In 2040, the Lower Mainland could have 1.

3 million more people, 600,000 more cars and three times as much freight container traffic as today. We will be older and our infrastructure will be, too. If climate change continues at the current rate, weather could be warmer and wetter, and we can expect more violent storms and floods.

HOW CAN WE ENSURE THIS IS STILL THE BEST PLACE TO LIVE IN 2040?

STRATEGY DISCUSSION GUIDE

OCTOBER 2007

THE dEcISIONS WE MAkE TOdAy SET THE cOuRSE fOR THE fuTuRE

NOW IS THE TIME TRANSPORT 2040
We are already experiencing the effects of global warming – unpredictable weather, insects destroying pine forests and salmon stocks under threat.

Climate change, a population that is both growing and aging, high housing costs and transportation are just some of the challenges we face in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. All of these issues affect our quality of life today and in the future.
We have the opportunity to ensure that our region continues to grow and thrive in a productive, supportive and sustainable manner…if we make the right decisions today. TransLink is preparing a 30-year transportation strategy for the region titled Now is the Time Transport 2040. This strategy will enable us to seize opportunities and meet the challenges we face, today and tomorrow. These challenges and opportunities are significant and pressing. They include doing our part to reduce the province’s greenhouse gas emissions by 33 per cent – a significant challenge given the continued growth that is forecast for the Lower Mainland. We invite you to help develop our new transportation strategy. Your leadership is vital to the realization of our dreams. Now is the time for you to be engaged, be energized and be part of the region’s future success.

TRANSLINk, AN INTEGRATEd REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION AuTHORITy
TransLink is the first transportation authority in North America with responsibility for both roads and transit. Other areas of responsibility include transportation demand management, intelligent transportation systems, technology, regional cycling planning and AirCare vehicle emissions testing. This uniquely integrated model, which enables TransLink to plan the network as a strategic whole, has drawn acclaim from transportation experts around the world. TransLink serves the Lower Mainland, which includes the nation’s third largest urban centre, home to half of British Columbia’s workforce and Canada’s gateway to Asia Pacific economies.

HAS THERE EVER BEEN A BETTER TIME TO ACT?

TOGETHER CREATING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

B.C. GOVERNMENT 30-YEAR TRANSPORTATION VISION METRO VANCOUVER REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY TRANSLINK 30-YEAR STRATEGY

10-YEAR TRANSPORTATION PLANS ONE-YEAR TRANSPORTATION IMPLEMENTATION PLANS

THE MAkING Of A GREAT PLAcE
We have much to be proud of, yet still there is not enough transit and getting around on the roads can be slow and unreliable.

WITH THE RIGHT STRATEGy TOdAy WE cAN PROTEcT WHAT WE HAVE ANd BuILd A BETTER fuTuRE
Just as our transportation system has been shaped by past decisions, the choices we make today will determine how well the system meets future needs.
Improvements in transportation aren’t created only by new infrastructure. New services, policy decisions and outside influences also affect how people and goods move around the Lower Mainland. The Vancity U-Pass program, launched in 2003, has dramatically reduced vehicle traffic to the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University while initiating a new generation into the culture of transit use. Thanks to expanded cycling programs, more people than ever are riding bikes. Financing and management of the Major Road Network improves safety and makes goods movement and transit more efficient. TransLink is also a leader in innovation. With the establishment of the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority Police Service in 2005, TransLink became the first transit authority in Canada with its own police service, helping to make the entire transit system safer. We’re also reducing greenhouse gas emissions by renewing the zero-emissions electric trolley fleet, using ultra-low sulfur diesel and bio-diesel, and buying hybrid buses.

kEy MILESTONES IN BuILdING THE REGION
1827 Founding of Fort Langley 1858 New Westminster named capital of B.C. 1886 Canadian Pacific Railway arrives in Port Moody 1886 City of Vancouver incorporated 1937 1967 1971 Pattullo Bridge opens with 25 cent toll First meeting of Greater Vancouver Regional District Chinatown and Gastown made historic areas rather than a freeway Agricultural Land Reserve created Public transit extended to Coquitlam, Delta, Surrey, and White Rock UN Habitat Conference held in Vancouver SeaBus launched

WHAT WILL WE LEAVE BEHINd fOR THE NExT gENERATION?

1973 1975

1976 1977

1986 Expo 86 1986 SkyTrain to New Westminster

WE ARE RIDING TRANSIT MORE

WE STILL LOVE OUR CARS

1986 First non-stop flights to China from Vancouver 1990 SkyTrain extended to Surrey

Number of transit trips in millions

200 160 120 80 40 0 11%
165M

2%

11%

1996 1999
77%
Auto Walking Cycling Transit

Livable Region Strategic Plan adopted TransLink created

124M

2001 98 B-Line bus service to Richmond begins 2002 Millennium Line opens

1998

2006

In 2004, 77 per cent of all Metro Vancouver resident trips were by auto, either driver or passenger. Goods and services are often delayed by congestion caused by single occupant vehicles.

