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Also Featuring ... Front-Runners in Diversity Leadership Series: Cardinal Health’s Jeanetta Darno • David Casey • Catalyst
Volume 9, Number 4 JULY / AUGUST 2007
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REGENERATIVE BRAKING

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PUBL I S HER
John S. Murphy
MANAGI NG EDI TOR
Linda Schellentrager
CREATI VE DI RECTOR
Damian Johnson
MARKETI NG DI RECTOR
Laurel L. Fumic
CONTRI BUT I NG EDI TOR
Alina Dunaeva
OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT
Jason Bice
WEB MAS TER
L ETT ERS TO THE EDI TOR
Commentaries or questions should be
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P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605.
All correspondence should include author’s
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Notable Pioneers
Can you imagine sitting down with the pioneers of any industry, political action
or social movement and listening to them talk not about the past, but about the
future? Wouldn’t that make you stop anything you were doing?
Then stop right now. Because we’ve pulled together the creative genius and
insight of our most notable diversity pioneers, and asked them to share with you
their thoughts about what the future holds for diversity. Their answers are—
well, diverse. Dive into this lively discussion that begins on page 29. You’ll
enjoy reading every essay.
We’re also proud to announce the winners of our 2007 Innovations in
Diversity Awards (page 81). For the second consecutive year, Sodexho took the
top honor. Rounding out the top ten, in order, are Royal Dutch Shell,
InterContinental Hotels Group, KPMG LLP, Lockheed Martin Corporation,
Kaiser Permanente, Best Buy, Dell Inc., MGM MIRAGE, and Credit Suisse.
These organizations have initiated D&I plans within the past two years
that have delivered a positive outcome on diversity management, employee
recruitment and retention, and workplace quality.
Eight other companies were given Excellence in Innovation Awards. They are
Blue Cross of California, Cardinal Health, Dow Chemical Company, Freescale
Semiconductor, Kelly Services, the New Jersey Department of Environmental
Protection, New York Life and Wal-Mart.
We are impressed with the variety and inventiveness shown by the companies
and organizations who are this year’s award-winners. If your diversity initiatives
are running out of gas or just plain stalled, you might want to steal an idea from
one of these fine organizations.
Also featured in this issue is a profile of Jeanetta Darno, director of diversity
and inclusion at Cardinal Health. We like introducing people who are making
a diversity difference; in fact, we pride ourselves in being the people-centered
magazine of diversity.
We’ve packed a lot into 96 pages. Dig in!
John Murphy
Managing Editor
2 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
of rapid change for our company and for our
industry, we believe that the unique perspective of each
Pfizer employee is vital. Why? Because the tough health
care challenges people are facing today call for new,
different, and diverse ways of thinking.
That’s why we’re implementing a global strategy to ensure
Pfizer’s culture not only respects, but also leverages each
individual employee’s background, character, and life
experiences. We’re putting those unique perspectives to
work to find new, innovative solutions for patients, and
better ways of working with our customers, our partners,
and the communities we serve.
At Pfizer, we believe diversity means an inclusive and
empowering work environment. The result? A happier,
healthier tomorrow for us all.
In a time
A Close-up of Jeanetta Darno,
Cardinal Health’s Director,
Diversity and Inclusion
Combine a background in business and the military
with an MBA and you have a powerful package.
That’s an apt description of Cardinal Health’s Jeanetta
Darno, who is responsible for enterprise-wide D&I
efforts that serve more than 40,000 employees
worldwide.
29
20
On the Cover / Special Feature
4 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
The Pioneers of Diversity
We asked nearly 40 diversity pioneers to look into their crystal ball and tell us where the
diversity movement was going in the next ten or fifteen years. We found their answers
covered a broad range of outcomes and predictions.
Volume 9 • Number 4
July / August 2007
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Momentum
Diversity Who, What, Where and When
From My Perspective
by David Casey
Is Normal Really Abnormal?
