Design and Analysis of Algorithms

Sohail Aslam
January 2004
2
Contents
1 Introduction 7
1.1 Origin of word: Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.2 Algorithm: Informal Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.3 Algorithms, Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.4 Implementation Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.5 Course in Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.6 Analyzing Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.7 Model of Computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.8 Example: 2-dimension maxima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.9 Brute-Force Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.10 Running Time Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1.10.1 Analysis of the brute-force maxima algorithm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.11 Analysis: A Harder Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.11.1 2-dimension Maxima Revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1.11.2 Plane-sweep Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1.11.3 Analysis of Plane-sweep Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.11.4 Comparison of Brute-force and Plane sweep algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2 Asymptotic Notation 23
3 Divide and Conquer Strategy 27
3.1 Merge Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
3.1.1 Analysis of Merge Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.1.2 The Iteration Method for Solving Recurrence Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.1.3 Visualizing Recurrences Using the Recursion Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3
4 CONTENTS
3.1.4 A Messier Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.2 Selection Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.2.1 Sieve Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.2.2 Applying the Sieve to Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.2.3 Selection Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.2.4 Analysis of Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
4 Sorting 39
4.1 Slow Sorting Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4.2 Sorting in O(nlog n) time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.2.1 Heaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.2.2 Heapsort Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.2.3 Heapify Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.2.4 Analysis of Heapify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.2.5 BuildHeap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.2.6 Analysis of BuildHeap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.2.7 Analysis of Heapsort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.3 Quicksort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.3.1 Partition Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.3.2 Quick Sort Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.3.3 Analysis of Quicksort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.3.4 Worst Case Analysis of Quick Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.3.5 Average-case Analysis of Quicksort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4 In-place, Stable Sorting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.5 Lower Bounds for Sorting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
5 Linear Time Sorting 57
5.1 Counting Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
5.2 Bucket or Bin Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.3 Radix Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
6 Dynamic Programming 73
6.1 Fibonacci Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
CONTENTS 5
6.2 Dynamic Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
6.3 Edit Distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
6.3.1 Edit Distance: Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
6.3.2 Edit Distance Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
6.3.3 Edit Distance: Dynamic Programming Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
6.3.4 Analysis of DP Edit Distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
6.4 Chain Matrix Multiply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
6.4.1 Chain Matrix Multiplication-Dynamic Programming Formulation . . . . . . . . . 85
6.5 0/1 Knapsack Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.5.1 0/1 Knapsack Problem: Dynamic Programming Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
7 Greedy Algorithms 97
7.1 Example: Counting Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
7.1.1 Making Change: Dynamic Programming Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
7.1.2 Complexity of Coin Change Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
7.2 Greedy Algorithm: Huffman Encoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
7.2.1 Huffman Encoding Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
7.2.2 Huffman Encoding: Correctness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
7.3 Activity Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
7.3.1 Correctness of Greedy Activity Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
7.4 Fractional Knapsack Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
8 Graphs 113
8.1 Graph Traversal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
8.1.1 Breadth-first Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
8.1.2 Depth-first Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
8.1.3 Generic Graph Traversal Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
8.1.4 DFS - Timestamp Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
8.1.5 DFS - Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
8.2 Precedence Constraint Graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
8.3 Topological Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
8.4 Strong Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
8.4.1 Strong Components and DFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
6 CONTENTS
8.5 Minimum Spanning Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.5.1 Computing MST: Generic Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
8.5.2 Greedy MST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
8.5.3 Kruskal’s Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
8.5.4 Prim’s Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
8.6 Shortest Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
8.6.1 Dijkstra’s Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
8.6.2 Correctness of Dijkstra’s Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
8.6.3 Bellman-Ford Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
8.6.4 Correctness of Bellman-Ford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
8.6.5 Floyd-Warshall Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
9 Complexity Theory 169
9.1 Decision Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
9.2 Complexity Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
9.3 Polynomial Time Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
9.4 The Class NP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
9.5 Reductions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
9.6 Polynomial Time Reduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
9.7 NP-Completeness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
9.8 Boolean Satisfiability Problem: Cook’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
9.9 Coping with NP-Completeness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1 Origin of word: Algorithm
The word Algorithm comes from the name of the muslim author Abu Ja’far Mohammad ibn Musa
al-Khowarizmi. He was born in the eighth century at Khwarizm (Kheva), a town south of river Oxus in
present Uzbekistan. Uzbekistan, a Muslim country for over a thousand years, was taken over by the
Russians in 1873.
His year of birth is not known exactly. Al-Khwarizmi parents migrated to a place south of Baghdad when
he was a child. It has been established from his contributions that he flourished under Khalifah
Al-Mamun at Baghdad during 813 to 833 C.E. Al-Khwarizmi died around 840 C.E.
Much of al-Khwarizmi’s work was written in a book titled al Kitab al-mukhatasar fi hisab al-jabr
wa’l-muqabalah (The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing). It is from the
titles of these writings and his name that the words algebra and algorithm are derived. As a result of his
work, al-Khwarizmi is regarded as the most outstanding mathematician of his time
1.2 Algorithm: Informal Definition
An algorithm is any well-defined computational procedure that takes some values, or set of values, as
input and produces some value, or set of values, as output. An algorithm is thus a sequence of
computational steps that transform the input into output.
1.3 Algorithms, Programming
A good understanding of algorithms is essential for a good understanding of the most basic element of
computer science: programming. Unlike a program, an algorithm is a mathematical entity, which is
independent of a specific programming language, machine, or compiler. Thus, in some sense, algorithm
7
8 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
design is all about the mathematical theory behind the design of good programs.
Why study algorithm design? There are many facets to good program design. Good algorithm design is
one of them (and an important one). To be really complete algorithm designer, it is important to be aware
of programming and machine issues as well. In any important programming project there are two major
types of issues, macro issues and micro issues.
Macro issues involve elements such as how does one coordinate the efforts of many programmers
working on a single piece of software, and how does one establish that a complex programming system
satisfies its various requirements. These macro issues are the primary subject of courses on software
engineering.
A great deal of the programming effort on most complex software systems consists of elements whose
programming is fairly mundane (input and output, data conversion, error checking, report generation).
However, there is often a small critical portion of the software, which may involve only tens to hundreds
of lines of code, but where the great majority of computational time is spent. (Or as the old adage goes:
80% of the execution time takes place in 20% of the code.) The micro issues in programming involve
how best to deal with these small critical sections.
It may be very important for the success of the overall project that these sections of code be written in the
most efficient manner possible. An unfortunately common approach to this problem is to first design an
inefficient algorithm and data structure to solve the problem, and then take this poor design and attempt
to fine-tune its performance by applying clever coding tricks or by implementing it on the most expensive
and fastest machines around to boost performance as much as possible. The problem is that if the
underlying design is bad, then often no amount of fine-tuning is going to make a substantial difference.
Before you implement, first be sure you have a good design. This course is all about how to design good
algorithms. Because the lesson cannot be taught in just one course, there are a number of companion
courses that are important as well. CS301 deals with how to design good data structures. This is not
really an independent issue, because most of the fastest algorithms are fast because they use fast data
structures, and vice versa. In fact, many of the courses in the computer science program deal with
efficient algorithms and data structures, but just as they apply to various applications: compilers,
operating systems, databases, artificial intelligence, computer graphics and vision, etc. Thus, a good
understanding of algorithm design is a central element to a good understanding of computer science and
good programming.
1.4 Implementation Issues
One of the elements that we will focus on in this course is to try to study algorithms as pure mathematical
objects, and so ignore issues such as programming language, machine, and operating system. This has
the advantage of clearing away the messy details that affect implementation. But these details may be
very important.
For example, an important fact of current processor technology is that of locality of reference. Frequently
accessed data can be stored in registers or cache memory. Our mathematical analysis will usually ignore
these issues. But a good algorithm designer can work within the realm of mathematics, but still keep an
1.5. COURSE IN REVIEW 9
open eye to implementation issues down the line that will be important for final implementation. For
example, we will study three fast sorting algorithms this semester, heap-sort, merge-sort, and quick-sort.
From our mathematical analysis, all have equal running times. However, among the three (barring any
extra considerations) quick sort is the fastest on virtually all modern machines. Why? It is the best from
the perspective of locality of reference. However, the difference is typically small (perhaps 10-20%
difference in running time).
Thus this course is not the last word in good program design, and in fact it is perhaps more accurately just
the first word in good program design. The overall strategy that I would suggest to any programming
would be to first come up with a few good designs from a mathematical and algorithmic perspective.
Next prune this selection by consideration of practical matters (like locality of reference). Finally
prototype (that is, do test implementations) a few of the best designs and run them on data sets that will
arise in your application for the final fine-tuning. Also, be sure to use whatever development tools that
you have, such as profilers (programs which pin-point the sections of the code that are responsible for
most of the running time).
1.5 Course in Review
This course will consist of four major sections. The first is on the mathematical tools necessary for the
analysis of algorithms. This will focus on asymptotics, summations, recurrences. The second element
will deal with one particularly important algorithmic problem: sorting a list of numbers. We will show a
number of different strategies for sorting, and use this problem as a case-study in different techniques for
designing and analyzing algorithms.
The final third of the course will deal with a collection of various algorithmic problems and solution
techniques. Finally we will close this last third with a very brief introduction to the theory of
NP-completeness. NP-complete problem are those for which no efficient algorithms are known, but no
one knows for sure whether efficient solutions might exist.
1.6 Analyzing Algorithms
In order to design good algorithms, we must first agree the criteria for measuring algorithms. The
emphasis in this course will be on the design of efficient algorithm, and hence we will measure
algorithms in terms of the amount of computational resources that the algorithm requires. These
resources include mostly running time and memory. Depending on the application, there may be other
elements that are taken into account, such as the number disk accesses in a database program or the
communication bandwidth in a networking application.
In practice there are many issues that need to be considered in the design algorithms. These include
issues such as the ease of debugging and maintaining the final software through its life-cycle. Also, one
of the luxuries we will have in this course is to be able to assume that we are given a clean, fully-specified
mathematical description of the computational problem. In practice, this is often not the case, and the
algorithm must be designed subject to only partial knowledge of the final specifications. Thus, in practice
10 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
it is often necessary to design algorithms that are simple, and easily modified if problem parameters and
specifications are slightly modified. Fortunately, most of the algorithms that we will discuss in this class
are quite simple, and are easy to modify subject to small problem variations.
1.7 Model of Computation
Another goal that we will have in this course is that our analysis be as independent as possible of the
variations in machine, operating system, compiler, or programming language. Unlike programs,
algorithms to be understood primarily by people (i.e. programmers) and not machines. Thus gives us
quite a bit of flexibility in how we present our algorithms, and many low-level details may be omitted
(since it will be the job of the programmer who implements the algorithm to fill them in).
But, in order to say anything meaningful about our algorithms, it will be important for us to settle on a
mathematical model of computation. Ideally this model should be a reasonable abstraction of a standard
generic single-processor machine. We call this model a random access machine or RAM.
A RAM is an idealized machine with an infinitely large random-access memory. Instructions are
executed one-by-one (there is no parallelism). Each instruction involves performing some basic operation
on two values in the machines memory (which might be characters or integers; let’s avoid floating point
for now). Basic operations include things like assigning a value to a variable, computing any basic
arithmetic operation (+, - , , integer division) on integer values of any size, performing any comparison
(e.g. x ≤ 5) or boolean operations, accessing an element of an array (e.g. A[10]). We assume that each
basic operation takes the same constant time to execute.
This model seems to go a good job of describing the computational power of most modern (nonparallel)
machines. It does not model some elements, such as efficiency due to locality of reference, as described
in the previous lecture. There are some “loop-holes” (or hidden ways of subverting the rules) to beware
of. For example, the model would allow you to add two numbers that contain a billion digits in constant
time. Thus, it is theoretically possible to derive nonsensical results in the form of efficient RAM
programs that cannot be implemented efficiently on any machine. Nonetheless, the RAM model seems to
be fairly sound, and has done a good job of modelling typical machine technology since the early 60’s.
1.8 Example: 2-dimension maxima
Let us do an example that illustrates how we analyze algorithms. Suppose you want to buy a car. You
want the pick the fastest car. But fast cars are expensive; you want the cheapest. You cannot decide which
is more important: speed or price. Definitely do not want a car if there is another that is both faster and
cheaper. We say that the fast, cheap car dominates the slow, expensive car relative to your selection
criteria. So, given a collection of cars, we want to list those cars that are not dominated by any other.
Here is how we might model this as a formal problem.
• Let a point p in 2-dimensional space be given by its integer coordinates, p = (p.x, p.y).
1.9. BRUTE-FORCE ALGORITHM 11
• A point p is said to be dominated by point q if p.x ≤ q.x and p.y ≤ q.y.
• Given a set of n points, P = {p
1
, p
2
, . . . , p
n
} in 2-space a point is said to be maximal if it is not
dominated by any other point in P.
The car selection problem can be modelled this way: For each car we associate (x, y) pair where x is the
speed of the car and y is the negation of the price. High y value means a cheap car and low y means
expensive car. Think of y as the money left in your pocket after you have paid for the car. Maximal
points correspond to the fastest and cheapest cars.
The 2-dimensional Maxima is thus defined as
• Given a set of points P = {p
1
, p
2
, . . . , p
n
} in 2-space, output the set of maximal points of P, i.e.,
those points p
i
such that p
i
is not dominated by any other point of P.
Here is set of maximal points for a given set of points in 2-d.
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(4,4)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(7,13)
(11,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
Figure 1.1: Maximal points in 2-d
Our description of the problem is at a fairly mathematical level. We have intentionally not discussed how
the points are represented. We have not discussed any input or output formats. We have avoided
programming and other software issues.
1.9 Brute-Force Algorithm
To get the ball rolling, let’s just consider a simple brute-force algorithm, with no thought to efficiency.
Let P = {p
1
, p
2
, . . . , p
n
} be the initial set of points. For each point p
i
, test it against all other points p
j
. If
p
i
is not dominated by any other point, then output it.
12 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
This English description is clear enough that any (competent) programmer should be able to implement
it. However, if you want to be a bit more formal, it could be written in pseudocode as follows:
MAXIMA(int n, Point P[1 . . . n])
1 for i ←1 to n
2 do maximal ←true
3 for j ←1 to n
4 do
5 if (i = j) and (P[i].x ≤ P[j].x) and (P[i].y ≤ P[j].y)
6 then maximal ←false; break
7 if (maximal = true)
8 then output P[i]
There are no formal rules to the syntax of this pseudo code. In particular, do not assume that more detail
is better. For example, I omitted type specifications for the procedure Maxima and the variable maximal,
and I never defined what a Point data type is, since I felt that these are pretty clear from context or just
unimportant details. Of course, the appropriate level of detail is a judgement call. Remember, algorithms
are to be read by people, and so the level of detail depends on your intended audience. When writing
pseudo code, you should omit details that detract from the main ideas of the algorithm, and just go with
the essentials.
You might also notice that I did not insert any checking for consistency. For example, I assumed that the
points in P are all distinct. If there is a duplicate point then the algorithm may fail to output even a single
point. (Can you see why?) Again, these are important considerations for implementation, but we will
often omit error checking because we want to see the algorithm in its simplest form.
Here are a series of figures that illustrate point domination.
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(4,4)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(7,13)
(11,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
Figure 1.2: Points that dominate (4, 11)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(4,4)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(7,13)
(11,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
Figure 1.3: Points that dominate (9, 10)
1.10. RUNNING TIME ANALYSIS 13
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(4,4)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(7,13)
(11,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
Figure 1.4: Points that dominate (7, 7)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(4,4)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(7,13)
(11,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
Figure 1.5: The maximal points
1.10 Running Time Analysis
The main purpose of our mathematical analysis will be measuring the execution time. We will also be
concerned about the space (memory) required by the algorithm.
The running time of an implementation of the algorithm would depend upon the speed of the computer,
programming language, optimization by the compiler etc. Although important, we will ignore these
technological issues in our analysis.
To measure the running time of the brute-force 2-d maxima algorithm, we could count the number of
steps of the pseudo code that are executed or, count the number of times an element of P is accessed or,
the number of comparisons that are performed.
The running time depends upon the input size, e.g. n Different inputs of the same size may result in
different running time. For example, breaking out of the inner loop in the brute-force algorithm depends
not only on the input size of P but also the structure of the input.
Two criteria for measuring running time are worst-case time and average-case time.
Worst-case time is the maximum running time over all (legal) inputs of size n. Let I denote an input
instance, let |I| denote its length, and let T(I) denote the running time of the algorithm on input I.
Then
T
worst
(n) = max
|I|=n
T(I)
Average-case time is the average running time over all inputs of size n. Let p(I) denote the probability
of seeing this input. The average-case time is the weighted sum of running times with weights
14 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
being the probabilities:
T
avg
(n) =
¸
|I|=n
p(I)T(I)
We will almost always work with worst-case time. Average-case time is more difficult to compute; it is
difficult to specify probability distribution on inputs. Worst-case time will specify an upper limit on the
running time.
1.10.1 Analysis of the brute-force maxima algorithm.
Assume that the input size is n, and for the running time we will count the number of time that any
element of P is accessed. Clearly we go through the outer loop n times, and for each time through this
loop, we go through the inner loop n times as well. The condition in the if-statement makes four accesses
to P. The output statement makes two accesses for each point that is output. In the worst case every point
is maximal (can you see how to generate such an example?) so these two access are made for each time
through the outer loop.
MAXIMA(int n, Point P[1 . . . n])
1 for i ←1 to n n times
2 do maximal ←true
3 for j ←1 to n n times
4 do
5 if (i = j)&(P[i].x ≤ P[j].x)&(P[i].y ≤ P[j].y) 4 accesses
6 then maximal ←false break
7 if maximal
8 then output P[i].x, P[i].y 2 accesses
Thus we might express the worst-case running time as a pair of nested summations, one for the i-loop
and the other for the j-loop:
T(n) =
n
¸
i=1

2 +
n
¸
j=1
4

=
n
¸
i=1
(4n +2)
= (4n +2)n = 4n
2
+2n
For small values of n, any algorithm is fast enough. What happens when n gets large? Running time
does become an issue. When n is large, n
2
term will be much larger than the n term and will dominate
the running time.
We will say that the worst-case running time is Θ(n
2
). This is called the asymptotic growth rate of the
function. We will discuss this Θ-notation more formally later.
1.10. RUNNING TIME ANALYSIS 15
The analysis involved computing a summation. Summation should be familiar but let us review a bit
here. Given a finite sequence of values a
1
, a
2
, . . . , a
n
, their sum a
1
+a
2
+. . . +a
n
is expressed in
summation notation as
n
¸
i=1
a
i
If n = 0, then the sum is additive identity, 0.
Some facts about summation: If c is a constant
n
¸
i=1
ca
i
= c
n
¸
i=1
a
i
and
n
¸
i=1
(a
i
+b
i
) =
n
¸
i=1
a
i
+
n
¸
i=1
b
i
Some important summations that should be committed to memory.
Arithmetic series
n
¸
i=1
i = 1 +2 +. . . +n
=
n(n +1)
2
= Θ(n
2
)
Quadratic series
n
¸
i=1
i
2
= 1 +4 +9 +. . . +n
2
=
2n
3
+3n
2
+n
6
= Θ(n
3
)
Geometric series
n
¸
i=1
x
i
= 1 +x +x
2
+. . . +x
n
=
x
(n+1)
−1
x −1
= Θ(n
2
)
If 0 < x < 1 then this is Θ(1), and if x > 1, then this is Θ(x
n
).
Harmonic series For n ≥ 0
H
n
=
n
¸
i=1
1
i
= 1 +
1
2
+
1
3
+. . . +
1
n
≈ ln n
= Θ(ln n)
16 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
1.11 Analysis: A Harder Example
Let us consider a harder example.
NESTED-LOOPS()
1 for i ←1 to n
2 do
3 for j ←1 to 2i
4 do k = j . . .
5 while (k ≥ 0)
6 do k = k −1 . . .
How do we analyze the running time of an algorithm that has complex nested loop? The answer is we
write out the loops as summations and then solve the summations. To convert loops into summations, we
work from inside-out.
Consider the inner most while loop.
NESTED-LOOPS()
1 for i ←1 to n
2 do for j ←1 to 2i
3 do k = j
4 while (k ≥ 0)
5 do k = k −1
It is executed for k = j, j −1, j −2, . . . , 0. Time spent inside the while loop is constant. Let I() be the
time spent in the while loop. Thus
I(j) =
j
¸
k=0
1 = j +1
Consider the middle for loop.
NESTED-LOOPS()
1 for i ←1 to n
2 do for j ←1 to 2i
3 do k = j
4 while (k ≥ 0)
5 do k = k −1
1.11. ANALYSIS: A HARDER EXAMPLE 17
Its running time is determined by i. Let M() be the time spent in the for loop:
M(i) =
2i
¸
j=1
I(j)
=
2i
¸
j=1
(j +1)
=
2i
¸
j=1
j +
2i
¸
j=1
1
=
2i(2i +1)
2
+2i
= 2i
2
+3i
Finally the outer-most for loop.
NESTED-LOOPS()
1 for i ←1 to n
2 do for j ←1 to 2i
3 do k = j
4 while (k ≥ 0)
5 do k = k −1
Let T() be running time of the entire algorithm:
T(n) =
n
¸
i=1
M(i)
=
n
¸
i=1
(2i
2
+3i)
=
n
¸
i=1
2i
2
+
n
¸
i=1
3i
= 2
2n
3
+3n
2
+n
6
+3
n(n +1)
2
=
4n
3
+15n
2
+11n
6
= Θ(n
3
)
1.11.1 2-dimension Maxima Revisited
Recall the 2-d maxima problem: Let a point p in 2-dimensional space be given by its integer coordinates,
p = (p.x, p.y). A point p is said to dominated by point q if p.x ≤ q.x and p.y ≤ q.y. Given a set of n
18 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
points, P = {p
1
, p
2
, . . . , p
n
} in 2-space a point is said to be maximal if it is not dominated by any other
point in P. The problem is to output all the maximal points of P. We introduced a brute-force algorithm
that ran in Θ(n
2
) time. It operated by comparing all pairs of points. Is there an approach that is
significantly better?
The problem with the brute-force algorithm is that it uses no intelligence in pruning out decisions. For
example, once we know that a point p
i
is dominated by another point p
j
, we do not need to use p
i
for
eliminating other points. This follows from the fact that dominance relation is transitive. If p
j
dominates
p
i
and p
i
dominates p
h
then p
j
also dominates p
h
; p
i
is not needed.
1.11.2 Plane-sweep Algorithm
The question is whether we can make an significant improvement in the running time? Here is an idea for
how we might do it. We will sweep a vertical line across the plane from left to right. As we sweep this
line, we will build a structure holding the maximal points lying to the left of the sweep line. When the
sweep line reaches the rightmost point of P , then we will have constructed the complete set of maxima.
This approach of solving geometric problems by sweeping a line across the plane is called plane sweep.
Although we would like to think of this as a continuous process, we need some way to perform the plane
sweep in discrete steps. To do this, we will begin by sorting the points in increasing order of their
x-coordinates. For simplicity, let us assume that no two points have the same y-coordinate. (This limiting
assumption is actually easy to overcome, but it is good to work with the simpler version, and save the
messy details for the actual implementation.) Then we will advance the sweep-line from point to point in
n discrete steps. As we encounter each new point, we will update the current list of maximal points.
We will sweep a vertical line across the 2-d plane from left to right. As we sweep, we will build a
structure holding the maximal points lying to the left of the sweep line. When the sweep line reaches the
rightmost point of P, we will have the complete set of maximal points. We will store the existing
maximal points in a list The points that p
i
dominates will appear at the end of the list because points are
sorted by x-coordinate. We will scan the list left to right. Every maximal point with y-coordinate less
than p
i
will be eliminated from computation. We will add maximal points onto the end of a list and
delete from the end of the list. We can thus use a stack to store the maximal points. The point at the top
of the stack will have the highest x-coordinate.
Here are a series of figures that illustrate the plane sweep. The figure also show the content of the stack.
1.11. ANALYSIS: A HARDER EXAMPLE 19
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
sweep line
stack
(2,5)
Figure 1.6: Sweep line at (2, 5)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
Figure 1.7: Sweep line at (3, 13)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
(4,11)
Figure 1.8: Sweep line at (4, 11)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
(4,11)
(5,1)
Figure 1.9: Sweep line at (5, 1)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
(4,11)
(7,7)
Figure 1.10: Sweep line at (7, 7)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
(4,11)
(9,10)
Figure 1.11: Sweep line at (9, 10)
20 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
(4,11)
(10,5)
(9,10)
Figure 1.12: Sweep line at (10, 5)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
sweep line
(3,13)
(12,12)
Figure 1.13: Sweep line at (12, 12)
2 4 6 8 10 14 16 18 12
2
4
6
8
10
14
12
(2,5)
(5,1)
(4,11)
(7,7)
(3,13)
(10,5)
(12,12)
(9,10)
(14,10)
(15,7)
(13,3)
stack
(3,13)
(12,12)
(14,10)
(15,7)
Figure 1.14: The final maximal set
Here is the algorithm.
PLANE-SWEEP-MAXIMA(n, P[1..n])
1 sort P in increasing order by x;
2 stack s;
3 for i ←1 to n
4 do
5 while (s.notEmpty() & s.top().y ≤ P[i].y)
6 do s.pop();
7 s.push(P[i]);
8 output the contents of stack s;
1.11. ANALYSIS: A HARDER EXAMPLE 21
1.11.3 Analysis of Plane-sweep Algorithm
Sorting takes Θ(nlog n); we will show this later when we discuss sorting. The for loop executes n
times. The inner loop (seemingly) could be iterated (n −1) times. It seems we still have an n(n −1) or
Θ(n
2
) algorithm. Got fooled by simple minded loop-counting. The while loop will not execute more n
times over the entire course of the algorithm. Why is this? Observe that the total number of elements that
can be pushed on the stack is n since we execute exactly one push each time during the outer for-loop.
We pop an element off the stack each time we go through the inner while-loop. It is impossible to pop
more elements than are ever pushed on the stack. Therefore, the inner while-loop cannot execute more
than n times over the entire course of the algorithm. (Make sure that you understand this).
The for-loop iterates n times and the inner while-loop also iterates n time for a total of Θ(n). Combined
with the sorting, the runtime of entire plane-sweep algorithm is Θ(nlog n).
1.11.4 Comparison of Brute-force and Plane sweep algorithms
How much of an improvement is plane-sweep over brute-force? Consider the ratio of running times:
n
2
nlogn
=
n
log n
n logn
n
logn
100 7 15
1000 10 100
10000 13 752
100000 17 6021
1000000 20 50171
For n = 1, 000, 000, if plane-sweep takes 1 second, the brute-force will take about 14 hours!. From this
we get an idea about the importance of asymptotic analysis. It tells us which algorithm is better for large
values of n. As we mentioned before, if n is not very large, then almost any algorithm will be fast. But
efficient algorithm design is most important for large inputs, and the general rule of computing is that
input sizes continue to grow until people can no longer tolerate the running times. Thus, by designing
algorithms efficiently, you make it possible for the user to run large inputs in a reasonable amount of time.
22 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION
Chapter 2
Asymptotic Notation
You may be asking that we continue to use the notation Θ() but have never defined it. Let’s remedy this
now. Given any function g(n), we define Θ(g(n)) to be a set of functions that asymptotically equivalent
to g(n). Formally:
Θ(g(n)) = {f(n) | there exist positive
constants c
1
, c
2
and n
0
such that
0 ≤ c
1
g(n) ≤ f(n) ≤ c
2
g(n)
for all n ≥ n
0
}
This is written as “f(n) ∈ Θ(g(n))” That is, f(n) and g(n) are asymptotically equivalent. This means
that they have essentially the same growth rates for large n. For example, functions like
• 4n
2
,
• (8n
2
+2n −3),
• (n
2
/5 +

n −10 log n)
• n(n −3)
are all asymptotically equivalent. As n becomes large, the dominant (fastest growing) term is some
constant times n
2
.
Consider the function
f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3
Our informal rule of keeping the largest term and ignoring the constant suggests that f(n) ∈ Θ(n
2
). Let’s
see why this bears out formally. We need to show two things for
f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3
Lower bound f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3 grows asymptotically at least as fast as n
2
,
23
24 CHAPTER 2. ASYMPTOTIC NOTATION
Upper bound f(n) grows no faster asymptotically than n
2
,
Lower bound: f(n) grows asymptotically at least as fast as n
2
. For this, need to show that there exist
positive constants c
1
and n
0
, such that f(n) ≥ c
1
n
2
for all n ≥ n
0
. Consider the reasoning
f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3 ≥ 8n
2
−3 = 7n
2
+ (n
2
−3) ≥ 7n
2
Thus c
1
= 7. We implicitly assumed that 2n ≥ 0 and n
2
−3 ≥ 0 These are not true for all n but if
n ≥

3, then both are true. So select n
0


3. We then have f(n) ≥ c
1
n
2
for all n ≥ n
0
.
Upper bound: f(n) grows asymptotically no faster than n
2
. For this, we need to show that there exist
positive constants c
2
and n
0
, such that f(n) ≤ c
2
n
2
for all n ≥ n
0
. Consider the reasoning
f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3 ≤ 8n
2
+2n ≤ 8n
2
+2n
2
= 10n
2
Thus c
2
= 10. We implicitly made the assumption that 2n ≤ 2n
2
. This is not true for all n but it is true
for all n ≥ 1 So select n
0
≥ 1. We thus have f(n) ≤ c
2
n
2
for all n ≥ n
0
.
From lower bound we have n
0


3 From upper bound we have n
0
≥ 1. Combining the two, we let n
0
be the larger of the two: n
0


3. In conclusion, if we let c
1
= 7, c
2
= 10 and n
0


3, we have
7n
2
≤ 8n
2
+2n −3 ≤ 10n
2
for all n ≥

3
We have thus established
0 ≤ c
1
g(n) ≤ f(n) ≤ c
2
g(n) for all n ≥ n
0
Here are plots of the three functions. Notice the bounds.
0
2e+10
4e+10
6e+10
8e+10
1e+11
0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000
f
(
n
)
n
Asymptotic Notation
8n^2+2n-3
7n^2
10n^2
Figure 2.1: Asymptotic Notation Example
We have established that f(n) ∈ n
2
. Let’s show why f(n) is not in some other asymptotic class. First,
let’s show that f(n) ∈ Θ(n). Show that f(n) ∈ Θ(n). If this were true, we would have had to satisfy
25
both the upper and lower bounds. The lower bound is satisfied because f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3 does grow
at least as fast asymptotically as n. But the upper bound is false. Upper bounds requires that there exist
positive constants c
2
and n
0
such that f(n) ≤ c
2
n for all n ≥ n
0
.
Informally we know that f(n) = 8n
2
+2n −3 will eventually exceed c
2
n no matter how large we make
c
2
. To see this, suppose we assume that constants c
2
and n
0
did exist such that 8n
2
+2n −3 ≤ c
2
n for
all n ≥ n
0
Since this is true for all sufficiently large n then it must be true in the limit as n tends to
infinity. If we divide both sides by n, we have
lim
n→∞

8n +2 −
3
n

≤ c
2
.
It is easy to see that in the limit, the left side tends to ∞. So, no matter how large c
2
is, the statement is
violated. Thus f(n) ∈ Θ(n).
Let’s show that f(n) ∈ Θ(n
3
). The idea would be to show that the lower bound f(n) ≥ c
1
n
3
for all
n ≥ n
0
is violated. (c
1
and n
0
are positive constants). Informally we know this to be true because any
cubic function will overtake a quadratic.
If we divide both sides by n
3
:
lim
n→∞

8
n
+
2
n
2

3
n
3

≥ c
1
The left side tends to 0. The only way to satisfy this is to set c
1
= 0. But by hypothesis, c
1
is positive.
This means that f(n) ∈ Θ(n
3
).
The definition of Θ-notation relies on proving both a lower and upper asymptotic bound. Sometimes we
only interested in proving one bound or the other. The O-notation is used to state only the asymptotic
upper bounds.
O(g(n)) = {f(n) | there exist positive
constants c and n
0
such that
0 ≤ f(n) ≤ cg(n)
for all n ≥ n
0
}
The Ω-notation allows us to state only the asymptotic lower bounds.
Ω(g(n)) = {f(n) | there exist positive
constants c and n
0
such that
0 ≤ cg(n) ≤ f(n)
for all n ≥ n
0
}
26 CHAPTER 2. ASYMPTOTIC NOTATION
The three notations:
Θ(g(n)) : 0 ≤ c
1
g(n) ≤ f(n) ≤ c
2
g(n)
O(g(n)) : 0 ≤ f(n) ≤ cg(n)
Ω(g(n)) : 0 ≤ cg(n) ≤ f(n)
for all n ≥ n
0
These definitions suggest an alternative way of showing the asymptotic behavior. We can use limits for
define the asymptotic behavior. Limit rule for Θ-notation:
lim
n→∞
f(n)
g(n)
= c,
for some constant c > 0 (strictly positive but not infinity) then f(n) ∈ Θ(g(n)). Similarly, the limit rule
for O-notation is
lim
n→∞
f(n)
g(n)
= c,
for some constant c ≥ 0 (nonnegative but not infinite) then f(n) ∈ O(g(n)) and limit rule for
Ω-notation:
lim
n→∞
f(n)
g(n)
= 0,
(either a strictly positive constant or infinity) then f(n) ∈ Ω(g(n)).
Here is a list of common asymptotic running times:
• Θ(1): Constant time; can’t beat it!
• Θ(log n): Inserting into a balanced binary tree; time to find an item in a sorted array of length n
using binary search.
• Θ(n): About the fastest that an algorithm can run.
• Θ(nlog n): Best sorting algorithms.
• Θ(n
2
), Θ(n
3
): Polynomial time. These running times are acceptable when the exponent of n is
small or n is not to large, e.g., n ≤ 1000.
• Θ(2
n
), Θ(3
n
): Exponential time. Acceptable only if n is small, e.g., n ≤ 50.
• Θ(n!), Θ(n
n
): Acceptable only for really small n, e.g. n ≤ 20.
Chapter 3
Divide and Conquer Strategy
The ancient Roman politicians understood an important principle of good algorithm design (although
they were probably not thinking about algorithms at the time). You divide your enemies (by getting them
to distrust each other) and then conquer them piece by piece. This is called divide-and-conquer. In
algorithm design, the idea is to take a problem on a large input, break the input into smaller pieces, solve
the problem on each of the small pieces, and then combine the piecewise solutions into a global solution.
But once you have broken the problem into pieces, how do you solve these pieces? The answer is to
apply divide-and-conquer to them, thus further breaking them down. The process ends when you are left
with such tiny pieces remaining (e.g. one or two items) that it is trivial to solve them. Summarizing, the
main elements to a divide-and-conquer solution are
Divide: the problem into a small number of pieces
Conquer: solve each piece by applying divide and conquer to it recursively
Combine: the pieces together into a global solution.
3.1 Merge Sort
Divide and conquer strategy is applicable in a huge number of computational problems. The first
example of divide and conquer algorithm we will discuss is a simple and efficient sorting procedure
called We are given a sequence of n numbers A, which we will assume are stored in an array A[1..n].
The objective is to output a permutation of this sequence sorted in increasing order. This is normally
done by permuting the elements within the array A. Here is how the merge sort algorithm works:
• (Divide:) split A down the middle into two subsequences, each of size roughly n/2
• (Conquer:) sort each subsequence by calling merge sort recursively on each.
• (Combine:) merge the two sorted subsequences into a single sorted list.
27
28 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY
Let’s design the algorithm top-down. We’ll assume that the procedure that merges two sorted list is
available to us. We’ll implement it later. Because the algorithm is called recursively on sublists, in
addition to passing in the array itself, we will pass in two indices, which indicate the first and last indices
of the sub-array that we are to sort. The call MergeSort(A, p, r) will sort the sub-array A[p : r] and
return the sorted result in the same sub-array.Here is the overview. If r = p, then this means that there is
only one element to sort, and we may return immediately. Otherwise if (p = r) there are at least two
elements, and we will invoke the divide-and-conquer. We find the index q, midway between p and r,
namely q = (p +r)/2 (rounded down to the nearest integer). Then we split the array into sub-arrays
A[p : q] and A[q +1 : r]. Call MergeSort recursively to sort each sub-array. Finally, we invoke a
procedure (which we have yet to write) which merges these two sub-arrays into a single sorted array.
Here is the MergeSort algorithm.
MERGE-SORT( array A, int p, int r)
1 if (p < r)
2 then
3 q ←(p +r)/2
4 MERGE-SORT(A, p, q) // sort A[p..q]
5 MERGE-SORT(A, q +1, r) // sort A[q +1..r]
6 MERGE(A, p, q, r) // merge the two pieces
The following figure illustrates the dividing (splitting) procedure.
7 5 2 4 1 6 3 0
1 6 3 0 7 5 2 4
7 5 2 4 1 6 3 0
7 5 2 4 1
6
3 0
split
Figure 3.1: Merge sort divide phase
Merging: All that is left is to describe the procedure that merges two sorted lists. Merge(A, p, q, r)
assumes that the left sub-array, A[p : q], and the right sub-array, A[q +1 : r], have already been sorted.
We merge these two sub-arrays by copying the elements to a temporary working array called B. For
convenience, we will assume that the array B has the same index range A, that is, B[p : r]. (One nice
thing about pseudo-code, is that we can make these assumptions, and leave them up to the programmer to
figure out how to implement it.) We have to indices i and j, that point to the current elements of each
3.1. MERGE SORT 29
sub-array. We move the smaller element into the next position of B (indicated by index k) and then
increment the corresponding index (either i or j). When we run out of elements in one array, then we just
copy the rest of the other array into B. Finally, we copy the entire contents of B back into A. (The use of
the temporary array is a bit unpleasant, but this is impossible to overcome entirely. It is one of the
shortcomings of MergeSort, compared to some of the other efficient sorting algorithms.)
Here is the merge algorithm:
MERGE( array A, int p, int q int r)
1 int B[p..r]; int i ←k ←p; int j ←q +1
2 while (i ≤ q) and (j ≤ r)
3 do if (A[i] ≤ A[j])
4 then B[k++ ] ←A[i++ ]
5 else B[k++ ] ←A[j++ ]
6 while (i ≤ q)
7 do B[k++ ] ←A[i++ ]
8 while (j ≤ r)
9 do B[k++ ] ←A[j++ ]
10 for i ←p to r
11 do A[i] ←B[i]
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
0 1 3 6 2 4 5 7
5 7 2 4 1 6 0 3
7 5 2 4 1
6
3 0
merge
Figure 3.2: Merge sort: combine phase
3.1.1 Analysis of Merge Sort
First let us consider the running time of the procedure Merge(A, p, q, r). Let n = r −p +1 denote the
total length of both the left and right sub-arrays. What is the running time of Merge as a function of n?
The algorithm contains four loops (none nested in the other). It is easy to see that each loop can be
executed at most n times. (If you are a bit more careful you can actually see that all the while-loops
30 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY
together can only be executed n times in total, because each execution copies one new element to the
array B, and B only has space for n elements.) Thus the running time to Merge n items is Θ(n). Let us
write this without the asymptotic notation, simply as n. (We’ll see later why we do this.)
Now, how do we describe the running time of the entire MergeSort algorithm? We will do this through
the use of a recurrence, that is, a function that is defined recursively in terms of itself. To avoid
circularity, the recurrence for a given value of n is defined in terms of values that are strictly smaller than
n. Finally, a recurrence has some basis values (e.g. for n = 1), which are defined explicitly.
Let T(n) denote the worst case running time of MergeSort on an array of length n. If we call MergeSort
with an array containing a single item (n = 1) then the running time is constant. We can just write
T(n) = 1, ignoring all constants. For n > 1, MergeSort splits into two halves, sorts the two and then
merges them together. The left half is of size n/2| and the right half is n/2|. How long does it take to
sort elements in sub array of size n/2|? We do not know this but because n/2| < n for n > 1, we can
express this as T(n/2|). Similarly the time taken to sort right sub array is expressed as T(n/2|). In
conclusion we have
T(n) =

1 if n = 1,
T(n/2|) +T(n/2|) +n otherwise
This is called recurrence relation, i.e., a recursively defined function. Divide-and-conquer is an
important design technique, and it naturally gives rise to recursive algorithms. It is thus important to
develop mathematical techniques for solving recurrences, either exactly or asymptotically.
Let’s expand the terms.
T(1) = 1
T(2) = T(1) +T(1) +2 = 1 +1 +2 = 4
T(3) = T(2) +T(1) +3 = 4 +1 +3 = 8
T(4) = T(2) +T(2) +4 = 8 +8 +4 = 12
T(5) = T(3) +T(2) +5 = 8 +4 +5 = 17
. . .
T(8) = T(4) +T(4) +8 = 12 +12 +8 = 32
. . .
T(16) = T(8) +T(8) +16 = 32 +32 +16 = 80
. . .
T(32) = T(16) +T(16) +32 = 80 +80 +32 = 192
What is the pattern here? Let’s consider the ratios T(n)/n for powers of 2:
T(1)/1 = 1 T(8)/8 = 4
T(2)/2 = 2 T(16)/16 = 5
T(4)/4 = 3 T(32)/32 = 6
This suggests T(n)/n = log n +1 Or, T(n) = nlog n +n which is Θ(nlog n) (using the limit rule).
3.1. MERGE SORT 31
3.1.2 The Iteration Method for Solving Recurrence Relations
Floor and ceilings are a pain to deal with. If n is assumed to be a power of 2 (2
k
= n), this will simplify
the recurrence to
T(n) =

1 if n = 1,
2T(n/2) +n otherwise
The iteration method turns the recurrence into a summation. Let’s see how it works. Let’s expand the
recurrence:
T(n) = 2T(n/2) +n
= 2(2T(n/4) +n/2) +n
= 4T(n/4) +n +n
= 4(2T(n/8) +n/4) +n +n
= 8T(n/8) +n +n +n
= 8(2T(n/16) +n/8) +n +n +n
= 16T(n/16) +n +n +n +n
If n is a power of 2 then let n = 2
k
or k = log n.
T(n) = 2
k
T(n/(2
k
)) + (n +n +n + +n)
. .. .
ktimes
= 2
k
T(n/(2
k
)) +kn
= 2
(log n)
T(n/(2
(log n)
)) + (log n)n
= 2
(log n)
T(n/n) + (log n)n
= nT(1) +nlog n = n +nlog n
3.1.3 Visualizing Recurrences Using the Recursion Tree
Iteration is a very powerful technique for solving recurrences. But, it is easy to get lost in all the symbolic
manipulations and lose sight of what is going on. Here is a nice way to visualize what is going on in
iteration. We can describe any recurrence in terms of a tree, where each expansion of the recurrence takes
us one level deeper in the tree.
Recall that the recurrence for MergeSort (which we simplified by assuming that n is a power of 2, and
hence could drop the floors and ceilings)
T(n) =

1 if n = 1,
2T(n/2) +n otherwise
Suppose that we draw the recursion tree for MergeSort, but each time we merge two lists, we label that
node of the tree with the time it takes to perform the associated (nonrecursive) merge. Recall that to
32 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY
merge two lists of size m/2 to a list of size m takes Θ(m) time, which we will just write as m. Below is
an illustration of the resulting recursion tree.
= n
2(n/2) = n
4(n/4) = n
8(n/8) = n
n(n/n) = n
+
+
+
.....
+
log(n)+1
levels
n(log(n)+1)
n
n/2
n/4 n/4
n/8 n/8 n/8 n/8
1 1 1 1 1 ......
n/2
n/4 n/4
n/8 n/8 n/8 n/8
1 1 1 1 1 ......
time to merge
Figure 3.3: Merge sort Recurrence Tree
3.1.4 A Messier Example
The merge sort recurrence was too easy. Let’s try a messier recurrence.
T(n) =

1 if n = 1,
3T(n/4) +n otherwise
Assume n to be a power of 4, i.e., n = 4
k
and k = log
4
n
T(n) = 3T(n/4) +n
= 3(3T(n/16) + (n/4) +n
= 9T(n/16) +3(n/4) +n
= 27T(n/64) +9(n/16) +3(n/4) +n
= . . .
= 3
k
T(
n
4
k
) +3
k−1
(n/4
k−1
)
+ +9(n/16) +3(n/4) +n
= 3
k
T(
n
4
k
) +
k−1
¸
i=0
3
i
4
i
n
3.1. MERGE SORT 33
With n = 4
k
and T(1) = 1
T(n) = 3
k
T(
n
4
k
) +
k−1
¸
i=0
3
i
4
i
n
= 3
log
4
n
T(1) +
(log
4
n)−1
¸
i=0
3
i
4
i
n
= n
log
4
3
+
(log
4
n)−1
¸
i=0
3
i
4
i
n
We used the formula a
log
b
n
= n
log
b
a
. n remains constant throughout the sum and 3
i
/4
i
= (3/4)
i
; we
thus have
T(n) = n
log
4
3
+n
(log
4
n)−1
¸
i=0

3
4

i
The sum is a geometric series; recall that for x = 1
m
¸
i=0
x
i
=
x
m+1
−1
x −1
In this case x = 3/4 and m = log
4
n −1. We get
T(n) = n
log
4
3
+n
(3/4)
log
4
n+1
−1
(3/4) −1
Applying the log identity once more
(3/4)
log
4
n
= n
log
4
(3/4)
= n
log
4
3−log
4
4
= n
log
4
3−1
=
n
log
4
3
n
If we plug this back, we get
T(n) = n
log
4
3
+n
n
log
4
3
n
−1
(3/4) −1
= n
log
4
3
+
n
log
4
3
−n
−1/4
= n
log
4
3
+4(n −n
log
4
3
)
= 4n −3n
log
4
3
With log
4
3 ≈ 0.79, we finally have the result!
T(n) = 4n −3n
log
4
3
≈ 4n −3n
0.79
∈ Θ(n)
34 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY
3.2 Selection Problem
Suppose we are given a set of n numbers. Define the rank of an element to be one plus the number of
elements that are smaller. Thus, the rank of an element is its final position if the set is sorted. The
minimum is of rank 1 and the maximum is of rank n.
Consider the set: ¦5, 7, 2, 10, 8, 15, 21, 37, 41¦. The rank of each number is its position in the sorted
order.
position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Number 2 5 7 8 10 15 21 37 41
For example, rank of 8 is 4, one plus the number of elements smaller than 8 which is 3.
The selection problem is stated as follows:
Given a set A of n distinct numbers and an integer k, 1 ≤ k ≤ n, output the element of A of rank
k.
Of particular interest in statistics is the median. If n is odd then the median is defined to be element of
rank (n +1)/2. When n is even, there are two choices: n/2 and (n +1)/2. In statistics, it is common to
return the average of the two elements.
Medians are useful as a measures of the central tendency of a set especially when the distribution of
values is highly skewed. For example, the median income in a community is a more meaningful measure
than average. Suppose 7 households have monthly incomes 5000, 7000, 2000, 10000, 8000, 15000 and
16000. In sorted order, the incomes are 2000, 5000, 7000, 8000, 10000, 15000, 16000. The median
income is 8000; median is element with rank 4: (7 +1)/2 = 4. The average income is 9000. Suppose the
income 16000 goes up to 450,000. The median is still 8000 but the average goes up to 71,000. Clearly,
the average is not a good representative of the majority income levels.
The selection problem can be easily solved by simply sorting the numbers of A and returning A[k].
Sorting, however, requires Θ(nlog n) time. The question is: can we do better than that? In particular, is
it possible to solve the selections problem in Θ(n) time? The answer is yes. However, the solution is far
from obvious.
3.2.1 Sieve Technique
The reason for introducing this algorithm is that it illustrates a very important special case of
divide-and-conquer, which I call the sieve technique. We think of divide-and-conquer as breaking the
problem into a small number of smaller subproblems, which are then solved recursively. The sieve
technique is a special case, where the number of subproblems is just 1.
The sieve technique works in phases as follows. It applies to problems where we are interested in finding
a single item from a larger set of n items. We do not know which item is of interest, however after doing
some amount of analysis of the data, taking say Θ(nk) time, for some constant k, we find that we do not
3.2. SELECTION PROBLEM 35
know what the desired the item is, but we can identify a large enough number of elements that cannot be
the desired value, and can be eliminated from further consideration. In particular “large enough” means
that the number of items is at least some fixed constant fraction of n (e.g. n/2, n/3). Then we solve the
problem recursively on whatever items remain. Each of the resulting recursive solutions then do the same
thing, eliminating a constant fraction of the remaining set.
3.2.2 Applying the Sieve to Selection
To see more concretely how the sieve technique works, let us apply it to the selection problem. We will
begin with the given array A[1..n]. We will pick an item from the array, called the pivot element which
we will denote by x. We will talk about how an item is chosen as the pivot later; for now just think of it as
a random element of A.
We then partition A into three parts.
1. A[q] contains the pivot element x,
2. A[1..q −1] will contain all the elements that are less than x and
3. A[q +1..n] will contains all elements that are greater than x.
Within each sub array, the items may appear in any order. The following figure shows a partitioned array:
5 4 1 92 3 7 6
pivot
p
r
Before partitioning
3 69 12 5 7 4
p r
After partitioning
q
x > x < x
Figure 3.4: A[p..r] partitioned about the pivot x
3.2.3 Selection Algorithm
It is easy to see that the rank of the The rank of the pivot x is q −p +1 in A[p..r]. Let
rank x = q −p +1. If k = rank x then the pivot is k
th
smallest. If k < rank x then search
A[p..q −1] recursively. If k > rank x then search A[q +1..r] recursively. Find element of rank (k −q)
because we eliminated q smaller elements in A.
SELECT( array A, int p, int r, int k)
36 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY
1 if (p = r)
2 then return A[p]
3 else x ← CHOOSE PIVOT(A, p, r)
4 q ← PARTITION(A, p, r, x)
5 rank x ←q −p +1
6 if k = rank x
7 then return x
8 if k < rank x
9 then return SELECT(A, p, q −1, k)
10 else return SELECT(A, q +1, r, k −q)
Example: select the 6
th
smallest element of the set ¦5, 9, 2, 6, 4, 1, 3, 7¦
4
5
1
9
2
3
7
6
6
3
9
1
2
5
7
4
initial
k=6
partition
pivot=4
rank
x
= 4
6
9
5
7
recurse
k=(6-4)=2
rank
x
= 3
6
9
5
7
partition
pivot=6
rank
x
= 2
6
5
recurse
k=2
6
5
DONE!!
partition
pivot=7
pivot
pivot
pivot
Figure 3.5: Sieve example: select 6
th
smallest element
3.2.4 Analysis of Selection
We will discuss how to choose a pivot and the partitioning later. For the moment, we will assume that
they both take Θ(n) time. How many elements do we eliminate in each time? If x is the largest or the
smallest then we may only succeed in eliminating one element.
5, 9, 2, 6, 4, 1 , 3, 7 pivot is 1
1 , 5, 9, 2, 6, 4, 3, 7 after partition
Ideally, x should have a rank that is neither too large or too small.
Suppose we are able to choose a pivot that causes exactly half of the array to be eliminated in each phase.
3.2. SELECTION PROBLEM 37
This means that we recurse on the remaining n/2 elements. This leads to the following recurrence:
T(n) =

1 if n = 1,
T(n/2) +n otherwise
If we expand this recurrence, we get
T(n) = n +
n
2
+
n
4
+. . .


