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March 19, 2011 - March 19, 2011, The Afro-American A1 $1.00

MARCH 19, 2011 - MARCH 25, 2011

Developers Vow to Preserve Read’s Outer Walls
buildings, said the redevelopment plan would still demolish several precious structures. “Read’s is certainly a signature building, but The developers of the West downtown it is a part of a block of buildings with civil development project that would revitalize the rights heritage,” he told the AFRO. “We would “Superblock” said this week that they will like to see additional buildings preserved to tell preserve the exterior walls of Read’s Drug that story.” Store and several other historical structures. Officials say the development will help The project garnered attention recently restore the block, which was once a bustling as preservationists and community members retail destination and create employment urged the city to halt development plans for opportunities. According to the Baltimore project to save the drug store, which was the Development Corp., the project will generate site of a civil rights sit-in orchestrated by upwards of 600 immediate construction jobs Morgan State University students in 1955. and 750 permanent jobs. It will also stream in In a statement, $18 million in sales Mayor Stephanie taxes and $2.3 million Rawlings-Blake in real estate taxes a said the building’s year. interior – which “Without new is deteriorating – housing and new has suffered from retail, the Howard “decades of remodels” street corridor ~ Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake will suffer, with and “ultimately its abandonment.” ramifications for She added that the developers, Lexington the greater Downtown area,” Kirby Fowler, Square Partners LLC, have agreed to keep president of the Downtown Partnership of the exterior walls intact and will release Baltimore, said in a prepared statement. further details in coming weeks. “This is a The site, which would be called the big step toward a reasonable compromise on Lexington Square Project, will include 500,000 this issue,” Rawlings-Blake said in a written square feet of retail, residential, office and statement. “Honoring our history and building parking space. for our future should not be mutually exclusive Diane Bell-McKoy, president and CEO of goals.” Associated Black Charities, said the project The $150 million development project could serve as employment “on-ramps” for the was scheduled to bulldoze at least 17 edifices city’s unemployed residents, many of whom classified as historic in the blighted corridor. are Black. “The integration of celebrating City officials said the partners will preserve 89 and preserving the history along with using percent of buildings on Lexington Street and the footprint to serve as a job ‘pathway’ for 76 percent of edifices on Howard Street. African Americans will create a win-win for John Hopkins, director for the Baltimore Baltimore,” she said. Heritage Inc., one of the preservation groups Harold A. Dawson Jr., president of the that fought to conserve Superblock’s historical Continued on A4 By Shernay Williams AFRO Staff Writer The recently announced compromise will retain the exterior walls of the Read’s Drug Store building and several of the other historical structures on the “Superblock.”

Philly Teens Become First ‘Amplify’ Focuses and Informs Famed Photographer Black Polo Champs B4 Baltimore in Second Session A4 Brian Lanker Dies A2

“Honoring our history and building for our future should not be mutually exclusive goals.”

Photo courtesy of Baltimore Heritage Inc.

Kweisi Mfume Stepping Down As CEO National Medical Association
By Gregory Dale AFRO Staff Writer Kweisi Mfume, former U.S. Congressman and current chief executive officer of the National Medical Association (NMA), recently announced he was stepping down from the position, effective in June. “I’ve had the opportunity to work with a great number of very talented physicians and scientists, as their chief administrator who runs the ship day in and day out,” Mfume told the AFRO in a recent interview. “I’ve really enjoyed my time working there.” The NMA is the nation’s oldest and largest medical association representing the interests of more than 30,000 AfricanAmerican physicians and

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Abolished Colonial Law Frees Many Homeowners
By Melissa Jones Special to the AFRO For more than 100 years, collecting ground rent on leased land had been the right of ground leaseholders or landlords in Baltimore City. During the 2007 session the Maryland General Assembly changed that provision of the real estate law, in part to correct a loophole that caused some homeowners to be evicted from their property. Some ground leaseholders are crying foul. Prior to 2007, throughout Baltimore City and in some surrounding counties, homeowners were required to pay ground rent on the parcel of land below their homes. The ground lease or monthly rent was a fixed amount determined by the value of the land at the time the home was Continued on A7

AFRO File Photo/Bill Tabron

Kweisi Mfume, shown in this AFRO file photo, has announced his plans to resign as president/ CEO of the National Medical Association.

their patients. Mfume, who also once served as president of the NAACP, notified the NMA’s board last week of his departure that’s set to occur on June 7. Despite his imminent exit, he’s offered to stay longer in the position to ensure a smooth transition for the organization’s next leader. Mfume said the organization has not announced a new leader. He joined the NMA in 2010, and explained that at the time of his hire, he agreed to stay in the position for a year to try to help it reach its goal of becoming more effective among plethora of healthcare and medical organizations. “Quite frankly, I feel like I’ve been able to do Continued on A4

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By Shernay Williams AFRO Staff Writer

City Education Advocates Bear Heavy Rains to Protest State Cuts
legislators and advocates – assembled by the Baltimore Education Coalition – showed up in yellow school buses and cars to swarm the capitol. Balancing umbrellas and large laminated signs emblazoned with phrases such as “Our Children are Worth It” and “Save Our

Judge Removes Peace Order Against Lawrence Bell
By Shernay Williams AFRO Staff Writer A district court judge has declined to give a Baltimore woman a peace order against former City Council President Lawrence Bell III for lack of evidence. Shan Mabry, 49, claims she dated the ex-politician for 20 years, but requested peace orders against him last September and late last month because he harassed her and destroyed her property. In her petition for the second peace order, she said she willingly dismissed the

ANNAPOLIS – Despite torrential rains and frigid conditions, hundreds rallied outside the Lawyer’s Mall in Annapolis last week protesting proposed state cuts to education. Impassioned Baltimore educators, students,

Continued on A8

Courtesy Photo

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District Court Judge Halee Weinstein dropped the peace order request against Lawrence Bell on March 15.

Photo by Courtney Bonaparte

Continued on A7

Teachers and students from Baltimore City took to the streets of Annapolis to protest the cuts to education. Many fear the cuts will undermine the educational advancements students have been making recently.

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

AFRO National Briefs
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Famed Photographer Brian Lanker Dies

Courtesy Image

Brian Lanker’s work was featured in I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America. Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Brian Lanker died March 13 at his home in Eugene, Ore., the RegisterGuard newspaper reported. He was 63. The photojournalist’s images were featured in I Dream a World: Portraits of Black Women Who Changed America and Track Town, USA. “Brian was a master craftsman who didn’t need words to communicate,” Register-Guard’s editor and publisher, Tony Baker, said in an article posted on the newspaper’s website. “His camera work alone made for extraordinary storytelling. He was a consummate professional, always prepared when on assignment for the paper. He was a big personality with a big-picture view of life and of his craft. Brian made everyone around him better at what they did.” Pa. Teen Accused of Killing Mom over Confiscated Video Game

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A Philadelphia teen is facing murder charges after he allegedly killed his mother for taking away his video game console. Kendall Anderson, 16, is being charged as an adult for the alleged murder of his mother, 37-year-old Rashida Anderson. Following a heated argument on Nov. 26 concerning a laptop stolen from school, Anderson’s mother confiscated his PlayStation video game console. “I couldn’t stand the arguing,” Anderson said in a confession read by homicide Detective Thorsten Lucke of the Philadelphia Police Department during a preliminary hearing. According to The Philadelphia Inquirer, the teen deliberated for three hours before he decided to kill his mother. In his confession, Anderson said he struck his mother with a claw hammer 20 times while she slept. The gruesome confession also revealed that he attempted to cremate her body. When his attempts failed, he proceeded to beat her head with a chair and dispose of her body in an alley behind the Anderson’s home. The body was discovered two days later, after family members’ suspicions led them to call the police. Anderson is charged with murder, possession of an instrument of crime and abuse of a corpse. “If I could, I would not do it again,” Anderson said in his confession, according to reports. “I really miss my mom. . . She was the only person who cared for me.” Similar video-game related deaths have occurred

Courtesy Photo

Kendall Anderson in the past few years. In 2008, Tyrone Spellman of Philadelphia murdered his 17-month-old daughter after she broke his Xbox. In 2010, Alexandra Tobias of Jacksonville, Fla., pleaded guilty to second-degree murder after shaking her baby to death for disturbing her while she played popular Facebook game Farmville. President Obama, First Lady Call for United Front Against Bullying President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama met with more than 150 parents, teachers, non-profit leaders, advocates, and policymakers at a White House conference on March 10 in an effort to address the problem of youth bullying. Those in attendance

discussed methods to achieve safer schools and communities for the nation’s students. One of the objectives of the conference was to dismiss the idea that bullying is a part of growing up. “Bullying can have destructive consequences for our young people. And it’s not something we have to accept. As parents and students; teachers and communities, we can take steps that will help prevent bullying and create a climate in our schools in which all of our children can feel safe,” Obama said in a prepared statement. “As parents, this issue really hits home for us. It breaks our hearts to think that any child feels afraid every day in the classroom, on the playground, or even online,” the first lady said. “I hope that all of you—and everyone watching online—will walk away from this conference with new ideas and solutions that you can take back to your own schools and communities.” The conference also highlighted private, nonprofit, and federal commitments to prevent bullying. MTV and Facebook were among the organizations that unveiled initiatives against bullying.
Courtesy Photo

President Obama and his wife, Michelle Obama, brought the issue of bullying center stage during a recent White House conference on the issue.

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2/23/11 12:56 PM

November 1, 2008 - November 7, 2008, The Washington Afro-American

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Jennifer Hudson and Relatives Identify Body of Her Slain NephewA3
The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 19, 2011
sport-utility vehicle sought in connection with the murder of Hudson’s mother and brother. The white, 1994 Chevrolet Suburban with Illinois license

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011 The Afro-American

Black Press Rebukes NAACP in Image Awards Advertising Debacle
Ben Jealous Admits ‘Grave Mistake’
By Hazel Trice Edney
TriceEdneyWire.com

By Alan King AFRO Staff Writer

Jennifer Hudson and other relatives positively identified

Special to the AFRO WASHINGTON (TriceEdneyWire.com) – On the 184th birthday of the Black Press, March 16, an odd debacle is underway. The NAACP, the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization, is under fire from Black newspapers around the country over an issue of economic injustice. NAACP President and Courtesy Photos CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous mom, Darnell Donerson who Jennifer Hudson and her admits that “a grave mistake brother, Jason. was killed, as well as her was made” right under his Photo courtesy of TriceEdneyWire.com nose when advertising inserts Ben Jealous, NAACP plate X584859 was found on the body of her 7-year-old were placed only in White president and CEO, admits Chicago’s West Side after nephew Monday, just hours newspapers on the eve of the “a grave mistake was police received a 7 a.m. call after his body was found in a organization’s annual image made.” He is working to awards, which aired March 4. ensure it does not happen Danny Bakewell, chairman again. of the National Newspaper sold and purchased ads in Publishers Association Black community newspapers (NNPA), a federation of across the country. Moreover, more than 200 Black-owned and Dallas Cowboys my life By Alan King I dedicated years ofplayers newspapers, is demanding Tony Romo and Terrell Owens, AFRO Staff Writer to working for them directly,” justice. among the names submitted to Jealous said in the statement. “If the NAACP desires election officials. Presidential candidate John Notwithstanding, Black to advertise with the Hurd said those workers, who McCain’s attack on ACORN – newspapers across the without White press, they need to were doing those things nation Associated Community have long knowledge or permisunderstand and experience – ACORN’s fought advertising Organization for Reform Now discrimination from mainly the repercussions ofof the going sion, were fired. confirms the success White corporate communities outside of their ‘house’ the “The evidence that has surorganization, the head of (The whichso far shows economic Black Press). The NAACP faced ignore the they faked group says. forms of their readers – “This is testimony to needs to know that by the work worth to get paid for work they didn’t consumers, who spend we’ve done Black Press they Black do, not to stuff ballot ignoring theand success we’ve boxes.” on goods and services. had,” Maude Hurd, president billionsACORN, she said, is the are ‘cutting off their nose toof victim of fraud, not the perpetraACORN, face,’” Bakewell Therefore, Black publishers spite theirsaid in an interview tor of it. within a AFRO. 7 letter to the March have expressed shock at said Hurd said the of things “When this attack started, we finding this kindonlyomission NNPA publishers, obtained bogus are the charges100-yearhad just announced that we had associated with the themby the Trice Edney News selves. And factcheck. org registered 1.3 million new votold NAACP, which has a rich Wire. “We have marched side ers,” she said. “That’s just to say agrees. history of fighting alongside by side with them and scared It concluded, “Neither that someone’s running been the Black Pressemployees have their voice ACORN’s success.” in the African ACORN nor its for racial and because of economic equality. or even American community. It is been found guilty of, McCain, who is running for As a unified response to truly disheartening to be on president on the Republican tick- charged with, casting fraudulent the omission, Bakewell asked the lashed out at ACORN in the votes.” et, battlefield with someone NNPA members to refrain priand not be able to share in the The problem came about final debate against Barack marily because of the way spoils.” contending the group “is from writing anything about Obama, ACORN operates. in the on In his first public response the verge of maybe perpetrat- the Image AwardsRather than rely on volunteers, it airing on ing one of the greatest frauds in weeks following itspays peoto the issue, Jealous released ple, many of them poor or unemFOX. avoter historyon this country, statement in Sunday after ployed, to sign up newand maybe destroying the fabric of Scathing articles voters. he was contacted by the Trice The idea was to help both those democracy.” Wire. editorials joined Bakewell’s Edney News being Factcheck.org, a non-partisan letter. registered and those doing “This year’s NAACP the registration. Web site, found those claims to Robert W. Bogle, annual Image Awards Maud explained, “We have a be “exaggerated,” with “no evipublisher of the Philadelphia television show was a great zero tolerance policy for deliberdence of any such democracyTribune, said in aregistration.” success,” he wrote in the ate falsification of March 3 destroying fraud.” Tribune news account neglect to statement. “However, on Most story reprinted by Hurd believes the McCain the eve of thepoliticallygrave show, a motivat- Target Market News: is point out that ACORN “In charges were (Thursday’s) Philadelphia regmistake was made: circulars required by law to turn in all ed. Daily News, the 42nd NAACP thatShe said, “Because it’s lowwere supposed to appear istration forms. And they also fail Awards Magazine was in both the mainstream to note that it was the organizaand moderate-income people, tion, in many instances, that was press and Black communitythe inserted and not one copy first and people of color, I believe brought in phony registrations McCain campaign thinks those insertedthe the Philadelphia newspapers only appeared in to the attention of authorities. voters are going press.” Tribune, America’s oldest the mainstream to vote The McCain camp apparently Democratic, which isdebacle not necesand America’s largest The advertising isn’t interested in those fine sarily true.” a firestorm of daily newspaper serving has sparked points, preferring to air ACORN is the Black Press the African-Americanmisleadcriticism fromno stranger to ing ads that seek controversy. community.” to link Obama family of which Jealous has undercutting For 38 years, the non-partisan to ACORN, thereby“This He continued, long been a member. Jealous organization has fought for social his political support. action is an insult to the men is a former NNPA executive McCain: I’m John McCain and economic justice for lowand I approve this work at the director and a former editor and women who message. and moderate-income Philadelphia Tribune and of The Jackson Advocate, an Announcer: Who is Barack Americans. With 400,000 memNNPA newspaper. NAACP Obama? A man with “a political ber families organized into more should be an insult to Black Americans in this at warp The insiders said he is set to chapbaptism performed country. than 1,200 neighborhood very right ofambition. After colmeetin 110 NNPA leaders and speed.” Vast full inclusion ters with cities nationwide, members has over theduringseen and participationChicago. lege, he moved to of African ACORN this week years the Became a community denied by its share of criticism while advo- Americans has been organizer. organization’s annual trek to There, Obama met Madeleine cating for affordable housing, the organization that purports Washington for Black Press Talbot, part of the Chicago living wages, healthcare for the that African Americans should Week activities. branch of ACORN. in was underserved— sensitive to and while organbe fairly included Heall so “I am very impressive American asked izing voter registration drives. aspects of that he was life.” to the need to support Black train the York Beacon’s But none has been as withering New ACORN staff. community newspapers. What did ACORN in Chicago and baseless as thisway to one. Publisher Walter Smith, They are the only engage in? Bullying banks. With the presidential election president of the 17-member assure Black readers in a Intimidation tactics. Disruption less than two weeks away, Northeast Publishers given community that youthe of business. ACORN forced ACORN’s detractors allege actually want your ads to mas- Association, wrotehome loans. banks to issue risky in an organization has engaged in reach them directly. In theafter editorial, types credit our The same “We of loans that sive voter registration fraud leadersthe the NAACP with past, I personally have both caused of financial crisis we’re the reported discovery of bogus in today. names, such as Mickey Mouse

ACORN Fights Back

Leader Calls Voter Registration Fraud Charges ‘Bogus’

from a neighbor about a suspicious vehicle. The man noticed the vehicle while walking his dog. According to the Chicago Tribune, the boy had been shot multiple times in the back seat of the vehicle. The SUV, regisgood sound judgment and tered to Hudson’s murdered common sense at with the brother, was towedleast. What were body inside and is being boy’s they thinking when this decision by made? Who processedwasevidence techniwere they trying to attract, cians and workers. The bodyand or who were they and taken was later removed trying to to impress?” the Cook County Medical Due to office. Examiner’slegalities, according Hudson and Jealous to the NAACP,other family members arrived at thethe withheld the name of Medical Examiner’s office mid-afteradvertising agency, which noon to identifythe guide for has distributed the body. Given the choicehis statement five years. But, between looking directly at the body the sought to explain how or viewing it occurred: omission on a wall-mounted “The advertising company originally conceived the guide and presented it as a fundraiser to the NAACP. video screen, the family chose It is solely responsible the the latter. According to for selling the ads and handling Tribune, Hudson said, “Yes, the distribution. It pays the that’s him.” NAACP a licensing royalty which is used to support our ongoing diversity efforts in Hollywood,” Jealous states. “Accordingly, I requested and

received assurance from the advertising company that their distribution plan included Black community newspapers. However, the advertising company has failed to follow through. This year, when the

newspapers. It is contrary to our explicit instruction, and we were not aware of the agency’s decision until after the guides hit the papers,” he said. “Nonetheless, it was made for a publication that

