Also Featuring ...

Deloitte’s Front-Runner, Redia Anderson Banks • Rejuvenating Diversity • Asian Pacific American Heritage

Volume 9, Number 3 MAY / JUNE 2007 $ 12.95 U.S.

Buffy Swinehart
AFLAC

Art Shingleton
BANK OF THE WEST

Anne DeVoe Lawler
CREW

Eileen Howard Dunn
CVS CAREMARK

Klaus Entenmann
DAIMLERCHRYSLER

Margot J. Copeland
KEYCORP

Eileen Sweeney
MOTOROLA

Chad A. Jester
NATIONWIDE

Mary Wong
OFFICE DEPOT

Ginny Creveling
ONEOK

Jane Robertson
ORACLE

Alison Hager
PFIZER INC

Polly O’Brien Morrow
PITNEY BOWES

Cynthia Z. Forbes
PRATT & WHITNEY

Barbara Del Duke
ROHM AND HAAS

Kathleen deLaski
SALLIE MAE

Stephen J. Brady
SODEXHO

Sandra Taylor
STARBUCKS

Michael Rouse
TOYOTA

ReedV .Tuckson,M.D.
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP

Mike Rizer
WACHOVIA

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Words Count
How odd that in the same month Profiles in Diversity Journal released its diversity Lexicon, Don Imus made news with a hurtful rant against the Rutgers University women’s basketball team. His actions spoke to the importance of words. Words count. When we have our brains sufficiently engaged, they convey the meaning we intend. Unfortunately, they can also suggest meanings we do not intend to convey. I’m not suggesting Imus was misunderstood. Rather, I’m underscoring how important it is to understand the weight words carry, particularly when the topic is as emotionally charged as racial or cultural issues can be. Yes, understanding words can help us better understand concepts and the people we work with every day. Savvy organizations know that everything they do communicates something. Even the decision not to communicate can send a powerful message, prompting individuals to ask, Why don’t they have anything to say? Well, this issue features companies and organizations with plenty to say. Be sure to read our feature on Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. I thoroughly enjoy the thoughts and ideas shared with us by organizations that value the heritage of Asian Americans. Many of their stories are touching, if not inspiring. We’ve also got an insider’s look at diversity within the giant we know by a single name: Deloitte. Redia Anderson Banks, chief diversity officer, is someone you’ll want to get to know better. Finally, our centerpiece this month is all about corporate philanthropy and social responsibility. Our approach is to examine the success stories, the lives touched by companies that invest in their communities to make life better for everyone. Talk about sending a powerful message. These companies’ actions speak far more eloquently than words ever could. They should be recognized and applauded. Enjoy the issue!

James R. Rector
PUBLISHER

John S. Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

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DIVERSITY
determines compa y’s success. determines a company’s success any s.
Eastman Kodak Company’s commitment to d ersity and inclusion Kodak Company’s commitment to div diversity involves ide. involves our employees, customers, suppliers and communities worldwi employees, customers, suppliers communities worldwide. marketplace, Kodak’s innovations reflect ns creativity In our global marketplace, Kodak’s innovation reflect the creativity and our diverse workforce wi inning culture. rich tapestry of our diverse workforce and winning culture.

www.kodak com/go/careers www.kodak.com/go/careers k. /
© Eastman Kodak Company, 2006 Kodak Company, n

28 On the Cover / Special Feature
Corporate Philanthropy and Social Responsibility Success Stories from Leading Organizations Success stories from a wide range of companies committed to improving the lives of the people in their communities. Here are the companies featured: Aflac Bank of the West CREW Foundation* CVS Caremark DaimlerChrysler Financial Services KeyBank Pratt & Whitney Motorola*
* Denotes companies with philanthropy photos, top of cover
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Nationwide Office Depot ONEOK Oracle Pfizer* Pitney Bowes

Rohm & Haas* Sallie Mae* Sodexho Starbucks Toyota UnitedHealth Group Wachovia

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A Close-up of Redia Anderson Banks, Deloitte’s Chief Diversity Officer and National Principal Armed with a master’s degree in clinical psychology, Ms. Banks—a former adult probation officer— is responsible for directing the diversity strategies at Deloitte & Touche USA LLP. At Deloitte, retaining top talent often stems from empowering people to thrive in a corporate culture that values their individuality.

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Rejuvenating Diversity Strategies Excellus and Harley-Davidson weigh in with advice for any organization looking to recharge its diversity strategies. Is rejuvenating necessary? How do you know? You’ll find the answers you may have been looking for right here.

Karen A. Jones, PhD Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Corporate Director, Diversity

Deborah P. Ashton, PhD Harley-Davidson Director of Diversity

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Asian Pacific American Heritage Month: A Time for Reflection
In May, we celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, honoring the contributions to American life made by nearly 12 million Asian Pacific Americans and their ancestors. We present thought-provoking essays from 15 diversity leaders to help us appreciate the Asian Pacific Americans.
Participating companies: AXA Equitable, Michael Ferik Bank of America, Sanjay Gupta Bank of the West, Paul Nakae Dell, Christina Y. Chen Ernst & Young, Nancy Ngou FBI, Weysan Dun General Electric, Michael E. Chen Georgia Power, Jackie Chen Lockheed Martin, Lily O’Byrne MGM MIRAGE, Ly Ping Wu Nationwide, Tariq Khan New York Life Insurance Co., Mary Dean Pfizer, Amal K. Naj Sodexho, Frances S. Nam Sprint Nextel, Tammy Edwards

departments

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Momentum
Diversity Who, What, Where and When

From My Perspective
by David Casey I didn’t mean it—so can’t we just move on? We can all think of “unforgettable” moments in our lives; are there such things as “unforgivable” moments? A personal perspective.

16 Employee Network Groups
Here’s how PepsiCo supports its ENGs. by Rachel Cheeks

18 Catalyst

The Catalyst Award: The evolution of diversity-and-inclusion initiatives As the global workforce evolves, so do the diversity-and-inclusion (D&I) initiatives created by organizations to advance women. Catalyst tracks the evolution of the coveted Catalyst Award from its inception to the present.

78 MicroTriggers

Real-Life MicroTriggers Several examples of MicroTriggers inspired by Ivy Planning’s diversity strategist Janet Crenshaw Smith’s new book, 58 Little Things That Have a Big Impact: What’s Your MicroTrigger? These stories provide real-life insight into the subtle behaviors that can derail relationships at work and play.

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Connecting to the community with talent, strength and diversity.
The new AT&T has a strong commitment to the communities we serve. We continually reaffirm that commitment and reinforce our connections to the community by embracing diversity and inclusion—both inside and outside the company. AT&T supports networking groups that promote mentoring, training, and enhanced opportunity for all employees, regardless of age, race, gender, or sexual orientation. These groups volunteer their time and resources to sponsor a wide range of activities and provide new ways in which AT&T connects to the people we serve. AT&T is proud of these efforts. Because, no matter how advanced our technology, we know that the strongest, most lasting connections are made within the community, face to face, person to person.

TheNewATT.com
©2007 AT&T Knowledge Ventures. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo, BellSouth, BellSouth logo, Cingular, and Cingular logos are trademarks of AT&T Knowledge Ventures and/or AT&T affiliated companies.

Kelly Services Named Bausch & Lomb Corporate Citizenship Supplier of the Year
TROY, Mich.—Kelly Services, Inc., a global staffing solutions provider, has received the Bausch & Lomb Corporate Citizenship Supplier of the Year honor during a ceremony recognizing supplier diversity at Bausch & Lomb’s World Headquarters. Kelly was recognized for From left to right: DeRoy Bryant—VP Procurement, B&L; Keilon Ratliff—National Account Manager, Kelly Services; Michelle Hammond—Manager Procurement, B&L; James Thurman— excellence in customer service, Director Supplier Diversity Development and Procurement, B&L quality, speed of delivery and competitive value. “Bausch & Lomb’s quality employee affinity networks and national company headquartered in Troy, Mich., standards and suppliers have helped us external community partnerships for the offering staffing solutions that include bring to market the world’s most food and facilities management company. temporary staffing services, outsourcing, comprehensive portfolio of eye health She also developed and implemented a vendor on-site and full-time placement. products,” said DeRoy Bryant, vice number of programs, including an exterKelly operates in 32 countries and president, global sourcing and procurenal giving strategy, and the creation and territories. Visit www.kellyservices.com. ment. “Kelly is a key partner, consislaunch of an internship program. tently demonstrating excellence by proPerez is an active member in several KPMG LLP Appoints viding us with the high levels of quality, diversity associations and organizations. Neddy Perez National service and individuals that allow us to She holds a bachelor’s degree in public Diversity Director better serve our customers and stay on relations from the University of Florida the leading edge in a competitive NEW YORK— and a master’s degree in human marketplace.” KPMG LLP, the resources management and international “This award reflects the high-quality audit, tax and business from Nova Southeastern service and customer satisfaction levels advisory firm, has University. we strive to provide our customers. announced that KPMG LLP, the audit, tax and Our companies share a commitment to Nereida (Neddy) advisory firm (www.us.kpmg.com), is quality and this honor inspires us to Perez has joined the U.S. member firm of KPMG continually grow and innovate with the U.S. firm as International. KPMG International’s Perez companies like Bausch & Lomb to meet national director member firms have 113,000 professionals, their changing needs,” said Nicole of diversity and affirmative action/ equal including more than 6,800 partners, in Lewis, vice president, supplier diversity employment opportunity, serving as the 148 countries. development, Kelly Services. firm’s chief diversity officer. Bausch & Lomb (NYSE:BOL) is the “KPMG is committed to being an Two Northrop Grumman eye health company, dedicated to employer of choice, and a big part of Employees Receive National perfecting vision and enhancing life for that is ensuring that we have a culture of Asian American Engineer of consumers around the world. Its core inclusion where all employees have an businesses include soft and rigid gas opportunity to grow and develop person- the Year Awards permeable contact lenses and lens care ally and professionally,” said Bruce Pfau, LOS ANGELES—Two Northrop products, and ophthalmic surgical and KPMG vice chair, human resources. Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) pharmaceutical products. More Perez brings a broad level of experiemployees, Brad Furukawa, vice presiinformation about the Company is on ence in community relations, human dent and chief information officer for the Bausch & Lomb Web site at resources and diversity management to the company’s Space Technology sector, www.bausch.com. KPMG. Most recently she was senior and Dr. Kim L. Ong, an industrial Kelly Services, Inc. (NASDAQ: director of external diversity relations at engineer and statistician within the KELYA, KELYB) is a Fortune 500 Sodexho, Inc., where she managed
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In a time of rapid change for our company and for our
industry, we believe that the unique perspective of each Pfizer employee is vital. Why? Because the tough health care challenges people are facing today call for new, different, and diverse ways of thinking. That’s why we’re implementing a global strategy to ensure Pfizer’s culture not only respects, but also leverages each individual employee’s background, character, and life experiences. We’re putting those unique perspectives to

work to find new, innovative solutions for patients, and better ways of working with our customers, our partners, and the communities we serve. At Pfizer, we believe diversity means an inclusive and empowering work environment. The result? A happier, healthier tomorrow for us all.

www.pfizer.com

© 2007 Pfizer Inc Printed in USA

Furukawa

Ong

company’s Information Technology sector, received awards for their outstanding contributions to engineering and community service at the 2007 Asian American Engineer of the Year Awards (AAEOY) in Washington. The awards were presented by the Chinese Institute of Engineers-USA (CIE-USA). CIE-USA is dedicated to fostering human relations and promoting diversity and information exchange among engineers and scientists. Nominees were judged on professional achievements, impact of professional accomplishments and community service. “Northrop Grumman gratefully acknowledges the skills and achievements of Brad and Kim,” said Michele Toth, vice president of human resources and administration and competitive excellence for Northrop Grumman’s Information Technology (IT) sector. “These two leaders are highly valued within the company and their talents merit these awards.” Furukawa is a 25-year veteran of Northrop Grumman. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Northern Illinois University, DeKalb. He also holds a Six Sigma Greenbelt certificate. Ong serves as Northrop Grumman’s project manager for the National Cancer Institute Center for Bioinformatics Thesaurus Maintenance and Application Development Support Project. Ong holds master’s degrees in industrial engineering and applied statistics, and a PhD in industrial engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. Northrop Grumman Corporation is a $30 billion global defense and technology company, whose 122,000

employees provide innovative systems, products, and solutions in information and services, electronics, aerospace and shipbuilding to government and commercial customers worldwide.

Time Warner executives launch the company’s National Second Tier Program. Left to right: Frederick C. Yeager, SVP, Finance; Jeffrey L. Bewkes, President & COO; Greta F. Davis, Executive Director, Supplier Diversity and Richard D. Parsons, Chairman & CEO.

Time Warner Launches National Second Tier Program to Increase Opportunities for MWBEs
NEW YORK—More than 100 program participants, including 40 key suppliers and business leaders, attended the 2007 kick-off reception launching Time Warner’s new National Second Tier Program. The reception was held in Time Warner’s Conference Center at the corporate headquarters—a fitting location given that the Center was one of the first Time Warner projects constructed with substantial participation of second tier suppliers. Time Warner Chairman and CEO Richard D. Parsons said, “Diversity is not just the right thing to do; it is the smart thing for business and our economy. Time Warner’s National Second Tier Program is all about increasing the number of diversely-owned companies we do business with and increasing their opportunities to do business with other firms throughout all industries.” Earlier in the day, the pilot participants attended a half-day session that included a comprehensive review of the program requirements and a

demonstration of the reporting tool that will capture their quarterly reports and track their second tier activity. The coordination of the second tier program was headed by Executive Director Greta Davis. Working with her team and consultant Ralph Moore of RGMA, they developed an aggressive framework that is in line with Time Warner’s proactive stand on supplier diversity. “In developing the project plan to launch this new initiative, we reached out to many of our key suppliers with a majority of them having advanced supplier diversity programs in place,” said Davis. The participants in the program represent a significant cross section of industries, including financial services, telecommunications, information technology, transportation and logistics, advertising, construction, and consulting. Time Warner Inc. is a leading media and entertainment company, whose businesses include interactive services, cable systems, filmed entertainment, television networks and publishing.

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Safeway Names Russell M. Jackson as Senior Vice President, Human Resources
PHOENIX, Ariz.— Russell M. Jackson has joined Safeway Inc. as senior vice president, human resources. Jackson is the first African American to hold Jackson this position at Safeway, one of the largest food and drug retailers in North America. Jackson comes to Safeway after spending 27 years at PG&E Corporation, where he served as senior vice president, human resources. At Safeway, Jackson will be responsible for all aspects of the human resources function, including employee relations, compensation, training, leadership development, recruiting, health and wellness and prevention programs. Jackson has an MBA from St. Mary’s College and a master’s degree in human resources and organizational development from the University of San Francisco. Safeway Inc. is a Fortune 50 company and one of the largest food and drug retailers in North America. The company operates 1,761 stores in the U.S. and Canada and had annual sales of $40.2 billion in 2006. Safeway’s common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol SWY.

Robert McNeely Promoted to Executive Vice President at Union Bank of California
SAN FRANCISCO —Union Bank of California, N.A., has announced that Robert A. McNeely, senior vice president and head of corporate community McNeely development, has been promoted to executive vice president by the UnionBanCal Corporation board of directors. McNeely reports directly to Chief Operating Officer Philip Flynn. Responsible for bankwide coordination of the company’s community development and reinvestment efforts, McNeely serves as its Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) officer. In 2006, Union Bank provided $3.3 billion in CRA-related loans and activities. McNeely chairs the CRA committee and serves as secretary to the bank’s public policy committee. In addition to serving as chief liaison to the bank’s community advisory board, McNeely is chairman and CEO of the Union Bank of California Foundation and heads both the diversity council and the environmental task force for the bank. Active in the community, McNeely serves on boards and committees for a wide range of organizations. Additionally, McNeely serves as a director for Social Compact, is a member of the President’s Diversity and Equity Community Advisory Council at San Diego State University, and the President’s Community Council at Point Loma Nazarene University. McNeely is a graduate of the Pacific Coast Banking School at the University of Washington in Seattle and the School of Bank Marketing at the University of Colorado in Boulder. He is a resident of San Diego. Based in San Francisco, UnionBanCal Corporation (NYSE:UB)

is a bank holding company with assets of $52.6 billion at December 31, 2006. The company’s Web site is located at www.unionbank.com.

