You are on page 1of 1

Statement from NIH to The Fact Checker, May 19, 2021:

NIH has never approved any grant to support “gain-of-func on” research on
coronaviruses that would have increased their transmissibility or lethality for
humans. The research proposed in the EcoHealth Alliance, Inc. grant
applica on sought to understand how bat coronaviruses evolve naturally in
the environment to become transmissible to the human popula on. This
included studying viral diversity in bat reservoirs, surveying people that live in
high-risk communi es for evidence of bat-coronavirus infec on and analyzing
data to predict which newly discovered viruses pose the greatest threat to
human health. The applica on did not propose research to enhance any
coronavirus to be more transmissible or virulent in humans. The applica on
was subjected to rigorous peer review and was judged to be very high priority,
given how SARS-CoV had already emerged in this bat popula on.
In 2014, the U.S. Government ini ated a funding pause for a subset of gain-of-
func on research that could be reasonably an cipated to confer a ributes to
in uenza, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), or SARS viruses such that
the virus would have enhanced pathogenicity or transmissibility in mammals
via the respiratory route. Following the ini a on of the pause, this grant was
reviewed again and determined by experts to fall outside the scope of the
funding pause. The grant applica on proposal also did not meet the de ni on
of research involving an enhanced poten al pandemic pathogen as de ned in
the 2017 HHS Framework (research that is reasonably an cipated to create,
transfer, or use PPPs resul ng from the enhancement of a pathogen’s
transmissibility or virulence in humans).
fl
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti
ti

ti
ti
ti
ti

ti
ti
ti
ti
ti

tt
fi
fi
ti
ti

You might also like