"If this company wants to do business with the NAACP again, they will need to Julian King, Jennnifer Hudson’s nephew. make things right with Black community in A spokesman for the office the murders but is being held newspapers in Hudson jail for where the told the newspaper that the marketsparole violation after guide was distributed, and convince us “She held hands with her family.capable of keepingvery emotional moment.” they are It was obviously a their word."
“remained strong for her family” and was clearly its leader. “She held hands with her famiguides came out, they did ly,” the spokesman said. “It not show up in any Black was obviously a very emotional community newspapers.” moment.” He concludes, “The The boy – the son of Julia NAACP does not condone Hudson, Jennifer’s sister – had the agency’s decision to been missing since Friday, exclude Black community when a relative found Julian’s grandmother, Darnell Donerson, 57, and his uncle, Jason Hudson, 29, shot to death in his grandmother’s home in the 7000 block of South Yale Avenue. An Amber Alert – a designation for high-risk missing children – was issued Friday after Julian was discovered missing after the murders. Police arrested William Balfour, the missing boy’s stepfather and estranged husband of Julia, at his girlfriend’s Southside apartment several hours after the murders. Balfour’s mother, Michele, has told reporters that her son had nothing to do with the slayings. Balfour remains a suspect in being convicted of attempted – Ben Jealous murder and vehicular hijacking. Cook Countyand as CEO bears our name, records show that he ultimate guilty to both I take pleaded responsibility chargesFor 1999.reason, I also for it. in that He was have convicted in to thefor possesapologized 1998 NNPA and sion of a stolen motor vehicle. promised their leadership this He was released from prison in will not happen again.” 2006 after serving seven years Jealous added that the for the attempted murder and car hijacking charges. The boy remained missing through a long weekend in which police and volunteers

No wonder Obama’s campaign is trying to distance him from the group, saying, “Barack Obama Never Organized with ACORN.” But Obama’s ties to ACORN run long and deep. He taught classes for ACORN. They even endorsed him for President. But now ACORN is in trouble. Reporter: There are at least 11 investigations across the country involving thousands of potentially fraudulent ACORN forms. Announcer: Massive voter fraud. And the Obama campaign paid more than $800,000 to an ACORN front for get out the vote efforts. Pressuring banks to issue risky loans. Nationwide voter fraud. Barack Obama. Bad judgment. Blind ambition. Too risky for America.

posted fliers bearing his photograph around the city. On Sunday, Jennifer Hudson asked for the public’s help in finding her nephew. In her MySpace blog, she thanked fans and supporters for their prayers and distribution will be put out offered a $100,000 reward to for bids next year with the boy anyone who returned assurance that alive. Black newspapers will be included. investigation, Since the “We who gained the Hudson –have also letstardom agency know on we will after appearing that“American not tolerate their abuse Idol,” and then won an of the trust the Award for her role in Academy NAACP has placed the them, nor that which Black in movie Dreamgirls – has stayed out of newspapers place community the public eye. inThe NAACP,” Jealous the Chicago Tribune reported that a“If this company wrote. parade of cars moved slowly past her family’s home wants to do business with Monday morning, past thewill the NAACP again, they news vans, reporters and curineed to make things right with ous onlookers. Black community newspapers Neighbors stood in the markets where the guide quietly and was distributed, and convince reflected on the us they violence.are capable of keeping theirfront of the Hudson’s In word.” Whether heavy jackets home, men in his explanation will end the controversy and hooded sweatshirts came to remains to white crosses barkiss the twinbe seen. Smith, who is also NNPA’s budget ing the names of Donerson and director, concludes his Jason. “Everybody is sick of going editorial, “Stay tuned, there’s throughmore to come.” Artisha much stuff like this,” West, a former resident of the area told the Tribune. “We all have to stick together. All these young children are dying, and for what?”

Succeeding in business is all about who you know. Starting with your bank.

Jason Hudson

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Since McCain’s comments, SQUARE HIGH ACORN’s 87 offices have been bombarded with threats and racist mail. The day after the presidential debate, vandals broke into the organization’s Boston and Seattle offices and stole computers. NOT ON THE LIST BREAD After a Cleveland representative appeared on TV, an e-mail was sent to the local office saying she “is going to have her life ended.” A worker in Providence, R.I., received a threatening call sayLEFT RIGHT ing, “We know you get off work at 9” and uttered racial epithets. A caller to one office left a message on the answering machine, saying: “Hi, I was just calling to let you know that Barack Obama needs to get hung. He’s a (expletive deleted) nigger, and he’s a piece of (expletive deleted). You guys are fraudulent, and you need to go to hell. All the niggers on oak trees. They’re gonna get all hung hon1 BANANA eys, they’re going to get assassinated, they’re gonna get killed.” Another message said, “You liberal idiots. Dumb (expletive deleted). Welfare bums. You guys just (expletive deleted) come to our country, consume every natural resource there is, R Ranked “Highest in Customer Satisfaction and make a lot of babies. That’s with Small Business Banking” w all you guys do. And then suck up the welfare and expect everyone else to pay for your hospital bills for your kids. I jus’ say let Before age five, every room is a classroom. your kids die. That’s the best move. Just let your children die. Business Class Banking. At SunTrust, our Business Class Bankingare everywhere. Simple things like Fun learning opportunities Forget about paying for hospital counting andovercome shapes activate a child’s learning ability, identifying daily team delivers ideas bills for them. I’m not gonna do and solutions to help businessesthem enter school more prepared. That’s why PNC and help it. You guys are lowlifes. And I like Online Cash Manager and SBA lendingand its Spanish-language equivalent Crezca challenges. Solutions founded Grow Up Great are just hope you all die.” two of the ways we help our clients managecon Éxito, a 10-year, $100 million program to help prepare young and grow their business. Hurd thinks the hate calls will children for school and success.up a free bilingual Sesame Street™ life. Pick Get cease soon. to know how our solutions can help drive your business’ “Happy, Healthy, Ready for School” kit at a PNC branch. It’s filled “In two weeks, Ia branch, visit online at suntrust.com/businessclass Stop by think these with all kinds of simple, everyday things you can do to help a child attacks will be over. But I think it learn. Together, we can work with our communities so an entire or call 866.442.1370. will be harder for us to get our generation won’t just grow up... but grow up great. name back on good graces SBA really trashed us in Lending Cash Management Deposit Solutions because they the last few weeks.” To find out more, go to pncgrowupgreat.com But ACORN will not be or call 1-877-PNC-GROW. deterred. “We’ve been fighting for a long time, for over 30 years, for the rights of low- and moderateSunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. income people all across the © 2011 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust and Live Solid. Bank Solid. are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc. country,”SunTrust said. “We’restudy based on more than score among major banks in thedecision-makers at small businesses with sales volume from 2010 Small Business Banking Hurd Banks, Inc., received the highest numerical 6,600 responses from financial United States in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates $100,000 to $10 million. Satisfaction Study. 2010 going to Proprietary studyfight for based on experiences and perceptions of decision-makers at small businesses surveyed between July and August 2010. Your experiences may vary. continue to results are Visit jdpower.com. economic justice in our communities.” TM /©2008 Sesame Workshop. All rights reserved. ©2008 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

March 19, 2011 - March 19, 2011, The Afro-American

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‘Amplify’ Focuses and Informs Baltimore in Second Session
by Shernay Williams AFRO Staff Writer Last weekend, a small but fervent crowd came out for the second quarter of Amplify Baltimore, a series of community conversations that relay important issues to city residents. The day of panel discussions included testimonies from leaders in public education, workforce and economic development and financial literacy. Roughly 150 persons trickled in and out throughout the day, but in most sessions, the large auditorium at the Maryland Institute College of Art seemed to swallow the tiny crowd. April Garrett, the Baltimore-born mastermind behind Amplify Baltimore, said although the turnout was low, she was pleased Baltimoreans from “all walks of life” checked in to confer on how to improve the city. She told the AFRO that attendance in Baltimore trails other cities such as Boston and New York, where she hosts similar forums through her non-profit Civic Frame. “At the end of the day, people have to make a choice to be agents of change in Baltimore,” she said, adding that the conversations are critical to Baltimore’s vitality because they link residents with innovators and activists. “Baltimore is not short on brilliant people committed to doing the work; we have a shortage of community people committed to change,” Garrett contended. She invited two dozen heavyweight leaders to prove it. Charter school founders, high-ranking city school officials and public school principals discussed the state of the city’s education. The talks touched on a host of issues including the benefits of charters, the next phases to improve city schools and the ineffectiveness of student assessments. Jack J. Pannell Jr., founder of the Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys that is set to open next fall, said it’s imperative for instructors to set high expectations for young Black males to “ensure their social and intellectual well being.” Chief academic officer for city schools, Sonja Brookins Santelises, urged Baltimore residents to claim ownership of their schools. “If we continue to answer questions by waiting for someone, we will never move forward,” she April Yvonne Garrett, Founder of Civic Fame, Inc. and organizer of Amplify Baltimore, moderates a panel discussion on public education during the second quarter of the Amplify Baltimore event at Maryland Institute College of Art on March 12.
Photo by Bill Taborn

said. The panel members seemed to agree that effective teachers and parental involvement have direct correlations to student achievement. About a dozen seventh

1991-1997, asserted that in order for Baltimore to return to its status as the “premiere city in the state” for education, “this is the kind of forum that has to take place around our community to change this.” While moderating the

estimated that about 1/3 of the city’s population or 200,000 residents are unemployed. He noted that about half of Black Baltimoreans are unemployed or underemployed. “What were assets are preliminaries now,” Karen L. Sitnick, director of the Mayor’s Office of Employment Development, said, referencing the importance of computer skills and some college experience in the evolving job market. Jason Perkins-Cohen, executive director of the Job Opportunities Task Force, contended that employers should treat their workers as assets and create more inspiring work environments. David Troy, another executive, said Baltimore has not enacted a “real” economic development strategy since the 1970s.

Baltimore is not short of brilliant people committed to doing the work; we have a shortage of community people committed to change.”
and eighth graders from Hampstead Hill Academy attended the session and said they would like to see more creative curriculum and high school choices. Walter G. Amprey, city schools superintendent from discussion, Garrett said ,“We’ve got to change the mentality and working as it relates to education.” A second panel addressed the complexity of helping ex-offenders transition from prison to the work place, growing workforce demands and employee-employer relationships. Ralph E. Moore Jr., director of the St. Frances Academy Community Center,

~ April Garrett

Continued from A1 Harold A. Dawson Co., one of a cluster of out-of-state development firms that make up the “Partners” in Lexington Square Partners, agreed. “Fighting for and supporting equality and opportunity for all people have been the basis of success for the company my father built,” the younger Dawson said in a statement. In documents, the company has vowed to “create access to opportunities for

Developers Vow

Lori Fagan heads the Bon Secours Family Support Center, which helps lowincome women with children become better mothers, earn their GEDs and prepare for careers. She said state funding for the program is threatened. “If they cut these programs, we will continue to have a population that believes they don’t have to work because they can get help from the government.”

A final forum on financial literacy discussed the importance of money management. Comptroller Joan M. Pratt discussed the ends and outs of maintaining the states money flow and the executive director of the Baltimore Green Currency Association, outlined his efforts to pitch a local currency called B-note in Baltimore. Other speakers included a student teller at MECU and the director from the Maryland CASH campaign. One Amplify Baltimore attendee said he’s supported several of Garrett’s events and appreciates her work but encouraged her to “take the conversations out to churches and community events where the common folk are.” John Daley, a Morgan State University student suggested Garrett get club promoters to “buy into the plan,” which he said would garner the attention of more young people. “I like that this is positive,” said community organizer Lanitra Jackson. “You can turn on the news, turn on the internet and see the negative. Who is going to talk about the positive.” Succeeding installments of Amplify Baltimore will address neighborhoods, food access, public and environmental health, public transportation and other matters in June and September. The inaugural event was held in January. Watch footage from all Amplify Baltimore events by visiting www.civicfame.org.

minority and women-owned businesses” and provide worker and entrepreneurial training. The predominately Black Dawson company has recently come to the forefront to represent Lexington Square Partners, a move some Baltimore insiders suspect was to dampen complaints that White executives were attempting to “destroy” civil rights history.

Continued from A1

Mfume

Balanced. Morally centered. Responsive. Coeducational.
Sarah Lewin ’09 Brown University ’13 • Majoring in math • Member of an improvisational theater company • Research assistant, Johns Hopkins School of Engineering (Summers 2007-09) • 2009 FS Mixed Chorus Award

Join us for “Lunch and Learn” with the Head of School Observe classes, speak with students, meet faculty and administrators. Next session: April 14. Visit friendsbalt.org or call 410.649.3211 to register. Johari Frasier ’09 M.I.T. ’13 • Majoring in physics • Hopes to be a professor • Teaches a voice acting seminar to Boston-area high school students • FS Wind Ensemble, trumpeter

just that, working with board and committee members to create a more efficient fiscal operation,” Mfume said. “After working so hard, I’m just going to take a break and try to recharge my engines for whatever my next step or endeavor might be. I’m not even in a rush to try to come up with solid plans [for my next step], but I’m sure something will present itself.” Mfume added that some of the highlights during his tenure at NMA include helping to reshape it to further cater to its physicians and patients’ needs. “The biggest thing has been to work with the physicians there in breathing a whole new sense of life back into the association and having an opportunity to make it much more of an advocacy organization on behalf of physicians around the country,” Mfume said. “The industry is changing so rapidly and so many of those physicians have been really working hard to fight those disparities that exist in our communities like cancer, cardio vascular disease ... hypertension and AIDS.” Additionally, he explained that he’s fought to ensure the organization’s mandate and concerns were heard among officials on Capitol Hill. Mfume also worked closely with the Student National Medical Association, a subdivision of the organization, to provide more mentorship opportunities to help them successfully lead the organization into a new era. “I’ve made a big push my whole time there as I did at the NAACP, to make sure that the younger aspect of the movement is not left out,” Mfume said. “We ought to be prepared to help them lead the way into the future.”

Community
Local Delta Chapter Hosts Employment Readiness Fair
By Courtney A. Bonaparte Special to the AFRO As the recession creeps on, the Baltimore County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority (BCAC) offers an event that will provide the community with valuable information and resources for seeking better employment and creating a small business. On March 26, the ladies of Delta Sigma Theta will host their third annual Entrepreneurship

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011, The Afro-American

Baltimore Native to Premiere Staged Reading of Letters Addressed To U.S. First Lady

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Courtesy Photo/BCAC Deltas

Expo and Employment Readiness Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. “BCAC hopes that the [fair] will give people the incentive and information on how to start their own business. We also are providing a network for business owners to network by sharing their successes with others. The knowledge gained at this event will demonstrate that things you may be passionate about can lead to a successful business idea,” said Barbara Crawley, chapter president, in an e-mailed statement. This free event will include two information sessions geared towards those seeking employment. This first session begins at 9 a.m. and will allow the attendees to have their résumés assessed and reviewed by human resources professionals. The second session, beginning at 10 a.m., will be an information session on how to complete the KSAs (Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities) section of federal job applications. The events and sessions for those who are interested in starting a business or are already entrepreneurs takes place from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Attendees have the opportunity to network with over 20 entrepreneurs, showcasing a wide range of businesses. Information sessions feature U.S. Small Business Administration, Women Entrepreneurs of Baltimore (WEB), and other entrepreneur assistance organizations and will also include a Q & A session with successful business owners.

Karima Amin, Barbara A. Seals Nevergold, Ph.D. and Peggy Brooks-Bertram, Dr. P.H., Ph.D. Courtesy Photo By AFRO Staff Messages of encouragement and wisdom will come alive in the staged reading of Go, Tell Michelle: Letters to the First Lady, premiering at Coppin State University’s James Weldon Johnson Auditorium on March 18. Drawn from the book Go, Tell Michelle: African American Women Write to the New First Lady, the performance will be a presentation of poems and letters of support, written by women from all across the country and addressed to Michelle Obama following her husband’s election to presidency. The book was penned by Baltimore native Peggy Brooks-Bertram and Dr. Barbara Seals Nevergold. The performance at Coppin will mark the second professional presentation of the production, as it first premiered in San Diego, Calif., in February. Bertram, now a resident of Buffalo, N.Y., received her early education at Baltimore City public schools. She completed her undergraduate studies at Goucher College and later received a master’s and doctorate in public health from Johns Hopkins University. In 2003, she co-authored the book series, Uncrowned Queens: African American Women Community Builders of Western New York and the State of Oklahoma. Bertram is currently working on a sequel to Go, Tell Michelle and a biography of her life growing up in East Baltimore. “Go, Tell Michelle, Letters to the First Lady,” will premiere at Coppin State University’s James Weldon Johnson Auditorium on March 18 at 7 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit: http://www.msbcoc.org/michelle/.