¸
i=0
n
2
i
= n

¸
i=0
1
2
i
Recall the formula for infinite geometric series; for any |c| < 1,

¸
i=0
c
i
=
1
1 −c
Using this we have
T(n) ≤ 2n ∈ Θ(n)
Let’s think about how we ended up with a Θ(n) algorithm for selection. Normally, a Θ(n) time
algorithm would make a single or perhaps a constant number of passes of the data set. In this algorithm,
we make a number of passes. In fact it could be as many as log n.
However, because we eliminate a constant fraction of the array with each phase, we get the convergent
geometric series in the analysis. This shows that the total running time is indeed linear in n. This lesson
is well worth remembering. It is often possible to achieve linear running times in ways that you would
not expect.
38 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY
Chapter 4
Sorting
For the next series of lectures, we will focus on sorting. There a number of reasons for sorting. Here are a
few important ones. Procedures for sorting are parts of many large software systems. Design of efficient
sorting algorithms is necessary to achieve overall efficiency of these systems.
Sorting is well studied problem from the analysis point of view. Sorting is one of the few problems where
provable lower bounds exist on how fast we can sort. In sorting, we are given an array A[1..n] of n
numbers We are to reorder these elements into increasing (or decreasing) order.
More generally, A is an array of objects and we sort them based on one of the attributes - the key value.
The key value need not be a number. It can be any object from a totally ordered domain. Totally ordered
domain means that for any two elements of the domain, x and y, either x < y, x = y or x > y.
4.1 Slow Sorting Algorithms
There are a number of well-known slow O(n
2
) sorting algorithms. These include the following:
Bubble sort: Scan the array. Whenever two consecutive items are found that are out of order, swap
them. Repeat until all consecutive items are in order.
Insertion sort: Assume that A[1..i −1] have already been sorted. Insert A[i] into its proper position in
this sub array. Create this position by shifting all larger elements to the right.
Selection sort: Assume that A[1..i −1] contain the i −1 smallest elements in sorted order. Find the
smallest element in A[i..n] Swap it with A[i].
These algorithms are easy to implement. But they run in Θ(n
2
) time in the worst case.
39
40 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
4.2 Sorting in O(nlog n) time
We have already seen that Mergesort sorts an array of numbers in Θ(nlog n) time. We will study two
others: Heapsort and Quicksort.
4.2.1 Heaps
A heap is a left-complete binary tree that conforms to the heap order. The heap order property: in a
(min) heap, for every node X, the key in the parent is smaller than or equal to the key in X. In other
words, the parent node has key smaller than or equal to both of its children nodes. Similarly, in a max
heap, the parent has a key larger than or equal both of its children Thus the smallest key is in the root in a
min heap; in the max heap, the largest is in the root.
13 13
16 16 21 21
31 31
26 26
24 24
65 65 32 32
68 68 19 19
13 21 16 24 31 19 68 65 26 32
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 0
1
2 3
7 6 5 4
8 9 10
Figure 4.1: A min-heap
The number of nodes in a complete binary tree of height h is
n = 2
0
+2
1
+2
2
+ +2
h
=
h
¸
i=0
2
i
= 2
h+1
−1
h in terms of n is
h = (log(n +1)) −1 ≈ log n ∈ Θ(log n)
One of the clever aspects of heaps is that they can be stored in arrays without using any pointers. This is
due to the left-complete nature of the binary tree. We store the tree nodes in level-order traversal. Access
4.2. SORTING IN O(NLOGN) TIME 41
to nodes involves simple arithmetic operations:
left(i) : returns 2i, index of left child of node i.
right(i) : returns 2i +1, the right child.
parent(i) : returns i/2|, the parent of i.
The root is at position 1 of the array.
4.2.2 Heapsort Algorithm
We build a max heap out of the given array of numbers A[1..n]. We repeatedly extract the the maximum
item from the heap. Once the max item is removed, we are left with a hole at the root. To fix this, we will
replace it with the last leaf in tree. But now the heap order will very likely be destroyed. We will apply a
heapify procedure to the root to restore the heap. Figure 4.2 shows an array being sorted.
HEAPSORT( array A, int n)
1 BUILD-HEAP(A, n)
2 m ←n
3 while (m ≥ 2)
4 do SWAP(A[1], A[m])
5 m ←m−1
6 HEAPIFY(A, 1, m)
42 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
21 57
19 19
16 44
68 23
13 87

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
21 57
19 19
16 44
68 23
13 87

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
21 57
19 19
16 44
68 23
13 87
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
21 57
19 19
16 44
68 23
sorted
heap violated

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
21 57
19 19
16 44 68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
21 57
19 19
16 44 68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15 21 57
19 19
16 44 68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
19 19
16 44
68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
19 19
16 44
68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12
31 15
19 19
16 44
68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12
31 15 19 19
68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12
31 15 19 19
68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12
31 15 19 19
68 23
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
19 19
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12 31 15
19 19
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
24 12
31 15
sorted

87 57 44 12 15 19 23
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0
sorted
Figure 4.2: Example of heap sort
4.2. SORTING IN O(NLOGN) TIME 43
4.2.3 Heapify Procedure
There is one principal operation for maintaining the heap property. It is called Heapify. (In other books it
is sometimes called sifting down.) The idea is that we are given an element of the heap which we suspect
may not be in valid heap order, but we assume that all of other the elements in the subtree rooted at this
element are in heap order. In particular this root element may be too small. To fix this we “sift” it down
the tree by swapping it with one of its children. Which child? We should take the larger of the two
children to satisfy the heap ordering property. This continues recursively until the element is either larger
than both its children or until its falls all the way to the leaf level. Here is the algorithm. It is given the
heap in the array A, and the index i of the suspected element, and m the current active size of the heap.
The element A[max] is set to the maximum of A[i] and it two children. If max = i then we swap A[i]
and A[max] and then recurse on A[max].
HEAPIFY( array A, int i, int m)
1 l ← LEFT(i)
2 r ← RIGHT(i)
3 max ←i
4 if (l ≤ m)and(A[l] > A[max])
5 then max ←l
6 if (r ≤ m)and(A[r] > A[max])
7 then max ←r
8 if (max = i)
9 then SWAP(A[i], A[max])
10 HEAPIFY(A, max, m)
4.2.4 Analysis of Heapify
We call heapify on the root of the tree. The maximum levels an element could move up is Θ(log n) levels.
At each level, we do simple comparison which O(1). The total time for heapify is thus O(log n). Notice
that it is not Θ(log n) since, for example, if we call heapify on a leaf, it will terminate in Θ(1) time.
4.2.5 BuildHeap
We can use Heapify to build a heap as follows. First we start with a heap in which the elements are not in
heap order. They are just in the same order that they were given to us in the array A. We build the heap by
starting at the leaf level and then invoke Heapify on each node. (Note: We cannot start at the top of the
tree. Why not? Because the precondition which Heapify assumes is that the entire tree rooted at node i is
already in heap order, except for i.) Actually, we can be a bit more efficient. Since we know that each
leaf is already in heap order, we may as well skip the leaves and start with the first non-leaf node. This
will be in position n/2. (Can you see why?)
44 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
Here is the code. Since we will work with the entire array, the parameter m for Heapify, which indicates
the current heap size will be equal to n, the size of array A, in all the calls.
BUILDHEAP( array A, int n)
1 for i ←n/2 downto 1
2 do
3 HEAPIFY(A, i, n)
4.2.6 Analysis of BuildHeap
For convenience, we will assume n = 2
h+1
−1 where h is the height of tree. The heap is a left-complete
binary tree. Thus at each level j, j < h, there are 2
j
nodes in the tree. At level h, there will be 2
h
or less
nodes. How much work does buildHeap carry out? Consider the heap in Figure 4.3:
3
2
1
0 0
1
0 0
2
1
0 0
1
0 0
3 x 1
1 x 4
2 x 2
0 x 8
Figure 4.3: Total work performed in buildheap
At the bottom most level, there are 2
h
nodes but we do not heapify these. At the next level up, there are
2
h−1
nodes and each might shift down 1. In general, at level j, there are 2
h−j
nodes and each may shift
down j levels.
So, if count from bottom to top, level-by-level, the total time is
T(n) =
h
¸
j=0
j2
h−j
=
h
¸
j=0
j
2
h
2
j
We can factor out the 2
h
term:
T(n) = 2
h
h
¸
j=0
j
2
j
4.2. SORTING IN O(NLOGN) TIME 45
How do we solve this sum? Recall the geometric series, for any constant x < 1

¸
j=0
x
j
=
1
1 −x
Take the derivative with respect to x and multiply by x

¸
j=0
jx
j−1
=
1
(1 −x)
2

¸
j=0
jx
j
=
x
(1 −x)
2
We plug x = 1/2 and we have the desired formula:

¸
j=0
j
2
j
=
1/2
(1 − (1/2))
2
=
1/2
1/4
= 2
In our case, we have a bounded sum, but since we the infinite series is bounded, we can use it as an easy
approximation:
T(n) = 2
h
h
¸
j=0
j
2
j
≤ 2
h

¸
j=0
j
2
j
≤ 2
h
2 = 2
h+1
Recall that n = 2
h+1
−1. Therefore
T(n) ≤ n +1 ∈ O(n)
The algorithm takes at least Ω(n) time since it must access every element at once. So the total time for
BuildHeap is Θ(n).
BuildHeap is a relatively complex algorithm. Yet, the analysis yield that it takes Θ(n) time. An intuitive
way to describe why it is so is to observe an important fact about binary trees The fact is that the vast
majority of the nodes are at the lowest level of the tree. For example, in a complete binary tree of height
h, there is a total of n ≈ 2
h+1
nodes.
The number of nodes at the bottom three levels alone is
2
h
+2
h−1
+2
h−2
=
n
2
+
n
4
+
n
8
=
7n
8
= 0.875n
Almost 90% of the nodes of a complete binary tree reside in the 3 lowest levels. Thus, algorithms that
operate on trees should be efficient (as BuildHeap is) on the bottom-most levels since that is where most
of the weight of the tree resides.
46 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
4.2.7 Analysis of Heapsort
Heapsort calls BuildHeap once. This takes Θ(n). Heapsort then extracts roughly n maximum elements
from the heap. Each extract requires a constant amount of work (swap) and O(log n) heapify. Heapsort
is thus O(nlog n).
Is HeapSort Θ(nlog n)? The answer is yes. In fact, later we will show that comparison based sorting
algorithms can not run faster than Ω(nlog n). Heapsort is such an algorithm and so is Mergesort that we
saw ealier.
4.3 Quicksort
Our next sorting algorithm is Quicksort. It is one of the fastest sorting algorithms known and is the
method of choice in most sorting libraries. Quicksort is based on the divide and conquer strategy. Here is
the algorithm:
QUICKSORT( array A, int p, int r)
1 if (r > p)
2 then
3 i ← a random index from [p..r]
4 swap A[i] with A[p]
5 q ← PARTITION(A, p, r)
6 QUICKSORT(A, p, q −1)
7 QUICKSORT(A, q +1, r)
4.3.1 Partition Algorithm
Recall that the partition algorithm partitions the array A[p..r] into three sub arrays about a pivot element
x. A[p..q −1] whose elements are less than or equal to x, A[q] = x, A[q +1..r] whose elements are
greater than x
We will choose the first element of the array as the pivot, i.e. x = A[p]. If a different rule is used for
selecting the pivot, we can swap the chosen element with the first element. We will choose the pivot
randomly.
The algorithm works by maintaining the following invariant condition. A[p] = x is the pivot value.
A[p..q −1] contains elements that are less than x, A[q +1..s −1] contains elements that are greater than
4.3. QUICKSORT 47
or equal to x A[s..r] contains elements whose values are currently unknown.
PARTITION( array A, int p, int r)
1 x ←A[p]
2 q ←p
3 for s ←p +1 to r
4 do if (A[s] < x)
5 then q ←q +1
6 swap A[q] with A[s]
7 swap A[p] with A[q]
8 return q
Figure 4.4 shows the execution trace partition algorithm.
p
5 8 6 4 7 3 1
r
q s
p
5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1
r
q s
p
5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1
r
q s
p
5 3 8 6 7 3 1
r
q s
p
5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1
r
q s
p
5 3 8 6 4 7 1
r
q s
p
r
q s
5 3 8 6 4 7 3
p
r
q s
5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1
p
r
q s
5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1
3
4
3
1
Figure 4.4: Trace of partitioning algorithm
4.3.2 Quick Sort Example
The Figure 4.5 trace out the quick sort algorithm. The first partition is done using the last element, 10, of
the array. The left portion are then partitioned about 5 while the right portion is partitioned about 13.
Notice that 10 is now at its final position in the eventual sorted order. The process repeats as the
algorithm recursively partitions the array eventually sorting it.
48 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12
1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5 1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12
1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5 1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12
1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5 1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5
1 2 3 4 8 6 7 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5 1 2 3 4 8 6 7 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12
1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5 1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5
1 2 3 4 8 6 7 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5 1 2 3 4 8 6 7 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5
1 2 3 4 7 6 8 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5 1 2 3 4 7 6 8 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5

7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4 7 6 12 3 8 7 1 15 5 16 14 9 17 11 13 10 4
7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12 7 6 4 3 8 2 1 5 15 16 14 11 17 9 13 10 12
1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5 1 2 4 3 8 6 7 9 11 16 14 15 12 13 10 17 5
1 2 3 4 8 6 7 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5 1 2 3 4 8 6 7 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5
1 2 3 4 7 6 8 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5 1 2 3 4 7 6 8 9 12 17 14 15 11 13 10 16 5
Figure 4.5: Example of quick sort
4.3. QUICKSORT 49
It is interesting to note (but not surprising) that the pivots form a binary search tree. This is illustrated in
Figure 4.6.
pivot
elements
10
5 13 5
3 9 16 11 3 9
2 4 7 2 4 7 12 15 17
1 6 8 1 6 8
14
Figure 4.6: Quicksort BST
4.3.3 Analysis of Quicksort
The running time of quicksort depends heavily on the selection of the pivot. If the rank of the pivot is
very large or very small then the partition (BST) will be unbalanced. Since the pivot is chosen randomly
in our algorithm, the expected running time is O(nlog n). The worst case time, however, is O(n
2
).
Luckily, this happens rarely.
4.3.4 Worst Case Analysis of Quick Sort
Let’s begin by considering the worst-case performance, because it is easier than the average case. Since
this is a recursive program, it is natural to use a recurrence to describe its running time. But unlike
MergeSort, where we had control over the sizes of the recursive calls, here we do not. It depends on how
the pivot is chosen. Suppose that we are sorting an array of size n, A[1 : n], and further suppose that the
pivot that we select is of rank q, for some q in the range 1 to n. It takes Θ(n) time to do the partitioning
and other overhead, and we make two recursive calls. The first is to the subarray A[1 : q −1] which has
q −1 elements, and the other is to the subarray A[q +1 : n] which has n −q elements. So if we ignore
the Θ(n) (as usual) we get the recurrence:
T(n) = T(q −1) +T(n −q) +n
50 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
This depends on the value of q. To get the worst case, we maximize over all possible values of q. Putting
is together, we get the recurrence
T(n) =

1 if n ≤ 1
max
1≤q≤n
(T(q −1) +T(n −q) +n) otherwise
Recurrences that have max’s and min’s embedded in them are very messy to solve. The key is
determining which value of q gives the maximum. (A rule of thumb of algorithm analysis is that the
worst cases tends to happen either at the extremes or in the middle. So I would plug in the value q = 1,
q = n, and q = n/2 and work each out.) In this case, the worst case happens at either of the extremes. If
we expand the recurrence for q = 1, we get:
T(n) ≤ T(0) +T(n −1) +n
= 1 +T(n −1) +n
= T(n −1) + (n +1)
= T(n −2) +n + (n +1)
= T(n −3) + (n −1) +n + (n +1)
= T(n −4) + (n −2) + (n −1) +n + (n +1)
= T(n −k) +
k−2
¸
i=−1
(n −i)
For the basis T(1) = 1 we set k = n −1 and get
T(n) ≤ T(1) +
n−3
¸
i=−1
(n −i)
= 1 + (3 +4 +5 + + (n −1) +n + (n +1))

n+1
¸
i=1
i =
(n +1)(n +2)
2
∈ Θ(n
2
)
4.3.5 Average-case Analysis of Quicksort
We will now show that in the average case, quicksort runs in Θ(nlog n) time. Recall that when we talked
about average case at the beginning of the semester, we said that it depends on some assumption about
the distribution of inputs. However, in the case of quicksort, the analysis does not depend on the
distribution of input at all. It only depends upon the random choices of pivots that the algorithm makes.
This is good, because it means that the analysis of the algorithm’s performance is the same for all inputs.
In this case the average is computed over all possible random choices that the algorithm might make for
the choice of the pivot index in the second step of the QuickSort procedure above.
To analyze the average running time, we let T(n) denote the average running time of QuickSort on a list
of size n. It will simplify the analysis to assume that all of the elements are distinct. The algorithm has n
4.3. QUICKSORT 51
random choices for the pivot element, and each choice has an equal probability of 1/n of occuring. So
we can modify the above recurrence to compute an average rather than a max, giving:
T(n) =

1 if n ≤ 1
1
n
¸
n
q=1
(T(q −1) +T(n −q) +n) otherwise
The time T(n) is the weighted sum of the times taken for various choices of q. I.e.,
T(n) =

1
n
(T(0) +T(n −1) +n)
+
1
n
(T(1) +T(n −2) +n)
+
1
n
(T(2) +T(n −3) +n)
+ +
1
n
(T(n −1) +T(0) +n)

We have not seen such a recurrence before. To solve it, expansion is possible but it is rather tricky. We
will attempt a constructive induction to solve it. We know that we want a Θ(nlog n). Let us assume that
T(n) ≤ cnlog n for n ≥ 2 where c is a constant.
For the base case n = 2 we have
T(n) =
1
2
2
¸
q=1
(T(q −1) +T(2 −q) +2)
=
1
2

(T(0) +T(1) +2) + (T(1) +T(0) +2)

=
8
2
= 4.
We want this to be at most c2 log 2, i.e.,
T(2) ≤ c2 log 2
or
4 ≤ c2 log 2
therefore
c ≥ 4/(2 log 2) ≈ 2.88.
For the induction step, we assume that n ≥ 3 and The induction hypothesis is that for any n

< n, we
have T(n

) ≤ cn

log n

. We want to prove that it is true for T(n). By expanding T(n) and moving the
52 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
factor of n outside the sum we have
T(n) =
1
n
n
¸
q=1
(T(q −1) +T(n −q) +n)
=
1
n
n
¸
q=1
(T(q −1) +T(n −q)) +n
=
1
n
n
¸
q=1
T(q −1) +
1
n
n
¸
q=1
T(n −q) +n
T(n) =
1
n
n
¸
q=1
T(q −1) +
1
n
n
¸
q=1
T(n −q) +n
Observe that the two sums add up the same values T(0) +T(1) + +T(n −1). One counts up and
other counts down. Thus we can replace them with 2
¸
n−1
q=0
T(q). We will extract T(0) and T(1) and treat
them specially. These two do not follow the formula.
T(n) =
2
n

n−1
¸
q=0
T(q)

+n
=
2
n

T(0) +T(1) +
n−1
¸
q=2
T(q)

+n
We will apply the induction hypothesis for q < n we have
T(n) =
2
n

T(0) +T(1) +
n−1
¸
q=2
T(q)

+n

2
n

1 +1 +
n−1
¸
q=2
(cqlog q)

+n
=
2c
n

n−1
¸
q=2
(cqln q)

+n +
4
n
We have never seen this sum before:
S(n) =
n−1
¸
q=2
(cqln q)
Recall from calculus that for any monotonically increasing function f(x)
b−1
¸
i=a
f(i) ≤
¸
b
a
f(x)dx
4.3. QUICKSORT 53
The function f(x) = xln x is monotonically increasing, and so
S(n) =
n−1
¸
q=2
(cqln q) ≤
¸
n
2
xln x dx (4.1)
We can integrate this by parts:
¸
n
2
xln x dx =
x
2
2
ln x −
x
2
4

n
x=2
¸
n
2
xln x dx =
x
2
2
ln x −
x
2
4

n
x=2
=

n
2
2
ln n −
n
2
4

− (2ln 2 −1)

n
2
2
ln n −
n
2
4
We thus have
S(n) =
n−1
¸
q=2
(cqln q) ≤
n
2
2
ln n −
n
2
4
Plug this back into the expression for T(n) to get
T(n) =
2c
n

n
2
2
ln n −
n
2
4

+n +
4
n
T(n) =
2c
n

n
2
2
ln n −
n
2
4

+n +
4
n
= cnln n −
cn
2
+n +
4
n
= cnln n +n

1 −
c
2

+
4
n
T(n) = cnln n +n

1 −
c
2

+
4
n
To finish the proof,we want all of this to be at most cnln n. For this to happen, we will need to select c
such that
n

1 −
c
2

+
4
n
≤ 0
If we select c = 3, and use the fact that n ≥ 3 we get
n

1 −
c
2

+
4
n
=
3
n

n
2
≤ 1 −
3
2
= −
1
2
≤ 0.
From the basis case we had c ≥ 2.88. Choosing c = 3 satisfies all the constraints. Thus
T(n) = 3nln n ∈ Θ(nlog n).
54 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
4.4 In-place, Stable Sorting
An in-place sorting algorithm is one that uses no additional array for storage. A sorting algorithm is
stable if duplicate elements remain in the same relative position after sorting.
9

3

3

5

6

5

2

1

3

unsorted
1

2

3

3

3

5

5

6

9 stable sort
1

2

3

3

3

5

5

6

9 unstable
Bubble sort, insertion sort and selection sort are in-place sorting algorithms. Bubble sort and insertion
sort can be implemented as stable algorithms but selection sort cannot (without significant modifications).
Mergesort is a stable algorithm but not an in-place algorithm. It requires extra array storage. Quicksort is
not stable but is an in-place algorithm. Heapsort is an in-place algorithm but is not stable.
4.5 Lower Bounds for Sorting
The best we have seen so far is O(nlog n) algorithms for sorting. Is it possible to do better than
O(nlog n)? If a sorting algorithm is solely based on comparison of keys in the array then it is impossible
to sort more efficiently than Ω(nlog n) time. All algorithms we have seen so far are comparison-based
sorting algorithms.
Consider sorting three numbers a
1
, a
2
, a
3
. There are 3! = 6 possible combinations:
(a
1
, a
2
, a
3
), (a
1
, a
3
, a
2
) , (a
3
, a
2
, a
1
)
(a
3
, a
1
, a
2
), (a
2
, a
1
, a
3
) , (a
2
, a
3
, a
1
)
One of these permutations leads to the numbers in sorted order.
The comparison based algorithm defines a decision tree. Here is the tree for the three numbers.
4.5. LOWER BOUNDS FOR SORTING 55
a1 < a2
a1 < a3
a2 <a3
a1 < a3
a2 < a3 2, 1, 3
2, 3, 1 3, 2, 1 1, 3, 2 3, 1, 2
1, 2, 3
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
Figure 4.7: Decision Tree
For n elements, there will be n! possible permutations. The height of the tree is exactly equal to T(n),
the running time of the algorithm. The height is T(n) because any path from the root to a leaf
corresponds to a sequence of comparisons made by the algorithm.
Any binary tree of height T(n) has at most 2
T(n)
leaves. Thus a comparison based sorting algorithm can
distinguish between at most 2
T(n)
different final outcomes. So we have
2
T(n)
≥ n! and therefore
T(n) ≥ log(n!)
We can use Stirling’s approximation for n!:
n! ≥

2πn

n
e

n
Thereofore
T(n) ≥ log


2πn

n
e

n

= log(

2πn) +nlog n −nlog e
∈ Ω(nlog n)
We thus have the following theorem.
Theorem 1
Any comparison-based sorting algorithm has worst-case running time Ω(nlog n).
56 CHAPTER 4. SORTING
Chapter 5
Linear Time Sorting
The lower bound implies that if we hope to sort numbers faster than O(nlog n), we cannot do it by
making comparisons alone. Is it possible to sort without making comparisons? The answer is yes, but
only under very restrictive circumstances. Many applications involve sorting small integers (e.g. sorting
characters, exam scores, etc.). We present three algorithms based on the theme of speeding up sorting in
special cases, by not making comparisons.
5.1 Counting Sort
We will consider three algorithms that are faster and work by not making comparisons. Counting sort
assumes that the numbers to be sorted are in the range 1 to k where k is small. The basic idea is to
determine the rank of each number in final sorted array.
Recall that the rank of an item is the number of elements that are less than or equal to it. Once we know
the ranks, we simply copy numbers to their final position in an output array.
The question is how to find the rank of an element without comparing it to the other elements of the
array?. The algorithm uses three arrays. As usual, A[1..n] holds the initial input, B[1..n] holds the sorted
output and C[1..k] is an array of integers. C[x] is the rank of x in A, where x ∈ [1..k]. The algorithm is
remarkably simple, but deceptively clever. The algorithm operates by first constructing C. This is done in
two steps. First we set C[x] to be the number of elements of A[j] that are equal to x. We can do this
initializing C to zero, and then for each j, from 1 to n, we increment C[A[j]] by 1. Thus, if A[j] = 5, then
the 5th element of C is incremented, indicating that we have seen one more 5. To determine the number
of elements that are less than or equal to x, we replace C[x] with the sum of elements in the sub array
R[1 : x]. This is done by just keeping a running total of the elements of C.
C[x] now contains the rank of x. This means that if x = A[j] then the final position of A[j] should be at
position C[x] in the final sorted array. Thus, we set B[C[x]] = A[j]. Notice We need to be careful if there
are duplicates, since we do not want them to overwrite the same location of B. To do this, we decrement
57
58 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
C[i] after copying.
COUNTING-SORT( array A, array B, int k)
1 for i ←1 to k
2 do C[i] ←0 k times
3 for j ←1 to length[A]
4 do C[A[j]] ←C[A[j]] +1 n times
5 // C[i] now contains the number of elements = i
6 for i ←2 to k
7 do C[i] ←C[i] +C[i −1] k times
8 // C[i] now contains the number of elements ≤ i
9 for j ←length[A] downto 1
10 do B[C[A[j]]] ←A[j]
11 C[A[j]] ←C[A[j]] −1 n times
There are four (unnested) loops, executed k times, n times, k −1 times, and n times, respectively, so the
total running time is Θ(n +k) time. If k = O(n), then the total running time is Θ(n).
Figure 5.1 through 5.19 shows an example of the algorithm. You should trace through the example to
convince yourself how it works.
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1..n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
C[1..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k = 7
Figure 5.1: Initial A and C arrays.
5.1. COUNTING SORT 59
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
1 0 0 0 0 0 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k
Figure 5.2: A[1] = 7 processed
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
1 1 0 0 0 0 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k
Figure 5.3: A[2] = 1 processed
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
1 1 0 1 0 0 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k
Figure 5.4: A[3] = 3 processed
60 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
1 2 0 1 0 0 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k
Figure 5.5: A[4] = 1 processed
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
1 2 1 1 0 0 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
k
Figure 5.6: A[5] = 2 processed
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Input
2 2 2 2 2 1 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
finally
Figure 5.7: C now contains count of elements of A
5.1. COUNTING SORT 61
2
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
2 11 9 9 8 6 4
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
fori= 2 to 7
doC[i ] =C[ i] +C[i -1]
Input
2 2 2 2 1 0
C[1 ..k]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
6 elements <= 3
Figure 5.8: C set to rank each number of A
3
11 2 4 6 8 9 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 11 9 9 8 5 4
C
C[A [11]] =C [A [11]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[6] =B[ C[3]] =B[ C[ A[11]]] =A[11] = 3
Figure 5.9: A[11] placed in output array B
62 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
11 2 4 5 8 9 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 11 9 9 7 5 4
C
C[A [10]] =C [A [10]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[8] =B[ C[4]] =B[ C[ A[10]]] =A[10] = 4
4
Figure 5.10: A[10] placed in output array B
7 2
11 2 4 5 7 9 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 11 9 9 7 5 3
C
C[A [9]] =C [A[9]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[4] =B[ C[2]] =B[ C[ A[9]]] =A[9] = 2
4 2
Figure 5.11: A[9] placed in output array B
5.1. COUNTING SORT 63
11 2 3 5 7 9 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 10 9 9 7 5 3
C
C [A[8]] =C [A [8]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B [1.. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A [1.. n]
Input
B [11] =B[ C[7]] =B[ C[ A[8]]] =A[8] = 7
4 2 7
Figure 5.12: A[8] placed in output array B
10 2 3 5 7 9 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 10 9 8 7 5 3
C
C [A [5]] =C[A [5]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[9] =B[ C[5]] =B[ C[ A[7]]] =A[7] = 5
4 2 7 5
Figure 5.13: A[7] placed in output array B
64 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
10 2 3 5 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 10 9 8 6 5 3
C
C[A [6]] =C [A [6]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[7] =B[ C[4]] =B[ C[ A[6]]] =A[6] = 4
4 2 7 5 4
Figure 5.14: A[6] placed in output array B
10 2 3 5 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 10 9 8 6 5 2
C
C[A [5]] =C [A[5]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[3] =B[ C[2]] =B[ C[ A[5]]] =A[5] = 2
4 2 7 5 4 2
Figure 5.15: A[5] placed in output array B
5.1. COUNTING SORT 65
10 2 2 5 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 10 9 8 6 5 2
C
C[A [4]] =C [A [4]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[2] =B[ C[1]] =B[ C[ A[4]]] =A[4] = 1
4 2 7 5 4 2 1
Figure 5.16: A[4] placed in output array B
10 1 2 5 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 10 9 8 6 4 2
C
C[A [3]] =C [A [3]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[5] =B[ C[3]] =B[ C[ A[3]]] =A[3] = 3
4 2 7 5 4 2 1 3
Figure 5.17: A[3] placed in output array B
66 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
10 1 2 4 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
0 10 9 8 6 4 2
C
C[A [3]] =C [A [3]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[1] =B[ C[1]] =B[ C[ A[2]]] =A[2] = 1
4 2 7 5 4 2 1 3 1
Figure 5.18: A[2] placed in output array B
10 0 2 4 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
0 9 9 8 6 4 2
C
C[A [1]] =C[A [1]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[10] =B[ C[7]] =B[ C[ A[1]]] =A[1] = 7
4 2 7 5 4 2 1 3 1 7
Figure 5.19: B now contains the final sorted data.
Counting sort is not an in-place sorting algorithm but it is stable. Stability is important because data are
often carried with the keys being sorted. radix sort (which uses counting sort as a subroutine) relies on it
to work correctly. Stability achieved by running the loop down from n to 1 and not the other way around:
5.1. COUNTING SORT 67
COUNTING-SORT( array A, array B, int k)
1
.
.
.
2 for j ←length[A] downto 1
3 do B[C[A[j]]] ←A[j]
4 C[A[j]] ←C[A[j]] −1
Figure 5.20 illustrates the stability. The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7, each appear twice. The two 4’s have
been given the superscript “*”. Numbers are placed in the output B array starting from the right. The two
4’s maintain their relative position in the B array. If the sorting algorithm had caused 4
∗∗
to end up on the
left of 4

, the algorithm would be termed unstable.
68 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
11 2 4 5 8 9 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 11 9 9 7 5 4
C
C[A [10]] =C [A [10]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4
*
5 7 2 4
**
3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[8] =B[ C[4]] =B[ C[ A[10]]] =A[10] = 4
4
**
10 2 3 5 7 8 9
C
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
2 10 9 8 6 5 3
C
C[A [6]] =C [A [6]]-1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
7 1 3 1 2 4
*
5 7 2 4
**
3
A[1 .. n]
Input
B[7] =B[ C[4]] =B[ C[ A[6]]] =A[6] = 4
4
**
2 7 5 4
*
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
B[1 .. n]
Output
3
##
7’ 1
^
3
#
1
^^
2
+
4
*
5 7” 2
++
4
**
3
##
A[1 .. n]
Input
4
**
2
++
7

5 4
*
2
+
1
^^
3
#
1
^
7’
Figure 5.20: Stability of counting sort
5.2. BUCKET OR BIN SORT 69
5.2 Bucket or Bin Sort
Assume that the keys of the items that we wish to sort lie in a small fixed range and that there is only one
item with each value of the key. Then we can sort with the following procedure:
1. Set up an array of “bins” - one for each value of the key - in order,
2. Examine each item and use the value of the key to place it in the appropriate bin.
Now our collection is sorted and it only took n operations, so this is an O(n) operation. However, note
that it will only work under very restricted conditions. To understand these restrictions, let’s be a little
more precise about the specification of the problem and assume that there are m values of the key. To
recover our sorted collection, we need to examine each bin. This adds a third step to the algorithm above,
3. Examine each bin to see whether there’s an item in it.
which requires m operations. So the algorithm’s time becomes:
T(n) = c
1
n +c
2
m
and it is strictly O(n +m). If m ≤ n, this is clearly O(n). However if m >> n, then it is O(m). An
implementation of bin sort might look like:
BUCEKTSORT( array A, int n, int M)
1 // Pre-condition: for 1 ≤ i ≤ n, 0 ≤ a[i] < M
2 // Mark all the bins empty
3 for i ←1 to M
4 do bin[i] ←Empty
5 for i ←1 to n
6 do bin[A[i]] ←A[i]
If there are duplicates, then each bin can be replaced by a linked list. The third step then becomes:
3. Link all the lists into one list.
We can add an item to a linked list in O(1) time. There are n items requiring O(n) time. Linking a list to
another list simply involves making the tail of one list point to the other, so it is O(1). Linking m such
lists obviously takes O(m) time, so the algorithm is still O(n +m). Figures 5.21 through 5.23 show the
algorithm in action using linked lists.
70 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
.78
.17
.39
.26
.72
.94
.21
.12
.68
.23
.78
.17
.39
.26
.72
.94
.21
.12
.68
.23
.78 .78
.17 .17
.26 .26
.94 .94
.12 .12
.39 .39 .39
.68 .68
.72 .72
.23 .23 .21 .21
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Step 1: insertion sort
within each list
Figure 5.21: Bucket sort: step 1, placing keys in bins in sorted order
.78
.17
.39
.26
.72
.94
.21
.12
.68
.23
.78
.17
.39
.26
.72
.94
.21
.12
.68
.23
.78 .78
.17 .17
.26 .26
.94 .94
.12 .12
.39 .39 .39
.68 .68
.72 .72
.23 .23 .21 .21
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Step 2: concatenate the
lists
Figure 5.22: Bucket sort: step 2, concatenate the lists
5.3. RADIX SORT 71
.78
.17
.39
.26
.72
.94
.21
.12
.68
.23
.78
.17
.39
.26
.72
.94
.21
.12
.68
.23
.78 .78
.17 .17
.26 .26
.94
.12
.39 .39
.68
.72
.23 .23 .21
Figure 5.23: Bucket sort: the final sorted sequence
5.3 Radix Sort
The main shortcoming of counting sort is that it is useful for small integers, i.e., 1..k where k is small. If
k were a million or more, the size of the rank array would also be a million. Radix sort provides a nice
work around this limitation by sorting numbers one digit at a time.
576 49[4] 9[5]4 [1]76 176
494 19[4] 5[7]6 [1]94 194
194 95[4] 1[7]6 [2]78 278
296 ⇒ 57[6] ⇒ 2[7]8 ⇒ [2]96 ⇒ 296
278 29[6] 4[9]4 [4]94 494
176 17[6] 1[9]4 [5]76 576
954 27[8] 2[9]6 [9]54 954
Here is the algorithm that sorts A[1..n] where each number is d digits long.
RADIX-SORT( array A, int n, int d)
1 for i ←1 to d
2 do stably sort A w.r.t i
th
lowest order digit
72 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING
Chapter 6
Dynamic Programming
6.1 Fibonacci Sequence
Suppose we put a pair of rabbits in a place surrounded on all sides by a wall. How many pairs of rabbits
can be produced from that pair in a year if it is supposed that every month each pair begets a new pair
which from the second month on becomes productive? Resulting sequence is
1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, . . . where each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers.
This problem was posed by Leonardo Pisano, better known by his nickname Fibonacci (son of Bonacci,
born 1170, died 1250). This problem and many others were in posed in his book Liber abaci, published
in 1202. The book was based on the arithmetic and algebra that Fibonacci had accumulated during his
travels. The book, which went on to be widely copied and imitated, introduced the Hindu-Arabic
place-valued decimal system and the use of Arabic numerals into Europe. The rabbits problem in the
third section of Liber abaci led to the introduction of the Fibonacci numbers and the Fibonacci sequence
for which Fibonacci is best remembered today.
This sequence, in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers, has proved extremely
fruitful and appears in many different areas of mathematics and science. The Fibonacci Quarterly is a
modern journal devoted to studying mathematics related to this sequence. The Fibonacci numbers F
n
are
defined as follows:
F
0
= 0
F
1
= 1
F
n
= F
n−1
+F
n−2
73
74 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
The recursive definition of Fibonacci numbers gives us a recursive algorithm for computing them:
FIB(n)
1 if (n < 2)
2 then return n
3 else return FIB(n −1) + FIB(n −2)
Figure ?? shows four levels of recursion for the call fib(8):
fib(4) fib(3)
fib(5)
fib(3) fib(2)
fib(4)
fib(6)
fib(3) fib(2)
fib(4)
fib(2) fib(1)
fib(3)
fib(5)
fib(7)
fib(3) fib(2)
fib(4)
fib(2) fib(1)
fib(3)
fib(5)
fib(2) fib(1)
fib(3)
fib(1) fib(0)
fib(2)
fib(4)
fib(6)
fib(8)
Figure 6.1: Recursive calls during computation of Fibonacci number
A single recursive call to fib(n) results in one recursive call to fib(n −1), two recursive calls to
fib(n −2), three recursive calls to fib(n −3), five recursive calls to fib(n −4) and, in general, F
k−1
recursive calls to fib(n −k) For each call, we’re recomputing the same fibonacci number from scratch.
We can avoid this unnecessary repetitions by writing down the results of recursive calls and looking them
up again if we need them later. This process is called memoization. Here is the algorithm with
memoization.
MEMOFIB(n)
1 if (n < 2)
2 then return n
3 if (F[n] is undefined)
4 then F[n] ← MEMOFIB(n −1) + MEMOFIB(n −2)
5 return F[n]
If we trace through the recursive calls to MEMOFIB, we find that array F[] gets filled from bottom up. I.e.,
first F[2], then F[3], and so on, up to F[n]. We can replace recursion with a simple for-loop that just fills
up the array F[] in that order.
6.2. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 75
This gives us our first explicit dynamic programming algorithm.
ITERFIB(n)
1 F[0] ←0
2 F[1] ←1
3 for i ←2 to n
4 do
5 F[i] ←F[i −1] +F[i −2]
6 return F[n]
This algorithm clearly takes only O(n) time to compute F
n
. By contrast, the original recursive algorithm
takes Θ(φ
n
), φ =
1+

5
2
≈ 1.618. ITERFIB achieves an exponential speedup over the original recursive
algorithm.
6.2 Dynamic Programming
Dynamic programming is essentially recursion without repetition. Developing a dynamic programming
algorithm generally involves two separate steps:
• Formulate problem recursively. Write down a formula for the whole problem as a simple
combination of answers to smaller subproblems.
• Build solution to recurrence from bottom up. Write an algorithm that starts with base cases and
works its way up to the final solution.
Dynamic programming algorithms need to store the results of intermediate subproblems. This is often
but not always done with some kind of table. We will now cover a number of examples of problems in
which the solution is based on dynamic programming strategy.
6.3 Edit Distance
The words “computer” and “commuter” are very similar, and a change of just one letter, p-¿m, will
change the first word into the second. The word “sport” can be changed into “sort” by the deletion of the
‘p’, or equivalently, ‘sort’ can be changed into ‘sport’ by the insertion of ‘p’. The edit distance of two
strings, s1 and s2, is defined as the minimum number of point mutations required to change s1 into s2,
where a point mutation is one of:
• change a letter,
• insert a letter or
76 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
• delete a letter
For example, the edit distance between FOOD and MONEY is at most four:
FOOD −→MOOD −→MON

D
−→MONED −→MONEY
6.3.1 Edit Distance: Applications
There are numerous applications of the Edit Distance algorithm. Here are some examples:
Spelling Correction
If a text contains a word that is not in the dictionary, a ‘close’ word, i.e. one with a small edit distance,
may be suggested as a correction. Most word processing applications, such as Microsoft Word, have
spelling checking and correction facility. When Word, for example, finds an incorrectly spelled word, it
makes suggestions of possible replacements.
Plagiarism Detection
If someone copies, say, a C program and makes a few changes here and there, for example, change
variable names, add a comment of two, the edit distance between the source and copy may be small. The
edit distance provides an indication of similarity that might be too close in some situations.
Computational Molecular Biology DNA is a polymer. The monomer units of DNA are nucleotides, and
the polymer is known as a “polynucleotide.” Each nucleotide consists of a 5-carbon sugar (deoxyribose),
a nitrogen containing base attached to the sugar, and a phosphate group. There are four different types of
nucleotides found in DNA, differing only in the nitrogenous base. The four nucleotides are given one
letter abbreviations as shorthand for the four bases.
• A-adenine
• G-guanine
• C-cytosine
• T-thymine
Double-helix of DNA molecule with nucleotides Figure of Double-helix of DNA molecule with
nucleotides goes here
The edit distance like algorithms are used to compute a distance between DNA sequences (strings over
A,C,G,T, or protein sequences (over an alphabet of 20 amino acids), for various purposes, e.g.:
• to find genes or proteins that may have shared functions or properties
• to infer family relationships and evolutionary trees over different organisms.
6.3. EDIT DISTANCE 77
Speech Recognition
Algorithms similar to those for the edit-distance problem are used in some speech recognition systems.
Find a close match between a new utterance and one in a library of classified utterances.
6.3.2 Edit Distance Algorithm
A better way to display this editing process is to place the words above the other:
S D I M D M
M A T H S
A R T S
The first word has a gap for every insertion (I) and the second word has a gap for every deletion (D).
Columns with two different characters correspond to substitutions (S). Matches (M) do not count. The
Edit transcript is defined as a string over the alphabet M, S, I, D that describes a transformation of one
string into another. For example
S D I M D M
1+ 1+ 1+ 0+ 1+ 0+ = 4
In general, it is not easy to determine the optimal edit distance. For example, the distance between
ALGORITHM and ALTRUISTIC is at most 6.
A L G O R I T H M
A L T R U I S T I C
Is this optimal?
6.3.3 Edit Distance: Dynamic Programming Algorithm
Suppose we have an m-character string A and an n-character string B. Define E(i, j) to be the edit
distance between the first i characters of A and the first j characters of B. For example,
i
. .. .
A L G O R I T H M
A L T R
. .. .
j
U I S T I C
The edit distance between entire strings A and B is E(m, n). The gap representation for the edit
sequences has a crucial “optimal substructure” property. If we remove the last column, the remaining
columns must represent the shortest edit sequence for the remaining substrings. The edit distance is 6 for
the following two words.
78 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
A L G O R I T H M
A L T R U I S T I C
If we remove the last column, the edit distance reduces to 5.
A L G O R I T H
A L T R U I S T I
We can use the optimal substructure property to devise a recursive formulation of the edit distance
problem. There are a couple of obvious base cases:
• The only way to convert an empty string into a string of j characters is by doing j insertions. Thus
E(0, j) = j
• The only way to convert a string of i characters into the empty string is with i deletions:
E(i, 0) = i
There are four possibilities for the last column in the shortest possible edit sequence:
Deletion: Last entry in bottom row is empty.
i=3
. .. .
A L G O R I T H M
A L
. .. .
j=2
T R U I S T I C
In this case
E(i, j) = E(i −1, j) +1
Insertion: The last entry in the top row is empty.
i=5
. .. .
A L G O R I T H M
A L T R U
. .. .
j=5
I S T I C
In this case
E(i, j) = E(i, j −1) +1
6.3. EDIT DISTANCE 79
Substitution: Both rows have characters in the last column.
i=4
. .. .
A L G O R I T H M
A L T
. .. .
j=3
R U I S T I C
If the characters are different, then
E(i, j) = E(i −1, j −1) +1
i=5
. .. .
A L G O R I T H M
A L T R
. .. .
j=4
U I S T I C
If characters are same, no substitution is needed:
E(i, j) = E(i −1, j −1)
Thus the edit distance E(i, j) is the smallest of the four possibilities:
E(i, j) = min

¸
¸
¸
E(i −1, j) +1
E(i, j −1) +1
E(i −1, j −1) +1 if A[i] = B[j]
E(i −1, j −1) if A[i] = B[j]

Consider the example of edit between the words “ARTS” and “MATHS”:
A R T S
M A T H S
The edit distance would be in E(4, 5). If we recursion to compute, we will have
E(4, 5) = min

¸
¸
¸
E(3, 5) +1
E(4, 4) +1
E(3, 4) +1 if A[4] = B[5]
E(3, 4) if A[4] = B[5]

Recursion clearly leads to the same repetitive call pattern that we saw in Fibonnaci sequence. To avoid
this, we will use the DP approach. We will build the solution bottom-up. We will use the base case
E(0, j) to fill first row and the base case E(i, 0) to fill first column. We will fill the remaining E matrix
row by row.
80 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M
A
T
H
S
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
A

2
T

3
H

4
S

5
Table 6.1: First row and first column entries using the base cases
We can now fill the second row. The table not only shows the values of the cells E[i, j] but also arrows
that indicate how it was computed using values in E[i −1, j], E[i, j −1] and E[i −1, j −1]. Thus, if a cell
E[i, j] has a down arrow from E[i −1, j] then the minimum was found using E[i −1, j]. For a right arrow,
the minimum was found using E[i, j −1]. For a diagonal down right arrow, the minimum was found
using E[i −1, j −1]. There are certain cells that have two arrows pointed to it. In such a case, the
minimum could be obtained from the diagonal E[i −1, j −1] and either of E[i −1, j] and E[i, j −1]. We
will use these arrows later to determine the edit script.
6.3. EDIT DISTANCE 81
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
A

2
T

3
H

4
S

5
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
A

2
T

3
H

4
S

5
Table 6.2: Computing E[1, 1] and E[1, 2]
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
A

2
T

3
H

4
S

5
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
A

2
T

3
H

4
S

5
Table 6.3: Computing E[1, 3] and E[1, 4]
An edit script can be extracted by following a unique path from E[0, 0] to E[4, 5]. There are three possible
paths in the current example. Let us follow these paths and compute the edit script. In an actual
implementation of the dynamic programming version of the edit distance algorithm, the arrows would be
recorded using an appropriate data structure. For example, each cell in the matrix could be a record with
fields for the value (numeric) and flags for the three incoming arrows.
82 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
A

2
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
T

3

2
`
2
`
2 →3
H

4

3
`↓
3
`↓
3
`
3
S

5

4
`↓
4
`↓
4
`
3
Table 6.4: The final table with all E[i, j] entries computed
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
A

2
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
T

3

2
`
2
`
2 →3
H

4

3
`↓
3
`↓
3
`
3
S

5

4
`↓
4
`↓
4
`
3
Solution path 1:
1+ 0+ 1+ 1+ 0 = 3
D M S S M
M A T H S
A R T S
6.3. EDIT DISTANCE 83
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
A

2
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
T

3

2
`
2
`
2 →3
H

4

3
`↓
3
`↓
3
`
3
S

5

4
`↓
4
`↓
4
`
3
Table 6.5: Possible edit scripts. The red arrows from E[0, 0] to E[4, 5] show the paths that can be followed
to extract edit scripts.
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
A

2
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
T

3

2
`
2
`
2 →3
H

4

3
`↓
3
`↓
3
`
3
S

5

4
`↓
4
`↓
4
`
3
Solution path 2:
1+ 1+ 0+ 1+ 0 = 3
S S M D M
M A T H S
A R T S
84 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
A R T S
0 →1 →2 →3 →4
M

1
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
A

2
`
1
`
→2
`
→3
`
→4
T

3

2
`
2
`
2 →3
H

4

3
`↓
3
`↓
3
`
3
S

5

4
`↓
4
`↓
4
`
3
Solution path 3:
1+ 0+ 1+ 0+ 1+ 0 = 3
D M I M D M
M A T H S
A R T S
6.3.4 Analysis of DP Edit Distance
There are Θ(n
2
) entries in the matrix. Each entry E(i, j) takes Θ(1) time to compute. The total running
time is Θ(n
2
).
6.4 Chain Matrix Multiply
Suppose we wish to multiply a series of matrices:
A
1
A
2
. . . A
n
In what order should the multiplication be done? A p q matrix A can be multiplied with a q r matrix
B. The result will be a p r matrix C. In particular, for 1 ≤ i ≤ p and 1 ≤ j ≤ r,
C[i, j] =
q
¸
k=1
A[i, k]B[k, j]
There are (p r) total entries in C and each takes O(q) to compute.
C[i, j] =
q
¸
k=1
A[i, k]B[k, j]
Thus the total number of multiplications is p q r. Consider the case of 3 matrices: A
1
is 5 4, A
2
is
4 6 and A
3
is 6 2 The multiplication can be carried out either as ((A
1
A
2
)A
3
) or (A
1
(A
2
A
3
)). The
cost of the two is
((A
1
A
2
)A
3
) = (5 4 6) + (5 6 2)= 180
(A
1
(A
2
A
3
)) = (4 6 2) + (5 4 2) = 88
6.4. CHAIN MATRIX MULTIPLY 85
There is considerable savings achieved even for this simple example. In general, however, in what order
should we multiply a series of matrices A
1
A
2
. . . A
n
. Matrix multiplication is an associative but not
commutative operation. We are free to add parenthesis the above multiplication but the order of matrices
can not be changed. The Chain Matrix Multiplication Problem is stated as follows:
Given a sequence A
1
, A
2
, . . . , A
n
and dimensions p
0
, p
1
, . . . , p
n
where A
i
is of dimension
p
i−1
p
i
, determine the order of multiplication that minimizes the number of operations.
We could write a procedure that tries all possible parenthesizations. Unfortunately, the number of ways
of parenthesizing an expression is very large. If there are n items, there are n −1 ways in which outer
most pair of parentheses can placed.
(A
1
)(A
2
A
3
A
4
. . . A
n
)
or (A
1
A
2
)(A
3
A
4
. . . A
n
)
or (A
1
A
2
A
3
)(A
4
. . . A
n
)
. . . . . .
or (A
1
A
2
A
3
A
4
. . . A
n−1
)(A
n
)
Once we split just after the k
th
matrix, we create two sublists to be parethesized, one with k and other
with n −k matrices.
(A
1
A
2
. . . A
k
) (A
k+1
. . . A
n
)
We could consider all the ways of parenthesizing these two. Since these are independent choices, if there
are L ways of parenthesizing the left sublist and R ways to parenthesize the right sublist, then the total is
L R. This suggests the following recurrence for P(n), the number of different ways of parenthesizing n
items:
P(n) =

1 if n = 1,
¸
n−1
k=1
P(k)P(n −k) if n ≥ 2
This is related to a famous function in combinatorics called the Catalan numbers. Catalan numbers are
related the number of different binary trees on n nodes. Catalan number is given by the formula:
C(n) =
1
n +1

2n
n

In particular, P(n) = C(n −1) C(n) ∈ Ω(4
n
/n
3/2
) The dominating term is the exponential 4
n
thus
P(n) will grow large very quickly. So this approach is not practical.
6.4.1 Chain Matrix Multiplication-Dynamic Programming Formulation
The dynamic programming solution involves breaking up the problem into subproblems whose solutions
can be combined to solve the global problem. Let A
i..j
be the result of multiplying matrices i through j. It
is easy to see that A
i..j
is a p
i−1
p
j
matrix.
A
3
4×5
A
4
5×2
A
5
2×8
A
6
8×7
= A
3..6
4×7
86 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
At the highest level of parenthesization, we multiply two matrices
A
1..n
= A
1..k
A
k+1..n
1 ≤ k ≤ n −1.
The question now is: what is the optimum value of k for the split and how do we parenthesis the
sub-chains A
1..k
and A
k+1..n
. We can not use divide and conquer because we do not know what is the
optimum k. We will have to consider all possible values of k and take the best of them. We will apply
this strategy to solve the subproblems optimally.
We will store the solutions to the subproblem in a table and build the table bottom-up (why)? For
1 ≤ i ≤ j ≤ n, let m[i, j] denote the minimum number of multiplications needed to compute A
i..j
. The
optimum can be described by the following recursive formulation.
• If i = j, there is only one matrix and thus m[i, i] = 0 (the diagonal entries).
• If i < j, the we are asking for the product A
i..j
.
• This can be split by considering each k, i ≤ k < j, as A
i..k
times A
k+1..j
.
The optimum time to compute A
i..k
is m[i, k] and optimum time for A
k+1..j
is in m[k +1, j]. Since A
i..k
is a p
i−1
p
k
matrix and A
k+1..j
is p
k
p
j
matrix, the time to multiply them is p
i−1
p
k
p
j
. This
suggests the following recursive rule:
m[i, i] = 0
m[i, j] = min
i≤k<j
(m[i, k] +m[k +1, j] +p
i−1
p
k
p
j
)
We do not want to calculate m entries recursively. So how should we proceed? We will fill m along the
diagonals. Here is how. Set all m[i, i] = 0 using the base condition. Compute cost for multiplication of a
sequence of 2 matrices. These are m[1, 2], m[2, 3], m[3, 4], . . . , m[n −1, n]. m[1, 2], for example is
m[1, 2] = m[1, 1] +m[2, 2] +p
0
p
1
p
2
For example, for m for product of 5 matrices at this stage would be:
m[1, 1]
←m[1, 2]

m[2, 2]
←m[2, 3]

m[3, 3]
←m[3, 4]

m[4, 4]
←m[4, 5]

m[5, 5]
6.4. CHAIN MATRIX MULTIPLY 87
Next, we compute cost of multiplication for sequences of three matrices. These are
m[1, 3], m[2, 4], m[3, 5], . . . , m[n −2, n]. m[1, 3], for example is
m[1, 3] = min

m[1, 1] +m[2, 3] +p
0
p
1
p
3
m[1, 2] +m[3, 3] +p
0
p
2
p
3
We repeat the process for sequences of four, five and higher number of matrices. The final result will end
up in m[1, n].
Example: Let us go through an example. We want to find the optimal multiplication order for
A
1
(5×4)
A
2
(4×6)
A
3
(6×2)
A
4
(2×7)
A
5
(7×3)
We will compute the entries of the m matrix starting with the base condition. We first fill that main
diagonal:
0
0
0
0
0
Next, we compute the entries in the first super diagonal, i.e., the diagonal above the main diagonal:
m[1, 2] = m[1, 1] +m[2, 2] +p
0
p
1
p
2
= 0 +0 +5 4 6 = 120
m[2, 3] = m[2, 2] +m[3, 3] +p
1
p
2
p
3
= 0 +0 +4 6 2 = 48
m[3, 4] = m[3, 3] +m[4, 4] +p
2
p
3
p
4
= 0 +0 +6 2 7 = 84
m[4, 5] = m[4, 4] +m[5, 5] +p
3
p
4
p
5
= 0 +0 +2 7 3 = 42
The matrix m now looks as follows:
0 120
0 48
0 84
0 42
0
We now proceed to the second super diagonal. This time, however, we will need to try two possible
values for k. For example, there are two possible splits for computing m[1, 3]; we will choose the split
that yields the minimum:
m[1, 3] = m[1, 1] +m[2, 3] +p
0
p
1
p
3
== 0 +48 +5 4 2 = 88
m[1, 3] = m[1, 2] +m[3, 3] +p
0
p
2
p
3
= 120 +0 +5 6 2 = 180
the minimum m[1, 3] = 88 occurs with k = 1
88 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
Similarly, for m[2, 4] and m[3, 5]:
m[2, 4] = m[2, 2] +m[3, 4] +p
1
p
2
p
4
= 0 +84 +4 6 7 = 252
m[2, 4] = m[2, 3] +m[4, 4] +p
1
p
3
p
4
= 48 +0 +4 2 7 = 104
minimum m[2, 4] = 104 at k = 3
m[3, 5] = m[3, 3] +m[4, 5] +p
2
p
3
p
5
= 0 +42 +6 2 3 = 78
m[3, 5] = m[3, 4] +m[5, 5] +p
2
p
4
p
5
= 84 +0 +6 7 3 = 210
minimum m[3, 5] = 78 at k = 3
With the second super diagonal computed, the m matrix looks as follow:
0 120 88
0 48 104
0 84 78
0 42
0
We repeat the process for the remaining diagonals. However, the number of possible splits (values of k)
increases:
m[1, 4] = m[1, 1] +m[2, 4] +p
0
p
1
p
4
= 0 +104 +5 4 7 = 244
m[1, 4] = m[1, 2] +m[3, 4] +p
0
p
2
p
4
= 120 +84 +5 6 7 = 414
m[1, 4] = m[1, 3] +m[4, 4] +p
0
p
3
p
4
= 88 +0 +5 2 7 = 158
minimum m[1, 4] = 158 at k = 3
m[2, 5] = m[2, 2] +m[3, 5] +p
1
p
2
p
5
= 0 +78 +4 6 3 = 150
m[2, 5] = m[2, 3] +m[4, 5] +p
1
p
3
p
5
= 48 +42 +4 2 3 = 114
m[2, 5] = m[2, 4] +m[5, 5] +p
1
p
4
p
5
= 104 +0 +4 7 3 = 188
minimum m[2, 5] = 114 at k = 3
The matrix m at this stage is:
6.4. CHAIN MATRIX MULTIPLY 89
0 120 88 158
0 48 104 114
0 84 78
0 42
0
That leaves the m[1, 5] which can now be computed:
m[1, 5] = m[1, 1] +m[2, 5] +p
0
p
1
p
5
= 0 +114 +5 4 3 = 174
m[1, 5] = m[1, 2] +m[3, 5] +p
0
p
2
p
5
= 120 +78 +5 6 3 = 288
m[1, 5] = m[1, 3] +m[4, 5] +p
0
p
3
p
5
= 88 +42 +5 2 3 = 160
m[1, 5] = m[1, 4] +m[5, 5] +p
0
p
4
p
5
= 158 +0 +5 7 3 = 263
minimum m[1, 5] = 160 at k = 3
We thus have the final cost matrix.
0 120 88 158 160
0 0 48 104 114
0 0 0 84 78
0 0 0 0 42
0 0 0 0 0
Here is the order in which m entries are calculated
0 1 5 8 10
0 0 2 6 9
0 0 0 3 7
0 0 0 0 4
0 0 0 0 0
and the split k values that led to a minimum m[i, j] value
0 1 1 3 3
0 2 3 3
0 3 3
0 4
0
90 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
Based on the computation, the minimum cost for multiplying the five matrices is 160 and the optimal
order for multiplication is
((A
1
(A
2
A
3
))(A
4
A
5
))
This can be represented as a binary tree
A
1
A
2
A
3
2
1
A
4
A
5
4
3
Figure 6.2: Optimum matrix multiplication order for the five matrices example
Here is the dynamic programming based algorithm for computing the minimum cost of chain matrix
multiplication.
MATRIX-CHAIN(p, N)
1 for i = 1, N
2 do m[i, i] ←0
3 for L = 2, N
4 do
5 for i = 1, n −L +1
6 do j ←i +L −1
7 m[i, j] ←∞
8 for k = 1, j −1
9 do t ←m[i, k] +m[k +1, j] +p
i−1
p
k
p
j
10 if (t < m[i, j])
11 then m[i, j] ←t; s[i, j] ←k
Analysis: There are three nested loops. Each loop executes a maximum n times. Total time is thus
Θ(n
3
).
The s matrix stores the values k. The s matrix can be used to extracting the order in which matrices are to
be multiplied. Here is the algorithm that caries out the matrix multiplication to compute A
i..j
:
6.5. 0/1 KNAPSACK PROBLEM 91
MULTIPLY(i, j)
1 if (i = j)
2 then return A[i]
3 else k ←s[i, j]
4 X ← MULTIPLY(i, k)
5 Y ← MULTIPLY(k +1, j)
6 return X Y
6.5 0/1 Knapsack Problem
A thief goes into a jewelry store to steal jewelry items. He has a knapsack (a bag) that he would like to
fill up. The bag has a limit on the total weight of the objects placed in it. If the total weight exceeds the
limit, the bag would tear open. The value of of the jewelry items varies for cheap to expensive. The
thief’s goal is to put items in the bag such that the value of the items is maximized and the weight of the
items does not exceed the weight limit of the bag. Another limitation is that an item can either be put in
the bag or not - fractional items are not allowed. The problem is: what jewelry should the thief choose
that satisfy the constraints?
Formally, the problem can be stated as follows: Given a knapsack with maximum capacity W, and a set S
consisting of n items Each item i has some weight w
i
and value value v
i
(all w
i
, v
i
and W are integer
values) How to pack the knapsack to achieve maximum total value of packed items? For example,
consider the following scenario:
Figure 6.3: Knapsack can hold W = 20
Item i Weight w
i
Value v
i
1 2 3
2 3 4
3 4 5
4 5 8
5 9 10
The knapsack problem belongs to the domain of optimization problems. Mathematically, the problem is
maximize
¸
i∈T
v
i
subject to
¸
i∈T
w
i
≤ W
92 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
The problem is called a “0-1” problem, because each item must be entirely accepted or rejected. How do
we solve the problem. We could try the brute-force solution:
• Since there are n items, there are 2
n
possible combinations of the items (an item either chosen or
not).
• We go through all combinations and find the one with the most total value and with total weight
less or equal to W
Clearly, the running time of such a brute-force algorithm will be O(2
n
). Can we do better? The answer is
“yes”, with an algorithm based on dynamic programming Let us recap the steps in the dynamic
programming strategy:
1. Simple Subproblems: We should be able to break the original problem to smaller subproblems
that have the same structure
2. Principle of Optimality: Recursively define the value of an optimal solution. Express the solution
of the original problem in terms of optimal solutions for smaller problems.
3. Bottom-up computation: Compute the value of an optimal solution in a bottom-up fashion by
using a table structure.
4. Construction of optimal solution: Construct an optimal solution from computed information.
Let us try this: If items are labelled 1, 2, . . . , n, then a subproblem would be to find an optimal solution
for
S
k
= items labelled 1, 2, . . . , k
This is a valid subproblem definition. The question is: can we describe the final solution S
n
in terms of
subproblems S
k
? Unfortunately, we cannot do that. Here is why. Consider the optimal solution if we can
choose items 1 through 4 only.
Solution S
4
• Items chosen are 1, 2, 3, 4
• Total weight: 2 +3 +4 +5 = 14
• Total value: 3 +4 +5 +8 = 20
Item w
i
v
i
1 2 3
2 3 4
3 4 5
4 5 8
5 9 10
Now consider the optimal solution when items 1 through 5 are available.
6.5. 0/1 KNAPSACK PROBLEM 93
Solution S
5
• Items chosen are 1, 3, 4, 5
• Total weight: 2 +4 +5 +9 = 20
• Total value: 3 +5 +8 +10 = 26
S
4
is not part of S
5
!!
Item w
i
v
i
1 2 3
2 3 4
3 4 5
4 5 8
5 9 10
The solution for S
4
is not part of the solution for S
5
. So our definition of a subproblem is flawed and we
need another one.
6.5.1 0/1 Knapsack Problem: Dynamic Programming Approach
For each i ≤ n and each w ≤ W, solve the knapsack problem for the first i objects when the capacity is
w. Why will this work? Because solutions to larger subproblems can be built up easily from solutions to
smaller ones. We construct a matrix V[0 . . . n, 0 . . . W]. For 1 ≤ i ≤ n, and 0 ≤ j ≤ W, V[i, j] will store
the maximum value of any set of objects {1, 2, . . . , i} that can fit into a knapsack of weight j. V[n, W]
will contain the maximum value of all n objects that can fit into the entire knapsack of weight W.
To compute entries of V we will imply an inductive approach. As a basis, V[0, j] = 0 for 0 ≤ j ≤ W
since if we have no items then we have no value. We consider two cases:
Leave object i: If we choose to not take object i, then the optimal value will come about by considering
how to fill a knapsack of size j with the remaining objects {1, 2, . . . , i −1}. This is just V[i −1, j].
Take object i: If we take object i, then we gain a value of v
i
. But we use up w
i
of our capacity. With the
remaining j −w
i
capacity in the knapsack, we can fill it in the best possible way with objects
{1, 2, . . . , i −1}. This is v
i
+V[i −1, j −w
i
]. This is only possible if w
i
≤ j.
This leads to the following recursive formulation:
V[i, j] = −∞ if j < 0
V[0, j] = 0 if j ≥ 0
V[i, j] =

