The popular
CobbCast news blog continues to provide a platform for news and events from across the District’s 114 schools, including student
group achievements, awards and honors, community service and partnerships and employee features.

In June 2010, Superintendent Fred Sanderson announced his intention to retire following the completion of his contract in June
2011. The District conducted a public survey in September 2010, offering stakeholders the opportunity to gauge the District’s
strengths and weaknesses, identify possible goals for a new superintendent, and to specify leadership qualities most important
for a candidate to embody. The feedback from the survey was used in two focus groups to glean more insight into stakeholders’
ideal candidate. The Board of Education used the input from the survey and focus groups to develop job criteria and procured the
services of the Georgia School Boards Association (GSBA) to accept applications and present a set of qualified candidates to the
Board. The application window closed on Jan. 31, 2011 and the Board will hire Cobb’s next superintendent in spring of 2011. 8
Budget & Finance
2010 proved to be one of the most difficult economic years in the Sources of Revenue
history of the Cobb County School District. Continued state aus- Local Sources..................................................................$450,893,745
(Includes property taxes, real estate transfers,
terity cuts and a 10 percent decrease in local property tax collec-
alcoholic beverage taxes, misc. fees.)
tions for Fiscal Year 2010 required the District make more than State Sources...................................................................$355,737,499
$97 million Federal Sources...............................................................$12,749,103
in cuts after BUDGETED FY2011 REVENUE.......................... $819,390,347
the start of
the 2009-10
school year,
including a
2-percent pay
reduction for Local State
all employ- Sources Sources
In spring 2010, the District held public information sessions to ees.
engage the community in the budget development process. 55.03% 43.42%
Heading into
the Fiscal Year 2011 budget cycle, the District faced a $126.7
million shortfall, again due to declining state and local revenue.
Following a number of community forums and a public survey,
Superintendent Fred Sanderson presented a balanced budget Federal Sources
that required numerous difficult steps to address the shortfall, 1.56%
including:

• Reducing 68 central office and support positions Where the Money Goes
Instruction.......................................................................$582,790,028
• Increasing to maximum class sizes and Maintenance & Operations..........................................$56,927,727
School Administration..................................................$51,731,909
reducing 636 teaching positions Student Transportation................................................$42,599,559
Instructional Staff Services..........................................$23,765,541
• Five furlough days for all school district staff Pupil Support Services..................................................$18,383,805
Central Support Services..............................................$14,437,022
• Freezing school salary step for all eligible employees Educational Media Services.........................................$14,232,064
Support Services - Business.........................................$5,378,175
• Reducing 55 counselor/graduation coach positions Transfers..........................................................................$4,560,729
General Administration................................................$4,485,104
• Reducing 112 custodian positions
Community Services.....................................................$66,923
Capital Outlay.................................................................$17,983
• Eliminating 100 buses, routes and driver positions
Debt Service....................................................................$0
BUDGETED FY2011 EXPENSES........................ $819,376,569
• Restructuring alternative education programs

The Board approved the FY11 budget on June 9, 2010. “This


is uncharted territory for our school district,” said 2010 Board
Chair Lynnda Eagle. “We’re experiencing what so many private
corporations have been through in the past couple of years. Instruction
I am deeply sorry that the budget we approved results in job 71.13%
reductions, but I have no doubt the District will continue to
offer the very highest quality education, and our teachers and
administrators will rise up to meet this challenge as they
always have. Through their commitment, the Cobb County Other
School District will persevere and maintain its reputation for 28.87%
academic excellence.”
9
How Cobb County Compares to State Averages in Spending
% Above/
Cost Per Child Cobb Georgia Difference Below State
Average
Instruction $6,302 $5,658 $644 11.38% Compared to the average
Media $133 $161 ($28) (17.39%) school system in Georgia,
Instruction Support $299 $353 ($54) (15.30%)
Cobb County spends less
Pupil Services $188 $243 ($55) (22.63%)
General Administration $115 $209 ($94) (44.98%) on operational costs and
School Administration $501 $553 ($52) (9.40%) support and more on
Transportation $404 $417 ($13) (3.12%) student instruction.
Maintenance & Operation $555 $712 ($157) (22.05%)
Capital Projects $0 $4 ($4) (100.00%)
Food Service $0 $1 ($1) (100.00%)
Debt Service $68 $12 $56 466.67%
TOTAL $8,567 $8,321 $242 2.91%
Source: Georgia Department of Education Expense Report Online

Low Taxes + High Test Results = VALUE


Cobb County property
2010 School Property Tax 2010 SAT
on Home Assessed at $165,000 District Averages owners saw no increase in
school property tax rates
COBB $1058.00 1522
Atlanta* $1107.00 1133 from FY2010 to FY2011,
Fulton $1184.00 1567 despite the financial
DeKalb $1229.00 1328 challenges presented by the
Gwinnett* $1277.00 1533 state and local economies.
* based on FY2010 millage
Source: CCSD FY2011 Budget Popular Report

