You are on page 1of 8

Department of

C ll l
Cellular and Physiological Sciences
d Ph i l i l S i

Muscle Tissue 
Presented by: Dr. M. Alimohammadi
E
E‐mail: majidad@interchange.ubc.ca
il jid d@i t h b
Phone: (604) 822 ‐ 7545

Lecture Outline
1. Terminology of muscular tissue.

2. Classification of muscular tissue.

3. Major histological features of skeletal and smooth muscle 
h l lf f k l l d h l
tissues.

4.    Contraction mechanism (sliding filament theory) 
Muscular Tissue 
• Originates from 
Mesoderm and is 
di id d i t t
divided into two 
major groups:
• Striated; found as:
Striated; found as:
1. Skeletal muscle 
(voluntarily)
2. Cardiac muscle
• Smooth;
• f
found in the wall of 
d i th ll f
hollow viscera, blood 
vessels, and dermis of 
the skin. F. 4.1

Muscle Cell (Fiber)


Muscle Cell (Fiber)

• Sarcolema                                    Cell membrane
• Sarcoplasm                                  Cytoplasm
• Sarcoplasmic Reticulum             E.R 
• Sarcosome                                    Mitochondria
• Myofila e t
Myofilament                                 Mi ofila e t
Microfilament
• Myoglobin                                    Pigment
Skeletal Muscle & Myofibrils
• Is composed of long cylindrical, multinucleated cells.
• Muscle fibers are individually  surrounded by a layer of CT 
(endomysium) to form a muscle bundle which is invested by
(endomysium) to form a muscle bundle which is invested by 
another layer of CT (perimysium). Finally the whole muscle is 
wrapped by a third layer of CT (epimysium). 
• Within each muscle fiber there are bundles (myofibril) of 
myofilaments
• Each myofibril is surrounded by an interconnected network
Each myofibril is surrounded by an interconnected network 
of ER (sarcoplasmic reticulum).
• Also among these myofibrils, numerous mitochondia
(sarcosomes) are found
(sarcosomes) are found.
• The myofibrils show light (I) and dark (A) bands (striations).

F. 4.3
F. 4.4

Myofilaments 
• There are two types of 
h f
myofilaments:
1. Thick (myosin); 1.6 μm 
l
long and 15 nm in 
d 15 i
diameter, made up of 
myosin molecules with 
heavy and light subunits
heavy and light subunits 
(meromyosins).
2. Thin (actin); 1 μm long 
and 5 nm in diameter
and 5 nm in diameter, 
made up of actin (f), 
troponin, and 
p y
tropomyosin.
• Both filaments are 
attached ( actin, directly 
and myosin, indirectly)
y y
to “Z” disks.
F. 4.8
• That part of the myofibril 
which is occupied by both 
hi h i o u ied by both
types of myofilaments
p
represent the “A” band,  ,
while those parts which 
contain just the thin or 
thick
filaments are known as “I” 
p
and “H” bands respectively. y
• During muscle contraction, 
the width of I, and H bands 
reduce leading to
reduce leading to 
shortening of sarcomeres. 

F. 4.8

Sarcotubular System
• The two ends of 
reticular network 
surrounding the
surrounding the 
myofibrils, enlarge 
to form terminal 
cisternae.
i te ae
• The two adjacent 
cisternae are 
separated by a  F. 4.7
transverse tubule 
(continuous with
(continuous with 
the sarcolemma), 
and all together 
referred to as 
f d
“Triad”.
Sliding Filament Theory

• Is explained as the following sequences:
1. An impulse is transmitted into the interior of the fiber via 
t
transverse tubule.
t b l
2. Calcium ions leave the terminal cisterna and enter the 
cytosole.
3. Conformational changes in troponin in the presence of 
calcium ions, causes the tropomyosin to sink down, 
exposing the active site of actin.
4 Hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and a phosphate group at the 
4. H d l i f ATP ADP d h h h
presence of Mg ions.
5. Formation of a strong bond between actin and myosin 
while the myosin molecule bends.
hil th i l l b d
6. Another ATP molecule binds to the myosin, leading to its 
detachment from actin.
Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types
1. Red (type I), aerobic, slow twitch with high endurance. 
Contain numerous mitochondria, and myoglobin (postural 
muscles).
muscles)
2. White (type IIB),
anaerobic, fast
anaerobic, fast 
twitch, and capable of 
producing high 
force. Contain 
few mitochondria
3. Intermediate 
(type IIA).

F. 4.12

Smooth Muscle
• Fusiform (spindle shaped) mono‐nucleated cells with no 
striation.
• Smooth muscle cells lack “T”
Smooth muscle cells lack  T  tubule system.  Cytoplasm is 
tubule system Cytoplasm is
acidophilic and the nucleus is centrally located.
• Each cell is individually surrounded by a thin layer of CT 
(external lamina)
(external lamina).
• The most important 
function of smooth 
muscle tissue is 
peristaltic 
movements of GI 
f GI
tract and also 
constriction of
constriction of 
blood vessels.
F. 4.25
Smooth Muscle Contraction
• This contraction is slower, more 
Thi t ti i l
energy efficient, more sustainable , 
and shows less fatigue compared to 
skeletal muscle tissue.
k l t l l ti
• There are three different types of 
y
myofilaments:
Thick (myosin), Thin (actin), and 
Intermediate (desmin / vimentin). F. 4.26

• Th
These filaments are 
fil t
attached to each other 
y p
inside the cytoplasm and 
also to the cell membrane 
by means of Dense Bodies 
( b d
(Z band equivalent).
l )