All of us could benefit from further diversity training precisely because we are normal.
David Casey explains why.
Catalyst
LGBT Inclusion at Work
In honor of Pride Month, Catalyst focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender
(LGBT) inclusion at work, with a special focus on an area for which most organizations
have not yet created policies: transgender inclusion.
MicroTriggers
Real-Life MicroTriggers
MicroTriggers are those subtle—and not so subtle—behaviors, phrases and inequities
that trigger an instantaneous negative response. Here are more examples submitted
by real people whose identities and places of business are being protected for obvious
reasons.
2007 International Innovation in Diversity Awards
Innovation is creativity colliding with opportunity. Some organizations do it well; others
languish, never quite finding the spark that ignites new ideas or makes old ideas fresh.
Here are the best and best-executed innovations of 2006.
81
6 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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Volume 9 • Number 4
July / August 2007
Different perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and
equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our
unique blend of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with
innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.
©2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC.
www.bankofthewest.com
AT BANK OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE
WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED.
[ BANK OF THE WEST ]
WANT TO WORK FOR A
TRULY GREAT BANK?
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American Airlines and
American Eagle Appoint Four
Newest African American
Leaders
FORT WORTH, Texas—American
Airlines and its regional affiliate,
American Eagle, have announced their
most recent appointments of African-
American leaders.
David Campbell
Dave Campbell has
been named senior
vice president—
Technical Operations.
He assumes over-
sight for the
Maintenance and
Stores, Flight, and
System Operations
Control (SOC) organizations.
Previously Campbell was the vice pres-
ident for base maintenance at
American’s Alliance Fort Worth and
Kansas City bases. He joined American
Airlines in 1988, serving in a variety
of roles. A graduate of Louisiana Tech
University, Campbell holds a bachelor’s
degree in business administration.
Lillian Dukes
Lillian Dukes has
been appointed vice
president of
Technical Services
for American Eagle
Airlines. She has
spent more than
20 years in the
aerospace industry.
Dukes earned a master’s degree in
electrical engineering at Villanova
University and a bachelor’s degree in
electrical engineering and mathematics
from Carnegie-Mellon University. Her
career as an engineer began with
General Electric Aerospace. Dukes has
been widely recognized as someone
making a difference in the technology
industry. She has spoken internation-
ally on issues facing maintenance
organizations within the airlines and
has continued to mentor students
and employees in their professional
growth.
Michael Collins
Michael Collins has joined American
Airlines as manag-
ing director for
Diversity Strategies
and will lead the
team responsible for
advancing the com-
pany’s efforts in
diversity for
employees, cus-
tomers and suppliers. Collins joins
American from Citigroup in Las
Vegas, Nevada, where he served as
operations manager for Citicards.
Prior to Citigroup, he was the regional
manager for diversity at American
Express. He holds a bachelor’s degree
in business administration from
Illinois State University and an
M.B.A. from the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro.
Eric Stallworth
Eric Stallworth has
joined American
Airlines as manager
of Diversity
Strategies. He will
be responsible for
creating strategies
that strengthen the
company’s
relationships with its employees, its
customers and the communities it
serves. A Louisiana native, Stallworth
is a graduate of Xavier University in
New Orleans. He most recently served
as diversity program director for
Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids,
Iowa. American Airlines is the world’s
largest airline. American Eagle oper-
ates more than 1,800 daily flights to
more than 160 cities throughout the
United States, Canada, the Bahamas,
Mexico and the Caribbean on behalf
of American Airlines. American
Airlines, Inc. and American Eagle
Airlines, Inc. are
subsidiaries of AMR Corporation.
(NYSE:AMR).
Catherine M. Coughlin
Named Senior Executive
Vice President and Global
Marketing Officer by
AT&T Inc.
Catherine
Coughlin, former
CEO and president
of AT&T Midwest,
has been named
global marketing
officer by AT&T.