Comparison of General Administration Expenditures


Metro Atlanta School Districts
In May 2010, the Atlanta
Journal-Constitution said,
General Administration General Administration
District
Expenditure per FTE Percent of Total Expenditures “Cobb County, while having
Atlanta $1626.00 13.2%
the second-largest student
Dekalb $267.00 2.9% population in the state,
Georgia (avg.) $228.00 2.7% has one of the smallest
Gwinnett $213.00 2.7%
central-office staffs and
Fulton $176.00 1.8%
Cobb $115.00 1.4% some of the lowest costs.”
Source: Georgia Dept. of Education Report Card
10
SPLOST
In September 2008, Cobb County taxpayers approved a second five-year renewal of the one-cent sales tax program known as
SPLOST. The SPLOST III program is focused on revitalizing the District’s aging facilities and meeting the District’s capital needs
through 2013.

In September 2010, the Board of Education approved an acceleration plan for SPLOST III projects to address a projected short-
fall in sales tax revenue due to economic conditions. The District partnered with Kennesaw State University to produce a revised
sales tax revenue forecast. The revised forecast, approximately 26.5 percent lower than the original SPLOST III revenue estimate,
was presented to the school board in January 2010. To address the shortfall, all SPLOST III project budgets, in turn, have been
reduced 20 percent. While sales tax revenue has been lower than expected, most project bids have come in well under budget
as well – in some cases by 30 or 40 percent. The SPLOST III acceleration plan is taking advantage of this favorable construction
market by issuing short-term notes valued at $62 million in calendar year 2011, $62 million in 2012 and $31 million in 2013. The
objective of the acceleration plan is to offset the decline in sales tax revenue and ensure that all SPLOST III projects are delivered
to taxpayers as promised.

Also in 2010, the Board declared $23 million remaining from the prior SPLOST II program as excess funds, allowing the District
to offset an increase in the property tax millage rate. State law requires that excess proceeds from a SPLOST building program
that remain once all projects are accounted for must be used for reducing school system long-term debt. In the event there is no
long-term debt, as is the case in Cobb, the excess proceeds must be used for the purpose of reducing the property tax millage rate.
As a result of the Board actions, Cobb County property owners saw no increase in their 2011 school tax rates despite the extreme-
ly challenging budget conditions.

Ongoing updates for the SPLOST program are available on the District Web site.

2010 SPLOST Project Highlights


• Construction for the East Side replacement school and new ninth grade
centers at North Cobb and South Cobb high schools began in early 2010.

• SPLOST funds were used to purchase and install a Telematics Information


System for the District’s buses and fleet vehicles. See the Operations Section
for additional details.

• The Board approved a plan to construct a new Clarkdale Elementary School


on the relocated site adjacent to Cooper Middle School, between Ewing Road
and Flint Hill Road in Austell. The plan encompasses construction of a larger The new East Side Elementary replacement school will open
in August 2011 for the start of the 2011-12 school year.
school with up to 53 classrooms and redistricting that will relieve overcrowd-
ing at Hollydale, Sanders and other nearby elementary schools.

• Football teams and physical education classes at 12 Cobb high schools made
use of newly-installed artificial turf fields funded by SPLOST III. Kennesaw
Mountain, Pope, South Cobb, Walton, Campbell, Osborne and Pebblebrook
high schools began using the fields in early fall 2010. Turf was installed at
Kell, Harrison, Lassiter, Sprayberry and Wheeler high schools following the
completion of fall activities and athletics. Fields at North Cobb, Allatoona,
Hillgrove and McEachern are scheduled to have artificial turf installed after
the 2010-11 school year concludes.
11
Osborne High School was one of the 12 Cobb high
schools to have new artificial turf fields installed in 2010.
SPLOST III BUDGETED APPROPRIATIONS SPLOST III EXPENDITURES
(Through June 30, 2010) (Through June 30, 2010)

14%
20% Curriculum, 43%
Maintenance/ Instruction, Curriculum,
Renovation Technology Instruction,
Technology
24%
17% Support/Safety
Support/Safety Improvements
33% Improvements
Additions/
Modifications 20%
13% Maintenance/
New or 1% Renovation
Replacement Program 1%
Facilities Management Program
2% Management
Land 5%
New or
7% Replacement
Additions/ Facilities
Modifications

SPLOST III Revenues*


Month Projected Actual % Change
FY2009 Total $48,118,584 $37,331,872 -22.4%
July-09 $12,029,646 $9,227,362 -23.29%
August-09 $12,029,646 $9,282,049 -22.84%
September-09 $12,029,646 $10,298,744 -14.39%
October-09 $12,029,646 $8,750,229 -27.26%
November-09 $12,029,646 $9,151,507 -23.93%
December-09 $12,029,646 $10,086,417 -16.15%
January-10 $8,635,211 $9,989,842 15.69%
February-10 $10,425,078 $9,764,565 -6.34%
March-10 $8,701,184 $8,905,035 2.34%
April-10 $8,575,633 $9,976,408 16.33%
May-10 $9,405,573 $9,295,402 -1.17%
June-10 $9,470,862 $9,908,144 4.62%
Total $127,391,417 $114,635,704 -10.01%
Inception to Date $175,510,001 $151,967,576 -13.41%
* KSU projections used beginning January 2010