V[i −1, j] if w
i
> j
max
¸
V[i −1, j], v
i
+V[i −1, j −w
i
]
¸
if w
i
≤ j
A naive evaluation of this recursive definition is exponential. So, as usual, we avoid re-computation by
making a table.
Example: The maximum weight the knapsack can hold is W is 11. There are five items to choose from.
Their weights and values are presented in the following table:
94 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
Weight limit (j): 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28
The [i, j] entry here will be V[i, j], the best value obtainable using the first i rows of items if the
maximum capacity were j. We begin by initializating and first row.
Weight limit: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6 0
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18 0
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22 0
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28 0
Recall that we take V[i, j] to be 0 if either i or j is ≤ 0. We then proceed to fill in top-down, left-to-right
always using
V[i, j] = max
¸
V[i −1, j], v
i
+V[i −1, j −w
i
]
¸
Weight limit: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6 0 1 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18 0
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22 0
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28 0
Weight limit: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6 0 1 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18 0 1 6 7 7 18 19 24 25 25 25 25
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22 0
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28 0
As an illustration, the value of V[3, 7] was computed as follows:
V[3, 7] =max
¸
V[3 −1, 7], v
3
+V[3 −1, 7 −w
3
]
¸
=max
¸
V[2, 7], 18 +V[2, 7 −5]
¸
=max
¸
7, 18 +6
¸
=24
6.5. 0/1 KNAPSACK PROBLEM 95
Weight limit: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6 0 1 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18 0 1 6 7 7 18 19 24 25 25 25 25
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22 0 1 6 7 7 18 22 24 28 29 29 40
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28 0
Finally, we have
Weight limit: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6 0 1 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18 0 1 6 7 7 18 19 24 25 25 25 25
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22 0 1 6 7 7 18 22 24 28 29 29 40
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28 0 1 6 7 7 18 22 28 29 34 35 40
The maximum value of items in the knapsack is 40, the bottom-right entry). The dynamic programming
approach can now be coded as the following algorithm:
KNAPSACK(n, W)
1 for w = 0, W
2 do V[0, w] ←0
3 for i = 0, n
4 do V[i, 0] ←0
5 for w = 0, W
6 do if (w
i
≤ w & v
i
+V[i −1, w−w
i
] > V[i −1, w])
7 then V[i, w] ←v
i
+V[i −1, w−w
i
]
8 else V[i, w] ←V[i −1, w]
The time complexity is clearly O(n W). It must be cautioned that as n and W get large, both time and
space complexity become significant.
Constructing the Optimal Solution
The algorithm for computing V[i, j] does not keep record of which subset of items gives the optimal
solution. To compute the actual subset, we can add an auxiliary boolean array keep[i, j] which is 1 if we
decide to take the i
th
item and 0 otherwise. We will use all the values keep[i, j] to determine the optimal
subset T of items to put in the knapsack as follows:
• If keep[n, W] is 1, then n ∈ T. We can now repeat this argument for keep[n −1, W −w
n
].
• If kee[n, W] is 0, the n ∈ T and we repeat the argument for keep[n −1, W].
96 CHAPTER 6. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING
We will add this to the knapsack algorithm:
KNAPSACK(n, W)
1 for w = 0, W
2 do V[0, w] ←0
3 for i = 0, n
4 do V[i, 0] ←0
5 for w = 0, W
6 do if (w
i
≤ w & v
i
+V[i −1, w−w
i
] > V[i −1, w])
7 then V[i, w] ←v
i
+V[i −1, w−w
i
]; keep[i, w] ←1
8 else V[i, w] ←V[i −1, w]; keep[i, w] ←0
9 // output the selected items
10 k ←W
11 for i = n downto 1
12 do if (keep[i, k] = 1)
13 then output i
14 k ←k −w
i
Here is the keep matrix for the example problem.
Weight limit: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
w
1
= 1 v
1
= 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
2
= 2 v
2
= 6 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
3
= 5 v
3
= 18 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
w
4
= 6 v
4
= 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1
w
5
= 7 v
5
= 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0
When the item selection algorithm is applied, the selected items are 4 and 3. This is indicated by the
boxed entries in the table above.
Chapter 7
Greedy Algorithms
An optimization problem is one in which you want to find, not just a solution, but the best solution.
Search techniques look at many possible solutions. E.g. dynamic programming or backtrack search. A “
greedy algorithm” sometimes works well for optimization problems
A greedy algorithm works in phases. At each phase:
• You take the best you can get right now, without regard for future consequences.
• You hope that by choosing a local optimum at each step, you will end up at a global optimum.
For some problems, greedy approach always gets optimum. For others, greedy finds good, but not always
best. If so, it is called a greedy heuristic, or approximation. For still others, greedy approach can do very
poorly.
7.1 Example: Counting Money
Suppose you want to count out a certain amount of money, using the fewest possible bills (notes) and
coins. A greedy algorithm to do this would be: at each step, take the largest possible note or coin that
does not overshoot.
while (N > 0){
give largest denomination coin ≤ N
reduce N by value of that coin
}
Consider the currency in U.S.A. There are paper notes for one dollar, five dollars, ten dollars, twenty
dollars, fifty dollars and hundred dollars. The notes are also called “bills”. The coins are one cent, five
cents (called a “nickle”), ten cents (called a “dime”) and twenty five cents (a “quarter”). In Pakistan, the
currency notes are five rupees, ten rupees, fifty rupees, hundred rupees, five hundred rupees and thousand
97
98 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
rupees. The coins are one rupee and two rupees. Suppose you are asked to give change of $6.39 (six
dollars and thirty nine cents), you can choose:
• a $5 note
• a $1 note to make $6
• a 25 cents coin (quarter), to make $6.25
• a 10 cents coin (dime), to make $6.35
• four 1 cents coins, to make $6.39
Notice how we started with the highest note, $5, before moving to the next lower denomination.
Formally, the Coin Change problem is: Given k denominations d
1
, d
2
, . . . , d
k
and given N, find a way of
writing
N = i
1
d
1
+i
2
d
2
+ +i
k
d
k
such that
i
1
+i
2
+ +i
k
is minimized.
The “size” of problem is k.
The greedy strategy works for the coin change problem but not always. Here is an example where it fails.
Suppose, in some (fictional) monetary system, “ krons” come in 1 kron, 7 kron, and 10 kron coins Using
a greedy algorithm to count out 15 krons, you would get A 10 kron piece Five 1 kron pieces, for a total of
15 krons This requires six coins. A better solution, however, would be to use two 7 kron pieces and one 1
kron piece This only requires three coins The greedy algorithm results in a solution, but not in an optimal
solution
The greedy approach gives us an optimal solution when the coins are all powers of a fixed denomination.
N = i
0
D
0
+i
1
D
1
+i
2
D
2
+ +i
k
D
k
Note that this is N represented in based D. U.S.A coins are multiples of 5: 5 cents, 10 cents and 25 cents.
7.1.1 Making Change: Dynamic Programming Solution
The general coin change problem can be solved using Dynamic Programming. Set up a Table,
C[1..k, 0..N] in which the rows denote available denominations, d
i
; (1 ≤ i ≤ k) and columns denote the
amount from 0 . . . N units, (0 ≤ j ≤ N). C[i, j] denotes the minimum number of coins, required to pay
an amount j using only coins of denominations 1 to i. C[k, N] is the solution required.
To pay an amount j units, using coins of denominations 1 to i, we have two choices:
1. either chose NOT to use any coins of denomination i,
2. or chose at least one coin of denomination i, and also pay the amount (j −d
i
).
7.2. GREEDY ALGORITHM: HUFFMAN ENCODING 99
To pay (j −d
i
) units it takes C[i, j −d
i
] coins. Thus,
C[i, j] = 1 +C[i, j −d
i
]
Since we want to minimize the number of coins used,
C[i, j] = min(C[i −1, j], 1 +C[i, j −d
i
])
Here is the dynamic programming based algorithm for the coin change problem.
COINS(N)
1 d[1..n] = {1, 4, 6} // (coinage, for example)
2 for i = 1 to k
3 do c[i, 0] ←0
4 for i = 1 to k
5 do for j = 1 to N
6 do if (i = 1 & j < d[i])
7 then c[i, j] ←∞
8 else if (i = 1)
9 then c[i, j] ←1 +c[1, j −d[1]]
10 else if (j < d[i])
11 then c[i, j] ←c[i −1, j]
12 else c[i, j] ← min (c[i −1, j], 1 +c[i, j −d[i]])
13 return c[k, N]
7.1.2 Complexity of Coin Change Algorithm
Greedy algorithm (non-optimal) takes O(k) time. Dynamic Programming takes O(kN) time. Note that
N can be as large as 2
k
so the dynamic programming algorithm is really exponential in k.
7.2 Greedy Algorithm: Huffman Encoding
The Huffman codes provide a method of encoding data efficiently. Normally, when characters are coded
using standard codes like ASCII. Each character is represented by a fixed-length codeword of bits, e.g., 8
bits per character. Fixed-length codes are popular because it is very easy to break up a string into its
individual characters, and to access individual characters and substrings by direct indexing. However,
fixed-length codes may not be he most efficient from the perspective of minimizing the total quantity of
data.
Consider the string “ abacdaacac”. if the string is coded with ASCII codes, the message length would be
10 8 = 80 bits. We will see shortly that the same string encoded with a variable length Huffman
encoding scheme will produce a shorter message.
100 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
7.2.1 Huffman Encoding Algorithm
Here is how the Huffman encoding algorithm works. Given a message string, determine the frequency of
occurrence (relative probability) of each character in the message. This can be done by parsing the
message and counting how many time each character (or symbol) appears. The probability is the number
of occurrence of a character divided by the total characters in the message. The frequencies and
probabilities for the example string “ abacdaacac” are
character a b c d
frequency 5 1 3 1
probability 0.5 0.1 0.3 0.1
Next, create binary tree (leaf) node for each symbol (character) that occurs with nonzero frequency Set
node weight equal to the frequency of the symbol. Now comes the greedy part: Find two nodes with
smallest frequency. Create a new node with these two nodes as children, and with weight equal to the
sum of the weights of the two children. Continue until we have a single tree.
Finding two nodes with the smallest frequency can be done efficiently by placing the nodes in a
heap-based priority queue. The min-heap is maintained using the frequencies. When a new node is
created by combining two nodes, the new node is placed in the priority queue. Here is the Huffman tree
building algorithm.
HUFFMAN(N, symbol[1..N], freq[1..N])
1 for i = 1 to N
2 do t ←TreeNode(symbol[i], freq[i])
3 pq.insert(t, freq[i]) // priority queue
4 for i = 1 to N−1
5 do x = pq.remove(); y = pq.remove()
6 z ←new TreeNode
7 z.left ←x; z.right ←y
8 z.freq ←x.freq +y.freq
9 pq.insert(z, z.freq);
10 return pq.remove(); // root
Figure 7.1 shows the tree built for the example message “abacdaacac”
7.2. GREEDY ALGORITHM: HUFFMAN ENCODING 101
b
110
a
0
c
10
d
111
0 1
0
0
1
1
Figure 7.1: Huffman binary tree for the string “abacdaacac”
Prefix Property:
The codewords assigned to characters by the Huffman algorithm have the property that no codeword is a
prefix of any other:
character a b c d
frequency 5 1 3 1
probability 0.5 0.1 0.3 0.1
codeword 0 110 10 111
The prefix property is evident by the fact that codewords are leaves of the binary tree. Decoding a prefix
code is simple. We traverse the root to the leaf letting the input 0 or 1 tell us which branch to take.
Expected encoding length:
If a string of n characters over the alphabet C = {a, b, c, d} is encoded using 8-bit ASCII, the length of
encoded string is 8n. For example, the string “abacdaacac” will require 8 10 = 80 bits. The same
string encoded with Huffman codes will yield
a b a c d a a c a c
0 110 0 10 111 0 0 10 0 10
This is just 17 bits, a significant saving!. For a string of n characters over this alphabet, the expected
encoded string length is
n(0.5 1 +0.1 3 +0.3 2 +0.1 3) = 1.7n
In general, let p(x) be the probability of occurrence of a character, and let d
T
(x) denote the length of the
codeword relative to some prefix tree T. The expected number of bits needed to encode a text with n
characters is given by
B(T) = n
¸
x∈C
p(x)d
T
(x)
102 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
7.2.2 Huffman Encoding: Correctness
Huffman algorithm uses a greedy approach to generate a prefix code T that minimizes the expected
length B(T) of the encoded string. In other words, Huffman algorithm generates an optimum prefix code.
The question that remains is that why is the algorithm correct?
Recall that the cost of any encoding tree T is
B(T) = n
¸
x∈C
p(x)d
T
(x)
Our approach to prove the correctness of Huffman Encoding will be to show that any tree that differs
from the one constructed by Huffman algorithm can be converted into one that is equal to Huffman’s tree
without increasing its costs. Note that the binary tree constructed by Huffman algorithm is a full binary
tree.
Claim:
Consider two characters x and y with the smallest probabilities. Then there is optimal code tree in which
these two characters are siblings at the maximum depth in the tree.
Proof:
Let T be any optimal prefix code tree with two siblings b and c at the maximum depth of the tree. Such a
tree is shown in Figure 7.2Assume without loss of generality that
p(b) ≤ p(c) and p(x) ≤ p(y)
x
c
y
b
T
Figure 7.2: Optimal prefix code tree T
Since x and y have the two smallest probabilities (we claimed this), it follows that
p(x) ≤ p(b) and p(y) ≤ p(c)
7.2. GREEDY ALGORITHM: HUFFMAN ENCODING 103
Since b and c are at the deepest level of the tree, we know that
d(b) ≥ d(x) and d(c) ≥ d(y) (d is the depth)
Thus we have
p(b) −p(x) ≥ 0
and
d(b) −d(x) ≥ 0
Hence their product is non-negative. That is,
(p(b) −p(x)) (d(b) −d(x)) ≥ 0
Now swap the positions of x and b in the tree
x
c
y
b
T
Figure 7.3: Swap x and b in tree prefix tree T
This results in a new tree T

104 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
x c
y
b
T’
Figure 7.4: Prefix tree T

after x and b are swapped
Let’s see how the cost changes. The cost of T

is
B(T

) = B(T) −p(x)d(x) +p(x)d(b) −p(b)d(b) +p(b)d(x)
= B(T) +p(x)[d(b) −d(x)] −p(b)[d(b) −d(x)]
= B(T) − (p(b) −p(x))(d(b) −d(x))
≤ B(T) because (p(b) −p(x))(d(b) −d(x)) ≥ 0
Thus the cost does not increase, implying that T

is an optimal tree.
By switching y with c we get the tree T

. Using a similar argument, we can show that T

is also optimal.
x c
y
b
T’
=⇒
x
c
y
b
T’’
The final tree T

satisfies the claim we made earlier, i.e., consider two characters x and y with the
7.3. ACTIVITY SELECTION 105
smallest probabilities. Then there is optimal code tree in which these two characters are siblings at the
maximum depth in the tree.
The claim we just proved asserts that the first step of Huffman algorithm is the proper one to perform (the
greedy step). The complete proof of correctness for Huffman algorithm follows by induction on n.
Claim: Huffman algorithm produces the optimal prefix code tree.
Proof: The proof is by induction on n, the number of characters. For the basis case, n = 1, the tree
consists of a single leaf node, which is obviously optimal. We want to show it is true with exactly n
characters.
Suppose we have exactly n characters. The previous claim states that two characters x and y with the
lowest probability will be siblings at the lowest level of the tree. Remove x and y and replace them with a
new character z whose probability is p(z) = p(x) +p(y). Thus n −1 characters remain.
Consider any prefix code tree T made with this new set of n −1 characters. We can convert T into prefix
code tree T

for the original set of n characters by replacing z with nodes x and y. This is essentially
undoing the operation where x and y were removed an replaced by z. The cost of the new tree T

is
B(T

) = B(T) −p(z)d(z) +p(x)[d(z) +1] +p(y)[d(z) +1]
= B(T) − (p(x) +p(y))d(z) + (p(x) +p(y))[d(z) +1]
= B(T) + (p(x) +p(y))[d(z) +1 −d(z)]
= B(T) +p(x) +p(y)
The cost changes but the change depends in no way on the structure of the tree T (T is for n −1
characters). Therefore, to minimize the cost of the final tree T

, we need to build the tree T on n −1
characters optimally. By induction, this is exactly what Huffman algorithm does. Thus the final tree is
optimal.
7.3 Activity Selection
The activity scheduling is a simple scheduling problem for which the greedy algorithm approach provides
an optimal solution. We are given a set S = {a
1
, a
2
, . . . , a
n
} of n activities that are to be scheduled to use
some resource. Each activity a
i
must be started at a given start time s
i
and ends at a given finish time f
i
.
An example is that a number of lectures are to be given in a single lecture hall. The start and end times
have be set up in advance. The lectures are to be scheduled. There is only one resource (e.g., lecture hall)
Some start and finish times may overlap. Therefore, not all requests can be honored. We say that two
activities a
i
and a
j
are non-interfering if their start-finish intervals do not overlap. I.e,
(s
i
, f
i
) ∩ (s
j
, f
j
) = ∅. The activity selection problem is to select a maximum-size set of mutually
non-interfering activities for use of the resource.
So how do we schedule the largest number of activities on the resource? Intuitively, we do not like long
106 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
activities Because they occupy the resource and keep us from honoring other requests. This suggests the
greedy strategy: Repeatedly select the activity with the smallest duration (f
i
−s
i
) and schedule it,
provided that it does not interfere with any previously scheduled activities. Unfortunately, this turns out
to be non-optimal
Here is a simple greedy algorithm that works: Sort the activities by their finish times. Select the activity
that finishes first and schedule it. Then, among all activities that do not interfere with this first job,
schedule the one that finishes first, and so on.
SCHEDULE(a[1..N])
1 sort a[1..N] by finish times
2 A ←{a[1]}; // schedule activity 1 first
3 prev ←1; // most recently scheduled
4 for i = 2 to N
5 do if (a[i].start ≥ a[prev].finish)
6 then A ←A∪ a[i]; prev ←i
Figure 7.5 shows an example of the activity scheduling algorithm. There are eight activities to be
scheduled. Each is represented by a rectangle. The width of a rectangle indicates the duration of an
activity. The eight activities are sorted by their finish times. The eight rectangles are arranged to show the
sorted order. Activity a
1
is scheduled first. Activities a
2
and a
3
interfere with a
1
so they ar not selected.
The next to be selected is a
4
. Activities a
5
and a
6
interfere with a
4
so are not chosen. The last one to be
chosen is a
7
. Eventually, only three out of the eight are scheduled.
Timing analysis: Time is dominated by sorting of the activities by finish times. Thus the complexity is
O(Nlog N).
7.3. ACTIVITY SELECTION 107
a
1
a
2
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
Input
a
1
a
2
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
Add a
1
a
1
a
2
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
Add a
4
a
1
a
2
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
Add a
7
Figure 7.5: Example of greedy activity scheduling algorithm
7.3.1 Correctness of Greedy Activity Selection
Our proof of correctness is based on showing that the first choice made by the algorithm is the best
possible. And then using induction to show that the algorithm is globally optimal. The proof structure is
noteworthy because many greedy correctness proofs are based on the same idea: Show that any other
solution can be converted into the greedy solution without increasing the cost.
Claim:
Let S = {a
1
, a
2
, . . . , a
n
} of n activities, sorted by increasing finish times, that are to be scheduled to use
some resource. Then there is an optimal schedule in which activity a
1
is scheduled first.
Proof:
Let A be an optimal schedule. Let x be the activity in A with the smallest finish time. If x = a
1
then we
are done. Otherwise, we form a new schedule A

by replacing x with activity a
1
.
108 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
X
a
2
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
a
1
a
2
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
X = a
1
Figure 7.6: Activity X = a
1
We claim that A

= A− {x} ∪ {a
1
} is a feasible schedule, i.e., it has no interfering activities. This
because A− {x} cannot have any other activities that start before x finishes, since otherwise, these
activities will interfere with x.
X
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
a
1
a
3
a
4
a
5
a
6
a
7
a
8
A - {X} +{a
1
}
X
Figure 7.7: New schedule A

by replacing x with ctivity a
1
.
Since a
1
is by definition the first activity to finish, it has an earlier finish time than x. Thus a
1
cannot
interfere with any of the activities in A− {x}. Thus, A

is a feasible schedule. Clearly A and A

contain
the same number of activities implying that A

is also optimal.
Claim:
7.4. FRACTIONAL KNAPSACK PROBLEM 109
The greedy algorithm gives an optimal solution to the activity scheduling problem.
Proof:
The proof is by induction on the number of activities. For the basis case, if there are no activities, then the
greedy algorithm is trivially optimal. For the induction step, let us assume that the greedy algorithm is
optimal on any set of activities of size strictly smaller than |S| and we prove the result for S. Let S

be the
set of activities that do not interfere with activity a
1
, That is
S

= {a
i
∈ S|s
i
≥ f
1
}
Any solution for S

can be made into a solution for S by simply adding activity a
1
, and vice versa.
Activity a
1
is in the optimal schedule (by the above previous claim). It follows that to produce an optimal
schedule for the overall problem, we should first schedule a
1
and then append the optimal schedule for
S

. But by induction (since |S

| < |S|), this exactly what the greedy algorithm does.
7.4 Fractional Knapsack Problem
Earlier we saw the 0-1 knapsack problem. A knapsack can only carry W total weight. There are n items;
the i
th
item is worth v
i
and weighs w
i
. Items can either be put in the knapsack or not. The goal was to
maximize the value of items without exceeding the total weight limit of W. In contrast, in the fractional
knapsack problem, the setup is exactly the same. But, one is allowed to take fraction of an item for a
fraction of the weight and fraction of value. The 0-1 knapsack problem is hard to solve. However, there is
a simple and efficient greedy algorithm for the fractional knapsack problem.
Let ρ
i
= v
i
/w
i
denote the value per unit weight ratio for item i. Sort the items in decreasing order of ρ
i
.
Add items in decreasing order of ρ
i
. If the item fits, we take it all. At some point there is an item that
does not fit in the remaining space. We take as much of this item as possible thus filling the knapsack
completely.
110 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
Greedy solution
5
10
20
30
40
knapsack $30
6 2 5 3 4
$20 $100 $90 $160
60
5
20
35
$140
$100
$30
$270
Figure 7.8: Greedy solution to the fractional knapsack problem
It is easy to see that the greedy algorithm is optimal for the fractional knapsack problem. Given a room
with sacks of gold, silver and bronze, one (thief?) would probably take as much gold as possible. Then
take as much silver as possible and finally as much bronze as possible. It would never benefit to take a
little less gold so that one could replace it with an equal weight of bronze.
We can also observe that the greedy algorithm is not optimal for the 0-1 knapsack problem. Consider
the example shown in the Figure 7.9. If you were to sort the items by ρ
i
, then you would first take the
items of weight 5, then 20, and then (since the item of weight 40 does not fit) you would settle for the
item of weight 30, for a total value of $30 + $100 + $90 = $220. On the other hand, if you had been less
greedy, and ignored the item of weight 5, then you could take the items of weights 20 and 40 for a total
value of $100+$160 = $260. This is shown in Figure 7.10.
7.4. FRACTIONAL KNAPSACK PROBLEM 111
5
10
20
30
40
knapsack $30
6 2 5 3 4
$20 $100 $90 $160
60
Greedy solution
to 0-1 knapsack
5
20
30
$90
$100
$30
$220
Figure 7.9: Greedy solution for the 0-1 knapsack problem (non-optimal)
5
10
20
30
40
knapsack $30
6 2 5 3 4
$20 $100 $90 $160
60
Optimal solution
to 0-1 knapsack
20
40
$160
$100
$260
Figure 7.10: Optimal solution for the 0-1 knapsack problem
112 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS
Chapter 8
Graphs
We begin a major new topic: Graphs. Graphs are important discrete structures because they are a flexible
mathematical model for many application problems. Any time there is a set of objects and there is some
sort of “connection” or “relationship” or “interaction” between pairs of objects, a graph is a good way to
model this. Examples of this can be found in computer and communication networks transportation
networks, e.g., roads VLSI, logic circuits surface meshes for shape description in computer-aided design
and GIS precedence constraints in scheduling systems.
A graph G = (V, E) consists of a finite set of vertices V (or nodes) and E, a binary relation on V called
edges. E is a set of pairs from V. If a pair is ordered, we have a directed graph. For unordered pair, we
have an undirected graph.
1 3
2 4
graph
1 3
2 4
multi graph
1 3
2 4
directed graph
(digraph)
1
2 4
digraph
self-loop
Figure 8.1: Types of graphs
A vertex w is adjacent to vertex v if there is an edge from v to w.
113
114 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
1 3
2 4
adjacent vertices
1 & 2
1 & 3
1 & 4
2 & 4
Figure 8.2: Adjacent vertices
In an undirected graph, we say that an edge is incident on a vertex if the vertex is an endpoint of the
edge. of the edge
1 3
2 4
e1 incident on vertices 1 & 2
e1
e2
e3
e4
e2 incident on vertices 1 & 3
e3 incident on vertices 1 & 4
e4 incident on vertices 2 & 4
Figure 8.3: Incidence of edges on vertices
In a digraph, the number of edges coming out of a vertex is called the out-degree of that vertex. Number
of edges coming in is the in-degree. In an undirected graph, we just talk of degree of a vertex. It is the
number of edges incident on the vertex.
115
1 3
2 4
in: 1
out: 3
in: 1
out: 1
in: 1
out: 2
in: 3
out: 0
Figure 8.4: In and out degrees of vertices of a graph
For a digraph G = (V, E),
¸
v∈V
in-degree(v) =
¸
v∈V
out-degree(v) = |E|
where |E| means the cardinality of the set E, i.e., the number of edges.
For an undirected graph G = (V, E),
¸
v∈V
degree(v) = 2|E|
where |E| means the cardinality of the set E, i.e., the number of edges.
A path in a directed graphs is a sequence of vertices 'v
0
, v
1
, . . . , v
k
` such that (v
i−1
, v
i
) is an edge for
i = 1, 2, . . . , k. The length of the paths is the number of edges, k. A vertex w is reachable from vertex
u is there is a path from u to w. A path is simple if all vertices (except possibly the fist and last) are
distinct.
A cycle in a digraph is a path containing at least one edge and for which v
0
= v
k
. A Hamiltonian cycle
is a cycle that visits every vertex in a graph exactly once. A Eulerian cycle is a cycle that visits every
edge of the graph exactly once. There are also “path” versions in which you do not need return to the
starting vertex.
116 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
1 3
2 4
cycles:
1-3-4-2-1
1-4-2-1
1-2-1
Figure 8.5: Cycles in a directed graph
A graph is said to be acyclic if it contains no cycles. A graph is connected if every vertex can reach
every other vertex. A directed graph that is acyclic is called a directed acyclic graph (DAG).
There are two ways of representing graphs: using an adjacency matrix and using an adjacency list. Let
G = (V, E) be a digraph with n = |V| and let e = |E|. We will assume that the vertices of G are indexed
{1, 2, . . . , n}.
An adjacency matrix is a n n matrix defined for 1 ≤ v, w ≤ n.
A[v, w] =

1 if (v, w) ∈ E
0 otherwise
An adjacency list is an array Adj[1..n] of pointers where for 1 ≤ v ≤ n, Adj[v] points to a linked list
containing the vertices which are adjacent to v
Adjacency matrix requires Θ(n
2
) storage and adjacency list requires Θ(n +e) storage.
1
2 3
0
1 2 3
1
2
3
1 1 1
1
1
0
0 0
Adjacency Matrix
1 2 3
3
2
1
2
3
Adj
Adjacency List
Figure 8.6: Graph Representations
8.1 Graph Traversal
To motivate our first algorithm on graphs, consider the following problem. We are given an undirected
graph G = (V, E) and a source vertex s ∈ V. The length of a path in a graph is the number of edges on
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 117
the path. We would like to find the shortest path from s to each other vertex in the graph. The final result
will be represented in the following way. For each vertex v ∈ V, we will store d[v] which is the distance
(length of the shortest path) from s to v. Note that d[s] = 0. We will also store a predecessor (or parent)
pointer π[v] which is the first vertex along the shortest path if we walk from v backwards to s. We will set
π[s] = Nil.
There is a simple brute-force strategy for computing shortest paths. We could simply start enumerating
all simple paths starting at s, and keep track of the shortest path arriving at each vertex. However, there
can be as many as n! simple paths in a graph. To see this, consider a fully connected graph shown in
Figure 8.7
v
s
u w
Figure 8.7: Fully connected graph
There n choices for source node s, (n −1) choices for destination node, (n −2) for first hop (edge) in
the path, (n −3) for second, (n −4) for third down to (n − (n −1)) for last leg. This leads to n! simple
paths. Clearly this is not feasible.
8.1.1 Breadth-first Search
Here is a more efficient algorithm called the breadth-first search (BFS) Start with s and visit its adjacent
nodes. Label them with distance 1. Now consider the neighbors of neighbors of s. These would be at
distance 2. Now consider the neighbors of neighbors of neighbors of s. These would be at distance 3.
Repeat this until no more unvisited neighbors left to visit. The algorithm can be visualized as a wave
front propagating outwards from s visiting the vertices in bands at ever increasing distances from s.
118 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
s
Figure 8.8: Source vertex for breadth-first-search (BFS)
s
1
1
1
Figure 8.9: Wave reaching distance 1 vertices during BFS
s
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
Figure 8.10: Wave reaching distance 2 vertices during BFS
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 119
s
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
Figure 8.11: Wave reaching distance 3 vertices during BFS
8.1.2 Depth-first Search
Breadth-first search is one instance of a general family of graph traversal algorithms. Traversing a graph
means visiting every node in the graph. Another traversal strategy is depth-first search (DFS). DFS
procedure can be written recursively or non-recursively. Both versions are passed s initially.
RECURSIVEDFS(v)
1 if (v is unmarked )
2 then mark v
3 for each edge (v, w)
4 do RECURSIVEDFS(w)
ITERATIVEDFS(s)
1 PUSH(s)
2 while stack not empty
3 do v ← POP()
4 if v is unmarked
5 then mark v
6 for each edge (v, w)
7 do PUSH(w)
8.1.3 Generic Graph Traversal Algorithm
The generic graph traversal algorithm stores a set of candidate edges in some data structures we’ll call a
“bag”. The only important properties of the “bag” are that we can put stuff into it and then later take stuff
120 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
back out. Here is the generic traversal algorithm.
TRAVERSE(s)
1 put (∅, s) in bag
2 while bag not empty
3 do take (p, v) from bag
4 if (v is unmarked )
5 then mark v
6 parent (v) ←p
7 for each edge (v, w)
8 do put (v, w) in bag
Notice that we are keeping edges in the bag instead of vertices. This is because we want to remember,
whenever we visit v for the first time, which previously-visited vertex p put v into the bag. The vertex p
is call the parent of v.
The running time of the traversal algorithm depends on how the graph is represented and what data
structure is used for the bag. But we can make a few general observations.
• Since each vertex is visited at most once, the for loop in line 7 is executed at most V times.
• Each edge is put into the bag exactly twice; once as (u, v) and once as (v, u), so line 8 is executed
at most 2E times.
• Finally, since we can’t take out more things out of the bag than we put in, line 3 is executed at most
2E +1 times.
• Assume that the graph is represented by an adjacency list so the overhead of the for loop in line 7 is
constant per edge.
If we implement the bag by using a stack, we have depth-first search (DFS) or traversal.
TRAVERSE(s)
1 push(∅, s)
2 while stack not empty
3 do pop(p, v)
4 if (v is unmarked )
5 then mark v
6 parent (v) ←p
7 for each edge (v, w)
8 do push(v, w)
Figures 8.12 to 8.20 show a trace of the DFS algorithm applied to a graph. The figures show the content
of the stack during the execution of the algorithm.
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 121
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
, s
stack
Figure 8.12: Trace of Depth-first-search algorithm: source vertex ‘s’
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
stack
(a,b)
(a,c)
Figure 8.13: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘a’ popped
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
stack
(a,b)
(c,b)
(c,d)
(c,a)
(c,f)
Figure 8.14: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘c’ popped
122 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
stack
(f,d)
(f,c)
(f,g)
(a,b)
(c,b)
(c,d)
(c,a)
(f,e)
Figure 8.15: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘f’ popped
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
stack
(g,f)
(g,e)
(f,d)
(f,c)
(a,b)
(c,b)
(c,d)
(c,a)
(f,e)
Figure 8.16: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘g’ popped
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 123
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
(e,d)
(e,f)
(e,g)
(e,b)
stack
(g,f)
(f,d)
(f,c)
(a,b)
(c,b)
(c,d)
(c,a)
(f,e)
Figure 8.17: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘e’ popped
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
(e,d)
(e,f)
(e,g)
stack
(g,f)
(f,d)
(f,c)
(a,b)
(c,b)
(c,d)
(c,a)
(f,e)
Figure 8.18: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘b’ popped
124 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
stack
Figure 8.19: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘d’ popped
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
s
BFS Tree
Figure 8.20: Trace of DFS algorithm: the final DFS tree
Each execution of line 3 or line 8 in the TRAVERSE-DFS algorithm takes constant time. So the overall
running time is O(V +E). Since the graph is connected, V ≤ E +1, this is O(E).
If we implement the bag by using a queue, we have breadth-first search (BFS). Each execution of line 3
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 125
or line 8 still takes constant time. So overall running time is still O(E).
TRAVERSE(s)
1 enqueue(∅, s)
2 while queue not empty
3 do dequeue(p, v)
4 if (v is unmarked )
5 then mark v
6 parent (v) ←p
7 for each edge (v, w)
8 do enqueue(v, w)
If the graph is represented using an adjacency matrix, the finding of all the neighbors of vertex in line 7
takes O(V) time. Thus depth-first and breadth-first take O(V
2
) time overall.
Either DFS or BFS yields a spanning tree of the graph. The tree visits every vertex in the graph. This fact
is established by the following lemma:
Lemma:
The generic TRAVERSE(S) marks every vertex in any connected graph exactly once and the set of edges
(v, parent(v)) with parent(v) = ∅ form a spanning tree of the graph.
Proof:
First, it should be obvious that no vertex is marked more than once. Clearly, the algorithm marks s. Let
v = s be a vertex and let s → →u →v be a path from s to v with the minimum number of edges.
Since the graph is connected, such a path always exists. If the algorithm marks u, then it must put (u, v)
into the bag, so it must take (u, v) out of the bag at which point v must be marked. Thus, by induction on
the shortest-path distance from s, the algorithm marks every vertex in the graph.
Call an edge (v, parent(v)) with parent(v) = ∅, a parent edge. For any node v, the path of parent
edges v →parent(v) →parent(parent(v)) →. . . eventually leads back to s. So the set of parent
edges form a connected graph.
Clearly, both end points of every parent edge are marked, and the number of edges is exactly one less
than the number of vertices. Thus, the parent edges form a spanning tree.
8.1.4 DFS - Timestamp Structure
As we traverse the graph in DFS order, we will associate two numbers with each vertex. When we first
discover a vertex u, store a counter in d[u]. When we are finished processing a vertex, we store a counter
in f[u]. These two numbers are time stamps.
Consider the recursive version of depth-first traversal
126 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
DFS(G)
1 for (each u ∈ V)
2 do color[u] ←white
3 pred[u] ←nil
4 time ←0
5 for each u ∈ V
6 do if (color[u] = white)
7 then DFSVISIT(u)
The DFSVISIT routine is as follows:
DFSVISIT(u)
1 color[u] ←gray; // mark u visited
2 d[u] ←++ time
3 for (each v ∈ Adj[u])
4 do if (color[v] = white)
5 then pred[v] ←u
6 DFSVISIT(v)
7 color[u] ←black; // we are done with u
8 f[u] ←++ time;
Figures 8.21 through 8.25 present a trace of the execution of the time stamping algorithm. Terms like
“2/5” indicate the value of the counter (time). The number before the “/” is the time when a vertex was
discovered (colored gray) and the number after the “/” is the time when the processing of the vertex
finished (colored black).
d
b
e
f a
g c
b a
c
1/.. 2/..
3/..
DFS(a)
DFS(b)
DFS(c)
Figure 8.21: DFS with time stamps: recursive calls initiated at vertex ‘a’
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 127
return c
return b
b a
c
1/.. 2/..
3/..
b a
c
1/.. 2/5
3/4
Figure 8.22: DFS with time stamps: processing of ‘b’ and ‘c’ completed
DFS(f)
DFS(g)
b a
c
1/.. 2/5
3/4
f
g
b a
c
1/.. 2/5
3/4
7/..
6/..
Figure 8.23: DFS with time stamps: recursive processing of ‘f’ and ‘g’
128 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
f
g
b a
c
1/.. 2/5
3/4 7/..
6/..
return g
return f
return a
f
g
b a
c
1/10 2/5
3/4 7/8
6/9
Figure 8.24: DFS with time stamps: processing of ‘f’ and ‘g’ completed
f
g
b a
c
1/10 2/5
3/4
7/8
6/9
d e
11/14 12/13
DFS(d)
DFS(e)
return e
return f
Figure 8.25: DFS with time stamps: processing of ‘d’ and ‘e’
Notice that the DFS tree structure (actually a collection of trees, or a forest) on the structure of the graph
is just the recursion tree, where the edge (u, v) arises when processing vertex u we call DFSVISIT(V) for
some neighbor v. For directed graphs the edges that are not part of the tree (indicated as dashed edges in
Figures 8.21 through 8.25) edges of the graph can be classified as follows:
Back edge: (u, v) where v is an ancestor of u in the tree.
8.1. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 129
Forward edge: (u, v) where v is a proper descendent of u in the tree.
Cross edge: (u, v) where u and v are not ancestor or descendent of one another. In fact, the edge may
go between different trees of the forest.
The ancestor and descendent relation can be nicely inferred by the parenthesis lemma. u is a descendent
of v if and only if [d[u], f[u]] ⊆ [d[v], f[v]]. u is a ancestor of v if and only if [d[u], f[u]] ⊇ [d[v], f[v]]. u
is unrelated to v if and only if [d[u], f[u]] and [d[v], f[v]] are disjoint. The is shown in Figure 8.26. The
width of the rectangle associated with a vertex is equal to the time the vertex was discovered till the time
the vertex was completely processed (colored black). Imagine an opening parenthesis ‘(’ at the start of
the rectangle and and closing parenthesis ‘)’ at the end of the rectangle. The rectangle (parentheses) for
vertex ‘b’ is completely enclosed by the rectangle for ‘a’. Rectangle for ‘c’ is completely enclosed by
vertex ‘b’ rectangle.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
a
b
f
d
g
c
e
Figure 8.26: Parenthesis lemma
Figure 8.27 shows the classification of the non-tree edges based on the parenthesis lemma. Edges are
labelled ‘F’, ‘B’ and ‘C’ for forward, back and cross edge respectively.
130 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
f
g
b a
c
1/10 2/5
3/4
7/8
6/9
d e
11/14 12/13
F
C
C C
B
Figure 8.27: Classfication of non-tree edges in the DFS tree for a graph
For undirected graphs, there is no distinction between forward and back edges. By convention they are
all called back edges. Furthermore, there are no cross edges (can you see why not?)
8.1.5 DFS - Cycles
The time stamps given by DFS allow us to determine a number of things about a graph or digraph. For
example, we can determine whether the graph contains any cycles. We do this with the help of the
following two lemmas.
Lemma: Given a digraph G = (V, E), consider any DFS forest of G and consider any edge (u, v) ∈ E.
If this edge is a tree, forward or cross edge, then f[u] > f[v]. If this edge is a back edge, then
f[u] ≤ f[v].
Proof: For the non-tree forward and back edges the proof follows directly from the parenthesis lemma.
For example, for a forward edge (u, v), v is a descendent of u and so v’s start-finish interval is
contained within u’s implying that v has an earlier finish time. For a cross edge (u, v) we know
that the two time intervals are disjoint. When we were processing u, v was not white (otherwise
(u, v) would be a tree edge), implying that v was started before u. Because the intervals are
disjoint, v must have also finished before u.
8.2. PRECEDENCE CONSTRAINT GRAPH 131
Lemma: Consider a digraph G = (V, E) and any DFS forest for G. G has a cycle if and only if the DFS
forest has a back edge.
Proof: If there is a back edge (u, v) then v is an ancestor of u and by following tree edge from v to u,
we get a cycle.
We show the contrapositive: suppose there are no back edges. By the lemma above, each of the
remaining types of edges, tree, forward, and cross all have the property that they go from vertices
with higher finishing time to vertices with lower finishing time. Thus along any path, finish times
decrease monotonically, implying there can be no cycle.
The DFS forest in Figure 8.27 has a back edge from vertex ‘g’ to vertex ‘a’. The cycle is ‘a-g-f’.
Beware: No back edges means no cycles. But you should not infer that there is some simple relationship
between the number of back edges and the number of cycles. For example, a DFS tree may only have a
single back edge, and there may anywhere from one up to an exponential number of simple cycles in the
graph.
A similar theorem applies to undirected graphs, and is not hard to prove.
8.2 Precedence Constraint Graph
A directed acyclic graph (DAG) arise in many applications where there are precedence or ordering
constraints. There are a series of tasks to be performed and certain tasks must precede other tasks. For
example, in construction, you have to build the first floor before the second floor but you can do electrical
work while doors and windows are being installed. In general, a precedence constraint graph is a DAG in
which vertices are tasks and the edge (u, v) means that task u must be completed before task v begins.
For example, consider the sequence followed when one wants to dress up in a suit. One possible order
and its DAG are shown in Figure 8.28. Figure 8.29 shows the DFS with time stamps of the DAG.
132 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
underwear
pants
belt
shirt
coat
tie
socks
shoes
Figure 8.28: Order of dressing up in a suit
underwear
pants
belt
shirt
tie
coat
socks
shoes
11/14 1/10
2/9
3/6
4/5
7/8
12/13
15/16
Figure 8.29: DFS of dressing up DAG with time stamps
Another example of precedence constraint graph is the sets of prerequisites for CS courses in a typical
undergraduate program.
8.3. TOPOLOGICAL SORT 133
C1 Introduction to Computers
C2 Introduction to Computer Programming
C3 Discrete Mathematics
C4 Data Structures C2
C5 Digital Logic Design C2
C6 Automata Theory C3
C7 Analysis of Algorithms C3, C4
C8 Computer Organization and Assembly C2
C9 Data Base Systems C4, C7
C10 Computer Architecture C4, C5,C8
C11 Computer Graphics C4,C7
C12 Software Engineering C7,C11
C13 Operating System C4,C7,C11
C14 Compiler Construction C4,C6,C8
C15 Computer Networks C4,C7,C10
Table 8.1: Prerequisites for CS courses
The prerequisites can be represented with a precedence constraint graph which is shown in Figure 8.30
C4
C5
C6
C7
C1
C2
C3
C8
C9
C10
C11
C12
C13
C14
C15
Figure 8.30: Precedence constraint graph for CS courses
8.3 Topological Sort
A topological sort of a DAG is a linear ordering of the vertices of the DAG such that for each edge (u, v),
u appears before v in the ordering.
Computing a topological ordering is actually quite easy, given a DFS of the DAG. For every edge (u, v)
in a DAG, the finish time of u is greater than the finish time of v (by the lemma). Thus, it suffices to
output the vertices in the reverse order of finish times.
134 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
We run DFS on the DAG and when each vertex is finished, we add it to the front of a linked. Note that in
general, there may be many legal topological orders for a given DAG.
TOPOLOGICALSORT(G)
1 for (each u ∈ V)
2 do color[u] ←white
3 L ←new LinkedList()
4 for each u ∈ V
5 do if (color[u] = white)
6 then TOPVISIT(u)
7 return L
TOPVISIT(u)
1 color[u] ←gray; // mark u visited
2 for (each v ∈ Adj[u])
3 do if (color[v] = white)
4 then TOPVISIT(v)
5 Append u to the front of L
Figure 8.31 shows the linear order obtained by the topological sort of the sequence of putting on a suit.
The DAG is still the same; it is only that the order in which the vertices of the graph have been laid out is
special. As a result, all directed edges go from left to right.
socks
15/16
under-
wear
1/10
shirt
11/14
tie
12/13
pants
2/9
belt
3/6
shoes
7/8
coat
4/5
underwear
pants
belt
shirt
coat
tie
socks
shoes
Figure 8.31: Topological sort of the dressing up sequence
This is a typical example of how DFS used in applications. The running time is Θ(V +E).
8.4. STRONG COMPONENTS 135
8.4 Strong Components
We consider an important connectivity problem with digraphs. When diagraphs are used in
communication and transportation networks, people want to know that their networks are complete.
Complete in the sense that that it is possible from any location in the network to reach any other location
in the digraph.
A digraph is strongly connected if for every pair of vertices u, v ∈ V, u can reach v and vice versa. We
would like to write an algorithm that determines whether a digraph is strongly connected. In fact, we will
solve a generalization of this problem, of computing the strongly connected components of a digraph.
We partition the vertices of the digraph into subsets such that the induced subgraph of each subset is
strongly connected. We say that two vertices u and v are mutually reachable if u can reach v and vice
versa. Consider the directed graph in Figure 8.32. The strong components are illustrated in Figure 8.33.
D
E
G
F
C
A B
I
H
Digraph
Figure 8.32: A directed graph
136 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
D
E
G
F
C
A B
I
H
Digraph and Strong Components
Figure 8.33: Digraph with strong components
It is easy to see that mutual reachability is an equivalence relation. This equivalence relation partitions
the vertices into equivalence classes of mutually reachable vertices and these are the strong components.
If we merge the vertices in each strong component into a single super vertex, and join two super vertices
(A, B) if and only if there are vertices u ∈ A and v ∈ B such that (u, v) ∈ E, then the resulting digraph is
called the component digraph. The component digraph is necessarily acyclic. The is illustrated in Figure
8.34.
D,E
A,B,C
Component DAG
F,G,H,I
Figure 8.34: Component DAG of super vertices
8.4. STRONG COMPONENTS 137
8.4.1 Strong Components and DFS
Consider DFS of a digraph given in Figure ??. Once you enter a strong component, every vertex in the
component is reachable. So the DFS does not terminate until all the vertices in the component have been
visited. Thus all vertices in a strong component must appear in the same tree of the DFS forest.
Depth-first search of digraph
A
E
D
I
H F
G
C
B
1/8
2/3
5/6
4/7
9/12
10/11
13/18
14/17
15/16
Figure 8.35: DFS of a digraph
fig:dfsofdigraph
Observe that each strong component is a subtree in the DFS forest. Is it always true for any DFS? The
answer is “no”. In general, many strong components may appear in the same DFS tree as illustrated in
Figure 8.36
A
1/18
D 14/17 B 2/13
C 3/4 F
5/12
E
15/16
I 7/10
G
6/11
H 8/9
Figure 8.36: Another DFS tree of the digraph
138 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
Is there a way to order the DFS such that it true? Fortunately, the answer is “yes”. Suppose that you knew
the component DAG in advance. (This is ridiculous, because you would need to know the strong
components and this is the problem we are trying to solve.) Further, suppose that you computed a
reversed topological order on the component DAG. That is, for edge (u, v) in the component DAG, then
v comes before u. This is presented in Figure 8.37. Recall that the component DAG consists of super
vertices.
Reversed topological order
D,E A,B,C F,G,H,I
D,E A,B,C F,G,H,I
Topological order of component DAG
Figure 8.37: Reversed topological sort of component DAG
Now, run DFS, but every time you need a new vertex to start the search from, select the next available
vertex according to this reverse topological order of the component digraph. Here is an informal
justification. Clearly once the DFS starts within a given strong component, it must visit every vertex
within the component (and possibly some others) before finishing. If we do not start in reverse
topological, then the search may “leak out” into other strong components, and put them in the same DFS
tree. For example, in the Figure 8.36, when the search is started at vertex ‘a’, not only does it visit its
component with ‘b’ and ‘c’, but it also visits the other components as well. However, by visiting
components in reverse topological order of the component tree, each search cannot “leak out” into other
components, because other components would have already have been visited earlier in the search.
This leaves us with the intuition that if we could somehow order the DFS, so that it hits the strong
components according to a reverse topological order, then we would have an easy algorithm for
computing strong components. However, we do not know what the component DAG looks like. (After
all, we are trying to solve the strong component problem in the first place). The trick behind the strong
component algorithm is that we can find an ordering of the vertices that has essentially the necessary
property, without actually computing the component DAG.
We will discuss the algorithm without proof. Define G
T
to be the digraph with the same vertex set at G
but in which all edges have been reversed in direction. This is shown in Figure 8.38. Given an adjacency
list for G, it is possible to compute G
T
in Θ(V +E) time.
8.4. STRONG COMPONENTS 139
D
E
G
F
C
A B
I
H
Digraph G
T
Figure 8.38: The digraph G
T
Observe that the strongly connected components are not affected by reversal of all edges. If u and v are
mutually reachable in G, then this is certainly true in G
T
. All that changes is that the component DAG is
completely reversed. The ordering trick is to order the vertices of G according to their finish times in a
DFS. Then visit the nodes of G
T
in decreasing order of finish times. All the steps of the algorithm are
quite easy to implement, and all operate in Θ(V +E) time. Here is the algorithm:
STRONGCOMPONENTS(G)
1 Run DFS(G) computing finish times f[u]
2 Compute G
T
3 Sort vertices of G
T
in decreasing f[u]
4 Run DFS(G
T
) using this order
5 Each DFS tree is a strong component
The execution of the algorithm is illustrated in Figures 8.39, 8.40 and 8.41.
140 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
A
1/18
D 14/17 B 2/13
C 3/4 F
5/12
E
15/16
I 7/10
G
6/11
H 8/9
A D E B
F G I H
C
Note that maximum finish
times of components are in
valid topological order
18,17,12
vertices ordered by decreasing f[u]
Figure 8.39: DFS of digraph with vertices in descending order by finish times
D
E
G
F
C
A B
I
H
Digraph G
T
A D E B
F G I H
C
Run DFS on G
T
in this vertex order
Figure 8.40: Digraph G
T
and the vertex order for DFS
8.4. STRONG COMPONENTS 141
Final DFS with Components
A
E
D
I
H
F
G
C
B
Figure 8.41: Final DFS with strong components of G
T
The complete proof for why this algorithm works is in CLR. We will discuss the intuition behind why the
algorithm visits vertices in decreasing order of finish times and why the graph is revered. Recall that the
main intent is to visit the strong components in a reverse topological order. The problem is how to order
the vertices so that this is true. Recall from the topological sorting algorithm, that in a DAG, finish times
occur in reverse topological order (i.e., the first vertex in the topological order is the one with the highest
finish time). So, if we wanted to visit the components in reverse topological order, this suggests that we
should visit the vertices in increasing order of finish time, starting with the lowest finishing time.
This is a good starting idea, but it turns out that it doesn’t work. The reason is that there are many vertices
in each strong component, and they all have different finish times. For example, in Figure 8.36, observe
that in the first DFS, the lowest finish time (of 4) is achieved by vertex ‘c’, and its strong component is
first, not last, in topological order.
However, there is something to notice about the finish times. If we consider the maximum finish time in
each component, then these are related to the topological order of the component graph. In fact it is
possible to prove the following (but we won’t).
Lemma: Consider a digraph G on which DFS has been run. Label each component with the maximum
finish time of all the vertices in the component, and sort these in decreasing order. Then this order
is a topological order for the component digraph.
For example, in Figure 8.36, the maximum finish times for each component are 18 (for ¦a, b, c¦), 17 (for
¦d,e¦), and 12 (for ¦f,g,h,i¦). The order (18, 17, 12) is a valid topological order for the component
digraph. The problem is that this is not what we wanted. We wanted a reverse topological order for the
component digraph. So, the final trick is to reverse the digraph. This does not change the component
graph, but it reverses the topological order, as desired.
142 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
8.5 Minimum Spanning Trees
A common problem is communications networks and circuit design is that of connecting together a set of
nodes by a network of total minimum length. The length is the sum of lengths of connecting wires.
Consider, for example, laying cable in a city for cable t.v.
The computational problem is called the minimum spanning tree (MST) problem. Formally, we are given
a connected, undirected graph G = (V, E) Each edge (u, v) has numeric weight of cost. We define the
cost of a spanning tree T to be the sum of the costs of edges in the spanning tree
w(T) =
¸
(u,v)∈T
w(u, v)
A minimum spanning tree is a tree of minimum weight.
Figures ??, ?? and ?? show three spanning trees for the same graph. The first is a spanning tree but is not
a MST; the other two are.
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
9
4
8 2 2
10
9
8
1
5
7 6
Cost = 33
Figure 8.42: A spanning tree
that is not MST
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
9
4
8 2 2
10
9
8
1
5
7 6
Cost = 22
Figure 8.43: A minimum
spanning tree
a
b
c
f
e
d
9
4
8 2 2
10
9
8
1
5
7
Cost = 22
Figure 8.44: Another mini-
mum spanning tree
We will present two greedy algorithms (Kruskal’s and Prim’s) for computing MST. Recall that a greedy
algorithm is one that builds a solution by repeatedly selecting the cheapest among all options at each
stage. Once the choice is made, it is never undone.
Before presenting the two algorithms, let us review facts about free trees. A free tree is a tree with no
vertex designated as the root vertex. A free tree with n vertices has exactly n −1 edges. There exists a
unique path between any two vertices of a free tree. Adding any edge to a free tree creates a unique cycle.
Breaking any edge on this cycle restores the free tree. This is illustrated in Figure 8.45. When the edges
(b, e) or (b, d) are added to the free tree, the result is a cycle.
8.5. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 143
1
Free tree
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
9
4
8 2
2
10
9
8
5
7 6
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
9
4
8 2
2
10
9
8
5
7 6
a
b
c
f
e
g
d
9
4
8 2
2
10
9
8
5
7 6
Figure 8.45: Free tree facts
8.5.1 Computing MST: Generic Approach
Let G = (V, E) be an undirected, connected graph whose edges have numeric weights. The intuition
behind greedy MST algorithm is simple: we maintain a subset of edges E of the graph . Call this subset
A. Initially, A is empty. We will add edges one at a time until A equals the MST.
A subset A ⊆ E is viable if A is a subset of edges of some MST. An edge (u, v) ∈ E −A is safe if
A∪ {(u, v)} is viable. In other words, the choice (u, v) is a safe choice to add so that A can still be
extended to form a MST.
Note that if A is viable, it cannot contain a cycle. A generic greedy algorithm operates by repeatedly
adding any safe edge to the current spanning tree.
When is an edge safe? Consider the theoretical issues behind determining whether an edge is safe or not.
Let S be a subset of vertices S ⊆ V. A cut (S, V −S) is just a partition of vertices into two disjoint
subsets. An edge (u, v) crosses the cut if one endpoint is in S and the other is in V −S.
Given a subset of edges A, a cut respects A if no edge in A crosses the cut. It is not hard to see why
respecting cuts are important to this problem. If we have computed a partial MST and we wish to know
which edges can be added that do not induce a cycle in the current MST, any edge that crosses a
respecting cut is a possible candidate.
144 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
8.5.2 Greedy MST
An edge of E is a light edge crossing a cut if among all edges crossing the cut, it has the minimum
weight. Intuition says that since all the edges that cross a respecting cut do not induce a cycle, then the
lightest edge crossing a cut is a natural choice. The main theorem which drives both algorithms is the
following:
MST Lemma: Let G = (V, E) be a connected, undirected graph with real-valued weights on the edges.
Let A be a viable subset of E (i.e., a subset of some MST). Let (S, V −S) be any cut that respects
A and let (u, v) be a light edge crossing the cut. Then the edge (u, v) is safe for A. This is
illustrated in Figure 8.46.
7
8
6
10
u
v
x
A
4
9
y
Figure 8.46: Subset A with a cut (wavy line) that respects A
MST Proof: It would simplify the proof if we assume that all edge weights are distinct. Let T be any
MST for G. If T contains (u, v) then we are done. This is shown in Figure 8.47 where the lightest
edge (u, v) with cost 4 has been chosen.
8.5. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 145
u
v
x
A
4
y
Figure 8.47: MST T which contains light edge (u, v)
Suppose no MST contains (u, v). Such a tree is shown in Figure 8.48. We will derive a
contradiction.
u
v
x
A
4
y
8
Figure 8.48: MST T which does not contains light edge (u, v)
Add (u, v) to T thus creating a cycle as illustrated in Figure 8.49.
146 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
u
v
x
A
4
y
8
Figure 8.49: Cycle created due to T + (u, v)
Since u and v are on opposite sides of the cut, and any cycle must cross the cut an even number of
times, there must be at least one other edge (x, y) in T that crosses the cut. The edge (x, y) is not in
A because the cut respects A. By removing (x, y) we restore a spanning tree, call it T