2006 World Urban Forum held in Vancouver 2009 Canada Line opens 2010 Vancouver hosts 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games

Transit ridership has gone up 33 per cent since 1998

To sustain the region we love, we must find ways to keep our economy moving while strengthening our communities and protecting the environment.

WHAT WILL OUR CHOICES SAy ABOUT US?
Our transportation choices can change the climate
To reduce the impact of climate change, we must reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by creating a transportation system that is less reliant on fossil fuels. This might mean sharing cars, taking transit, walking or cycling, building denser communities, working from home more often or developing brand new solutions. Many of these choices have additional benefits – we can get to know each other better, experience the health and social benefits of closer-knit communities, and exercise our talent, skill and creativity to create solutions that will lead the world.

WE ARE TRAVELLING ALL OVER THE REGION

Our future prosperity depends on efficient movement of goods, people and services
The number of jobs in Metro Vancouver will have risen by 600,000 by 2040. This will affect our transportation system in several ways. If current trends continue employment locations will become more dispersed, and difficult to serve in ways that are cost effective and attractive. A robust economy also means that TransLink is experiencing difficulty attracting and retaining enough staff to operate and maintain transit operations. This could have an impact on our ability to expand transit services. Meanwhile, the success of the Asia Pacific gateway is making transportation a major employer in the region. The Lower Mainland’s natural beauty, mild climate and stable, civil society provide a huge competitive advantage in attracting and retaining skilled workers and desirable industries. We can maintain a healthy economy through co-operation among business, labour, educators and government, and by building the transportation network necessary for our prosperity.

Our region continues to grow and change
A growing population is a sign of success and the basis for a vibrant region with a strong economy. Our challenge in the next 30 years is to provide mobility for another 1.3 million people so we can live, work and play in a way that makes us feel proud of this place. One in four residents will be over the age of 65 in 2040; the last of the baby boomers will turn 75 that year. We have the opportunity to build a transportation network that enables people, goods and services to move easily while also protecting society’s most vulnerable and maintaining strong communities.

Historically, travel was to and from Vancouver

WE ARE GETTING OLDER
25%

WE ARE GETTING BIGGER
Lower Mainland Population (in millions)
3.8 million by 2040 2.5 million today

WE ARE WORKING ALL OVER THE REGION
Office space in Metro Vancouver (in millions of square feet)

OUR PORT IS EXPANDING
7 6
6.6M

50 Amount in % 40
37 46

25 20 15 10 5 0 2001 2031 2001 2031 By 2031, one-quarter of our population will be over the age of 65
13%

30 25 TEU’s (in millions) 20 15 10 5 0 1990 1995 2000
Metropolitan Core Business Parks Regional Town Centres

4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0

Median age

5 4 3 2 1 0
0.1M 2.2M

30 20 10 0

2010

2020

2030

2040

2005

1980

2006

2020

Now travel is from everywhere to everywhere

By 2031, the median age of British Coumbians will be 46

By 2040, 1.3 million more people will live in the Lower Mainland

Business Parks are growing four times faster than urban centres

There are plans to triple freight container traffic in Vancouver area ports by 2020

WE LOVE WHAT WE HAVE ANd WE HAVE TO WORk TO kEEP IT
When people in the Lower Mainland are asked about what they value most, they talk about protecting our natural setting, creating jobs and caring for the well-being of all our citizens.
Opinions polls, web-based surveys and focus groups in recent years reveal that people feel the most important contributions to our quality of life are: The environment/natural setting Weather/mild climate Employment opportunities Public transportation Good recreation areas and sports facilities The top issues people would like to see addressed to further improve our quality of life are: Poverty/homelessness Transportation/traffic congestion Affordable housing Reducing crime Improving public transit/ lowering transit fares

WE’RE cHANGING THE cLIMATE
Climate change has emerged as one of the most significant issues facing this region and the world. In February 2007, the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reported that certain human activities were altering the climate and warned that severe effects were inevitable unless greenhouse gas emissions are curbed. The evidence for climate change caused by fossil fuel combustion is described as “unequivocal” by the IPCC, a group of 2,500 climate experts convened by the United Nations. The British Columbia government has set a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 33 per cent from today’s levels by 2020. We are all part of the solution.

PROTEcTING THE THINGS WE VALuE
Our region attracts people from around the world, yet the growth that fuels our prosperity places new demands on the environment and our communities.

NOW IS THE TIME TO MODERNIZE AND INVEST IN OUR INFRASTRUCTURE
The quality of our transportation infrastructure is key to meeting the challenges ahead. By 2040, many of the region’s water crossings and road and rail MAJORIS THE will have surpassed theirAND INVEST IN OUR (2007)will need to be infrastructure TIME TO MODERNIZE design life expectancy and AGE BY 2040 NOW TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE CURRENT AGE INFRASTRUCTURE replaced or undergo significant maintenance or rehabilitation.
New Westminster Rail Bridge Pattullo Bridge 103 years 70 years 136 years
C02 in million tonnes

TO DO OUR PART WE HAVE TO REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
5M 6.5M 8M

MAJOR TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE CURRENT AGE (2007) AGE BY 2040
Massey Tunnel New Westminster Rail Bridge Ironworkers Memorial Bridge Pattullo Bridge Knight Street Bridge Massey Tunnel SkyTrain Expo Line Ironworkers Memorial Bridge SkyBridge Knight Street Bridge 48 years 103 years 47 years 70 years 33 years 48 years 22 years 47 years 18 years 33 years 81 years 136 years 80 years 103 years 66 years 81 years 55 years 80 years 51 years 66 years

103 years

HOW WILL WE PROTECT WHAT WE LOVE THE MOST?