WellPoint Appoints Linda Jimenez as Staff Vice President of Diversity Leadership
INDIANAPOLIS— WellPoint, Inc., the largest U.S. health benefits company, has announced that Linda Jimenez has been selected as staff vice president of diversity Jimenez leadership. Jimenez will be responsible for diversity management strategies and programs nationwide, including providing strategic guidance around talent management and acquisition, multicultural marketing, diversity metrics, and external branding. Jimenez previously headed her own consulting firm, Diversity & People Dynamics, where she developed and implemented custom-designed human relations processes, diversity training, management and leadership coaching and development programs, and assessment tools. A native of San Antonio, Texas, Jimenez received a juris doctor degree from the University of Texas School of Law, Austin. Jimenez currently serves on the advisory board for the Hospitality and Diversity Institute at the University of Houston and on the advisory board for the School of Hospitality Management at Penn State University. In addition, she is a contributing member of the Minorities in Franchising Committee of the International Franchising Association. WellPoint, Inc. is the largest health benefits company in terms of commercial membership in the United States. Headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana,

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WellPoint is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Additional information about WellPoint is available at www.wellpoint.com.

Raytheon Names Heidi Shyu Vice President, Corporate Technology and Research
WALTHAM, Mass. —Raytheon Company (RTN: NYSE) has appointed Heidi Shyu to the position of vice president, Shyu Corporate Technology and Research, reporting to Taylor W. Lawrence, the company’s vice president of Engineering, Technology and Mission Assurance. In her new role, Shyu will be responsible for the development and execution of an integrated technology and research strategy for the company. She will also chair the company’s Technology Leadership Council, which oversees Raytheon’s collective research collaboration and technology opportunities, and she will represent the company on outside councils regarding technology and the defense industry. In a career at Raytheon that has spanned more than 20 years, Shyu has worked on a variety of technical programs, including manned and unmanned aircraft systems and products. Most recently, she was vice president and technical director for the company’s Space and Airborne Systems business. Shyu is also Chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board for the U.S. Air Force, reporting to the Chief of Staff and the Secretary of the Air Force. In addition, she is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Air Force Association. Raytheon Company, with 2006 sales of $20.3 billion, is technology leader, specializing in defense, homeland security, and other government markets throughout the world. With headquarters in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs 73,000 people worldwide.

Shell Oil Company Names New General Counsel— Catherine Lamboley to Retire July 1
HOUSTON— William C. Lowrey has been appointed to succeed Catherine A. Lamboley as general counsel of Shell Oil Lowrey Company effective July 1. Lamboley, a leader in the Houston legal community, is retiring after 28 years with Shell. She has served as senior vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary of Shell Oil Company since 2000. Bill Lowrey is currently associate general counsel for Shell Trading and Shell Gas & Power. A 27-year Shell veteran, he has legal experience encompassing all facets of the business, from exploration and production through oil products. He has been particularly active in mergers and acquisitions. Prior to her current position, Lamboley was vice president, commercial products, for Shell Oil Products. She joined the Shell legal department as an attorney in 1979, and was instrumental in opening up opportunities for women to advance within the Shell organization. “I look forward to continuing and building on the foundation of excellence for which our legal department is known,” said Lowrey. “I want our organization to be a culture where people can do satisfying work and develop expertise that serves our business well.” Shell Oil Company is an affiliate of the Shell Group, a global group of energy and petrochemical companies, employing approximately 109,000 people and operating in more than 140 countries and territories.

The Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company Appoints Edward F. Clemons Senior Vice President
HORSHAM, Pa.— The Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company has announced that Edward F. Clemons, SPHR, has joined the company as Clemons senior vice president and chief human resources officer. In this position, he will have overall responsibility for the programs and activities that support the company’s associates, including benefits, compensation, recruiting, talent management and associate and leadership development. Clemons has more than 25 years’ human resource management and leadership experience. His most recent position was senior vice president, human resources, for Janney Montgomery Scott LLC, a key Penn Mutual affiliate and one of the largest full-service regional securities broker-dealers in the country. Clemons graduated from West Point Military Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree. He received his master’s degree in business administration from Temple University’s Fox School of Business and is a graduate of the University of Michigan, Human Resources Executive Program. In addition, he has earned the Senior Professional in Human Resources designation from the Human Resources Certification Institute. The Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company is the nation’s second oldest mutual life insurer. Visit Penn Mutual on the Internet at http://www.pennmutual.com.

PDJ
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by David Casey

I Didn’t Mean It—So Can’t We Just Move On?
“Racially insensitive describes all of the times I have been told how articulate I am. The verbally omitted portion of that statement is ‘for a black guy.’ ’’

re you the kind of person who finds it easy to forgive and forget, to turn the other cheek? We can all think of “unforgettable” moments in our lives; are there such things as “unforgivable” moments? I have said before that I believe the push to political correctness often presents a barrier to productive dialogue around issues of diversity management. What I meant by that is this: None of us is perfect all the time, and we should not strive for such elusive levels. But I sure did not mean that anything goes as long as we can throw out a vacuous, “I’m sorry” or, “Why can’t you just forgive and forget?” You know the recent headlines— the Don Imus characterization of the Rutgers women’s basketball team; Rush Limbaugh’s “Barack, the Magic Negro”; Tim Hardaway’s self proclaimed hatred of gay people. I could go on, but you get the point. What is mind boggling to me is not that these things have been put in the public eye by very public people, but the responses of those who think that people should just chill out, get over ourselves, forget it, put it into context (context— are you kidding me?!), and move on. My mind is boggled by those who have bestowed four out of five stars on YouTube for the Rush Limbaugh skit. After all, we do have a

A

Constitutional right to free speech, don’t we? In the case of Don Imus, his statements were initially characterized as “racially insensitive.” Uh, no, try again. Racially insensitive describes all of the times I have been told how articulate I am. The verbally omitted portion of that statement is “for a black guy.” If I had a nickel for every time I heard that, I’d give Bill Gates a run for the top of the Forbes list! Make sure you are sitting down before reading this—even I am guilty of making racially insensitive remarks. Yes, and I do this (diversity management) for a living. Once I was conversing with a black acquaintance who happens to be about 6 feet 7 inches tall, and I made the assumption that he played basketball in college, when in fact he had not. The verbal derogatory belittlement referenced from these recent headlines is not this kind of mere insensitivity. Do I know the original intent of these people? Of course not and my point is not to argue that. But what is clear to me is the lasting, indelible impact. Want to see first hand what this

lasting impact can look like, how it becomes institutionalized? Take a look at a recent film named A Girl Like Me by a young filmmaker, Kiri Davis. Ms. Davis replicated psychologist Dr. Kenneth Clark’s 1950s social study of the self impressions of black children (http://www.reelworks.org/watch.php). The self deprecating images these children have of themselves have undoubtedly been shaped in part by this type of toxic ranting. My point is that we can argue intent versus impact all day long, but let’s be real. The difference between humans and animals is our ability to apply reason and logic—especially before we speak. We know what is reasonably insensitive and what comes from deepseated disdain and bigotry. Whether you consider yourself the most tolerant liberal or the most unwavering conservative, you would be hard-pressed to convince me that free speech should come at the cost of human degradation. PDJ
David Casey is VP of Workforce Development, Chief Diversity Officer at WellPoint, Inc. His column appears in each issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal.

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There’s a place where everyone is welcome. Where everyone is treated the same. Boeing strongly supports the never-ending mission to ensure that every workplace is that welcome place.

Here’s a look at how PepsiCo supports its ENGs.
by Rachel Cheeks

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“At its core, PepsiCo’s Diversity and Inclusion program has leveraged our employee networks to help solve real business issues.”

epsiCo is firmly committed to leveraging the diversity its associates bring to the company and to fostering an environment which encourages these differing views of the world. The company’s Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) journey had its formal beginnings in 2000, and today it continues to evolve. Employee networks are a key ingredient in PepsiCo’s D&I strategy. Network members act as ambassadors who make their influence felt by creating positive change: taking actions that benefit both the individual associate and PepsiCo itself. Because of this, our employee networks are considered business partners at PepsiCo. Since the inception of PepsiCo’s D&I journey, three key strategies have proved their value consistently, making a difference in regions around the world. In addition, a fourth strategy for innovation recently has begun contributing tremendous business value.

1st Strategy: Leverage local networks to drive organizational change and business growth.
PepsiCo’s Global Diversity and Inclusion Office serves as the link between our networks and the company’s key business agendas and processes. As a result, each of PepsiCo’s seven Employee Network Groups benefits from enhanced connections with management. The teams focus on three components: • Employer of Choice consists of networking, professional development, membership and recruiting, as well as associate retention; • Partner of Choice refers to community involvement, building external strategic partnerships and enhancing cultural awareness; • Brand of Choice includes business imperatives, such as innovation and health and wellness; business insights, multicultural marketing and sampling opportunities.

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Doritos® Guacamole Tortilla Chips, Lay’s® Chile Limon Potato Chips and Funyuns® Onion Rings with Wasabi are just some of the recent products 2nd Strategy:
Provide powerful connections to achieve professional growth.

Each year the Global Diversity and Inclusion Office sponsors an Employee Networks Leadership Conference. The conference focuses on sharing best practices, identifying synergies, providing linkages to local and national D&I agendas and building a sense of community. In an open forum, attendees share their group’s proudest moments along with their opportunities and challenges. This exchange fosters the kind of crosspollination that only global, companywide networks can provide.

respective groups, network leaders also identify common business platforms to rally around.

3rd Strategy: Identify synergies and a common platform to link the networks so the “Power of One” can be achieved across the D&I and business agendas.
Over the years as our networks have evolved, we have expanded their perspectives, moving them from a local network focus to a national—and eventually global—level. As they identify organizational issues for their

are just some of the recent products PepsiCo has rolled out, through its out, through its Frito-Lay business, that were inspired Frito-Lay business, by its Latino and 4th Strategy: Asian employee netthat were inspired by works. These products Impact our innovation process have not only proved and appeal to popular with Hispanic its Latino and Asian diverse consumer and Asian consumers, tastes, thereby but have achieved employee networks. enhancing our broader popularity multicultural with other consumers outreach. as well. PepsiCo has reached out to diverse At its core, PepsiCo’s Diversity and communities since the 1940s, when Inclusion program has leveraged our the company developed a program to employee networks to help solve real increase Pepsi sales to African-Americans. business issues. Members of our various Today, innovation centers on identifying networks across PepsiCo are true D&I new product flavors to match the unique ambassadors who have been instrumentastes of diverse consumers … and intro- tal with helping us move our Diversity ducing new tastes to new audiences. and Inclusion journey forward. This effort has met with great success. Doritos® Guacamole Tortilla Chips, Rachel Cheeks is Senior Manager, PepsiCo Lay’s® Chile Limon Potato Chips and Global Diversity and Inclusion. Funyuns® Onion Rings with Wasabi

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The Catalyst Award
The evolution of diversity-and-inclusion initiatives

By Catalyst
As the global workforce evolves, so do the diversity-and-inclusion (D&I) initiatives created by organizations to advance women. Early on, initiatives focused on discrete issues, such as childcare, eldercare, personal safety and well being, communication and networking, and talent management. Today, diversity-and-inclusion initiatives

The Catalyst Award: Driving Diversity and Inclusion Forward
Since 1987, the Catalyst Award has recognized 64 cutting-edge strategic approaches within organizations that have advanced women and furthered diversity and inclusion. At first, the Catalyst Award celebrated forwardthinking ideas and the potential of innovative practices. Now, the award honors the process of making change and proven results. Given the changing nature of the D&I landscape in business, it is beneficial to note the evolution of Catalyst Award-winning initiatives over time. The following chronology outlines key themes in the unique history of the Catalyst Award.

1992–1995
Catalyst Award-winning initiatives became more sophisticated during this next phase, building diversity and inclusion into performance-management systems and processes. Many initiatives focused on explicitly engaging women in succession-planning, high-potential and leadership-development discussions, and decisions so that organizations could retain talented women. In addition, initiatives introduced highly developed diversity task forces, steering committees, and advisory teams that sought to engage business leaders in diversityand-inclusion discussions.

1996–1999
During this period, stringent accountability systems with goals tied clearly to pay and performance held senior leadership and middle management responsible for change. Initiatives also began to include increasingly tailored business cases for diversity and inclusion. Monitoring the pipeline for women and understanding emerging trends and markets were critical elements of the business rationale. During this interval, an initiative from an organization based outside of the United States or Canada won a Catalyst Award for the first time.

1987–1991
are an integral part of business strategy, as they anticipate competitive advantages, are integrated into performancemanagement systems, and reinforce their goals through stringent accountability systems. The first five years of the Catalyst Award highlighted programs or efforts that focused on bringing more women into management and supported them through targeted efforts: increased work-life programs such as childcare, eldercare, referral services; workplace environment programs such as sexual harassment training; and the creation of employee networks for women. This period also marked the beginning of developing unique opportunities for all women, including women of color.

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2000–2003
The beginning of the 21st century signaled an important step in the evolution of the Catalyst Award. Winning initiatives showcased strong change, whereby diversity became embedded and integrated into cultural behavior and practices. In these organizations, the value of diversity in the work environment, employee satisfaction, and respect for workers as individuals were critically important. A more global workforce affected diversity-andinclusion efforts, and the influence of the external marketplace and boards of directors added new layers to accountability.

notably, Catalyst Award-winning organizations show strong links between the representation of women in senior management and business performance. The progression in complexity and approach for Catalyst Award-winning initiatives mirrors the overall evolution of diversity and inclusion in organizations. Over the past 20 years, businesses and professional services firms have become increasingly savvy about leveraging the benefits of diversity, especially in optimizing the talents and contributions of their people and emphasizing the strong links with business success.

At first, the Catalyst Award celebrated forwardthinking ideas and the potential of innovative practices. Now, the award honors the process of making change and proven results.
honor roll of diversity initiatives in the business community. The winning models offer other organizations the knowledge and tools to effect meaningful progress in advancing women and embracing diversity and inclusion in all forms. Catalyst hopes that organizations can learn from and build upon the strategies and programs celebrated in the compendium and continue to develop cutting-edge initiatives that advance women in business. To purchase a copy of the Catalyst 20th Anniversary Awards Compendium for PDJ your organization, visit www.catalyst.org.
Catalyst is the leading research and advisory organization working with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women at work. To purchase your copy of the Catalyst 20th Anniversary Awards Compendium, or for more information about the Catalyst Award, and to download free copies of our research reports, visit www.catalyst.org.

2004 and Beyond
With greater stress on diversity and inclusion, the most recent winning initiatives featured impressive frameworks for driving change within organizations. These strategies have now become integrated into the business such that diversity and inclusion is a business strategy itself, rather than merely a business influence. Diversity of thought has also emerged as a significant factor. Recognizing all dimensions of diversity and inclusion is significant; this includes regional or local customization for sophisticated global D&I initiatives as a critical element for success. Most

Catalyst 20th Anniversary Awards Compendium
Although the scope and rigor of the initiatives have increased, the central criteria endure. These criteria— measurable results, accountability, business rationale, senior leadership support, communication, replicability, and originality—are clearly sounded in the Catalyst 20th Anniversary Awards Compendium. This limited-edition volume, which details each of the 64 Award-winning initiatives, sets the gold standard for diversity and inclusion in the workplace. It serves as a benchmark for progressive organizations and as an

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rmed with a master’s degree in clinical psychology, Ms. Banks— a former adult probation officer—is responsible for directing

the diversity strategies at Deloitte & Touche USA LLP. At Deloitte, retaining top talent often stems from empowering people to thrive in a corporate culture that values their individuality. Settle back and relax while this motorcycle-riding realist gives us a glimpse into Deloitte’s diversity strategies and attitudes.

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Interview

Redia Anderson Banks Deloitte

Please describe Deloitte’s global presence. Describe the scope and scale of the company to a reader who may not be familiar with it. Deloitte refers to Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, which is an organization of member firms around the world devoted to excellence in providing professional services and advice, focused on client service through a global strategy executed locally in nearly 150 countries. With access to the deep intellectual capital of approximately 135,000 people worldwide, Deloitte delivers services in four professional areas —audit, tax, consulting, and financial advisory services — and serves more than one-half of the world’s largest companies, as well as large national enterprises, public institutions, locally important clients, and successful, fast-growing global growth companies. How does Deloitte define diversity and inclusion, as it relates to the efforts within the company? At Deloitte the word ‘diversity’ means all aspects of an individual— not just race, gender, sexual orientation, and ethnicity. It is also used to describe attributes like age, thinking styles, work habits, career aspirations and experiences. That said, our mission has grown to be more inclusive, valuing each of our people for all they are as well as for what they can offer. We recognize that diversity and inclusion is something that matters to all of our stakeholders—our people, our clients, and our businesses—and we understand that it makes us stronger as individuals, as an organization, as a profession, and as a community. What are the main components of your D&I program? Is the management of D&I programs largely U.S.-based or present throughout the worldwide organization? Diversity and inclusion programs and initiatives are a fundamental part of the Deloitte U.S. Firms’ overall People Strategy and key business drivers. That said, we actively work to deepen our commitment to fostering a culture of inclusion by driving performance in three mutually-reinforcing focus areas, which include: • applying an immediate focus on recruiting and retaining top talent; • understanding diverse perspectives to achieve disproportionately higher team value; and • instilling a mindset of inclusion, rather than just removing barriers.