. This is
shown in Figure 8.50
u
v
x
A
4
y
Figure 8.50: Tree T

= T − (x, y) + (u, v)
We have w(T

) = w(T) −w(x, y) +w(u, v). Since (u, v) is the lightest edge crossing the cut we
have w(u, v) < w(x, y). Thus w(T

) < w(T) which contradicts the assumption that T was an
MST.
8.5. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 147
8.5.3 Kruskal’s Algorithm
Kruskal’s algorithm works by adding edges in increasing order of weight (lightest edge first). If the next
edge does not induce a cycle among the current set of edges, then it is added to A. If it does, we skip it
and consider the next in order. As the algorithm runs, the edges in A induce a forest on the vertices. The
trees of this forest are eventually merged until a single tree forms containing all vertices.
The tricky part of the algorithm is how to detect whether the addition of an edge will create a cycle in A.
Suppose the edge being considered has vertices (u, v). We want a fast test that tells us whether u and v
are in the same tree of A. This can be done using the Union-Find data structure which supports the
following O(log n) operations:
Create-set(u): Create a set containing a single item u.
Find-set(u): Find the set that contains u
Union(u,v): merge the set containing u and set containing v into a common set.
In Kruskal’s algorithm, the vertices will be stored in sets. The vertices in each tree of A will be a set. The
edges in A can be stored as a simple list. Here is the algorithm: Figures 8.51 through ?? demonstrate the
algorithm applied to a graph.
KRUSKAL(G = (V, E))
1 A ←{}
2 for ( each u ∈ V)
3 do create set(u)
4 sort E in increasing order by weight w
5 for ( each (u, v) in sorted edge list)
6 do if (find(u) = find(v))
7 then add (u, v) to A
8 union(u, v)
9 return A
148 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
a
8
b
c f
e
d
4
12
10
30
2
14
16
3
5
g
18
2
6
a
8
b
c f
e
d
4
12
10
30
14
16
3
5
g
18
2
6
a
8
b
c f
e
d
4
12
10
30
14
16
5
g
18
2
6
Figure 8.51: Kruskal algorithm: (b, d) and (d, e) added
a
8
b
c f
e
d
12
10
30
14
16
5
g
18
26
a
8
b
c f
e
d
12
10
30
14
16
g
18
26
a
b
c f
e
d
12
10
30
14
16
g
18
26
unsafe
8
Color indicates union set
Figure 8.52: Kruskal algorithm: (c, g) and (a, e) added
a
b
c f
e
d
12
10
30
14
16
g
18
26
unsafe
a
b
c f
e
d
12
30
14
16
g
18
26
a
b
c f
e
d
12
30
14
16
g
18
26
Figure 8.53: Kruskal algorithm: unsafe edges
8.5. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 149
a
b
c f
e
d
30
16
g
18
26
a
b
c f
e
d
30
g
18
26
a
b
c f
e
d
30
14
16
g
18
26
Figure 8.54: Kruskal algorithm: (e, f)added
a
b
c f
e
d
30
g
26
a
b
c f
e
d
30
g
a
b
c f
e
d
g
Figure 8.55: Kruskal algorithm: more unsafe edges and final MST
Analysis:
Since the graph is connected, we may assume that E ≥ V −1. Sorting edges ( line 4) takes Θ(Elog E).
The for loop (line 5) performs O(E) find and O(V) union operations. Total time for union −find is
O(Eα(V)) where α(V) is the inverse Ackerman function. α(V) < 4 for V less the number of atoms in
the entire universe. Thus the time is dominated by sorting. Overall time for Kruskal is
Θ(Elog E) = Θ(Elog V) if the graph is sparse.
8.5.4 Prim’s Algorithm
Kruskal’s algorithm worked by ordering the edges, and inserting them one by one into the spanning tree,
taking care never to introduce a cycle. Intuitively Kruskal’s works by merging or splicing two trees
together, until all the vertices are in the same tree.
In contrast, Prim’s algorithm builds the MST by adding leaves one at a time to the current tree. We start
with a root vertex r; it can be any vertex. At any time, the subset of edges A forms a single tree (in
Kruskal’s, it formed a forest). We look to add a single vertex as a leaf to the tree.
150 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
12
10
6
7
11
4
5
u
r
Figure 8.56: Prim’s algorithm: a cut of the graph
Consider the set of vertices S currently part of the tree and its complement (V −S) as shown in Figure
8.56. We have cut of the graph. Which edge should be added next? The greedy strategy would be to add
the lightest edge which in the figure is edge to ’u’. Once u is added, Some edges that crossed the cut are
no longer crossing it and others that were not crossing the cut are as shown in Figure 8.57
12
10
6
7
3
9
5
u
r
Figure 8.57: Prim’s algorithm: u selected
We need an efficient way to update the cut and determine the light edge quickly. To do this, we will make
use of a priority queue. The question is what do we store in the priority queue? It may seem logical that
edges that cross the cut should be stored since we choose light edges from these. Although possible, there
is more elegant solution which leads to a simpler algorithm.
8.5. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 151
For each vertex u ∈ (V −S) (not part of the current spanning tree), we associate a key key[u]. The
key[u] is the weight of the lightest edge going from u to any vertex in S. If there is no edge from u to a
vertex in S, we set the key value to ∞. We also store in pred[u] the end vertex of this edge in S. We will
also need to know which vertices are in S and which are not. To do this, we will assign a color to each
vertex. If the color of a vertex is black then it is in S otherwise not. Here is the algorithm:
PRIM((G, w, r))
1 for ( each u ∈ V)
2 do key [u] ←∞; pq.insert (u, key[u])
3 color [u] ← white
4 key [r] ←0; pred [r] ←nil; pq.decrease key (r, key [r]);
5 while ( pq.not empty ())
6 do u ← pq.extract min ()
7 for ( each u ∈ adj [u])
8 do if ( color [v] == white )and( w (u, v) < key [v])
9 then key [v] = w (u, v)
10 pq.decrease key (v, key [v])
11 pred [v] = u
12 color [u] = black
Figures 8.58 through 8.60 illustrate the algorithm applied to a graph. The contents of the priority queue
are shown as the algorithm progresses. The arrows indicate the predecessor pointers and the numeric
labels in each vertex is its key value.
PQ: 4,8,?,?,?,?
10
4
8
9
8 7
5
6
2 9 2
1
4
8
?
?
?
?
PQ: 8,8,10,?,?
10
4
8
9
8 7
5
6
2 9 2
1
8
8
10
?
?
Figure 8.58: Prim’s algorithm: edge with weight 4 selected
152 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
PQ: 1,2,10,?
10
4
8
9
8 7
5
6
2 9 2
1
2
10
1
?
PQ: 2,2,5
10
4
8
9
8 7
5
6
2 9 2
1
2
5
2
Figure 8.59: Prim’s algorithm: edges with weights 8 and 1 selected
PQ: 2,5
10
4
8
9
8 7
5
6
2 9 2
1
5
2
PQ: <empty>
10
4
8
9
8 7
5
6
2 9 2
1
Figure 8.60: Prim’s algorithm: the final MST
Analysis:
It takes O(log V) to extract a vertex from the priority queue. For each incident edge, we spend potentially
O(log V) time decreasing the key of the neighboring vertex. Thus the total time is
O(log V + deg(u) log V). The other steps of update are constant time.
So the overall running time is
T(V, E) =
¸
u∈V
(log V + deg(u) log V)
= log V
¸
u∈V
(1 + deg(u))
= (log V)(V +2E) = Θ((V +E) log V)
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 153
Since G is connected, V is asymptotically no greater than E so this is Θ(Elog V), same as Kruskal’s
algorithm.
8.6 Shortest Paths
A motorist wishes to find the shortest possible route between Peshawar and Karachi. Given a road map of
Pakistan on which the distance between each pair of adjacent cities is marked Can the motorist determine
the shortest route?
In the shortest-paths problem We are given a weighted, directed graph G = (V, E) The weight of path
p =< v
0
, v
1
, . . . , v
k
> is the sum of the constituent edges:
w(p) =
k
¸
i=1
w(v
i−1
, v
i
)
We define the shortest-path weight from u to v by
δ(u, v) =

min{w(p) : u
p
v} if there is a path from u to v
∞ otherwise
Problems such as shortest route between cities can be solved efficiently by modelling the road map as a
graph. The nodes or vertices represent cities and edges represent roads. Edge weights can be interpreted
as distances. Other metrics can also be used, e.g., time, cost, penalties and loss.
Similar scenarios occur in computer networks like the Internet where data packets have to be routed. The
vertices are routers. Edges are communication links which may be be wire or wireless. Edge weights can
be distance, link speed, link capacity link delays, and link utilization.
The breadth-first-search algorithm we discussed earlier is a shortest-path algorithm that works on
un-weighted graphs. An un-weighted graph can be considered as a graph in which every edge has weight
one unit.
There are a few variants of the shortest path problem. We will cover their definitions and then discuss
algorithms for some.
Single-source shortest-path problem: Find shortest paths from a given (single) source vertex s ∈ V to
every other vertex v ∈ V in the graph G.
Single-destination shortest-paths problem: Find a shortest path to a given destination vertex t from
each vertex v. We can reduce the this problem to a single-source problem by reversing the direction
of each edge in the graph.
Single-pair shortest-path problem: Find a shortest path from u to v for given vertices u and v. If we
solve the single-source problem with source vertex u, we solve this problem also. No algorithms
for this problem are known to run asymptotically faster than the best single-source algorithms in
the worst case.
154 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
All-pairs shortest-paths problem: Find a shortest path from u to v for every pair of vertices u and v.
Although this problem can be solved by running a single-source algorithm once from each vertex,
it can usually be solved faster.
8.6.1 Dijkstra’s Algorithm
Dijkstra’s algorithm is a simple greedy algorithm for computing the single-source shortest-paths to all
other vertices. Dijkstra’s algorithm works on a weighted directed graph G = (V, E) in which all edge
weights are non-negative, i.e., w(u, v) ≥ 0 for each edge (u, v) ∈ E.
Negative edges weights maybe counter to intuition but this can occur in real life problems. However, we
will not allow negative cycles because then there is no shortest path. If there is a negative cycle between,
say, s and t, then we can always find a shorter path by going around the cycle one more time.
4
-8
5
3
2
1
s t
Figure 8.61: Negative weight cycle
The basic structure of Dijkstra’s algorithm is to maintain an estimate of the shortest path from the source
vertex to each vertex in the graph. Call this estimate d[v]. Intuitively, d[v] will the length of the shortest
path that the algorithm knows of from s to v. This value will always be greater than or equal to the true
shortest path distance from s to v. I.e., d[v] ≥ δ(u, v). Initially, we know of no paths, so d[v] = ∞.
Moreover, d[s] = 0 for the source vertex.
As the algorithm goes on and sees more and more vertices, it attempts to update d[v] for each vertex in
the graph. The process of updating estimates is called relaxation. Here is how relaxation works.
Intuitively, if you can see that your solution is not yet reached an optimum value, then push it a little
closer to the optimum. In particular, if you discover a path from s to v shorter than d[v], then you need to
update d[v]. This notion is common to many optimization algorithms.
Consider an edge from a vertex u to v whose weight is w(u, v). Suppose that we have already computed
current estimates on d[u] and d[v]. We know that there is a path from s to u of weight d[u]. By taking
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 155
this path and following it with the edge (u, v) we get a path to v of length d[u] +w(u, v). If this path is
better than the existing path of length d[v] to v, we should take it. The relaxation process is illustrated in
the following figure. We should also remember that the shortest way back to the source is through u by
updating the predecessor pointer.
2
2 2
10
s
u
v
t
d[u]=4
d[v]=10
Figure 8.62: Vertex u relaxed
2
2 2
10
s
u
v
t
d[u]=4
d[v]=d[u]+w(u,v)=6
Figure 8.63: Vertex v relaxed
RELAX((u, v))
1 if (d[u] +w(u, v) < d[v])
2 then d[v] ←d[u] +w(u, v)
3 pred[v] = u
Observe that whenever we set d[v] to a finite value, there is always evidence of a path of that length.
Therefore d[v] ≥ δ(s, v). If d[v] = δ(s, v), then further relaxations cannot change its value.
It is not hard to see that if we perform RELAX(U,V) repeatedly over all edges of the graph, the d[v]
values will eventually converge to the final true distance value from s. The cleverness of any shortest path
algorithm is to perform the updates in a judicious manner, so the convergence is as fast as possible.
Dijkstra’s algorithm is based on the notion of performing repeated relaxations. The algorithm operates by
maintaining a subset of vertices, S ⊆ V, for which we claim we know the true distance, d[v] = δ(s, v).
Initially S = ∅, the empty set. We set d[u] = 0 and all others to ∞. One by one we select vertices from
V −S to add to S.
How do we select which vertex among the vertices of V −S to add next to S? Here is greediness comes
in. For each vertex u ∈ (V −S), we have computed a distance estimate d[u].
The greedy thing to do is to take the vertex for which d[u] is minimum, i.e., take the unprocessed vertex
that is closest by our estimate to s. Later, we justify why this is the proper choice. In order to perform
156 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
this selection efficiently, we store the vertices of V −S in a priority queue.
DIJKSTRA((G, w, s))
1 for ( each u ∈ V)
2 do d[u] ←∞
3 pq.insert (u, d[u])
4 d[s] ←0; pred [s] ←nil; pq.decrease key (s, d[s]);
5 while ( pq.not empty ())
6 do u ← pq.extract min ()
7 for ( each v ∈ adj[u])
8 do if (d[u] +w(u, v) < d[v])
9 then d[v] = d[u] +w(u, v)
10 pq.decrease key (v, d[v])
11 pred [v] = u
Note the similarity with Prim’s algorithm, although a different key is used here. Therefore the running
time is the same, i.e., Θ(Elog V).
Figures 8.64 through ?? demonstrate the algorithm applied to a directed graph with no negative weight
edges.
0
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
7
2
select 0
Figure 8.64: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 0
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 157
2
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
7
2
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
5
2
10
7
select 2
Figure 8.65: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 2
5
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
5
2
10
7
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
5
2
6
7
select 5
Figure 8.66: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 5
6
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
5
2
6
7
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
5
2
6
7
select 6
Figure 8.67: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 6
158 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
7
0
s
7
2
3 2
1
5
8
4 5
5
2
6
7
select 7
Figure 8.68: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 7
fig:dijlast
8.6.2 Correctness of Dijkstra’s Algorithm
We will prove the correctness of Dijkstr’s algorithm by Induction. We will use the definition that δ(s, v)
denotes the minimal distance from s to v.
For the base case
1. S = {s}
2. d(s) = 0, which is δ(s, s)
Assume that d(v) = δ(s, v) for every v ∈ S and all neighbors of v have been relaxed. If d(u) ≤ d(u

)
for every u

∈ V then d(u) = δ(s, u), and we can transfer u from V to S, after which d(v) = δ(s, v) for
every v ∈ S.
We do this as a proof by contradiction. Suppose that d(u) > δ(s, u). The shortest path from s to u,
p(s, u), must pass through one or more vertices exterior to S. Let x be the last vertex inside S and y be
the first vertex outside S on this path to u. Then p(s, u) = p(s, x) ∪ {(x, y)} ∪ p(y, u).
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 159
s
S
x
y
u
Figure 8.69: Correctness of Dijkstra’s algorithm
The length of p(s, u) is δ(s, u) = δ(s, y) +δ(y, u). Because y was relaxed when x was put into S,
d(y) = δ(s, y) by the convergence property. Thus d(y) ≤ δ(s, u) ≤ d(u). But, because d(u) is the
smallest among vertices not in S, d(u) ≤ d(y) . The only possibility is d(u) = d(y), which requires
d(u) = δ(s, u) contradicting the assumption.
By the upper bound property, d(u) ≥ δ(s, u). Since d(u) > δ(s, u) is false, d(u) = δ(s, u), which is
what we wanted to prove. Thus, if we follow the algorithm’s procedure, transferring from V to S, the
vertex in V with the smallest value of d(u) then all vertices in S have d(v) = δ(s, v)
8.6.3 Bellman-Ford Algorithm
Dijkstra’s single-source shortest path algorithm works if all edges weights are non-negative and there are
no negative cost cycles. Bellman-Ford allows negative weights edges and no negative cost cycles. The
algorithm is slower than Dijkstra’s, running in Θ(VE) time.
Like Dijkstra’s algorithm, Bellman-Ford is based on performing repeated relaxations. Bellman-Ford
applies relaxation to every edge of the graph and repeats this V −1 times. Here is the algorithm; its is
160 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
illustrated in Figure 8.70.
BELLMAN-FORD(G, w, s)
1 for ( each u ∈ V)
2 do d[u] ←∞
3 pred[u] = nil
4
5 d[s] ←0;
6 for i = 1 to V −1
7 do for ( each (u, v) in E )
8 do RELAX(u, v)
0
s
8
4
-6
5
8
4
0
s
8
4
-6
5
0
s
8
4
-6
5
8
2
9
0
s
8
4
-6
5
8
2
7
2
1
3
4
Figure 8.70: The Bellman-Ford algorithm
8.6.4 Correctness of Bellman-Ford
Think of Bellman-Ford as a sort of bubble-sort analog for shortest path. The shortest path information is
propagated sequentially along each shortest path in the graph. Consider any shortest path from s to some
other vertex u: 'v
0
, v
1
, . . . , v
k
` where v
0
= s and v
k
= u.
Since a shortest path will never visit the same vertex twice, we know that k ≤ V −1. Hence the path
consists of at most V −1 edges. Since this a shortest path, it is δ(s, v
i
), the true shortest path cost from s
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 161
to v
i
that satisfies the equation:
δ(s, v
i
) = δ(s, v
i−1
) +w(v
i−1
, v
i
)
Claim: We assert that after the i
th
pass of the “for-i” loop, d[v
i
] = δ(s, v
i
).
Proof: The proof is by induction on i. Observe that after the initialization (pass 0), d[v
1
] = d[s] = 0.
In general, prior to the i
th
pass through the loop, the induction hypothesis tells us that
d[v
i−1
] = δ(s, v
i−1
). After the i
th
pass, we have done relaxation on the edge (v
i−1
, v
i
) (since we do
relaxation along all edges). Thus after the i
th
pass we have
d[v
i
] ≤ d[v
i−1
] +w(v
i−1
, v
i
)
= δ(s, v
i−1
) +w(v
i−1
, v
i
)
= δ(s, v
i
)
Recall from Dijkstra’s algorithm that d[v
i
] is never less than δ(s, v
i
). Thus, d[v
i
] is in fact equal to
δ(s, v
i
). This completes the induction proof.
In summary, after i passes through the for loop, all vertices that are i edges away along the shortest path
tree from the source have the correct values stored in d[u]. Thus, after the (V −1)
st
iteration of the for
loop, all vertices u have correct distance values stored in d[u].
8.6.5 Floyd-Warshall Algorithm
We consider the generalization of the shortest path problem: to compute the shortest paths between all
pairs of vertices. This is called the all-pairs shortest paths problem.
Let G = (V, E) be a directed graph with edge weights. If (u, v) ∈ E is an edge then w(u, v) denotes its
weight. δ(u, v) is the distance of the minimum cost path between u and v. We will allow G to have
negative edges weights but will not allow G to have negative cost cycles. We will present an Θ(n
3
)
algorithm for the all pairs shortest path. The algorithm is called the Floyd-Warshall algorithm and is
based on dynamic programming.
We will use an adjacency matrix to represent the digraph. Because the algorithm is matrix based, we will
employ the common matrix notation, using i, j and k to denote vertices rather than u, v and w.
The input is an n n matrix of edge weights:
w
ij
=

0 if i = j
w(i, j) if i = j and (i, j) ∈ E
∞ if i = j and (i, j) ∈ E
The output will be an n n distance matrix D = d
ij
, where d
ij
= δ(i, j), the shortest path cost from
vertex i to j.
162 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
The algorithm dates back to the early 60’s. As with other dynamic programming algorithms, the genius
of the algorithm is in the clever recursive formulation of the shortest path problem. For a path
p = 'v
1
, v
2
, . . . , v
l
, we say that the vertices v
2
, v
3
, . . . , v
l−1
are the intermediate vertices of this path.
Formulation: Define d
(k)
ij
to be the shortest path from i to j such that any intermediate vertices on the
path are chosen from the set {1, 2, . . . , k}. The path is free to visit any subset of these vertices and in any
order. How do we compute d
(k)
ij
assuming we already have the previous matrix d
(k−1)
? There are two
basic cases:
1. Don’t go through vertex k at all.
2. Do go through vertex k.
i
j
d
ik
(k-1)
d
ij
(k-1)
d
kj
(k-1)
vertices i to k-1
k
Figure 8.71: Two cases for all-pairs shortest path
Don’t go through k at all
Then the shortest path from i to j uses only intermediate vertices {1, 2, . . . , k −1}. Hence the length of
the shortest is d
(k−1)
ij
Do go through k
First observe that a shortest path does not go through the same vertex twice, so we can assume that we
pass through k exactly once. That is, we go from i to k and then from k to j. In order for the overall path
to be as short as possible, we should take the shortest path from i to k and the shortest path from k to j.
Since each of these paths uses intermediate vertices {1, 2, . . . , k −1}, the length of the path is
d
(k−1)
ik
+d
(k−1)
kj
.
The following illustrate the process in which the value of d
k
3,2
is updated as k goes from 0 to 4.
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 163
4
1
1
2
3
1
8 4
2
2
Figure 8.72: k = 0, d
(0)
3,2
= ∞(no path)
4
1
1
2
3
1
8 4
2
2
Figure 8.73: k = 1, d
(1)
3,2
= 12 (3 →1 →2)
4
1
1
2
3
1
8 4
2
2
Figure 8.74: k = 2, d
(2)
3,2
= 12 (3 →1 →2)
4
1
1
2
3
1
8 4
2
2
Figure 8.75: k = 3, d
(3)
3,2
= 12 (3 →1 →2)
164 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
4
1
1
2
3
1
8 4
2
2
Figure 8.76: k = 4, d
(4)
3,2
= 7 (3 →1 →4 →2)
This suggests the following recursive (DP) formulation:
d
(0)
ij
= w
ij
d
(k)
ij
= min

d
(k−1)
ij
, d
(k−1)
ik
+d
(k−1)
kj

The final answer is d
(n)
ij
because this allows all possible vertices as intermediate vertices.
As is the case with DP algorithms, we will avoid recursive evaluation by generating a table for d
(k)
ij
. The
algorithm also includes mid-vertex pointers stored in mid[i, j] for extracting the final path.
FLOYD-WARSHALL(n, w[1..n, 1..n])
1 for (i = 1, n)
2 do for (j = 1, n)
3 do d[i, j] ←w[i, j]; mid[i, j] ←null
4 for (k = 1, n)
5 do for (i = 1, n)
6 do for (j = 1, n)
7 do if (d[i, k] +d[k, j] < d[i, j])
8 then d[i, j] = d[i, k] +d[k, j]
9 mid[i, j] = k
Clearly, the running time is Θ(n
3
). The space used by the algorithm is Θ(n
2
).
Figure 8.77 through 8.81 demonstrate the algorithm when applied to a graph. The matrix to left of the
graph contains the matrix d entries. A circle around an entry d
i,k
indicates that it was updated in the
current k iteration.
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 165
4
1
1
2
3
1
8
4
2
9
0 8 1
0 1
0 4
0 9 2
d
(0)
Figure 8.77: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d
(
0)
4
1
1
2
3
1
8
4
2
9
0 8 1
0 1
0 4
0 9 2
d
(1)
12 5
12
5
Figure 8.78: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d
(
1)
166 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
4
1
1
2
3
1
8
4
2
3
0 8 1
0 1
0 4
0 3 2
d
(2)
12 5
12
5
9
9
Figure 8.79: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d
(
2)
0 8 1
0 1
0 4
0 3 2
d
(2)
12 5
9
7
6 5
4
1
1
2
3
1
8
4
2
3
12
5
9
5 7
6
Figure 8.80: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d
(
3)
8.6. SHORTEST PATHS 167
4
1
1
2
3
1
3
4
2
3
0 3 1
0 1
0 4
0 3 2
d
(4)
7 5
7
5
4
4
7
6 5
5 7
6
Figure 8.81: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d
(
4)
Extracting Shortest Path:
The matrix d holds the final shortest distance between pairs of vertices. In order to compute the shortest
path, the mid-vertex pointers mid[i, j] can be used to extract the final path. Whenever we discovered that
the shortest path from i to j passed through vertex k, we set mid[i, j] = k. If the shortest path did not
pass through k then mid[i, j] = null.
To find the shortest path from i to j, we consult mid[i, j]. If it is null, then the shortest path is just the
edge (i, j). Otherwise we recursively compute the shortest path from i to mid[i, j] and the shortest path
from mid[i, j] to j.
PATH(i, j)
1 if (mid[i, j] == null)
2 then output(i, j)
3 else PATH(i, mid[i, j])
4 PATH(mid[i, j], j)
168 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS
Chapter 9
Complexity Theory
So far in the course, we have been building up a “bag of tricks” for solving algorithmic problems.
Hopefully you have a better idea of how to go about solving such problems. What sort of design
paradigm should be used: divide-and-conquer, greedy, dynamic programming.
What sort of data structures might be relevant: trees, heaps, graphs. What is the running time of the
algorithm. All of this is fine if it helps you discover an acceptably efficient algorithm to solve your
problem.
The question that often arises in practice is that you have tried every trick in the book and nothing seems
to work. Although your algorithm can solve small problems reasonably efficiently (e.g., n ≤ 20), for the
really large problems you want to solve, your algorithm never terminates. When you analyze its running
time, you realize that it is running in exponential time, perhaps n

n
, or 2
n
, or 2
2
n
, or n! or worse!.
By the end of 60’s, there was great success in finding efficient solutions to many combinatorial problems.
But there was also a growing list of problems for which there seemed to be no known efficient
algorithmic solutions.
People began to wonder whether there was some unknown paradigm that would lead to a solution to
there problems. Or perhaps some proof that these problems are inherently hard to solve and no
algorithmic solutions exist that run under exponential time.
Near the end of the 1960’s, a remarkable discovery was made. Many of these hard problems were
interrelated in the sense that if you could solve any one of them in polynomial time, then you could solve
all of them in polynomial time. this discovery gave rise to the notion of NP-completeness.
This area is a radical departure from what we have been doing because the emphasis will change. The
goal is no longer to prove that a problem can be solved efficiently by presenting an algorithm for it.
Instead we will be trying to show that a problem cannot be solved efficiently.
Up until now all algorithms we have seen had the property that their worst-case running time are bounded
above by some polynomial in n. A polynomial time algorithm is any algorithm that runs in O(n
k
) time.
A problem is solvable in polynomial time if there is a polynomial time algorithm for it.
Some functions that do not look like polynomials (such as O(nlog n) are bounded above by polynomials
(such as O(n
2
)). Some functions that do look like polynomials are not. For example, suppose you have
169
170 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
an algorithm that takes as input a graph of size n and an integer k and run in O(n
k
) time.
Is this a polynomial time algorithm? No, because k is an input to the problem so the user is allowed to
choose k = n, implying that the running time would be O(n
n
). O(n
n
) is surely not a polynomial in n.
The important aspect is that the exponent must be a constant independent of n.
9.1 Decision Problems
Most of the problems we have discussed involve optimization of one form of another. Find the shortest
path, find the minimum cost spanning tree, maximize the knapsack value. For rather technical reasons,
the NP-complete problems we will discuss will be phrased as decision problems.
A problem is called a decision problem if its output is a simple “yes” or “no” (or you may this of this as
true/false, 0/1, accept/reject.) We will phrase may optimization problems as decision problems. For
example, the MST decision problem would be: Given a weighted graph G and an integer k, does G have
a spanning tree whose weight is at most k?
This may seem like a less interesting formulation of the problem. It does not ask for the weight of the
minimum spanning tree, and it does not even ask for the edges of the spanning tree that achieves this
weight. However, our job will be to show that certain problems cannot be solved efficiently. If we show
that the simple decision problem cannot be solved e¡ciently, then the more general optimization problem
certainly cannot be solved efficiently either.
9.2 Complexity Classes
Before giving all the technical definitions, let us say a bit about what the general classes look like at an
intuitive level.
Class P: This is the set of all decision problems that can be solved in polynomial time. We will
generally refer to these problems as being “easy” or “efficiently solvable”.
Class NP: This is the set of all decision problems that can be verified in polynomial time. This class
contains P as a subset. It also contains a number of problems that are believed to be very “ hard” to
solve.
Class NP: The term “NP” does not mean “not polynomial”. Originally, the term meant “
non-deterministic polynomial” but it is a bit more intuitive to explain the concept from the
perspective of verification.
Class NP-hard: In spite of its name, to say that a problem is NP-hard does not mean that it is hard to
solve. Rather, it means that if we could solve this problem in polynomial time, then we could solve
all NP problems in polynomial time. Note that for a problem to NP-hard, it does not have to be in
the class NP.
9.3. POLYNOMIAL TIME VERIFICATION 171
Class NP-complete: A problem is NP-complete if (1) it is in NP and (2) it is NP-hard.
The Figure 9.1 illustrates one way that the sets P, NP, NP-hard, and NP-complete (NPC) might look. We
say might because we do not know whether all of these complexity classes are distinct or whether they
are all solvable in polynomial time. The Graph Isomorphism, which asks whether two graphs are
identical up to a renaming of their vertices. It is known that this problem is in NP, but it is not known to
be in P. The other is QBF, which stands for Quantified Boolean Formulas. In this problem you are given a
boolean formula and you want to know whether the formula is true or false.
NPC
P
NP
NP-hard
Quantified Boolean
Formulas
No Hamiltonian cycle
0/1 knapsack
Hamiltonian cycle
Satisfiability
Graph Isomorphism
MST
Strong connectivity
Figure 9.1: Complexity Classes
9.3 Polynomial Time Verification
Before talking about the class of NP-complete problems, it is important to introduce the notion of a
verification algorithm. Many problems are hard to solve but they have the property that it easy to verify
the solution if one is provided. Consider the Hamiltonian cycle problem.
Given an undirected graph G, does G have a cycle that visits every vertex exactly once? There is no
known polynomial time algorithm for this problem.
172 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
Non-Hamiltonian Hamiltonian
Figure 9.2: Hamiltonian Cycle
However, suppose that a graph did have a Hamiltonian cycle. It would be easy for someone to convince
of this. They would simply say: “the cycle is 'v
3
, v
7
, v
1
, . . . , v
1
3` We could then inspect the graph and
check that this is indeed a legal cycle and that it visits all of the vertices of the graph exactly once. Thus,
even though we know of no efficient way to solve the Hamiltonian cycle problem, there is a very efficient
way to verify that a a given cycle is indeed a Hamiltonian cycle.
The piece of information that allows verification is called a certificate. Note that not all problems have
the property that they are easy to verify. For example, consider the following two:
1. UHC = {(G)|G has a unique Hamiltonian cycle}
2. HC = {(G)|G has no Hamiltonian cycle}
Suppose that a graph G is in UHC. What information would someone give us that would allow us to
verify this? They could give us an example of the unique Hamiltonian cycle and we could verify that it is
a Hamiltonian cycle. But what sort of certificate could they give us to convince us that this is the only
one?
They could give another cycle that is not Hamiltonian. But this does not mean that there is not another
cycle somewhere that is Hamiltonian. They could try to list every other cycle of length n, but this is not
efficient at all since there are n! possible cycles in general. Thus it is hard to imagine that someone could
give us some information that would allow us to efficiently verify that the graph is in UHC.
9.4 The Class NP
The class NP is a set of all problems that can be verified by a polynomial time algorithm. Why is the set
called “NP” and not “VP”? The original term NP stood for non-deterministic polynomial time. This
9.5. REDUCTIONS 173
referred to a program running on a non-deterministic computer that can make guesses. Such a computer
could non-deterministically guess the value of the certificate. and then verify it in polynomial time. We
have avoided introducing non-determinism here; it is covered in other courses such as automata or
complexity theory.
Observe that P ⊆ NP. In other words, if we can solve a problem in polynomial time, we can certainly
verify the solution in polynomial time. More formally, we do not need to see a certificate to solve the
problem; we can solve it in polynomial time anyway.
However, it is not known whether P = NP. It seems unreasonable to think that this should be so. Being
able to verify that you have a correct solution does not help you in finding the actual solution. The belief
is that P = NP but no one has a proof for this.
9.5 Reductions
The class NP-complete (NPC) problems consists of a set of decision problems (a subset of class NP) that
no one knows how to solve efficiently. But if there were a polynomial solution for even a single
NP-complete problem, then ever problem in NPC will be solvable in polynomial time. For this, we need
the concept of reductions.
Consider the question: Suppose there are two problems, A and B. You know (or you strongly believe at
least) that it is impossible to solve problem A in polynomial time. You want to prove that B cannot be
solved in polynomial time. We want to show that
(A ∈ P) ⇒(B ∈ P)
How would you do this? Consider an example to illustrate reduction: The following problem is
well-known to be NPC:
3-color: Given a graph G, can each of its vertices be labelled with one of 3 different colors such that two
adjacent vertices have the same label (color).
Coloring arises in various partitioning problems where there is a constraint that two objects cannot be
assigned to the same set of partitions. The term “coloring” comes from the original application which
was in map drawing. Two countries that share a common border should be colored with different colors.
It is well known that planar graphs can be colored (maps) with four colors. There exists a polynomial
time algorithm for this. But determining whether this can be done with 3 colors is hard and there is no
polynomial time algorithm for it. In Figure 9.3, the graph on the left can be colored with 3 colors while
the graph on the right cannot be colored.
174 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
3-Colorable Not 3-colorable
Figure 9.3: Examples of 3-colorable and non-3-colorable graphs
Example1: Fish tank problem
Consider the following problem than can be solved with the graph coloring approach. A tropical fish
hobbyist has six different types of fish designated by A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Because of
predator-prey relationships, water conditions and size, some fish can be kept in the same tank. The
following table shows which fish cannot be together:
Type Cannot be with
A B, C
B A ,C, E
C A, B, D, E
D C, F
E B, C, F
F D, E
These constraints can be displayed as a graph where an edge between two vertices exists if the two
species cannot be together. This is shown in Figure 9.4. For example, A cannot be with B and C; there is
an edge between A and B and between A and C.
Given these constraints, What is the smallest number of tanks needed to keep all the fish? The answer
can be found by coloring the vertices in the graph such that no two adjacent vertices have the same color.
This particular graph is 3-colorable and therefore, 3 fish tanks are enough. This is depicted in Figure 9.5.
The 3 fish tanks will hold fish as follows:
Tank 1 Tank 2 Tank 3
A, D F, C B, E
9.5. REDUCTIONS 175
A
B
C
D
F
E
Figure 9.4: Graph representing constraints be-
tween fish species
A
B
C
D
F
E
Figure 9.5: Fish tank graph colored with 3 colors
The 3-color (3Col) problem will the play the role of A, which we strongly suspect to not be solvable in
polynomial time. For our problem B, consider the following problem: Given a graph G = (V, E), we say
that a subset of vertices V

⊆ V forms a clique if for every pair of vertices u, v ∈ V

, the edge
(u, v) ∈ V

That is, the subgraph induced by V

is a complete graph.
Clique Cover: Given a graph G and an integer k, can we find k subsets of vertices V
1
, V
2
, . . . , V
k
, such
that
¸
i
V
i
= V, and that each V
i
is a clique of G.
The following figure shows a graph that has a clique cover of size 3. There are three subgraphs that are
complete.
Clique cover (size=3)
Figure 9.6: Graph with clique cover of size 3
176 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
The clique cover problem arises in applications of clustering. We put an edge between two nodes if they
are similar enough to be clustered in the same group. We want to know whether it is possible to cluster all
the vertices into k groups.
Suppose that you want to solve the CCov problem. But after a while of fruitless effort, you still cannot
find a polynomial time algorithm for the CCov problem. How can you prove that CCov is likely to not
have a polynomial time solution?
You know that 3Col is NP-complete and hence, experts believe that 3Col ∈ P. You feel that there is some
connection between the CCov problem and the 3Col problem. Thus, you want to show that
(3Col ∈ P) ⇒(CCov ∈ P)
Both problems involve partitioning the vertices into groups. In the clique cover problem, for two vertices
to be in the same group, they must be adjacent to each other. In the 3-coloring problem, for two vertices
to be in the same color group, they must not be adjacent. In some sense, the problems are almost the
same but the adjacency requirements are exactly reversed.
We claim that we can reduce the 3-coloring problem into the clique cover problem as follows: Given a
graph G for which we want to determine its 3-colorability, output the pair (G, 3) where G denotes the
complement of G. Feed the pair (G, 3) into a routine for clique cover.
For example, the graph G in Figure 9.7 is 3-colorable and its complement (G, 3) is coverable by 3
cliques. The graph G in Figure 9.8 is not 3-colorable; it is also not coverable by cliques.
3-Colorable
Coverable by 3
cliques
G
G
Figure 9.7: 3-colorable G and clique coverable (G, 3)
9.6. POLYNOMIAL TIME REDUCTION 177
Not 3-colorable
Not coverable
H
H
Figure 9.8: G is not 3-colorable and (G, 3) is not clique coverable
9.6 Polynomial Time Reduction
Definition: We say that a decision problem L
1
is polynomial-time reducible to decision problem L
2
(written L
1

p
L
2
) if there is polynomial time computable function f such that for all x, x ∈ L
1
if and
only if f(x) ∈ L
2
.
In the previous example we showed that
3Col ≤
P
CCov
In particular, we have f(G) = (G, 3). It is easy to complement a graph in O(n
2
) (i.e., polynomial time).
For example, flip the 0’s and 1’s in the adjacency matrix.
The way this is used in NP-completeness is that we have strong evidence that L
1
is not solvable in
polynomial time. Hence, the reduction is effectively equivalent to saying that “since L
1
is not likely to be
solvable in polynomial time, then L
2
is also not likely to be solvable in polynomial time.
9.7 NP-Completeness
The set of NP-complete problems is all problems in the complexity class NP for which it is known that if
any one is solvable in polynomial time, then they all are. Conversely, if any one is not solvable in
polynomial time, then none are.
Definition: A decision problem L is NP-Hard if
L


P
L for all L

∈ NP.
178 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
Definition: L is NP-complete if
1. L ∈ NP and
2. L


P
L for some known NP-complete problem L

.
Given this formal definition, the complexity classes are:
P: is the set of decision problems that are solvable in polynomial time.
NP: is the set of decision problems that can be verified in polynomial time.
NP-Hard: L is NP-hard if for all L

∈ NP, L


P
L. Thus if we could solve L in polynomial time, we
could solve all NP problems in polynomial time.
NP-Complete L is NP-complete if
1. L ∈ NP and
2. L is NP-hard.
The importance of NP-complete problems should now be clear. If any NP-complete problem is solvable
in polynomial time, then every NP-complete problem is also solvable in polynomial time. Conversely, if
we can prove that any NP-complete problem cannot be solved in polynomial time, the every
NP-complete problem cannot be solvable in polynomial time.
9.8 Boolean Satisfiability Problem: Cook’s Theorem
We need to have at least one NP-complete problem to start the ball rolling. Stephen Cook showed that
such a problem existed. He proved that the boolean satisfiability problem is NP-complete. A boolean
formula is a logical formulation which consists of variables x
i
. These variables appear in a logical
expression using logical operations
1. negation of x: x
2. boolean or: (x ∨y)
3. boolean and: (x ∧y)
For a problem to be in NP, it must have an efficient verification procedure. Thus virtually all NP
problems can be stated in the form, “does there exists X such that P(X)”, where X is some structure (e.g.
a set, a path, a partition, an assignment, etc.) and P(X) is some property that X must satisfy (e.g. the set
of objects must fill the knapsack, or the path must visit every vertex, or you may use at most k colors and
no two adjacent vertices can have the same color). In showing that such a problem is in NP, the certificate
consists of giving X, and the verification involves testing that P(X) holds.
9.8. BOOLEAN SATISFIABILITY PROBLEM: COOK’S THEOREM 179
In general, any set X can be described by choosing a set of objects, which in turn can be described as
choosing the values of some boolean variables. Similarly, the property P(X) that you need to satisfy, can
be described as a boolean formula. Stephen Cook was looking for the most general possible property he
could, since this should represent the hardest problem in NP to solve. He reasoned that computers (which
represent the most general type of computational devices known) could be described entirely in terms of
boolean circuits, and hence in terms of boolean formulas. If any problem were hard to solve, it would be
one in which X is an assignment of boolean values (true/false, 0/1) and P(X) could be any boolean
formula. This suggests the following problem, called the boolean satisfiability problem.
SAT: Given a boolean formula, is there some way to assign truth values (0/1, true/false) to the variables
of the formula, so that the formula evaluates to true?
A boolean formula is a logical formula which consists of variables x
i
, and the logical operations x
meaning the negation of x, boolean-or (x ∨y) and boolean-and (x ∧y). Given a boolean formula, we
say that it is satisfiable if there is a way to assign truth values (0 or 1) to the variables such that the final
result is 1. (As opposed to the case where no matter how you assign truth values the result is always 0.)
For example
(x
1
∧ (x
2
∨x
3
)) ∧ ((x
2
∧x
3
) ∨x
1
)
is satisfiable, by the assignment x
1
= 1, x
2
= 0 and x
3
= 0. On the other hand,
(x
1
∨ (x
2
∧x
3
)) ∧ (x
1
∨ (x
2
∧x
3
)) ∧ (x
2
∨x
3
) ∧ (x
2
∨x
3
)
is not satisfiable. Such a boolean formula can be represented by a logical circuit made up of OR, AND
and NOT gates. For example, Figure 9.9 shows the circuit for the boolean formula
((x
1
∧x
4
) ∨x
2
) ∧ ((x
3
∧x
4
) ∨x
2
) ∧x
5
x
1
x
2
x
3
x
4
x
5
Figure 9.9: Logical circuit for a boolean formula
180 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
Cook’s Theorem: SAT is NP-complete
We will not prove the theorem; it is quite complicated. In fact, it turns out that a even more restricted
version of the satisfiability problem is NP-complete.
A literal is a variable x or its negation x. A boolean formula is in 3-Conjunctive Normal Form (3-CNF)
if it is the boolean-and of clauses where each clause is the boolean-or of exactly three literals. For
example,
(x
1
∨x
2
∨x
3
) ∧ (x
1
∨x
3
∨x
4
) ∧ (x
2
∨x
3
∨x
4
)
is in 3-CNF form. 3SAT is the problem of determining whether a formula is 3-CNF is satisfiable. 3SAT
is NP-complete. We can use this fact to prove that other problems are NP-complete. We will do this with
the independent set problem.
Independent Set Problem: Given an undirected graph G = (V, E) and an integer k, does G contain a
subset V

of k vertices such that no two vertices in V

are adjacent to each other.
Independent set of size 4
Figure 9.10:
The independent set problem arises when there is some sort of selection problem where there are mutual
restrictions pairs that cannot both be selected. For example, a company dinner where an employee and
his or her immediate supervisor cannot both be invited.
Claim: IS is NP-complete
The proof involves two parts. First, we need to show that IS ∈ NP. The certificate consists of k vertices
of V

. We simply verify that for each pair of vertices u, v ∈ V

, there is no edge between them. Clearly,
this can be done in polynomial time, by an inspection of the adjacency matrix.
Second, we need to establish that IS is NP-hard This can be done by showing that some known
NP-compete (3SAT) is polynomial-time reducible to IS. That is, 3SAT ≤
P
IS.
9.8. BOOLEAN SATISFIABILITY PROBLEM: COOK’S THEOREM 181
An important aspect to reductions is that we do not attempt to solve the satisfiability problem. Remember:
It is NP-complete, and there is not likely to be any polynomial time solution. The idea is to translate the
similar elements of the satisfiable problem to corresponding elements of the independent set problem.
What is to be selected?
3SAT: Which variables are to be assigned the value true, or equivalently, which literals will be true and
which will be false.
IS: Which vertices will be placed in V

.
Requirements:
3SAT: Each clause must contain at least one true valued literal.
IS: V

must contain at least k vertices.
Restrictions:
3SAT: If x
i
is assigned true, then x
i
must be false and vice versa.
IS: If u is selected to be in V

and v is a neighbor of u then v cannot be in V

.
We want a function which given any 3-CNF boolean formula F , converts it into a pair (G, k) such that
the above elements are translated properly. Our strategy will be to turn each literal into a vertex. The
vertices will be in clause clusters of three, one for each clause. Selecting a true literal from some clause
will correspond to selecting a vertex to add to V

. We will set k equal to the number of clauses, to force
the independent set subroutine to select one true literal from each clause. To keep the IS subroutine from
selecting two literals from one clause and none from some other, we will connect all the vertices in each
clause cluster with edges. To keep the IS subroutine from selecting a literal and its complement to be
true, we will put an edge between each literal and its complement.
A formal description of the reduction is given below. The input is a boolean formula F in 3-CNF, and the
output is a graph G and integer k.
3SAT-TO-IS(F)
1 k ← number of clauses in F
2 for ( each clause C in F )
3 do create a clause cluster of
4 3 vertices from literals of C
5 for ( each clause cluster (x
1
, x
2
, x
3
) )
6 do create an edge (x
i
, x
j
) between
7 all pairs of vertices in the cluster
8 for ( each vertex x
i
)
9 do create an edge between x
i
and
10 all its complement vertices x
i
182 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
11 return (G, k) // output is graph G and integer k
If F has k clauses, then G has exactly 3k vertices. Given any reasonable encoding of F , it is an easy
programming exercise to create G (say as an adjacency matrix) in polynomial time. We claim that F is
satisfiable if and only if G has an independent set of size k.
Example: Suppose that we are given the 3-CNF formula:
(x
1
∨x
2
∨x
3
) ∧ (x
1
∨x
2
∨x
3
) ∧ (x
1
∨x
2
∨x
3
) ∧ (x
1
∨x
2
∨x
3
)
The following series of figures show the reduction which produces the graph and sets k = 4. First, each of
the four literals is converted into a three-vertices graph. This is shown in Figure 9.11
x
1
x
3
x
2
x
1
x
3
x
2
x
3
x
1
x
2
x
3
x
1
x
2
Figure 9.11: Four graphs, one for each of the 3-terms literal
Next, each term is connected to its complement. This is shown in Figure 9.12.
9.8. BOOLEAN SATISFIABILITY PROBLEM: COOK’S THEOREM 183
x
1
x
3
x
2
x
1
x
3
x
2
x
3
x
1
x
2
x
3
x
1
x
2
Figure 9.12: Each term is connected to its complement
The boolean formula is satisfied by the assignment x
1
= 1, x
2
= 1 x
3
= 0. This implies that the first
literal of the first and last clauses are 1, the second literal of the second clause is 1, and the third literal of
the third clause is 1. By selecting vertices corresponding to true literals in each clause, we get an
independent set of size k = 4. This is shown in Figure 9.13.
x
1
x
3
x
2
x
1
x
3
x
2
x
3
x
1
x
2
x
3
x
1
x
2
Figure 9.13: Independent set corresponding to x
1
= 1, x
2
= 1 x
3
= 0
Correctness Proof:
We claim that F is satisfiable if and only if G has an independent set of size k. If F is satisfiable, then each
of the k clauses of F must have at least one true literal. Let V

denote the corresponding vertices from
each of the clause clusters (one from each cluster). Because we take vertices from each cluster, there are
184 CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY
no inter-cluster edges between them, and because we cannot set a variable and its complement to both be
true, there can be no edge of the form (x
i
, x
i
) between the vertices of V

. Thus, V

is an independent set
of size k.
Conversely, G has an independent set V

of size k. First observe that we must select a vertex from each
clause cluster, because there are k clusters, and we cannot take two vertices from the same cluster
(because they are all interconnected). Consider the assignment in which we set all of these literals to 1.
This assignment is logically consistent, because we cannot have two vertices labelled x
i
and x
i
in the
same cluster.
Finally the transformation clearly runs in polynomial time. This completes the NP-completeness proof.
Also observe that the the reduction had no knowledge of the solution to either problem. Computing the
solution to either will require exponential time. Instead, the reduction simple translated the input from
one problem into an equivalent input to the other problem.
9.9 Coping with NP-Completeness
With NP-completeness we have seen that there are many important optimization problems that are likely
to be quite hard to solve exactly. Since these are important problems, we cannot simply give up at this
point, since people do need solutions to these problems. Here are some strategies that are used to cope
with NP-completeness:
Use brute-force search: Even on the fastest parallel computers this approach is viable only for the
smallest instance of these problems.
Heuristics: A heuristic is a strategy for producing a valid solution but there are no guarantees how close
it to optimal. This is worthwhile if all else fails.
General search methods: Powerful techniques for solving general combinatorial optimization
problems. Branch-and-bound, A*-search, simulated annealing, and genetic algorithms
Approximation algorithm: This is an algorithm that runs in polynomial time (ideally) and produces a
solution that is within a guaranteed factor of the optimal solution.