2007

2020

2040

SkyTrain Expo transportation infrastructure is key to meeting the challenges 22 years 55 years The quality of ourLine ahead. If we maintain the infrastructure we have it will serve us for years to come SkyBridge 18 years 51 years

If current trends continue, our cars will be producing about eight million tonnes of carbon dioxide by 2040.

The quality of our transportation infrastructure is key to meeting the challenges ahead. If we maintain the infrastructure we have it will serve us for years to come

2040 A VIEW Of THE fuTuRE
Most people walk, bike and take transit. Communities are concentrated near high quality transit, reducing pressure on industrial lands and green spaces. Efficient road networks speed goods, people and services in low-emission vehicles.

IN 2040 ANd fOR GENERATIONS TO cOME WE ARE kNOWN AS A PLAcE THAT GOT IT RIGHT
It is January 1, 2040. The jewel on the Pacific has retained its position as the best place in the world to live because of choices made 30 years earlier – choices that protected the natural environment, supported a vibrant economy and fostered an inclusive society.
The Lower Mainland’s rapid transit lines were diligently maintained, refurbished and extended. Most people use public transit, walk or cycle for the majority of their trips. On the designated corridors of the Frequent Transit Network (FTN), buses or trains arrive frequently throughout the day, everyday, and people don’t need to rely on a schedule. The FTN is a short walk away and serves all the key employment, education, commercial and recreational destinations for residents and visitors alike. With guaranteed service, the FTN has stimulated high density growth and development along each corridor. Walking and cycling are comfortable and safe. Senior citizens and people with mobility challenges maintain their independence by living in complete communities. The Pacific Gateway seaports and airports are thriving. The supply chain is reliable due to increased use of roads during off peak hours, cheap night tolls on major bridges, strategic investments in road and rail, superb critical incident management, and road priority for trucks and transit. The air is clean because public transit and private vehicles use low or zero-emissions technology and major infrastructure projects are constructed with full lifecycle carbon costs in mind. By focusing development in existing built-up areas, industrial and natural lands are protected. The investments we made were expensive. For example, a new rapid transit line cost more than $2 billion. New revenue sources were needed. Transportation is financed in part by user fees set in proportion to usage and impacts. All levels of government allocate tax revenue to transportation in a stable and appropriate manner. Other revenues are derived from real estate, advertising and commercial partnerships. Getting it right meant grappling with hard choices. But we got it right.

PROPOSEd STRATEGIES
TransLink has developed seven key strategies to guide development of our transportation network:

1 2

Use our assets to their fullest potential and keep them in a state of good repair. Strategically expand the supply of transportation to provide real alternatives to singleoccupancy vehicle travel. Minimize environmental impact of transportation. Build and operate a safe, secure and accessible transportation system. Secure funding that is stable and predictable, and that influences transportation choices. Implement and manage transit investment in ways that encourage development of communities that are designed for transit, cycling and walking. Work collaboratively with other transportation and planning agencies and stakeholders in the Lower Mainland.

3 4 5 6

THERE’S NO TIME LIkE THE fUTURE.

7

TO ENSuRE A BRIGHT fuTuRE NOW IS THE TIME TO PLAN
This discussion guide is intended to help you consider possibilities as we look forward 30 years. Our shared success depends on how we work together to develop our best ideas. The next step is to map out a pathway that meets our needs and reflects our shared values. Then TransLink will develop a 30-year transportation strategy. Once that strategy has been discussed and approved, we will undertake consultations and research to create a 10-year plan that sets out specific projects and programs. Your input is important to the success of these planning processes. Please join us in creating an exciting vision of the future. For further information please visit our website at www.translink.bc.ca or call 604-453-4500

QuESTIONS TO cONSIdER
Discussion at upcoming strategy meetings will centre around six key questions. It would be helpful if you gave some thought to these questions prior to attending a meeting:

1 2

What do you want your transportation experience to be like in 2040? What are the most important issues facing the regional transportation system in the next 30 years? What strategies should TransLink consider to address these issues? What strategies should be considered by other agencies that are involved in or that impact the regional transportation system? In a financially constrained reality, what do you think the difficult choices and trade-offs will be? What would be your priorities?

3 4

The chaLLenges and POssibiLiTies are beFOre us

5

NOW IS THE TIME TO WORk TOGETHER

www.translink.bc.ca

TRANSPORT 2040, STRATEGY DISCUSSION GUIDE, OCTOBER 2007 DESIGNED BY INVISION CREATIVE

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