How do you keep diversity a priority throughout your company? Specifically, how do you energize people or get their buy-in for diversity? Diversity and inclusion is tightly woven into the fabric of our organization. It is built into our People Strategy, which calls for us to specifically meet our hiring needs by making focused efforts to attract qualified minority talent. This is a business imperative, not a matter of achieving some magic ratio. In addition, we make sure that diversity is top of mind in our succession planning processes for key senior management roles in the organization. Additionally, through the “tone at the top” mentality of our CEOelect, Barry Salzberg, our leaders are encouraged to “walk the talk” by demonstrating their own personal commitment to diversity. For instance, Mr. Salzberg is the Chairman of the YMCA of greater New York and on the board of the Jackie Robinson Foundation. He regularly works with some of the country’s top historically black colleges and universities and has a strong presence in a variety of high schools through Deloitte’s strategic partnership with College Summit, a program designed to encourage more low-income kids to go to college. Are there unique opportunities in your industry for implementing diversity programs? With a little creativity and some out-of-the-box thinking, the opportunities to implement diversity programs are plentiful. Through our strategic partnerships with universities and professional and social organizations like INROADS, The Jackie Robinson Foundation, Just One Break (JOB), Association of Latino Professionals in Finance and Accounting (ALPFA), and National Association of Black Accountants (NABA), we are able to support the communities we serve by creating a link that reaches our team and the community. By doing so, we can continue to create more diversity programs.
CORPORATE LEADERSHIP

What resources (financial and manpower) are allocated to diversity? How do these reflect your company’s leadership commitment to diversity? There are several companywide diversity champions across the Deloitte U.S. Firms. In addition to Barry Salzberg and myself, top program leaders include Chief People Officer Paul Parker, and Managing Principal of Talent Cathy Benko—all of whom show the

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Redia Anderson Banks Deloitte

THINK TANK
Twelve alumni of the Breakthrough Leadership Program were named to a new Think Tank that advises leadership on key business issues. Pictured with Barry Salzberg, U.S. national managing partner, at left, and Redia Anderson Banks, chief diversity officer, both of Deloitte & Touche, at right, are (left to right): Jonathan Campbell, senior manager, Deloitte Consulting Venisa Ibarra, senior manager, Deloitte & Touche Andres De Aguero, senior, Deloitte Consulting Thomas Reynolds, senior manager, Deloitte Services Ruchir Nanda, senior manager, Deloitte Consulting Ana Maria Mendez, manager, Deloitte Tax Kaplan Mobray, U.S. diversity recruiting leader, Deloitte Services Grace Garcia Yap, senior manager, Deloitte & Touche Seidu Sumani, senior manager, Deloitte & Touche Jenny Chang, senior manager, Deloitte & Touche

same level of focus and attention to our programs and initiatives. Through their combined efforts, Deloitte has proven time and time again that diversity and inclusion is an important differentiator for its people and organization as well as in the marketplace. With such programs as the Breakthrough Leadership Program, Business Resource Groups and Efficacy Training Program, the organization aims to provide real-life experiences that stretch people’s capabilities while helping them learn from others. Whatever an individual’s level is, it’s always a two-way experience, and it requires constant attention from our leaders. Does your company address diversity in its annual report? Is it important to talk about diversity with shareholders? Each year we release a stand-alone Diversity & Inclusion annual report that provides an overview of the organization’s accomplishments from the previous year and serves as a window into the future plans of its programs and initiatives. The annual report is an integral part of Deloitte’s internal and external communications around its strides to build a true culture of inclusion. How are decisions about diversity made in your organization? Is there a diversity council and who heads it up? Who participates? Guided by my own leadership and direction, internal decisions about diversity are driven by our National Diversity Leadership

Pil Chung, senior manager, Deloitte Consulting Enrique Olivares, senior manager, Deloitte Consulting

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National Diversity & Inclusion leaders Scott Steffens, partner; Zain McKinney, partner; Jason Harper, principal; and Joe Dung, partner, attended the Deloitte reception at the 2006 NABA Conference.

“There is nothing more reassuring and satisfying than when someone tells us that the reason they stay with Deloitte is because of one of our progressive diversity programs, that allows them to feel like an important and contributing member of our organization.”

Council. The council is made up of a diverse group of key leaders and staff, who develop and implement policies and programs to enable a more inclusive work environment. Also, Deloitte’s external Diversity Advisory Board is an integral part of helping the organization meet and fulfill its diversity and inclusion goals. The advisory board consists of six high-profile individuals, which includes: • Weldon Latham, Esq.; Diversity Advisory Board chair; partner, Davis, Wright, Tremain LLP • Aida Alvarez; former director, U.S. Small Business Administration • Jewell Jackson McCabe; chair, National Coalition of 100 Black Women; president, Jewell Jackson McCabe Associates • Omar Wasow; executive director, Blackplanet.com and Harvard University doctoral candidate • Alice Young; partner and

chair of the Asia Pacific Practice at Kaye Scholer, LLP International Law Firm • Richard “Dick” Macedonia; president/CEO of Sodexho, Inc. What evidence makes you confident that you and your team have developed momentum for the organization in the right direction? What is the vision for the company in five years? In addition to industry and individual recognitions and accolades for our work around and commitment to diversity and inclusion in the workplace, the best barometer for our success is the feedback we receive from our people. There is nothing more reassuring and satisfying than when someone tells us that the reason they stay with Deloitte is because of one of our progressive diversity programs, that allows them to feel like an important and contributing member of our organization. Externally, it is a great honor to be regularly recognized for our efforts in driving a culture of inclusion throughout the company. Some of our industry recognitions include: • FORTUNE Magazine’s 2007 lists for “Best Companies,” “Most Diverse” and “Most Women.” • DiversityInc named Deloitte & Touche USA LLP to its “Top Companies for Diversity” (2007), “Top 10 for Executive Women” (2007) and “Top 10 for Disabilities” (2007). The firm also made the “Top 10 for GLBT” list (2005 & 2006). • The Human Rights Campaign (HRC), a national gay and lesbian organization, recently included the Deloitte U.S. Firms among the 138 major U.S. companies earning a top rating of 100 percent in their fifth annual Corporate Equality Index.

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Redia Anderson Banks Deloitte

EXECUTIVE PROFILE

Redia Anderson Banks
Title: Chief Diversity Officer, National Principal Years in current position: Six Education: MA, Clinical Psychology, Trinity University, San Antonio First job: Federal Bureau of Investigation— Special Agent in the white-collar crime and organized crime units Philosophy: “Never underestimate the power of a few committed people to change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” What I’m reading: Showdown—Good & Evil, by Ted Dekker; East of Eden, by John Steinbeck Family: Married; one son, one daughter
How does your company gauge Interests: In addition to spending time with inclusion of my family, I enjoy riding the Harley-Davidson employees? motorcycle that my husband recently gave me. What are the I also serve on several non-profit boards such tests, measureas the YMCA Camping Services, whose mission ments and is to provide the resources necessary to send benchmarks underprivileged children to summer camp. (metrics) that indicate where the company is on the inclusion graph? With diversity and inclusion being a part of our People Strategy as Redia Anderson Banks delivers opening remarks to students at well as a business imperative, accountability is extremely important Bennett College for Women at the “Women of Deloitte” panel during the Chief Diversity Officers Forum in Greensboro, NC on to measuring our success. We have implemented several metrics and March 21, 2007. tools that help us gauge the impact of our efforts. First, we use diversity scorecards to measure our efforts on the corporate, regional and functional levels based on established goals and objectives. Second, we take a look at the results of the organization’s annual Global celebrate success by recognizing our people, their individuality and People Commitment Survey, which gives some insight into the level the differences they bring to the table each day. of satisfaction and ongoing needs of our people at all levels. How do you deal with those who perceive inclusion Some say diversity is a “numbers game.” How does programs for underrepresented groups as being your company know its culture is not just tied up in exclusionary for others? Have you encountered this attitude? numbers? How do you celebrate success? As previously mentioned, diversity and inclusion is closely tied to Throughout the Deloitte U.S. Firms, we firmly believe Deloitte’s overall People Strategy and is a part of the organization’s that all of our people benefit from working in a diverse core foundation. At our organization, it is about identifying and environment. By regularly encouraging a culture of inclusion hiring the best-qualified, high-performing people that bring solid we work to give everyone an opportunity to thrive and solutions to our clients. Diversity is an absolute business imperative, succeed across the organization. To do this, we emphasize the not a matter of reaching a magic number or ratio. That said, we following:

EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS

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• Ownership of one’s own career. To be successful, one has to be empowered with excellent technical and interpersonal skills. • We expect employees to demonstrate personal accountability and to be proactive in the way they work individually and with others. • We also pay close attention to civic engagement and community involvement, as those activities foster leadership skills and demonstrate a sense of integrity. Please describe your method for orienting new hires into your culture. How do you educate new employees about the importance of diversity? Each new hire at Deloitte is required to take an online training course called “Diversity & Inclusion: Bottom Line Impact” within the first 60 days of their start date. The course offers an in“I use this to keep depth look at Deloitte’s culture my team focused on of inclusion and its impact on the organization as a whole. It our goals: ‘Never also serves to familiarize new hires with our Diversity & underestimate the Inclusion policies, programs and power of a few initiatives.

IMPACT DAY
More than 24,000 volunteers across the country participated in more than 500 projects during the 2006 IMPACT Day, a day that the Deloitte U.S. Firms dedicate to community service and professional development workshops.

Pictured are Claudia Quintana, senior, Deloitte Tax, and Leonel Bueno, consultant, Deloitte & Touche, both volunteers from the Chicago Business Resource Groups, who helped to improve the overall efficiency of a school library by coding and reorganizing books. The involvement of our BRG members enhances our marketplace profile as a great place to work through business development, community service and professional development workshops.

committed people

Can you name specific to change the ways your company supports upward develworld. Indeed, it is opment toward managethe only thing that ment positions? With opportunities for profesever has.’” sional development and career growth being an important driver for recruiting and retaining top talent, we have developed and implemented a variety of programs for our people at all levels. Among them are the: • Future Leaders Apprentice Program (FLAP), which was developed to help us recruit accounting students and fill the talent pipeline. Participants receive $5,000 to help pay the costs of their undergraduate or graduate education. Once they start working within the Deloitte U.S. Firms, they have the benefit of a mentor and enrollment in a two-year leadership development curriculum. • Efficacy program and seminars for new hires, which give new minority staff members the opportunity to begin building their
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business skills while networking with the leadership as well as their peers. • Breakthrough Leadership Program, a comprehensive, cross-functional professional development program for high-performing managers and senior managers, designed to groom the next generation of minority talent. • Business Resource Groups, also known as employee networks or affinity groups, are open to all professionals within the Deloitte U.S. Firms and enable people with like interests and/or backgrounds to network and share best practices. The BRGs include the Asian BRG; Deloitte’s Parents Network; Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Allies and the Women’s Initiative, to name a few.

The Deloitte U.S. Firms' leadership panel discussion at NABA 2006. Left to right: Chet Wood, chairman and chief executive officer of Deloitte Tax; Tony Reid, principal; Jim Brady, regional managing partner; Redia Anderson Banks, chief diversity officer; and Allen Thomas, partner.

Where does your personal belief in diversity and inclusion come from? Who were your role models, or was there a pivotal experience that helped shape your view? My personal belief in diversity comes from my father. I have a sister with cerebral palsy who was denied access to the public school system when we were growing up. In an effort to ensure that she received an education, my father wrote letters to the school and our congressman, fought hard to be heard at education board and town meetings and played an integral role getting a law passed that gave her the opportunity to learn. As a result of his efforts, my sister earned her BBA from the University of Texas, San Antonio. I admire my father’s fortitude and belief in what is right. He has a strong ability to have a vision and work toward it, ultimately opening doors for people who are unable to do it for themselves. As Deloitte’s Chief Diversity Officer, I work to apply these same ideals and principles to what I do each day. At our organization, Diversity & Inclusion is the vehicle that enables all of our people to achieve success, regardless of their differences. How did you get to your present position? What was your career path? In 2001, I was recruited by Deloitte to further develop and drive its evolving diversity and inclusions programs. I was brought on board as a direct admit principal. Prior to joining the organization, I was a human resources executive at a major pharmaceuticals company, where I oversaw experienced hire recruiting and served as an HR generalist. Since this was more than 15 years ago, I had the good fortune to be a part of the discussion around work-life balance and workplace diversity issues, as they were just starting to surface. My very forward-thinking boss at the time asked me to take on developing the first iteration of diversity programs for the company. Who were/are your mentors? What about their business skill or style influenced you? How did they help in your professional and personal life? Are you mentoring anyone today? My mentors consist of a diverse group of individuals that I call my “personal board of directors.” Nearly 50 percent of them are a part of corporate America and the other half are not. Through them I receive a broad range of perspectives and guidance that help to inform my decision-making process. Given their varying backgrounds and points of view, I am able to look to each of them as a sounding board for different things at

different times. Having a personal board of directors has enriched my life and enabled me to achieve my professional and personal goals and objectives. What are your specific responsibilities for advancing diversity and inclusion in your organization? What are the strategies you employ to move inclusion forward? As Deloitte’s Chief Diversity Officer, I am responsible for setting the strategy for the firm’s diversity and inclusion programs so that we are actively attracting and retaining the best talent in the marketplace. In order to move inclusion forward throughout our organization, my team and I work to support Deloitte’s business objectives for growth and profitability through talent pipeline management, encouraging a culture of inclusion and driving brand eminence and marketplace recognition.

“My mentors consist of a diverse group of individuals that I call my “personal board of directors.” Nearly 50 percent of them are a part of corporate America and the other half are not. Through them I receive a broad range of perspectives and guidance that help to inform my decisionmaking process.”

Have you any “mottos” to rally your team regarding D&I? There is a quote by 20th century anthropologist Mary Mead that goes, “Never underestimate the power of a few committed people to change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” I use this to keep my team focused on our goals. What has been your proudest moment as leader in this company? I am extremely proud of many of Deloitte’s accomplishments around workforce Diversity and Inclusion so it is very difficult for me to choose just one. Frankly, each time one of our people tells me that a program or initiative has empowered them to achieve their personal and professional goals or has allowed them to feel like an important and contributing member of our organization, I know that we are on the right track.
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Corporate Philanthropy

Aflac joins in the fight against pediatric cancer

The Aflac Duck joins in the fight

flac is well-known for building Programs that help relationships throughout the fight communities, but no relationship • Aflac Holiday Duck—More than is more meaningful to the company $1 million raised, over 73,000 collectible than the one with pediatric cancer ducks sold with proceeds benefiting patients. 32 pediatric hospitals nationwide. Over ten years ago, Aflac’s connection with childhood cancer • Aflac Family Baseball Nights— research and treatment began when Courtesy of Aflac, pediatric cancer the corporation pledged $3 million patients and their families in 15 cities to Egleston Children’s Hospital in are invited to an entertaining night of Atlanta. After the hospital merged baseball. Buffy Swinehart with Scottish Rite Children’s Manager, Cause Marketing Hospital, the Aflac Cancer Center • Aflac All-American Baseball Classic— and Philanthropy and Blood Disorders Service National, premier high school baseball Aflac of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta event for senior athletes. Over 28 MLB was formed. first-round draft picks have been alumni of the game. In 2006, employees gave nearly 6,000 volunteer hours, Proceeds benefit childhood cancer research. and the company donated almost $4 million to this cause. Each month, employees visit the facility to play bingo with The Aflac Cancer Center is one of the top five pediatric the patients, while Aflac’s sales agents have given over cancer care hospitals in the nation, treating more than $17 million from their own salaries. This spirit of giving 300 newly diagnosed cancer patients and over 1,000 comes from the top. Recently, Dan Amos, Aflac’s chairman sickle cell patients each year. Employees and agents have and CEO, received the Starlight Foundation Award for his provided countless volunteer hours and contributed over work with childhood cancer patients and their families. $35 million to help make it one of top five pediatric cancer care hospitals in the nation. PDJ

A

When the Aflac Duck was born, its popularity with consumers garnered the company instant name recognition. Now, the spokesduck splits its time between promoting Aflac insurance and spreading the message about pediatric cancer. Speciallythemed plush ducks have been sold with proceeds benefiting research and treatment for the disease.