2

Contents
1 Introduction 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 Origin of word: Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Algorithm: Informal Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Algorithms, Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementation Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Course in Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Analyzing Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7 7 7 8 9 9

Model of Computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Example: 2-dimension maxima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Brute-Force Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.10.1 Analysis of the brute-force maxima algorithm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

1.10 Running Time Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.11 Analysis: A Harder Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.11.1 2-dimension Maxima Revisited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.11.2 Plane-sweep Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.11.3 Analysis of Plane-sweep Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1.11.4 Comparison of Brute-force and Plane sweep algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2 3 Asymptotic Notation Divide and Conquer Strategy 3.1 3.1.1 3.1.2 3.1.3 23 27

Merge Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Analysis of Merge Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 The Iteration Method for Solving Recurrence Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Visualizing Recurrences Using the Recursion Tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Sieve Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 3. . . . . .3 4.4 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . .1 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 4. . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . .2 4. . . . . . . . . 57 Bucket or Bin Sort . . . . . . .1 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Radix Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 4. .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .4 4 Sorting 4. . . . . . . 43 Analysis of BuildHeap . . . . . . . . . . .4 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4. .3. . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 73 6 Dynamic Programming 6. . . . . . 35 Selection Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . .5 4. . . . . . . . 47 Analysis of Quicksort . . . . . 39 Sorting in O(n log n) time .2 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 BuildHeap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Lower Bounds for Sorting . . . .1 Fibonacci Sequence . . . . . . . . . . 50 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 5 In-place. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Heapify Procedure . . . 36 39 Selection Problem . . .6 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .1 4. . . . .2. . . . Stable Sorting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Heaps .2 3. . . . . 43 Analysis of Heapify . . . . 49 Worst Case Analysis of Quick Sort . . . . . . .3 4. . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 3. . . 54 57 Linear Time Sorting 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Quicksort . .4 4. . . . . . . . . . . 40 Heapsort Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3. . 46 4. .3. . . . . . .2 CONTENTS A Messier Example . . . . . . .4 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Quick Sort Example . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Applying the Sieve to Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. 49 Average-case Analysis of Quicksort . . . 44 Analysis of Heapsort . . . . . . . . . . 34 Slow Sorting Algorithms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Counting Sort . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . 35 Analysis of Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Partition Algorithm . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . .2 8. .4 Edit Distance: Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Making Change: Dynamic Programming Solution . . . . . . . 85 0/1 Knapsack Problem: Dynamic Programming Approach .3 5 Dynamic Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Timestamp Structure . . . .4 7. . . . . . 75 Edit Distance . . . . . 93 97 6. . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Chain Matrix Multiplication-Dynamic Programming Formulation . . . . . . . 77 Analysis of DP Edit Distance . 99 Activity Selection . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Graph Traversal . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Edit Distance Algorithm . . . . . . .4 6. . . . . . .2 8. . . 116 Precedence Constraint Graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cycles . . . . . . . . 100 Huffman Encoding: Correctness . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 6. . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . . .2 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 8. . . . . . . . . . . .1 Example: Counting Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 7. . . . . 137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Strong Components . . . . 107 Greedy Algorithm: Huffman Encoding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . 98 Complexity of Coin Change Algorithm . .3 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2 7. . 119 Generic Graph Traversal Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Fractional Knapsack Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 DFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . . . 130 8 Graphs 8. . .4. . 109 113 Breadth-first Search . . .1 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 8. . . . . . . . . .1 0/1 Knapsack Problem . .1 7. .2 7. . .1 7. . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Correctness of Greedy Activity Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Chain Matrix Multiply . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS 6. . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8. . . . . . . . . 117 Depth-first Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . . . . .3. .5. . . . . . 125 DFS . . 84 6. . . .2 6. . . . . .1. . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Edit Distance: Dynamic Programming Algorithm . . . . 91 7 Greedy Algorithms 7. . . . . . .3 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Huffman Encoding Algorithm . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Strong Components and DFS . . 131 Topological Sort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9. . 177 Boolean Satisfiability Problem: Cook’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . 172 Reductions . . . . . . .6.3 8. . . . . . . 161 169 Shortest Paths . . . . .9 Decision Problems . . . . . . . . . . . .5 CONTENTS Minimum Spanning Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Prim’s Algorithm .4 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 8. . . . 142 8. . . 160 Floyd-Warshall Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. 170 Complexity Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . .1 9. . 171 The Class NP .1 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Greedy MST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . .5 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Kruskal’s Algorithm . 149 Dijkstra’s Algorithm . . . . . . . .6 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 9. . 184 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 NP-Completeness . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 9. .2 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Correctness of Dijkstra’s Algorithm . . . 170 Polynomial Time Verification . . . 159 Correctness of Bellman-Ford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8. . . . 153 9 Complexity Theory 9. . . . . . . . . . . .2 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Coping with NP-Completeness . . . . . . . . . . 173 Polynomial Time Reduction . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . .2 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .4 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Computing MST: Generic Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Bellman-Ford Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

or compiler. It is from the titles of these writings and his name that the words algebra and algorithm are derived. As a result of his work. 1. was taken over by the Russians in 1873. al-Khwarizmi is regarded as the most outstanding mathematician of his time 1.3 Algorithms. a town south of river Oxus in present Uzbekistan. Much of al-Khwarizmi’s work was written in a book titled al Kitab al-mukhatasar fi hisab al-jabr wa’l-muqabalah (The Compendious Book on Calculation by Completion and Balancing). Uzbekistan.E. algorithm 7 . Al-Khwarizmi parents migrated to a place south of Baghdad when he was a child.E. An algorithm is thus a sequence of computational steps that transform the input into output. or set of values. a Muslim country for over a thousand years. It has been established from his contributions that he flourished under Khalifah Al-Mamun at Baghdad during 813 to 833 C.1 Origin of word: Algorithm The word Algorithm comes from the name of the muslim author Abu Ja’far Mohammad ibn Musa al-Khowarizmi. which is independent of a specific programming language. He was born in the eighth century at Khwarizm (Kheva). as output. as input and produces some value. Unlike a program. Programming A good understanding of algorithms is essential for a good understanding of the most basic element of computer science: programming.2 Algorithm: Informal Definition An algorithm is any well-defined computational procedure that takes some values. machine. Al-Khwarizmi died around 840 C. or set of values. Thus. in some sense. His year of birth is not known exactly. an algorithm is a mathematical entity.Chapter 1 Introduction 1.

) The micro issues in programming involve how best to deal with these small critical sections. These macro issues are the primary subject of courses on software engineering. but where the great majority of computational time is spent. but just as they apply to various applications: compilers. first be sure you have a good design. CS301 deals with how to design good data structures. computer graphics and vision. This course is all about how to design good algorithms. and operating system. 1. It may be very important for the success of the overall project that these sections of code be written in the most efficient manner possible. because most of the fastest algorithms are fast because they use fast data structures. Why study algorithm design? There are many facets to good program design. An unfortunately common approach to this problem is to first design an inefficient algorithm and data structure to solve the problem. In fact.8 CHAPTER 1. and so ignore issues such as programming language. data conversion. However. artificial intelligence. error checking. operating systems. an important fact of current processor technology is that of locality of reference. but still keep an . there are a number of companion courses that are important as well. etc. INTRODUCTION design is all about the mathematical theory behind the design of good programs. Our mathematical analysis will usually ignore these issues. many of the courses in the computer science program deal with efficient algorithms and data structures. machine. which may involve only tens to hundreds of lines of code. To be really complete algorithm designer. In any important programming project there are two major types of issues. Before you implement. databases. (Or as the old adage goes: 80% of the execution time takes place in 20% of the code. it is important to be aware of programming and machine issues as well. But a good algorithm designer can work within the realm of mathematics. then often no amount of fine-tuning is going to make a substantial difference. there is often a small critical portion of the software. This is not really an independent issue. This has the advantage of clearing away the messy details that affect implementation. But these details may be very important.4 Implementation Issues One of the elements that we will focus on in this course is to try to study algorithms as pure mathematical objects. and how does one establish that a complex programming system satisfies its various requirements. and then take this poor design and attempt to fine-tune its performance by applying clever coding tricks or by implementing it on the most expensive and fastest machines around to boost performance as much as possible. a good understanding of algorithm design is a central element to a good understanding of computer science and good programming. A great deal of the programming effort on most complex software systems consists of elements whose programming is fairly mundane (input and output. For example. and vice versa. Frequently accessed data can be stored in registers or cache memory. The problem is that if the underlying design is bad. Macro issues involve elements such as how does one coordinate the efforts of many programmers working on a single piece of software. Thus. Good algorithm design is one of them (and an important one). macro issues and micro issues. Because the lesson cannot be taught in just one course. report generation).

In practice. we must first agree the criteria for measuring algorithms. be sure to use whatever development tools that you have. and quick-sort. 1. The final third of the course will deal with a collection of various algorithmic problems and solution techniques. summations. and use this problem as a case-study in different techniques for designing and analyzing algorithms. the difference is typically small (perhaps 10-20% difference in running time). However.1. Also. These include issues such as the ease of debugging and maintaining the final software through its life-cycle. do test implementations) a few of the best designs and run them on data sets that will arise in your application for the final fine-tuning. and in fact it is perhaps more accurately just the first word in good program design. such as profilers (programs which pin-point the sections of the code that are responsible for most of the running time). These resources include mostly running time and memory. This will focus on asymptotics. 1. all have equal running times. NP-complete problem are those for which no efficient algorithms are known. one of the luxuries we will have in this course is to be able to assume that we are given a clean. We will show a number of different strategies for sorting. Thus. we will study three fast sorting algorithms this semester. In practice there are many issues that need to be considered in the design algorithms. this is often not the case. Next prune this selection by consideration of practical matters (like locality of reference). COURSE IN REVIEW 9 open eye to implementation issues down the line that will be important for final implementation. and the algorithm must be designed subject to only partial knowledge of the final specifications. heap-sort. The overall strategy that I would suggest to any programming would be to first come up with a few good designs from a mathematical and algorithmic perspective. and hence we will measure algorithms in terms of the amount of computational resources that the algorithm requires.5. The first is on the mathematical tools necessary for the analysis of algorithms. but no one knows for sure whether efficient solutions might exist. fully-specified mathematical description of the computational problem. The emphasis in this course will be on the design of efficient algorithm. there may be other elements that are taken into account. such as the number disk accesses in a database program or the communication bandwidth in a networking application.5 Course in Review This course will consist of four major sections. Why? It is the best from the perspective of locality of reference. among the three (barring any extra considerations) quick sort is the fastest on virtually all modern machines. From our mathematical analysis. The second element will deal with one particularly important algorithmic problem: sorting a list of numbers.6 Analyzing Algorithms In order to design good algorithms. recurrences. Finally we will close this last third with a very brief introduction to the theory of NP-completeness. For example. However. in practice . Also. Thus this course is not the last word in good program design. Finally prototype (that is. Depending on the application. merge-sort.

• Let a point p in 2-dimensional space be given by its integer coordinates. performing any comparison (e. Each instruction involves performing some basic operation on two values in the machines memory (which might be characters or integers.. as described in the previous lecture. You want the pick the fastest car. We assume that each basic operation takes the same constant time to execute.7 Model of Computation Another goal that we will have in this course is that our analysis be as independent as possible of the variations in machine. Here is how we might model this as a formal problem. the model would allow you to add two numbers that contain a billion digits in constant time. A[10]). But. × . let’s avoid floating point for now). accessing an element of an array (e. p.y). and has done a good job of modelling typical machine technology since the early 60’s. Thus. we want to list those cars that are not dominated by any other. the RAM model seems to be fairly sound. Fortunately. in order to say anything meaningful about our algorithms. such as efficiency due to locality of reference. There are some “loop-holes” (or hidden ways of subverting the rules) to beware of. compiler. Unlike programs. Instructions are executed one-by-one (there is no parallelism). you want the cheapest. cheap car dominates the slow. But fast cars are expensive. We say that the fast. p = (p.10 CHAPTER 1. expensive car relative to your selection criteria. For example. It does not model some elements. integer division) on integer values of any size. x ≤ 5) or boolean operations. Thus gives us quite a bit of flexibility in how we present our algorithms.e.x. and easily modified if problem parameters and specifications are slightly modified. Definitely do not want a car if there is another that is both faster and cheaper. programmers) and not machines.g. Suppose you want to buy a car. . . You cannot decide which is more important: speed or price. Nonetheless. Basic operations include things like assigning a value to a variable. We call this model a random access machine or RAM. and are easy to modify subject to small problem variations. algorithms to be understood primarily by people (i. computing any basic arithmetic operation (+. INTRODUCTION it is often necessary to design algorithms that are simple. A RAM is an idealized machine with an infinitely large random-access memory. most of the algorithms that we will discuss in this class are quite simple.g. 1. So. it is theoretically possible to derive nonsensical results in the form of efficient RAM programs that cannot be implemented efficiently on any machine. and many low-level details may be omitted (since it will be the job of the programmer who implements the algorithm to fill them in). 1.8 Example: 2-dimension maxima Let us do an example that illustrates how we analyze algorithms. it will be important for us to settle on a mathematical model of computation. given a collection of cars. Ideally this model should be a reasonable abstraction of a standard generic single-processor machine. operating system. or programming language. This model seems to go a good job of describing the computational power of most modern (nonparallel) machines.

7) (11. i. p2. If pi is not dominated by any other point. We have avoided programming and other software issues.13) (4.y ≤ q. • Given a set of n points.11) (9. .3) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Figure 1.. output the set of maximal points of P. . . . .e. 1.4) (5.9.x ≤ q. with no thought to efficiency.y. High y value means a cheap car and low y means expensive car. .12) (14. We have intentionally not discussed how the points are represented.10) (15. The 2-dimensional Maxima is thus defined as • Given a set of points P = {p1. pn} be the initial set of points.9 Brute-Force Algorithm To get the ball rolling.1) (12. pn} in 2-space a point is said to be maximal if it is not dominated by any other point in P.1. Here is set of maximal points for a given set of points in 2-d. .10) (7.5) (13. . P = {p1. then output it. For each point pi. . 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (7. those points pi such that pi is not dominated by any other point of P. test it against all other points pj. . .x and p. . p2. Think of y as the money left in your pocket after you have paid for the car.5) (4. Maximal points correspond to the fastest and cheapest cars.1: Maximal points in 2-d Our description of the problem is at a fairly mathematical level. y) pair where x is the speed of the car and y is the negation of the price. let’s just consider a simple brute-force algorithm. pn} in 2-space.7) (2. Let P = {p1. . 11 The car selection problem can be modelled this way: For each car we associate (x. BRUTE-FORCE ALGORITHM • A point p is said to be dominated by point q if p. We have not discussed any input or output formats. p2.

and so the level of detail depends on your intended audience.7) (2. since I felt that these are pretty clear from context or just unimportant details.13) (12. these are important considerations for implementation. . .x) and (P[i].11) (9.5) (13. When writing pseudo code.11) (9. For example. n]) 1 for i ← 1 to n 2 do maximal ← true 3 for j ← 1 to n 4 do 5 if (i = j) and (P[i]. I omitted type specifications for the procedure Maxima and the variable maximal. Here are a series of figures that illustrate point domination.12 CHAPTER 1. do not assume that more detail is better. In particular. INTRODUCTION This English description is clear enough that any (competent) programmer should be able to implement it. I assumed that the points in P are all distinct. For example. if you want to be a bit more formal. the appropriate level of detail is a judgement call.y) 6 then maximal ← false.10) (15. 11) Figure 1.y ≤ P[j]. Remember.7) (2.12) (4. 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (7.7) 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (7. you should omit details that detract from the main ideas of the algorithm.5) (4.5) (4.1) (11. However. If there is a duplicate point then the algorithm may fail to output even a single point. it could be written in pseudocode as follows: M AXIMA(int n. You might also notice that I did not insert any checking for consistency.10) (7.5) (13.10) (15.x ≤ P[j].3: Points that dominate (9. algorithms are to be read by people. and just go with the essentials. but we will often omit error checking because we want to see the algorithm in its simplest form.12) (4. Of course. (Can you see why?) Again.4) (5.2: Points that dominate (4.7) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Figure 1.3) (14. and I never defined what a Point data type is. 10) . Point P[1 .13) (12.4) (5. break 7 if (maximal = true) 8 then output P[i] There are no formal rules to the syntax of this pseudo code.10) (7.1) (11.3) (14.

3) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Figure 1.4: Points that dominate (7.4) (5. let |I| denote its length.10. we could count the number of steps of the pseudo code that are executed or.7) (11. count the number of times an element of P is accessed or.5) (4.10) (7.7) (2. e.3) (14. we will ignore these technological issues in our analysis.13) (12. To measure the running time of the brute-force 2-d maxima algorithm.12) (4.5) (4. The average-case time is the weighted sum of running times with weights . The running time depends upon the input size.g. Let p(I) denote the probability of seeing this input.11) (9.1) (11. programming language. Then Tworst(n) = max T (I) |I|=n Average-case time is the average running time over all inputs of size n. the number of comparisons that are performed. optimization by the compiler etc.7) 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (7. We will also be concerned about the space (memory) required by the algorithm. Although important.7) (2.12) (14.10) (15.11) (9. RUNNING TIME ANALYSIS 13 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (7. Worst-case time is the maximum running time over all (legal) inputs of size n. breaking out of the inner loop in the brute-force algorithm depends not only on the input size of P but also the structure of the input.13) (4.4) (5. 7) Figure 1.1.10) (15.5: The maximal points 1.5) (13. n Different inputs of the same size may result in different running time. The running time of an implementation of the algorithm would depend upon the speed of the computer.10 Running Time Analysis The main purpose of our mathematical analysis will be measuring the execution time.1) (12. For example. Two criteria for measuring running time are worst-case time and average-case time.10) (7.5) (13. and let T (I) denote the running time of the algorithm on input I. Let I denote an input instance.

x ≤ P[j]. Average-case time is more difficult to compute. n]) 1 for i ← 1 to n n times 2 do maximal ← true 3 for j ← 1 to n n times 4 do 5 if (i = j)&(P[i]. . we go through the inner loop n times as well. Point P[1 . The condition in the if-statement makes four accesses to P. any algorithm is fast enough.10. it is difficult to specify probability distribution on inputs. We will discuss this Θ-notation more formally later. Worst-case time will specify an upper limit on the running time. one for the i-loop and the other for the j-loop: n n T (n) = i=1 n 2+ j=1 4 = i=1 (4n + 2) = (4n + 2)n = 4n2 + 2n For small values of n. In the worst case every point is maximal (can you see how to generate such an example?) so these two access are made for each time through the outer loop. What happens when n gets large? Running time does become an issue.1 Analysis of the brute-force maxima algorithm. We will say that the worst-case running time is Θ(n2).x.y) 4 accesses 6 then maximal ← false break 7 if maximal 8 then output P[i].y ≤ P[j].x)&(P[i]. 1. M AXIMA(int n. When n is large. n2 term will be much larger than the n term and will dominate the running time. .14 being the probabilities: Tavg(n) = |I|=n CHAPTER 1.y 2 accesses Thus we might express the worst-case running time as a pair of nested summations. P[i]. This is called the asymptotic growth rate of the function. and for the running time we will count the number of time that any element of P is accessed. and for each time through this loop. . Assume that the input size is n. The output statement makes two accesses for each point that is output. INTRODUCTION p(I)T (I) We will almost always work with worst-case time. Clearly we go through the outer loop n times.

. . Harmonic series For n ≥ 0 Hn = i=1 n 1 i 1 1 1 + + . . + ≈ ln n 2 3 n = Θ(ln n) =1+ . + n2 i=1 = Geometric series n 2n3 + 3n2 + n = Θ(n3) 6 xi = 1 + x + x2 + . Summation should be familiar but let us review a bit here. their sum a1 + a2 + . Arithmetic series n i = 1 + 2 + . RUNNING TIME ANALYSIS The analysis involved computing a summation. Given a finite sequence of values a1. .. . 0. + xn i=1 = x(n+1) − 1 = Θ(n2) x−1 If 0 < x < 1 then this is Θ(1). then this is Θ(xn). . and if x > 1. . . + n i=1 = Quadratic series n n(n + 1) = Θ(n2) 2 i2 = 1 + 4 + 9 + . then the sum is additive identity. a2. Some facts about summation: If c is a constant n n cai = c i=1 i=1 n ai n and n (ai + bi) = i=1 i=1 ai + i=1 bi Some important summations that should be committed to memory..10. + an is expressed in summation notation as n 15 ai i=1 If n = 0. . . . . an.1.

LOOPS() 1 2 3 4 5 for i ← 1 to n do for j ← 1 to 2i do k = j while (k ≥ 0) do k = k − 1 .11 Analysis: A Harder Example Let us consider a harder example. 0. . Consider the inner most while loop. . . Let I() be the time spent in the while loop. j − 2. NESTED . . NESTED . How do we analyze the running time of an algorithm that has complex nested loop? The answer is we write out the loops as summations and then solve the summations. j − 1. Thus j I(j) = k=0 1=j+1 Consider the middle for loop. To convert loops into summations.LOOPS() 1 2 3 4 5 for i ← 1 to n do for j ← 1 to 2i do k = j while (k ≥ 0) do k = k − 1 It is executed for k = j. we work from inside-out. . .LOOPS() 1 2 3 4 5 6 for i ← 1 to n do for j ← 1 to 2i do k = j . . NESTED . . INTRODUCTION 1. while (k ≥ 0) do k = k − 1 .16 CHAPTER 1. Time spent inside the while loop is constant.

x. A point p is said to dominated by point q if p. Given a set of n . p = (p.y.1.y ≤ q.11.1 2-dimension Maxima Revisited Recall the 2-d maxima problem: Let a point p in 2-dimensional space be given by its integer coordinates.y). NESTED . Let M() be the time spent in the for loop: 2i 17 M(i) = j=1 2i I(j) = j=1 2i (j + 1) 2i = j=1 j+ j=1 1 2i(2i + 1) + 2i 2 = 2i2 + 3i = Finally the outer-most for loop.LOOPS() 1 2 3 4 5 for i ← 1 to n do for j ← 1 to 2i do k = j while (k ≥ 0) do k = k − 1 Let T () be running time of the entire algorithm: n T (n) = i=1 n M(i) (2i2 + 3i) i=1 n n = = i=1 2i + i=1 2 2 3i =2 n(n + 1) 2n3 + 3n + n +3 6 2 4n3 + 15n2 + 11n = 6 3 = Θ(n ) 1. ANALYSIS: A HARDER EXAMPLE Its running time is determined by i.x and p.x ≤ q.11. p.

We will sweep a vertical line across the 2-d plane from left to right. once we know that a point pi is dominated by another point pj. We will store the existing maximal points in a list The points that pi dominates will appear at the end of the list because points are sorted by x-coordinate. We can thus use a stack to store the maximal points.2 Plane-sweep Algorithm The question is whether we can make an significant improvement in the running time? Here is an idea for how we might do it.18 CHAPTER 1. When the sweep line reaches the rightmost point of P . we do not need to use pi for eliminating other points. We will sweep a vertical line across the plane from left to right. As we sweep this line. and save the messy details for the actual implementation. 1.11. We will scan the list left to right. INTRODUCTION points. For simplicity. but it is good to work with the simpler version. When the sweep line reaches the rightmost point of P. This follows from the fact that dominance relation is transitive. we will begin by sorting the points in increasing order of their x-coordinates. The problem is to output all the maximal points of P. The figure also show the content of the stack. We will add maximal points onto the end of a list and delete from the end of the list. For example. we need some way to perform the plane sweep in discrete steps. we will build a structure holding the maximal points lying to the left of the sweep line. pn} in 2-space a point is said to be maximal if it is not dominated by any other point in P. It operated by comparing all pairs of points. Although we would like to think of this as a continuous process. . If pj dominates pi and pi dominates ph then pj also dominates ph. . we will build a structure holding the maximal points lying to the left of the sweep line. pi is not needed. . then we will have constructed the complete set of maxima. To do this. As we encounter each new point. let us assume that no two points have the same y-coordinate. P = {p1. This approach of solving geometric problems by sweeping a line across the plane is called plane sweep. .) Then we will advance the sweep-line from point to point in n discrete steps. The point at the top of the stack will have the highest x-coordinate. p2. As we sweep. Every maximal point with y-coordinate less than pi will be eliminated from computation. We introduced a brute-force algorithm that ran in Θ(n2) time. . Is there an approach that is significantly better? The problem with the brute-force algorithm is that it uses no intelligence in pruning out decisions. (This limiting assumption is actually easy to overcome. we will have the complete set of maximal points. Here are a series of figures that illustrate the plane sweep. we will update the current list of maximal points.

7) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 stack Figure 1.13) (4.7) (7.7: Sweep line at (3.10) (7.7) (4.11) (9. 10) .10) (7.11) (3.5) (13.5) (10. 5) sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (3.1) (4.10: Sweep line at (7.3) (5.1) (2. 11) sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (3.13) (4.10) (7.11) (9.10) (15.5) (10.11) (9.9: Sweep line at (5.13) (4.11) (9.3) (5.3) (5.10) (15.5) (13.7) (2.7) (5.13) (4.5) (13.7) (2. 1) sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (3.10) (15.13) (4.11: Sweep line at (9.13) (12.1.13) (2.7) (2.12) (14.5) (12.10) (15.5) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 stack 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 stack Figure 1.7) (9.13) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 stack 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 stack Figure 1.11.5) (2.10) (15.1) (12.5) (13. 7) Figure 1.7) (2.13) (12.1) (12.12) (14.12) (14.1) (4.6: Sweep line at (2. 13) sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (3.12) (14. ANALYSIS: A HARDER EXAMPLE 19 sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 (3.11) (3.10) (7.11) (9.5) (13.1) (3.3) (5.13) Figure 1.11) (3.5) (10.1) (12.10) (4.8: Sweep line at (4.7) (10.12) (14.12) (14.11) (3.13) (4.10) (15.7) (10.5) (13.7) Figure 1.11) (9.5) (10.10) (7.3) (5.7) sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 stack (3.10) (7.3) (5.

20

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2
(3,13) (4,11) (9,10) (7,7) (10,5) (13,3) (5,1) (12,12) (14,10) (15,7) (10,5) (9,10) (4,11) (3,13)

sweep line 14 12 10 8 6 4 2
(3,13) (4,11) (9,10) (7,7) (10,5) (13,3) (5,1) (12,12) (3,13) (12,12) (14,10) (15,7)

(2,5)

(2,5)

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18

stack

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18

stack

Figure 1.12: Sweep line at (10, 5)

Figure 1.13: Sweep line at (12, 12)

14 12 10 8 6 4 2
(3,13) (4,11) (9,10) (7,7) (10,5) (13,3) (5,1) (12,12) (14,10) (15,7) (15,7) (14,10) (12,12) (3,13)

(2,5)

2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18
Figure 1.14: The final maximal set Here is the algorithm.
PLANE - SWEEP - MAXIMA(n,

stack

P[1..n])

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

sort P in increasing order by x;

stack s; for i ← 1 to n do while (s.notEmpty() & s.top().y ≤ P[i].y) do s.pop(); s.push(P[i]);
output the contents of stack s;

1.11. ANALYSIS: A HARDER EXAMPLE

21

1.11.3 Analysis of Plane-sweep Algorithm
Sorting takes Θ(n log n); we will show this later when we discuss sorting. The for loop executes n times. The inner loop (seemingly) could be iterated (n − 1) times. It seems we still have an n(n − 1) or Θ(n2) algorithm. Got fooled by simple minded loop-counting. The while loop will not execute more n times over the entire course of the algorithm. Why is this? Observe that the total number of elements that can be pushed on the stack is n since we execute exactly one push each time during the outer for-loop. We pop an element off the stack each time we go through the inner while-loop. It is impossible to pop more elements than are ever pushed on the stack. Therefore, the inner while-loop cannot execute more than n times over the entire course of the algorithm. (Make sure that you understand this). The for-loop iterates n times and the inner while-loop also iterates n time for a total of Θ(n). Combined with the sorting, the runtime of entire plane-sweep algorithm is Θ(n log n).

1.11.4 Comparison of Brute-force and Plane sweep algorithms
How much of an improvement is plane-sweep over brute-force? Consider the ratio of running times: n n2 = nlogn log n n 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 logn 7 10 13 17 20
n logn

15 100 752 6021 50171

For n = 1, 000, 000, if plane-sweep takes 1 second, the brute-force will take about 14 hours!. From this we get an idea about the importance of asymptotic analysis. It tells us which algorithm is better for large values of n. As we mentioned before, if n is not very large, then almost any algorithm will be fast. But efficient algorithm design is most important for large inputs, and the general rule of computing is that input sizes continue to grow until people can no longer tolerate the running times. Thus, by designing algorithms efficiently, you make it possible for the user to run large inputs in a reasonable amount of time.

22

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION

functions like • 4n2. We need to show two things for f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 Lower bound f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 grows asymptotically at least as fast as n2. c2 and n0 such that 0 ≤ c1g(n) ≤ f(n) ≤ c2g(n) for all n ≥ n0} This is written as “f(n) ∈ Θ(g(n))” That is. As n becomes large. This means that they have essentially the same growth rates for large n. Let’s remedy this now. the dominant (fastest growing) term is some constant times n2. For example. Let’s see why this bears out formally. Formally: Θ(g(n)) = {f(n) | there exist positive constants c1. Consider the function f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 Our informal rule of keeping the largest term and ignoring the constant suggests that f(n) ∈ Θ(n2). we define Θ(g(n)) to be a set of functions that asymptotically equivalent to g(n). • (8n2 + 2n − 3). f(n) and g(n) are asymptotically equivalent. √ • (n2/5 + n − 10 log n) • n(n − 3) are all asymptotically equivalent. 23 . Given any function g(n).Chapter 2 Asymptotic Notation You may be asking that we continue to use the notation Θ() but have never defined it.

Consider the reasoning f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 ≤ 8n2 + 2n ≤ 8n2 + 2n2 = 10n2 Thus c2 = 10. Consider the reasoning f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 ≥ 8n2 − 3 = 7n2 + (n2 − 3) ≥ 7n2 Thus√1 = 7. We then have f(n) ≥ c1n2 for all n ≥ n0. This is not true for all n but it is true for all n ≥ 1 So select n0 ≥ 1. We implicitly made the assumption that 2n ≤ 2n2. we have √ 7n2 ≤ 8n2 + 2n − 3 ≤ 10n2 for all n ≥ 3 We have thus established 0 ≤ c1g(n) ≤ f(n) ≤ c2g(n) Here are plots of the three functions. we let n0 ≥ the be the larger of the two: n0 ≥ 3. CHAPTER 2. For this. Notice the bounds. then both are true. Upper bound: f(n) grows asymptotically no faster than n2. ASYMPTOTIC NOTATION Lower bound: f(n) grows asymptotically at least as fast as n2. Asymptotic Notation 1e+11 8n^2+2n-3 7n^2 10n^2 for all n ≥ n0 8e+10 6e+10 f(n) 4e+10 2e+10 0 0 20000 40000 n 60000 80000 100000 Figure 2. let’s show that f(n) ∈ Θ(n). need to show that there exist positive constants c1 and n0. Let’s show why f(n) is not in some other asymptotic class. if we let c1 = 7. Show that f(n) ∈ Θ(n). we need to show that there exist positive constants c2 and n0. For this. If this were true. √ From lower bound we have n0√ 3 From upper bound we have n0 ≥ 1. We thus have f(n) ≤ c2n2 for all n ≥ n0. c2 = 10 and n0 ≥ 3. In conclusion. Combining√ two. such that f(n) ≤ c2n2 for all n ≥ n0. First. such that f(n) ≥ c1n2 for all n ≥ n0. we would have had to satisfy .24 Upper bound f(n) grows no faster asymptotically than n2. So select n0 ≥ 3. We implicitly assumed that 2n√ 0 and n2 − 3 ≥ 0 These are not true for all n but if c ≥ n ≥ 3.1: Asymptotic Notation Example We have established that f(n) ∈ n2.

Sometimes we only interested in proving one bound or the other. n→∞ It is easy to see that in the limit. This means that f(n) ∈ Θ(n3).25 both the upper and lower bounds. To see this. c1 is positive. Informally we know that f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 will eventually exceed c2n no matter how large we make c2. we have lim 8n + 2 − 3 n ≤ c2. suppose we assume that constants c2 and n0 did exist such that 8n2 + 2n − 3 ≤ c2n for all n ≥ n0 Since this is true for all sufficiently large n then it must be true in the limit as n tends to infinity. But by hypothesis. But the upper bound is false. Let’s show that f(n) ∈ Θ(n3). If we divide both sides by n. The lower bound is satisfied because f(n) = 8n2 + 2n − 3 does grow at least as fast asymptotically as n. If we divide both sides by n3: n→∞ lim 3 2 8 + 2− 3 n n n ≥ c1 The left side tends to 0. the left side tends to ∞. O(g(n)) = {f(n) | there exist positive constants c and n0 such that 0 ≤ f(n) ≤ cg(n) for all n ≥ n0} The Ω-notation allows us to state only the asymptotic lower bounds. Informally we know this to be true because any cubic function will overtake a quadratic. The only way to satisfy this is to set c1 = 0. (c1 and n0 are positive constants). The definition of Θ-notation relies on proving both a lower and upper asymptotic bound. Upper bounds requires that there exist positive constants c2 and n0 such that f(n) ≤ c2n for all n ≥ n0. Ω(g(n)) = {f(n) | there exist positive constants c and n0 such that 0 ≤ cg(n) ≤ f(n) for all n ≥ n0} . The O-notation is used to state only the asymptotic upper bounds. So. no matter how large c2 is. Thus f(n) ∈ Θ(n). The idea would be to show that the lower bound f(n) ≥ c1n3 for all n ≥ n0 is violated. the statement is violated.

the limit rule for O-notation is f(n) = c. These running times are acceptable when the exponent of n is small or n is not to large..g..g. • Θ(2n). n→∞ g(n) lim for some constant c > 0 (strictly positive but not infinity) then f(n) ∈ Θ(g(n)). Θ(n3): Polynomial time. e. n ≤ 1000. Similarly. Acceptable only if n is small. n ≤ 20. lim n→∞ g(n) for some constant c ≥ 0 (nonnegative but not infinite) then f(n) ∈ O(g(n)) and limit rule for Ω-notation: f(n) = 0.g. can’t beat it! • Θ(log n): Inserting into a balanced binary tree. e. lim n→∞ g(n) Here is a list of common asymptotic running times: • Θ(1): Constant time. time to find an item in a sorted array of length n using binary search. We can use limits for define the asymptotic behavior. . e. Θ(3n): Exponential time. Limit rule for Θ-notation: f(n) = c. (either a strictly positive constant or infinity) then f(n) ∈ Ω(g(n)). • Θ(n2).26 The three notations: CHAPTER 2. n ≤ 50. Θ(nn): Acceptable only for really small n. ASYMPTOTIC NOTATION Θ(g(n)) : 0 ≤ c1g(n) ≤ f(n) ≤ c2g(n) O(g(n)) : 0 ≤ f(n) ≤ cg(n) Ω(g(n)) : 0 ≤ cg(n) ≤ f(n) for all n ≥ n0 These definitions suggest an alternative way of showing the asymptotic behavior. • Θ(n log n): Best sorting algorithms. • Θ(n): About the fastest that an algorithm can run. • Θ(n!).

Chapter 3 Divide and Conquer Strategy
The ancient Roman politicians understood an important principle of good algorithm design (although they were probably not thinking about algorithms at the time). You divide your enemies (by getting them to distrust each other) and then conquer them piece by piece. This is called divide-and-conquer. In algorithm design, the idea is to take a problem on a large input, break the input into smaller pieces, solve the problem on each of the small pieces, and then combine the piecewise solutions into a global solution. But once you have broken the problem into pieces, how do you solve these pieces? The answer is to apply divide-and-conquer to them, thus further breaking them down. The process ends when you are left with such tiny pieces remaining (e.g. one or two items) that it is trivial to solve them. Summarizing, the main elements to a divide-and-conquer solution are Divide: the problem into a small number of pieces Conquer: solve each piece by applying divide and conquer to it recursively Combine: the pieces together into a global solution.

3.1

Merge Sort

Divide and conquer strategy is applicable in a huge number of computational problems. The first example of divide and conquer algorithm we will discuss is a simple and efficient sorting procedure called We are given a sequence of n numbers A, which we will assume are stored in an array A[1..n]. The objective is to output a permutation of this sequence sorted in increasing order. This is normally done by permuting the elements within the array A. Here is how the merge sort algorithm works: • (Divide:) split A down the middle into two subsequences, each of size roughly n/2 • (Conquer:) sort each subsequence by calling merge sort recursively on each. • (Combine:) merge the two sorted subsequences into a single sorted list. 27

28

CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY

Let’s design the algorithm top-down. We’ll assume that the procedure that merges two sorted list is available to us. We’ll implement it later. Because the algorithm is called recursively on sublists, in addition to passing in the array itself, we will pass in two indices, which indicate the first and last indices of the sub-array that we are to sort. The call MergeSort(A, p, r) will sort the sub-array A[p : r] and return the sorted result in the same sub-array.Here is the overview. If r = p, then this means that there is only one element to sort, and we may return immediately. Otherwise if (p = r) there are at least two elements, and we will invoke the divide-and-conquer. We find the index q, midway between p and r, namely q = (p + r)/2 (rounded down to the nearest integer). Then we split the array into sub-arrays A[p : q] and A[q + 1 : r]. Call MergeSort recursively to sort each sub-array. Finally, we invoke a procedure (which we have yet to write) which merges these two sub-arrays into a single sorted array. Here is the MergeSort algorithm.
MERGE - SORT(

array A, int p, int r)

1 2 3 4 5 6

if (p < r) then q ← (p + r)/2 MERGE - SORT(A, p, q) // sort A[p..q] MERGE - SORT(A, q + 1, r) // sort A[q + 1..r] MERGE(A, p, q, r) // merge the two pieces

The following figure illustrates the dividing (splitting) procedure.

7 5 2 4 1 6 3 0

7 5 2 4

1 6 3 0

7 5 7 5 2

2 4 4 1

1 6 6 3

3 0 0

split
Figure 3.1: Merge sort divide phase Merging: All that is left is to describe the procedure that merges two sorted lists. Merge(A, p, q, r) assumes that the left sub-array, A[p : q], and the right sub-array, A[q + 1 : r], have already been sorted. We merge these two sub-arrays by copying the elements to a temporary working array called B. For convenience, we will assume that the array B has the same index range A, that is, B[p : r]. (One nice thing about pseudo-code, is that we can make these assumptions, and leave them up to the programmer to figure out how to implement it.) We have to indices i and j, that point to the current elements of each

3.1. MERGE SORT

29

sub-array. We move the smaller element into the next position of B (indicated by index k) and then increment the corresponding index (either i or j). When we run out of elements in one array, then we just copy the rest of the other array into B. Finally, we copy the entire contents of B back into A. (The use of the temporary array is a bit unpleasant, but this is impossible to overcome entirely. It is one of the shortcomings of MergeSort, compared to some of the other efficient sorting algorithms.) Here is the merge algorithm:
MERGE(

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

array A, int p, int q int r) int B[p..r]; int i ← k ← p; int j ← q + 1 while (i ≤ q) and (j ≤ r) do if (A[i] ≤ A[j]) then B[k++ ] ← A[i++ ] else B[k++ ] ← A[j++ ] while (i ≤ q) do B[k++ ] ← A[i++ ] while (j ≤ r) do B[k++ ] ← A[j++ ] for i ← p to r do A[i] ← B[i]

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

2 4 5 7

0 1 3 6

5 7 7 5 2

2 4 4 1

1 6 6 3

0 3 0

merge
Figure 3.2: Merge sort: combine phase

3.1.1 Analysis of Merge Sort
First let us consider the running time of the procedure Merge(A, p, q, r). Let n = r − p + 1 denote the total length of both the left and right sub-arrays. What is the running time of Merge as a function of n? The algorithm contains four loops (none nested in the other). It is easy to see that each loop can be executed at most n times. (If you are a bit more careful you can actually see that all the while-loops

simply as n. Let us write this without the asymptotic notation. If we call MergeSort with an array containing a single item (n = 1) then the running time is constant. a recurrence has some basis values (e. how do we describe the running time of the entire MergeSort algorithm? We will do this through the use of a recurrence. In conclusion we have 1 if n = 1. T (n) = n log n + n which is Θ(n log n) (using the limit rule).. i. we can express this as T ( n/2 ). The left half is of size n/2 and the right half is n/2 ... T (16) = T (8) + T (8) + 16 = 32 + 32 + 16 = 80 . (We’ll see later why we do this. that is. a recursively defined function. How long does it take to sort elements in sub array of size n/2 ? We do not know this but because n/2 < n for n > 1. Finally.) Now. MergeSort splits into two halves. a function that is defined recursively in terms of itself..) Thus the running time to Merge n items is Θ(n).. and it naturally gives rise to recursive algorithms. For n > 1. T (n) = T ( n/2 ) + T ( n/2 ) + n otherwise This is called recurrence relation.g. ignoring all constants. Let’s expand the terms. It is thus important to develop mathematical techniques for solving recurrences. Divide-and-conquer is an important design technique.. which are defined explicitly. Let T (n) denote the worst case running time of MergeSort on an array of length n. T (32) = T (16) + T (16) + 32 = 80 + 80 + 32 = 192 What is the pattern here? Let’s consider the ratios T (n)/n for powers of 2: T (1)/1 = 1 T (2)/2 = 2 T (4)/4 = 3 T (8)/8 = 4 T (16)/16 = 5 T (32)/32 = 6 This suggests T (n)/n = log n + 1 Or. sorts the two and then merges them together. Similarly the time taken to sort right sub array is expressed as T ( n/2 ). T (1) = 1 T (2) = T (1) + T (1) + 2 = 1 + 1 + 2 = 4 T (3) = T (2) + T (1) + 3 = 4 + 1 + 3 = 8 T (4) = T (2) + T (2) + 4 = 8 + 8 + 4 = 12 T (5) = T (3) + T (2) + 5 = 8 + 4 + 5 = 17 .e.30 CHAPTER 3. . either exactly or asymptotically. for n = 1). because each execution copies one new element to the array B.. We can just write T (n) = 1. T (8) = T (4) + T (4) + 8 = 12 + 12 + 8 = 32 . and B only has space for n elements. To avoid circularity. the recurrence for a given value of n is defined in terms of values that are strictly smaller than n. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY together can only be executed n times in total.

and hence could drop the floors and ceilings) T (n) = 1 2T (n/2) + n if n = 1. T (n) = 2T (n/2) + n otherwise The iteration method turns the recurrence into a summation.1. this will simplify the recurrence to 1 if n = 1. Let’s expand the recurrence: T (n) = 2T (n/2) + n = 2(2T (n/4) + n/2) + n = 4T (n/4) + n + n = 4(2T (n/8) + n/4) + n + n = 8T (n/8) + n + n + n = 8(2T (n/16) + n/8) + n + n + n = 16T (n/16) + n + n + n + n If n is a power of 2 then let n = 2k or k = log n. Let’s see how it works. Recall that to . But. MERGE SORT 31 3. it is easy to get lost in all the symbolic manipulations and lose sight of what is going on.2 The Iteration Method for Solving Recurrence Relations Floor and ceilings are a pain to deal with.3. T (n) = 2kT (n/(2k)) + (n + n + n + · · · + n) k times = 2 T (n/(2 )) + kn = 2(log n)T (n/(2(log n))) + (log n)n = 2(log n)T (n/n) + (log n)n = nT (1) + n log n = n + n log n k k 3. otherwise Suppose that we draw the recursion tree for MergeSort. Here is a nice way to visualize what is going on in iteration.1. Recall that the recurrence for MergeSort (which we simplified by assuming that n is a power of 2.3 Visualizing Recurrences Using the Recursion Tree Iteration is a very powerful technique for solving recurrences.1. where each expansion of the recurrence takes us one level deeper in the tree. We can describe any recurrence in terms of a tree. but each time we merge two lists. If n is assumed to be a power of 2 (2k = n). we label that node of the tree with the time it takes to perform the associated (nonrecursive) merge.

. 1 3T (n/4) + n if n = 1. otherwise T (n) = Assume n to be a power of 4..4 A Messier Example The merge sort recurrence was too easy. which we will just write as m. Let’s try a messier recurrence. n = 3kT ( k ) + 3k−1(n/4k−1) 4 + · · · + 9(n/16) + 3(n/4) + n n = 3 T ( k) + 4 k k−1 i=0 3i n 4i .... DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY merge two lists of size m/2 to a list of size m takes Θ(m) time... 1 1 1 1 ... 1 1 1 1 1 . time to merge n n/2 n/2 =n + 2(n/2) = n + n/4 n/8 n/8 n/8 n/4 n/8 n/4 n/8 n/8 n/8 n/4 n/8 4(n/4) = n + 8(n/8) = n log(n)+1 levels ..1.e...3: Merge sort Recurrence Tree 3... Below is an illustration of the resulting recursion tree.32 CHAPTER 3. n = 4k and k = log4 n T (n) = 3T (n/4) + n = 3(3T (n/16) + (n/4) + n = 9T (n/16) + 3(n/4) + n = 27T (n/64) + 9(n/16) + 3(n/4) + n = .. i. 1 + n(n/n) = n n(log(n)+1) Figure 3...

79.3. We get T (n) = nlog4 3 + n Applying the log identity once more (3/4)log4 n = nlog4 (3/4) = nlog4 3−log4 4 = nlog4 3−1 = If we plug this back.79 ∈ Θ(n) . we get T (n) = n −1 (3/4) − 1 log4 3 n −n = nlog4 3 + −1/4 log4 3 =n + 4(n − nlog4 3) log4 3 (3/4)log4 n+1 − 1 (3/4) − 1 nlog4 3 n +n nlog4 3 n = 4n − 3nlog4 3 With log4 3 ≈ 0. we finally have the result! T (n) = 4n − 3nlog4 3 ≈ 4n − 3n0.1. MERGE SORT With n = 4k and T (1) = 1 n T (n) = 3 T ( k ) + 4 k k−1 33 i=0 3i n 4i 3i n 4i (log4 n)−1 =3 log4 n T (1) + i=0 (log4 n)−1 = nlog4 3 + i=0 3i n 4i We used the formula alogb n = nlogb a. we thus have (log4 n)−1 T (n) = n log4 3 +n i=0 3 4 i The sum is a geometric series. recall that for x = 1 m xi = i=0 xm+1 − 1 x−1 In this case x = 3/4 and m = log4 n − 1. n remains constant throughout the sum and 3i/4i = (3/4)i.

output the element of A of rank k. the solution is far from obvious. 7000. Suppose 7 households have monthly incomes 5000. 3. The median is still 8000 but the average goes up to 71. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY 3. 7. The rank of each number is its position in the sorted order.2. The selection problem can be easily solved by simply sorting the numbers of A and returning A[k]. 15000. however.000. 10000. for some constant k. there are two choices: n/2 and (n + 1)/2. 8. 41}. Of particular interest in statistics is the median. we find that we do not . one plus the number of elements smaller than 8 which is 3. is it possible to solve the selections problem in Θ(n) time? The answer is yes. it is common to return the average of the two elements. 7000. Thus. 1 ≤ k ≤ n. taking say Θ(nk) time. the incomes are 2000. Suppose the income 16000 goes up to 450. the median income in a community is a more meaningful measure than average. 21. For example. Define the rank of an element to be one plus the number of elements that are smaller. 10. 15000 and 16000. requires Θ(n log n) time. The minimum is of rank 1 and the maximum is of rank n. Medians are useful as a measures of the central tendency of a set especially when the distribution of values is highly skewed.000. 10000. The average income is 9000. which are then solved recursively. The median income is 8000. where the number of subproblems is just 1. median is element with rank 4: (7 + 1)/2 = 4. however after doing some amount of analysis of the data. 37. 8000. 16000. Consider the set: {5. position Number 1 2 2 5 3 7 4 5 8 10 6 15 7 21 8 9 37 41 For example.34 CHAPTER 3. The sieve technique works in phases as follows. If n is odd then the median is defined to be element of rank (n + 1)/2. 2000. However. 2. It applies to problems where we are interested in finding a single item from a larger set of n items. The question is: can we do better than that? In particular. 8000. Sorting. When n is even. 15. We think of divide-and-conquer as breaking the problem into a small number of smaller subproblems. Clearly. In statistics.2 Selection Problem Suppose we are given a set of n numbers. the average is not a good representative of the majority income levels. In sorted order. The sieve technique is a special case. 5000. We do not know which item is of interest. which I call the sieve technique.1 Sieve Technique The reason for introducing this algorithm is that it illustrates a very important special case of divide-and-conquer. rank of 8 is 4. the rank of an element is its final position if the set is sorted. The selection problem is stated as follows: Given a set A of n distinct numbers and an integer k.

but we can identify a large enough number of elements that cannot be the desired value. Within each sub array. 1. int r.q − 1] will contain all the elements that are less than x and 3..2. int p.q − 1] recursively... SELECT( array A.r]. int k) .n] will contains all elements that are greater than x.2. Find element of rank (k − q) because we eliminated q smaller elements in A. n/3). 2. called the pivot element which we will denote by x.r] recursively. In particular “large enough” means that the number of items is at least some fixed constant fraction of n (e.. SELECTION PROBLEM 35 know what the desired the item is. Each of the resulting recursive solutions then do the same thing. n/2. A[q] contains the pivot element x.. eliminating a constant fraction of the remaining set. 3.g. the items may appear in any order.2 Applying the Sieve to Selection To see more concretely how the sieve technique works. If k = rank x then the pivot is kth smallest. The following figure shows a partitioned array: pivot p r 5 92 64 1 3 7 q p r 3 12 4 69 5 7 <x x >x Before partitioning After partitioning Figure 3.3.4: A[p... We will pick an item from the array.2. let us apply it to the selection problem.r] partitioned about the pivot x 3. If k > rank x then search A[q + 1.3 Selection Algorithm It is easy to see that the rank of the The rank of the pivot x is q − p + 1 in A[p. A[1. for now just think of it as a random element of A.n]. We then partition A into three parts. We will begin with the given array A[1. If k < rank x then search A[p. We will talk about how an item is chosen as the pivot later. Let rank x = q − p + 1. Then we solve the problem recursively on whatever items remain. A[q + 1. and can be eliminated from further consideration.

9.36 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 CHAPTER 3. 2. 2. 1 . 6. r) q ← PARTITION(A. 5. 5. 3. 3. p.5: Sieve example: select 6th smallest element 3. 6.2. x should have a rank that is neither too large or too small. p. Suppose we are able to choose a pivot that causes exactly half of the array to be eliminated in each phase. q + 1.4 Analysis of Selection We will discuss how to choose a pivot and the partitioning later. 4. k − q) Example: select the 6th smallest element of the set {5. 7 pivot is 1 after partition Ideally. 9. r. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY if (p = r) then return A[p] else x ← CHOOSE PIVOT(A. x) rank x ← q − p + 1 if k = rank x then return x if k < rank x then return SELECT(A. For the moment. 3. 1. 6. q − 1. k) else return SELECT(A. 7 1 . 4. . 9. 2. p. 7} rankx= 4 pivot 5 9 2 6 4 1 3 7 3 1 2 4 6 9 5 7 rankx= 3 rankx= 2 pivot pivot 6 9 5 7 6 5 7 9 6 5 5 6 partition pivot=6 initial partition k=6 pivot=4 recurse partition k=(6-4)=2 pivot=7 recurse k=2 DONE!! Figure 3. r. How many elements do we eliminate in each time? If x is the largest or the smallest then we may only succeed in eliminating one element. 4. we will assume that they both take Θ(n) time.

2 4 n 2i 1 2i i=0 Recall the formula for infinite geometric series. . for any |c| < 1. In fact it could be as many as log n. Normally. This leads to the following recurrence: T (n) = If we expand this recurrence.. a Θ(n) time algorithm would make a single or perhaps a constant number of passes of the data set.3. In this algorithm. It is often possible to achieve linear running times in ways that you would not expect. we make a number of passes. ∞ ci = i=0 1 1−c Using this we have T (n) ≤ 2n ∈ Θ(n) Let’s think about how we ended up with a Θ(n) algorithm for selection.2.. This shows that the total running time is indeed linear in n. SELECTION PROBLEM This means that we recurse on the remaining n/2 elements. we get T (n) = n + ≤ ∞ 37 1 T (n/2) + n if n = 1. we get the convergent geometric series in the analysis. However. otherwise =n i=0 ∞ n n + + . because we eliminate a constant fraction of the array with each phase. This lesson is well worth remembering.

38 CHAPTER 3. DIVIDE AND CONQUER STRATEGY .

Chapter 4 Sorting
For the next series of lectures, we will focus on sorting. There a number of reasons for sorting. Here are a few important ones. Procedures for sorting are parts of many large software systems. Design of efficient sorting algorithms is necessary to achieve overall efficiency of these systems. Sorting is well studied problem from the analysis point of view. Sorting is one of the few problems where provable lower bounds exist on how fast we can sort. In sorting, we are given an array A[1..n] of n numbers We are to reorder these elements into increasing (or decreasing) order. More generally, A is an array of objects and we sort them based on one of the attributes - the key value. The key value need not be a number. It can be any object from a totally ordered domain. Totally ordered domain means that for any two elements of the domain, x and y, either x < y, x = y or x > y.

4.1

Slow Sorting Algorithms

There are a number of well-known slow O(n2) sorting algorithms. These include the following:

Bubble sort: Scan the array. Whenever two consecutive items are found that are out of order, swap them. Repeat until all consecutive items are in order. Insertion sort: Assume that A[1..i − 1] have already been sorted. Insert A[i] into its proper position in this sub array. Create this position by shifting all larger elements to the right. Selection sort: Assume that A[1..i − 1] contain the i − 1 smallest elements in sorted order. Find the smallest element in A[i..n] Swap it with A[i].

These algorithms are easy to implement. But they run in Θ(n2) time in the worst case. 39

40

CHAPTER 4. SORTING

4.2

Sorting in O(n log n) time

We have already seen that Mergesort sorts an array of numbers in Θ(n log n) time. We will study two others: Heapsort and Quicksort.

4.2.1 Heaps
A heap is a left-complete binary tree that conforms to the heap order. The heap order property: in a (min) heap, for every node X, the key in the parent is smaller than or equal to the key in X. In other words, the parent node has key smaller than or equal to both of its children nodes. Similarly, in a max heap, the parent has a key larger than or equal both of its children Thus the smallest key is in the root in a min heap; in the max heap, the largest is in the root.
1 2 21 4 24 5 31 6 19

13 3 16 7 68

8

65

9 26 10 32

13 21 16 24 31 19 68 65 26 32 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Figure 4.1: A min-heap

The number of nodes in a complete binary tree of height h is
h

n = 2 + 2 + 2 + ··· + 2 = h in terms of n is

0

1

2

h

2i = 2h+1 − 1
i=0

h = (log(n + 1)) − 1 ≈ log n ∈ Θ(log n) One of the clever aspects of heaps is that they can be stored in arrays without using any pointers. This is due to the left-complete nature of the binary tree. We store the tree nodes in level-order traversal. Access

4.2. SORTING IN O(N LOG N) TIME
to nodes involves simple arithmetic operations:

41

left(i) : returns 2i, index of left child of node i. right(i) : returns 2i + 1, the right child. parent(i) : returns i/2 , the parent of i.

The root is at position 1 of the array.