Members of the Baltimore County Alumnae Chapter, The event takes place Saturday, March 26 at Randallstown Delta Sigma Theta, will host an entrepreneurship and job Community Center located at 3505 Resource Drive, readiness fair on March 26 in Randallstown. Randallstown, Md., from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Rita’s Italian Ice to Welcome Spring with Annual Giveaway
By AFRO Staff On March 20, Rita’s Italian Ice will say goodbye to winter weather with their annual First Day of Spring Giveaway, offering visitors free cups of their famous Italian Ice. This year, over 45 participating Rita’s locations in the Baltimore area will serve attendees one free regular size cup of their Italian Ice in the flavor of their choice. Visitors will also get a chance to purchase the company’s other famed treats including their signature layered Gelati, Old Fashioned Frozen Custard and Misto creations. Now approaching its 19th year, Rita’s annual spring giveaway has exploded in popularity throughout many states across the U.S. In previous years, the company reported serving enough Italian Ice to fill over 13 tanker trucks. Rita’s expects this year’s event to be bigger than ever, estimating to give away over 1 million cups nationwide. “For 19 years we’ve planned this annual, free event as a way to generate excitement for the season and to say ‘thank you’ to our loyal Rita’s Italian Ice lovers and the communities that support us year in and year out,” Jim Rudolph, Rita’s chairman of the board and chief executive officer said in a statement. The First Day of Spring Giveaway will take place on March 20 from 12 to 9 p.m., at more than 550 Rita’s Italian Ice locations across the country. For more information and to find participating locations, visit www.ritasice.com.

More Community on A6

Total Joint Tuesday
Knee Pain Seminar

UNIVERSAL PICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH RELATIVITY MEDIA A WORKING TITLE PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH BIG TALK PICTURES “PAUL” SIMON PEGG NICK FROST JASON BATEMAN KRIEXECUTIVE IG BILL HADER BLYTHE DANNER JOHN CARROLL LYNCH WITH SIGOURNEY WEAVER STEN WI MUSIC AND SETH ROGEN AS “PAUL” BY DAVID ARNOLD PRODUCERS LIZA CHASIN DEBRA HAYWARD NATASCHA WHARTON ROBERT GRAF WRITTEN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY SIMON PEGG & NICK FROST BY NIRA PARK TIM BEVAN ERIC FELLNER BY GREG MOTTOLA A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
SOUNDTRACK ON UNIVERSAL RECORDS
© 2010 UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

s your active lifestyle taking its toll on your knees? Are conservative treatment methods not enough to ease your pain? Join Dr. James E. Wood Jr., Harbor Hospital chief of orthopaedics, for an informative discussion on innovative surgical treatment options for your aching knees. Registration is required; light refreshments will be served. To register for this free seminar, visit harborhospital.org/totaljoint or call 410-350-2563. James E. Wood Jr., M.D., is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon. He is one of the leading knee replacement surgeons in the region, and was a fellow in sports medicine, working with the team physicians for the Los Angeles Lakers, Dodgers, Angels, Rams and Kings.

I

Tuesday, March 22 5:30 p.m. — refreshments • 6 p.m. — seminar Harbor Hospital’s Waterfront Baum Auditorium 3001 South Hanover Street • Baltimore, MD 21225

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES
MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes - Text PAUL with your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)!

STARTS FRIDAY, MARCH 18

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

Community continued from A5

Baltimore’s ‘Snoop’ Drug Sting Raises Questions About War on Drugs
A federal drug trafficking sting which netted 64 arrests in Baltimore was lauded by federal officials but has introduced new arguments questioning the effectiveness of America’s war on drugs. “Wherever criminal gangs bring violence to our streets, that is where we will direct the resources needed to send them to prison,” Baltimore U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said in a statement. “We must persist in this coordinated effort, because every American deserves to live in a safe neighborhood.” A total of 40 people were charged by the state while 24 were charged federally. Authorities also seized marijuana, heroin, guns and $69,000 in cash. Among those charged was Felicia “Snoop” Pearson, 30, a former actress on HBO’s “The Wire,” whose involvement made the case especially newsworthy. Pearson’s difficult upbringing led her to prior brushes with the law, including a murder conviction in 1996. David Simon, producer of “The Wire,” said her

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arrest should be enough to prompt authorities to take Felicia “Snoop” Pearson Courtesy Photo a further look at the war on drugs. the war on drugs has devolved “In an essay published into a war on the underclass, in Time two years ago, the that in places like West and writers of ‘The Wire’ made East Baltimore, where the the argument that we believe drug economy is now the only factory still hiring and where the educational system is so crippled that the vast majority of children are trained only for the corners, a legal campaign to imprison our most vulnerable and damaged citizens is little more than amoral,” he said in a statement. He said that Pearson’s vastly different upbringing and environment from his own is one that makes him incapable of judgment. “I, for one, do not qualify as a peer to Felicia Pearson,” he said. “The opportunities and experiences of her life do not correspond in any way with my own, and her America is different from my own.” Despite Simon’s opinion, authorities say the arrests were necessary to further eliminate the scourge of drugs and violence on Baltimore’s streets. “These arrests are representative of law enforcement’s commitment to keep this city safe from the violence and crimes associated with drug trafficking,” DEA Special Agent in-charge Ava CooperDavis said in a statement.

BCPS Accepting Applications for Summer Music Camp
Applications are being accepted through May 6 for Baltimore County Public Schools Summer Instrumental Music Camp. The camp, to be held this year at Cockeysville Middle School, 10401 Greenside Drive, will take place June 21-29 and is open to BCPS students who will be entering grades 6-12 in the 2011-2012 school year and who are enrolled in their school’s band or orchestra. No audition is required. The camp operates from 9 a.m. to 1:50 p.m. each day. During the camp, students will play in a band or orchestra at the appropriate grade level. In addition to large group rehearsals, students will participate in enrichment classes and will receive instruction to enhance instrumental performance skills. At the end of the camp, all of the musical ensembles will perform in a public concert in the outdoor amphitheater at Oregon Ridge Park, the summer home of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra on June 29. Bus transportation will be available from the following locations: Arbutus Middle, Catonsville Middle, Deep Creek Middle, Deer Park Middle, Dumbarton Middle, Dundalk High, Franklin Middle, Golden Ring Middle, Hereford Middle, Kenwood High, Loch Raven High, Middle River Middle, Parkville High, Patapsco High, Perry Hall Middle, Pikesville Middle, Pine Grove Middle, Ridgely Middle, and Southwest Academy. Camp information and applications are available online at http://www.bcps.org/ offices/elem_music/pdf/MusicCamp-Registration-Form. pdf. A program fee of $200 covers all instruction and transportation.

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 19, 2011

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011 The Afro-American

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Stop Diabetes!
Share. Act. Learn. Give
By Rev. Dorothy S. Boulware Special to the AFRO While the thought of more than 10,000 elementary school-aged children moving at the same time might seem a tad foreboding, the March 24 simultaneous exercise event in 26 Maryland schools is being carefully orchestrated and is just what the doctor ordered – for 15 minutes, that is. The event is simply the way the American Diabetes Association, in partnership with Playworks and Baltimore City Public Schools, has chosen to remind the community that everyone needs to get moving, children included, to stave off the epidemic of obesity that has plunged one in four AfricanAmerican children into type II diabetes, a category formerly reserved for overweight adults. Today, almost one in every three children in the nation is overweight or obese. The number rises to 40 percent in African-American and Hispanic communities, according to the Let’s Move Campaign website. “Stop Diabetes” is both the intent and the mantra of the ADA’s 2011 campaign to begin March 22 with a week of activities starting with a rally in Annapolis and a meeting to encourage Maryland legislators to do their part in mandating, as much as possible, healthier habits in state schools. “Our intent is to raise the level of awareness about the seriousness of diabetes in our community and the need to look at systems and policies that can improve the lives of those living with diabetes and also to prevent diabetes,” said Shawn McIntosh, ADA director of programs and advocacy. “Our specific bill is HB 168, which has been stuck in the House Ways and Means Committee for a place in every Maryland school for physical education, much of which succumbed to ongoing budget woes. “Many parents do not realize that PE was taken out of many school systems. Parents often say we had PE every day,” said Walker, who represents Prince George’s County. “Well in some school systems students participate in PE only once a week. This is unacceptable and we are doing a tremendous disservice to our kids.“ The bill requires “that a public school student in elementary school be provided a daily program of physical activity totaling at least 150 minutes of physical activity each week, including at least 90 minutes of physical education; that the program of physical activity for a specified category of student be consistent with a specified plan

“Many parents do not realize that PE was taken out of many school systems.”
~Jay Walker, D-Dist. 26
six years now, and we need to get it out of committee so the entire House can vote on it.” House Bill 168 was introduced six years ago by former NFL player and current state delegate, Jay Walker (D-Dist. 26), to make

for the student; public elementary schools to designate a specified group to plan and coordinate specified activities,” according to the legislative website synopsis. “One in every three children born after 2000 will develop diabetes,” McIntosh said. “We need people to get involved, to join the Stop Diabetes movement – they can take the risk test on our website, attend workshops and take control of their own lifestyle behavior changes.” She said people can also volunteer to help ADA spread the word. The week of activities abounds with opportunities for health information on diabetes and other conditions, instruction on healthy cooking, a workout with Ravens fitness trainer Monte Sanders and a Spin-A-Thon at Gold’s Gym. For more information on Stop Diabetes Rally Week activities visit https://sites.google.com/site/ stopdiabetesmaryland or to take the risk test, visit diabetes.org or call the Baltimore office at 410265-0075. law believe no one will truly benefit from the change. “Here’s one thing the State did not figure on and this is probably going to hurt the people that own the houses. If you own a house with a $3,000 ground rent and because the [leaseholder] did not register it, you now own the ground rent basically. You own the house fee simple,” said Barnstein. “Someone ought to notify the Internal Revenue that ought to be a taxable event. Everybody that gets a fee simple property should probably pay income tax on that $3,000 because the State of Maryland is basically giving them a $3,000 ground rent for nothing.”

Continued from A1

Abolished Colonial Law Frees Many Homeowners
estimates that only 85,000 of the 115,000 to 130,000 properties in Baltimore City eligible for ground rent collection were registered with the department. The ground rent was extinguished for the remaining 30,000 to 40,000 properties. “The only way to find out if your property was registered is to do a real property data search [on SDAT’s website],” said Anderson. “Say you lived in Florida and you own one ground rent and you’re getting paid on it, would you want the state to take it away from you? Who ever heard of a law coming out that if you’re getting paid on something and you don’t file a certain form, you lose statute process is unreasonably harsh and costly.” To enforce ground rent payments, the law required the ground leaseholder to pay a $10 registration fee for the first property and from $3 to $5 for every property thereafter, depending on the date filed. The law also stipulated that no new ground rents could be created after 2007, putting an end to the practice in existence since colonial times. The 2007 law mandated SDAT maintain a database of registered properties. To get information regarding ground rent registration for the land where a home is located, conduct a real property search through the SDAT website are settled. For homeowners whose properties were registered by the ground leaseholder, the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development offers lowinterest loans to help residents who need assistance to purchase their ground rent. “For people making less than 80 percent of the statewide median income, we provide deferred loans from about $1,500 to $3,000 to help the individual purchase their ground rent from the lease holder,” said Catherine Spencer, a special loans processor with the department. “This program has been going on for years and it’s different than the redemption program administered by the Department of Assessments, but it’s a very low cost way to buy out your ground rent.” A spokesman for Baltimore City Council President Bernard “Jack’ Young told the AFRO that Young has not received any feedback from city residents negatively impacted by the 2007 law. Barnstein and other ground lease holders affected by the

built and was included in the original deed. Many rents were established as far back as the late 1800s. Ground rents were in place for 99 years and perpetually renewable. Even as ownership of the home changed hands, the ground leaseholder could remain the same. After a series of investigative news articles published in 2006 exposed investors that used an ejectment clause in the ground rent law to foreclose on homeowners for back rent, lawmakers took action with House Bill 580 and Senate Bill 622. Under the 2007 changes to sections 8-701 through 8-711 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, ground leaseholders had until Sept. 30, 2010 to register their properties with the Maryland State Department of Assessments and Taxation (SDAT) in order to be eligible to collect ground rent. If the property was not registered by the end of the specified date, the ground rent would be extinguished. Lee Barnstein, an attorney with a practice in Pikesville and ground leaseholder for multiple properties, claims that the changes in the law place an undue burden on ground leaseholders. “I estimate there’s about 20,000 people that lost their ground rent and most of them are individual people that have one or two ground rents,” said Barnstein. Paul Anderson, chief legal review officer for SDAT,

Choose

“The only way to find out if your property was registered [or not] is to do a real property data search.”
~ Paul Anderson, chief legal review officer for SDAT
it,” said Barnstein. “There are some pending court cases that will hopefully overturn this law.” Anderson said one such case would be reviewed by the Court of Appeals in June. According to online court records, Charles Muskin, who represents the trust for a deceased ground lease holder in a suit against SDAT, alleges the 2007 law violates federal and state constitutions by “transferring property and contract rights to a third person without compensation” and that the “ground rent at: http://sdatcert3.resiusa. org/rp_rewrite/. The property address, entered without street name suffixes, is needed. Once information regarding the property is on the screen, click on the “Ground Rent Registration” link in the upper right hand corner of the property record. This will give ground rent registration information. If the fields are blank, the property was not registered and any existing ground rent relationship has been severed – at least until any pending lawsuits regarding this statute change

The Quality of Mercy...
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Lawrence Bell
Continued from A1 first case against Bell, 49, because he was running for elected office, but asserted he continued to cyber-stalk her and tap into her phone conversations. Mabry was granted a temporary peace order against Bell March 1 and March 8, but at a final hearing March 15, District Court

“I think it will become apparent to anyone with ordinary judgment that the allegations defy common sense.”
~Lawrence Bell
Judge Halee Weinstein chose not to grant an extended peace order that would have lasted six months because “the petitioner could not meet required burden of proof,” according to court records. Bell still faces third-degree criminal charges of burglary, stalking, theft of less than $1,000 and excessive telephone calls related to

the case. That trial is set for April 7. Natalie T. Collins, Bell’s attorney, told the AFRO she believes the criminal case will be dismissed. “Her story is not credible. We have reason to believe that Ms. Mabry is in need of psychiatric care,” she said, adding that Bell had not seen Mabry in years prior to the hearings. “He was never in a relationship with her ... He would consider them friends on an acquaintance level.” In a recent interview, Bell expressed similar sentiments. “I think it will become apparent to anyone with ordinary judgment that the allegations defy common sense,” he said. Mabry declined to comment when approached by the AFRO. Bell served 12 years on the city council before launching an unsuccessful mayoral bid against Gov. Martin O’Malley in 1999, a campaign which brought to light Bell’s unflattering personal and financial woes. He dropped out of public view and moved to Atlanta before resurfacing in Baltimore in 2006 for a state senate race, eventually won by Catherine Pugh, D-40.

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

March 19, 2011 - March 19, 2011, The Afro-American

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PGCC Communication & Theatre Department
By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer The Prince George’s Community College Communication and Theatre Department is currently in rehearsals of August Wilson’s play, Two Trains Running, a story about civil rights era Pittsburgh. “August Wilson didn’t write about famous people,” said Charles Weldon, the director of the play. “He wrote about people you’ve never heard of, who live in the house next door or the house down the street, and their struggles.” Weldon is a veteran actor who has acted in a production of Two Trains Running himself. Weldon’s career includes working in films such as Stir Crazy and Malcolm X as well as appearing on primetime television shows, “Law and Order” and “New York Undercover.” He’s brought years of experience to the play so it’s only natural that he’s using that experience to teach the students at PGCC – a process

Veteran Actor Directs Wilson’s ‘Two Trains Running’
he said is coming along slowly but surely. “I used to teach acting a lot and that’s what I find myself doing,” Weldon said. “At this point I’m doing more teaching than directing. “At the same time you want to push [the students] to where they can get to the point to where they can start creating on their own,” he continued. “Some of them are getting there and doing that and I really appreciate that.” Weldon is very handson with the students and actors. He doesn’t mind stopping a scene or changing a detail here and there to have the play make more sense. He’ll even talk to an actor in the middle of scene, something that PGCC acting teacher Gina Alvarado-Otero appreciates. “I love when he just goes and whispers advice in their ears,” she said. “Some people may get flustered but the kids hear the advice and then they’re fine.” Weldon said there are some distinct challenges with working with a school, however. He said that after a month of rehearsals with a professional acting company, a play would be ready for open. But with students, who have to worry about school and other time restrictions, it’s more difficult to get this play perfected. “I know these kids can’t come to rehearsal until they get out of school,” he said. “You can’t rehearse more than four hours, which is totally different than professionals because then you can rehearse seven working hours.” Weldon is also concerned with his other job as artistic director of the Negro Ensemble Company in Harlem, whose alumni list includes Phylicia Rashad, Denzel Washington and Samuel L. Jackson. Weldon said he didn’t mind taking the job, although he knew the school wouldn’t be able to pay him much. “All I say is help me so that I don’t lose money,” Weldon said. “My staff is always one the phone with me and when I woke up this morning I had a lot of messages. The natives are getting restless.” Despite the challenges, the play is coming along and will be ready to open on March 31. Weldon says the experience has been invaluable to him. “This is a good place to start directing,” he said. “The kids are trying. It’s good for me to go through this part of it because I plan to do a lot more of it.”