C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E Name: Aflac, Inc. Headquarters: Columbus, Georgia Web site: www.aflac.com Primary business: Voluntary benefit offerings Employees: 4,300 employees with over 63,000 sales agents nationwide

Aflac
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Creativity means taking a chance. And that’s the only way to grow.
I’m interested in a lot of different things. At Hallmark— working in several different departments— I’ve had the chance to explore all those interests. With every job, I came in as a beginner and grew to be an expert. Within one opportunity, there is always another. As a creative person, advancing in my career gives me even more freedom to express myself. I use my mind in ways I never imagined. That’s what lets me say I love where I am and I love what I do.
rachel britt—production art supervisor

l i v e yo u r pa s s i o n . l o v e yo u r w o r k .

for infor mat ion on hal lmar k care er opp ortunit ies, v isit www.hal lmar k.com/care ers.
© 2007 hal lmar k licensing , inc.

Corporate Philanthropy

Bank of the West invests in the future with Operation Hope

S

ince 2000, Bank of the West has been a strong supporter of Operation Hope, a growing provider of financial literacy programs and catalyst for “silver rights,” an agenda focusing on wealth-building and urban development for people and communities in poverty, regardless of color or ethnicity. Founded in 1991 in the wake of Top: John Bryant, right, is with Chairman and CEO civil unrest in Los Angeles, Don McGrath in an Oakland classroom. Operation Hope is headed by John Above: Art Shingleton, left, CEO Don McGrath and Bryant, a charismatic young leader John Bryant, right, at a Federal Reserve-hosted and entrepreneur who has taken his Art Shingleton meeting in San Francisco last fall on “silver rights.” message of financial empowerment SVP/Community Affairs through education into governmental Bank of the West and national arenas, earning the cooperation and praise of major banks, regulators high profile support from Mayor John Hickenlooper and and elected officials. Superintendent Michael Bennet, which is typical of the Operation Hope’s primary program is “Banking on our community support that greets “Banking on our Future.” Future,” which brings volunteer bankers into elementary, Operation Hope and Bank of the West also cooperate in middle school and secondary classrooms to increase student a joint venture, hybrid banking institution in Oakland’s awareness of what intelligent saving, spending and use of Fruitvale neighborhood. The “HOPE Center” combines a credit can mean for their futures. traditional Bank of the West branch with a financial counseling Bank of the West, whose Chairman Don McGrath sits center and a cyber-café where clients have free access to the on Operation Hope’s board of directors, has invested or Internet to research personal finance options. Users of the committed $835,000 to date in support of Operation Hope facility can get computer training and credit counseling as and has provided an additional $1 million in such in-kind well as assistance with mortgage applications and even small services as volunteer banker/teachers and facility space. business planning and SBA application help. PDJ Through these investments, Bank of the West was able to launch the financial literacy program in Oakland, Portland and Denver between 2003 and C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E 2006. Bank of the West Name: Bank of the West banker/teachers have Headquarters: San Francisco, California contributed more than 300 Web site: www.bankofthewest.com hours to classroom presentaPrimary business: Commercial bank tions before nearly 2,500 Employees: 9,735 FTE inner city students. The launch of Denver’s program in 2006 included

Bank of the West

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Corporate Philanthropy

CREW Careers : building opportunities, one brick at a time
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larissa King is a 16-year-old high school junior in Northwest Dallas. Without even knowing it, she is building her future one brick at a time. For the last three years, Clarissa, who is a member of Girls, Inc., has Top: The CREW Careers Charlotte class of 2007 takes a attended the CREW Careers™ program field trip to the Home Federal Savings and Loan in Dallas. CREW (Commercial Real Building in downtown Charlotte. The girls played “This Old Building,” a game to determine the best Estate Women) Careers takes place in reuse, then met with the actual developers. 26 cities in North America. Through this program, Clarissa and more than Above: A CREW Careers instructor takes students on a 800 other girls have learned about the field trip to a vacant office building in downtown Charlotte. The girls made their own plans for how to facets of commercial real estate: design, redevelop the building, then met with the actual architecture, brokerage, leasing, develAnne DeVoe Lawler developers. opment, law, appraisal and many other 2007 Chair fields. CREW Foundation The girls also learn about themto encourage girls to consider commercial real estate selves. Commercial real estate remains one of those profescareers as an option. sional fields that is white male-dominated. Through independent research, CREW Network, and its philanthropic • Starbucks and KeyBank join as strong multi-year lead donors. Other donors are the law firms Holland & arm, the CREW Foundation, documented pay and promoKnight and Akerman Senterfitt; McCarthy Building tion disparities between men and women in this field. Companies; National Association of Industrial and Office CREW Careers was conceived as a program to better the Properties (NAIOP); and Regency Centers. Other partwork environment for women in commercial real estate. The ners include Appraisal Institute Education Trusts, CREW classroom modules and onsite, hardhat tours are a way of Miami, Grant Thornton LLP and Perkins Coie, LLP. removing the psychological barriers that prevent even greater With girls like Clarissa in mind, these companies are numbers of women from choosing this career path. “Having mentors and role models from CREW has given helping build a solid foundation for women and for the commercial real estate world, which will benefit from a more me the chance to explore the different careers in commercial diverse workplace. real estate. My involvement has created a curiosity to learn PDJ more and possibly consider studying commercial real C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E estate after high school,” Name: CREW Foundation, CREW Network Clarissa said. Headquarters: Lawrence, Kansas Companies that underWeb site: www.crewnetwork.org stand the value of diversity in Primary business: A professional association dedicated to the success of women in the workplace fund CREW Commercial Real Estate Careers: Employees: More than 7,000 members • Cushman & Wakefield is the Global Executive Donor of CREW Careers, making a multi-year commitment
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Corporate Philanthropy

CVS All Kids Can™ offers children with disabilities the opportunity to learn, play and succeed

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lay time for eight-year-old Sarah has meant sitting in a wheelchair watching her friends ride swings, climb up ladders and race down the slide. Cerebral palsy may limit Sarah’s ability to sit, stand and walk, but her condition has never limited her Top: Jeb Bush, former Governor of Florida, celebrates ability and desire to laugh and play the groundbreaking of a new CVS All Kids Can with her friends. Boundless playground with 8-year-old Sarah Busansky Soon, Sarah will enjoy her own and her mom, Stefani, at Jorge Mas Canosa (Riverside) Park, in Miami. day at the park, thanks to a new barrier-free playground under developAbove: Groundbreaking—David Rickard, Executive Vice ment in her community. Hers is one Caremark, breaks ground on a Eileen Howard Dunn President of CVS Boundless playground with Jebnew of countless success stories generated, CVS All Kids Can Bush, Vice President former Governor of Florida, and Manuel Diaz, Miami in part, by CVS All Kids Can™, Corporate Communications Mayor, along with children from the community at a five-year, $25 million commitment Jorge Mas Canosa (Riverside) Park. CVS Caremark by the CVS Caremark Charitable Trust and CVS Caremark to support children with disabilities. the importance of inclusion; and to provide medical rehabiliCVS All Kids Can and one of its partners, Boundless ® Playgrounds , celebrated with Sarah during a groundbreaking tation and related services to children with disabilities. “CVS All Kids Can creates positive outcomes and ceremony for another Boundless playground at Jorge Mas long-term success for children with disabilities by increasing Canosa (Riverside) Park, in Miami. The CVS Caremark opportunities for learning, physical activity and play. In Charitable Trust pledged $950,000 to help complete eight many cases we support settings which bring children with of these playgrounds under construction in south Florida. disabilities together with their typically developing peers. The cornerstone of the company’s philanthropy efforts, In the end, our work truly benefits children of all abilities,” CVS All Kids Can is committed to making life easier for says Eileen Howard Dunn, Vice President, Corporate children with disabilities. In addition to Boundless Communications, CVS Caremark. Playgrounds, CVS All Kids Can partners with Easter Seals PDJ and Meeting Street, a nationally and internationally recognized innovator in educational and therapeutic C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E services for children with Name: CVS Caremark Corporation disabilities and developmental Headquarters: Woonsocket, Rhode Island delays. CVS All Kids Can Web site: www.cvs.com aims to build barrier-free Primary business: Integrated pharmacy services playgrounds so children of all Employees: 182,000 abilities can play side-by-side; to raise awareness in schools and local communities about

CVS Caremark

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Corporate Philanthropy

Nashville Area Habitat for Humanity and DaimlerChrysler Financial Services kick off largest Habitat build in Nashville history

Prior to becoming home owners, Habitat for Humanity partner families must complete 475 hours of “sweat equity” at the build site and in the classroom. Yvette T. stops from building her new home, for a moment, to pose with three vice presidents from DaimlerChrysler Financial Services. The Nashville Area Habitat for Humanity built a record 50 homes in 2006, 38 locally and 12 abroad. From left: Richard Howard, VP, DaimlerChrysler Truck Financial; Chris McCarthy, President and CEO, NAHFH; Yvette T. (recipient); William F. Jones Jr., VP, Chrysler Financial; and Jürgen Rochert, VP, Mercedes-Benz Financial.

DCFS representatives plan to return vette T. recalls a time in her life to Nashville and attend dedication cerewhen she thought financial issues monies for the families that are purchasing would make becoming a homeowner these homes. The dedication ceremony impossible. She said, “All the odds will be held Sunday, April 29, 2007. were against me. If it were not for this “With the help of DaimlerChrysler opportunity through Habitat, I think Financial Services we can finish the 140 we would always live in an apartment Habitat homes in Providence Park in and never get out of the cycle of poverty.” Klaus Entenmann 2007,” said Chris McCarthy, NAHFH. Yvette T. is one of 16 families President and CEO “Then, the neighborhood and community whose lives will be transformed by the DaimlerChrysler Financial will be complete for everyone to enjoy.” largest Habitat for Humanity effort in Services Americas LLC DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Nashville history. More than 600 has partnered with Habitat for Humanity employees constructed wall panels for in communities across North America. 14 new Habitat homes in the Ryman DCFS regularly schedules community volunteer activities as Exhibit Hall at Nashville’s Gaylord Opryland Hotel. part of its meeting and conference programs. The homes will be completed in Nashville Area Habitat DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Americas LLC for Humanity’s (NAHFH) all-Habitat Providence Park provides brand-specific financing for automotive dealers’ community this spring. DCFS employees scheduled the inventories and their retail consumers, and conducts business volunteer activity as part of their annual Field Sales as Chrysler Financial and Mercedes-Benz Financial. Conference in Nashville. DaimlerChrysler Financial Services is one of the leading “Habitat for Humanity helps people to help themselves financial services organizations worldwide. and to break the vicious cycle of poverty through home For more information, visit their Web site at: ownership,” said Klaus Entenmann, President and CEO PDJ www.daimlerchryslerfinancialservices.com/na. of DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Americas LLC. “We are pleased to partner with Habitat for Humanity to build on our commitC O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E ment to financial empowerment in our Name: DaimlerChrysler Financial Services Americas LLC communities.” Headquarters: Farmington Hills, Michigan “We will provide the building Web site: www.daimlerchryslerfinancialservices.com/na materials, tools and safety equipment Primary business: Automotive finance necessary to construct the interior and Employees: 5,600 exterior walls,” said Gary Bigelow, COO of NAHFH. “The experience will be similar to the build site without concern for the weather.”

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DaimlerChrysler

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[ BANK OF THE WEST ]

WANT O WORK WA TO WORK FOR A ANT TRULY GREAT TRULY G A T LY GREAT BANK? L ? AT

AT BA AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE ANK WEST, T O S WEL LL EM MPLOYEES SERV VED. WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED.
Different p perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value dive h That’s k West, diversity and ersity ees. tinue than nks equal opportunity for all our employe Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our opportunity employees. Year year, cont end oday’ environment, it is our emplo oyees unique ble of people. After all, in to s competitive banking e blend today’s employees with e rest innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com www.bankofthewest.com

Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V West subsidiarie es employers. e

© 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC. k West.

Corporate Philanthropy

Key grant helps homeless access job training

One of the first graduates receiving his certificate of completion. Nine people graduated in December, 2006; eleven in March and three in June, 2007.

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says Margot J. Copeland, chair of the ore than 130 residents of the Key Foundation and director of YMCA of Greater Cleveland’s corporate diversity and philanthropy award-winning transitional housing at KeyCorp. “By providing job training program, Y-Haven, now have the and placement opportunities, this opportunity for job training and placeprogram transforms the lives of its ment through a new vocational participants as well as positively affecting project, “Green Team,” made possible the community at large by fostering by a $150,000 Key Foundation grant. Margot J. Copeland a healthier economy and elevating Named for its focus on placing Chair of the Key Foundation civic spirit.” individuals in cleaning and mainteDirector of Corporate Key Foundation is a private nance industry jobs, Green Team Diversity & Philanthropy foundation funded by KeyCorp. includes the classroom and field KeyCorp Charitable grants are given by the training needed to develop work-related foundation to charitable organizations skills and proficiency. The curriculum in the communities that Key serves. consists of two weeks of orientation, Grants from Key Foundation principally support organizatraining preparation and initial skill assessments; one week tions and institutions that promote economic independence of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) through financial education and workforce initiatives that training and related safety issues; six weeks of practical implementation and skills testing; and a final week of review foster diversity and inclusion. PDJ and written tests of skills, knowledge and safety procedures. “Key is a long-time supporter of the YMCA,” says Glenn Haley, president and CEO of the Greater Cleveland C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E YMCA. “Their donation to our Green Team project Name: KeyCorp provided a much-needed revenue stream to expand Headquarters: Cleveland, Ohio Y-Haven’s services and offer additional employment Web site: www.key.com opportunities to our community’s homeless population.” Primary business: Banking (Key companies provide Over their two-year transition with Y-Haven, the men investment management, retail and commercial banking, of Green Team will provide quality maintenance to consumer finance, and investment banking products and contracted sites, establishing a revenue stream to help sustain services to individuals and companies throughout the the program. These men will then gain employment upon United States and, for certain businesses, internationally.) graduating from the Y-Haven program. Employees: 20,000 “Green Team epitomizes our efforts to invest in programs and organizations that promote workforce development,”

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“OUR GREATEST ASSET IS OUR DIVERSITY. TOGETHER, WE DRIVE INNOVATION.”
Earl Exum, Director, Global Repair Services

At Pratt & Whitney, you’ll find diversity at the core of who we are and what we offer. With so many different talents and perspectives, we continue to find a better way. From design to manufacturing to service, from commercial flight to space exploration, we help our customers grow and prosper. Working together, we all succeed. The Eagle is everywhere.

www.pw.utc.com

Corporate Philanthropy

Motorola support brings Chicago girls closer to science

Project Exploration’s Sisters4Science program uses female scientists to engage girls in exploring science.

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they visited engineering labs, observed otorola and the professors and students doing real science Motorola Foundation experiments and participated in hands(www.motorola.com/giving) cultivate on design activities. the skilled scientists and engineers In the past seven years, 92 percent needed to create tomorrow’s new ideas of Project Exploration students have by supporting programs that inspire graduated from high school and young people, particularly girls and 57 percent have enrolled in a four-year underserved minorities, to embrace Eileen Sweeney college. Girls who participate in Project science and math at an early age. Director Exploration’s programs are majoring in The Motorola Foundation’s Motorola Foundation science at rates five times the national $60,000 multi-year commitment to average. These statistics are exciting Project Exploration (www.projectexbecause the program targets students ploration.org) supports its Sisters4from low-income families who are not Science program, which combines necessarily academically successful. science exploration with leadership development for approximately 100 “I already feel successful. minority middle- and high-school girls in Chicago. [Participating in Project Exploration] feels like Sisters4Science creates a safe space for girls to explore an accomplishment already. If I can do this, science, exposes girls to a wide variety of women scientists, what else can I do? I think I have a future and develops leadership and communication skills. Women scientists regularly assist with Sisters4Science sessions on in science. Before, I didn’t really think much topics ranging from anatomy to paleontology and about it.” engineering to chemistry. - Britney, 13, current student, first-year participant For example, during a recent “World of Engineering” project, students experienced the various disciplines of engineering. A computer engineer worked with the girls to design a Web page. An industrial engineer led the girls in “acting out” the production process, having them calculate C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E the cost of materials and identify the pros and cons of manuName: Motorola facturing the product. A mechanical engineer had the girls Headquarters: Schaumburg, Illinois design a paper car that could travel the farthest distance with Web site: www.motorola.com one puff of air. Primary business: Wireless and broadband Together the girls attended the Northwestern University communication School of Engineering’s annual career day for girls, where Employees: 70,000

PDJ

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healthy business
a rare combination
At UnitedHealth Group, we are a healthy business in more ways than one. We are a Fortune 100 company identified as one of the two most admired companies in the health care industry by rankings published in Fortune magazine. Each day we also have the privilege to make a significant difference in someone’s life. Sound like a rare combination? It is.