4.2.2 Heapsort Algorithm

We build a max heap out of the given array of numbers A[1..n]. We repeatedly extract the the maximum item from the heap. Once the max item is removed, we are left with a hole at the root. To fix this, we will replace it with the last leaf in tree. But now the heap order will very likely be destroyed. We will apply a heapify procedure to the root to restore the heap. Figure 4.2 shows an array being sorted.
HEAPSORT(

array A, int n)

1 2 3 4 5 6

BUILD - HEAP(A, n)

m←n while (m ≥ 2) do SWAP(A[1], A[m]) m←m−1 HEAPIFY(A, 1, m)

2: Example of heap sort . SORTING 23 68 44 16 19 4 5 87 13 6 7 6 7 23 57 44 12 15 19 87 87 57 44 12 15 19 23 heap violated 23 68 44 16 ⇒ 87 57 44 12 15 19 23 57 21 23 68 12 24 15 31 1 2 3 19 4 5 6 7 44 16 ⇒ 23 68 12 24 0 1 15 31 2 3 sorted 57 21 44 16 19 4 5 6 7 ⇒ 57 21 12 24 0 1 15 31 2 3 19 4 5 6 7 0 23 57 44 12 15 19 87 sorted 57 23 44 12 15 19 87 57 23 44 12 15 19 87 19 23 68 12 24 0 1 15 31 2 3 57 21 4 5 6 7 44 16 ⇒ 23 68 12 24 0 1 15 31 2 sorted 44 16 19 ⇒ 23 68 12 24 15 31 1 2 sorted 44 16 19 ⇒ 3 4 5 6 7 0 3 4 5 6 7 19 23 44 12 15 57 87 sorted 44 23 19 12 15 57 87 44 23 19 12 15 57 87 15 31 23 68 12 24 0 1 44 16 2 3 4 5 6 7 19 ⇒ 15 31 12 24 0 1 2 sorted 23 68 19 ⇒ 15 31 12 24 sorted 23 68 19 ⇒ 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 15 23 19 12 44 57 87 sorted 23 15 19 12 44 57 87 23 15 19 12 44 57 87 12 24 15 31 23 68 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 19 ⇒ 15 31 sorted 19 12 24 ⇒ 15 31 sorted 19 12 24 ⇒ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 12 15 19 23 44 57 87 sorted 19 15 12 23 44 57 87 19 15 12 23 44 57 87 15 31 12 24 ⇒ sorted ⇒ sorted ⇒ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 15 12 19 23 44 57 87 sorted 12 15 19 23 44 57 87 ⇒ sorted Figure 4.42 87 13 57 21 12 24 0 1 15 31 2 3 19 4 5 44 16 23 68 6 7 0 12 24 1 57 21 15 31 2 3 19 4 5 87 13 44 16 23 68 0 12 24 1 57 21 15 31 2 3 CHAPTER 4.

4. Which child? We should take the larger of the two children to satisfy the heap ordering property. The maximum levels an element could move up is Θ(log n) levels. and the index i of the suspected element. A[max]) HEAPIFY(A. We build the heap by starting at the leaf level and then invoke Heapify on each node. for example. we do simple comparison which O(1). int m) l ← LEFT(i) r ← RIGHT(i) max ← i if (l ≤ m)and(A[l] > A[max]) then max ← l if (r ≤ m)and(A[r] > A[max]) then max ← r if (max = i) then SWAP(A[i]. and m the current active size of the heap. Notice that it is not Θ(log n) since.2. It is called Heapify.2. If max = i then we swap A[i] and A[max] and then recurse on A[max]. Why not? Because the precondition which Heapify assumes is that the entire tree rooted at node i is already in heap order. (Can you see why?) . (In other books it is sometimes called sifting down.2. Here is the algorithm. They are just in the same order that they were given to us in the array A. This continues recursively until the element is either larger than both its children or until its falls all the way to the leaf level. (Note: We cannot start at the top of the tree. It is given the heap in the array A.3 Heapify Procedure There is one principal operation for maintaining the heap property.) Actually. First we start with a heap in which the elements are not in heap order. Since we know that each leaf is already in heap order. At each level.5 BuildHeap We can use Heapify to build a heap as follows. To fix this we “sift” it down the tree by swapping it with one of its children. max. it will terminate in Θ(1) time.4 Analysis of Heapify We call heapify on the root of the tree. we may as well skip the leaves and start with the first non-leaf node. HEAPIFY( 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 array A. 4. SORTING IN O(N LOG N) TIME 43 4. if we call heapify on a leaf. The element A[max] is set to the maximum of A[i] and it two children.2. but we assume that all of other the elements in the subtree rooted at this element are in heap order. int i. This will be in position n/2. In particular this root element may be too small. The total time for heapify is thus O(log n). m) 4.) The idea is that we are given an element of the heap which we suspect may not be in valid heap order. except for i. we can be a bit more efficient.

there will be 2h or less nodes. Since we will work with the entire array. there are 2j nodes in the tree. At the next level up. How much work does buildHeap carry out? Consider the heap in Figure 4. there are 2h−j nodes and each may shift down j levels. n) 4. j < h.3: 3 3x1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 2x2 1x4 0x8 Figure 4. The heap is a left-complete binary tree. the parameter m for Heapify.44 CHAPTER 4. level-by-level. there are 2h−1 nodes and each might shift down 1. int n) for i ← n/2 downto 1 do HEAPIFY(A. the total time is h h T (n) = j=0 j2 h−j = j=0 h j 2h 2j We can factor out the 2h term: T (n) = 2 h j=0 j 2j . the size of array A. which indicates the current heap size will be equal to n. SORTING Here is the code. if count from bottom to top. BUILDHEAP( 1 2 3 array A. In general. at level j. So. in all the calls.6 Analysis of BuildHeap For convenience. Thus at each level j. At level h. we will assume n = 2h+1 − 1 where h is the height of tree. there are 2h nodes but we do not heapify these.2.3: Total work performed in buildheap At the bottom most level. i.

An intuitive way to describe why it is so is to observe an important fact about binary trees The fact is that the vast majority of the nodes are at the lowest level of the tree. Thus. algorithms that operate on trees should be efficient (as BuildHeap is) on the bottom-most levels since that is where most of the weight of the tree resides. we can use it as an easy approximation: h T (n) = 2 h j=0 ∞ j 2j j 2j ≤ 2h h j=0 ≤ 2 · 2 = 2h+1 Recall that n = 2h+1 − 1. we have a bounded sum. SORTING IN O(N LOG N) TIME How do we solve this sum? Recall the geometric series.4. but since we the infinite series is bounded. Yet. BuildHeap is a relatively complex algorithm. the analysis yield that it takes Θ(n) time.2.875n 2 4 8 8 Almost 90% of the nodes of a complete binary tree reside in the 3 lowest levels. The number of nodes at the bottom three levels alone is 2h + 2h−1 + 2h−2 = n n n 7n + + = = 0. for any constant x < 1 ∞ 45 xj = j=0 1 1−x Take the derivative with respect to x and multiply by x ∞ jxj−1 = j=0 1 (1 − x)2 j=0 ∞ jxj = x (1 − x)2 We plug x = 1/2 and we have the desired formula: ∞ j=0 j 1/2 1/2 = = =2 j 2 2 (1 − (1/2)) 1/4 In our case. For example. Therefore T (n) ≤ n + 1 ∈ O(n) The algorithm takes at least Ω(n) time since it must access every element at once. there is a total of n ≈ 2h+1 nodes. in a complete binary tree of height h. . So the total time for BuildHeap is Θ(n).

r] into three sub arrays about a pivot element x. q + 1. Is HeapSort Θ(n log n)? The answer is yes. Heapsort is thus O(n log n). q − 1) QUICKSORT(A.7 Analysis of Heapsort Heapsort calls BuildHeap once. This takes Θ(n). In fact.1 Partition Algorithm Recall that the partition algorithm partitions the array A[p. A[q + 1. A[p. A[p] = x is the pivot value. A[p. A[q] = x. r) 4. r) QUICKSORT(A.3 Quicksort Our next sorting algorithm is Quicksort.r] whose elements are greater than x We will choose the first element of the array as the pivot. It is one of the fastest sorting algorithms known and is the method of choice in most sorting libraries.s − 1] contains elements that are greater than . we can swap the chosen element with the first element..46 CHAPTER 4.. int r) if (r > p) then i ← a random index from [p.3. x = A[p]. If a different rule is used for selecting the pivot.. We will choose the pivot randomly.. Heapsort is such an algorithm and so is Mergesort that we saw ealier.e. The algorithm works by maintaining the following invariant condition.. Each extract requires a constant amount of work (swap) and O(log n) heapify. Here is the algorithm: QUICKSORT( 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 array A. int p. later we will show that comparison based sorting algorithms can not run faster than Ω(n log n). p.2. SORTING 4.. i. p. 4.q − 1] contains elements that are less than x. A[q + 1. Quicksort is based on the divide and conquer strategy.r] swap A[i] with A[p] q ← PARTITION(A. Heapsort then extracts roughly n maximum elements from the heap.q − 1] whose elements are less than or equal to x.

QUICKSORT or equal to x A[s.2 Quick Sort Example The Figure 4.r] contains elements whose values are currently unknown. The left portion are then partitioned about 5 while the right portion is partitioned about 13. PARTITION( 47 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 array A. The process repeats as the algorithm recursively partitions the array eventually sorting it. of the array. 10. .3.5 trace out the quick sort algorithm. Notice that 10 is now at its final position in the eventual sorted order. p r 5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1 q s p r 5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1 q s p r 5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1 q s p r 5 3 8 6 4 7 3 1 q s p r 5 3 4 6 8 7 3 1 q s p r 5 3 4 6 8 7 3 1 q s p r 5 3 4 3 8 7 6 1 q s p r 5 3 4 3 1 7 6 8 q s p r 1 3 4 3 5 7 6 8 q s Figure 4.4 shows the execution trace partition algorithm.4..3. The first partition is done using the last element. int r) x ← A[p] q←p for s ← p + 1 to r do if (A[s] < x) then q ← q + 1 swap A[q] with A[s] swap A[p] with A[q] return q Figure 4.4: Trace of partitioning algorithm 4. int p.

SORTING 4 10 7 7 6 6 12 4 3 3 11 9 8 8 7 2 1 1 15 13 17 5 ⇓ ⇓ 5 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 7 7 6 6 12 4 3 3 11 9 8 8 7 2 1 1 15 13 17 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 7 7 1 6 6 2 12 4 4 3 3 3 11 9 5 8 8 8 7 2 6 1 1 7 15 13 17 5 9 ⇓ 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 10 12 11 13 14 15 17 16 7 7 1 6 6 2 12 4 4 3 3 3 11 9 5 8 8 8 7 2 6 1 1 7 15 13 17 5 9 ⇓ 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 10 12 11 13 14 15 17 16 7 7 1 1 6 6 2 2 12 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 11 9 5 5 8 8 8 8 7 2 6 6 1 1 7 7 15 13 17 5 9 9 ⇓ 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 10 12 11 13 14 15 17 16 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 7 7 1 1 1 6 6 2 2 2 12 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 11 9 5 5 5 8 8 8 8 6 7 2 6 6 7 1 1 7 7 8 15 13 17 5 9 9 9 ⇓ 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 10 12 11 13 14 15 17 16 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 7 7 1 1 1 6 6 2 2 2 12 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 11 9 5 5 5 8 8 8 8 6 7 2 6 6 7 1 1 7 7 8 15 13 17 5 9 9 9 ⇓ 5 16 14 9 4 10 10 17 15 16 14 11 12 13 10 12 11 13 14 15 17 16 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Figure 4.48 7 6 12 3 11 8 7 1 15 13 17 5 16 14 9 CHAPTER 4.5: Example of quick sort .

It takes Θ(n) time to do the partitioning and other overhead.3. Suppose that we are sorting an array of size n. It depends on how the pivot is chosen. the expected running time is O(n log n). Luckily.4. here we do not. The worst case time. and we make two recursive calls. The first is to the subarray A[1 : q − 1] which has q − 1 elements. for some q in the range 1 to n. and the other is to the subarray A[q + 1 : n] which has n − q elements. But unlike MergeSort.4 Worst Case Analysis of Quick Sort Let’s begin by considering the worst-case performance. So if we ignore the Θ(n) (as usual) we get the recurrence: T (n) = T (q − 1) + T (n − q) + n . 10 5 3 2 1 4 6 7 8 Figure 4. and further suppose that the pivot that we select is of rank q. A[1 : n].6: Quicksort BST pivot elements 13 9 11 12 14 15 16 17 4. Since this is a recursive program.3 Analysis of Quicksort The running time of quicksort depends heavily on the selection of the pivot. this happens rarely. because it is easier than the average case. If the rank of the pivot is very large or very small then the partition (BST) will be unbalanced. Since the pivot is chosen randomly in our algorithm.3. is O(n2). however.6. 4. it is natural to use a recurrence to describe its running time. QUICKSORT 49 It is interesting to note (but not surprising) that the pivots form a binary search tree. This is illustrated in Figure 4.3. where we had control over the sizes of the recursive calls.

in the case of quicksort. we get: T (n) ≤ T (0) + T (n − 1) + n = 1 + T (n − 1) + n = T (n − 1) + (n + 1) = T (n − 2) + n + (n + 1) = T (n − 3) + (n − 1) + n + (n + 1) = T (n − 4) + (n − 2) + (n − 1) + n + (n + 1) k−2 = T (n − k) + For the basis T (1) = 1 we set k = n − 1 and get n−3 (n − i) i=−1 T (n) ≤ T (1) + n+1 (n − i) i=−1 = 1 + (3 + 4 + 5 + · · · + (n − 1) + n + (n + 1)) ≤ i= i=1 (n + 1)(n + 2) ∈ Θ(n2) 2 4. In this case the average is computed over all possible random choices that the algorithm might make for the choice of the pivot index in the second step of the QuickSort procedure above. quicksort runs in Θ(n log n) time. Recall that when we talked about average case at the beginning of the semester. we maximize over all possible values of q.50 CHAPTER 4. and q = n/2 and work each out. It will simplify the analysis to assume that all of the elements are distinct. because it means that the analysis of the algorithm’s performance is the same for all inputs. It only depends upon the random choices of pivots that the algorithm makes. Putting is together.) In this case. To get the worst case. SORTING This depends on the value of q. the worst case happens at either of the extremes. q = n. we let T (n) denote the average running time of QuickSort on a list of size n.5 Average-case Analysis of Quicksort We will now show that in the average case. we get the recurrence  1 if n ≤ 1 T (n) =  max (T (q − 1) + T (n − q) + n) otherwise 1≤q≤n Recurrences that have max’s and min’s embedded in them are very messy to solve. So I would plug in the value q = 1. (A rule of thumb of algorithm analysis is that the worst cases tends to happen either at the extremes or in the middle. we said that it depends on some assumption about the distribution of inputs. However. the analysis does not depend on the distribution of input at all. This is good.3. If we expand the recurrence for q = 1. To analyze the average running time. The key is determining which value of q gives the maximum. The algorithm has n .

. 2 1 T (n) = 2 (T (q − 1) + T (2 − q) + 2) q=1 1 = (T (0) + T (1) + 2) + (T (1) + T (0) + 2) 2 8 = = 4.3. and each choice has an equal probability of 1/n of occuring.88. we assume that n ≥ 3 and The induction hypothesis is that for any n < n. QUICKSORT random choices for the pivot element. So we can modify the above recurrence to compute an average rather than a max. i.e. expansion is possible but it is rather tricky. giving: 1 1 n n q=1(T (q 51 T (n) = if n ≤ 1 − 1) + T (n − q) + n) otherwise The time T (n) is the weighted sum of the times taken for various choices of q.4. We know that we want a Θ(n log n).e. T (2) ≤ c2 log 2 or 4 ≤ c2 log 2 therefore c ≥ 4/(2 log 2) ≈ 2. I. T (n) = 1 (T (0) + T (n − 1) + n) n 1 + (T (1) + T (n − 2) + n) n 1 + (T (2) + T (n − 3) + n) n 1 + · · · + (T (n − 1) + T (0) + n) n For the base case n = 2 we have We have not seen such a recurrence before.. We will attempt a constructive induction to solve it. we have T (n ) ≤ cn log n . We want to prove that it is true for T (n). Let us assume that T (n) ≤ cn log n for n ≥ 2 where c is a constant. By expanding T (n) and moving the . For the induction step. To solve it. 2 We want this to be at most c2 log 2.

T (n) = 2 n n−1 T (q) + n q=0 n−1 2 = T (0) + T (1) + T (q) + n n q=2 We will apply the induction hypothesis for q < n we have 2 T (0) + T (1) + T (n) = T (q) + n n q=2 2 (cq log q) + n 1+1+ ≤ n q=2 2c = n We have never seen this sum before: S(n) = q=2 n−1 n−1 n−1 (cqln q) + n + q=2 4 n n−1 (cqln q) Recall from calculus that for any monotonically increasing function f(x) b−1 b i=a f(i) ≤ f(x)dx a . Thus we can replace them with 2 q=0 T (q). We will extract T (0) and T (1) and treat them specially. SORTING (T (q − 1) + T (n − q) + n) q=1 n (T (q − 1) + T (n − q)) + n q=1 n 1 = n 1 n 1 T (q − 1) + n q=1 n n T (n − q) + n q=1 n T (n) = T (q − 1) + q=1 1 n T (n − q) + n q=1 Observe that the two sums add up the same values T (0) + T (1) + · · · + T (n − 1).52 factor of n outside the sum we have 1 T (n) = n = 1 n n CHAPTER 4. One counts up and n−1 other counts down. These two do not follow the formula.

88. and use the fact that n ≥ 3 we get T (n) = cnln n + n 1 − . n 1− 4 c + 2 n To finish the proof. Thus T (n) = 3nln n ∈ Θ(n log n). we will need to select c such that 4 c + ≤0 n 1− 2 n If we select c = 3. Choosing c = 3 satisfies all the constraints.3.we want all of this to be at most cnln n. and so n−1 n 53 S(n) = q=2 (cqln q) ≤ xln x dx 2 (4.4. For this to happen. 2 2 From the basis case we had c ≥ 2. QUICKSORT The function f(x) = xln x is monotonically increasing.1) We can integrate this by parts: n xln x dx = 2 n 2 x2 x2 ln x − 2 4 n x=2 xln x dx = x2 n x2 ln x − 2 4 x=2 2 n n2 ln n − = − (2ln 2 − 1) 2 4 n2 n2 ln n − ≤ 2 4 n−1 We thus have S(n) = q=2 (cqln q) ≤ n2 n2 ln n − 2 4 Plug this back into the expression for T (n) to get T (n) = 2c n2 4 n2 +n+ ln n − n 2 4 n T (n) = 2c n2 4 n2 +n+ ln n − n 2 4 n cn 4 = cnln n − +n+ 2 n 4 c + = cnln n + n 1 − 2 n 4 c 3 n + = − 2 n n 2 3 1 ≤ 1 − = − ≤ 0.

Bubble sort and insertion sort can be implemented as stable algorithms but selection sort cannot (without significant modifications). Quicksort is not stable but is an in-place algorithm. a1. (a2. Mergesort is a stable algorithm but not an in-place algorithm. . (a1. There are 3! = 6 possible combinations: (a1. (a2. SORTING 4.54 CHAPTER 4. a3) . (a3. a2. Heapsort is an in-place algorithm but is not stable. a3. a1) (a3. Here is the tree for the three numbers. a1) One of these permutations leads to the numbers in sorted order. A sorting algorithm is stable if duplicate elements remain in the same relative position after sorting. a2. a3). insertion sort and selection sort are in-place sorting algorithms. All algorithms we have seen so far are comparison-based sorting algorithms. a2. a3.4 In-place. a2). The comparison based algorithm defines a decision tree. Stable Sorting An in-place sorting algorithm is one that uses no additional array for storage. Consider sorting three numbers a1.5 Lower Bounds for Sorting The best we have seen so far is O(n log n) algorithms for sorting. a1. 4. Is it possible to do better than O(n log n)? If a sorting algorithm is solely based on comparison of keys in the array then it is impossible to sort more efficiently than Ω(n log n) time. It requires extra array storage. a2) . 9 3 3 5 6 5 2 1 3 1 2 3 3 3 1 2 3 3 3 5 5 6 9 5 5 6 9 unsorted stable sort unstable Bubble sort. a3.

1 NO 3. 2 NO a1 < a3 NO 3. LOWER BOUNDS FOR SORTING a1 < a2 YES NO 55 a2 < a3 YES 1. The height is T (n) because any path from the root to a leaf corresponds to a sequence of comparisons made by the algorithm. 1 Figure 4. there will be n! possible permutations. 3.7: Decision Tree For n elements. Theorem 1 Any comparison-based sorting algorithm has worst-case running time Ω(n log n). the running time of the algorithm.5. The height of the tree is exactly equal to T (n).4. 2 YES 2. . 2. 1. Thus a comparison based sorting algorithm can distinguish between at most 2T(n) different final outcomes. 3. 2. 1. So we have 2T(n) ≥ n! and therefore T (n) ≥ log(n!) We can use Stirling’s approximation for n!: n! ≥ Thereofore T (n) ≥ log n n e √ = log( 2πn) + n log n − n log e ∈ Ω(n log n) 2πn √ √ 2πn n e n We thus have the following theorem. 3 a1 < a3 NO a2 < a3 YES 2. Any binary tree of height T (n) has at most 2T(n) leaves. 3 YES 1.

SORTING .56 CHAPTER 4.

but deceptively clever. The algorithm operates by first constructing C. and then for each j.k] is an array of integers. but only under very restrictive circumstances. Many applications involve sorting small integers (e. we cannot do it by making comparisons alone. Counting sort assumes that the numbers to be sorted are in the range 1 to k where k is small. To do this. We can do this initializing C to zero. This means that if x = A[j] then the final position of A[j] should be at position C[x] in the final sorted array. Thus. 5.. The basic idea is to determine the rank of each number in final sorted array.n] holds the initial input. sorting characters. etc. B[1. if A[j] = 5. Is it possible to sort without making comparisons? The answer is yes.k]. Recall that the rank of an item is the number of elements that are less than or equal to it. This is done by just keeping a running total of the elements of C. First we set C[x] to be the number of elements of A[j] that are equal to x.Chapter 5 Linear Time Sorting The lower bound implies that if we hope to sort numbers faster than O(n log n). A[1..n] holds the sorted output and C[1. To determine the number of elements that are less than or equal to x. The question is how to find the rank of an element without comparing it to the other elements of the array?.. exam scores.. The algorithm uses three arrays. indicating that we have seen one more 5. Notice We need to be careful if there are duplicates. we decrement 57 . we set B[C[x]] = A[j]. C[x] now contains the rank of x. we increment C[A[j]] by 1. we simply copy numbers to their final position in an output array. C[x] is the rank of x in A. Thus. from 1 to n. This is done in two steps. by not making comparisons. then the 5th element of C is incremented. The algorithm is remarkably simple. As usual. we replace C[x] with the sum of elements in the sub array R[1 : x]. Once we know the ranks. We present three algorithms based on the theme of speeding up sorting in special cases.1 Counting Sort We will consider three algorithms that are faster and work by not making comparisons.). since we do not want them to overwrite the same location of B. where x ∈ [1.g.

and n times.. Figure 5.n] 7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3 k=7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C[1. so the total running time is Θ(n + k) time. If k = O(n). executed k times.SORT( CHAPTER 5. then the total running time is Θ(n).. You should trace through the example to convince yourself how it works. COUNTING . array A. . respectively.1: Initial A and C arrays.58 C[i] after copying.19 shows an example of the algorithm. int k) for i ← 1 to k do C[i] ← 0 k times for j ← 1 to length[A] do C[A[j]] ← C[A[j]] + 1 n times // C[i] now contains the number of elements = i for i ← 2 to k do C[i] ← C[i] + C[i − 1] k times // C[i] now contains the number of elements ≤ i for j ← length[A] downto 1 do B[C[A[j]]] ← A[j] C[A[j]] ← C[A[j]] − 1 n times Input 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 A[1. k − 1 times.1 through 5. array B. LINEAR TIME SORTING 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 There are four (unnested) loops. n times.k] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Figure 5.

.5.k] 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 Figure 5.3: A[2] = 1 processed Input 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 A[1...k] 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Figure 5.n] 7 1 3 k 1 2 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3 3 4 5 6 7 C[1..4: A[3] = 3 processed .n] 7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3 k 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C[1.k] 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Figure 5..n] 7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 k 2 4 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C[1.1..2: A[1] = 7 processed Input 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 A[1. COUNTING SORT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 59 Input A[1.

.6: A[5] = 2 processed Input 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 A[1..k] 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 Figure 5..k] 2 2 2 2 1 0 2 Figure 5.n] 7 1 3 k 1 2 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3 3 4 5 6 7 C[1.60 1 2 3 4 5 6 CHAPTER 5.5: A[4] = 1 processed Input 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 A[1.k] 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 Figure 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING 7 8 9 10 11 Input A[1...n] 7 k 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C[1.n] 7 1 3 1 2 4 5 7 2 4 3 finally 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C[1.7: C now contains count of elements of A ..

...9: A[11] placed in output array B .n] 3 B[6] = B[C[3]] = B[C[A[11]]] = A[11] = 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 4 6 8 9 9 11 C[A[11]] = C[A[11]] .1 C 2 4 5 8 9 9 11 Figure 5.k] 2 2 2 2 1 0 2 for i = 2 to 7 do C[i] = C[i] + C[i-1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 4 6 8 9 9 11 6 elements <= 3 Figure 5.8: C set to rank each number of A Input A[1.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.1. COUNTING SORT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 61 Input A[1..5.n] 7 1 1 3 2 1 3 2 4 4 5 5 6 7 7 2 4 3 C[1.

LINEAR TIME SORTING A[1...n] 2 3 4 B[4] = B[C[2]] = B[C[A[9]]] = A[9] = 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 4 5 7 9 9 11 C[A[9]] = C[A[9]] .11: A[9] placed in output array B .n] 3 4 B[8] = B[C[4]] = B[C[A[10]]] = A[10] = 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 4 5 8 9 9 11 C[A[10]] = C[A[10]] .1 C 2 3 5 7 9 9 11 Figure 5.62 Input CHAPTER 5.1 C 2 4 5 7 9 9 11 Figure 5.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.10: A[10] placed in output array B Input A[1.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1...

1.1 C 2 3 5 7 8 9 10 Figure 5.5..1 C 2 3 5 7 9 9 10 Figure 5.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.. COUNTING SORT Input 63 A[1...n] 2 3 4 5 7 B[9] = B[C[5]] = B[C[A[7]]] = A[7] = 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 3 5 7 9 9 10 C[A[5]] = C[A[5]] .12: A[8] placed in output array B Input A[1.13: A[7] placed in output array B .n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.n] 2 3 4 7 B[11] = B[C[7]] = B[C[A[8]]] = A[8] = 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 3 5 7 9 9 11 C[A[8]] = C[A[8]] .

n] 2 2 3 4 4 5 7 B[3] = B[C[2]] = B[C[A[5]]] = A[5] = 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 3 5 7 8 9 10 C[A[5]] = C[A[5]] ..64 Input CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING A[1..n] 2 3 4 4 5 7 B[7] = B[C[4]] = B[C[A[6]]] = A[6] = 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 3 5 7 8 9 10 C[A[6]] = C[A[6]] .1 C 2 2 5 6 8 9 10 Figure 5.1 C 2 3 5 6 8 9 10 Figure 5...n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.14: A[6] placed in output array B Input A[1.15: A[5] placed in output array B .

n] 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 7 B[5] = B[C[3]] = B[C[A[3]]] = A[3] = 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 1 2 5 7 8 9 10 C[A[3]] = C[A[3]] ..5. COUNTING SORT Input 65 A[1..1 C 1 2 5 6 8 9 10 Figure 5.16: A[4] placed in output array B Input A[1.n] 1 2 2 3 4 4 5 7 B[2] = B[C[1]] = B[C[A[4]]] = A[4] = 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 2 5 7 8 9 10 C[A[4]] = C[A[4]] .17: A[3] placed in output array B .1 C 1 2 4 6 8 9 10 Figure 5..n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.1..

19: B now contains the final sorted data. Stability achieved by running the loop down from n to 1 and not the other way around: ..18: A[2] placed in output array B Input A[1. Stability is important because data are often carried with the keys being sorted. Counting sort is not an in-place sorting algorithm but it is stable..n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.1 C 0 2 4 6 8 9 9 Figure 5.n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4 10 3 11 B[1.n] 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 7 B[1] = B[C[1]] = B[C[A[2]]] = A[2] = 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 1 2 4 7 8 9 10 C[A[3]] = C[A[3]] .66 Input CHAPTER 5. radix sort (which uses counting sort as a subroutine) relies on it to work correctly. LINEAR TIME SORTING A[1.1 C 0 2 4 6 8 9 10 Figure 5.n] 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 7 7 B[10] = B[C[7]] = B[C[A[1]]] = A[1] = 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 0 2 4 7 8 9 10 C[A[1]] = C[A[1]] ...

int k) . for j ← length[A] downto 1 do B[C[A[j]]] ← A[j] C[A[j]] ← C[A[j]] − 1 .1. . Numbers are placed in the output B array starting from the right. the algorithm would be termed unstable. array A. each appear twice. and 7. The two 4’s have been given the superscript “*”.5. 4. If the sorting algorithm had caused 4∗∗ to end up on the left of 4∗ . 2. array B. .SORT( 1 2 3 4 Figure 5. The two 4’s maintain their relative position in the B array. 3. COUNTING SORT 67 COUNTING . The numbers 1.20 illustrates the stability.

n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4* 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4** 10 3 11 B[1.n] 7’ 1 1^ 2 3# 3 1^^ 4 2+ 5 4* 6 5 7 7” 8 2++ 9 4** 10 3## 11 ^ B[1.1 C 2 3 5 6 8 9 10 Input A[1..n] Output 7 1 1 2 3 3 1 4 2 5 4* 6 5 7 7 8 2 9 4** 10 3 11 B[1...n] 2 3 4* 4** 5 7 B[7] = B[C[4]] = B[C[A[6]]] = A[6] = 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 3 5 7 8 9 10 C[A[6]] = C[A[6]] .20: Stability of counting sort ....1 C 2 4 5 7 9 9 11 Input A[1.n] 3 4** B[8] = B[C[4]] = B[C[A[10]]] = A[10] = 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C 2 4 5 8 9 9 11 C[A[10]] = C[A[10]] .68 Input CHAPTER 5.n] 1 Output 1^^ 2+ 2++ 3# 3## 4* 4** 5 7’ 7” Figure 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING A[1.

There are n items requiring O(n) time. The third step then becomes: 3. Examine each bin to see whether there’s an item in it. So the algorithm’s time becomes: T (n) = c1n + c2m and it is strictly O(n + m). so the algorithm is still O(n + m). then each bin can be replaced by a linked list. so this is an O(n) operation. int M) 1 // Pre-condition: for 1 ≤ i ≤ n. We can add an item to a linked list in O(1) time. Now our collection is sorted and it only took n operations. Set up an array of “bins” . let’s be a little more precise about the specification of the problem and assume that there are m values of the key.in order. int n. However. Then we can sort with the following procedure: 1.2 Bucket or Bin Sort Assume that the keys of the items that we wish to sort lie in a small fixed range and that there is only one item with each value of the key. then it is O(m). To recover our sorted collection. Examine each item and use the value of the key to place it in the appropriate bin.5. we need to examine each bin. note that it will only work under very restricted conditions. If m ≤ n. . To understand these restrictions. this is clearly O(n). An implementation of bin sort might look like: B UCEKT S ORT( array A. so it is O(1). Figures 5. However if m >> n.one for each value of the key . This adds a third step to the algorithm above.21 through 5.23 show the algorithm in action using linked lists. BUCKET OR BIN SORT 69 5. Linking m such lists obviously takes O(m) time. which requires m operations.2. Link all the lists into one list. Linking a list to another list simply involves making the tail of one list point to the other. 3. 2. 0 ≤ a[i] < M 2 // Mark all the bins empty 3 for i ← 1 to M 4 do bin[i] ← Empty 5 for i ← 1 to n 6 do bin[A[i]] ← A[i] If there are duplicates.

94 . concatenate the lists .68 .21 . placing keys in bins in sorted order .68 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 .23 .78 Figure 5.17 .17 .23 .21 .12 .12 .12 .23 .26 Step 2: concatenate the lists .21: Bucket sort: step 1.26 . LINEAR TIME SORTING .94 .26 Step 1: insertion sort within each list .26 .17 .78 .39 .72 .72 .70 CHAPTER 5.94 .78 .12 .22: Bucket sort: step 2.68 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 .23 .68 .39 .78 Figure 5.94 .72 .39 .21 .39 .72 .17 .21 .

n] where each number is d digits long. 576 494 194 296 278 176 954 49[4] 19[4] 95[4] 57[6] 29[6] 17[6] 27[8] 9[5]4 5[7]6 1[7]6 2[7]8 4[9]4 1[9]4 2[9]6 [1]76 [1]94 [2]78 ⇒ [2]96 [4]94 [5]76 [9]54 176 194 278 296 494 576 954 ⇒ ⇒ ⇒ Here is the algorithm that sorts A[1.3.23 .23: Bucket sort: the final sorted sequence .68 .26 ..78 5.e.72 .39 .SORT( 1 2 array A.3 Radix Sort The main shortcoming of counting sort is that it is useful for small integers.94 .r.12 . RADIX SORT 71 . int d) for i ← 1 to d do stably sort A w.78 .t ith lowest order digit . int n.39 . 1.17 .26 .. i. the size of the rank array would also be a million. RADIX ..5.12 . If k were a million or more.23 .72 .21 .k where k is small. Radix sort provides a nice work around this limitation by sorting numbers one digit at a time.68 .17 .94 Figure 5.21 .

72 CHAPTER 5. LINEAR TIME SORTING .

2. The book. 34. The book was based on the arithmetic and algebra that Fibonacci had accumulated during his travels. . How many pairs of rabbits can be produced from that pair in a year if it is supposed that every month each pair begets a new pair which from the second month on becomes productive? Resulting sequence is 1. This sequence. 5. where each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. This problem was posed by Leonardo Pisano. introduced the Hindu-Arabic place-valued decimal system and the use of Arabic numerals into Europe. The Fibonacci Quarterly is a modern journal devoted to studying mathematics related to this sequence. in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. . died 1250). 55.Chapter 6 Dynamic Programming 6. 1. This problem and many others were in posed in his book Liber abaci. published in 1202. 21.1 Fibonacci Sequence Suppose we put a pair of rabbits in a place surrounded on all sides by a wall. 3. The Fibonacci numbers Fn are defined as follows: F0 = 0 F1 = 1 Fn = Fn−1 + Fn−2 73 . The rabbits problem in the third section of Liber abaci led to the introduction of the Fibonacci numbers and the Fibonacci sequence for which Fibonacci is best remembered today. born 1170. better known by his nickname Fibonacci (son of Bonacci. 13. . 8. which went on to be widely copied and imitated. has proved extremely fruitful and appears in many different areas of mathematics and science.

. first F[2]. I. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING The recursive definition of Fibonacci numbers gives us a recursive algorithm for computing them: FIB(n) 1 2 3 if (n < 2) then return n else return FIB(n − 1) + FIB(n − 2) Figure ?? shows four levels of recursion for the call fib(8): fib(8) fib(7) fib(6) fib(5) fib(4) fib(4) fib(5) fib(3) fib(4) fib(5) fib(3) fib(3) fib(6) fib(4) fib(2) fib(4) fib(3) fib(3) fib(2) fib(3) fib(2) fib(2) fib(1) fib(3) fib(2) fib(2) fib(1) fib(2) fib(1) fib(1) fib(0) Figure 6. and so on.74 CHAPTER 6. in general.e. five recursive calls to fib(n − 4) and. three recursive calls to fib(n − 3). This process is called memoization. then F[3].1: Recursive calls during computation of Fibonacci number A single recursive call to fib(n) results in one recursive call to fib(n − 1). Here is the algorithm with memoization. We can replace recursion with a simple for-loop that just fills up the array F[] in that order. two recursive calls to fib(n − 2). we’re recomputing the same fibonacci number from scratch. M EMO F IB(n) 1 if (n < 2) 2 then return n 3 if (F[n] is undefined) 4 then F[n] ← M EMO F IB(n − 1) + M EMO F IB(n − 2) 5 return F[n] If we trace through the recursive calls to M EMO F IB. we find that array F[] gets filled from bottom up. We can avoid this unnecessary repetitions by writing down the results of recursive calls and looking them up again if we need them later. . Fk−1 recursive calls to fib(n − k) For each call. up to F[n].

6. We will now cover a number of examples of problems in which the solution is based on dynamic programming strategy. p-¿m. This is often but not always done with some kind of table. Dynamic programming algorithms need to store the results of intermediate subproblems. Write an algorithm that starts with base cases and works its way up to the final solution. • Build solution to recurrence from bottom up. 6. ‘sort’ can be changed into ‘sport’ by the insertion of ‘p’. φ = 1+ 5 ≈ 1. or equivalently. s1 and s2. • insert a letter or . the original recursive algorithm √ takes Θ(φn). Write down a formula for the whole problem as a simple combination of answers to smaller subproblems. Developing a dynamic programming algorithm generally involves two separate steps: • Formulate problem recursively. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING This gives us our first explicit dynamic programming algorithm. By contrast.3 Edit Distance The words “computer” and “commuter” are very similar. where a point mutation is one of: • change a letter. The edit distance of two strings. The word “sport” can be changed into “sort” by the deletion of the ‘p’. is defined as the minimum number of point mutations required to change s1 into s2. and a change of just one letter. will change the first word into the second.618.2 Dynamic Programming Dynamic programming is essentially recursion without repetition.2. 6. I TER F IB achieves an exponential speedup over the original recursive 2 algorithm. I TER F IB(n) 1 F[0] ← 0 2 F[1] ← 1 3 for i ← 2 to n 4 do 5 F[i] ← F[i − 1] + F[i − 2] 6 return F[n] 75 This algorithm clearly takes only O(n) time to compute Fn.

DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING For example.g.1 Edit Distance: Applications There are numerous applications of the Edit Distance algorithm. the edit distance between the source and copy may be small. one with a small edit distance.76 • delete a letter CHAPTER 6. i. have spelling checking and correction facility. the edit distance between FOOD and MONEY is at most four: FOOD −→ MOOD −→ MON D −→ MONED −→ MONEY 6. for various purposes.C. Computational Molecular Biology DNA is a polymer. may be suggested as a correction. such as Microsoft Word.T. say. add a comment of two. • A-adenine • G-guanine • C-cytosine • T-thymine Double-helix of DNA molecule with nucleotides Figure of Double-helix of DNA molecule with nucleotides goes here The edit distance like algorithms are used to compute a distance between DNA sequences (strings over A.e. Here are some examples: Spelling Correction If a text contains a word that is not in the dictionary. change variable names. a ‘close’ word. The monomer units of DNA are nucleotides. and the polymer is known as a “polynucleotide.G. and a phosphate group.” Each nucleotide consists of a 5-carbon sugar (deoxyribose). e. The four nucleotides are given one letter abbreviations as shorthand for the four bases. When Word. differing only in the nitrogenous base. finds an incorrectly spelled word. a nitrogen containing base attached to the sugar. Plagiarism Detection If someone copies. for example. .3. or protein sequences (over an alphabet of 20 amino acids). a C program and makes a few changes here and there.: • to find genes or proteins that may have shared functions or properties • to infer family relationships and evolutionary trees over different organisms. it makes suggestions of possible replacements. The edit distance provides an indication of similarity that might be too close in some situations. There are four different types of nucleotides found in DNA. Most word processing applications. for example.

i A L A L G j O R I T H M T R U I S T I C The edit distance between entire strings A and B is E(m. For example. Columns with two different characters correspond to substitutions (S).3 Edit Distance: Dynamic Programming Algorithm Suppose we have an m-character string A and an n-character string B.3. D that describes a transformation of one string into another. The Edit transcript is defined as a string over the alphabet M. j) to be the edit distance between the first i characters of A and the first j characters of B. EDIT DISTANCE Speech Recognition 77 Algorithms similar to those for the edit-distance problem are used in some speech recognition systems. For example.6.3. A L A L Is this optimal? G O R T R I U I S T T H M I C 6. Matches (M) do not count. 6.3. The gap representation for the edit sequences has a crucial “optimal substructure” property. S. the distance between ALGORITHM and ALTRUISTIC is at most 6. I. Define E(i.2 Edit Distance Algorithm A better way to display this editing process is to place the words above the other: S D M A A M T R T I D M H S S The first word has a gap for every insertion (I) and the second word has a gap for every deletion (D). For example S 1+ D 1+ I M 1+ 0+ D 1+ M 0+ = 4 In general. . it is not easy to determine the optimal edit distance. the remaining columns must represent the shortest edit sequence for the remaining substrings. The edit distance is 6 for the following two words. Find a close match between a new utterance and one in a library of classified utterances. n). If we remove the last column.

j) = j • The only way to convert a string of i characters into the empty string is with i deletions: E(i. j) = E(i − 1. 0) = i There are four possibilities for the last column in the shortest possible edit sequence: Deletion: Last entry in bottom row is empty. the edit distance reduces to 5. i=5 A A L L G O R I T H T R U I S T j=5 M I C In this case E(i. j − 1) + 1 . i=3 A A L L j=2 G O R I T H M T R U I S T I C In this case E(i. j) = E(i. There are a couple of obvious base cases: • The only way to convert an empty string into a string of j characters is by doing j insertions. Thus E(0. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING T T H M I C S If we remove the last column. A L A L G O T R R U I I S T T H I We can use the optimal substructure property to devise a recursive formulation of the edit distance problem. j) + 1 Insertion: The last entry in the top row is empty.78 A L A L G O R T R I U I CHAPTER 6.

j) = E(i − 1. j − 1) + 1  E(i. 4) if A[4] = B[5] Recursion clearly leads to the same repetitive call pattern that we saw in Fibonnaci sequence. 4) + 1 if A[4] = B[5] E(3. 0) to fill first column. j) = E(i − 1. j − 1) if A[i] = B[j] Consider the example of edit between the words “ARTS” and “MATHS”: A R T M A T S H S The edit distance would be in E(4. . j − 1) + 1 i=5 A A L L G O R I T H M T R U I S T I C j=4 If characters are same. To avoid this.3. j) to fill first row and the base case E(i. We will use the base case E(0. j) + 1   E(i. i=4 79 A A L L G O R I T H M T R U I S T I C j=3 If the characters are different. 5). j) = min   E(i − 1. 4) + 1  E(4. we will have   E(3. j − 1) Thus the edit distance E(i. j − 1) + 1 if A[i] = B[j] E(i − 1. j) is the smallest of the four possibilities:   E(i − 1. If we recursion to compute. 5) = min  E(3.6. 5) + 1  E(4. We will build the solution bottom-up. then E(i. EDIT DISTANCE Substitution: Both rows have characters in the last column. no substitution is needed: E(i. We will fill the remaining E matrix row by row. we will use the DP approach.

j] and E[i. the minimum was found using E[i. j − 1] and either of E[i − 1. We will use these arrows later to determine the edit script. j − 1]. E[i. j − 1] and E[i − 1. j] then the minimum was found using E[i − 1.1: First row and first column entries using the base cases 0 →1 →2 →3 ↓ 1 ↓ 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 ↓ 5 We can now fill the second row. the minimum could be obtained from the diagonal E[i − 1. The table not only shows the values of the cells E[i. j − 1]. if a cell E[i. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING A R T S →4 M A T H S 0 →1 →2 →3 →4 M A T H S Table 6. For a right arrow.80 A R T S CHAPTER 6. In such a case. Thus. the minimum was found using E[i − 1. j]. There are certain cells that have two arrows pointed to it. j − 1]. For a diagonal down right arrow. j − 1]. j]. j] has a down arrow from E[i − 1. j] but also arrows that indicate how it was computed using values in E[i − 1. .

3.6. Let us follow these paths and compute the edit script. In an actual implementation of the dynamic programming version of the edit distance algorithm. 1] and E[1. 4] 0 →1 →2 →3 ↓ 1 1 →2 →3 ↓ 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 ↓ 5 An edit script can be extracted by following a unique path from E[0.3: Computing E[1. For example. 2] 0 →1 →2 →3 ↓ 1 1 →2 ↓ 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 ↓ 5 A R T S A R T S →4 →4 M A T H S 0 →1 →2 →3 →4 ↓ 1 1 →2 →3 ↓ 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 ↓ 5 M A T H S Table 6. 5]. There are three possible paths in the current example. 3] and E[1.2: Computing E[1. 0] to E[4. . EDIT DISTANCE A R T S A R T S →4 81 M A T H S 0 →1 →2 →3 →4 ↓ 1 1 ↓ 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 ↓ 5 M A T H S Table 6. the arrows would be recorded using an appropriate data structure. each cell in the matrix could be a record with fields for the value (numeric) and flags for the three incoming arrows.

j] entries computed A 0 →1 ↓ M 1 1 ↓ A 2 1 ↓ ↓ T 3 2 ↓ ↓ H 4 3 ↓ ↓ S 5 4 R T S →2 →3 →4 →2 →3 →4 →2 →3 →4 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 2 →3 ↓ 3 3 ↓ 4 3 Solution path 1: 1+ 0+ 1+ 1+ D M S S M A T H A R T 0 =3 M S S .4: The final table with all E[i. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING T S →1 →2 →3 →4 1 →2 →3 →4 ↓ 2 2 2 →3 ↓ ↓ ↓ 3 3 3 3 ↓ ↓ ↓ 4 4 4 3 1 →2 →3 →4 Table 6.82 A 0 ↓ M 1 ↓ A 2 ↓ T 3 ↓ H 4 ↓ S 5 R CHAPTER 6.

5: Possible edit scripts. A 0 →1 ↓ M 1 1 ↓ A 2 1 ↓ ↓ T 3 2 ↓ ↓ H 4 3 ↓ ↓ S 5 4 R T S →2 →3 →4 →2 →3 →4 →2 →3 →4 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 2 →3 ↓ 3 3 ↓ 4 3 Solution path 2: 1+ 1+ 0+ 1+ S S M D M A T H A R T 0 =3 M S S . EDIT DISTANCE A 0 ↓ M 1 ↓ A 2 ↓ T 3 ↓ H 4 ↓ S 5 R T S 83 →1 →2 →3 →4 1 →2 →3 →4 ↓ 2 2 →3 2 ↓ ↓ ↓ 3 3 3 3 ↓ ↓ ↓ 4 4 4 3 1 →2 →3 →4 Table 6.3. 0] to E[4. 5] show the paths that can be followed to extract edit scripts.6. The red arrows from E[0.

j] Thus the total number of multiplications is p · q · r. An Suppose we wish to multiply a series of matrices: In what order should the multiplication be done? A p × q matrix A can be multiplied with a q × r matrix B.4 Analysis of DP Edit Distance There are Θ(n2) entries in the matrix. Consider the case of 3 matrices: A1 is 5 × 4. k]B[k. The total running time is Θ(n2). The result will be a p × r matrix C. j] There are (p · r) total entries in C and each takes O(q) to compute. j] = k=1 A[i. In particular. j] = k=1 A[i. The cost of the two is ((A1A2)A3) = (5 · 4 · 6) + (5 · 6 · 2)= 180 (A1(A2A3)) = (4 · 6 · 2) + (5 · 4 · 2) = 88 . q C[i. Each entry E(i. j) takes Θ(1) time to compute. q C[i. for 1 ≤ i ≤ p and 1 ≤ j ≤ r. . DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING →2 →3 →4 →2 →3 →4 →2 →3 →4 2 ↓ 3 ↓ 4 2 →3 ↓ 3 3 ↓ 4 3 Solution path 3: 1+ 0+ 1+ 0+ D M I M M A T A R T 1+ D H 0 =3 M S S 6.84 A 0 →1 ↓ M 1 1 ↓ A 2 1 ↓ ↓ T 3 2 ↓ ↓ H 4 3 ↓ ↓ S 5 4 R T S CHAPTER 6. A2 is 4 × 6 and A3 is 6 × 2 The multiplication can be carried out either as ((A1A2)A3) or (A1(A2A3)). 6. k]B[k. .3.4 Chain Matrix Multiply A1A2 .

however. .. one with k and other with n − k matrices. . if there are L ways of parenthesizing the left sublist and R ways to parenthesize the right sublist. We could write a procedure that tries all possible parenthesizations. . Matrix multiplication is an associative but not commutative operation. . . the number of ways of parenthesizing an expression is very large. An) or (A1A2A3)(A4 . An) or (A1A2)(A3A4 . p1.4. If there are n items. It is easy to see that Ai. then the total is L · R. . P(n) = n−1 k=1 P(k)P(n − k) if n ≥ 2 This is related to a famous function in combinatorics called the Catalan numbers. A3 4×5 A4 5×2 A5 2×8 A6 8×7 = A3. ..4. The Chain Matrix Multiplication Problem is stated as follows: Given a sequence A1.6. Catalan number is given by the formula: C(n) = 1 2n n+1 n In particular. An−1)(An) Once we split just after the kth matrix. . the number of different ways of parenthesizing n items: 1 if n = 1. . We are free to add parenthesis the above multiplication but the order of matrices can not be changed. or (A1A2A3A4 . .1 Chain Matrix Multiplication-Dynamic Programming Formulation The dynamic programming solution involves breaking up the problem into subproblems whose solutions can be combined to solve the global problem. .j be the result of multiplying matrices i through j. . In general. . we create two sublists to be parethesized... . . Let Ai. Ak) (Ak+1 . This suggests the following recurrence for P(n). An and dimensions p0. 6. in what order should we multiply a series of matrices A1A2 .. . An) . determine the order of multiplication that minimizes the number of operations. .j is a pi−1 × pj matrix.6 4×7 . .. P(n) = C(n − 1) C(n) ∈ Ω(4n/n3/2) The dominating term is the exponential 4n thus P(n) will grow large very quickly. . . A2. An) We could consider all the ways of parenthesizing these two. CHAIN MATRIX MULTIPLY 85 There is considerable savings achieved even for this simple example. . there are n − 1 ways in which outer most pair of parentheses can placed. Unfortunately. (A1A2 . So this approach is not practical. An. Catalan numbers are related the number of different binary trees on n nodes. . Since these are independent choices. pn where Ai is of dimension pi−1 × pi. (A1)(A2A3A4 .. .

m[3..j is pk × pj matrix. • If i < j. 2] = m[1. Since Ai. m[n − 1. we multiply two matrices A1. j]. These are m[1. The optimum can be described by the following recursive formulation. 3] ↓ m[3.k · Ak+1.. 1] ←m[1. .k is m[i. k] + m[k + 1. So how should we proceed? We will fill m along the diagonals.. for m for product of 5 matrices at this stage would be: m[1.j. j] + pi−1pkpj) i≤k<j We do not want to calculate m entries recursively. We will have to consider all possible values of k and take the best of them. i] = 0 using the base condition. 2]. n]. Here is how. i] = 0 m[i.. • If i = j.86 CHAPTER 6. We can not use divide and conquer because we do not know what is the optimum k. 5] . The question now is: what is the optimum value of k for the split and how do we parenthesis the sub-chains A1. j] denote the minimum number of multiplications needed to compute Ai. We will apply this strategy to solve the subproblems optimally. m[1.. 4]. We will store the solutions to the subproblem in a table and build the table bottom-up (why)? For 1 ≤ i ≤ j ≤ n.. This suggests the following recursive rule: m[i. 4] ←m[4.j. there is only one matrix and thus m[i.n.. m[2. 2] + p0 · p1 · p2 For example. the we are asking for the product Ai. Set all m[i. the time to multiply them is pi−1 × pk × pj. i ≤ k < j..k is a pi−1 × pk matrix and Ak+1. .j. 3] ←m[3. 2].n 1 ≤ k ≤ n − 1. .j is in m[k + 1. 3].. for example is m[1. 2] ←m[2. i] = 0 (the diagonal entries).. 2] ↓ m[2..k times Ak+1. as Ai. j] = min (m[i. 1] + m[2.n = A1. • This can be split by considering each k. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING At the highest level of parenthesization.k and Ak+1. Compute cost for multiplication of a sequence of 2 matrices. The optimum time to compute Ai.. k] and optimum time for Ak+1. 4] ↓ m[4. . let m[i. 5] ↓ m[5..

we will need to try two possible values for k. m[2. 4] = m[3. 4] + p2 · p3 · p4 = 0 + 0 + 6 · 2 · 7 = 84 m[4. five and higher number of matrices.6. 2] + m[3. 5]. 3] = 88 occurs with k = 1 . we compute cost of multiplication for sequences of three matrices. 3] + p0 · p1 · p3 m[1. 4] + m[5. n]. For example. the diagonal above the main diagonal: m[1. This time. CHAIN MATRIX MULTIPLY Next. 3] = m[2. however. The final result will end up in m[1. . 3]. 2] + p0 · p1 · p2 = 0 + 0 + 5 · 4 · 6 = 120 m[2. 3] = min m[1. . 1] + m[2. 5] + p3 · p4 · p5 = 0 + 0 + 2 · 7 · 3 = 42 The matrix m now looks as follows: 0 120 0 48 0 84 0 42 0 We now proceed to the second super diagonal. 1] + m[2. 3] = m[1. 3] + m[4. . 2] = m[1. 3] + p1 · p2 · p3 = 0 + 0 + 4 · 6 · 2 = 48 m[3. there are two possible splits for computing m[1. we compute the entries in the first super diagonal. m[3. 2] + m[3. We first fill that main diagonal: 0 0 0 0 0 Next. 1] + m[2. . 3] + p0 · p1 · p3 == 0 + 48 + 5 · 4 · 2 = 88 m[1. for example is m[1. m[n − 2. 2] + m[3. 4]. Example: Let us go through an example. We want to find the optimal multiplication order for A1 · A2 · A3 · A4 · A5 (5×4) (4×6) (6×2) (2×7) (7×3) We will compute the entries of the m matrix starting with the base condition. i. m[1..e. 3] + p0 · p2 · p3 = 120 + 0 + 5 · 6 · 2 = 180 the minimum m[1. These are m[1. 3]. 3] + p0 · p2 · p3 87 We repeat the process for sequences of four. we will choose the split that yields the minimum: m[1. 5] = m[4.4. 3] = m[1. 3]. n].

4] + m[5. 4] = m[1. 4] + p0 · p3 · p4 = 88 + 0 + 5 · 2 · 7 = 158 minimum m[1. 5] = m[2. the number of possible splits (values of k) increases: m[1. 4] = m[2. 5] = 114 at k = 3 The matrix m at this stage is: . 3] + m[4. 4] = 104 at k = 3 m[3. 4] + p1 · p2 · p4 = 0 + 84 + 4 · 6 · 7 = 252 m[2. 3] + m[4. 4] + m[5. 2] + m[3. 5] = 78 at k = 3 With the second super diagonal computed. 2] + m[3. 4] = 158 at k = 3 m[2. 5] + p2 · p4 · p5 = 84 + 0 + 6 · 7 · 3 = 210 minimum m[3. 4] and m[3. 5] + p1 · p4 · p5 = 104 + 0 + 4 · 7 · 3 = 188 minimum m[2. 4] = m[1. 3] + m[4. 4] = m[1. 4] + p0 · p2 · p4 = 120 + 84 + 5 · 6 · 7 = 414 m[1. 3] + m[4. 5] = m[3. 2] + m[3. 5] + p1 · p3 · p5 = 48 + 42 + 4 · 2 · 3 = 114 m[2. 5] + p2 · p3 · p5 = 0 + 42 + 6 · 2 · 3 = 78 m[3.88 Similarly. 5] = m[2. 4] = m[2. the m matrix looks as follow: 0 120 0 88 48 104 0 84 0 78 42 0 We repeat the process for the remaining diagonals. 4] + p1 · p3 · p4 = 48 + 0 + 4 · 2 · 7 = 104 minimum m[2. 5]: CHAPTER 6. 5] = m[2. However. 5] = m[3. 1] + m[2. 5] + p1 · p2 · p5 = 0 + 78 + 4 · 6 · 3 = 150 m[2. 4] + p0 · p1 · p4 = 0 + 104 + 5 · 4 · 7 = 244 m[1. for m[2. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING m[2.