SPLOST II BUDGETED APPROPRIATIONS SPLOST II EXPENDITURES


(Through June 30, 2010) (Through June 30, 2010)
2% 2%
Program Program
Management Management
10% 10%
Property Tax Property Tax
Rollback 8% Rollback
Support/Safety
Improvements
10% 32% 33%
Support/Safety
Improvements New Schools/Land New Schools/Land

13%
13%
Curriculum,
Curriculum,
Instruction,
Instruction,
Technology
Technology

27% 6% 27%
Additions/Renovations Maintenance Additions/Renovations
Projects
6%
Maintenance 12
Projects
Schools & Principals
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS PRINCIPAL Shallowford Falls Doreen Griffeth
Acworth Kathleen Curran Sky View Cindy Cutler
Addison Karen Crowder Sope Creek Martha Whalen
Argyle Robert Babay Still Grace Manharth
Austell Primary Marvin Bynes Teasley Joanne Robblee
Austell Intermediate Clint Terza Timber Ridge Tracie Doe
Baker Phyllis Jones Tritt Karen Frost
Bells Ferry Ladonna Starnes Varner Pamela Adeli
Belmont Hills Terry Floyd Vaughan Barbara Swinney
Big Shanty Lynne Hutnik
Birney Rattana Inthirathvongsy MIDDLE SCHOOLS PRINCIPAL
Blackwell Maurine Kozol Awtrey Jeffrey Crawford
Brown Brett Ward Barber Lisa Williams
Brumby Amanda Richie Campbell M.S. Denise Magee
Bryant Primary Patrice Moore Cooper Peggy Martin
Bryant Intermediate Alfreda Williams Daniell David Nelson
Bullard Sharon Hardin Dickerson Carole Brink
Chalker Jo Ann Sappington Dodgen Robin Lattizori
Cheatham Hill Belinda Walters-Brazile Durham Georganne Young
Clarkdale Marjorie Bickerstaff East Cobb Tiffany Honore'
Clay Florence Williams Floyd Teresa Hargrett
Compton Elizabeth Murphy Garrett Fredrick Harris
Davis Dee Mobley Griffin Darryl York
Dowell Janis Komara Hightower Trail Hilda Wilkins
Due West Peggy Fleming Lindley Sandra Ervin
East Side Elizabeth Mavity Lindley 6th Grade Academy Landon Brown
Eastvalley Karen Wacker Lost Mountain Terry Poor
Fair Oaks Cindy Szwec Lovinggood Elizabeth Wilson
Ford Jami Frost Mabry Merrilee Heflin
Frey Joyce Piket McCleskey Claire Lyons
Garrison Mill Paula Huffman McClure Susan Wing
Green Acres Mitchel Bivens Palmer Cathy Wentworth
Harmony Leland Hermia Simmons-Deveaux Pine Mountain Lisa Jackson
Hayes Primary David Pearce Simpson Andrew Bristow
Hayes Intermediate Teressa Watson Smitha Sharon Tucker
Hollydale Lynn McWhorter Tapp Jerry Dority
Keheley Liz Jackson
Kemp Kristina Mason HIGH SCHOOLS PRINCIPAL
Kennesaw Wanda Floyd Allatoona J. Scott Bursmith
Kincaid Cheryl Mauldin Campbell Grant Rivera
King Springs Linda Keeney Harrison Donald Griggers
LaBelle Lisa Hogan Hillgrove Robert Shaw
Lewis Kristi Kee Kell Trudie Donovan
Mableton Kym Eisgruber Kennesaw Mountain Kevin C. Daniel
McCall Primary Thomas Farrell Lassiter Chris Richie
Milford Michelle Pearce McEachern Regina Montgomery
Mount Bethel Joan Johnson North Cobb Phillip Page
Mountain View Renee Garriss Osborne Charlotte Stowers
Murdock Cynthia Hanauer Pebblebrook Zinta Perkins
Nicholson Wanda Shue Pope Rick Beaulieu
Nickajack Beverly Parks South Cobb Ashley Hosey
Norton Park Douglas Daugherty Sprayberry Edward Wagner
Pickett's Mill Shelia Chesser Walton Judith McNeill
Pitner Sherri Hill Wheeler David Chiprany
Powder Springs Darlene Mitchell
Powers Ferry Joan Mills SPECIAL SCHOOLS PRINCIPAL
Riverside Primary Doris Billups-McClure Adult Education Center Cherry Gipson
Riverside Intermediate Althea Singletary International Welcome Ctr Greg Ewing
Rocky Mount Gail May
Russell Nancy DiPetrillo HAVEN Academy: Marianne Weidner
Sanders Primary Rebecca Jenkins Hawthorne Center Marilyn Mitchell-Wilson, AP
Sanders Intermediate Pamela Dingle Fitzhugh Lee Center Jean Mason, AP
Sedalia Park Patricia Thomas Oakwood Digital Academy Steven Butler