We are UnitedHealth Group…
As a recipient of a recent award from the INROADS program, UnitedHealth Group is becoming better known for its efforts in supporting educational opportunities for African-American, Hispanic and Native American college students. This year, the UHG Foundation will be offering over $700,000 in scholarships to diverse minority and rural students.
Whether it’s a nurse answering questions on the phone, a technologist managing a health information database or any of us holding thousands of positions at UnitedHealth Group, each person’s role is important. Every single one of us is valued. Become one of us! Join one of our winning teams and you’ll be inspired to discover your own mix of professional advantages and personal rewards. At UnitedHealth Group, we believe diverse viewpoints, cultural backgrounds, beliefs, lifestyles, and a number of various dimensions of difference are assets – assets that help us generate the innovations of tomorrow. You can join our dynamic culture of excellence at any of our 200 locations across the U.S. Here are just few areas with available positions:

• Finance • IT • Actuarial • Medical Directors

• Nursing • Marketing • Operations • Sales

To find out more about these and other opportunities with UnitedHealth Group nationwide and to apply online, visit our CAREERS page at www.unitedhealthgroup.com. Feel free to perform a search using location and/or keywords. Or, you may send your cover letter and resume to DiversityOffice@uhc.com. UnitedHealth Group offers a full range of comprehensive benefits, including medical, dental and vision, as well as a matching 401(k) and an employee stock purchase plan. At UnitedHealth Group, we want to celebrate you as a unique individual, complimenting the richness of our diverse culture and talent. UnitedHealth Group is an equal opportunity employer.

Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere: An equal opportunity employer. M/F/D/V.

Corporate Philanthropy

Nationwide encourages and rewards volunteerism

Nationwide Associate Kimberly Branham tutors a fourth-grade student in reading—a volunteer opportunity she found through the On Your Side Volunteer Network.

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understand the important impact her ommunity involvement at words and actions can have on another Nationwide extends beyond the person. “When I gave the student that boundaries of financial contributions. I tutor a Valentine’s Day card, he just lit Nationwide associates donate thouChad A. Jester up. That meant a lot,” she said. sands of hours every year, putting their President The On Your Side Volunteer hands, hearts and minds at the service Nationwide Foundation Network also enables associates to track of their communities. and Vice President the hours they spend volunteering and In September of 2005, the company Corporate Citizenship provides incentives for participation, launched the On Your Side Volunteer & Customer Relations such as the ability to earn paid time off, Network, an innovative, Web-based grant money for their volunteer organizaprogram that helps associates search for tion and internal recognition. and find volunteer activities that match their locations, Leilani Shaw, a Nationwide associate who volunteers availability, personal passions and skills. with Children & Families of Iowa, says the program So far, the program has energized more than 3,000 demonstrates the company’s commitment to associates. Nationwide associates to log nearly 40,000 hours of service. “When Nationwide began allowing associates to volunteer And while these activities are having a direct impact on the their time and donate to the nonprofit organizations of their landscape of communities across the country, associates say choice, it showed they have a consideration for our values they, too, are reaping the benefits of volunteerism. and needs,” she said. Nationwide Associate Kimberly Branham volunteers as a Girl Scout Troop Leader and as a tutor for a fourth-grade child. She says her involvement has helped her contribute to her community, and also to her own development. C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E “As a scout leader, I feel that if I can get a group of Name: Nationwide hormonal preteens to peacefully exist at camp for three days, Headquarters: Columbus, Ohio I can handle anything! And in the process of helping the Web site: www.nationwide.com girls, I’ve developed so many skills that help me in the Primary business: Insurance and financial workplace and in my personal life,” she said. Employees: About 35,000 Community involvement has also helped Branham

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His legacy lives on.

Thurmond B. Woodard
Chief Ethics, Privacy & Compliance Officer Vice President, Global Diversity

1949 - 2007

“Thurmond, in life and forever in our memory, provides us a lasting model of what we stand for, what we should strive for and why it matters.” Michael Dell

Corporate Philanthropy

Office Depot turns in-kind donations into treasure

Through Office Depot's GIK program in Houston, TX local charities like the United Way receive school and office products and distribute them to deserving charities.

The impact of these in-kind hen one person can’t find a use donations is widespread and profound. for something, someone else Supplies that Office Depot donated to often views the same item as if it were the Idaho PTA were given to a school worth its weight in gold. This phethat had lost most of its library and nomenon can be seen every day in the offices in a fire. In Delaware, scrapbooks case of the thousands of products that Mary Wong and supplies from Office Depot became Office Depot donates to Gifts In Kind President holiday gifts that helped disadvantaged International (GIKI) each year. Office Depot Foundation teens to exercise their creativity and Numerous items for which the leading imagination. And in Alexandria, Va., office products company no longer has the donations enabled a local YMCA to a use are exactly what hundreds of supply its “Operation Hero” homework nonprofit organizations around the help program for an entire school year. nation and throughout the world do Office Depot also regularly makes in-kind product need. It’s a classic win-win situation! donations to Feed The Children and the SHOPA Kids in “Office Depot is recognized for its leadership in product Need Foundation’s nationwide network of resource centers donations. Each year nearly a thousand nonprofits receive for teachers. The contributions clearly demonstrate the free and useful office supplies through Gifts In Kind company’s commitment to serving the community, while International’s partnership,” says Barbara Florence, the also helping to protect the environment by reducing waste. organization’s vice president for donor development. In that respect, the program is actually a win-win-win! “We are honored to work side-by-side with Office Depot.” PDJ Since establishing the partnership in 2001, Office Depot has donated hundreds of thousands of products worth tens of millions of dollars through GIKI. Each of the C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E company’s retail stores and warehouse facilities is Name: Office Depot matched with a local charity, which receives ongoing Headquarters: Delray Beach, Florida donations ranging from office supplies and furniture to Web site: www.officedepot.com and technology products, computer software and accessories. www.community.officedepot.com These items enable charities to stretch their budgets and Primary business: Office supply products and services, maximize their resources for the delivery of critical technology, office furniture community services. In addition, school supplies Employees: 52,000 associates globally donated by Office Depot help to ensure that children

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from low-income families have the resources to reach their full potential.

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Corporate Philanthropy

ONEOK’s commitment to improving communities

VWE’s commitment to serving communities and changing lives: Employees of Texas Gas Service, a division of ONEOK, contribute time and effort as Volunteers With Energy members to complete a Habitat for Humanity House in the Austin, Texas area.

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through Volunteers With Energy. He NEOK, Inc.’s Volunteers With remembers well why he pledged to dedicate Energy program (VWE) was so much time to VWE’s Habitat for founded in 1993 and encompasses the Humanity projects: He was given a personal tri-state region of Oklahoma, Kansas tour by a seven-year-old child of the first and Texas—areas where the majority of house he helped build. “Working alongside its employees work and live. Its mission that family for so long and then seeing that Ginny Creveling is to improve the quality of life by child experience something that, in his Executive Director helping others through volunteer mind, was so grand was very emotional,” ONEOK Foundation participation in community service Novak says. projects and civic activities. ONEOK is a long-standing supporter of ONEOK, headquartered in Tulsa, Habitat for Humanity. Oklahoma Natural Okla., is a diversified natural gas Gas and Kansas Gas Service, both divisions company that distributes natural gas to of ONEOK, have also dedicated numerous more than two million customers, marhours and labor through VWE helping to build homes in kets gas to its customers—primarily local gas distribution their communities. companies—and is the general partner of ONEOK Partners, Volunteers With Energy is about more than fulfilling a one of the largest publicly traded master limited partnerships civic duty. For the ONEOK volunteers who graciously give in the country. FORTUNE magazine recently recognized up weekends and evening hours, it is about really making a ONEOK as one of the most admired companies in America difference in the communities in which they live and work. and the number one energy company. “Volunteering is the importance of serving others,” says Since 2003, VWE has answered the call of more than 400 requests for volunteers. In 2006, 1,245 ONEOK employ- former VWE Chair Mae Williams. “Our impact has changed lives and encouraged others to do the same.” ees donated more than 9,250 hours of volunteer service. PDJ Bill Novak, a financial accountant C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E with Texas Gas Name: ONEOK, Inc. Service, a division Headquarters: Tulsa, Oklahoma of ONEOK, valWeb site: www.oneok.com ues the time he Primary business: A diversified energy company and the general partner and 45.7 percent has invested owner of ONEOK Partners, L.P. building houses Employees: 4,544 for Habitat for Humanity

ONEOK Foundation
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Corporate Philanthropy

Oracle named Corporation of the Year by the United Negro College Fund

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racle received the Corporation of the Year Award at the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) Annual Awards Dinner held in January 2007 at the Oakland Marriott City Center in Oakland, California. During the award ceremonies, Oracle was recognized for its outstanding commitment to the education of today’s youth.

One such student is Aduramigba Sopeju from Benedict College. “During the summer of 2006, I had the opportunity to intern at Oracle,” says Sopeju. “My project involved the development of business and human resources applications. At Jane Robertson the end of the summer, I was able to build Senior Director and deploy two applications. I was also Oracle Diversity able to learn some managerial skills.” Last year, Oracle realized the critical need for additional assistance for young A Partnership that Makes people in certain economically distressed a Difference areas. A Community Impact Grant of $250,000 was awarded Oracle has had a unique partnership with the UNCF since 1998. The company’s support has made it possible for UNCF to young people from Bayview-Hunter’s Point, Richmond, East Palo Alto, East Oakland, and Marin City. With this member schools to have access to state-of-the-art technology grant, they will have an opportunity to receive the college as well as the funds necessary to give students a quality education they deserve and break the cycle of poverty. education. In 2002, Oracle was asked to play an integral part in the UNCF Technology Enhancement Capital Campaign, a program to provide historically black colleges and universities PDJ access to advanced teaching and learning methods, and cutting edge technology within degree programs. Oracle answered with a donation of $9 million in C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E database management software and $1 million for training Name: Oracle faculty and students in the use of this new software. Headquarters: Redwood Shores, California In addition, Oracle also instituted the Oracle Scholars Web site: www.oracle.com Program, that provided over $446,000 in scholarships for Primary business: Enterprise software young men and women majoring in accounting, business Employees: 68,000+ administration, engineering, finance, human resources, and marketing. These students receive grants to complete their studies during the school year and in the summer have an opportunity to intern at Oracle and receive special mentoring from company employees.

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Changing neighborhoods. Changing lives.
National City is committed to strengthening the communities we serve. Our efforts lead the way to new opportunities and help build a brighter tomorrow. Visit NationalCity.com/About to learn more.

NationalCity.com
Member FDIC • ©2007, National City Corporation®
CS-26654

Corporate Philanthropy

Pfizer’s Global Health Fellows Program addresses world health challenges
scientist working on a database to improve patient care at a refugee camp in northern Kenya. A research manager bringing her skills to bear on an AIDS vaccine clinical trial in Uganda. A doctor assessing training for medical colleagues in Russia. These are the faces of Pfizer’s Global Health Fellows Program (GHF), an Top: Global Health Fellow Dennis Vargo innovative public-private partnership teaching Pharmacology students during leveraging Pfizer’s most valuable Rounds at the Infectious Disease resource—its people—to address Institute in Uganda; Middle: Fellow systemic public health challenges in JoAnne Blakely’s shot of a fire outbreak near the AMREF health center in developing nations. Alison Hager Nairobi’s Kibera slum; Bottom: Fellow Now in its fourth year, the GHF Global Health Fellows, Tsuneo Tsubaki worked with a Vellore program selects volunteers from among sixth round, Business India blood bank to increase donations. Pfizer employees to serve with nonprofits Enabling Group in developing countries. The goal: Pfizer Inc transfer knowledge and skills to build Partnering NGOs report numerous benefits to their organcapacity that will be helpful long after they have gone home. izations and the communities they serve. The program has won The 128 scientists, clinical researchers, analysts, nurses, almost universal support from partner organizations—one partdoctors, and HR managers whom Pfizer has deployed to 30 ner calculated that it would have cost up to $150,000 to developing countries all share an incredible desire to do good. replicate what one Fellow produced. But with the strategic guidance, established partnerships, and For the Fellows, the personal and business results have technical resources of Pfizer, they become powerful catalysts been abundant. Survey results show that for 88 percent of for change. The GHF program also manifests Pfizer’s overarching purpose: helping people live longer, healthier lives. Fellows, the experience met all or most of their personal and Pfizer works with experienced non-governmental organiza- professional development goals, and 69 percent of supervisors report greater pride in the company because a group member tion (NGO) partners to identify high impact assignments, was a Fellow. You can find out more about the GHF program encouraging employees to apply for deployments from 3-6 at www.pfizer.com. months. Pfizer pays their salaries and expenses, while mainPDJ taining their jobs at home, and provides grants to NGO partners to help leverage the work of the Fellows. The range of projects is wide. Fellows have helped train clinical C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E and research personnel in medicine and pharmacy, Name: Pfizer Inc strengthened laboratories and financial systems, written Headquarters: New York City clinical protocols, and designed fundraising strategies. Web site: www.pfizer.com What’s more, they have trained local staff to continue Primary business: Pharmaceuticals this work. Employees: 100,000

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mgmmiragediversity.com
N e v a d a : B e l l a g i o • M G M G r a n d • M a n d a l a y B a y • T h e M i r a g e • Tr e a s u r e I s l a n d • M o n t e C a r l o • N e w Yo r k - N e w Yo r k • L u x o r • E x c a l i b u r • C i r c u s C i r c u s Railroad Pass • Primm Valley Resorts • Silver Legacy • Circus Circus Reno • Colorado Belle • Edgewater • Gold Strike • Nevada Landing O u t s i d e N e v a d a : B e a u R i v a g e • G o l d S t r i k e - Tu n i c a • G r a n d V i c t o r i a • M G M G r a n d D e t r o i t

Corporate Philanthropy

Pitney Bowes Literacy and Education Fund grant launches hispanic family reading program

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he National Center for Family Above: A family enjoying some time together Literacy (NCFL) developed and reading as participants in the Hispanic Literacy piloted a program over the past year Program. that addressed the specific literacy needs of Spanish-speaking Hispanic families. According to NCFL, after the program La Lectura en Familia/Families Reading Polly O’Brien Morrow ended, 50 percent of parents reported Together was made possible with a President they now had a library card, compared to $120,000 grant from the Pitney Bowes Pitney Bowes Literacy 35 percent prior to attending the workLiteracy and Education Fund. and Education Fund shop. Library visits increased by 29 per“Pitney Bowes gave the funding and cent and parents reported increases in how resources that enabled us to make this often they read to their children. In addiprogram a reality,” said Emily tion, children showed an average gain of Kirkpatrick, senior director, NCFL. The 2.38 points on the Get Ready to Read! screening tool, twice grant funded virtually all aspects of the program, from the the gain made by a control group of comparison children. team of NCFL literacy experts who brainstormed the idea, “The results from La Lectura en Familia define its success,” to the development, design and printing of curriculum, parent said Polly O’Brien Morrow, president of the Pitney Bowes resource and facilitator’s guides. It also covered the fees Literacy and Education Fund. “This effective program has associated with piloting the program and measurement tools, raised parental awareness of the important role they play in including before and after surveys for parent and child encouraging their child’s educational development. We’re participants. proud to be a part of this program, which has made a The program provided two 90-minute workshops to give parents early literacy skills to support their preschool children. difference in the lives of so many children and families.” PDJ Topics included language development, phonological awareness, alphabet knowledge and book awareness. C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E Parents from 160 Hispanic families participated in pilot Name: Pitney Bowes Inc. programs offered in Albuquerque, N.M.; New Rochelle, Headquarters: Stamford, Connecticut N.Y.; and Denver, Colo. Web site: www.pb.com “The program was very successful,” said Cindy Primary business: Pitney Bowes provides the world’s most Nelson, project manager, NCFL. “In just two short sescomprehensive suite of mailstream software, hardware, services sions, parents became aware of how important it is to read and solutions to help companies manage their flow of mail, with their children and to involve literacy in their everydocuments and packages to improve communication day routines.”