2] + m[3.6. 5] = m[1. 1] + m[2. j] value 0 1 0 1 3 2 3 0 3 0 3 3 3 4 0 .4. 5] which can now be computed: m[1. 5] = m[1. 0 0 0 0 0 120 0 0 0 0 88 158 48 104 0 84 0 0 0 0 160 114 78 42 0 Here is the order in which m entries are calculated 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 8 6 3 0 0 10 9 7 4 0 and the split k values that led to a minimum m[i. 3] + m[4. 5] = m[1. 5] + p0 · p4 · p5 = 158 + 0 + 5 · 7 · 3 = 263 minimum m[1. 4] + m[5. 5] + p0 · p2 · p5 = 120 + 78 + 5 · 6 · 3 = 288 m[1. 5] = 160 at k = 3 We thus have the final cost matrix. CHAIN MATRIX MULTIPLY 0 120 0 88 158 48 104 0 84 0 89 114 78 42 0 That leaves the m[1. 5] + p0 · p1 · p5 = 0 + 114 + 5 · 4 · 3 = 174 m[1. 5] + p0 · p3 · p5 = 88 + 42 + 5 · 2 · 3 = 160 m[1. 5] = m[1.

2: Optimum matrix multiplication order for the five matrices example 4 A4 A5 Here is the dynamic programming based algorithm for computing the minimum cost of chain matrix multiplication. n − L + 1 do j ← i + L − 1 m[i.CHAIN(p. Each loop executes a maximum n times. j]) then m[i.j: for i = 1. Here is the algorithm that caries out the matrix multiplication to compute Ai. N do for i = 1. j] ← t. j] ← ∞ for k = 1. k] + m[k + 1. MATRIX .90 CHAPTER 6.. j] ← k . N do m[i. The s matrix can be used to extracting the order in which matrices are to be multiplied. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING Based on the computation. j] + pi−1 · pk · pj if (t < m[i. N) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Analysis: There are three nested loops. the minimum cost for multiplying the five matrices is 160 and the optimal order for multiplication is ((A1(A2A3))(A4A5)) This can be represented as a binary tree 3 1 A1 2 A2 A3 Figure 6. Total time is thus Θ(n3). j − 1 do t ← m[i. i] ← 0 for L = 2. s[i. The s matrix stores the values k.

The value of of the jewelry items varies for cheap to expensive. vi and W are integer values) How to pack the knapsack to achieve maximum total value of packed items? For example. the problem can be stated as follows: Given a knapsack with maximum capacity W.6. 0/1 KNAPSACK PROBLEM 91 MULTIPLY(i. Another limitation is that an item can either be put in the bag or not . He has a knapsack (a bag) that he would like to fill up.5. the problem is maximize i∈T vi wi ≤ W subject to i∈T . The bag has a limit on the total weight of the objects placed in it. j) return X · Y 6.5 0/1 Knapsack Problem A thief goes into a jewelry store to steal jewelry items. consider the following scenario: Item i 1 2 3 4 5 Weight wi Value vi 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 8 9 10 Figure 6.3: Knapsack can hold W = 20 The knapsack problem belongs to the domain of optimization problems. and a set S consisting of n items Each item i has some weight wi and value value vi (all wi . j] X ← MULTIPLY(i. The thief’s goal is to put items in the bag such that the value of the items is maximized and the weight of the items does not exceed the weight limit of the bag. Mathematically. j) 1 2 3 4 5 6 if (i = j) then return A[i] else k ← s[i. k) Y ← MULTIPLY(k + 1.fractional items are not allowed. the bag would tear open. If the total weight exceeds the limit. The problem is: what jewelry should the thief choose that satisfy the constraints? Formally.

• We go through all combinations and find the one with the most total value and with total weight less or equal to W Clearly. . Can we do better? The answer is “yes”. we cannot do that. Simple Subproblems: We should be able to break the original problem to smaller subproblems that have the same structure 2. there are 2n possible combinations of the items (an item either chosen or not). . . Principle of Optimality: Recursively define the value of an optimal solution. Consider the optimal solution if we can choose items 1 through 4 only. 4. . 2. n. 4 • Total weight: 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 14 • Total value: 3 + 4 + 5 + 8 = 20 Item 1 2 3 4 5 wi vi 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 8 9 10 Now consider the optimal solution when items 1 through 5 are available. Here is why. the running time of such a brute-force algorithm will be O(2n). . .92 CHAPTER 6. Solution S4 • Items chosen are 1. 2. Bottom-up computation: Compute the value of an optimal solution in a bottom-up fashion by using a table structure. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING The problem is called a “0-1” problem. Let us try this: If items are labelled 1. Construction of optimal solution: Construct an optimal solution from computed information. with an algorithm based on dynamic programming Let us recap the steps in the dynamic programming strategy: 1. 3. . We could try the brute-force solution: • Since there are n items. Express the solution of the original problem in terms of optimal solutions for smaller problems. 2. . because each item must be entirely accepted or rejected. . How do we solve the problem. The question is: can we describe the final solution Sn in terms of subproblems Sk? Unfortunately. 3. then a subproblem would be to find an optimal solution for Sk = items labelled 1. k This is a valid subproblem definition.

then we gain a value of vi. . So our definition of a subproblem is flawed and we need another one. . i − 1}. i} that can fit into a knapsack of weight j. . To compute entries of V we will imply an inductive approach. We construct a matrix V[0 . then the optimal value will come about by considering how to fill a knapsack of size j with the remaining objects {1. j]. j − wi] if wi > j if wi ≤ j A naive evaluation of this recursive definition is exponential. j] = 0 if j ≥ 0 V[i. . . . j] = −∞ if j < 0 V[0. .6. we avoid re-computation by making a table. 2. . and 0 ≤ j ≤ W. This is just V[i − 1. 5 • Total weight: 2 + 4 + 5 + 9 = 20 • Total value: 3 + 5 + 8 + 10 = 26 S4 is not part of S5!! Item 1 2 3 4 5 wi vi 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 8 9 10 93 The solution for S4 is not part of the solution for S5. . With the remaining j − wi capacity in the knapsack. V[n. i − 1}. 4. vi + V[i − 1.5. 2. W]. . 2.1 0/1 Knapsack Problem: Dynamic Programming Approach For each i ≤ n and each w ≤ W. So. n.5. we can fill it in the best possible way with objects {1. We consider two cases: Leave object i: If we choose to not take object i. as usual. . . 3. . This is only possible if wi ≤ j. . j] max V[i − 1. W] will contain the maximum value of all n objects that can fit into the entire knapsack of weight W. j − wi]. j]. j] = V[i − 1. . V[0. . Example: The maximum weight the knapsack can hold is W is 11. This leads to the following recursive formulation: V[i. As a basis. Take object i: If we take object i. 6. j] = 0 for 0 ≤ j ≤ W since if we have no items then we have no value. Why will this work? Because solutions to larger subproblems can be built up easily from solutions to smaller ones. Their weights and values are presented in the following table: . j] will store the maximum value of any set of objects {1. 0/1 KNAPSACK PROBLEM Solution S5 • Items chosen are 1. This is vi + V[i − 1. But we use up wi of our capacity. V[i. 0 . For 1 ≤ i ≤ n. solve the knapsack problem for the first i objects when the capacity is w. There are five items to choose from.

j] entry here will be V[i. 18 + V[2. 7] =max V[3 − 1. the value of V[3. 7 − w3] =max V[2. 18 + 6 =24 . the best value obtainable using the first i rows of items if the maximum capacity were j. 7 − 5] =max 7. v3 + V[3 − 1. j − wi] Weight limit: w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 Weight limit: w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 6 3 4 1 1 7 7 5 6 1 1 7 7 7 8 1 1 7 7 9 1 7 10 11 1 1 7 7 2 1 6 6 3 1 7 7 4 5 1 1 7 7 7 18 6 1 7 19 7 1 7 24 8 9 1 1 7 7 25 25 10 1 7 25 11 1 7 25 As an illustration. Weight limit: w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 3 4 1 1 5 6 1 1 7 8 1 1 9 1 10 11 1 1 Recall that we take V[i. vi + V[i − 1. j] to be 0 if either i or j is ≤ 0. 7] was computed as follows: V[3. left-to-right always using V[i. j] = max V[i − 1. j]. 7]. We begin by initializating and first row. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 The [i.94 Weight limit (j): w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 0 1 2 3 4 CHAPTER 6. 7]. We then proceed to fill in top-down. j].

W] is 0. w − wi] > V[i − 1. w]) then V[i. Constructing the Optimal Solution The algorithm for computing V[i. To compute the actual subset. • If kee[n. j] does not keep record of which subset of items gives the optimal solution. j] which is 1 if we decide to take the ith item and 0 otherwise.5. 0/1 KNAPSACK PROBLEM Weight limit: w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 Finally. W) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 for w = 0. The dynamic programming approach can now be coded as the following algorithm: KNAPSACK(n. the n ∈ T and we repeat the argument for keep[n − 1. w] The time complexity is clearly O(n · W).6. w] ← 0 for i = 0. w] ← V[i − 1. then n ∈ T . W − wn]. W do if (wi ≤ w & vi + V[i − 1. . W]. the bottom-right entry). we have Weight limit: w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 6 6 6 6 3 1 7 7 7 7 4 5 1 1 7 7 7 18 7 18 7 18 6 1 7 19 22 22 7 1 7 24 24 28 8 9 1 1 7 7 25 25 28 29 29 34 10 1 7 25 29 35 11 1 7 25 40 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 6 6 6 3 1 7 7 7 4 5 1 1 7 7 7 18 7 18 6 1 7 19 22 7 1 7 24 24 8 9 1 1 7 7 25 25 28 29 10 1 7 25 29 11 1 7 25 40 95 The maximum value of items in the knapsack is 40. We can now repeat this argument for keep[n − 1. both time and space complexity become significant. we can add an auxiliary boolean array keep[i. w] ← vi + V[i − 1. 0] ← 0 for w = 0. We will use all the values keep[i. W] is 1. j] to determine the optimal subset T of items to put in the knapsack as follows: • If keep[n. n do V[i. W do V[0. w − wi] else V[i. It must be cautioned that as n and W get large.

w]) then V[i. 0] ← 0 for w = 0. w] ← 1 else V[i. W do V[0. w]. w] ← vi + V[i − 1. n do V[i. keep[i. W) CHAPTER 6.96 We will add this to the knapsack algorithm: KNAPSACK(n. w − wi] > V[i − 1. w] ← V[i − 1. w − wi]. the selected items are 4 and 3. . k] = 1) then output i k ← k − wi Here is the keep matrix for the example problem. W do if (wi ≤ w & vi + V[i − 1. This is indicated by the boxed entries in the table above. w] ← 0 for i = 0. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 for w = 0. w] ← 0 // output the selected items k←W for i = n downto 1 do if (keep[i. keep[i. Weight limit: w1 = 1 v1 = 1 w2 = 2 v2 = 6 w3 = 5 v3 = 18 w4 = 6 v4 = 22 w5 = 7 v5 = 28 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 0 5 1 1 1 0 0 6 1 1 1 1 0 7 1 1 1 0 1 8 1 1 1 1 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 10 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 0 When the item selection algorithm is applied.

Search techniques look at many possible solutions. If so. fifty rupees. greedy finds good. There are paper notes for one dollar. you will end up at a global optimum. greedy approach always gets optimum. five hundred rupees and thousand 97 . five cents (called a “nickle”). or approximation. For some problems.1 Example: Counting Money Suppose you want to count out a certain amount of money. the currency notes are five rupees. not just a solution. For still others.A. take the largest possible note or coin that does not overshoot.Chapter 7 Greedy Algorithms An optimization problem is one in which you want to find. The coins are one cent. For others.g. it is called a greedy heuristic. greedy approach can do very poorly. but not always best. but the best solution. ten cents (called a “dime”) and twenty five cents (a “quarter”). without regard for future consequences.S. hundred rupees. A “ greedy algorithm” sometimes works well for optimization problems A greedy algorithm works in phases. E. A greedy algorithm to do this would be: at each step. • You hope that by choosing a local optimum at each step. ten dollars. 7. In Pakistan. twenty dollars. using the fewest possible bills (notes) and coins. ten rupees. The notes are also called “bills”. five dollars. dynamic programming or backtrack search. At each phase: • You take the best you can get right now. while (N > 0){ give largest denomination coin ≤ N reduce N by value of that coin } Consider the currency in U. fifty dollars and hundred dollars.

you would get A 10 kron piece Five 1 kron pieces. to make $6. .39 (six dollars and thirty nine cents). N] is the solution required.98 CHAPTER 7.39 Notice how we started with the highest note. di. and also pay the amount (j − di). . using coins of denominations 1 to i. Here is an example where it fails.. for a total of 15 krons This requires six coins. . To pay an amount j units. and 10 kron coins Using a greedy algorithm to count out 15 krons.1 Making Change: Dynamic Programming Solution The general coin change problem can be solved using Dynamic Programming.1. 10 cents and 25 cents. “ krons” come in 1 kron. C[1.N] in which the rows denote available denominations. . C[i. 7. to make $6.35 • four 1 cents coins. $5. however. find a way of writing N = i1d1 + i2d2 + · · · + ikdk such that i1 + i2 + · · · + ik is minimized.k.S. (1 ≤ i ≤ k) and columns denote the amount from 0 .25 • a 10 cents coin (dime). you can choose: • a $5 note • a $1 note to make $6 • a 25 cents coin (quarter). N = i0D0 + i1D1 + i2D2 + · · · + ikDk Note that this is N represented in based D. The “size” of problem is k. d2. j] denotes the minimum number of coins. GREEDY ALGORITHMS rupees. before moving to the next lower denomination. . Suppose. Suppose you are asked to give change of $6. C[k. either chose NOT to use any coins of denomination i. we have two choices: 1. but not in an optimal solution The greedy approach gives us an optimal solution when the coins are all powers of a fixed denomination. 7 kron. U. 0. to make $6.A coins are multiples of 5: 5 cents. in some (fictional) monetary system. the Coin Change problem is: Given k denominations d1. . 2. A better solution. (0 ≤ j ≤ N). The greedy strategy works for the coin change problem but not always. . dk and given N. Formally. The coins are one rupee and two rupees.. N units. or chose at least one coin of denomination i. would be to use two 7 kron pieces and one 1 kron piece This only requires three coins The greedy algorithm results in a solution. Set up a Table. required to pay an amount j using only coins of denominations 1 to i.

C[i. Dynamic Programming takes O(kN) time. when characters are coded using standard codes like ASCII.2. Thus. Fixed-length codes are popular because it is very easy to break up a string into its individual characters. the message length would be 10 × 8 = 80 bits. j] = min(C[i − 1. N] 7. C[i.1. Normally. j]. However. j − di] coins. j] ← 1 + c[1. 8 bits per character. ...2 Greedy Algorithm: Huffman Encoding The Huffman codes provide a method of encoding data efficiently. 0] ← 0 for i = 1 to k do for j = 1 to N do if (i = 1 & j < d[i]) then c[i. GREEDY ALGORITHM: HUFFMAN ENCODING To pay (j − di) units it takes C[i. j] else c[i. Consider the string “ abacdaacac”. We will see shortly that the same string encoded with a variable length Huffman encoding scheme will produce a shorter message.n] = {1. Note that N can be as large as 2k so the dynamic programming algorithm is really exponential in k. j]. j] ← min (c[i − 1. j − di]) Here is the dynamic programming based algorithm for the coin change problem. 6} // (coinage. fixed-length codes may not be he most efficient from the perspective of minimizing the total quantity of data. 4. and to access individual characters and substrings by direct indexing.2 Complexity of Coin Change Algorithm Greedy algorithm (non-optimal) takes O(k) time. j] ← c[i − 1. e. j − d[i]]) return c[k. j] = 1 + C[i. Each character is represented by a fixed-length codeword of bits. COINS(N) 99 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 d[1. j] ← ∞ else if (i = 1) then c[i. for example) for i = 1 to k do c[i. 1 + C[i. 1 + c[i. 7.7. j − d[1]] else if (j < d[i]) then c[i.g. if the string is coded with ASCII codes. j − di] Since we want to minimize the number of coins used.

Now comes the greedy part: Find two nodes with smallest frequency.insert(z.freq pq. and with weight equal to the sum of the weights of the two children.100 CHAPTER 7.remove().5 b c 1 3 0. The min-heap is maintained using the frequencies. freq[i]) pq.freq). When a new node is created by combining two nodes.1 Next.1 shows the tree built for the example message “abacdaacac” .1 0. freq[1.freq ← x.freq + y. create binary tree (leaf) node for each symbol (character) that occurs with nonzero frequency Set node weight equal to the frequency of the symbol. The probability is the number of occurrence of a character divided by the total characters in the message.3 d 1 0. determine the frequency of occurrence (relative probability) of each character in the message.remove() z ← new TreeNode z. symbol[1. freq[i]) // priority queue for i = 1 to N − 1 do x = pq.insert(t. Continue until we have a single tree. GREEDY ALGORITHMS 7. The frequencies and probabilities for the example string “ abacdaacac” are character frequency probability a 5 0..N]) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 for i = 1 to N do t ← TreeNode(symbol[i]. z.2.left ← x.. HUFFMAN (N. return pq. // root Figure 7.N]. Finding two nodes with the smallest frequency can be done efficiently by placing the nodes in a heap-based priority queue.right ← y z. the new node is placed in the priority queue.1 Huffman Encoding Algorithm Here is how the Huffman encoding algorithm works. This can be done by parsing the message and counting how many time each character (or symbol) appears. Create a new node with these two nodes as children. Here is the Huffman tree building algorithm. y = pq.remove(). z. Given a message string.

d} is encoded using 8-bit ASCII. We traverse the root to the leaf letting the input 0 or 1 tell us which branch to take. c.3 · 2 + 0.1: Huffman binary tree for the string “abacdaacac” Prefix Property: The codewords assigned to characters by the Huffman algorithm have the property that no codeword is a prefix of any other: character frequency probability codeword a 5 0. b.5 · 1 + 0.1 · 3) = 1. and let dT (x) denote the length of the codeword relative to some prefix tree T . a significant saving!. let p(x) be the probability of occurrence of a character. The expected number of bits needed to encode a text with n characters is given by B(T ) = n p(x)dT (x) x∈C .2. For a string of n characters over this alphabet.7n In general. GREEDY ALGORITHM: HUFFMAN ENCODING 101 0 1 a 0 0 1 c 10 0 1 b 110 d 111 Figure 7.1 0.5 0 b c 1 3 0. the expected encoded string length is n(0.1 · 3 + 0. For example.7.3 110 10 d 1 0. Expected encoding length: If a string of n characters over the alphabet C = {a. The same string encoded with Huffman codes will yield a b 0 110 a 0 c 10 d a 111 0 a c 0 10 a 0 c 10 This is just 17 bits. the string “abacdaacac” will require 8 × 10 = 80 bits. Decoding a prefix code is simple.1 111 The prefix property is evident by the fact that codewords are leaves of the binary tree. the length of encoded string is 8n.

GREEDY ALGORITHMS 7. In other words.2: Optimal prefix code tree T Since x and y have the two smallest probabilities (we claimed this). The question that remains is that why is the algorithm correct? Recall that the cost of any encoding tree T is B(T ) = n x∈C p(x)dT (x) Our approach to prove the correctness of Huffman Encoding will be to show that any tree that differs from the one constructed by Huffman algorithm can be converted into one that is equal to Huffman’s tree without increasing its costs.2. Note that the binary tree constructed by Huffman algorithm is a full binary tree. Claim: Consider two characters x and y with the smallest probabilities. it follows that p(x) ≤ p(b) and p(y) ≤ p(c) . Proof: Let T be any optimal prefix code tree with two siblings b and c at the maximum depth of the tree. Then there is optimal code tree in which these two characters are siblings at the maximum depth in the tree.2Assume without loss of generality that p(b) ≤ p(c) and p(x) ≤ p(y) T x y c b Figure 7. Such a tree is shown in Figure 7. Huffman algorithm generates an optimum prefix code.102 CHAPTER 7.2 Huffman Encoding: Correctness Huffman algorithm uses a greedy approach to generate a prefix code T that minimizes the expected length B(T ) of the encoded string.

we know that d(b) ≥ d(x) Thus we have p(b) − p(x) ≥ 0 and d(b) − d(x) ≥ 0 Hence their product is non-negative. GREEDY ALGORITHM: HUFFMAN ENCODING Since b and c are at the deepest level of the tree. (p(b) − p(x)) · (d(b) − d(x)) ≥ 0 Now swap the positions of x and b in the tree d(c) ≥ d(y) 103 and (d is the depth) T x y c b Figure 7.2.3: Swap x and b in tree prefix tree T This results in a new tree T . That is.7.

104 CHAPTER 7. i.e. Using a similar argument. x Figure 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS T’ b y c Let’s see how the cost changes.. By switching y with c we get the tree T . implying that T is an optimal tree. consider two characters x and y with the . The cost of T is B(T ) = B(T ) − p(x)d(x) + p(x)d(b) − p(b)d(b) + p(b)d(x) = B(T ) + p(x)[d(b) − d(x)] − p(b)[d(b) − d(x)] = B(T ) − (p(b) − p(x))(d(b) − d(x)) ≤ B(T ) because (p(b) − p(x))(d(b) − d(x)) ≥ 0 Thus the cost does not increase. we can show that T is also optimal.4: Prefix tree T after x and b are swapped T’ b y c x =⇒ T’’ b c y x The final tree T satisfies the claim we made earlier.

The start and end times have be set up in advance. So how do we schedule the largest number of activities on the resource? Intuitively. The activity selection problem is to select a maximum-size set of mutually non-interfering activities for use of the resource. we do not like long . Claim: Huffman algorithm produces the optimal prefix code tree. . which is obviously optimal. The lectures are to be scheduled. For the basis case. .7. Thus the final tree is optimal. fj) = ∅. lecture hall) Some start and finish times may overlap. the number of characters. There is only one resource (e. The complete proof of correctness for Huffman algorithm follows by induction on n. we need to build the tree T on n − 1 characters optimally. This is essentially undoing the operation where x and y were removed an replaced by z. I.. a2. The previous claim states that two characters x and y with the lowest probability will be siblings at the lowest level of the tree. We say that two activities ai and aj are non-interfering if their start-finish intervals do not overlap. this is exactly what Huffman algorithm does. Each activity ai must be started at a given start time si and ends at a given finish time fi. An example is that a number of lectures are to be given in a single lecture hall. We can convert T into prefix code tree T for the original set of n characters by replacing z with nodes x and y. Suppose we have exactly n characters. an} of n activities that are to be scheduled to use some resource.e. fi) ∩ (sj. not all requests can be honored. Remove x and y and replace them with a new character z whose probability is p(z) = p(x) + p(y). The cost of the new tree T is B(T ) = B(T ) − p(z)d(z) + p(x)[d(z) + 1] + p(y)[d(z) + 1] = B(T ) − (p(x) + p(y))d(z) + (p(x) + p(y))[d(z) + 1] = B(T ) + (p(x) + p(y))[d(z) + 1 − d(z)] = B(T ) + p(x) + p(y) The cost changes but the change depends in no way on the structure of the tree T (T is for n − 1 characters). . 7. to minimize the cost of the final tree T . (si. Therefore. Thus n − 1 characters remain. n = 1. Then there is optimal code tree in which these two characters are siblings at the maximum depth in the tree. Proof: The proof is by induction on n. ACTIVITY SELECTION 105 smallest probabilities. We want to show it is true with exactly n characters. the tree consists of a single leaf node. By induction. The claim we just proved asserts that the first step of Huffman algorithm is the proper one to perform (the greedy step).3.3 Activity Selection The activity scheduling is a simple scheduling problem for which the greedy algorithm approach provides an optimal solution. . Therefore.g. We are given a set S = {a1. Consider any prefix code tree T made with this new set of n − 1 characters.

The eight activities are sorted by their finish times. Unfortunately. and so on.finish) then A ← A ∪ a[i]. only three out of the eight are scheduled. Activities a2 and a3 interfere with a1 so they ar not selected. Each is represented by a rectangle. this turns out to be non-optimal Here is a simple greedy algorithm that works: Sort the activities by their finish times.5 shows an example of the activity scheduling algorithm. prev ← i . Eventually. Activity a1 is scheduled first. Then. for i = 2 to N do if (a[i].106 CHAPTER 7. provided that it does not interfere with any previously scheduled activities. schedule the one that finishes first. There are eight activities to be scheduled. Select the activity that finishes first and schedule it. The eight rectangles are arranged to show the sorted order. among all activities that do not interfere with this first job. Thus the complexity is O(N log N).N] by finish times A ← {a[1]}. // most recently scheduled Figure 7.. The next to be selected is a4. The last one to be chosen is a7.N]) 1 2 3 4 5 6 sort a[1. // schedule activity 1 first prev ← 1. Activities a5 and a6 interfere with a4 so are not chosen. GREEDY ALGORITHMS activities Because they occupy the resource and keep us from honoring other requests. Timing analysis: Time is dominated by sorting of the activities by finish times.start ≥ a[prev]. SCHEDULE(a[1. The width of a rectangle indicates the duration of an activity.. This suggests the greedy strategy: Repeatedly select the activity with the smallest duration (fi − si) and schedule it.

1 Correctness of Greedy Activity Selection Our proof of correctness is based on showing that the first choice made by the algorithm is the best possible. The proof structure is noteworthy because many greedy correctness proofs are based on the same idea: Show that any other solution can be converted into the greedy solution without increasing the cost. . Then there is an optimal schedule in which activity a1 is scheduled first. . If x = a1 then we are done. . . a2. Let x be the activity in A with the smallest finish time. Otherwise. sorted by increasing finish times. Proof: Let A be an optimal schedule. we form a new schedule A by replacing x with activity a1.3.3. an} of n activities. ACTIVITY SELECTION Input a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 107 Add a 1 a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 Add a 7 a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 Add a 4 a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 Figure 7. Claim: Let S = {a1.5: Example of greedy activity scheduling algorithm 7.7. that are to be scheduled to use some resource. And then using induction to show that the algorithm is globally optimal. .

Claim: . A is a feasible schedule.e. since otherwise. Thus.7: New schedule A by replacing x with ctivity a1. it has no interfering activities.6: Activity X = a1 We claim that A = A − {x} ∪ {a1} is a feasible schedule.{X} +{a 1} a1 X a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 X a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 Figure 7. it has an earlier finish time than x. Since a1 is by definition the first activity to finish. A . these activities will interfere with x. i. Thus a1 cannot interfere with any of the activities in A − {x}. Clearly A and A contain the same number of activities implying that A is also optimal. GREEDY ALGORITHMS X = a1 X a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 a1 a2 a3 a4 a5 a6 a7 a8 Figure 7.. This because A − {x} cannot have any other activities that start before x finishes.108 CHAPTER 7.

let us assume that the greedy algorithm is optimal on any set of activities of size strictly smaller than |S| and we prove the result for S. if there are no activities. There are n items. The goal was to maximize the value of items without exceeding the total weight limit of W. In contrast. Let ρi = vi/wi denote the value per unit weight ratio for item i. For the basis case. the ith item is worth vi and weighs wi. FRACTIONAL KNAPSACK PROBLEM The greedy algorithm gives an optimal solution to the activity scheduling problem.4. 7. there is a simple and efficient greedy algorithm for the fractional knapsack problem. We take as much of this item as possible thus filling the knapsack completely. Proof: 109 The proof is by induction on the number of activities. That is S = {ai ∈ S|si ≥ f1} Any solution for S can be made into a solution for S by simply adding activity a1. But. For the induction step. one is allowed to take fraction of an item for a fraction of the weight and fraction of value. A knapsack can only carry W total weight. the setup is exactly the same. Sort the items in decreasing order of ρi. Activity a1 is in the optimal schedule (by the above previous claim). Add items in decreasing order of ρi. . The 0-1 knapsack problem is hard to solve. If the item fits. However. At some point there is an item that does not fit in the remaining space. and vice versa. But by induction (since |S | < |S|). Items can either be put in the knapsack or not.4 Fractional Knapsack Problem Earlier we saw the 0-1 knapsack problem. then the greedy algorithm is trivially optimal. Let S be the set of activities that do not interfere with activity a1.7. It follows that to produce an optimal schedule for the overall problem. we should first schedule a1 and then append the optimal schedule for S . this exactly what the greedy algorithm does. in the fractional knapsack problem. we take it all.

and ignored the item of weight 5. We can also observe that the greedy algorithm is not optimal for the 0-1 knapsack problem. if you had been less greedy. then 20. then you would first take the items of weight 5. It would never benefit to take a little less gold so that one could replace it with an equal weight of bronze. If you were to sort the items by ρi .10.9. and then (since the item of weight 40 does not fit) you would settle for the item of weight 30. silver and bronze. one (thief?) would probably take as much gold as possible. Consider the example shown in the Figure 7. for a total value of $30 + $100 + $90 = $220. GREEDY ALGORITHMS 35 $140 60 40 30 5 knapsack $30 6 10 $20 2 20 5 $100 5 $90 3 $160 4 $30 $270 Greedy solution 20 $100 Figure 7.110 CHAPTER 7.8: Greedy solution to the fractional knapsack problem It is easy to see that the greedy algorithm is optimal for the fractional knapsack problem. This is shown in Figure 7. On the other hand. then you could take the items of weights 20 and 40 for a total value of $100+$160 = $260. . Then take as much silver as possible and finally as much bronze as possible. Given a room with sacks of gold.

10: Optimal solution for the 0-1 knapsack problem . FRACTIONAL KNAPSACK PROBLEM 111 30 $90 60 40 30 5 knapsack $30 6 10 $20 2 20 5 $100 5 $90 3 $160 4 $30 20 $100 $220 Greedy solution to 0-1 knapsack Figure 7.7.4.9: Greedy solution for the 0-1 knapsack problem (non-optimal) $160 40 60 40 30 5 knapsack $30 6 10 $20 2 20 20 $100 $100 5 $90 3 $160 4 $260 Optimal solution to 0-1 knapsack Figure 7.

112 CHAPTER 7. GREEDY ALGORITHMS .

Graphs are important discrete structures because they are a flexible mathematical model for many application problems. Examples of this can be found in computer and communication networks transportation networks. graph 1 3 directed graph (digraph) 1 3 2 1 4 self-loop 2 1 4 3 2 digraph 4 2 4 multi graph Figure 8. a binary relation on V called edges. E is a set of pairs from V. logic circuits surface meshes for shape description in computer-aided design and GIS precedence constraints in scheduling systems. For unordered pair. Any time there is a set of objects and there is some sort of “connection” or “relationship” or “interaction” between pairs of objects. we have a directed graph. If a pair is ordered. E) consists of a finite set of vertices V (or nodes) and E. roads VLSI. a graph is a good way to model this.. we have an undirected graph.Chapter 8 Graphs We begin a major new topic: Graphs. 113 . A graph G = (V. e.1: Types of graphs A vertex w is adjacent to vertex v if there is an edge from v to w.g.

we just talk of degree of a vertex.3: Incidence of edges on vertices In a digraph. we say that an edge is incident on a vertex if the vertex is an endpoint of the edge.114 CHAPTER 8. the number of edges coming out of a vertex is called the out-degree of that vertex.2: Adjacent vertices In an undirected graph. It is the number of edges incident on the vertex. . of the edge 1 e1 2 e2 e3 3 e1 incident on vertices 1 & 2 e2 incident on vertices 1 & 3 e3 incident on vertices 1 & 4 e4 4 e4 incident on vertices 2 & 4 Figure 8. In an undirected graph. Number of edges coming in is the in-degree. GRAPHS adjacent vertices 1 3 1&2 1&3 1&4 2 4 2&4 Figure 8.

A vertex w is reachable from vertex u is there is a path from u to w. vk such that (vi−1. For an undirected graph G = (V. A Eulerian cycle is a cycle that visits every edge of the graph exactly once. A path is simple if all vertices (except possibly the fist and last) are distinct. . . . . A cycle in a digraph is a path containing at least one edge and for which v0 = vk. . the number of edges.115 in: 1 out: 3 in: 1 out: 1 1 3 2 in: 1 out: 2 4 in: 3 out: 0 Figure 8. A path in a directed graphs is a sequence of vertices v0.e.4: In and out degrees of vertices of a graph For a digraph G = (V. k.. . degree(v) = 2|E| v∈V where |E| means the cardinality of the set E. E). There are also “path” versions in which you do not need return to the starting vertex. in-degree(v) = v∈V v∈V out-degree(v) = |E| where |E| means the cardinality of the set E. . i. vi) is an edge for i = 1. The length of the paths is the number of edges. . A Hamiltonian cycle is a cycle that visits every vertex in a graph exactly once.. . the number of edges. i. v1.e. 2. E). k.

. . Let G = (V. An adjacency matrix is a n × n matrix defined for 1 ≤ v. .1 Graph Traversal To motivate our first algorithm on graphs. w) ∈ E 0 otherwise An adjacency list is an array Adj[1. w] = 1 if (v. .116 CHAPTER 8. A directed graph that is acyclic is called a directed acyclic graph (DAG). consider the following problem.. There are two ways of representing graphs: using an adjacency matrix and using an adjacency list. 2. A graph is connected if every vertex can reach every other vertex. The length of a path in a graph is the number of edges on .5: Cycles in a directed graph A graph is said to be acyclic if it contains no cycles. w ≤ n.n] of pointers where for 1 ≤ v ≤ n. n}.6: Graph Representations 8. GRAPHS 1 3 cycles: 1-3-4-2-1 1-4-2-1 1-2-1 2 4 Figure 8. We are given an undirected graph G = (V. A[v. We will assume that the vertices of G are indexed {1. E) and a source vertex s ∈ V. 1 2 1 0 1 3 1 1 0 1 2 3 Adj 1 3 2 Adjacency List 2 3 1 1 2 1 0 0 2 3 3 Adjacency Matrix Figure 8. E) be a digraph with n = |V| and let e = |E|. Adj[v] points to a linked list containing the vertices which are adjacent to v Adjacency matrix requires Θ(n2) storage and adjacency list requires Θ(n + e) storage.

1 Breadth-first Search Here is a more efficient algorithm called the breadth-first search (BFS) Start with s and visit its adjacent nodes. Repeat this until no more unvisited neighbors left to visit. For each vertex v ∈ V. There is a simple brute-force strategy for computing shortest paths. Now consider the neighbors of neighbors of neighbors of s.8. there can be as many as n! simple paths in a graph. The final result will be represented in the following way. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 117 the path. We will set π[s] = Nil. However. we will store d[v] which is the distance (length of the shortest path) from s to v. 8.7 s u Figure 8. We would like to find the shortest path from s to each other vertex in the graph. (n − 3) for second. This leads to n! simple paths.1. (n − 1) choices for destination node. and keep track of the shortest path arriving at each vertex. To see this. (n − 2) for first hop (edge) in the path.7: Fully connected graph v w There n choices for source node s. Label them with distance 1. Clearly this is not feasible. . Now consider the neighbors of neighbors of s. These would be at distance 3. We could simply start enumerating all simple paths starting at s. These would be at distance 2. (n − 4) for third down to (n − (n − 1)) for last leg. The algorithm can be visualized as a wave front propagating outwards from s visiting the vertices in bands at ever increasing distances from s. consider a fully connected graph shown in Figure 8. We will also store a predecessor (or parent) pointer π[v] which is the first vertex along the shortest path if we walk from v backwards to s.1. Note that d[s] = 0.

10: Wave reaching distance 2 vertices during BFS . GRAPHS s Figure 8.9: Wave reaching distance 1 vertices during BFS 2 1 2 2 1 2 s 1 2 2 Figure 8.118 CHAPTER 8.8: Source vertex for breadth-first-search (BFS) 1 s 1 1 Figure 8.

Traversing a graph means visiting every node in the graph. Both versions are passed s initially. RECURSIVE DFS(v) 1 2 3 4 if (v is unmarked ) then mark v for each edge (v.1. Another traversal strategy is depth-first search (DFS).11: Wave reaching distance 3 vertices during BFS 8. The only important properties of the “bag” are that we can put stuff into it and then later take stuff . DFS procedure can be written recursively or non-recursively.8. w) do PUSH(w) 8. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 3 2 1 2 2 1 2 3 3 s 1 2 3 3 119 2 Figure 8.1.1.2 Depth-first Search Breadth-first search is one instance of a general family of graph traversal algorithms. w) do RECURSIVE DFS(w) ITERATIVE DFS(s) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 PUSH(s) while stack not empty do v ← POP() if v is unmarked then mark v for each edge (v.3 Generic Graph Traversal Algorithm The generic graph traversal algorithm stores a set of candidate edges in some data structures we’ll call a “bag”.

v) and once as (v. • Each edge is put into the bag exactly twice. T RAVERSE(s) 1 put (∅. The running time of the traversal algorithm depends on how the graph is represented and what data structure is used for the bag. the for loop in line 7 is executed at most V times. But we can make a few general observations. w) Figures 8. once as (u.12 to 8. w) 8 do push(v. . which previously-visited vertex p put v into the bag. line 3 is executed at most 2E + 1 times. This is because we want to remember. u). w) 8 do put (v. GRAPHS Notice that we are keeping edges in the bag instead of vertices. so line 8 is executed at most 2E times.120 back out. we have depth-first search (DFS) or traversal. since we can’t take out more things out of the bag than we put in. If we implement the bag by using a stack. s) in bag 2 while bag not empty 3 do take (p. whenever we visit v for the first time. s) 2 while stack not empty 3 do pop(p. • Assume that the graph is represented by an adjacency list so the overhead of the for loop in line 7 is constant per edge. v) from bag 4 if (v is unmarked ) 5 then mark v 6 parent (v) ← p 7 for each edge (v. • Since each vertex is visited at most once. • Finally. T RAVERSE(s) 1 push(∅. v) 4 if (v is unmarked ) 5 then mark v 6 parent (v) ← p 7 for each edge (v. The vertex p is call the parent of v.20 show a trace of the DFS algorithm applied to a graph. w) in bag CHAPTER 8. Here is the generic traversal algorithm. The figures show the content of the stack during the execution of the algorithm.

14: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘c’ popped . GRAPH TRAVERSAL 121 b s a e d g .1.12: Trace of Depth-first-search algorithm: source vertex ‘s’ b s a e d g (a.b) stack d g c f Figure 8.b) (a.s stack c f Figure 8.c) (a.f) (c.d) (c.b) stack c f Figure 8.a) (c.8.13: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘a’ popped b s a e (c.

d) (c.c) (f.g) (f.d) (f.d) (f.b) stack Figure 8.b) (a. GRAPHS b s a e d g c f (f.f) (f.c) (f.b) (a.e) (c.e) (c.d) (c.122 CHAPTER 8.16: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘g’ popped .b) stack Figure 8.a) (c.15: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘f’ popped b s a e d g c f (g.a) (c.e) (g.

b) (a.g) (e.e) (c.f) (g.d) (e.c) (f.1.17: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘e’ popped b s a e d g c f (e.18: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘b’ popped .b) (e.g) (e.f) (f.a) (c.d) (f.c) (f.b) (a.8.e) (c.d) (c.d) (c. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 123 b s a e d g c f (e.a) (c.f) (f.b) stack Figure 8.f) (g.d) (f.b) stack Figure 8.d) (e.

Each execution of line 3 . If we implement the bag by using a queue. Since the graph is connected. So the overall running time is O(V + E).124 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS b s a e d g c f stack Figure 8. this is O(E).19: Trace of DFS algorithm: vertex ‘d’ popped b s a e d g c BFS Tree f Figure 8. V ≤ E + 1.20: Trace of DFS algorithm: the final DFS tree Each execution of line 3 or line 8 in the T RAVERSE -DFS algorithm takes constant time. we have breadth-first search (BFS).

When we are finished processing a vertex. Thus depth-first and breadth-first take O(V 2) time overall. w) 125 If the graph is represented using an adjacency matrix.Timestamp Structure As we traverse the graph in DFS order. the algorithm marks every vertex in the graph. v) into the bag. So the set of parent edges form a connected graph. This fact is established by the following lemma: Lemma: The generic T RAVERSE ( S ) marks every vertex in any connected graph exactly once and the set of edges (v. These two numbers are time stamps. Let v = s be a vertex and let s → · · · → u → v be a path from s to v with the minimum number of edges. For any node v. . it should be obvious that no vertex is marked more than once. eventually leads back to s. GRAPH TRAVERSAL or line 8 still takes constant time. v) 4 if (v is unmarked ) 5 then mark v 6 parent (v) ← p 7 for each edge (v. Consider the recursive version of depth-first traversal . Either DFS or BFS yields a spanning tree of the graph. s) 2 while queue not empty 3 do dequeue(p.1. we store a counter in f[u]. T RAVERSE(s) 1 enqueue(∅. both end points of every parent edge are marked. parent(v)) with parent(v) = ∅.1. Clearly. w) 8 do enqueue(v. by induction on the shortest-path distance from s. store a counter in d[u]. such a path always exists. the parent edges form a spanning tree. a parent edge. parent(v)) with parent(v) = ∅ form a spanning tree of the graph. v) out of the bag at which point v must be marked. . we will associate two numbers with each vertex.4 DFS . Clearly. The tree visits every vertex in the graph. Call an edge (v. the finding of all the neighbors of vertex in line 7 takes O(V) time. the algorithm marks s. the path of parent edges v → parent(v) → parent(parent(v)) → . Since the graph is connected. and the number of edges is exactly one less than the number of vertices. So overall running time is still O(E). so it must take (u. then it must put (u. Thus. Proof: First. When we first discover a vertex u. If the algorithm marks u.8. 8. Thus.

. b 1/. Figures 8.21 through 8. // we are done with u 8 f[u] ← ++ time. c Figure 8. d e b a f DFS(a) DFS(b) DFS(c) 2/.. The number before the “/” is the time when a vertex was discovered (colored gray) and the number after the “/” is the time when the processing of the vertex finished (colored black). // mark u visited 2 d[u] ← ++ time 3 for (each v ∈ Adj[u]) 4 do if (color[v] = white) 5 then pred[v] ← u 6 DFS VISIT(v) 7 color[u] ← black.126 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS DFS(G) 1 for (each u ∈ V) 2 do color[u] ← white 3 pred[u] ← nil 4 time ← 0 5 for each u ∈ V 6 do if (color[u] = white) 7 then DFS VISIT(u) The DFS VISIT routine is as follows: DFS VISIT(u) 1 color[u] ← gray.25 present a trace of the execution of the time stamping algorithm.. a c g 3/. Terms like “2/5” indicate the value of the counter (time).21: DFS with time stamps: recursive calls initiated at vertex ‘a’ .

c Figure 8.. f c 3/4 7/.23: DFS with time stamps: recursive processing of ‘f’ and ‘g’ .. g Figure 8....22: DFS with time stamps: processing of ‘b’ and ‘c’ completed b 2/5 1/..8.1. a c 3/4 DFS(f) DFS(g) 2/5 b 1/. a c 3/. 1/. GRAPH TRAVERSAL 127 b 2/... a 2/5 return c return b 3/4 b 1/. a 6/.

where the edge (u.25: DFS with time stamps: processing of ‘d’ and ‘e’ Notice that the DFS tree structure (actually a collection of trees.. or a forest) on the structure of the graph is just the recursion tree. g b 2/5 return g return f return a 3/4 a 1/10 f 6/9 c 7/8 g Figure 8.24: DFS with time stamps: processing of ‘f’ and ‘g’ completed d 11/14 DFS(d) DFS(e) return e return f e 12/13 b 2/5 a 1/10 f 6/9 c 3/4 7/8 g Figure 8. For directed graphs the edges that are not part of the tree (indicated as dashed edges in Figures 8.21 through 8. . v) where v is an ancestor of u in the tree. GRAPHS b 2/5 1/. f c 3/4 7/. v) arises when processing vertex u we call DFSV ISIT ( V ) for some neighbor v. a 6/.25) edges of the graph can be classified as follows: Back edge: (u..128 CHAPTER 8..

f[u]] and [d[v]. Rectangle for ‘c’ is completely enclosed by vertex ‘b’ rectangle. f[v]]. u is a descendent of v if and only if [d[u]. the edge may go between different trees of the forest. 129 Cross edge: (u. GRAPH TRAVERSAL Forward edge: (u. f[u]] ⊇ [d[v]. f[u]] ⊆ [d[v]. f[v]] are disjoint. The width of the rectangle associated with a vertex is equal to the time the vertex was discovered till the time the vertex was completely processed (colored black). The ancestor and descendent relation can be nicely inferred by the parenthesis lemma. In fact. Edges are labelled ‘F’. Imagine an opening parenthesis ‘(’ at the start of the rectangle and and closing parenthesis ‘)’ at the end of the rectangle. u is unrelated to v if and only if [d[u].27 shows the classification of the non-tree edges based on the parenthesis lemma. v) where u and v are not ancestor or descendent of one another. . f[v]].8. ‘B’ and ‘C’ for forward. a d b f e c 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 g 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Figure 8. u is a ancestor of v if and only if [d[u]. The is shown in Figure 8.1. The rectangle (parentheses) for vertex ‘b’ is completely enclosed by the rectangle for ‘a’. back and cross edge respectively. v) where v is a proper descendent of u in the tree.26: Parenthesis lemma Figure 8.26.

Lemma: Given a digraph G = (V. . v). For example. If this edge is a back edge. then f[u] ≤ f[v]. there are no cross edges (can you see why not?) 8. v) would be a tree edge). v) we know that the two time intervals are disjoint. If this edge is a tree. When we were processing u. v was not white (otherwise (u. Because the intervals are disjoint. Proof: For the non-tree forward and back edges the proof follows directly from the parenthesis lemma.5 DFS . E). consider any DFS forest of G and consider any edge (u.1. We do this with the help of the following two lemmas. then f[u] > f[v]. implying that v was started before u. v is a descendent of u and so v’s start-finish interval is contained within u’s implying that v has an earlier finish time. For example. By convention they are all called back edges.130 CHAPTER 8. v) ∈ E.27: Classfication of non-tree edges in the DFS tree for a graph For undirected graphs. Furthermore. there is no distinction between forward and back edges. for a forward edge (u. forward or cross edge. GRAPHS d 11/14 e 12/13 C b 2/5 a 1/10 6/9 C f F c 3/4 B g 7/8 C Figure 8. v must have also finished before u. For a cross edge (u. we can determine whether the graph contains any cycles.Cycles The time stamps given by DFS allow us to determine a number of things about a graph or digraph.

But you should not infer that there is some simple relationship between the number of back edges and the number of cycles. G has a cycle if and only if the DFS forest has a back edge. v) means that task u must be completed before task v begins. v) then v is an ancestor of u and by following tree edge from v to u. we get a cycle.2. By the lemma above. and cross all have the property that they go from vertices with higher finishing time to vertices with lower finishing time. in construction. We show the contrapositive: suppose there are no back edges. PRECEDENCE CONSTRAINT GRAPH 131 Lemma: Consider a digraph G = (V. For example. In general.8. The DFS forest in Figure 8. and is not hard to prove. Figure 8. consider the sequence followed when one wants to dress up in a suit.2 Precedence Constraint Graph A directed acyclic graph (DAG) arise in many applications where there are precedence or ordering constraints. a precedence constraint graph is a DAG in which vertices are tasks and the edge (u. The cycle is ‘a-g-f’. There are a series of tasks to be performed and certain tasks must precede other tasks. you have to build the first floor before the second floor but you can do electrical work while doors and windows are being installed. For example. implying there can be no cycle. For example. Proof: If there is a back edge (u. . A similar theorem applies to undirected graphs. Beware: No back edges means no cycles.27 has a back edge from vertex ‘g’ to vertex ‘a’. tree. and there may anywhere from one up to an exponential number of simple cycles in the graph. Thus along any path. 8.28. forward. a DFS tree may only have a single back edge. finish times decrease monotonically.29 shows the DFS with time stamps of the DAG. One possible order and its DAG are shown in Figure 8. each of the remaining types of edges. E) and any DFS forest for G.

132 underwear socks CHAPTER 8. .28: Order of dressing up in a suit 1/10 underwear 11/14 shirt socks 15/16 2/9 pants 12/13 tie 3/6 belt 7/8 shoes 4/5 coat Figure 8.29: DFS of dressing up DAG with time stamps Another example of precedence constraint graph is the sets of prerequisites for CS courses in a typical undergraduate program. GRAPHS pants shirt shoes belt tie coat Figure 8.

For every edge (u. Thus.C11 C4.C8 C4.C11 C4. Computing a topological ordering is actually quite easy. the finish time of u is greater than the finish time of v (by the lemma).8.3 Topological Sort A topological sort of a DAG is a linear ordering of the vertices of the DAG such that for each edge (u. C4 C2 C4.C10 Table 8. C5.30 C1 C4 C7 C2 C5 C8 C10 C12 C11 C13 C3 C6 C9 C14 C15 Figure 8.C7 C7.30: Precedence constraint graph for CS courses 8.C6.C7. .C7. v) in a DAG. C7 C4. TOPOLOGICAL SORT C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 C7 C8 C9 C10 C11 C12 C13 C14 C15 Introduction to Computers Introduction to Computer Programming Discrete Mathematics Data Structures Digital Logic Design Automata Theory Analysis of Algorithms Computer Organization and Assembly Data Base Systems Computer Architecture Computer Graphics Software Engineering Operating System Compiler Construction Computer Networks 133 C2 C2 C3 C3. u appears before v in the ordering. v).1: Prerequisites for CS courses The prerequisites can be represented with a precedence constraint graph which is shown in Figure 8. it suffices to output the vertices in the reverse order of finish times.C8 C4. given a DFS of the DAG.3.

all directed edges go from left to right. .134 CHAPTER 8. Note that in general.31 shows the linear order obtained by the topological sort of the sequence of putting on a suit. GRAPHS We run DFS on the DAG and when each vertex is finished. it is only that the order in which the vertices of the graph have been laid out is special. underwear pants shirt belt tie socks shoes coat socks 15/16 shirt 11/14 tie 12/13 underwear 1/10 pants 2/9 shoes 7/8 belt 3/6 coat 4/5 Figure 8. T OPOLOGICAL S ORT(G) 1 for (each u ∈ V) 2 do color[u] ← white 3 L ← new LinkedList() 4 for each u ∈ V 5 do if (color[u] = white) 6 then T OP V ISIT(u) 7 return L T OP V ISIT(u) 1 color[u] ← gray. As a result. // mark u visited 2 for (each v ∈ Adj[u]) 3 do if (color[v] = white) 4 then T OP V ISIT(v) 5 Append u to the front of L Figure 8. we add it to the front of a linked. The running time is Θ(V + E). The DAG is still the same. there may be many legal topological orders for a given DAG.31: Topological sort of the dressing up sequence This is a typical example of how DFS used in applications.

We would like to write an algorithm that determines whether a digraph is strongly connected. In fact. The strong components are illustrated in Figure 8. When diagraphs are used in communication and transportation networks. We say that two vertices u and v are mutually reachable if u can reach v and vice versa.33.8. STRONG COMPONENTS 135 8.4 Strong Components We consider an important connectivity problem with digraphs.32. Consider the directed graph in Figure 8. A digraph is strongly connected if for every pair of vertices u.4. we will solve a generalization of this problem. of computing the strongly connected components of a digraph. people want to know that their networks are complete. Complete in the sense that that it is possible from any location in the network to reach any other location in the digraph.32: A directed graph . u can reach v and vice versa. We partition the vertices of the digraph into subsets such that the induced subgraph of each subset is strongly connected. v ∈ V. C A B D F E G I H Digraph Figure 8.

then the resulting digraph is called the component digraph. The component digraph is necessarily acyclic.E F.136 CHAPTER 8. This equivalence relation partitions the vertices into equivalence classes of mutually reachable vertices and these are the strong components.B.I Component DAG Figure 8. v) ∈ E.34: Component DAG of super vertices . GRAPHS C A B D F E G I H Digraph and Strong Components Figure 8. and join two super vertices (A. B) if and only if there are vertices u ∈ A and v ∈ B such that (u.33: Digraph with strong components It is easy to see that mutual reachability is an equivalence relation.H. A.C D.34.G. The is illustrated in Figure 8. If we merge the vertices in each strong component into a single super vertex.

4.8. many strong components may appear in the same DFS tree as illustrated in Figure 8. Thus all vertices in a strong component must appear in the same tree of the DFS forest.35: DFS of a digraph fig:dfsofdigraph Observe that each strong component is a subtree in the DFS forest. every vertex in the component is reachable. STRONG COMPONENTS 137 8.4.36 1/18 A 2/13 3/4 C B D E 14/17 15/16 5/12 6/11 7/10 8/9 F G I H Figure 8. Is it always true for any DFS? The answer is “no”.36: Another DFS tree of the digraph . 1/8 I 9/12 E C 13/18 2/3 H 4/7 F 10/11 D A 14/17 5/6 G B 15/16 Depth-first search of digraph Figure 8. So the DFS does not terminate until all the vertices in the component have been visited. In general. Once you enter a strong component.1 Strong Components and DFS Consider DFS of a digraph given in Figure ??.

This is presented in Figure 8. so that it hits the strong components according to a reverse topological order. However. not only does it visit its component with ‘b’ and ‘c’. Suppose that you knew the component DAG in advance. when the search is started at vertex ‘a’. but every time you need a new vertex to start the search from.36. in the Figure 8. . it is possible to compute GT in Θ(V + E) time. For example.) Further. then v comes before u. (After all. We will discuss the algorithm without proof.H. This leaves us with the intuition that if we could somehow order the DFS. Define GT to be the digraph with the same vertex set at G but in which all edges have been reversed in direction. for edge (u.37. it must visit every vertex within the component (and possibly some others) before finishing. because you would need to know the strong components and this is the problem we are trying to solve. then we would have an easy algorithm for computing strong components. The trick behind the strong component algorithm is that we can find an ordering of the vertices that has essentially the necessary property. and put them in the same DFS tree. the answer is “yes”. That is. This is shown in Figure 8. without actually computing the component DAG.38. Recall that the component DAG consists of super vertices.G.B. (This is ridiculous.E F.E A. v) in the component DAG. we do not know what the component DAG looks like.C D. Clearly once the DFS starts within a given strong component. Here is an informal justification. A. by visiting components in reverse topological order of the component tree. we are trying to solve the strong component problem in the first place). suppose that you computed a reversed topological order on the component DAG. select the next available vertex according to this reverse topological order of the component digraph.I Topological order of component DAG F. because other components would have already have been visited earlier in the search. GRAPHS Is there a way to order the DFS such that it true? Fortunately. then the search may “leak out” into other strong components.G.C Reversed topological order Figure 8.I D.B.138 CHAPTER 8. Given an adjacency list for G. run DFS. but it also visits the other components as well.37: Reversed topological sort of component DAG Now. However.H. each search cannot “leak out” into other components. If we do not start in reverse topological.

The ordering trick is to order the vertices of G according to their finish times in a DFS. and all operate in Θ(V + E) time.38: The digraph GT Observe that the strongly connected components are not affected by reversal of all edges. STRONG COMPONENTS 139 C A B D F E G I H Digraph GT Figure 8.41.40 and 8.4. 8. If u and v are mutually reachable in G.39. Then visit the nodes of GT in decreasing order of finish times. All the steps of the algorithm are quite easy to implement. . Here is the algorithm: S TRONG C OMPONENTS(G) 1 Run DFS(G) computing finish times f[u] 2 Compute GT 3 Sort vertices of GT in decreasing f[u] 4 Run DFS(GT ) using this order 5 Each DFS tree is a strong component The execution of the algorithm is illustrated in Figures 8. then this is certainly true in GT . All that changes is that the component DAG is completely reversed.8.