Continued from A1

City Education Advocates
chops the state’s contribution to teacher’s retirement and pensions by $2 million. For Baltimore City, the cuts equate to $250 less per pupil or a 10 percent reduction, according to Baltimore Education Coalition memos. The cuts come as the state must close a $1.3 billion budget gap, and state officials say it promotes fiscal responsibility. In an open letter to the public school community time of growing enrollment is a grave risk to the progress and momentum that is now underway in City Schools,” he wrote. Alonso said the fresh round of cuts would surely lead to fewer teachers and increased class sizes, or fewer career, technical, art, music or after school programs. It could also halt efforts to restore deteriorating school structures. Baltimore City Schools depends on the state for nearly 70 percent of their budget. The spending proposal undercuts the Thornton funding formula, which in 2002 affixed a per-pupil benchmark for state aid. The legislature has flat lined school funding for the last three years without inflation adjustments, which city school officials assert led to $250 million less aid than mandated under Thornton. What’s worse, enrollment is expected to increase by 800 students next year. “I think that if budget cuts take place, we won’t be able to be educated as much as we are now,” Lashia Daniels, a Baltimore City College High student said in a video posted on the Baltimore City Public Schools website. “If we have more funding we will be able to have different after school programs and it will distract us from being out on the streets and making bad decisions and I think that is very important to keep our minds focused.” Sharon Wheaton, a Baltimore pre-K teacher said she attended last week’s rally to evoke change. “We see a wrong and we want to make it right,” she said. At the protest, several Baltimore City legislators asserted their opposition of the bill. Del. Curt Anderson said the Baltimore delegation – which he chairs – has “backed up” $800 million in education aid and “are going for more.” Del. Keiffer Mitchell Jr. added that he has “a vested interest” in education funding because his two children attend Baltimore City Public Schools. Baltimore Democrat Del. Jill P. Carter has said one of the reasons she attempted to scuttle the now-stalled samesex marriage bill earlier this month was to push forward debate about school funding. State legislators are scheduled to vote on the budget, with the first round of votes scheduled before March 19.

Schools,” the energetic crowd urged state legislators to “Keep the Promise.” It was the education coalition’s second protest to preserve state funding. On Feb. 28, dozens of teachers, students, parents and school supporters took to Annapolis to testify against slashes to education. In his state budget proposal, Gov. Martin O’Malley purports to keep education funding flat, but the even stream of cash

Photo by George Barnette

Charles Weldon works with two students during rehearsals of Two Trains Running.

“Any change in the state method for funding education that reduces our funding at a time of growing enrollment is a grave risk to the progress and momentum that is now underway in City Schools.”
- Baltimore city schools CEO Andres A. Alonso
won’t pay for increased student enrollment or chart adjustments for inflation. The result is $15 million worth of cuts to Baltimore City Schools and $94 million statewide. O’Malley’s spending plan limits funding growth to 1 percent a year and dated Feb. 15, Baltimore city schools CEO Andres A. Alonso said the aid reductions would foil his administration’s attempts to turn around city schools. “Any change in the state method for funding education that reduces our funding at a

Author Appearances and Booksignings | Free Program

Saturday, March 19, 1 p.m.

Dolen Perkins-Valdez is a former University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow and graduate of Harvard. Wench is her first novel.

Saturday, April 16, 1 p.m.

Wendy Coakley-Thompson is the author of Triptych, Back to Life (2004 Romantic Times Award nominee) Coakley-Thompson also covers the publishing industry for Examiner.com.

Saturday, May 21, 1 p.m.

(Mother/Daughter discussion) Jewell Parker Rhodes is an award-winning author of fiction and nonfiction. Her book Ninth Ward is a winner of the Coretta Scot King Award.

Saturday, June 18, 1 p.m.

Charlene Davis, MSW first book is Pay Attention to the Red Flag. She is inspired by John Grisham, Eric Jerome Dickey, T.D. Jakes, and Oprah Winfrey.

Attendees are asked to register by calling: 443-263-1827

of Maryland African American History & Culture

Reginald F. Lewis Museum
830 E. Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21202 443-263-1800 www.AfricanAmericanCulture.org

Opinion
During the most difficult economic period in several generations, I count myself fortunate. In addition to the blessings of family and reasonably good health, I represent a true community of conscience in the Congress of the United States. Here in the Baltimore region, we devote considerable attention to our shortcomings. We also should recognize the culture of caring about others that Elijah Cummings does so much to sustain our community. This is an element of the truth about ourselves that so pervades our daily lives that it may go unnoticed. It should not. Here in our community, heroes and heroines are responding to their own struggles in life, not by taking from others, but by giving. Despite the challenges on our streets, at our jobs and in our schools, they have never lost the vision and will to overcome. I share these reflections to give credit where credit is due – and I have another, even more compelling motivation as well. All too often, when I go to work in Washington, I encounter a more self-centered, less generous vision for our country. We all should be clear. The political arguments about budgets in Washington and our state legislatures have implications far beyond the appropriate role of government in our lives. At their heart, these legislative struggles are about the quality of life that we, as Americans, are committed to providing for our children and the generations yet unborn.

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011, The Afro-American

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What Kind of America?

Our governments – at every level – face financial deficits that must be addressed. Yet, underlying many of the arguments about balancing our public accounts is a more fundamental moral challenge. When 220,000 Marylanders and more than 13,000,000 other Americans are taking the early bus each day in a struggle to find jobs, proposals to cut job training and referral programs are immoral, as well as fiscally unwise. When we know that modest amounts invested now in federal Women, Infants and Children (WIC) funding can save tens of thousands of lives (and billions of dollars) in the years to come, efforts to cut this vital funding are totally inconsistent with the value our nation places upon human life. When those who applaud educational achievement vote to cut 10,000 teachers, tutors and aides from low-income, Title I public schools nationwide – and to cut federal financial aid for more than 10 million deserving college students – how can they defend themselves against charges of hypocrisy? I wish that I could assure my neighbors that the Republican “Tea Party” attack upon our future as a great nation is limited to the examples that I have noted. It is not. Even a perfunctory review of H.R. 1, passed by the House (235-189) by a Republican party-line vote, reveals a lock-step, ideological disregard for America’s “safety net,” our prosperity, our public health, our environment, and our security. Perhaps even more profound, we are facing a serious challenge to the moral sensibilities that are the foundation of our national unity. We can trust the Senate and our president to fight for us and the American values that H.R. 1 disregards. I also have faith that our community and our nation will eventually rise to overcome the desperate challenge that we now face. Yet that short-term victory (in all probability, one filled with painful compromise) will not be the end of this challenge.

The more fundamental struggle, to be waged in the hearts and minds of 308 million Americans, is just beginning. Those Tea-Party Republicans in the House of Representatives are gasping from the growing federal debt. They may be surprised to learn that so am I. Yet I also ask them this basic question: With the greatest economy in the world, why can’t America’s elected representatives find the resources needed to accomplish our practical (and moral) national imperatives? I ask this because I represent a community that has not lost its conscience. I represent a community that understands a basic truth about life in our country. The most crippling segregation of all is the segregation from hope that is the inevitable consequence of unrelieved poverty. We must organize and work together to convince our countrymen and women of the wisdom and justice of our cause – or we must relegate our children to the evolving economic serfdom of our time. This struggle is about what kind of America we are determined to create. Congressman Elijah Cummings represents Maryland’s 7th Congressional District in the United States House of Representatives.

The Real Terrorism

What we witnessed March 10 on Capitol Hill during hearings led by Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, was a shameful example of the excesses of power. Claiming concern over the alleged radicalization of Muslims in America, Rep. King conducted nothing short of a “witch hunt,” by singling out a single group of Americans as an internal threat to the nation’s security Walter Fields worthy of suspicion by their fellow citizens. The insult was enough to bring Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), one of two Muslims serving in Congress, to tears as he defended American Muslims, and emotionally described the sacrifice that some Muslims made on Sept. 11, 2001. The arrogance of Rep. King was evident as he maintained that the threat of radical elements among the nation’s Muslim population was extensive enough to warrant a McCarthy-like probe. This, despite the fact that King’s earlier claims that more than 80 percent of imams in our country were radicalized has never been substantiated and widely ridiculed. To add insult, and further fan the flames of hate toward Muslims, King had pictures of the devastation of 9/11 on the walls of the hearing room. It was one of the worst examples of the immorality of political leadership of recent memory.

Peter King is looking in all the wrong places

Meanwhile, as King works to pin the scarlet letter of terrorism on Muslims, and make Islam a dirty word in America, the suspect in the attempted bombing of the Martin Luther King Day parade route in Spokane, Wash., Kevin William Harpham, was a member of the neo-Nazi National Alliance according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. Like Timothy McVeigh, he is a former soldier in the U.S. Army, who sympathizes with White supremacists. Had the bomb – placed where it was intended to do major damage – detonated, the crowd would have been sprayed with lead pellets coated with rat poison. Yet, despite the very real existence and continued threat of White supremacist groups and militias, Rep. King is invested in using his office to harbor his personal prejudices. In Detroit, a family is grieving over the deaths of two children, 8-year-old Alaya Cook and 10-year-old Lataya Cook, who lost their lives in a fire that investigators have deemed arson. The girls were too afraid to jump from a second-story window at the urging of their father, who was injured in the blaze. The home had been firebombed. While the perpetrator(s) have yet to be caught, and the cause remains unknown, the incident is eerily similar to the tragic fire that took the life of a Baltimore family several years back. In that incident, drug dealers had set the house ablaze because the parents were spoke out against the illegal drug activity occurring in their neighborhood. Whether drug dealers or gangs are responsible for the tragedy in Detroit, there is one thing that is certain: Alaya and Lataya are just the latest victims of an epidemic of urban violence that is stealing the dreams and futures of a generation of children. In cities, big and small, in every corner of our nation, gangs and drug dealers are terrorizing communities, and their prey is

mostly Black and Latino children and families. Perhaps that is why Rep. King does not show the same concern or expresses the same outrage over the domestic terrorism of which there is ample evidence—just as Timothy McVeigh showed no concern for the life of children when he helped plot the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, a building that contained a day care center; and in the same way Kevin William Harpham apparently had little regard for the lives of children on the streets of Spokane celebrating the birthday of America’s prince of peace, Dr. King. The congressman should talk to funeral home directors and shock trauma medical professionals who, every day, witness the result of the carnage that has taken over communities. Put the faces of our dead children on the walls of your hearing room Mr. King, and let America see what real domestic terrorism looks like. We are treading on dangerous waters here. Peter King is not making us any safer. In fact, he is giving reason for Muslims and others to hate us. It is his ilk, and other demagogues, who put the security of our nation in jeopardy. If he was serious and sincere about the safety of American citizens Rep. King would be examining the resurgence of White supremacist groups, the proliferation of gangs across America, including in seemingly “safe” White suburban communities, and the unfettered access to firearms and explosives. The Long Island, N.Y. congressman is perpetrating a fraud and he needs to be called out. All Americans deserve better from our political leadership than the equivalent of “Bozo goes to Congress.” Walter Fields is the executive editor of NorthStarNews.com, where this article was originally published.

I have recently been shocked and appalled by ads that I and other Black publishers saw in several major newspapers (The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, etc.) confirming that Toyota spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to advertise in White mainstream daily newspapers “THANKING” their general market consumers for their loyalty Danny J. Bakewell Sr. and patronage to Toyota during their time of major controversy and concerns over the safety of Toyota’s vehicles. Thanking their customers is a smart move on Toyota’s behalf and one that I applaud. However, we can’t overlook the fact that Black people represent almost 10 percent of Toyota’s American market share, and with a $1.2 billion annual advertising budget it is not unreasonable for the Black Press to always expect to have a stake in Toyota’s advertising (including Black advertising agencies). Nevertheless, Black newspapers were left off Toyota’s latest marketing campaign, sending a clear and direct message that the Black consumer is still being taken for granted and Black people are still being disrespected and undervalued. This is disappointing behavior from a company who was all too eager to send us their press releases and ask us to write stories and editorials to influence Black America to stay with them in their time of trouble. But now that Toyota’s pain has been essentially eased—for now—by a report issued by the Federal Transportation Department and NASA that found no faults with Toyota’s electronic accelerator controls, the Black press has once again been forgotten along

Toyota Disrespects and Devalues the Patronage of their Black Consumers
with the Black consumer. Toyota should note that it is going to take more than a passing grade on a federal transportation report card to bring back the consumer safety confidence enjoyed for years by Toyota from American consumers prior to one of the largest vehicle recalls in U.S. history. So when the decision was made to advertise in mainstream newspapers from coast to coast thanking their customers for their loyalty, where was Toyota’s loyalty to the 10 percent of African- American consumers? DON’T WE ALSO DESERVE A GREAT BIG THANK YOU? Historically, there has always been an imbalance between what goes out of the Black community and what comes into the Black community relative to retail goods, services and representation. Despite the fact that the buying power of

“…we can’t overlook the fact that Black people represent almost 10 percent of Toyota’s American market share…”
America’s Blacks is reported to be roughly $1 trillion this year. And it is highly doubtful that Black-owned businesses will report revenue numbers that are the same and/or reap any of the benefits proportionate to our buying power. However, the question still remains, why is Toyota undervaluing the Black consumer and showing our community such blatant disrespect? Tried, true, and tested — the NNPA (Black Press of America) remains the gatekeeper for reaching the Black community. Corporations and advertising agencies wanting and needing to reach the African-American consumer must understand the relationship of the Black Press with Black people. They must remember to place their advertising messages on the pages of Black newspapers throughout America, and Black consumers

will respond in kind (Black advertising agencies could help them with this). The days of being silent and complaining among ourselves regarding these unethical and immoral business practices are over. When Toyota wanted our help, it had no problem seeking all 200 Black newspapers in America to do just that. Their message to Black people was, “Please help us. We value your business.” We do not want Toyota to use us for editorial coverage and then overlook us with their advertising dollars. Black newspapers are not afraid to demand fair representation and a seat to dine at Toyota’s table, especially when their food is purchased with approximately 10 percent of Black consumer dollars. We are not interested in fighting with Toyota however, Toyota has enjoyed healthy African-American consumer support, and despite last year’s set back we have remained loyal. If you want to thank Black consumers for our loyalty and keep our business, do it on the pages of the Black newspapers that Black people read, respect, trust and own. As chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, I represent 200 Black publishers throughout America. I am challenging Toyota’s chairman and CEO to do the right thing and meet with me to discuss the future of their relationship with Black consumers and whether or not we as Black newspaper publishers should continue supporting Toyota or should organize a campaign to take Black brand loyalty to Toyota elsewhere. WE WILL NOT BUY WHERE WE ARE DISRESPECTED….THAT IS A PROMISE! Danny Bakewell Sr. is the chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, parent organization to more than 200 independently owned Black newspapers.

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011
March 31. For more information and to apply: www.ecyp.org. March 19 Lines Connect Book Club: Dolen Perkins-Valdez Reginald F. Lewis Museum, 830 E. Pratt St., Baltimore. 1 p.m. Author Dolen-PerkinsValdez will speak about her debut novel, Wench, a fascinating historical drama. For more information: 443-2631875. International Women’s History Month Literary Festival Enoch Pratt Free Library, Central Branch, 400 Cathedral St., Baltimore. 1-4 p.m. Four female writers from various regions across the globe discuss the voice and role of women in the past, present and future. For more information: 410-3965430. Mike Epps & Friends First Mariner Arena, 201 West Baltimore St., Baltimore. 8 p.m. Comedian Mike Epps brings special guest Sheryl Underwood to this night of laughs. $37-73. For more information: 410-547-7328. March 23 Her Stories Enoch Pratt Free Library, Walbrook Branch, 3203 W. North Ave., Baltimore. 1 p.m. Hear African-American stories and proverbs celebrating Women’s History Month. For more information: 410-3860935. March 24-27 Maryland Black Business Summit & Expo 2011 Palladium Conference Center, 2900 Liberty Heights Ave., Baltimore. Various times. The Business Summit will bring together over 250-500 business owners and professionals to assess the present status of Maryland’s African-American business and economic development. This event will include workshops, banquets, award presentations and more. For more information: www. blackdollarexchange.com. March 26-27 Baltimore Natural Hair Care Expo 2011 Pikesville Hilton, 1726 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville, Md. Various times. Experience Baltimore’s only conference on natural hair care, holistic beauty and wearable art. $15. For more information: 410-298-0660. March 26 Entrepreneur Expo & Job Fair Randallstown Community Center, 3505 Resource Drive, Randallstown, Md. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Baltimore County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority will host this event to provide resourceful information to community members seeking employment. For more information, e-mail: shdail@msn.com. The Many Faces of Breast Cancer 2011: Celebration of Sisterhood New Psalmist Baptist Church, 6020 Marian Drive, Baltimore. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Visit the 17th annual educational symposium at New Psalmist Baptist Church for a celebration of sisterhood and survivorship. Mayor Stephanie RawlingsBlake and various breast cancer survivors will be the event’s guest speakers. For more information: 410-938-8990.

Community Calendar
March 18-31 Elijah Cummings Youth Program Citywide. The Elijah Cummings Youth Program in Israel is currently accepting applications for next year’s class. Current high school sophomores are encouraged to apply for this free once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to travel abroad and develop as leaders. Deadline is

Stop Diabetes!
March 22, 5:30 p.m. Diabetes Prevention Lecture Enoch Pratt Free Library Central Branch March 23, 11 a.m. Health Fair and Cooking Demonstration Lexington Market Fair 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cooking Demonstration 12 to 1 p.m. March 23, 1 p.m. Diabetes Prevention Lecture Enoch Pratt Free Library Clifton Branch March 25, 11 a.m. Diabetes Prevention Health Fair St. Agnes Hospital Workout with Ravens trainer Monte Sanders 12 to 12:30 p.m. March 26, 8:30 a.m. Stop Diabetes Expo with health screenings St. Joseph Medical Center 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Stop Diabetes Symposium St. Joseph Medical Center 12:30 to 3 p.m. Spin-A-Thon to Stop Diabetes Gold’s Gym, Marley Station Mall 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 27 Stop Diabetes Sunday Empowerment Temple AME Church Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown Sen. Catherine Pugh

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March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011, The Afro-American

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Lori and Howard Tutman III John and Charlene McCargo

Wanda and Dr. Robert Draper

The Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Baltimore Alumni Chapter, recognized 2011 as a year of celebration. The fraternity celebrated its 100th anniversary, the 90th anniversary of the Baltimore Alumni Chapter and the 40th anniversary of “Night in Kappa Vegas.” Over the last four decades, the Baltimore Alumni Chapter’s annual “Night in Kappa Vegas” has emerged Photos by A. Lois De Laine, Ed.D. as the social event of the season and is attended each year by more than 1,400 friends and supporters from across the country. This well-attended event allows the Baltimore Alumni Chapter and the Kappa Alpha Psi Foundation to award scholarships to deserving collegeFenton bound high school and students and provide Myrna much needed mentoring Pugh and support services to at-risk youth.