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Corporate Philanthropy

Pratt & Whitney volunteers give students the ‘power to read’

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Power to Read program at Hockanum. magine standing at an ATM where Today, over 70 employees with diverse every button and every prompt on backgrounds and job responsibilities volthe screen is a puzzle—because you unteer one hour a week during the school can’t read. year to serve as reading tutors for students A national adult literacy survey in first through fifth grade, an engaging showed that 21-23 percent of adults in Cynthia Z. Forbes experience that reaffirms the importance the nation are at the lowest level of Manager, Public Affairs of individual contributions and responsiliteracy—this translates to 40 to Pratt & Whitney ble corporate citizenship. Since its incep44 million adults who are functionally tion, the Power to Read program has illiterate. For them, it’s a struggle even helped nearly 500 students improve their to use an ATM or navigate a city street. reading skills an average of one grade level But Pratt & Whitney volunteers in after only 22-25 weekly sessions, giving them the power to the Power to Read program are working hard to ensure that read and the power to succeed. students at Hockanum Elementary School in East Hartford, The Pratt & Whitney contributions program reaches more Conn., aren’t challenged by everyday life in this way. than 20 states in the United States and the territory of Puerto “One of the most important things we can do as a Rico, as well as Canada, Russia and India. Pratt & Whitney company is teach our children to read,” says Public Affairs invests about 30 percent of its annual contributions budget in Manager Cynthia Forbes, who oversees all of the company’s education initiatives, including Power to Read, as part of a volunteer and contributions programs. “Once they can read, giving strategy that supports math and science education, arts there’s nothing they can’t learn to do. It opens up so many and culture and the environment. windows of opportunity for them.” Power to Read, patterned after a highly successful PDJ Phono-Graphix tutoring program established at the Timber Trace Elementary School in Palm Beach C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E Gardens, Fla., in 1998, teaches stuName: Pratt & Whitney (a United Technologies company—UTX) dents to recognize letters as sound picHeadquarters: East Hartford, Connecticut tures to improve their reading skills. In Web site: www.pw.utc.com 2000, Pratt & Whitney partnered with Primary business: A world leader in the design, manufacture and service the Raymond Foundation, a nonprofit of aircraft engines, space propulsion systems and industrial gas turbines educational organization (http://raymondfoundation.org), to create the

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Corporate Philanthropy

‘Hip Kids’ helps combat adolescent obesity from Rohm and Haas Community Partnership Initiative (CPI)

Rohm and Haas Community Partnership Initiative (CPI) program empowers communities to partner with nonprofits to administer fun, educational, and life-changing programs for neighboring school age children.

seven communities where it has manufacdolescent obesity can lead to preturing or research operations in the ventable health-related conditions United States and awards $210,000 according to recent studies making annually through this program. The news headlines. The Ambler, Penn., Barbara Del Duke company’s Community Advisory Councils YMCA is taking on this challenging North American (CACs) identify the most pressing issue through a unique program funded Communications Specialist needs in the community and select the by a $30,000 grant from Rohm and Rohm and Haas organization and program best positioned Haas Company’s Community to impact that need. Partnership Initiative. Rohm and Haas Community The YMCA’s Hip Kids program Partnership Initiative has awarded nearly promotes good food and health choices $1.7 million over the past nine years, and has had lasting among children ages 8 to 12. “We knew we had to address childhood obesity,” Daniel Silverman, senior program director impact in communities across the country. Cindy Meyers, YMCA of Ambler fitness specialist, notes, “We started the at the YMCA Ambler facility, explains. “Through the Rohm Hip Kids program two years ago. A total of 30 kids have gone and Haas Community Partnership Initiative grant, we are through a 12-week program and 28 remain active afterwards. able to hire and train staff, which is critical to properly We’ve even had families join the Y so they can exercise implementing the program. We also provide program fee together. The CPI grant allowed us to invest the time to reimbursements to recipients who complete the program, PDJ get this program off to a great start.” and purchase incentive gifts for the children as they reach milestones in achieving their personal health and fitness goals.” Hip Kids is a 12-week program, which requires at least one parent to participate with C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E the child to help increase chances of success. Name: Rohm and Haas Company Parents meet with a nutritionist one-on-one Headquarters: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and with their child to learn about making Web site: www.rohmhaas.com healthier eating and exercise choices. Primary business: Manufacturing Rohm and Haas Company offers Employees: Approx.16,000 globally Community Partnership Initiative grants in

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Corporate Philanthropy

The Sallie Mae Fund makes college possible for thousands of students in need

Ean Garrett, American Dream Scholarship recipient, Howard University.

1993, HCF has given more than ccording to recent research, nearly $6 million in scholarships to more 4.4 million students who graduate than 2,800 Hispanic-American students. from high school this decade will not Kathleen deLaski Scholarship recipient Jose Manaiza attend a four-year college because President spoke his first words in English to a they believe they cannot afford it. The Sallie Mae Fund stranger beside him on a flight from Scholarships play a critical role in Honduras to the United States. Those helping deserving students bridge the simple words of, “Hello my name is Jose,” financial gap to attend college. set in motion Manaiza’s personal As a leader in increasing access to American Dream. higher education, Sallie Mae addresses In less than a year, Manaiza earned his high school diploma. the financial need by providing scholarship dollars to help With assistance from HCF and The Sallie Mae Fund, he students achieve their education dreams through its charitable arm, The Sallie Mae Fund. In 2006, more than 1,000 students began his college journey at UCLA, where he will graduate with top honors this year. nationwide received scholarships totaling $2.6 million. “I represent the struggle of every Hispanic who overcomes “While for many promising young adults, paying for barriers and succeeds against adversity,” says Manaiza. “My college often seems impossible, scholarships can make a message is about following dreams, never giving up. Thanks to practical difference for students each year in meeting the my family’s initiative, The Sallie Mae Fund and HCF, I now cost of college,” said Kathleen deLaski, president of The live in a nation where I have greater expectations.” Sallie Mae Fund. PDJ To provide these scholarship programs for underserved students, The Fund collaborates with a number of similar organizations, such C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E as the Hispanic College Fund (HCF). Name: The Sallie Mae Fund The Sallie Mae Fund and HCF created the Headquarters: Reston, Virginia First in My Family Scholarship in 2001. The Web site: www.SallieMae.com effort, which provides scholarships to students Primary business: College saving plans and student loans who are the first in their family to attend Employees: 12,000 college, benefited 178 Hispanic-American students in 2006 through scholarships ranging from $500 to $5,000. Since its founding in

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Corporate Philanthropy

Sodexho Foundation supports Community Kitchen, a national program of America’s Second Harvest— The Nation’s Food Bank Network

Top: Watonah “Toni” Harris, Community Kitchen graduate and Sodexho, Inc. employee. Above: Toni Harris, Sodexho, Inc. employee and Richard Macedonia, president and CEO, Sodexho, Inc.

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balanced meals that are, in turn, served f you give food to a hungry person, to other people in need. Sodexho supports they can eat for a day. But if you give 30 Community Kitchen programs them skills, knowledge and opportunity, Stephen J. Brady nationwide, with grants and job they can thrive for a lifetime. This President placement opportunities for qualified adaptation of a familiar adage is what Sodexho Foundation candidates from among the 600-plus we believe at the Sodexho Foundation. program graduates. Feeding people is only one part of the Since 1999, the Sodexho Foundation solution. The long term solution is has been committed to helping people to empower them with skills, like Toni Harris, who have the will not knowledge, opportunity and, most just to survive, but to thrive. It’s just one way Sodexho helps importantly—hope. Put into action, the mission works. Just ask Watonah “Toni” to improve the quality of daily life, not just for today, but for generations, and for the 35 million people in our nation Harris. Just a few years ago, this single mother struggled affected by hunger. to support her two daughters through public assistance To join us in the fight against hunger, please visit programs. She could barely pay for rent, utilities and food. www.helpstophunger.org. For more information about Summoning the will to change her life, Toni joined the Sodexho’s diversity and inclusion programs, please visit Community Kitchen program at the Community Food Bank www.sodexhoUSA.com/diversity.asp. of New Jersey. She learned cooking skills, menu planning, proper nutrition, safe food handling and workplace PDJ skills. Through the program, Toni earned a food handler’s license, a ServSafe sanitation certificate and cooking skills. It was worth it— C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E today, Toni works for Sodexho as a cafeteria Name: Sodexho, Inc. and catering cook for a hospital in Virginia, Headquarters: Gaithersburg, Maryland and also handles inventory and food Web site: www.sodexhoUSA.com safety tracking. Primary business: Food service and facilities management Community Kitchen is a national program Employees: 110,000—United States; 125,000—North America of America’s Second Harvest—The Nation’s Food Bank Network. Through their culinary classes, Community Kitchen students prepare

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Corporate Philanthropy

Starbucks and Starbucks Foundation focus on youth development programs

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future of peace and understanding. ontributing positively to our City at Peace’s program accomplishes communities and environment is the goals of the Starbucks Foundation’s so important to Starbucks that they are grantmaking. The program supports and guiding principles for our company. guides, instructs and nurtures youth leaders We jointly fulfill this commitment with of tomorrow. Youth are challenged to partners (employees), at all levels of the examine the issues that young people face company, by getting involved together Sandra Taylor today and to create solutions for personal to help build stronger communities. Senior Vice President, and societal change. They then present In alignment with our guiding Corporate Social their learning in a professional, theatrical principles, The Starbucks Foundation Responsibility setting where they’ve created all the was founded in 1997, with the mission Starbucks scripts, songs, music, sets and choreography to create hope, discovery and opportufor a feature length performance. nity in communities where Starbucks partners live and work. The success of City at Peace is also a testimony to the Since then the Starbucks Foundation has maintained a focus Starbucks partners who have been able to establish ongoing on improving young peoples’ lives by supporting literacy and connections with the program. This has enabled City at Peace youth development programs for children. To date, the to apply for and receive funding for three consecutive years, Foundation has provided over $12 million to more than 700 youth-focused organizations in the United States and Canada. contributing to its steady growth in Los Angeles. In addition to City at Peace, LA, the Starbucks Foundation Recently, The Starbucks Foundation and Starbucks has also supported City at Peace affiliates in cities across the partners were honored for their support by City at Peace, United States. Los Angeles, an after school program for teens. Now in its fifth year, City at Peace is a dynamic youth development PDJ program that uses performing arts to bring together teenagers from diverse backgrounds, to create personal and C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E social change in pursuit of a city at Name: Starbucks Coffee Company peace. Through a creative process, Headquarters: Seattle, Washington participants learn to forge relationships Web site: www.starbucks.com across cultures; resolve conflicts withPrimary business: Food services out violence; and work towards a Employees: 137,054

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CHEVRON is a registered trademark of Chevron Corporation. The CHEVRON HALLMARK is a trademark of Chevron Corporation. © 2007 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

The more perspectives, the better our perspective.
We’re proud to partner with minority- and women-owned businesses around the world. By forming strong relationships with organizations that promote equality and fairness, we help create better opportunities for everyone. To learn more, visit us at chevron.com.

Corporate Philanthropy

San Antonio Toyota/FFA diversity initiative farms out success

Above: The National FFA Convention. Right: Joseph Martinez at the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo, one of the largest stock shows in the country.

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t’s a sunny Friday afternoon in San Antonio, Texas, but Joseph Martinez, a Burbank High senior, has only one thing on his mind—taking care of his market pig, Joe Bob. Martinez feeds Joe Bob, cleans his pen and takes him for a walk at the school farm, completing the twice-daily routine by early evening. third year compared to three the first year. “We started raising our pigs from “I would be in a different place right the day they were born, and we’ll care now (if not for her membership),” says for them until they go to market,” says Michael Rouse Danielle Ramirez, president of Burbank Martinez, motioning toward the dozen Corporate Manager High’s FFA club. “I used to be shy and other Burbank High FFA members of Philanthropy and didn’t have speaking skills. Now I’m outtending to their pigs. “It’s a very handsCommunity Affairs going, and my communication with on program. There’s no time off during Toyota Motor Sales others is so much better. I’m going to weekends or holidays. It really teaches enroll in the vet tech program at my community college and you responsibility. Without Toyota’s support, we’d never get then transfer to Texas A&M University. It feels good having the chance to experience this.” Since the early 1990s, Toyota has provided 10 scholarships a plan.” “The San Antonio Toyota/FFA Diversity Initiative has of $2,500 each annually to members of FFA (founded as succeeded beyond anything that I had imagined,” says Future Farmers of America) pursuing a four-year college Michael Rouse, Toyota Motor Sales corporate manager of degree in any area of agriculture. philanthropy and community affairs. “Our investment got Tammie Jones, treasurer of the San Antonio FFA Alumni, students involved, got parents involved, got the school district and her family have been positively impacted by the program. involved. It grew into something much greater than anything “Toyota has given our kids a chance to get out there and see what the world has to offer them,” Jones says. “My daugh- we could have done alone.” ter joined FFA and learned public speaking and PDJ leadership skills. Now she’s studying agriculture education in college. Her dream is to become an Ag Ed teacher.” C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E The progress at Burbank High, Name: Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc. Southside High and Southwest High Headquarters: Torrance, California since the program’s inception three Web site: www.toyota.com years ago is significant. FFA memberPrimary business: Sales and Marketing of Toyota, Lexus and Scion vehicles ship at the three schools grew from 110 Employees: 6,000 students to 183. Hispanic membership increased from 56 to 123. Eleven students received college scholarships the

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Innovation has many faces.
At Lockheed Martin, that includes everyone.
Whether it’s breakthrough technology for fighter jets, spacecraft that explore the cosmos, or information systems that keep government running smoothly, Lockheed Martin has important work to do. We need the sharpest minds available. And when we find them, we welcome them.

www.lockheedmartin.com
© 2007 Lockheed Martin Corporation

Corporate Philanthropy

United Health Foundation funds Centers of Excellence in four challenged communities

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that is targeted to meet the needs of n economically disadvantaged neighethnically diverse individuals. borhoods across America, community The New Orleans clinic, called the health centers improve access to care Daughters of Charity Health Center— and help close the gap in health St. Cecilia, was announced in August disparities by providing people with the 2006. Already, it is providing critical opportunity to see health professionals, primary care, HIV outreach and behavioral regardless of their ability to pay. Few Reed V. Tuckson, M.D. health and preventive services to the of these communities have been under Executive Vice President residents of the Bywater and the Ninth greater strain than those in New Orleans. and Chief of Medical Affairs Ward communities, who were especially In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, UnitedHealth Group hard hit by Hurricane Katrina. many poorer neighborhoods continue Dr. Robert Post, a clinical leader working to lack the local healthcare services and with the EXCELth Center of Excellence, infrastructure that are desperately needed observed, “While New Orleans still has a long way to go, by its most vulnerable residents. As a result, the emergency the establishment of a more reliable and easily-accessible room is often the only place where people can receive care, healthcare clinic represents a critical first step in the rebuilding thereby increasing costs, stretching precious resources and process. We are incredibly grateful to the United Health sometimes delaying care for those with real emergencies. Foundation. Their generosity is a dream come true and In response, the United Health Foundation, funded solely enables us to improve healthcare outcomes for underserved by UnitedHealth Group, has devoted $17 million to establish populations.” four “Centers of Excellence” in especially challenged PDJ communities in Washington, D.C., the South Bronx, Miami and, most recently, in New Orleans. C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E These essential Name: UnitedHealth Group clinics receive Headquarters: Minneapolis, Minnesota multi-year grants Web site: www.unitedhealthgroup.com of $1 million Primary business: UnitedHealth Group is a diversified health and well-being company dedicated annually to proto making healthcare work better. vide expanded Employees: 58,000 (as of 12/12/2006) access to high quality clinical care

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Corporate Philanthropy

Wachovia supports Teach for America

Leyla Bravo, corps member of Teach for America.