140 CHAPTER 8. GRAPHS 1/18 A 2/13 3/4 C B D E 14/17 15/16 5/12 6/11 7/10 8/9 F G I H f[u] Note that maximum finish times of components are in valid topological order 18.39: DFS of digraph with vertices in descending order by finish times C Digraph GT A B D F E G I H A D E B T F G I H C Run DFS on G in this vertex order Figure 8.12 vertices ordered by decreasing A D E B F G I H C Figure 8.17.40: Digraph GT and the vertex order for DFS .

Label each component with the maximum finish time of all the vertices in the component.e. the maximum finish times for each component are 18 (for {a.4. and 12 (for {f. So. 17. Recall from the topological sorting algorithm. This is a good starting idea. So. then these are related to the topological order of the component graph.41: Final DFS with strong components of GT The complete proof for why this algorithm works is in CLR. the first vertex in the topological order is the one with the highest finish time). not last. 12) is a valid topological order for the component digraph. and sort these in decreasing order.i}). this suggests that we should visit the vertices in increasing order of finish time. We wanted a reverse topological order for the component digraph. there is something to notice about the finish times. .h. b. In fact it is possible to prove the following (but we won’t).. If we consider the maximum finish time in each component. observe that in the first DFS. For example. However. We will discuss the intuition behind why the algorithm visits vertices in decreasing order of finish times and why the graph is revered. finish times occur in reverse topological order (i.36. in Figure 8.36. Then this order is a topological order for the component digraph.e}). the lowest finish time (of 4) is achieved by vertex ‘c’. The problem is that this is not what we wanted. and its strong component is first. The order (18.g. if we wanted to visit the components in reverse topological order. but it turns out that it doesn’t work. in Figure 8. starting with the lowest finishing time. that in a DAG.8. 17 (for {d. The reason is that there are many vertices in each strong component. The problem is how to order the vertices so that this is true. the final trick is to reverse the digraph. c}). and they all have different finish times. Recall that the main intent is to visit the strong components in a reverse topological order. STRONG COMPONENTS 141 F D A I E C G H B Final DFS with Components Figure 8. This does not change the component graph. For example. Lemma: Consider a digraph G on which DFS has been run. in topological order. as desired. but it reverses the topological order.

Once the choice is made.v. Consider. the result is a cycle. for example.44: Another miniFigure 8.42: A spanning tree mum spanning tree spanning tree that is not MST We will present two greedy algorithms (Kruskal’s and Prim’s) for computing MST.45. GRAPHS 8. d) are added to the free tree. the other two are. . This is illustrated in Figure 8. The first is a spanning tree but is not a MST. Breaking any edge on this cycle restores the free tree. laying cable in a city for cable t.5 Minimum Spanning Trees A common problem is communications networks and circuit design is that of connecting together a set of nodes by a network of total minimum length. We define the cost of a spanning tree T to be the sum of the costs of edges in the spanning tree w(T ) = (u. E) Each edge (u. There exists a unique path between any two vertices of a free tree. it is never undone. The length is the sum of lengths of connecting wires. Before presenting the two algorithms. 10 b e 10 b 6 5 9 f g e b 6 5 g 10 8 7 d e 4 a 8 9 d 7 4 a 8 9 d 7 4 a 9 8 c 5 9 f 8 c 2 1 2 8 c 2 1 9 f 2 2 1 Cost = 33 Cost = 22 Cost = 22 Figure 8. A free tree with n vertices has exactly n − 1 edges. e) or (b. Adding any edge to a free tree creates a unique cycle. Figures ??. let us review facts about free trees. Formally. When the edges (b.142 CHAPTER 8. ?? and ?? show three spanning trees for the same graph. we are given a connected.43: A minimum Figure 8. v) A minimum spanning tree is a tree of minimum weight. A free tree is a tree with no vertex designated as the root vertex. undirected graph G = (V. v) has numeric weight of cost. Recall that a greedy algorithm is one that builds a solution by repeatedly selecting the cheapest among all options at each stage.v)∈T w(u. The computational problem is called the minimum spanning tree (MST) problem.

A subset A ⊆ E is viable if A is a subset of edges of some MST. A generic greedy algorithm operates by repeatedly adding any safe edge to the current spanning tree.5. V − S) is just a partition of vertices into two disjoint subsets. If we have computed a partial MST and we wish to know which edges can be added that do not induce a cycle in the current MST. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 10 8 9 8 c g 2 f 1 4 a 8 c 9 2 b 8 d 9 f 10 7 5 2 e 6 g 2 d 9 f 7 5 2 143 b 4 a b 4 a 8 c 9 2 8 d 9 10 7 5 e 6 e 6 g Free tree Figure 8. . Note that if A is viable. An edge (u. We will add edges one at a time until A equals the MST. Call this subset A. Given a subset of edges A. it cannot contain a cycle. It is not hard to see why respecting cuts are important to this problem. any edge that crosses a respecting cut is a possible candidate. the choice (u. In other words. Initially. v)} is viable. A cut (S. v) ∈ E − A is safe if A ∪ {(u. Let S be a subset of vertices S ⊆ V.1 Computing MST: Generic Approach Let G = (V. E) be an undirected.5.8. connected graph whose edges have numeric weights. v) is a safe choice to add so that A can still be extended to form a MST.45: Free tree facts 8. v) crosses the cut if one endpoint is in S and the other is in V − S. When is an edge safe? Consider the theoretical issues behind determining whether an edge is safe or not. a cut respects A if no edge in A crosses the cut. The intuition behind greedy MST algorithm is simple: we maintain a subset of edges E of the graph . A is empty. An edge (u.

V − S) be any cut that respects A and let (u. This is illustrated in Figure 8. The main theorem which drives both algorithms is the following: MST Lemma: Let G = (V.2 Greedy MST An edge of E is a light edge crossing a cut if among all edges crossing the cut. a subset of some MST). 9 u 4 7 x 10 8 y v 6 A Figure 8. This is shown in Figure 8.. Let A be a viable subset of E (i. . v) then we are done. then the lightest edge crossing a cut is a natural choice. v) with cost 4 has been chosen. Intuition says that since all the edges that cross a respecting cut do not induce a cycle. v) be a light edge crossing the cut. E) be a connected.e. Let T be any MST for G. v) is safe for A. Then the edge (u. Let (S.144 CHAPTER 8.5. it has the minimum weight. GRAPHS 8.47 where the lightest edge (u.46. If T contains (u.46: Subset A with a cut (wavy line) that respects A MST Proof: It would simplify the proof if we assume that all edge weights are distinct. undirected graph with real-valued weights on the edges.

47: MST T which contains light edge (u. We will derive a contradiction. Such a tree is shown in Figure 8.48: MST T which does not contains light edge (u. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 145 u 4 v x y A Figure 8. v) to T thus creating a cycle as illustrated in Figure 8. v) Add (u.48.8.5. v). . v) Suppose no MST contains (u.49. u 4 v x 8 y A Figure 8.

y) + w(u. v) We have w(T ) = w(T ) − w(x.50: Tree T = T − (x. y) we restore a spanning tree. GRAPHS u 4 v x 8 y A Figure 8. y) is not in A because the cut respects A. Since (u. there must be at least one other edge (x. v) is the lightest edge crossing the cut we have w(u. call it T .146 CHAPTER 8.50 u 4 v x y A Figure 8. v) < w(x. By removing (x. v). Thus w(T ) < w(T ) which contradicts the assumption that T was an MST. y) in T that crosses the cut. This is shown in Figure 8. y) + (u. The edge (x. .49: Cycle created due to T + (u. and any cycle must cross the cut an even number of times. y). v) Since u and v are on opposite sides of the cut.

E)) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A ← {} for ( each u ∈ V) do create set(u) sort E in increasing order by weight w for ( each (u. v) in sorted edge list) do if (find(u) = find(v)) then add (u. The edges in A can be stored as a simple list. the edges in A induce a forest on the vertices. Suppose the edge being considered has vertices (u. The tricky part of the algorithm is how to detect whether the addition of an edge will create a cycle in A. then it is added to A. v). Find-set(u): Find the set that contains u Union(u.v): merge the set containing u and set containing v into a common set. KRUSKAL(G = (V. we skip it and consider the next in order. We want a fast test that tells us whether u and v are in the same tree of A. v) return A . v) to A union(u.8. The vertices in each tree of A will be a set.5.5.3 Kruskal’s Algorithm Kruskal’s algorithm works by adding edges in increasing order of weight (lightest edge first). If it does. The trees of this forest are eventually merged until a single tree forms containing all vertices. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 147 8. This can be done using the Union-Find data structure which supports the following O(log n) operations: Create-set(u): Create a set containing a single item u. In Kruskal’s algorithm. the vertices will be stored in sets. As the algorithm runs. Here is the algorithm: Figures 8. If the next edge does not induce a cycle among the current set of edges.51 through ?? demonstrate the algorithm applied to a graph.

d) and (d. e) added a a a b 10 unsafe d 12 30 14 26 g e b e b e 18 16 18 12 d 30 14 26 g 16 18 12 d 30 14 26 g 16 c f c f c f Figure 8. e) added a 8 b 10 5 e b 8 a unsafe 10 e b 8 a 10 e 18 12 c d 30 14 26 g 16 18 12 d 30 14 26 g 16 18 12 d 30 14 26 g 16 f c f c f Color indicates union set Figure 8. GRAPHS 5 e 16 30 f 2 6 Figure 8.53: Kruskal algorithm: unsafe edges .148 a 8 b 2 18 12 c 4 g 14 2 6 d 30 f c 4 g 10 3 16 18 12 14 2 6 d 30 f c 4 g 5 e b 8 10 3 16 18 12 14 d a 5 e b 8 10 a CHAPTER 8.51: Kruskal algorithm: (b. g) and (a.52: Kruskal algorithm: (c.

In contrast.8. Sorting edges ( line 4) takes Θ(E log E). until all the vertices are in the same tree. α(V) < 4 for V less the number of atoms in the entire universe. We look to add a single vertex as a leaf to the tree.4 Prim’s Algorithm Kruskal’s algorithm worked by ordering the edges. f)added a a a b e b e b e d 30 c 26 g f c d 30 f c d f g g Figure 8. . it can be any vertex. We start with a root vertex r. The for loop (line 5) performs O(E) find and O(V) union operations. At any time. Overall time for Kruskal is Θ(E log E) = Θ(E log V) if the graph is sparse.54: Kruskal algorithm: (e. Intuitively Kruskal’s works by merging or splicing two trees together. Prim’s algorithm builds the MST by adding leaves one at a time to the current tree.55: Kruskal algorithm: more unsafe edges and final MST Analysis: Since the graph is connected. Total time for union − find is O(Eα(V)) where α(V) is the inverse Ackerman function. 8.5. we may assume that E ≥ V − 1. taking care never to introduce a cycle. the subset of edges A forms a single tree (in Kruskal’s. and inserting them one by one into the spanning tree. Thus the time is dominated by sorting. it formed a forest). MINIMUM SPANNING TREES a a a 149 b e b e b e 18 d 30 c 14 26 g 16 18 d 30 16 18 d 30 f c 26 g f c 26 g f Figure 8.5.

Although possible. there is more elegant solution which leads to a simpler algorithm. Once u is added. Which edge should be added next? The greedy strategy would be to add the lightest edge which in the figure is edge to ’u’.57: Prim’s algorithm: u selected We need an efficient way to update the cut and determine the light edge quickly. we will make use of a priority queue. The question is what do we store in the priority queue? It may seem logical that edges that cross the cut should be stored since we choose light edges from these. Some edges that crossed the cut are no longer crossing it and others that were not crossing the cut are as shown in Figure 8.57 12 10 6 r 7 u 9 5 3 Figure 8. GRAPHS 12 10 6 r 11 4 u 7 5 Figure 8.56: Prim’s algorithm: a cut of the graph Consider the set of vertices S currently part of the tree and its complement (V − S) as shown in Figure 8. We have cut of the graph.150 CHAPTER 8. .56. To do this.

we will assign a color to each vertex. v) < key [v]) 9 then key [v] = w (u.60 illustrate the algorithm applied to a graph. MINIMUM SPANNING TREES 151 For each vertex u ∈ (V − S) (not part of the current spanning tree). v) 10 pq.?.?. PQ: 4.?.?. Here is the algorithm: P RIM((G.8.extract min () 7 for ( each u ∈ adj [u]) 8 do if ( color [v] == white )and( w (u. If there is no edge from u to a vertex in S. The arrows indicate the predecessor pointers and the numeric labels in each vertex is its key value.58: Prim’s algorithm: edge with weight 4 selected . The key[u] is the weight of the lightest edge going from u to any vertex in S.decrease key (v.? 10 10 8 8 2 1 9 ? 7 5 2 6 ? Figure 8. We will also need to know which vertices are in S and which are not.? 10 ? 4 4 9 8 8 2 1 8 ? 9 ? 7 5 2 6 ? 8 8 4 9 PQ: 8. key [v]) 11 pred [v] = u 12 color [u] = black Figures 8. we associate a key key[u]. w. To do this. pq. 5 while ( pq. key [r]).58 through 8. pq. The contents of the priority queue are shown as the algorithm progresses.not empty ()) 6 do u ← pq.10.insert (u. If the color of a vertex is black then it is in S otherwise not. pred [r] ← nil. key[u]) 3 color [u] ← white 4 key [r] ← 0.decrease key (r.5. r)) 1 for ( each u ∈ V) 2 do key [u] ← ∞.8.8. We also store in pred[u] the end vertex of this edge in S. we set the key value to ∞.

10. we spend potentially O(log V) time decreasing the key of the neighboring vertex.2.60: Prim’s algorithm: the final MST Analysis: It takes O(log V) to extract a vertex from the priority queue. Thus the total time is O(log V + deg(u) log V). So the overall running time is T (V.5 10 7 CHAPTER 8.152 PQ: 1.? 10 4 8 2 2 9 1 7 10 6 ? 2 8 4 8 2 2 9 PQ: 2.2. For each incident edge. GRAPHS 5 6 2 2 9 8 5 9 5 1 1 Figure 8.5 10 4 8 7 5 6 2 2 8 4 PQ: <empty> 10 8 7 6 9 8 2 9 5 9 2 9 5 2 1 1 Figure 8.59: Prim’s algorithm: edges with weights 8 and 1 selected PQ: 2. The other steps of update are constant time. E) = u∈V (log V + deg(u) log V) (1 + deg(u)) u∈V = log V = (log V)(V + 2E) = Θ((V + E) log V) .

same as Kruskal’s algorithm.g. Single-destination shortest-paths problem: Find a shortest path to a given destination vertex t from each vertex v. link capacity link delays. Edge weights can be interpreted as distances. Edges are communication links which may be be wire or wireless. Edge weights can be distance. e. . The nodes or vertices represent cities and edges represent roads. . cost. SHORTEST PATHS Since G is connected. Similar scenarios occur in computer networks like the Internet where data packets have to be routed.6. .8. Given a road map of Pakistan on which the distance between each pair of adjacent cities is marked Can the motorist determine the shortest route? In the shortest-paths problem We are given a weighted. Single-source shortest-path problem: Find shortest paths from a given (single) source vertex s ∈ V to every other vertex v ∈ V in the graph G. The vertices are routers. Single-pair shortest-path problem: Find a shortest path from u to v for given vertices u and v. No algorithms for this problem are known to run asymptotically faster than the best single-source algorithms in the worst case. directed graph G = (V. time. 153 8. penalties and loss. v) = min{w(p) : u p v} if there is a path from u to v otherwise Problems such as shortest route between cities can be solved efficiently by modelling the road map as a graph. vi) We define the shortest-path weight from u to v by δ(u. and link utilization. We will cover their definitions and then discuss algorithms for some. we solve this problem also. Other metrics can also be used. The breadth-first-search algorithm we discussed earlier is a shortest-path algorithm that works on un-weighted graphs. We can reduce the this problem to a single-source problem by reversing the direction of each edge in the graph. An un-weighted graph can be considered as a graph in which every edge has weight one unit. ∞ . If we solve the single-source problem with source vertex u. v1. There are a few variants of the shortest path problem.6 Shortest Paths A motorist wishes to find the shortest possible route between Peshawar and Karachi. .. V is asymptotically no greater than E so this is Θ(E log V). link speed. vk > is the sum of the constituent edges: k w(p) = i=1 w(vi−1. E) The weight of path p =< v0.

then you need to update d[v]. if you discover a path from s to v shorter than d[v]. then we can always find a shorter path by going around the cycle one more time. In particular. If there is a negative cycle between. This value will always be greater than or equal to the true shortest path distance from s to v. However. Initially. Moreover. w(u. Consider an edge from a vertex u to v whose weight is w(u. i. This notion is common to many optimization algorithms. if you can see that your solution is not yet reached an optimum value.. By taking . it attempts to update d[v] for each vertex in the graph. then push it a little closer to the optimum. The process of updating estimates is called relaxation. we know of no paths. 8. v) ∈ E. Call this estimate d[v]. E) in which all edge weights are non-negative. Suppose that we have already computed current estimates on d[u] and d[v].. GRAPHS All-pairs shortest-paths problem: Find a shortest path from u to v for every pair of vertices u and v. we will not allow negative cycles because then there is no shortest path. 2 s 5 4 -8 3 1 t Figure 8. d[v] ≥ δ(u.6. say.e. s and t.e. Negative edges weights maybe counter to intuition but this can occur in real life problems. d[v] will the length of the shortest path that the algorithm knows of from s to v. v). Here is how relaxation works.61: Negative weight cycle The basic structure of Dijkstra’s algorithm is to maintain an estimate of the shortest path from the source vertex to each vertex in the graph. We know that there is a path from s to u of weight d[u]. d[s] = 0 for the source vertex. so d[v] = ∞. v) ≥ 0 for each edge (u. Intuitively.1 Dijkstra’s Algorithm Dijkstra’s algorithm is a simple greedy algorithm for computing the single-source shortest-paths to all other vertices. Although this problem can be solved by running a single-source algorithm once from each vertex.154 CHAPTER 8. v). As the algorithm goes on and sees more and more vertices. Intuitively. Dijkstra’s algorithm works on a weighted directed graph G = (V. it can usually be solved faster. I.

so the convergence is as fast as possible. d[v] = δ(s. v) pred[v] = u Observe that whenever we set d[v] to a finite value. v). we justify why this is the proper choice. The cleverness of any shortest path algorithm is to perform the updates in a judicious manner. The algorithm operates by maintaining a subset of vertices. How do we select which vertex among the vertices of V − S to add next to S? Here is greediness comes in. For each vertex u ∈ (V − S).8. SHORTEST PATHS 155 this path and following it with the edge (u. Dijkstra’s algorithm is based on the notion of performing repeated relaxations. take the unprocessed vertex that is closest by our estimate to s. v). for which we claim we know the true distance. v) < d[v]) then d[v] ← d[u] + w(u. Therefore d[v] ≥ δ(s. the d[v] values will eventually converge to the final true distance value from s. S ⊆ V. We set d[u] = 0 and all others to ∞.v)=6 v 2 2 u d[u]=4 Figure 8. v). Later. there is always evidence of a path of that length.63: Vertex v relaxed 1 2 3 if (d[u] + w(u.6. We should also remember that the shortest way back to the source is through u by updating the predecessor pointer. v) we get a path to v of length d[u] + w(u. the empty set. If d[v] = δ(s. then further relaxations cannot change its value. It is not hard to see that if we perform R ELAX ( U . The greedy thing to do is to take the vertex for which d[u] is minimum. In order to perform . V ) repeatedly over all edges of the graph.62: Vertex u relaxed RELAX((u.. v). i. d[v]=10 s 2 t 2 u d[u]=4 Figure 8. we should take it. The relaxation process is illustrated in the following figure. If this path is better than the existing path of length d[v] to v. One by one we select vertices from V − S to add to S.e. we have computed a distance estimate d[u]. v)) 10 2 v s 2 t 10 d[v]=d[u]+w(u. Initially S = ∅.

pred [s] ← nil.156 this selection efficiently. d[u]) 4 d[s] ← 0. 5 while ( pq. we store the vertices of V − S in a priority queue. select 0 1 s 7 0 2 5 3 2 8 4 5 0 s 7 0 2 7 3 2 2 1 8 4 5 5 Figure 8. i.insert (u..e.decrease key (s. Θ(E log V). v) 10 pq. although a different key is used here.decrease key (v. w.64 through ?? demonstrate the algorithm applied to a directed graph with no negative weight edges. GRAPHS Note the similarity with Prim’s algorithm. pq. s)) 1 for ( each u ∈ V) 2 do d[u] ← ∞ 3 pq.not empty ()) 6 do u ← pq. v) < d[v]) 9 then d[v] = d[u] + w(u. Therefore the running time is the same. d[v]) 11 pred [v] = u CHAPTER 8.64: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 0 . d[s]). D IJKSTRA((G.extract min () 7 for ( each v ∈ adj[u]) 8 do if (d[u] + w(u. Figures 8.

6. SHORTEST PATHS 157 select 2 7 0 2 7 3 2 2 1 8 4 5 2 s 7 0 2 5 5 3 2 2 1 8 10 4 5 7 s 5 Figure 8.8.67: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 6 .65: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 2 select 5 7 0 2 5 3 2 2 1 8 10 4 5 7 5 s 0 2 7 5 3 2 2 1 8 6 4 5 7 s 5 5 Figure 8.66: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 5 select 6 7 0 2 5 3 2 2 1 8 6 4 5 7 6 s 0 2 7 5 3 2 2 1 8 6 4 5 7 s 5 5 Figure 8.

u). after which d(v) = δ(s. Then p(s. and we can transfer u from V to S. u). We will use the definition that δ(s. s) Assume that d(v) = δ(s. The shortest path from s to u. which is δ(s. If d(u) ≤ d(u ) for every u ∈ V then d(u) = δ(s. GRAPHS select 7 7 0 2 5 3 2 2 1 8 6 4 5 7 7 s 5 Figure 8. u). S = {s} 2. must pass through one or more vertices exterior to S. Let x be the last vertex inside S and y be the first vertex outside S on this path to u. u). v) for every v ∈ S. y)} ∪ p(y. v) denotes the minimal distance from s to v.6. v) for every v ∈ S and all neighbors of v have been relaxed. p(s. We do this as a proof by contradiction. x) ∪ {(x. .158 CHAPTER 8. Suppose that d(u) > δ(s.68: Dijkstra’s algorithm: select 7 fig:dijlast 8. d(s) = 0. u) = p(s.2 Correctness of Dijkstra’s Algorithm We will prove the correctness of Dijkstr’s algorithm by Induction. For the base case 1.

The algorithm is slower than Dijkstra’s. d(y) = δ(s. Bellman-Ford applies relaxation to every edge of the graph and repeats this V − 1 times. But. Since d(u) > δ(s. u). u) is false. Like Dijkstra’s algorithm. u) is δ(s.69: Correctness of Dijkstra’s algorithm The length of p(s. Because y was relaxed when x was put into S. transferring from V to S. By the upper bound property. The only possibility is d(u) = d(y). which requires d(u) = δ(s. SHORTEST PATHS 159 u S s x y Figure 8.6. v) 8. which is what we wanted to prove. because d(u) is the smallest among vertices not in S. Bellman-Ford is based on performing repeated relaxations. the vertex in V with the smallest value of d(u) then all vertices in S have d(v) = δ(s.8. u). u) contradicting the assumption. Bellman-Ford allows negative weights edges and no negative cost cycles. u). its is . running in Θ(VE) time. d(u) ≤ d(y) . Here is the algorithm. Thus. u) ≤ d(u). Thus d(y) ≤ δ(s. y) by the convergence property. if we follow the algorithm’s procedure. d(u) ≥ δ(s. y) + δ(y.3 Bellman-Ford Algorithm Dijkstra’s single-source shortest path algorithm works if all edges weights are non-negative and there are no negative cost cycles. u) = δ(s. d(u) = δ(s.6.

the true shortest path cost from s . Since this a shortest path. . B ELLMAN -F ORD(G. v1. GRAPHS 8 s 0 4 3 2 8 s 0 1 8 -6 -6 4 8 -6 4 5 2 7 5 4 5 4 8 -6 9 5 2 8 s 0 8 s 0 4 Figure 8. 6 for i = 1 to V − 1 7 do for ( each (u. it is δ(s. . vi). Hence the path consists of at most V − 1 edges. Since a shortest path will never visit the same vertex twice. v) in E ) 8 do RELAX(u. w. vk where v0 = s and vk = u. v) CHAPTER 8. Consider any shortest path from s to some other vertex u: v0.6. The shortest path information is propagated sequentially along each shortest path in the graph.4 Correctness of Bellman-Ford Think of Bellman-Ford as a sort of bubble-sort analog for shortest path. .70.160 illustrated in Figure 8. s) 1 for ( each u ∈ V) 2 do d[u] ← ∞ 3 pred[u] = nil 4 5 d[s] ← 0. . we know that k ≤ V − 1.70: The Bellman-Ford algorithm 8.

j) ∈ E if i = j and (i. E) be a directed graph with edge weights. where dij = δ(i. we will employ the common matrix notation. We will present an Θ(n3) algorithm for the all pairs shortest path. 161 In general. v) ∈ E is an edge then w(u.6. SHORTEST PATHS to vi that satisfies the equation: δ(s. . v) denotes its weight. all vertices u have correct distance values stored in d[u]. Thus. d[vi] is in fact equal to δ(s. d[v1] = d[s] = 0. vi) = δ(s. j)   ∞ if i = j if i = j and (i. we have done relaxation on the edge (vi−1. This is called the all-pairs shortest paths problem. prior to the ith pass through the loop. vi) Claim: We assert that after the ith pass of the “for-i” loop. vi). all vertices that are i edges away along the shortest path tree from the source have the correct values stored in d[u].8. vi) = δ(s. vi). The algorithm is called the Floyd-Warshall algorithm and is based on dynamic programming. Proof: The proof is by induction on i. j).6. vi) = δ(s. vi). the shortest path cost from vertex i to j. This completes the induction proof. In summary. v and w. Let G = (V. We will allow G to have negative edges weights but will not allow G to have negative cost cycles. If (u. vi) (since we do relaxation along all edges). After the ith pass. Observe that after the initialization (pass 0). v) is the distance of the minimum cost path between u and v. vi−1). Because the algorithm is matrix based. using i. vi−1) + w(vi−1. j and k to denote vertices rather than u. 8. vi−1) + w(vi−1. Thus. The input is an n × n matrix of edge weights:  0  wij = w(i. vi) Recall from Dijkstra’s algorithm that d[vi] is never less than δ(s. We will use an adjacency matrix to represent the digraph. after the (V − 1)st iteration of the for loop. the induction hypothesis tells us that d[vi−1] = δ(s. Thus after the ith pass we have d[vi] ≤ d[vi−1] + w(vi−1. j) ∈ E The output will be an n × n distance matrix D = dij. d[vi] = δ(s. δ(u.5 Floyd-Warshall Algorithm We consider the generalization of the shortest path problem: to compute the shortest paths between all pairs of vertices. after i passes through the for loop.

the length of the path is (k−1) (k−1) dik + dkj . . The following illustrate the process in which the value of dk is updated as k goes from 0 to 4.2 . For a path p = v1. 2. . so we can assume that we pass through k exactly once. k − 1}. . 3. k}. . vl. . . the genius of the algorithm is in the clever recursive formulation of the shortest path problem. . . . That is. . . (k) dij i (k-1) j vertices i to k-1 dik (k-1) k dkj (k-1) Figure 8. . v2. vl−1 are the intermediate vertices of this path. . Do go through vertex k. we should take the shortest path from i to k and the shortest path from k to j. . . As with other dynamic programming algorithms.71: Two cases for all-pairs shortest path Don’t go through k at all Then the shortest path from i to j uses only intermediate vertices {1. . . Since each of these paths uses intermediate vertices {1. How do we compute dij assuming we already have the previous matrix d(k−1)? There are two basic cases: 1. 2. we say that the vertices v2. In order for the overall path to be as short as possible. Hence the length of (k−1) the shortest is dij Do go through k First observe that a shortest path does not go through the same vertex twice. we go from i to k and then from k to j. . v3. Formulation: Define dij to be the shortest path from i to j such that any intermediate vertices on the path are chosen from the set {1. GRAPHS The algorithm dates back to the early 60’s.162 CHAPTER 8. . Don’t go through vertex k at all. k − 1}. 2. The path is free to visit any subset of these vertices and in any (k) order. 2. .

2 = 12 (3 → 1 → 2) (2) 1 8 2 2 4 2 3 Figure 8. d3.75: k = 3. d3.2 = ∞ (no path) (0) 1 8 2 2 4 2 3 Figure 8.73: k = 1.2 = 12 (3 → 1 → 2) (1) 4 1 4 8 2 2 1 1 1 1 4 2 3 Figure 8. d3.2 = 12 (3 → 1 → 2) (3) 4 1 4 8 2 2 1 1 .8. SHORTEST PATHS 163 1 1 4 2 3 Figure 8.74: k = 2.72: k = 0.6. d3.

j] ← null 4 for (k = 1. The algorithm also includes mid-vertex pointers stored in mid[i.. j] < d[i. As is the case with DP algorithms. w[1.. k] + d[k.k indicates that it was updated in the current k iteration. j] = d[i.n]) 1 for (i = 1. j] for extracting the final path. GRAPHS 1 1 4 2 3 Figure 8. 1. the running time is Θ(n3). F LOYD -WARSHALL(n. n) 5 do for (i = 1. The matrix to left of the graph contains the matrix d entries. j]) 7 8 then d[i. n) 6 do for (j = 1. we will avoid recursive evaluation by generating a table for dij . j]. j] ← w[i. n) do if (d[i.164 CHAPTER 8. d3. n) 3 do d[i.n. j] 9 mid[i. j] = k (k) Clearly.77 through 8.81 demonstrate the algorithm when applied to a graph. k] + d[k.2 = 7 (3 → 1 → 4 → 2) dij = wij dij = min dij (n) (k) (k−1) (0) (4) 4 8 2 2 1 This suggests the following recursive (DP) formulation: . dik (k−1) + dkj (k−1) The final answer is dij because this allows all possible vertices as intermediate vertices. mid[i. . The space used by the algorithm is Θ(n2). n) 2 do for (j = 1. Figure 8. A circle around an entry di.76: k = 4.

78: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d(1) .8. SHORTEST PATHS 165 1 0 8 0 4 2 1 0 9 0 9 3 1 1 4 1 4 2 8 2 d (0) Figure 8.6.77: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d(0) 1 0 8 0 4 12 2 1 0 9 5 0 5 9 3 1 12 1 4 1 4 2 8 2 d (1) Figure 8.

79: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d(2) 7 0 5 4 7 8 0 12 2 9 1 0 3 1 6 5 0 5 1 4 6 1 4 5 8 2 9 2 12 3 1 d (2) 3 Figure 8. GRAPHS 1 0 8 0 4 12 2 9 1 0 3 5 0 5 3 3 1 1 4 9 1 12 4 2 8 2 d (2) Figure 8.166 CHAPTER 8.80: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d(3) .

j] and the shortest path from mid[i. If it is null. we set mid[i. then the shortest path is just the edge (i. j). Otherwise we recursively compute the shortest path from i to mid[i.81: Floyd-Warshall Algorithm example: d(4) Extracting Shortest Path: The matrix d holds the final shortest distance between pairs of vertices. j] = null. j) 3 else PATH(i. In order to compute the shortest path.8.6. j]. j] == null) 2 then output(i. we consult mid[i. j]) 4 PATH(mid[i. If the shortest path did not pass through k then mid[i. PATH(i. j] to j. the mid-vertex pointers mid[i. j] = k. SHORTEST PATHS 167 7 0 5 4 7 3 0 7 2 4 1 0 3 1 1 6 5 0 5 4 6 1 4 5 3 2 4 2 7 3 1 d (4) 3 Figure 8. j]. To find the shortest path from i to j. j) . Whenever we discovered that the shortest path from i to j passed through vertex k. j) 1 if (mid[i. j] can be used to extract the final path. mid[i.

GRAPHS .168 CHAPTER 8.

perhaps n n. All of this is fine if it helps you discover an acceptably efficient algorithm to solve your problem. By the end of 60’s. Instead we will be trying to show that a problem cannot be solved efficiently. then you could solve all of them in polynomial time. The question that often arises in practice is that you have tried every trick in the book and nothing seems to work. This area is a radical departure from what we have been doing because the emphasis will change. or n! or worse!. Although your algorithm can solve small problems reasonably efficiently (e. People began to wonder whether there was some unknown paradigm that would lead to a solution to there problems. A problem is solvable in polynomial time if there is a polynomial time algorithm for it. The goal is no longer to prove that a problem can be solved efficiently by presenting an algorithm for it. Near the end of the 1960’s. Hopefully you have a better idea of how to go about solving such problems. greedy. What sort of design paradigm should be used: divide-and-conquer. a remarkable discovery was made.. Or perhaps some proof that these problems are inherently hard to solve and no algorithmic solutions exist that run under exponential time. graphs. Up until now all algorithms we have seen had the property that their worst-case running time are bounded above by some polynomial in n. this discovery gave rise to the notion of NP-completeness. Some functions that do look like polynomials are not. or 22 . Many of these hard problems were interrelated in the sense that if you could solve any one of them in polynomial time. For example. n ≤ 20). heaps. What sort of data structures might be relevant: trees. What is the running time of the algorithm. for the really large problems you want to solve. But there was also a growing list of problems for which there seemed to be no known efficient algorithmic solutions. A polynomial time algorithm is any algorithm that runs in O(nk) time. there was great success in finding efficient solutions to many combinatorial problems. When you analyze its running √ n time.Chapter 9 Complexity Theory So far in the course. or 2n.g. dynamic programming. your algorithm never terminates. Some functions that do not look like polynomials (such as O(n log n) are bounded above by polynomials (such as O(n2)). you realize that it is running in exponential time. suppose you have 169 . we have been building up a “bag of tricks” for solving algorithmic problems.

We will generally refer to these problems as being “easy” or “efficiently solvable”. it does not have to be in the class NP. Class NP: This is the set of all decision problems that can be verified in polynomial time. then the more general optimization problem certainly cannot be solved efficiently either. because k is an input to the problem so the user is allowed to choose k = n. does G have a spanning tree whose weight is at most k? This may seem like a less interesting formulation of the problem. Class NP: The term “NP” does not mean “not polynomial”. Class P: This is the set of all decision problems that can be solved in polynomial time. Originally. Note that for a problem to NP-hard.2 Complexity Classes Before giving all the technical definitions. the NP-complete problems we will discuss will be phrased as decision problems. A problem is called a decision problem if its output is a simple “yes” or “no” (or you may this of this as true/false. Rather. 9. accept/reject. O(nn) is surely not a polynomial in n. Class NP-hard: In spite of its name. It does not ask for the weight of the minimum spanning tree. COMPLEXITY THEORY an algorithm that takes as input a graph of size n and an integer k and run in O(nk) time. 9. it means that if we could solve this problem in polynomial time. implying that the running time would be O(nn). the term meant “ non-deterministic polynomial” but it is a bit more intuitive to explain the concept from the perspective of verification.1 Decision Problems Most of the problems we have discussed involve optimization of one form of another.) We will phrase may optimization problems as decision problems. For example. and it does not even ask for the edges of the spanning tree that achieves this weight. It also contains a number of problems that are believed to be very “ hard” to solve. If we show that the simple decision problem cannot be solved e¡ciently.170 CHAPTER 9. For rather technical reasons. Is this a polynomial time algorithm? No. let us say a bit about what the general classes look like at an intuitive level. find the minimum cost spanning tree. . the MST decision problem would be: Given a weighted graph G and an integer k. maximize the knapsack value. The important aspect is that the exponent must be a constant independent of n. 0/1. to say that a problem is NP-hard does not mean that it is hard to solve. However. our job will be to show that certain problems cannot be solved efficiently. then we could solve all NP problems in polynomial time. Find the shortest path. This class contains P as a subset.

Consider the Hamiltonian cycle problem. We say might because we do not know whether all of these complexity classes are distinct or whether they are all solvable in polynomial time. The Graph Isomorphism. but it is not known to be in P. POLYNOMIAL TIME VERIFICATION Class NP-complete: A problem is NP-complete if (1) it is in NP and (2) it is NP-hard. It is known that this problem is in NP. which asks whether two graphs are identical up to a renaming of their vertices. Quantified Boolean Formulas No Hamiltonian cycle NP-hard 0/1 knapsack Hamiltonian cycle Satisfiability Graph Isomorphism MST Strong connectivity NPC NP P Figure 9. which stands for Quantified Boolean Formulas. . The other is QBF. NP. Given an undirected graph G.3 Polynomial Time Verification Before talking about the class of NP-complete problems.1 illustrates one way that the sets P.3.1: Complexity Classes 9. Many problems are hard to solve but they have the property that it easy to verify the solution if one is provided. it is important to introduce the notion of a verification algorithm. 171 The Figure 9. does G have a cycle that visits every vertex exactly once? There is no known polynomial time algorithm for this problem. NP-hard.9. In this problem you are given a boolean formula and you want to know whether the formula is true or false. and NP-complete (NPC) might look.

consider the following two: 1. even though we know of no efficient way to solve the Hamiltonian cycle problem.2: Hamiltonian Cycle However. v1. Thus it is hard to imagine that someone could give us some information that would allow us to efficiently verify that the graph is in UHC. It would be easy for someone to convince of this. there is a very efficient way to verify that a a given cycle is indeed a Hamiltonian cycle. COMPLEXITY THEORY Non-Hamiltonian Hamiltonian Figure 9.172 CHAPTER 9. UHC = {(G)|G has a unique Hamiltonian cycle} 2. They would simply say: “the cycle is v3. 9. . Note that not all problems have the property that they are easy to verify. What information would someone give us that would allow us to verify this? They could give us an example of the unique Hamiltonian cycle and we could verify that it is a Hamiltonian cycle.4 The Class NP The class NP is a set of all problems that can be verified by a polynomial time algorithm. They could try to list every other cycle of length n. Why is the set called “NP” and not “VP”? The original term NP stood for non-deterministic polynomial time. For example. . v7. But what sort of certificate could they give us to convince us that this is the only one? They could give another cycle that is not Hamiltonian. HC = {(G)|G has no Hamiltonian cycle} Suppose that a graph G is in UHC. but this is not efficient at all since there are n! possible cycles in general. Thus. v13 We could then inspect the graph and check that this is indeed a legal cycle and that it visits all of the vertices of the graph exactly once. But this does not mean that there is not another cycle somewhere that is Hamiltonian. The piece of information that allows verification is called a certificate. suppose that a graph did have a Hamiltonian cycle. . . This .

In other words. We have avoided introducing non-determinism here.3. More formally. It is well known that planar graphs can be colored (maps) with four colors. Two countries that share a common border should be colored with different colors. and then verify it in polynomial time. Such a computer could non-deterministically guess the value of the certificate. It seems unreasonable to think that this should be so. However.5 Reductions The class NP-complete (NPC) problems consists of a set of decision problems (a subset of class NP) that no one knows how to solve efficiently. Being able to verify that you have a correct solution does not help you in finding the actual solution. can each of its vertices be labelled with one of 3 different colors such that two adjacent vertices have the same label (color). A and B. For this. . it is covered in other courses such as automata or complexity theory. if we can solve a problem in polynomial time. we do not need to see a certificate to solve the problem. The term “coloring” comes from the original application which was in map drawing. we can certainly verify the solution in polynomial time. 9. But if there were a polynomial solution for even a single NP-complete problem.9. we need the concept of reductions. we can solve it in polynomial time anyway.5. then ever problem in NPC will be solvable in polynomial time. You want to prove that B cannot be solved in polynomial time. We want to show that (A ∈ P) ⇒ (B ∈ P) How would you do this? Consider an example to illustrate reduction: The following problem is well-known to be NPC: 3-color: Given a graph G. Observe that P ⊆ NP. Consider the question: Suppose there are two problems. Coloring arises in various partitioning problems where there is a constraint that two objects cannot be assigned to the same set of partitions. You know (or you strongly believe at least) that it is impossible to solve problem A in polynomial time. it is not known whether P = NP. the graph on the left can be colored with 3 colors while the graph on the right cannot be colored. In Figure 9. REDUCTIONS 173 referred to a program running on a non-deterministic computer that can make guesses. The belief is that P = NP but no one has a proof for this. There exists a polynomial time algorithm for this. But determining whether this can be done with 3 colors is hard and there is no polynomial time algorithm for it.

Because of predator-prey relationships. E. This is depicted in Figure 9. F F D. some fish can be kept in the same tank. COMPLEXITY THEORY 3-Colorable Not 3-colorable Figure 9. there is an edge between A and B and between A and C. E D C. For example. The following table shows which fish cannot be together: Type Cannot be with A B. and F. D F. A cannot be with B and C. D. C B. B. C. C B A .174 CHAPTER 9. What is the smallest number of tanks needed to keep all the fish? The answer can be found by coloring the vertices in the graph such that no two adjacent vertices have the same color. B. respectively.C. This is shown in Figure 9. water conditions and size. D. E C A. 3 fish tanks are enough. C.4. Given these constraints.5. E These constraints can be displayed as a graph where an edge between two vertices exists if the two species cannot be together. This particular graph is 3-colorable and therefore.3: Examples of 3-colorable and non-3-colorable graphs Example1: Fish tank problem Consider the following problem than can be solved with the graph coloring approach. A tropical fish hobbyist has six different types of fish designated by A. The 3 fish tanks will hold fish as follows: Tank 1 Tank 2 Tank 3 A. F E B. E .

v) ∈ V That is. .6: Graph with clique cover of size 3 . Clique Cover: Given a graph G and an integer k. For our problem B.4: Graph representing constraints beFigure 9. can we find k subsets of vertices V1.5: Fish tank graph colored with 3 colors tween fish species The 3-color (3Col) problem will the play the role of A. the subgraph induced by V is a complete graph. such that i Vi = V. Vk. . . and that each Vi is a clique of G. V2. REDUCTIONS 175 A E B F C D F E A B C D Figure 9. the edge (u. which we strongly suspect to not be solvable in polynomial time. There are three subgraphs that are complete. v ∈ V . E).5. Clique cover (size=3) Figure 9. we say that a subset of vertices V ⊆ V forms a clique if for every pair of vertices u. The following figure shows a graph that has a clique cover of size 3. . consider the following problem: Given a graph G = (V.9.

We put an edge between two nodes if they are similar enough to be clustered in the same group. In the 3-coloring problem. We claim that we can reduce the 3-coloring problem into the clique cover problem as follows: Given a graph G for which we want to determine its 3-colorability. Thus. COMPLEXITY THEORY The clique cover problem arises in applications of clustering. You feel that there is some connection between the CCov problem and the 3Col problem. We want to know whether it is possible to cluster all the vertices into k groups. the problems are almost the same but the adjacency requirements are exactly reversed. experts believe that 3Col ∈ P. for two vertices to be in the same group. the graph G in Figure 9. 3) into a routine for clique cover. you want to show that (3Col ∈ P) ⇒ (CCov ∈ P) Both problems involve partitioning the vertices into groups. In the clique cover problem. they must be adjacent to each other. G G 3-Colorable Coverable by 3 cliques Figure 9. you still cannot find a polynomial time algorithm for the CCov problem.176 CHAPTER 9. for two vertices to be in the same color group. they must not be adjacent. Feed the pair (G. 3) where G denotes the complement of G. 3) . 3) is coverable by 3 cliques. it is also not coverable by cliques.8 is not 3-colorable. Suppose that you want to solve the CCov problem. For example. But after a while of fruitless effort. output the pair (G.7 is 3-colorable and its complement (G.7: 3-colorable G and clique coverable (G. In some sense. The graph G in Figure 9. How can you prove that CCov is likely to not have a polynomial time solution? You know that 3Col is NP-complete and hence.

. 3) is not clique coverable 9. we have f(G) = (G. .9. x ∈ L1 if and only if f(x) ∈ L2.8: G is not 3-colorable and (G. then L2 is also not likely to be solvable in polynomial time. if any one is not solvable in polynomial time.7 NP-Completeness The set of NP-complete problems is all problems in the complexity class NP for which it is known that if any one is solvable in polynomial time.6. The way this is used in NP-completeness is that we have strong evidence that L1 is not solvable in polynomial time. POLYNOMIAL TIME REDUCTION 177 H H Not 3-colorable Not coverable Figure 9. For example. the reduction is effectively equivalent to saying that “since L1 is not likely to be solvable in polynomial time. then none are. 3). It is easy to complement a graph in O(n2) (i. In the previous example we showed that 3Col ≤P CCov In particular. Conversely. 9. Hence.6 Polynomial Time Reduction Definition: We say that a decision problem L1 is polynomial-time reducible to decision problem L2 (written L1 ≤p L2) if there is polynomial time computable function f such that for all x.e. Definition: A decision problem L is NP-Hard if L ≤P L for all L ∈ NP. then they all are. polynomial time). flip the 0’s and 1’s in the adjacency matrix.

178 Definition: L is NP-complete if 1. L ∈ NP and

CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY

2. L ≤P L for some known NP-complete problem L .

Given this formal definition, the complexity classes are: P: is the set of decision problems that are solvable in polynomial time. NP: is the set of decision problems that can be verified in polynomial time. NP-Hard: L is NP-hard if for all L ∈ NP, L ≤P L. Thus if we could solve L in polynomial time, we could solve all NP problems in polynomial time. NP-Complete L is NP-complete if 1. L ∈ NP and

2. L is NP-hard.

The importance of NP-complete problems should now be clear. If any NP-complete problem is solvable in polynomial time, then every NP-complete problem is also solvable in polynomial time. Conversely, if we can prove that any NP-complete problem cannot be solved in polynomial time, the every NP-complete problem cannot be solvable in polynomial time.

9.8

Boolean Satisfiability Problem: Cook’s Theorem

We need to have at least one NP-complete problem to start the ball rolling. Stephen Cook showed that such a problem existed. He proved that the boolean satisfiability problem is NP-complete. A boolean formula is a logical formulation which consists of variables xi. These variables appear in a logical expression using logical operations 1. negation of x: x 2. boolean or: (x ∨ y) 3. boolean and: (x ∧ y) For a problem to be in NP, it must have an efficient verification procedure. Thus virtually all NP problems can be stated in the form, “does there exists X such that P(X)”, where X is some structure (e.g. a set, a path, a partition, an assignment, etc.) and P(X) is some property that X must satisfy (e.g. the set of objects must fill the knapsack, or the path must visit every vertex, or you may use at most k colors and no two adjacent vertices can have the same color). In showing that such a problem is in NP, the certificate consists of giving X, and the verification involves testing that P(X) holds.

9.8. BOOLEAN SATISFIABILITY PROBLEM: COOK’S THEOREM

179

In general, any set X can be described by choosing a set of objects, which in turn can be described as choosing the values of some boolean variables. Similarly, the property P(X) that you need to satisfy, can be described as a boolean formula. Stephen Cook was looking for the most general possible property he could, since this should represent the hardest problem in NP to solve. He reasoned that computers (which represent the most general type of computational devices known) could be described entirely in terms of boolean circuits, and hence in terms of boolean formulas. If any problem were hard to solve, it would be one in which X is an assignment of boolean values (true/false, 0/1) and P(X) could be any boolean formula. This suggests the following problem, called the boolean satisfiability problem. SAT: Given a boolean formula, is there some way to assign truth values (0/1, true/false) to the variables of the formula, so that the formula evaluates to true? A boolean formula is a logical formula which consists of variables xi , and the logical operations x meaning the negation of x, boolean-or (x ∨ y) and boolean-and (x ∧ y). Given a boolean formula, we say that it is satisfiable if there is a way to assign truth values (0 or 1) to the variables such that the final result is 1. (As opposed to the case where no matter how you assign truth values the result is always 0.) For example (x1 ∧ (x2 ∨ x3)) ∧ ((x2 ∧ x3) ∨ x1) is satisfiable, by the assignment x1 = 1, x2 = 0 and x3 = 0. On the other hand, (x1 ∨ (x2 ∧ x3)) ∧ (x1 ∨ (x2 ∧ x3)) ∧ (x2 ∨ x3) ∧ (x2 ∨ x3) is not satisfiable. Such a boolean formula can be represented by a logical circuit made up of OR, AND and NOT gates. For example, Figure 9.9 shows the circuit for the boolean formula ((x1 ∧ x4) ∨ x2) ∧ ((x3 ∧ x4) ∨ x2) ∧ x5

x1

x2 x3 x4 x5
Figure 9.9: Logical circuit for a boolean formula

180 Cook’s Theorem: SAT is NP-complete

CHAPTER 9. COMPLEXITY THEORY

We will not prove the theorem; it is quite complicated. In fact, it turns out that a even more restricted version of the satisfiability problem is NP-complete. A literal is a variable x or its negation x. A boolean formula is in 3-Conjunctive Normal Form (3-CNF) if it is the boolean-and of clauses where each clause is the boolean-or of exactly three literals. For example, (x1 ∨ x2 ∨ x3) ∧ (x1 ∨ x3 ∨ x4) ∧ (x2 ∨ x3 ∨ x4) is in 3-CNF form. 3SAT is the problem of determining whether a formula is 3-CNF is satisfiable. 3SAT is NP-complete. We can use this fact to prove that other problems are NP-complete. We will do this with the independent set problem. Independent Set Problem: Given an undirected graph G = (V, E) and an integer k, does G contain a subset V of k vertices such that no two vertices in V are adjacent to each other.

Independent set of size 4
Figure 9.10: The independent set problem arises when there is some sort of selection problem where there are mutual restrictions pairs that cannot both be selected. For example, a company dinner where an employee and his or her immediate supervisor cannot both be invited. Claim: IS is NP-complete The proof involves two parts. First, we need to show that IS ∈ NP. The certificate consists of k vertices of V . We simply verify that for each pair of vertices u, v ∈ V , there is no edge between them. Clearly, this can be done in polynomial time, by an inspection of the adjacency matrix. Second, we need to establish that IS is NP-hard This can be done by showing that some known NP-compete (3SAT) is polynomial-time reducible to IS. That is, 3SAT ≤P IS.

The idea is to translate the similar elements of the satisfiable problem to corresponding elements of the independent set problem. The vertices will be in clause clusters of three. We will set k equal to the number of clauses. or equivalently. Selecting a true literal from some clause will correspond to selecting a vertex to add to V .TO -IS(F) 1 k ← number of clauses in F 2 for ( each clause C in F ) 3 do create a clause cluster of 4 3 vertices from literals of C 5 for ( each clause cluster (x1. Requirements: 3SAT: Each clause must contain at least one true valued literal. A formal description of the reduction is given below. What is to be selected? 3SAT: Which variables are to be assigned the value true. To keep the IS subroutine from selecting two literals from one clause and none from some other. x3) ) 6 do create an edge (xi. IS: V must contain at least k vertices. Restrictions: 3SAT: If xi is assigned true. to force the independent set subroutine to select one true literal from each clause. and the output is a graph G and integer k.9. which literals will be true and which will be false. IS: Which vertices will be placed in V . then xi must be false and vice versa. xj) between 7 all pairs of vertices in the cluster 8 for ( each vertex xi ) 9 do create an edge between xi and 10 all its complement vertices xi . k) such that the above elements are translated properly.8. BOOLEAN SATISFIABILITY PROBLEM: COOK’S THEOREM 181 An important aspect to reductions is that we do not attempt to solve the satisfiability problem. we will connect all the vertices in each clause cluster with edges. and there is not likely to be any polynomial time solution. converts it into a pair (G. Remember: It is NP-complete. we will put an edge between each literal and its complement. To keep the IS subroutine from selecting a literal and its complement to be true. Our strategy will be to turn each literal into a vertex. 3SAT. IS: If u is selected to be in V and v is a neighbor of u then v cannot be in V . The input is a boolean formula F in 3-CNF. We want a function which given any 3-CNF boolean formula F . x2. one for each clause.

it is an easy programming exercise to create G (say as an adjacency matrix) in polynomial time. This is shown in Figure 9. We claim that F is satisfiable if and only if G has an independent set of size k. .182 11 return (G. COMPLEXITY THEORY If F has k clauses. each term is connected to its complement. Given any reasonable encoding of F . Example: Suppose that we are given the 3-CNF formula: (x1 ∨ x2 ∨ x3) ∧ (x1 ∨ x2 ∨ x3) ∧ (x1 ∨ x2 ∨ x3) ∧ (x1 ∨ x2 ∨ x3) The following series of figures show the reduction which produces the graph and sets k = 4. k) // output is graph G and integer k CHAPTER 9. one for each of the 3-terms literal Next. First. then G has exactly 3k vertices.11 x1 x1 x2 x3 x1 x2 x3 x1 x2 x3 x2 x3 Figure 9.12. This is shown in Figure 9. each of the four literals is converted into a three-vertices graph.11: Four graphs.

Because we take vertices from each cluster.13.13: Independent set corresponding to x1 = 1.8. By selecting vertices corresponding to true literals in each clause. x1 x1 x2 x3 x1 x2 x3 x1 x2 x3 x2 x3 Figure 9. Let V denote the corresponding vertices from each of the clause clusters (one from each cluster). there are .9.12: Each term is connected to its complement The boolean formula is satisfied by the assignment x1 = 1. then each of the k clauses of F must have at least one true literal. x2 = 1 x3 = 0 Correctness Proof: We claim that F is satisfiable if and only if G has an independent set of size k. This implies that the first literal of the first and last clauses are 1. the second literal of the second clause is 1. If F is satisfiable. BOOLEAN SATISFIABILITY PROBLEM: COOK’S THEOREM 183 x1 x1 x2 x3 x1 x2 x3 x1 x2 x3 x2 x3 Figure 9. we get an independent set of size k = 4. and the third literal of the third clause is 1. This is shown in Figure 9. x2 = 1 x3 = 0.

Finally the transformation clearly runs in polynomial time. and we cannot take two vertices from the same cluster (because they are all interconnected). we cannot simply give up at this point. Since these are important problems.184 CHAPTER 9. Conversely. V is an independent set of size k. Consider the assignment in which we set all of these literals to 1. Thus. . COMPLEXITY THEORY no inter-cluster edges between them. Computing the solution to either will require exponential time. Instead. Branch-and-bound. the reduction simple translated the input from one problem into an equivalent input to the other problem. there can be no edge of the form (xi. Heuristics: A heuristic is a strategy for producing a valid solution but there are no guarantees how close it to optimal. This assignment is logically consistent. simulated annealing. This completes the NP-completeness proof. Also observe that the the reduction had no knowledge of the solution to either problem. since people do need solutions to these problems. General search methods: Powerful techniques for solving general combinatorial optimization problems. because there are k clusters. and because we cannot set a variable and its complement to both be true. and genetic algorithms Approximation algorithm: This is an algorithm that runs in polynomial time (ideally) and produces a solution that is within a guaranteed factor of the optimal solution.9 Coping with NP-Completeness With NP-completeness we have seen that there are many important optimization problems that are likely to be quite hard to solve exactly. 9. This is worthwhile if all else fails. A*-search. xi) between the vertices of V . because we cannot have two vertices labelled xi and xi in the same cluster. First observe that we must select a vertex from each clause cluster. Here are some strategies that are used to cope with NP-completeness: Use brute-force search: Even on the fastest parallel computers this approach is viable only for the smallest instance of these problems. G has an independent set V of size k.

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