Michael and Dawn Millner

Carolyn Chissell

Eric and Carolyn Morris

Sara Bragg Gray and Anne Shervington Davis

Brigitte and Harold Hodges Alice Pinderhughes and Dr. Jesse Weaver

Ellsworth and Chandra Jackson

Pamela and Steward Beckham

Lauren Dowdy, Kelley Richards and Dani Freeman

Meredith and E. Dean Evans

Gladys Wade Bragg, Floyd Taliaferro III and Gwen Taliaferro

Comptroller Joan Pratt and Sen. Nathaniel McFadden

Kappas Samuel Jackson Jr., Charles Thomas Jr., and Kenneth Bradley

Angela Gibson, George F. David III and DeVera Redmond

Dedric Rogers, first vice polemarch; Howard L. Tutman Jr., 29th international grand polemarch and and Gary P. Palmer, chapter polemarch

Pat Waddy, Carol Rogers and Tahlea McNeil

In commemoration of the 25th consecutive celebration of African American Patriots Day, veterans and civilians gathered at the War Memorial Plaza on Fayette and Gay streets on Feb. 26. According to the state’s military department website, the event was sponsored by the AfricanAmerican Patriots Consortium and the National Association of Black Veterans. The day’s events included tributes to Korean War veterans and the reading of a proclamation from Maryland Gov. Martin O’ Malley by Secretary of Veterans Affairs Edward Chow. Col. David Clark, executive director of the Department of Defense Commemorative Commission for the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War, was the keynote speaker. Photos by J.D. Howard Former Del. Clarence Tiger Davis and Gunnery Sgt. Rogers. Ethel D. Nicholson, president

The Maryland Chapter No. 33 of the Korean Veterans headed by Commissioner Raymond H. Glock

Johnny Hall, chaplain, AAPC giving the prayer.

The Milford Mill High Academy JROTC Color Guard. First file: C/1st Lt. Joseph, C/1st Sgt. Grayson, C/1st Lt. High. Second file: C/LCpl Davis, C/Pfc Amison, C/Lcpl Archibald and C/Pvt Lively. Third file: Company gunnery Hill, C/1st Lt. Ako, C/1st Lt. Pittman and C/Cpl Dunchie The parade

Address given by Col. David Clark, former director DOD, 60th Commemoration Company

Secretary of Veterans Affairs Edward Chow Jr.

Clarence Tiger Davis, MIke Taylor and Milton England lay a wreath.

James McClain, Del. Melvin Stukes and Sgt. David White

Cpl. Samuel Boone Jr., United States Marine Corp, received the Silver Star Medal from President Barack Obama. A marching unit

Col. Wayne Johnson, MDARNG, reads the governor’s proclamation.

The Sensational Royal Lights perform.

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

www.afro.com

‘Kam’s Kapsules’: Weekly Film Previews

Morgan State Alum’s ‘Isaiah Wait’ Featured in Film Fest
By Gregory Dale AFRO Staff Writer When an e-mail from the D.C. Independent Film Festival appeared in filmmaker David Lee Roberts’ inbox, he initially disregarded it. “I thought it was junk e-mail,” Roberts told the AFRO in a recent interview. But to his surprise, it was a message to inform him that his film Isaiah Wait had been selected for entry in the annual festival, which only chooses 110 films out of 2,000 worldwide submissions. “When I found that out it really made me feel good,” he said. Now, fresh off its world premiere at the event, Roberts hopes the film will be a beacon of encouragement for viewers across the globe that are experiencing tough times. “The film gives you a greater appreciation for what you may be going through,” Roberts said. Set in the District, Isaiah Wait tells the story of a grandmother named Mrs. Bennett who is raising her teenage grandson, Isaiah. While struggling to pay bills, various circumstances strip her of her finances and she winds up with a mere $60 in her pocket. While Isaiah wants his grandmother to use the money for groceries, she opts to continue tithing to her church, despite her grandson’s wishes. While Isaiah struggles to understand her faith, he later finds that those who are patient and trust in God are ultimately blessed. Based on a true story, Isaiah Wait explores many pertinent issues in the Black community that countless people can identify with. “When I heard the story, it inspired and encouraged me to hear how faithful this grandmother was in the midst of all her struggles,” Roberts said. He added that he also wanted to tell the story to dispel some of negative perceptions some people hold about spiritual practices, like tithing. “Tithing itself in many cases has been looked upon in many negative lights,” he said. “I wanted to show some of the positive things that can come about [as a result of tithing.]” The 20-minute short premiered at the film festival on March 8 and was nominated for a handful of awards. Roberts said he felt honored that his film was selected from such a myriad of participants, mainly because spiritual films are rarely featured at the event. “The D.C. Film Festival is not a Christian film festival,” he said. “I found out during the premiere that they generally get a lot of spiritual films, but they [generally] don’t accept them. But, they looked beyond that and found quality, so that made it a little bit better for me.” The experience at the festival opened more doors for the District native, as he was approached by a few sponsors at the event who offered to fund his next project. The recent success is like a dream come true for Roberts, who became interested in filming while attending Morgan State University. After graduating, he enrolled at Ohio University’s school of film. But his love for his hometown drew him back to the District, where he currently resides.

Though many may believe Roberts faces a tough road ahead in today’s industry as a Black filmmaker, he insists otherwise, and recalls a message that was given to him early on in his career. “My advisor told me, ‘You are not a Black filmmaker, you are a filmmaker who just happens to be Black,’ and I understood and appreciated that,” Roberts said. “I want people to remember the quality that I bring to them, rather than who I am as a person. So, regardless of what color I am, I’m going to always push to work with a diverse group of people to embrace a universal concept that everyone can appreciate.” For more information visit the D.C. Independent Film Festival’s website at dciff.org.

Courtesy Photo

David Lee Roberts

Black Female Jockey’s Success and Struggle With Bipolar Disorder Detailed in New Memoir
By Gregory Dale AFRO Staff Writer Sylvia Harris had reached rock bottom. She was homeless, she had lost custody of one of her children, and above all, she was battling mental illness. At her emotional peak, she needed an escape. When a twist of fate elicited a fond childhood pastime−horseback riding−she finally found the answer to her whirlwind of despair. After utilizing the activity as outlet to curb her problems, she went on to break barriers in the process. Her incredible story is detailed in the book, Long Shot: My Bipolar Life and the Horses Who Saved Me. Released on March 8, Long Shot, is a memoir that captures Harris’ ascent from a single mother facing bipolar disorder to her status as just the second AfricanAmerican female jockey in the country to win a major thoroughbred race. “I don’t even know how I made it out alive,” Harris told the AFRO as she reflected on her past. “I had low points before, but it had never gotten to the point where I was homeless. It was kind of devastating−to the point where I did not care what was going to happen to me.” Though she was originally born in Germany, Harris grew up in California. At the onset of her adult life, problems began to arise. Harris’ manic behavior ranged from hearing voices, to spontaneous imaginary outbreaks and before long, she found herself alone on the streets of Orlando, Fla., struggling with her illness. But a breakthrough occurred while she was residing in a local shelter. After holding a conversation with a priest at the establishment, he discovered that she had a passion for horses−which she developed as a child. “The priest told me, ‘OK, I’ll be right back,’” Harris said. “He was gone a few minutes and he said, ‘Get your stuff together and be ready in a half an hour.’ Harris explained that then he set her up with a job at a farm in Ocala, Fla. She spent a considerable time at this location as a groomer and cared for the horses. At that moment, she immediately found solace. “There was just something about the being or the essence of the horse that for me [was] very calming and therapeutic,” Harris said. I just have a very strong connection and bond with animals, particularly horses. I think it’s because they don’t judge us the same. They’re not verbal and cruel enough to hurt our feelings the way people do to one another.” She later wanted to become a jockey. Though others attempted to discourage her from following her aspirations, she defied their opposition and acquired a license. She explained that people would often tell her she was too old, and horseback riding wasn’t a sport that African Americans participated in. “[When] people were telling me ‘no,’ it wasn’t because I physically couldn’t do it, because a majority of the physical part comes from the horse,” Harris said. It was because there are some color problems and color issues very much in effect in this country.” Shortly thereafter, she made history when she won her first major thoroughbred race at 40 years old. This victory made her just the second African-American woman to achieve this honor, the first being jockey
Continued on B3

Courtesy Photo

Sylvia Harris

4th Annual Governor’s Leadership in Aging Award
DEPARTMENT OF AGING

For Excellence and Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Aging and Quality of Life for Seniors

Older Americans/Marylander Month Celebration May 10, 2011, 12 noon – 2pm Catonsville Senior Center 501 N. Rolling Rd., Catonsville, MD 21228

Trailblazer

Nomination Information Instructions Categories
• • • • • • Select a Category. Complete the nomination form and attach a 500 word or less description of recommendation (why the nominee meets criteria). Visual Arts nominations must be accompanied by photos, slides, or CD of artwork. Performing Arts nominations must be accompanied by a DVD or web link to a video sharing site (i.e. YouTube). Photography nominations must be in .jpg or .gif and must not exceed 5 MB in size. Nominations that do not require supporting materials can be faxed to: 410-333-7943 All nominations must be postmarked or e-mailed no later than April 8, 2011. You may download copies of the nomination form by visiting the website at: www.mdoa.state.md.us For more information, call: 410-767-1064 or 1-800- 243-3425

An individual, community group, business or organization that has demonstrated leadership in advocacy or developed an innovative program, research or training for seniors.

Visual and Performing Arts

An individual, 60 years of age or older, or a group (members must be 55 years of age or older), who has demonstrated excellence in the visual or performing arts.

Photography

An individual 60 years or older who demonstrates excellence in photography or photojournalism that portrays “Successful Aging”.

Health and Vitality

An individual 60 years or older who demonstrates a commitment to healthy living and who serves as a role model to others.

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011, The Afro-American

Popular Rapper, Singer Nate Dogg Dies at 41
By Marc Tyler Special to the AFRO Popular singer Nathaniel D. Hale, known to hip-hop music fans as Nate Dogg, died March 15 at age 41 after a lengthy illness. News of his death was first reported by the Long Beach, Calif. newspaper the Press Telegram, which confirmed the news with Nate’s family. While Nathaniel D.Hale, aka, the cause of death wasn’t released, the Nate Dogg singer suffered strokes in 2007 and Courtesy Photo 2008. According to entertainment website Lifeofthecity.com, the Nate Dogg. rapper dropped out of high school at 16 in Long Beach, Calif., Several celebrities took to social media sites to remember and left home to join the U.S. Marine Corps. He served for only the late singer, including close friend Snoop Dogg. “We lost a three years. true legend n hip hop n rnb,” the former Death Row Records In 1991, Nate Dogg, Snoop Dogg, and their friend Warren member tweeted. “One of my best friends n a brother to me G, formed a rap trio called 213. The group recorded their first since 1986 when I was a sophomore at poly high where we demo in the back of the famed V.I.P. record store in Long met.” Beach and the record later caught the ear of rapper/producer Dr. Rapper 50 Cent also sounded off on Twitter, saying, “I just Dre. [learned] nate dog is dead damn. GOD BLESS HIM R.I.P he Nate Dogg came to fame in the 1990s after he debuted meant a lot to west coast hiphop. I’ve always been a fan of it.” on Dr. Dre’s The Chronic album, and from there he began to California-based rapper Xzibit tweeted, “We love you Nate work with a handful of artists including Enimem, Fabolous, Dogg, it’s never going to be the same. We lost a soldier, a Ludacris, 50 Cent, and Tupac. Nate Dogg was featured on father, a legend, a homie. My condolences go out to Ms. Ruth Warren G’s 1994 single “Regulate,” which peaked at No. 2 on and the entire family. Celebrate.” the Hot 100. The song was the first in a string of top hip-hop singles that included Nate Dogg’s melow voice, including Dr. Dre’s “The Next Episode,” Fabolous’ “Can’t Deny It,” Ludacris’ “Area Codes” and Eminem’s “Shake That.” The mellow-voiced entertainer’s signature sound became an integral part of the 1990s music scene and the West Coast “gangsta-funk” movement. He also released a number of solo albums, including G-Funk Classics Vol. 1 & 2, Music & Me, and

B3

Book Review

‘Black Gotham: A Family History of African-Americans in 19th Century New York City’
By Kam Williams Special to the AFRO “This book is… not exactly a family memoir, but neither is it traditional social history. It is a narrative that lies somewhere in between. It records my search to find my father’s New York family; my success in uncovering many documents [which] serve as a pathway to a larger public history: the history of social movements, Courtesy Image political events, and cultural influences… I’ve written Black Gotham out of a sense of obligation to the dead, to give a face to those left faceless by acts of trauma and erasure. I also feel I owe something to my family and my community… Black Gotham is meant to be an act of reparation, an act to repair the tears of memory—tears in the sense of both sorrow and rupture.” -- Excerpted from the Introduction (pgs. 6, 30 & 31) Before undertaking this daunting project, Carla Peterson was aware of precious little about her roots. In fact, although she’s African American, the only 19th century ancestor she really knew anything about was a Caucasian greatgrandfather from Haiti named Philip Augustus White (18231891). But despite that lack of genealogical information, Peterson, a professor of English at the University of Maryland, embarked on a fruitful quest which began in the manuscript room at the famed Schomburg Center for Research. And the upshot of her tireless efforts is Black Gotham: A Family History of African-Americans in 19th Century New York City. Among the surprising data unearthed by the author in the course of her study was that she had descended from New York City’s Black upper class, a cosmopolitan community comprised not only of doctors, businessmen and other professionals but of writers, artists and musicians, too. This information flies in the face of the conventional wisdom which would suggest that the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s represented the first flowering of Black culture in the city. While Peterson’s family tree certainly proves fascinating, what makes her seminal opus so significant is how she painstakingly reconstructs her forefathers’ past in light of the overall African-American struggle for emancipation and equality in the 1800s. Thus, we learn here about the collective, New York City Black lobby for everything from abolition to quality education to the right to vote to the protection of fugitive slaves. Such demands for dignity in the face of virulent racism and constant threats of violence often came at a great cost, given that back then the Dred Scott decision was still the law of the land. For in issuing that landmark ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court had deemed Blacks as “beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect.“ A shameful legacy which makes Carla Peterson’s overdue tribute to her intrepid ancestors an invaluable addition to the annals of African-American literature.

By Rosa Pryor

Roots Unltd., a very popular night club located at 2148 Vine St. (corner of Smallwood Street) in West Baltimore, is celebrating their 34th anniversary on March 27 starting at 5 p.m. Plenty of food, music and dancing. Veronica “Ronnie” Jackson is the owner. HEY YA’LL LET’S GO NIGHT CLUBBING Hello, everyone! How are you? I am having myself a ball! This week, I have about five suitcases open and I’m starting to pack for my cruise to the Bahamas on the Carnival Pride. We leave April 3. Honey child, I love to cruise. I try to go on one every year in between the time I am not traveling on the road cross country. My “Boo-Boo” Shorty (my husband) and I are sponsoring and hosting this cruise. I am so excited. We planned this cruise especially for my “Rambling Rose” fans and friends who want to travel with us and it worked out great!

Anthony “Swamp Dog” Clark, blues entertainer, took the roof off the Chef Mac Restaurant last week on Harford Road with the “Down Home Blues.” Aretha Franklin – now what does that tell you? “Twine Time,” who is a local dynamic blues band with roots firmly planted in the style of East Coast and Chicago Blues, will be at the club on March 19 and on March 25. Carl Filplak, one of the baddest jazz musicians and guitarists around, will also be there. Well, my dear friends, I have a lot more to tell you, but not enough space. I will inform you of the other clubs and restaurants and what is happening the next time. Until then, if you need me call me at 410-833-9474 or e-mail me at rosapryor@aol.com. UNTIL THE NEXT TIME, I’M MUSICALLY YOURS.