In Leyla’s first year, she was the sole achovia partners with Teach For Mike Rizer teacher for a class of 33 fifth graders at America, the national corps of Director of Community C.E.S. 70 in the South Bronx. Ten of her outstanding recent college graduates Relations, Wachovia students had yet to master the alphabet. who commit two years to teach in Unfazed, Leyla rolled up her sleeves and urban and rural public schools. The got to work. “Because I wanted to get my company and its foundation have kids where they needed to be as quickly as contributed $3.7 million to Teach For possible, I used every resource,” she says. “I tapped into more America, and the organization has received an additional experienced teachers and got advice from them, and then $4 million from the Wachovia Championship PGA TOUR I discovered what fit in my classroom.” event. By the end of the year, Leyla’s students had advanced Nearly 17,000 individuals have served as corps member 1.5 grade levels in reading and reached 79 percent content since Teach For America began in 1990; currently, 4,400 are mastery in everyday math. teaching in classrooms across the country. New York City Wachovia is proud to support Teach For America corps teacher Leyla Bravo is committed to leveling the playing field members like Leyla, who have touched the lives of more than for students in low-income communities. When Leyla was a child, her family moved from Nicaragua 2.5 million students. PDJ to Miami. “I was in a lot of advanced classes, and there were very few other Latinos or black students even though the majority of my school was black and Latino,” she says. “I felt out of place.” C O R P O R AT E P R O F I L E That feeling intensified when she entered Harvard. Name: Wachovia Corporation Eventually, Leyla not only caught up but became a campus Headquarters: Charlotte, North Carolina leader. She rebuilt the pan-Latino student organization Web site: www.wachovia.com Fuerza Latina, created a Latino guide to Harvard, and Primary business: Financial services started a salsa dance troupe. After she earned her BA Employees: 108,000 in government/political science, her passion for helping the Latino community led her to join Teach For America.

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By Karen A. Jones, PhD Excellus BlueCross BlueShield Corporate Director, Diversity

cross America, corporate entities—private, public, for profit and nonprofit, institutions of higher education, and secondary schools—are all struggling to figure out how to best revitalize their diversity initiatives. Most entities are quickly learning that more must be done if we are to capitalize on our human talent. As such, we must re-examine our current partnerships and create new streams of collaboration, particularly if we are to recruit, attract, and retain diverse candidates. We are all grappling with how to diversify our candidate pools and, more importantly, how to ascertain what we can do to become a premier employer of choice. That’s the million dollar question. As we begin to move forward and determine future employment goals, we begin to think about the skills required for those positions. Regardless of the industry, many of our positions will be in the technical, finance, customer satisfaction, and management fields. This means that most of our new hires will need some form of higher education and, at the very least, a high school education or its equivalent. This is where our greatest challenge will lie. The need to redefine and expand our diversity perspectives rests with the knowledge that our educational institutions are becoming pinnacles of hope for some and bastions of lost opportunities for others. In 2006, Time magazine reported that at least 30 percent of America’s high school students have left school without graduating. In the Rochester, New York, city school district, our graduation rates are much worse. We have 50 percent of our students entering 9th grade failing to graduate within 5 years. Less than half of the graduating high school students will attend college. According to the 2000 Census, 15 percent of the adults in Rochester lack a high school diploma. Latinos account for 42 percent, whites 12.6 percent, blacks 34.5 percent, and Asians 19.6 percent of those without a diploma. Additionally, of the 27.1 percent of the population with a bachelor’s degree or higher, Latinos account for 12 percent, whites 28.9 percent, blacks 10.6 percent, and Asians 52.8 percent.

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Blacks and Latinos are lagging behind their counterparts when it comes to completing high school and getting a college degree. What is the long term impact? It means that our companies will continue to encounter significant difficulties when trying to recruit candidates from local communities, especially black and Latino prospects. Without a diverse pool of job applicants, candidates, and employees, we will be ill-equipped to compete in the global marketplace. What must we do to address these challenges? We must begin to invest in our youth. To this end, we must create new partnerships with our community-based organizations and our local educational institutions to help strengthen literacy programs and encourage educational attainment. At Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, we have initiated several approaches to meet this goal:

We must begin to invest in our youth. To this end, we must create new partnerships with our community-based organizations and our local educational institutions to help strengthen literacy programs and encourage educational attainment. At Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, we have initiated several approaches to meet this goal.

Partnered with Rochester’s Summer of Opportunity Program. This program is a wonderful example of our collaboration with the city. Every summer our city’s Bureau of Youth Services partners with local companies to identify summer youth employment opportunities. For the last several years, we have hired six or seven students who were prescreened by the city. Two of these students were subsequently offered part-time employment opportunities.

Partnered with a local community-based Head Start program to support their literacy projects. It is well documented that the promotion of literacy enhances the learning process. Children who are exposed early to letter recognition and letter sounds, will complete the 3rd grade reading at an age-appropriate level. When children develop a love for reading and learning, they will be better prepared to enter college, thus increasing their chances of obtaining a degree. Established a High School Students on Staff program. The goal of this program is to introduce young adults to the health care industry with the hopes of encouraging them to select health care as a career choice. Students attending the Rochester city schools are eligible for two years of continuous employment. The students must maintain a 2.5 grade point average, have a 93 percent high school attendance rate, and have good performance appraisals. They are matched with a supervisor who in most instances serves as a mentor to guide the student throughout his/her tenure at the company. Upon graduation and acceptance into college, students then are awarded a $500 scholarship.

Established a Business Associate Development Program. This program is designed to attract recent MBA or MHA graduates. It is a high-level, rigorous two-year program that enables each candidate to complete three or four rotations in various departments throughout the company. Each rotation lasts anywhere from six to nine months, allowing the new hire to manage projects as an individual contributor or as part of a project team. The goal is to provide the candidate with an opportunity to secure a permanent position within the organization, allowing him or her to touch upon other functional areas. Thus far, four of the five associates have been offered permanent positions. Each candidate also has an executive sponsor to serve as a mentor. As diversity leaders, it is imperative that we encourage our companies to think outside the box, to re-examine our diversity initiatives and our collaborative efforts. We must renew the efforts to invest in our youth, to provide them with skills to become successful in the academic and employment sectors. We must prepare them so that they may regain the competitive advantage in the global economy. We must raise our level of expectations. After all, if we don’t invest in the communities we serve, we will lose the value gained from having a diverse pool of educated job candidates, and this is a business case imperative we cannot afford to lose.

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By Deborah P. Ashton, PhD Harley-Davidson Director of Diversity

ow do you rejuvenate your diversity strategies? First, you have to know when, where and if it needs to be rejuvenated. If new hires, participants for diversity training, employees, vendors and buyers for supplier diversity initiatives are coming in droves, then your diversity strategy is “hitting on all cylinders.” If, however, your company is not yet getting these desired results, you need to take a fresh look at your strategies and determine what you can do to be more successful. The question then becomes, How do you know you are getting the desired results? You have to know where you are going before you get there. You have to know what your desired goal is. At Harley-Davidson, a Managed Change Model is used. During the pre-define, define and design stage of an initiative: • Stakeholders are assessed • Potential resistance is determined • Current, desired and change-state issues are reviewed • Potential risks are identified and documented • Change plans begin to be built During the development stage, the change plans begin to be executed; during implementation, the plans are monitored and adjusted; and during the sustain stage, the plan is executed. To sustain the execution of the plan, you must regularly evaluate the results to determine if your strategy needs tweaking or a complete overhaul. Choose evaluation tools and metrics that accurately assess the success of each initiative. If there are events or milestones for the initiatives, a review should be done once you’ve completed the task to determine what worked and what can be improved. The improvements can then be implemented and reviewed to determine if you are achieving the desired impact. The Four C’s of Diversity Yes, diversity is like a diamond. Its value and desirability are based on the four C’s. While carat-weight may influence the price, two diamonds that weigh exactly the same may vary greatly in their value and desirability based on the color, clarity and cut. So, too, all four C’s contribute to the success of diversity strategies. While choosing relevant metrics is essential in identifying what needs rejuvenating, to be successful, you must:

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• • • •

Connect the Strategy to the Business Cultivate Champions and Allies Choose Relevant Metrics Celebrate Success

Connect the Strategy to the Business When you are asked whether there is a business case for diversity, you are being asked to demonstrate how your strategy contributes to the success of your business. So, to initiate or rejuvenate your diversity strategies, you need to have diversity principles, a diversity vision and a diversity mission for the company. All three must be connected to the company’s values, vision, mission and business strategy. These are the principles, vision and mission that were developed at Harley-Davidson. Diversity Principles • Diversity is the right thing to do • Diversity is the bright thing to do to grow our people, to grow our business, to minimize our business risk, to strengthen our brand Diversity Vision Harley-Davidson values, embraces and celebrates diversity to develop and continuously improve mutually beneficial relationships with stakeholders and to transform dreamers into riders in an increasingly dynamic and diverse market. Diversity Mission Our Diversity Mission is to foster a culture that integrates diversity and inclusion into all aspects of the business in order to further fulfill dreams through the experiences of motorcycling. The diversity principles are connected directly to HarleyDavidson’s values, people, market and brand. This gives HarleyDavidson a competitive edge in being an employer of choice and in expanding our market share. Cultivate Champions and Allies To cultivate champions and allies, you must give credit to what has gone before and validate what has been successful. When I joined Harley-Davidson, I understood it was important to “stop, look and listen.” After all, Harley-Davidson has been around for over a century and has been an icon for at least half a century; it must be doing something right! So I sought input from key stakeholders, potential champions and allies. If your stakeholders participate in the development of the diversity principles, vision and mission, they are more likely to help develop and own the diversity strategies. This ownership ensures that the strategies are aligned with business objectives and overall success. Key stakeholders and potential champions and allies knew I

valued what had gone before. They knew I was doing my homework to lay down the foundation for successful rejuvenation. By listening, I am able to learn what works and what does not work at Harley-Davidson. By stopping, looking and listening, I have been able to identify and cultivate champions and allies. I have been able to see who has the passion to be champions and allies and who needs the business analysis to assume those roles. Part of cultivating is to: • Obtain CEO’s endorsement of diversity strategies • Develop champions across company • Collaborate with leaders • Focus on reaching business objectives • Have leaders’ commitments • Ensure accountability I have been extremely lucky at Harley-Davidson; within the first six months the CEO, COO, GC, VP of HR, CFO and several Operation Executives agreed to be members of the newly established Harley-Davidson’s Executive Diversity Council (EDC). When the business leaders are the diversity champions, the diversity strategies are rejuvenated. Choose Relevant Metrics It is important to know what is relevant to the targeted group. Determining what is relevant may be obtained through surveys, focus groups or interviews. After collecting data to determine your company’s diversity strengths and diversity opportunities, you can accentuate the strengths and find solutions to the opportunities. Once again, it is important to “accentuate the positive; eliminate the negative”—keep the baby, throw out the bathwater. The metrics that provide the best directions are metrics that are valued by your company. For diversity events, attendance rate and positive evaluations of the programs are important indicators. For diversity training, it is important that needs analyses are done periodically, because the diversity needs of your company may change over time. Up-todate data and analysis keeps your diversity initiatives vital and relevant to all your stakeholders. Celebrate Success The adage is, “What gets measured gets done.” To successfully rejuvenate diversity strategies, you must understand that what is reinforced is repeated. You must not just choose relevant metrics; you must have the policies and procedures in place to reward success. Ultimately, the success of rejuvenated strategies is based on sustaining momentum; the desired results are maintained when the desired behaviors are rewarded. In summary, how do you rejuvenate your diversity strategies? Practice the four C’s. PDJ
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Dr. Christina Y. Chen
Director, Global Business Process Improvement DELL INC.

As a major global company, Dell understands that in order to be successful and a great place to work, our business must be able to leverage the similarities and differences of all our team members. I have personally experienced Dell’s commitment to embrace the many cultures, lifestyles and races that help make Dell a winning and vibrant culture. I serve as the Executive Board Member of Dell’s Asian Network Group, Asians in Motion (A.I.M.). My fellow A.I.M. members and I find ourselves in perpetual motion, working to enhance our contributions to the company, but also to increase awareness of our heritage among our non-Asian colleagues. We also work to promote Asian Americans’ growing role in corporate America and our communities, and as business and civic leaders. My family and I celebrate our culture year-round because of the many, significant contributions we have made to this country and the world. However, I appreciate that May is designated as the official month for all of us to take time to recognize and commemorate the many achievements that Asian Americans have made and continue to make to our nation.

Ken started his career as an entry level employee in shipping and, by working hard and being a change agent and effective networker, he progressed to being the highest ranked Asian UPS executive. Ken has provided me with candid feedback through informal “get-to-knows” and formal speaking engagements that I have attended. The accomplishments of the Asian Pacific American community are noteworthy and oftentimes not widely recognized. That’s why I believe we should celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage not only during the month of May, but throughout the year.

Michael E. Chen
President and CEO GE COMMERCIAL FINANCE MEDIA, COMMUNICATIONS & ENTERTAINMENT

Jackie Chen
Accounting and Budgeting Supervisor GEORGIA POWER

One of the Asian American leaders that most inspires me is Ken Lee, UPS Corporate VP of International Security. He received the 2006 Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business Award from the Asian American Business Development Center, highlighting his contributions to the economy and community. Ken is an advisor to “Chopstix for Charity,” raising money for Asian human service organizations in the Atlanta area. He also serves as honorary board advisor to the Association of Chinese Professionals and serves on the U.S.-Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce. What inspires me is his devotion for developing the next generation of leaders. A second generation Asian American,

The people who inspire me most are my father and late mother. In 1950, they left China in the hopes of giving their children a better future. They had to leave everything behind and had very little money, but believed in the importance of education. After graduating with a PhD from Columbia University, my father went to work for IBM. My mother also earned a master’s degree from Columbia, and together they saved their money in order to educate my sister and me. They have inspired me to be the best that I can be and to do it with integrity, “My parents have trust and commitment. It is important to com- inspired me to be memorate Asian American the best that I can be heritage. We are successful doctors, engineers, business and to do it with people, entrepreneurs and integrity, trust and more. We are known for our dedication, work ethic, commitment.” loyalty and honesty. I believe we have made America a better place and that Asian Americans will play a big part in global growth as American companies look to expand into Asia. I am proud to be an American of Asian descent and the head of GE’s Asian-Pacific American Forum. It is an honor and a privilege to work for a company whose Chairman, Jeff Immelt, understands the importance of building diversity in order to be a truly successful organization.

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Mary Dean
Vice President, Women’s Market NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

My mother is my inspiration. She was the driving force in my family. She always wanted all five of her children to contribute and add value to society. It was her belief that the way to make this happen was to get the best education possible. From the time we were very young she took us to the library every day during summer vacation. She didn’t speak a lot of English but somehow she managed to get to know all of our teachers intimately. She didn’t let the language barrier stop her from getting involved and monitoring our progress. I’m just beginning to appreciate how challenging it must have been to raise five children and be involved as much as she was.

Weysan Dun
Special Agent-in-Charge (SAC) FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION (FBI)

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month is significant to me both as an American of Asian ethnicity and also as a federal government executive. My parents came to the United States from China in the 1950s, met and married in the United States and settled in the Midwest. My family was one of only two Asian families in the community, so until I went to college, I had little exposure to other Asians and even less knowledge of the contributions Asian Pacific Americans were making to our country. I chose a career of public service, starting as a U.S. Army Officer after college. I then became a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) where I have served for 25 years. I now have the privilege of being in the FBI’s Senior Executive Service and being the first person of Chinese ethnicity to become Special Agent-in-Charge of an FBI Field Division. While there are many distinguished Asian Pacific Americans, it is not any single individual but the collective breadth, depth and impact of their accomplishments that truly merit recognition. Asian Pacific Americans are not only making significant contributions, but are leaders in virtually all fields and professions. Examples range from highlevel government executives like former Washington State

Governor Gary Locke and current U.S. Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, to business leaders like NVIDEA Corporation founder, President and CEO Jen-Hsun Huang; and Dell Computer General Counsel Lawrence P. Tu. Asian Pacific Americans have held senior U.S. Military leadership positions such as U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Ming E. Chang, the first ethnic Asian to reach flag rank in the U.S. Navy, and former U.S. Army Chief of Staff, General Eric Shinseki. The beautiful music of cellist Yo Yo Ma and the magnificent buildings designed by architect I. M. Pei add to the cultural richness of America. American jurisprudence has benefitted from the leadership and contributions of Asian Pacific Americans such as Ronald S.W. Lew, the first U.S. District Court Judge in the continental United States of Chinese ethnicity. While I do not personally know the people listed above, I am awed and humbled by their accomplishments and contributions. My good friend, Dr. Henry C. Lee, Chief Emeritus of the Connecticut State Police Forensic Science Laboratory, former Commissioner of the Connecticut State Police and Professor of Forensic Science, is a leader in not only the Criminal Justice field but in Forensic Science and academia. I find Dr. Lee’s story particularly inspiring because of his humble beginnings in the United States and the many obstacles he has overcome on his path to being a highly respected, world renown Forensic Scientist. It is important to remember, acknowledge and highlight the significance and breadth of Asian Pacific American contributions to the fabric of our country so that Asian Pacific American youth will be proud of their heritage and encouraged to pursue their dreams and interests, knowing that obstacles can be overcome and opportunities are limitless for those who apply themselves.