ENTER TO WIN

The RYZE Band & Chandra will be performing at the “Jazz and R&B Brunch” hosted by Randy Dennis at the Champagne Ballroom, 2701 Patapsco Ave., on March 20, 1-4 p.m. For reservations, call 410-655-1114. Well, enough about the cruise; you may or may not be going with us. I now want talk about the dynamite time I had at Chef Mac’s Restaurant located at 4709 Harford Road. The atmosphere was great. As you enter, you are greeted by a hostess who is pleasant, smiling, polite, cordial and has a dazzling personality. The buffet meal was scrumptious, even though most of it was seafood dishes and I am allergic. But, girlfriend! The music, man-n-n-n-n-n-n-n-n! The music was out-of-sight. One of my favorite blues artist, Anthony “Swamp Dog” Clark, performed with his band. He carried a black case full of harmonicas of all shapes, sizes and sounds and he was qualified to play them all. His backup musicians were very gifted and talented in their own right. My favorite tunes they played were “Down Home Blues” and “Black Drawers.” Mac, the owner, told me every weekend he will have blues bands, but occasionally, R&B and jazz bands, too. On March 17, WEAA 88.9 FM will broadcast the “Magic Bird” show live from Chef Mac’s. Broadcast from 8-9 p.m. Karaoke comes to the up-and-coming restaurant club, which can seat almost 300 guests on Wednesday nights starting in April with DJ Reginald Kelly. The club is also B.Y.O.B. They sell sodas, water and juices. Chef Mac’s entertainment lineup for March 18 is “Ursula Ricks Project” with a great show of blues of the ‘90s. Ursula reminds you of Etta James, KoKo Taylor, Nina Simone and

Lauren Thompson, renowned radio personality and host of “Baltimore’s Community Connection” on WFBR-1590 AM Radio from 1-2 p.m. every Friday. Yours truly, “Rambling Rose,” joins her on air also with some news about entertainment events. If you’ve got a book, new CD, talent, or a fundraiser, plug into her network or call 443-854-1127.

Black Female Jockey
Continued from B2

champion Cheryl White. Harris’ story quickly found its way onto national headlines, as people from across the country fell in love with her story. Today, Harris continues to ride and compete. With the release of her book, she hopes to inspire others with disabilities in hopes for them to accomplish their dreams, as she did. “Just because you have a disability or challenge, that doesn’t mean that your dream can’t come true,” Harris said. “They may not come right away when you want them to, but they will, if you keep your faith intact.” ‘Long Shot: My Bipolar Life and the Horses Who Saved Me’ is available now. For more information, visit: www.harpercollins.com.

LOG ONTO WWW.AFRO.COM AND REGISTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN YOUR COPY OF SKYLINE ON DVD!
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SKYLINE is on Blu-ray™ Hi-Def & DVD March 22

B4

The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

More Sports on afro.com

Philly Teens Become First All-Black Joppy Beats Cummings in Judges’ Polo Team Champions Decision
By Stephen D. Riley AFRO Staff Writer Maybe it was fitting of a fighter’s last goaround or maybe it was just a sign of the times. In a lackluster bout full of frustration, William Joppy defeated Cory “Black Ice” Cummings by unanimous decision in 10 rounds on Courtesy Photo March 12 at George Mason William Joppy (left) defeated Cory “Black Ice” Cummings University’s Patriot Center. (right) in a 10-round unanimous decision March 12 at George Mason University’s Patriot Center. Joppy, a Washington, D.C. native, didn’t do much, but apparently it was enough to hold off his Baltimore-based opponent and end his career with his 40th victory. Although he has yet to issue a formal statement, Joppy told the AFRO that his fight against Cummings would be his last after a lengthy but successful career. “My last one, man,” Joppy said after the fight. “I’m tired…. I was doing some roadwork (before the fight) and midway through I was like, ‘I’m tired of this.’ I love the sport of boxing, but I’m tired of this [expletive].” Appearing tired in the ring as well, Joppy paced his way through a full 10 rounds as both fighters exchanged punches throughout. In the early rounds, however, it was Cummings providing the fireworks as the 31-year-old unleashed power punch after power punch as the budding boxer attempted to make up for a controversial draw when the two men fought in early November. Cummings continued to land big time blows for the majority of the bout but Joppy routinely countered with effective flurries that tilted the scorecards in his favor. “I wasn’t busy enough,” Cummings said after the fight. “You can’t just throw only one shot; you’ve got to put the shots together and apparently I wasn’t doing it. So, props to Joppy for being a better man tonight.” Fighting close to his hometown, Joppy, a former three-time WBA middleweight champion, improved his record to 40-6-1 while Cummings fell to 17-5-1. The former sparring partners exchanged pleasantries after the bout and each thanked the crowd for showing support for a rivalry that’s been brewing for the last seven years.

Courtesy Photo

Brandon Rease, Kareem Rosser and Daymar Rosser became the first all AfricanAmerican polo team win the U.S. Polo Association Interscholastic Championship on March 13.
By Perry Green AFRO Sports Editor Black sports history was made in Virginia on March 13 when four African-American boys became the first all-Black polo team to capture the U.S. Polo Association Interscholastic Championship at the Virginia Polo Center. According to reports, Cowtown-Work to Ride, based in Fairmount Park, Pa., knocked off a Baltimore, Md.-based polo team, 24-17, in the 42nd annual national title game. Winning polo championships may be news to most Blacks, but it’s nothing unfamiliar to this group of African-American teens from West Philly. Cowtown-Work to Ride had just become the first all-Black group to win the regional championship last month. According to their website, CowtownWTR is a non-profit program founded in 1994 that offers urban youths riding lessons in exchange for labor. Brandon Rease, one of the top players on the team, said that polo is a sport that you can easily get hooked on. “If you get involved with it and want to do really good in it, you just practice every day,” Rease told NBC29.com. “…. A sport is a sport, no matter if it’s for Black, White, anything.” Team captain Kareem Rosser told reporters that winning the title was not only a major win for his teammates, but for everyone around them. “You know, not only did we do it for each other, but we did it for the polo community, and we did it for every other African-American young boy who comes from where we come from,” said Rosser. “You know we wanted to let everyone know that it was possible, and that whatever you put your mind to, you can actually do.”

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Real Estate
By Doug Miller Special to the NNPA from thedefendersonline.com African Americans may find themselves in the middle of a potentially devastating financial squeeze play, disproportionately pressed from one side by foreclosures tied to the ongoing U.S. mortgage crisis and constricted on the other by growing government demands for concessions from Black-heavy public employee unions. As governors and legislatures from Wisconsin to Indiana and Ohio continue to focus on fewer public-sector

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011, The Afro-American

B5

Double Whammy: Blacks in the Grip of Foreclosure/Wage-Concession Vice
employees as the centerpiece of plans to slash the cost of government services, the upshot could be more downsized Black employees with no regular income to pay mortgages that already may be in danger of foreclosure. According to Steven Pitts, a labor policy specialist with the University of CaliforniaBerkeley Labor Center, about 14.5 percent of all publicsector workers in the United States are African-American, which ranks that sector second only to health and education services in terms of a workforce that is heavily Black. More than one in five Black workers is employed in public administration in particular, either on a local, state or federal level. An Equal Employment Opportunity Commission report released last year added credence to those figures, showing that 18 percent of people employed by the federal government in 2009 were African-American. A separate report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics released earlier this year disclosed that Black workers also were more likely to be union members than Whites, Asians or Hispanics. Asked about the potential impact of widespread cutbacks in the number of workers employed in the public sector, Pitts said, “The danger is that it would have a disproportionate effect on Black workers.” At the same time, African Americans find themselves bearing an unequal burden in what has become a prolonged national crisis in mortgage foreclosures. Research published last year by the Center for Responsible Lending (CRL) in Washington, D.C., revealed that Blacks and Latinos are nearly 75 percent more likely to experience foreclosure than Whites. A separate study published last fall by Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs went so far as to call the foreclosure mess “a highly radicalized process.” Researchers Jacob Rugh and Douglas Massey contended that segregation created a unique bloc of minority clients who were differentially sold risky subprime loans. According to Rugh and Massey, the outcome of the crisis “was not simply a result of neutral market forces, but was structured on the basis of race and ethnicity through the social fact of residential segregation.” “Ultimately,” they concluded, “the racialization

of America’s foreclosure crisis occurred because of a systematic failure to enforce basic civil rights laws.” Reaffirming that the mortgage foreclosure problem continues to have a disproportionate impact on Blacks and Hispanics, Kathleen Day, a spokesperson for the CRL, added: “To the extent that someone loses their job, they can’t pay their mortgage. That compounds the problem even more.” Doug Miller is a former director of internal communications for Citigroup and has written extensively about the use of technology in financial services.

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B6 The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Men’s Basketball
By Keith Henry Special to the AFRO The great shooting that Morgan State displayed in the past two Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) championship games came to a screeching halt this year. Instead, it was Hampton University that got some timely baskets from junior guard Darrion Pellum to beat Morgan, 60-55, in the MEAC Tournament Championship game on March 12 at the Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Winston-Salem, N.C. As conference champion, Hampton will receive an automatic bid to the NCAA Championship Tournament. MSU’s top player, junior center Kevin Thompson got into foul trouble early, and his absence became a huge factor in the game. “We need him on the floor, that’s obvious,” Morgan State head coach Todd Bozeman said. “He fought hard in there; it’s hard when you’re at the disadvantage.” Hampton head coach Ed Joyner Jr. said about the game, “It was a war; it was what we expected; it’s the

Hampton Holds Off Morgan to Win MEAC Title
one we wanted to win.” Bozeman was unhappy with the officiating in the game and expressed that during the post-game press conference. “It’s ridiculous; I think they got what they wanted,” Bozeman said. “I think it’s hard when you have so many officials that come from one particular university. I can take a loss when everything is fair and square.” In the first half, Morgan State kept Pellum, Hampton’s outstanding guard, scoreless. Even so, Hampton (24-8) got off to a good start in the game, outscoring MSU 10-2 in the game’s first five minutes. Morgan’s defense would eventually break down against Hampton’s lively offense, led by Brandon Tunnel’s 20 points. “Sometimes the ball didn’t go in the basket,” said Morgan sophomore DeWayne Jackson, who finished with a game-high 25 points. “But we really weren’t worried about our offense, it was our defense.” Morgan State ends its season with a 17-14 overall record.

(Courtesy Photo)

Todd Bozeman, head coach of the Morgan State men’s basketball team, questioned the officiating in the MEAC championship game between MSU and Hampton University.

Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Women’s Basketball
By Maurice Williams Special to the AFRO Hampton University’s women’s basketball team employed the same formula that it has used throughout the tournament: keeping the game close through the first half and then parlaying the scoring of its three veterans, junior Melanie Warner, senior Quanneisha Perry and junior Jericka Jenkins along with some stifling second half defense to pull away from its opponents. The Lady Pirates continued that same formula to defeat Howard University, 61-42 in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) women’s tournament championship on March 12 at the Joel Coliseum in Winston-Salem, N.C. “It is interesting that these two teams are 1-2 in the conference in scoring defense,” said Hampton head coach David Six, in his second year at the helm. “In the first half, we were feeling each other out. But in the second half, we got things going. We knew that if we did not turn the ball over and rebound well, we would win the game. We have been consistent in those areas all season.” Hampton (25-6 overall record) now receives an automatic bid to the NCAA women’s basketball championship tournament and will await the pairings that will be announced on March 14. The first half was a grind-it-out affair with neither team being able to generate much offense. Both teams shot under 30 percent, but the seasoned Lady Pirates, who won their second straight tournament title, did just enough to maintain a 21-16 advantage at the half. Perry, the MEAC Defensive Player of the Year and a first

Hampton Grinds by Howard for Second Straight Championship

(Courtesy Photo/HamptonPirates.com)

Hampton head coach David Six has led the Lady Pirates basketball team to two consecutive MEAC titles and NCAA Tournament appearances. team All-MEAC selection, struggled early but came on down the stretch to give her team a push. She scored six points and grabbed six rebounds while Warner added four and reserve Keiara Avant, a sophomore, tallied five. Hampton came out and imposed its will on the young Howard team, which is dominated by sophomores and who were playing in their first tournament championship. “I think Hampton’s experience was definitely a factor, especially when you have players like Warner, Jenkins and Perry,” said Howard coach Niki Geckeler. “But that was not the overriding factor. We just lost our legs. We played four games to get here. We are very young and I am excited about the future.” Howard (16-18 overall) struggled offensively. Even their leading scorer, MEAC Player of the Year Saadia Doyle, had problems getting touches and starting point guard Cheyenne Curley-Payne, a sophomore who was had an outstanding tournament before this game, was held scoreless. “Their defense was really sagging and helping out a lot,” said Doyle, a Howard redshirt sophomore, who finished with a game-high 16 points and seven rebounds. “It made it hard to penetrate and we did not knock down the shots that we shot earlier in the tournament.” Sophomore guard Tamoria Holmes would lead Howard with 12 points in a losing effort, while Curley-Payne pulled down a career-high 10 rebounds. As for Hampton coach Six, he will now advance to his second straight NCAA Tournament appearance. “Our performance in the NCAAs last year left a bad taste in our mouths,” said Six. “We wanted an opportunity to get back there and atone ourselves. We do not just want to be there; we want to win. I think we are good enough to win.”

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The object of this suit is to officially change the name of the petitioner from Devon Lisa Gershaneck to Devon Gershaneck Ba It is this 9th day of March, 2011 by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, ORDERED, that publication be given one time in a newspaper of general circulation in Baltimore City on or before the 9th day of April, 2011, which shall warn all interested persons to file an affidavit in opposition to the relief requested on or before the 19th day of April, 2011. Frank M. Conaway Clerk 3/18

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY Case No.: 24D11000673 IN THE MATTER OF DEVON LISA GERSHANECK FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO DEVON GERSHANECK BA ORDER FOR NOTICE BY PUBLICATION

The Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners is inviting interested companies to submit bids to: BCS-11069. In order to participate, interested bidders need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website at https://ebidmarketplace.com Solicitation BCS-11069 will be available for review commencing Friday, March 11, 2011. The Bid Due Date is Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be accepted after that time. Any questions related to this solicitation should be directed to the Buyer.
Baltimore City Public Schools. INVITATION FOR BIDS: BCS-11073 Provide Media Center Renovation Services at John Eager Howard Elementary School #61

1 Col. Inch Up to 20 Words
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AFRO Classified minimum ad rate is $26.74 per col. inch (an inch consists of up to 20 words). Mail in your ad on form below along with CHECK or MONEY ORDER to: WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN CO., 1917 Benning Road, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002-4723, Attn: Clsf. Adv. Dept.

1 6 11 16

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The Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners is inviting interested companies to submit bids to: BCS-11073. In order to participate, interested bidders need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website at https://ebidmarketplace.com Solicitation BCS-11073 will be available for review commencing Friday, March 11, 2011. The Bid Due Date is Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be accepted after that time. Any questions related to this solicitation should be directed to the Buyer.
Baltimore City Public Schools. INVITATION FOR BIDS: BCS-11074 Provide Media Center Renovation Services at Mary Rodman Elementary School #204

NAME ADDRESS PHONE NO. CLASSIFICATION (Room, Apt, House, etc.)

INSERTION DATE:

WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN-NEWSPAPER
Legal Advertising Rates Effective October 1, 2006
PROBATE DIVISION (Estates) 202-879-9460/61 PROBATE NOTICES
a. Order Nisi b. Small Estates (single publication) c. Notice to Creditors 1. Domestic 2. Foreign d. Escheated Estates e. Standard Probates $ 60 per insertion $180.00 per 3 weeks $ 50 per insertion $ 60 per insertion $ 180.00 per 3 weeks $ 60 per insertion $ 180.00 per 3 weeks $ 60 per insertion $ 360.00 per 6 weeks $ 125.00

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY Case No.: 24D11000435 IN THE MATTER OF MICHELLE DIANNA PHILLIPS FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO MICHELLE DIANNA LOPEZ ORDER FOR NOTICE BY PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to officially change the name of the petitioner from Michelle Dianna Phillips to Michelle Dianna Lopez It is this 24th day of February, 2011 by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, ORDERED, that publication be given one time in a newspaper of general circulation in Baltimore City on or before the 24th day of March, 2011, which shall warn all interested persons to file an affidavit in opposition to the relief requested on or before the 4th day of April, 2011. Frank M. Conaway Clerk 3/18
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY Case Number 24C06009314/FR Cypress Properties Incorporated c/o Allen C Tochterman, Esquire 11411 Cedar Lane Kingsville, Maryland 21087 Plaintiff v. ROOSEVELT LABOO THE STATE OF MARYLAND Unknown Tenants of the Subject Property The Mayor and City Council of Baltimore, Maryland All Persons having or claiming to have an interest in the property listed below Their respective heirs, devisees, executors, administrators, grantees, assigns, or successors in right title and interest The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the property in the City of Baltimore, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the City of Baltimore and the State of Maryland to the Plaintiff in this proceeding: N W S M A R M O N AV 162-8 FT SW OF BELLE AV Ward 28, Section 02, Block 8265, Lot 009 Lot Size 20-4 x 129-11 The Complaint states, among other things, that the amount necessary for redemption has not been paid. It is thereupon this 1st day of March, 2011 by the Circuit Court of Baltimore City, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a coy of this order in THE AFRO AMERICAN, a newspaper of general circulation in the City of Baltimore once a week for three (3) successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the 30th day of April, 2011 and redeem the subject property and answer the Complaint or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff title to the property, free and clear of all encumbrances. Frank M.Conaway, Clerk TRUE COPY TEST Pamela J. White JUDGE, CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY 3/11, 3/18, 3/25

The Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners is inviting interested companies to submit bids to: BCS-11074. In order to participate, interested bidders need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website at https://ebidmarketplace.com Solicitation BCS-11074 will be available for review commencing Friday, March 11, 2011. The Bid Due Date is Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be accepted after that time. Any questions related to this solicitation should be directed to the Buyer.
Baltimore City Public Schools. INVITATION FOR BIDS: BCS-11075 Provide Media Center Renovation Services at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute School #403

CIVIL NOTICES
a. Name Changes 202-879-1133 b. Real Property $ 80.00 $ 200.00

FAMILY COURT
202-879-1212

DOMESTIC RELATIONS
202-879-0157
a. Absent Defendant b. Absolute Divorce c. Custody Divorce $ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00

The Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners is inviting interested companies to submit bids to: BCS-11075. In order to participate, interested bidders need to visit eMaryland Marketplace website at https://ebidmarketplace.com Solicitation BCS-11075 will be available for review commencing Friday, March 11, 2011. The Bid Due Date is Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. local time. No bids will be accepted after that time. Any questions related to this solicitation should be directed to the Buyer.

To place your ad, call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 262 Public Notices $50.00 & up depending on size Baltimore Legal Notices are $24.15 per inch. There is no flat rate — 1-800 (AFRO) 892 For Proof of Publication, please call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 244

LEGAL LEGAL NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES LEGAL
File No. BCI-10#16 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-001162 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

LEGAL NOTICES NOTICES NOTICES LEGAL LEGAL
File No. BCI-10#16 File No. BCI-10#41 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-001155 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

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Baltimore City Public Schools INVITATION FOR BIDS: RFP-11060 Executive Search Services The Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners invites interested companies to submit proposals to: Provide Executive Search Services to recruit and select district-level positions on an as-needed basis. In order to participate, interested bidders need to register with eMaryland Marketplace by visiting their website at https:// ebidmarketplace.com and clicking the Registration button. Solicitation RFP-11060 will be available for review commencing Thursday, March 10, 2011. The Proposal Due Date is Thursday, March 24, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. local time. No proposals will be accepted after that time. Any questions related to this solicitation should be directed to the Buyer, Shabray Stanfield at sstanfield@bcps.k12.md.us
City of Baltimore Department of Finance Bureau of Purchases Sealed proposals addressed to the Board of Estimates of Baltimore, will be received until, but not later than 11:00 a.m. local time on the following date(s) for the stated requirements: MARCH 23, 2011 EMERGENCY MEDICAL SUPPLIES B50001865 MARCH 30, 2011 ASPHALT PAVING MACHINE B50001878 TA N D E M W H E E L D U M P T R U C K S B50001880 2011 CREW CAB WITH UTILITY BODY B50001881 APRIL 6, 2011 REPAIR & INSTALLATION OF OVERHEAD MECHANICAL DOOR SYSTEMS B50001811 WELLNESS & FITNESS PROGRAM FOR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT B50001812 APRIL 20. 2011 INSPECTIONS, TESTING, REPAIRS, MAINTENANCE & INSTALLATION SERVICES FOR UNDERGROUD & ABOVE GROUND STORAGE TANKS B50001887 THE ENTIRE SOLICITATION DOCUMENT CAN BE VIEWED AND DOWN LOADED BY VISITING THE CITYS WEB SITE: www.baltimorecitibuy.org

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REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. ROBERT J. BRUCE Jr., REGINA L. BRUCE AND/OR UNKNOWN TENANTS AND OWNERS OF 4900 Saint Georges Ave. and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account No. 27-475183C-025; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 4900 Saint Georges Ave. described as Lot Size 27-6x150 and known as Ward 27 Section 47 Block 5183C Lot 025. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 1st day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 31 day of March, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 30th day of April, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. MARIA V. GAUTO, UNKNOWN OWNER AND/ OR TENANT, WORLD ALLIANCE FINANCIAL CORP., HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE COMPANY, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, Inc., and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account No. 28-03-8323-017; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 5215 Bosworth Ave. described as Lot Size 120x12011, Ward 28, Section 03, Block 8323, Lot 017. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 1st day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 31 day of March, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 30th day of April, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

B8

The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011
LEGAL NOTICES

File No. BCI-10#22 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1166 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 28th day of February, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 30th day of March, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 29th day of April, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Lynn K. Stewart JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/11, 3/18, 3/25

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY INVITATION FOR BIDS EXTERIOR REPAIRS J. VAN STORY BRANCH APARTMENTS IFB NUMBER: B-1652-11

File No. BCI-10#51 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1153 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

(∫HABC∫) (“HABC”) will issue an Invitation for Bids (∫IFB∫) (“IFB”) for qualified and interested vendors

The Housing Authority of Baltimore City

to submit sealed bids to repair and replace concrete; replace masonry, panel trim and sealants; install balcony waterproofing and drain pipes; and reinstall loose railings at J. Story Branch Senior Apartments located at 11 W. 20th Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218.

File No. BCI-10#43 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1163 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Responders shall also comply with all applicable requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. Section 1701u. The IFB may be obtained on or after Monday, March 21, 2011, at the following location: Housing Authority of Baltimore City Division of Fiscal Operations, Purchasing Department 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414 Baltimore, Maryland 21202 Attention: John Airey, Chief of Contracting Services Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586 Questions regarding the IFB should be directed in writing to the address and individual indicated above, and must include the reference: HABC IFB Number B-1653-11.
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY INVITATION FOR BIDS WESTPORT HOMES / MT. WINANS ROOF REPLACEMENT IFB NUMBER: B-1654-11

File No. BCI-10#46 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1163 TAX SALE Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1156TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION
REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. CLARENCE GREAR, LISA GREAR, UNKNOWN OWNER AND/OR TENANT, MERCANTILE POTOMAC BANK, PNC BANK, THE HARBOR BANK OF MARYLAND and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account No. 09-18-3942-044; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 2835 Hillen Road described as Lot Size 20x81-7, Ward 09, Section 18, Block 3942, Lot 044. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6)

Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 28th day of February, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 30th day of March, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 29th day of April, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Lynn K. Stewart JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/11, 3/18, 3/25

File No. BCI-10#92 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1167 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

SERVICE TECH LLC AND/OR UNKNOWN TENANTS & OWNERS OF 2911 Norfolk Ave. and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 2911 Norfolk Ave. Also described as Lot size 21-8x92-6; Ward 15, Section 31, Block 3169, Lot 006. Tax Account No. 15-31-3169-006
Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 28th day of February, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs.

(∫HABC∫) (“HABC”) will issue an Invitation for Bids (∫IFB∫) (“IFB”) for interested and qualified vendors

The Housing Authority of Baltimore City

to submit sealed bids to remove and replace existing shingle roofing system with new Architectural Grade shingles including flashing, ice shields and new vent boots. BIDS WILL BE DUE no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, April 25, 2011.

A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., at the Charles L. Benton Building, 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202. HABC has established a minimum goal of twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount of the proposed contract for Minority Business Enterprise (∫MBE∫) utilization, applicable to all minority and non-minority businesses proposing to provide the requested services as the prime contractor. No

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REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. GODWIN DELILLYE, GLORIA A. DELILLYE, WACHOVIA BANK, TRSTE, Inc., GUARDIAN PROTECTION SERVICES, Inc., UNKNOWN TENANTS AND/OR OWNERS 4402 Maine Ave. and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 4402 Maine Ave. described as Lot Size 120x120-11, Ward 28, Section 03, Block 8323, Lot 017. Tax Account No. 28-03-8323-017. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 2 day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 1 day of April, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 3 day of May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. STANLEY HOCHMAN, UNKNOWN TENANTS, BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, CHETINA JOHNSON, MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY AND CITY OF BALTIMORE and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any i n t e r e s t i n t h e Ta x A c c o u n t N o . 15-31-3172-023. situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 2911 Rockrose Ave. Also described as Lot size 20x92-6; Ward 15, Section 31, Block 3172, Lot 023. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 2 day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 1 day of April, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 3 day of May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

BIDS WILL BE DUE no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, April 21, 2011. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday, March 30, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., at the Charles L. Benton Building, 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202. HABC has established a minimum goal of twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount of the proposed contract for Minority Business Enterprise (“MBE”) utilization, ap(∫MBE∫) plicable to all minority and non-minority businesses proposing to provide the requested services as the prime contractor. No goal has been established for participation of Women-owned businesses (“WBE’s”) how(∫WBEs∫), ever, HABC strongly encourages and affirmatively promotes the use of WBEs in all HABC contracts. Responders shall also comply with all applicable requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. Section 1701u. The IFB may be obtained on or after Monday, March 21, 2011, at the following location: Housing Authority of Baltimore City Division of Fiscal Operations, Purchasing Department 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414 Baltimore, Maryland 21202 Attention: John Airey, Chief of Contracting Services Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586 Questions regarding the IFB should be directed in writing to the address and individual indicated above, and must include the reference: HABC IFB Number B-1652-11.
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY INVITATION FOR BIDS CAREY HOUSE WINDOW REPLACEMENT IFB NUMBER: B-1653-11

File No. BCI-10#87 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-001157 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

File No. BCI-10#55 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1154 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

known Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, k n o w n a s Ta x A c c o u n t N o . 27-23-4293-136.; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 3712 Bartwood Road. Also described as Lot size 31-8x92-6; Ward 27, Section 23, Block 4293, Lot 136.

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. HARRISON EDWARD JOHNSON, JACQUELINE JOHNSON, MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Un-

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. ROBERT O. ROBINSON, UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNER OF 2530 LOYOLA SOUTHWAY, CHASE BANK USE, NA, and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account No. 15-33-3355-016; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 2530 Loyola Southway. Also described as Lot Size 22x90, Ward 15, Section 33, Block 3355, Lot 016. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 1st day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 31st day of March, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 30th day of April, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

The Housing Authority of Baltimore City (∫HABC∫) will issue an Invitation for Bids (“HABC”) (∫IFB∫) for qualified and interested vendors (“IFB”) to submit sealed bids to supply and install new windows at Carey House located at 1431 N. Carey Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21217. BIDS WILL BE DUE no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, April 15, 2011. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday, March 30, 2011 at 11:00 a.m., at the Charles L. Benton Building, 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202. HABC has established a minimum goal of twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount of the proposed contract for Minority Business Enterprise (“MBE”) utilization, ap(∫MBE∫) plicable to all minority and non-minority businesses proposing to provide the requested services as the prime contractor. No goal has been established for participation of Women-owned businesses (“WBE’s”) how(∫WBEs∫), ever, HABC strongly encourages and affirmatively promotes the use of WBEs in all HABC contracts.

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VICTOR S. CARTER, RUTH N. CARTER AND/OR UNKNOWN TENANTS AND OWNERS OF 4217 Norfolk Ave. and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account No. 28-04-2745-017; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 4217 Norfolk Ave. described as Lot Size 28-10x93-11 and known as Ward 28 Section 04 Block 2745 Lot 017.

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs.

persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as Tax Account No. 09-18-3942-044; situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 2835 Hillen Road described as Lot Size 20x81-7, Ward 09, Section 18, Block 3942, Lot 044. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein aboveLEGAL NOTICES described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 2 day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 1 day of April, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 3 day of May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

LEGAL NOTICES
File No. BCI-10#66 Maxwell C. Cohen, Esq. The Law Offices of Maxwell C. Cohen, LLC 17 Warren Road, Suite 14-B Baltimore, Maryland 21208 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 24-C-11-1168 TAX SALE ORDER OF PUBLICATION

REV PS, LLC, Assignee Plaintiff vs. EARL A. MARTIN Sr., UNKNOWN TENANTS AND/OR OWNERS OF 1800 E. 29th St., and MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF BALTIMORE CITY and All Unknown Owners of the Property described below; all Persons, all heirs, devisees, personal representatives, and executors, administrators, grantees, assigns or successors in right, title, interest, and any and all persons having or claiming to have any interest in the property and premises situate in the City of Baltimore, known as 1800 E. 29th St. described as Lot Size 20x95, Ward 09, Section 18, Block 3955, Lot 025. Tax Account No. 09-18-3955-025. Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 2 day of March, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 1 day of April, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 3 day of May, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Pamela J. White JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/18, 3/25, 4/1

Defendants The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the herein above described property sold, either directly or via assignment, by the Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and Baltimore City to the Plaintiff in the proceeding. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption of the subject property has not been paid, although more than six (6) months from the date of the sale have expired, LEGAL NOTICES and more than two (2) months from the date that the first of two (2) separate pre-suit Notices of the tax sale was sent to each required interested party have expired. It is thereupon this 28th day of February, 2011, by the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Baltimore City, Maryland once a week for three (3) successive weeks, on or before the 30th day of March, 2011 warning all persons interested in the Property referenced above to appear in this Court by the 29th day of April, 2011 and redeem the Property referenced herein or to answer the Complaint or thereafter a Final Decree will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. The Defendants are hereby informed of the latest date to file a written Answer or Petition to Redeem the property mentioned in the Complain described above, and that failure to file a response on or before the date specified may result in a Default Judgment foreclosing all rights of redemption in and as to the Property being rendered by this Court against them. Lynn K. Stewart JUDGE- Baltimore City Circuit Court 3/11, 3/18, 3/25

BIDS WILL BE DUE no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, April 25, 2011. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., at the Charles L. Benton Building, 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202.

March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011, The Afro-American
LEGAL NOTICES
BOARD OF LIQUOR LICENSE COMMISSIONERS FOR BALTIMORE CITY NOTICE Petitions have been filed by the following applicants for licenses to sell alcoholic beverages at the premises set opposite their respective names. The real property for these applications will be posted on Monday, March 14, 2011. Written protests concerning any application will be accepted until and including the time of the conference or hearing. Conferences and public hearings will be held after March 31, 2011. Interested parties should contact the office of the Board, 231 E. Baltimore Street, 6th Floor, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 or by calling (410) 396-4385 to determine the exact time and date that a particular application will be considered by the Board. Written protests will be acknowledged by the Board and such protestants will be notified as to the date, time and place of the hearing and/or conference. 1. CLASS “A” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR LICENSE No. 1 Singh, Inc. Transfer of ownership & location 530 Dundalk Avenue Balwinder Sandhu from 6425 Pulaski Highway, change Class “D”BWL tavern license to Class “A”BWL package goods license 2. CLASS “B” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR RESTAURANT LICENSE Bagby’s Bistro, LLC New license, request for 1006 Fleet Street Blake Smith for outdoor table service David Smith Douglas Schmidt Hogee, Inc. Szu Ho Chen Kuen Cheng Chen New license 2501-03 N. Charles Street

B9

LEGAL NOTICES HABC has established a minimum goal of twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount of the proposed contract for Minority Business Enterprise (“MBE”) utilization, ap(∫MBE∫) plicable to all minority and non-minority businesses proposing to provide the requested services as the prime contractor. No goal has been established for participation of Women-owned businesses (“WBE’s”) how(∫WBEs∫), ever, HABC strongly encourages and affirmatively promotes the use of WBEs in all HABC contracts.
Responders shall also comply with all applicable requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. Section 1701u. The IFB may be obtained on or after Monday, March 28, 2011, at the following location: Housing Authority of Baltimore City Division of Fiscal Operations, Purchasing Department 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414 Baltimore, Maryland 21202 Attention: John Airey, Chief of Contracting Services Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586 Questions regarding the IFB should be directed in writing to the address and individual indicated above, and must include the reference: HABC IFB Number B-1654-11.
HOUSING AUTHORITY OF BALTIMORE CITY INVITATION FOR BIDS CHERRY HILL HOMES ROOF REPLACEMENT IFB NUMBER: B-1655-11

LEGAL NOTICES
BALTIMORE COUNTY, MARYLAND INVITATION FOR BIDS CONTRACT NO. 08247 SX0 LILAC LANE SANITARY SEWER CONSTRUCTION - HEALTH PROJECT WHITE MARSH - DISTRICT 11 c 5 CONTRACT COST GROUP “C” ($500,000 TO$1,000,000)” ∫C∫ ($500,000 to $1,000,000) WORK CLASSIFICATION: F-1 BID DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2011 AT 10:30 A.M. LOCAL TIME On or after MARCH 21, 2011, the above contract documents may be inspected and purchased from the Division of Construction Contracts Administration, Department of Public Works, Room 300B, County Office Building (COB), 111 W. Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, upon receipt of payment of $15.00 (FIFTEEN DOLLARS) per contract. All checks should be made payable to BALTIMORE COUNTY MD. NO REFUNDS will be made to anyone. Direct any questions to 410-887-3531. Bidders obtaining documents from another source other than Baltimore County WILL NOT be allowed to submit proposals to Baltimore County. The proposed work consists of: 2,430 (LF) 8 Inch Polyvinyl Chloride Pipe 250 (LF) 6 Inch Polyvinyl Chloride Pipe A pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. local time in room 215 of the County Office Building located at 111 West Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, MD 21204. THE PROJECT IS SUBJECT TO A MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE UTILIZATION GOAL AND FEMALE CONTRACTORS UTILIZATION GOALS. THESE GOAL REQUIREMENTS ARE MORE FULLY EXPLAINED IN THE SPECIFICATIONS. THE MBE/WBE FORMS IN THE PROPOSAL BOOKLET MUST BE COMPLETED AND SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF BID OPENING. Sealed proposals (the entire book) addressed to Baltimore County, Maryland for this contract will be received in the Baltimore County Purchasing Division, Room 148, Old Courthouse, 400 Washington Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, until the time specified on the contract at which time they will be publicly opened and read. ONLY CONTRACTORS WHO HAVE BEEN PREQUALIFIED BY BALTIMORE COUNTY AT LEAST TEN (10) DAYS PRIOR TO THE OPENING OF BIDS WILL BE ALLOWED TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS. All proposals must be accompanied by a Bid Bond, on the approved form provided, in the amount as set forth in the “Information for Bidders”. ∫Information Bidders∫. No other form of proposal guaranty is acceptable. The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to reject any or all proposals or bids or parts of bids and to waive technicalities as may be deemed Keith Dorsey, Director Office of Budget & Finance

3. CLASS BD7, BEER, WINE & LIQUOR TAVERN LICENSE Samsung Liquors, Inc. Transfer of ownership 1301-03 W. Pratt Street Haeng Hyun Kim J.D.’s Smokehouse Bar & Grill, Inc. Request for live 3000-02 O’Donnell Street Jerry Friedenberg entertainment Paul Friedenberg Eddie Robinson’s Gorsuch House, Inc. Transfer of ownership 5307 Belair Road Robert Williams from secured creditor Portillo, LLC Juan Portillo Finale, LLC Nancy A. Van Gelder Transfer of ownership Transfer of ownership, request for live entertainment 529 S. Bond Street 3326-28 Foster Avenue

(“HABC”) will issue an Invitation for Bids (∫HABC∫) (“IFB”) for interested and qualified vendors (∫IFB∫)

The Housing Authority of Baltimore City

to submit sealed bids to remove and replace existing shingle roofing system with new Architectural Grade shingles including flashing, ice shields, new vent boots, new gutter and downspouts and ridge vents with cap shingles. BIDS WILL BE DUE no later than 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, April 25, 2011.