Tammy Edwards
Director, Office of Inclusion and Diversity SPRINT NEXTEL

At Sprint Nextel, inclusion and diversity are key parts of the way we do business, and Asian Pacific Americans are crucial to this. We’ve seen the important contributions Asian Pacific Americans have made to society and to the world of technology and telecommunications in particular. From Dr. An Wang—whose developments in the areas of calculators, word processors and computers are still seen in

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the technology we all use today—to the members of OASIS, Sprint Nextel’s Asian Pacific American resource group, our culture has been both strengthened and enriched by the contributions of Asian Pacific Americans. I am excited to work at a company like Sprint Nextel that celebrates these successes, not only during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month but year-round. OASIS members devote much time and energy to making Sprint Nextel a better company—for their fellow employees, our customers, our vendors, and the communities in which Sprint Nextel does business.

Michael Ferik
Senior Vice President AXA EQUITABLE

I was raised in a multicultural home in Toronto, the world’s most multicultural city. My mother is Philippina and my father is Czechoslovakian. Amongst my family and friends, diversity has always seemed “normal” to me. Of the many Asian-Americans that have inspired me, my mother stands head and shoulders above the rest. She is an inspiration to me. My mother earned a master’s degree in statistics and pursued a career as a teacher and economist. She came to Toronto to see the world and met my father. Over their 35-year marriage, she has fostered a wonderful relationship that continues to blossom. In addition to always being there for my father and me, my mother is devoted to her church community and has generously given her energy and support to its many charitable causes. In all my endeavors, her love, support and example motivate me to be the best that I can be. As an actuary, I have been proud to follow in her footsteps. I strive to live as fulfilling a life as she has in her career, religion and, most importantly, as a spouse and parent. I celebrate my Mom every day. Appreciating cultural heritages of all kinds is a way of life, not a one-time, scheduled event.

makes us a better company and helps us reflect the communities where we do business. Here, I feel I am an employee first, an Asian American second. I can share my insight as a business person and also contribute to the conversation through my unique background and cultural experiences. I believe the first step to being a leader is connecting with people and at the same time being comfortable with who you are. You can be proud of your heritage and be yourself while still being a good leader. It is about ensuring people bring every part of themselves to work—meaning their education, culture, work experience, and thoughts to the conversation. It is important for Asian Americans to encourage their teams to celebrate success and to be more comfortable talking about their own personal success, as well as that of their team. I remind other Asian Americans that you can be successful by being yourself and without fundamentally changing who you are. Be proud of your heritage and use your work and cultural experience to complement the business. Let’s commemorate the contributions of Asian Americans not just in May, but all year long!

Tariq Khan
VP, Market Development and Diversity NATIONWIDE FINANCIAL NETWORK

Sanjay Gupta
BANK OF AMERICA

At Bank of America, we support a work environment that fosters diversity, inclusion and innovation. Bringing people together

For me, every month is a celebration of diversity. Our country is going through a demographic evolution that makes it increasingly important to embrace the rich cultural heritage of our diverse populations. Understanding different cultures and behaviors helps us to become better neighbors and better employers. One of the ways that we celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month at Nationwide is through our sponsorship of the annual Columbus Asian Festival. This event, attended by more than 100,000 people every Memorial Day weekend, celebrates the unique cultures of the Asian community through artistic demonstrations, cultural displays and colorful entertainment. As an Asian American associate, I’m proud to work for a company that supports my community and the other communities that surround us. Nationwide’s commitment to diversity is a true reflection of the On Your Side® promise that we deliver to our customers, associates and the community.

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Among the many Asian Americans who have inspired me, I would like to recognize all mothers in general and Asian mothers in particular for being the torch of our next generation. Many Asian mothers have made education a top priority and I believe the next generation of Asian Americans will be blessed with a superior education in what is a very competitive environment.

actions and policies. With a footprint across the West and Midwestern United States, we have a multiplicity of ethnic backgrounds and cultures. Personal achievement and community involvement have always been a large part of the bank’s culture, which promotes all our diversities.

Frances S. Nam, Esq.
Vice President, Government Affairs Chair, Pan Asian Network Group SODEXHO, INC.

Amal K. Naj
Senior Vice President, Worldwide Investor Development and Strategy PFIZER INC

I haven’t really consciously searched for role models within the confines of my national origin or culture or geographic boundaries. Instead, I have found myself naturally drawn toward people, irrespective of their origin, who stood out for their natural ability to move seamlessly across many divides. The people I’m drawn to see others not through the lens framed by one’s origin, but as they really are in terms of traits that are universal across all human beings. I have met these “universal” human beings throughout my personal and professional life and admired their innate qualities to look past the differences as well as to embrace them. Most of these people have been ordinary people, and they demonstrated these qualities during the ordinary course of time.

My two young daughters and I observe Asian Pacific American Heritage Month by participating in community events, gathering with our Asian friends, and talking about the strengths that come from knowing another culture. I live with one foot on Asian ground and the other foot on Western ground. Former Department of Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta exemplifies the ability to live successfully in both Asian and Western cultures. What I admire most about Secretary Mineta is that he never forgot his roots, having been interned in the Japanese internment camps during World War II. He has personally mentored me and exemplifies one who has achieved great success, yet still remembers what it was like climbing those lower rungs on the ladder of success.

Paul Nakae
Executive Vice President BANK OF THE WEST

Nancy Ngou
Core Business Services People Leader ERNST & YOUNG

My father and uncle taught me that acceptance by society is measured, in part, by individual success and by one’s personal interaction with the community. My grandfather came to America from Japan in 1915 with the dream of owning a large farm. He eventually bought that farm in Northern California. After World War II, my father and his siblings went on to universities and became successful in agriculture, aerospace, and teaching. They also became very active in the community. My uncle was a founding member of a large cooperative fruit exchange. My father and mother were part of a group that helped found a new Catholic parish in Los Angeles. This sense of accomplishment and volunteerism continues this day with myself, my siblings and my own children. At Bank of the West, we celebrate and promote diversity awareness on a year-round basis through senior management

My mother is the Asian American who most inspired me. I observed my mother’s ability to always stay true to herself, yet blend with so many different types of people and different cultures. We lived in the suburbs of Los Angeles in a white neighborhood which over time became a Hispanic neighborhood. My mother had an incredible ability to get along with everyone, to make everyone feel at home and to build deep, lasting relationships with such ease. She could strike up a conversation with just about anyone. Our holiday celebrations always included friends and others who had no place to go for the holidays. She would always invite them over for dinner and to celebrate with us, as she never wanted anyone to feel left out or alone. Throughout, her kindness was never forced, always genuine. This month also allows us to appreciate the history and

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perspectives

backgrounds

We each have a unique story to tell

thoughts

experiences

Our di erent backgrounds, experiences, thoughts and perspectives have helped shape us into who we are today. As we help you protect the things that matter most to you, we know one approach won’t work for everyone. Truly listening to our customers is at the heart of our On Your Side® promise. And at Nationwide, we care about helping you meet your unique needs.

Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. 1-877-On Your Side is a service mark of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2007 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, All Rights Reserved.

the challenges the various Asian groups encountered as they came to the land of opportunity. The Chinese who worked hard to build the railroads but then were denied citizenship. Those who were only allowed to own laundries or restaurants. The shameful treatment of the Japanese during war times. These reminders allow us to honor and respect our Asian ancestors for their tenacity and fight to ensure the generations that followed would be able to remain in the land of opportunity. This should also serve as lessons to all of us today as we welcome new immigrants and new cultures into this great country.

Ly Ping Wu
Vice President THE MANSION AT MGM GRAND

Lily O’Byrne
Vice President, System Design and Integration LOCKHEED MARTIN

As I reflect on those who have most influenced me, I cannot help but first think of my mother, a lady of strength and character, who always sought the very best for her family. She was a source of inspiration, focus, and direction for me. She was a constant in my life, always ready to guide, to teach, to advise, and to encourage me. Another source of inspiration for me has been Madame Chiang, the wife of the Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek. Madame Chiang arrived in the United States at age ten, and was educated through Wesleyan, in Macon, Georgia, and then enrolled at Wellesley College, where she majored in English literature and minored in philosophy. In her senior year, she was named a Durant Scholar, Wellesley’s highest academic distinction. Madame Chiang achieved a remarkable education in her time. She returned to China after graduation, and filled roles of increasing influence. She initiated China’s New Life Movement in 1934, with the goal of the “physical, educational and moral rebirth of the Chinese nation,” based on traditional Chinese values. Madame Chiang Kai-shek was her husband’s English translator, secretary, advisor, and a person of influential significance for the Nationalist cause. In February, 1943, Madame Chiang became the first Chinese national, and the second woman, ever to address a joint session of the U.S. House and Senate, making the case for strong U.S. support of China in its war with Japan. She distinguished herself as an ‘informal ambassador’ and was an adept bridgebuilder of the highest order. I have endeavored to follow her example in linking the values, ethics, and initiatives of the East with my adoptive culture in the West.

My parents, Yen Wu and Wei-Fong Wong Wu, are the Asian Americans who have inspired me the most. In late 1948, my parents had to flee the civil war in China to escape communism. With young children in tow, they left their families and worldly possessions and boarded a battleship to the island of Taiwan— off the coast of China—to start a new life. I recall that in my youth, my parents spoke of the terror of wars, the sadness of families being separated without contact, and their endurance of hardships. But, through their determination, optimism, and unwavering work ethic, my brother, my sister, and I all completed college and received advanced degrees. (My brother has a PhD in physics; my sister is a petroleum-physicist.) All of us established our own lives with various rewarding pursuits and accomplishments. Even though they are no longer with me, my parents inspired me to live a productive, fulfilled, and happy life. I am confident and optimistic when faced with challenges, and I am grateful for what I can accomplish every step of the way. The United States “Even though my of America is truly a land parents are no of opportunities, and it is a nation rich with immigrants. longer with me, We should be mindful of the they inspired me contributions made by all ethnicities. We can only be to live a producstronger by respecting and tive, fulfilled, and building on each other’s happy life. I am differences. This building process is like a river, flowing confident and constantly, and therefore, as optimistic when we designate a certain time period to celebrate one faced with chalculture, we live to respect lenges, and I am all cultures without grateful for what time constraint.

I can accomplish every step of the way.” PDJ

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Real-Life MicroTriggers

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icroTriggers are those subtle—and not so subtle—behaviors, phrases and inequities that trigger an instantaneous negative response. This issue, we offer three examples submitted by real people whose identities and places of business are being protected for obvious reasons.

MicroTrigger #51
(Getting physically close to you or touching you when speaking)

“THE COMPANY I WORK FOR IS GREAT! The fact that I use a wheelchair has not made a difference in the opportunities that I receive or in interactions with teammates. The only issue that I encounter is that people often want to touch or lean on my wheelchair like it was just a piece of furniture. My wheelchair has become an extension of my body, and I regard it as my personal space. Having someone rest their foot on the wheels, lean on the chair arm or maneuver handlebars without my okay is intrusive. I know people don’t mean to invade my space, but they’re doing just that. And when they hover over me, it can be very upsetting. I just don’t know what to say without making the other person uncomfortable … but what about my needs?”

have worked in the same job with the same people for over seven years. Three administrative people sit together outside the offices of the leaders we support. Our bosses receive lots of calls and visits from other people in the company, so we often talk with many of the same people several times a week. All three of us are female, and although we are all white women, we look very different from each other. It is very annoying, however, when people continue to confuse me with one of the others. It’s as though we are interchangeable and are not individuals. It is very annoying and it makes me feel like I’m not important. I still do my work in a professional manner but it can be hard to treat those people with a smile when I feel insulted.” “I WORK AT A GOVERNMENT AGENCY; I NEVER WENT TO COLLEGE BUT I WORKED MY WAY UP from a temporary secretary to a senior specialist in my field. I was attending a meeting where I felt strongly about an issue and believed I could sway the popular vote to my point of view and I had a senior chemist to back me up. Well, the meeting started and my chemist was late. I was articulate in my argument, I’d done my homework and had all the facts in order. My boss said no. I reiterated my key arguments clearly making my point. No, he’s not convinced. Just then the PhD chemist, who doesn’t have the organizational skills to be on time for a meeting, strolled in. He quickly summarized my arguments and guess what … my boss was convinced. I guess it sounds better if the speaker has a degree.” “I AM A BLACK WOMAN WITH A LIGHT BROWN COMPLEXION. During the summer months, especially, I often receive ‘comparison’ checks from my white co-workers regarding our respective skin tones. After a vacation or a weekend in the garden, these co-workers come in to work, grab my arm, and proudly proclaim, ‘Look, I’m darker than you are!’ I’m never quite sure what the appropriate response should be. Do I say, ‘That’s great, keep it up,’ or something that lets them know how offensive the comment is to me? I dread the summer months at work and these ‘comparison’ conversations.” Janet Crenshaw Smith is President of Ivy Planning Group LLC, a consulting and training firm that specializes in diversity, stategy and leadership. Her book is titled 58 Little Things That Have a Big Impact.

MicroTrigger #7
(Never remembering your name)

and #32
(Frequently confusing you with someone of the same demographic)

“I’M AN ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT IN A LARGE COMPANY and
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M Y R T H A C A SA N OVA TAY L O R H . C OX J R . EDIE FRASER ELSIE CROSS PRICE COBBS

Diversity Pioneers
A very special feature— in the next Profiles in Diversity Journal.

L E E GA R D E N S WA R T Z R A FA E L G O N Z A L E Z STEVE HANAMURA R O B E R T H AY L E S J E F F H OWA R D ED HUBBARD LEWIS GRIGGS

BAILEY JACKSON J U D I T H K AT Z M A R I LY N L O D E N

K AY I WATA

FRANCIE KENDALL MYRNA MAROFSKY PAT R I C I A P O P E JULIE O’MARA JUAN LOPEZ

FREDERICK A. MILLER

MARGARET REGAN ALAN RICHTER ARMIDA MENDEZ RUSSELL GEORGE SIMONS KAREN STINSON JANET SMITH GARY SMITH TERRY SIMMONS EDIE SEASHORE A N I TA ROW E

SONDRA THIEDERMAN R O O S E V E LT T H O M A S MICHAEL WHEELER HERBERT Z. WONG TREVOR WILSON

MARY-FRANCES WINTERS

Bank of the West

37

Hallmark

31

Pfizer Inc

9

www.bankofthewest.com
BellSouth 7

www.hallmark.com
Ivy Planning 63

www.pfizer.com
Pratt & Whitney 39

www.bellsouth.com
The Boeing Company 15

www.ivygroupllc.com
Lockheed Martin 59

www.pw.utc.com
Sodexho cover 3

www.boeing.com
Chevron 57

www.lockheedmartin.com
MFHA 53

www.sodexhousa.com
Shell 61

www.chevron.com
Cisco 11

www.mfha.net
MGM MIRAGE 49

www.shell.com
UnitedHealth Group 41

www.cisco.com
Dell, Inc. 43

www.mgmmirage.com
National City Bank 47

www.unitedhealthgroup.com
WellPoint cover 4

www.dell.com
Eastman Kodak Company 3

www.nationalcity.com
Nationwide Insurance 75

www.wellpoint.com

www.kodak.com
Ford Motor Company cover 2, pg 1

www.nationwide.com
PepsiCo, Inc. 77

www.ford.com

www.pepsico.com

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Thanks to you,
equality in our workforce means a healthier work environment for all of our associates.

WellPoint proudly recognizes GLBT Pride Month and celebrates the talents and successes of our GLBT associates and business partners.
At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today. By providing domestic partner benefits that include vision, dental, and dependent medical coverage to our associates, we are closing the gap between the insured and uninsured in the GLBT community. Also, by extending these benefit options to our members, we are leading the way in encouraging the growth of inclusive policies that not only recognize, but encourage diversity of all kinds, including sexual orientation and gender identity. Working to better people’s lives is not something you do everyday – but it can be, at WellPoint.

Better health care, thanks to you. Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers
EOE ®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2006 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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