A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011 at 11:00 a.m., at the Charles L. Benton Building, 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 416, Baltimore, Maryland, 21202. HABC has established a minimum goal of twenty percent (20%) of the total dollar amount of the proposed contract for Minority Business Enterprise (“MBE”) utilization, ap(∫MBE∫) plicable to all minority and non-minority businesses proposing to provide the requested services as the prime contractor. No goal has been established for participation of Women-owned businesses (“WBE’s”) how(∫WBEs∫), ever, HABC strongly encourages and affirmatively promotes the use of WBEs in all HABC contracts. Responders shall also comply with all applicable requirements of Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, 12 U.S.C. Section 1701u. The IFB may be obtained on or after Monday, March 28, 2011, at the following location: Housing Authority of Baltimore City Division of Fiscal Operations, Purchasing Department 417 E. Fayette Street, Room 414 Baltimore, Maryland 21202 Attention: John Airey, Chief of Contracting Services Tel: (410)396-3261 Fax: (410)962-1586 Questions regarding the IFB should be directed in writing to the address and individual indicated above, and must include the reference: HABC IFB Number B-1655-11.

PUBLIC NOTICE ENTERPRISE ZONE EXPANSION

The City of Baltimore will submit an application to the State of Maryland’s best for the interest of the County. Maryland¬s Department of Business and Economic Development for the proposed expansion of Baltimore City’s Enterprise Zone to include the following areas: City¬s
0 0

Jones Falls/Reservoir Hill (40th Street to North Avenue)-Enterprise Zone Fairfield/Hawkins Point (Frankfurst Avenue to Hawkins Point Road)-Focus Area

Two public hearings to present the proposed Enterprise Zone expansion will be held on Monday, March 21st, 7:00 p.m., Roosevelt Rec. Center at 1221 W. 36th St, Baltimore, MD 21211 (to discuss the Jones Falls/Mt. Vernon Mill Enterprise Zone expansion) and March 23rd, 6:00 p.m., Curtis Bay Recreation Center, 1630 Filbert Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland, 21226 (to discuss the Fairfield/Hawkins Point Focus area). If you have any questions regarding the public hearing, please contact Elizabeth Hines or Betty Goetzinger at Baltimore Development Corporation: 410-837-9305.

CAREER CORNER
Dean of Enrollment Management

BALTIMORE COUNTY, MARYLAND INVITATION FOR BIDS CONTRACT NO. 11044 DX0 MOUNT VISTA ROAD STREAM RESTORATION KINGSVILLE - DISTRICT 11 c 3 CONTRACT COST GROUP “B”($100,000 to $500,000)∫ ∫B ($100,000 to $500,000)” WORK CLASSIFICATION: K-5 BID DATE: TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 2011 AT 10:30 AM. LOCAL TIME On or after MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2011, the above contract documents may be inspected and purchased from the Division of Construction Contracts Administration, Department of Public Works, Room 300B, County Office Building (COB), 111 W. Chesapeake Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, upon receipt of payment of $35.00 (THIRTY-FIVE DOLLARS) per contract. All checks should be made payable to BALTIMORE COUNTY MD. NO REFUNDS will be made to anyone. Direct any questions to 410-887-3531. Bidders obtaining documents from another source other than Baltimore County WILL NOT be allowed to submit proposals to Baltimore County. The proposed work consists of: 95 (LF) Imbricated Riprap 72 (LF) Rock Toe (RT) 1,200 (SY) Placing Furnished Topsoil 2∫ Depth THE PROJECT IS SUBJECT TO A MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE UTILIZATION GOAL AND FEMALE CONTRACTORS UTILIZATION GOALS. THESE GOAL REQUIREMENTS ARE MORE FULLY EXPLAINED IN THE SPECIFICATIONS. THE MBE/WBE FORMS IN THE PROPOSAL BOOKLET MUST BE COMPLETED AND SUBMITTED AT THE TIME OF BID OPENING. Sealed proposals (the entire book) addressed to Baltimore County, Maryland for this contract will be received in the Baltimore County Purchasing Division, Room 148, Old Courthouse, 400 Washington Avenue, Towson, MD 21204, until the time specified on the contract at which time they will be publicly opened and read. ONLY CONTRACTORS WHO HAVE BEEN PREQUALIFIED BY BALTIMORE COUNTY AT LEAST TEN (10) DAYS PRIOR TO THE OPENING OF BIDS WILL BE ALLOWED TO SUBMIT PROPOSALS. All proposals must be accompanied by a Bid Bond, on the approved form provided, in the amount as set forth in the “Information for Bidders”. ∫Information Bidders∫. No other form of proposal guaranty is acceptable. The Purchasing Agent reserves the right to reject any or all proposals or bids or parts of bids and to waive technicalities as may be deemed best for the interest of the County. Keith Dorsey, Director Office of Budget & Finance

The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) is the largest community college in the State of Maryland and a national leader among the nation’s community colleges. CCBC has three campuses, three large extension sites and an enrollment of 74,000 students. The Dean of Enrollment Management is accountable for providing college-wide leadership in enrollment planning, outreach and recruitment and supervises professional, classified and technical staff. Major responsibilities include supervisory oversight of all key Enrollment Management functions: Admissions, Records and Registration, Financial Aid, International Student Services, the College-wide Contact Center, and Inbound/Outbound Enrollment Communications. The successful candidate will join a dynamic institutional leadership team committed to providing students with an accessible, affordable and high quality collegiate experience. A dedication to teamwork and collaboration with supervisors, fellow administrators and subordinates is necessary in this position. The candidate must have a keen awareness of strategies required to maximize the resources of the college and must maintain a strong focus on data, business processes, and applications of technology. A Master’s degree is required (Doctorate preferred) with five (5) years of progressively responsible administrative experience, preferably in enrollment management and/or student services. The College will seek an individual with documented success in developing and implementing student services programs for a diverse student body. Excellent written and oral communication skills; and demonstrated success in cultivating collaboration and effective teamwork for a large staff, along with student information data base systems is required. Inter-campus travel is also required. To apply, please visit the website at: www.ccbcmdjobs.com

INVITATION FOR BIDS NO. PM5179A11 INVITATION FOR BIDS NO. PM5179A11 The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission is soliciting bids for the following: Contract Title: Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity Contract for Sewer Main, Sewer House Connection, and Manhole Repair, Replacement, and Renewals in Paint Branch, Lower Anacostia, and Beaverdam Basins, George’s Prince George¬s and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. Bid Due Date: April 6, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. Submit Offers to: Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission Bond Information: $100,000 bid bond required. Additional Information: Pre-Bid Conference scheduled for Monday, March 21, 2011, at 10:30 a.m. See website at http://www.cbr-wssc.com for moreinformation and to obtain a bid package. Contact: Questions pertaining to this solicitation should be directed to Ms. Evita Fields, Acquisition Consultant Assistant; telephone number: 301-206-8549; e-mail address: eFields@wsscwater.com.
INVITATION FOR SOLICITATION NO. PM5239A11 INVITATION FOR BIDS NO. PM5239A11 The Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission is soliciting bids for the following: Contract Title: Lateral/Sewer House Connection and Renewals in Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties George¬s Bid Due Date: March 29, 2011 at 10 a.m. Submit Offers to: Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission Bond Information: $100,000 bid bond required. Additional Information: Pre-Bid Conference scheduled for March 15 at 10:30 a.m. See website at http://www.cbr-wssc.com for more information and to obtain a bid package. Contact: Questions pertaining to this solicitation should be directed to Ms. Evita Fields, Acquisition Consultant Assistant; telephone number: 301-206-8549; e-mail address: eFields@wsscwater.com.

CCBC practices equal opportunity in education and employment and is strongly and actively committed to diversity within the college community.

EEO/AA

CITY OF BALTIMORE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS BUREAU OF WATER AND WASTEWATER NOTICE OF LETTING

To Advertise call 410-5548200

Sealed Bids or Proposals, in duplicate addressed to the Board of Estimates of the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore and marked for Sanitary Contract 896-Repair and Replacement of Existing Sanitary Sewers at Various Locations will be received at the Office of the Comptroller, Room 204, City Hall, Baltimore, Maryland until 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, April 13, 2011. Positively no bids will be received after 11:00 A.M. Bids will be publicly opened by the Board of Estimates in Room 215, City Hall at Noon. The Contract Documents may be examined, without charge, at the Department of Public Works Service Center located on the first floor of the Abel Wolman Municipal Building, 200 N. Holliday Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 as of Friday, March 11, 2011 and copies may be purchased for a non-refundable cost of $30.00. Conditions and requirements of the Bid are found in the bid package. All contractors bidding on this Contract must first be prequalified by the City of Baltimore Contractors Qualification Committee. Interested parties should call 410-396-6883 or contact the Committee at 751 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21202. If a bid is submitted by a joint venture (“JV”) then in that event, the document that established the JV (∫JV∫), shall be submitted with the bid for verification purposes. The Prequalification Category required for bidding on this project is B02552Sewer Construction Cost Qualification Range for this work shall be $5,000,000.00 to $10,000,000.00 ∫Pre-Bidding Information∫ session will be conducted at 300 Abel A “Pre-Bidding Information” Wolman Municipal Building Conference Room on March 18, 2011 at 10:00 A.M. Principal Items of work for this project are: Repair and replacement of sanitary sewers, manholes, house connections, and appurtenances; as well as maintenance functions such as televising, cleaning and by-pass pumping at various locations, and other related work, including but not limited to paving and surface restoration. The contractor must be able to mobilize multiple work crews with the necessary equipment to perform the work as designated by the Engineer. Generally, this is a requirements type contract, and work assignments are on an urgent, as-needed basis. The contractor must be able to proceed with the work within three (3) days of receipt of direction from the Engineer. The MBE goal is 10% The WBE goal is 3% SANITARY CONTRACT 896 APPROVED: Bernice H. Taylor Clerk, Board of Estimates APPROVED: Alfred H. Foxx Director of Public Works

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Faith Pulse
By Rev. Dorothy S. Boulware Special to the AFRO A great sermon is a scripturally based assertion of God’s truth presented to make a tangible difference in the life of the hearer. A great sermon inspires. A great sermon informs. A great sermon plants the seeds of transformation. “I Will Wait for You,” a great sermon, a powerful declaration of the holiness of waiting for the divinely appointed person for your life, is being masterfully preached on YouTube by spoken word poet, Janette…IKZ. Her skillful use of language draws the listener into her passionate proclamation of her willingness to wait. Her energy

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The Afro-American, March 19, 2011 - March 25, 2011

‘I Will Wait for You’

and determination make it clear she’s leaned in the wrong direction more than once. Her use of scripture reveals a disciple amply armed with the sword of the Spirit. “He had a form of godliness, but not much. But hey, I can change him…,” the poet says in one line. In another, she added, “I will no longer get braided down from so called friends and family talks about my biological clock when I serve the author of time.” Viewer responses have been mostly positive. “I Will Wait for You” is “so dope and you inspired [me] to keep waiting for the one who reflects the Son,” said Elizabeth D. in her online response. Sharontina, another YouTube

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In addition to her spoken word ministry and a full-time job, Janette… IKZ helps young people appreciate various types of music in her spare time.
respondent, said she couldn’t stop watching and that it had her reading the Bible at that very moment. Janette…IKZ is one of the

young poets who proclaim their faith in the Passion for Christ Movement, a California based church that attracts young and old alike. “Their focus is discipleship and evangelism,” said Janette… IKZ, who has been affiliated with the church for less than a year. “They’re not one of those churches that compromise the Spirit of God to draw young people.” She said her first night there, more than 250 were in attendance and 25 gave their lives to Christ. “They were stretched the length of the street sharing the gospel with each of them individually, so they’d know what they were doing and not just respond to their emotions,” she said. But this is not her first exposure to church, as is evident in her poetry. She grew up in the Church of God in Christ and was spiritually mentored by a strong

mother and grandmother. “My grandmother had me in shut-ins and 24-hour prayers. She had me fasting by the time I was 7 or 8. She wasn’t forcing me, I wanted to do it,” Janette… IKZ said, remembering having to recite the books of the Bible or the Beatitudes before getting a treat from the ice cream truck. “I have a reverence for holiness and I don’t play around with this thing at all. I’m living a life worthy of the calling I’ve received.” And she’s waiting on God for her next steps. She could never have imagined “I Will Wait for You” would take off the way it has, having only been public for a week. It’s being shared on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. Even Grammy Awardwinning artist Chrisette Michele tweeted her recommendation of the video, the writing of which began as an entry in Janette… IKZ’s prayer journal. “I was just

talking to the Lord, telling him I was tired of waiting and playing around with relationships,” she said. And tired of doing it her way. “I told the Lord I could make a decision and do things my own way, which hadn’t worked out very well in the past, or I could just commit to Him, knowing He would work it out.” Her team members, who usually confer with her on pieces before they become public, were less than thrilled with this one. “They said it didn’t have the usual finesse. They liked it, but weren’t so sure.” And neither was she. They agreed it was a step down from the last piece. “But it was a matter of obedience, which just proves if you do what God tells you, He’ll surely do His part.” More than 102,558 viewers on YouTube in one week, as of this writing. Not too shabby.

Obituary
Sondra E. Banfield Dailey, 66
Educator, Entrepreneur
Sondra Elise Banfield Dailey was the firstborn of the late Dr. Gilbert Leslie Banfield and Marion Elza Martin Banfield, goddaughter of the late Howard Thurman. Born on Dec. 29, 1944, she was educated in Baltimore City public schools and graduated from Forest Park Senior High School in 1962. Sondra’s parents were founding members of the Baltimore Ethical Society where she attended and later taught Sunday school. She attended Howard University, receiving a bachelor’s in psychology and a master’s in elementary education. She also earned an MBA in international business from the University of Baltimore. Sondra developed a passion for the arts and dance at a young age. She was proud to have danced with George Faison during her years at Howard. She pursued her lifelong love of dance through Joyworks Ministries and as the director of Dance for Joy, the dance ministry of Faith Christian Fellowship in Owing Mills, Md. As a co-founder of Sandbox Empowerment Group, she counseled abused women about making productive choices in life and helped prepare them for future job etiquette, offering guidance on speech, dress and professional presentation skills. While employed as a counselor at the Calvert School, she wrote a first-grade American history book and a fourth-grade Texas history book, both of which were published and distributed as part of the school’s premier home school curriculum. Her son Jason remembers, “My mother remained poetically obsessed with education, literature. She had obligatory charge to open doors of opportunity for young students and troubled adults alike. There was a time, long after Garth and I had left the ‘carpool’ days wherein my mother would drive clear across town for 2 years every morning to pick up a child who had been accepted to St. Paul’s school but had no means of transportation to get there. She was an early riser and a fundamentally offering person.” After graduating from Howard, Sondra married Dr. Eli Anthony Timoll. Out of their union, two sons were born, Jason Anthony Lloyd and Garth Andrew Leslie, who were her pride and joy.

During the 1980s, Sondra owned and operated Banfield Design Group, an interior design firm that successfully completed projects for a number of residential clients, businesses and educational institutions in the Baltimore area. From 1992 – 2000, Sondra served on the board of trustees of St. Paul’s School where both her sons were students. After reconnecting with her high school sweetheart at a class reunion, Sondra married Dr. Maceo Crenshaw Dailey Jr. in June 2003 and joined her new husband in El Paso, Texas. While in El Paso, Sondra served on several boards including Kids Excel El Paso and the FEMAP Foundation, organizations respectively engaged in health and educational development for marginalized populations in the El Paso/ Mexico border region. Her board activities resulted in bringing in significant donations to both organizations and learning the basics of Spanish to communicate effectively. In her last fundraising event, Sondra helped raise over $120,000 for the FEMAP Foundation and delivered her speech completely in Spanish after having studied the language for only a brief time. In pursuing another of her passions, Sondra founded Loopworks, a hand-knit accessories and specialty clothing business. She was recognized for her work being featured in the 2004 winter edition of Interweave Knits magazine. Sondra was co-founder and publisher of Sweet Earth Flying Press, a company established in 2008, which already has published Boy of the Border by Langston Hughes and Arna Bontemps and Burning Horses by Agatha Hoff. Two other books on which Sondra worked are forthcoming. Sondra transitioned peacefully on Feb. 27. She will be remembered with love by her husband, Dr. Maceo Dailey; her sons, Jason and Garth Timoll; siblings Gilbert Leslie Banfield Jr., Karen Evans and Adrienne Banfield-Jones; daughter-in-law Phyllis Timoll; nieces and nephews Jada Pinkett Smith, Tiffany White, Brett Evans, Whitney Karimah and Gilbert Leslie Banfield IV (Trey) and a host of other relatives and friends. Services were held at St. Paul’s School in Brooklandville, Md., on March 7. In lieu of flowers, please send contributions4:48 BGE_2009_gasleak_Afro_11_7.qxp:Layout 1 10/29/09 to St. Paul’s school in her honor.

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