Ms. Coughlin
joined
Southwestern Bell in her native St. Louis
in 1979. She has grown with the
company as it evolved from a five-state
telephone operation to the world’s
largest telecommunications services
provider. Today, AT&T leads the indus-
try in wireless, business, Internet access,
voice and directory, and is gaining
momentum in the TV market.
In her current position, Ms.
Coughlin oversees brand strategy,
advertising, corporate communications,
corporate responsibility, events and
sponsorships worldwide. She reports
to Chairman and CEO Randall
Stephenson. Ms. Coughlin is charged
with completing the integration of
advertising and communications for
wireless and the Southeast following the
completion of the BellSouth merger late
last year, and further building AT&T’s
brand and reputation for service among
its customers worldwide.
Ms. Coughlin holds a B.A. in
economics from Northwestern
University and an M.B.A. in finance
from St. Louis University. She serves on
the board of directors of several organi-
zations, including Northwestern
University.
8 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
Cou ghl i n
Randall Stephenson Becomes
Chairman and CEO
of AT&T Inc.
SAN ANTONIO,
Texas—Randall
Stephenson has
been named chair-
man of the board
and chief executive
officer of AT&T
Inc., one of the
world’s leading
telecommunications companies.
Stephenson, 47, succeeded Edward E.
Whitacre Jr., who retired from both
positions today. Stephenson announced
that the following executives will report
to him:
Bill Blase, 52, senior executive
vice president, Human Resources
Jim Callaway, 60, senior executive
vice president, Executive Operations
Jim Cicconi, 54, senior executive
vice president, External and Legislative
Affairs
Cathy Coughlin, 49, senior executive
vice president and global marketing
officer
Ralph de la Vega, 55, group president,
Regional Telecommunications and
Entertainment
Rick Lindner, 52, senior executive
vice president and chief financial officer
Forrest Miller, 54, group president,
Corporate Strategy and Development
Stan Sigman, 60, president and chief
executive officer, AT&T Mobility
Ron Spears, 59, group president,
Global Business Services
John Stankey, 44, group president,
Operations Support
Wayne Watts, 53, senior executive
vice president and general counsel
Ray Wilkins, 55, group president,
Diversified Businesses.
“We are focused on developing
innovative ways to meet our customers’
communications needs while providing
the best, most reliable and easiest service
possible,” said Stephenson.
AT&T Inc. (NYSE: ATT) is a pre-
mier communications holding company.
Additional information about AT&T
Inc. is available at http://www.att.com.
Burson-Marsteller Appoints
Mireille Grangenois
Managing Director of
Multicultural Practice
NEW YORK –
Burson-Marsteller,
a leading global
public relations and
communications
consultancy, has
appointed Mireille
Grangenois as
managing director
to lead its Multicultural Practice.
Grangenois will report to Patrick Ford,
U.S. president and CEO, and New York
Market Leader Tony Telloni.
Grangenois was most recently vice
president for advertising at The
Baltimore Sun where she helped deliver
readership and audience growth, with an
emphasis on applying consumer-focused
intelligence in product development. A
significant part of her strategy was to
identify and implement audience building
and revenue producing strategies that
enhanced the newspaper’s relationship with
Maryland’s African-American market.
Grangenois earned a bachelor’s
degree in journalism from New York
University. She is currently a trustee of
the Center Stage Theater in Baltimore.
Clinton Names Weldon Latham
National Campaign
Co-Chair
The Clinton
campaign has
announced that
Washington attor-
ney and democratic
activist Weldon
Latham has been
named a national
co-chair of Hillary’s
campaign. “My
friend Weldon has devoted his career to
fostering diversity in public life and the
workplace, and I’m honored to have his
support,” Clinton said.
Latham is a senior partner and chair
of the Corporate Diversity Counseling
Group at the international law firm
Davis Wright Tremaine, with 30 years of
experience in corporate law, crisis manage-
ment and corporate diversity counseling.
“Senator Hillary Clinton has a
strong vision for America’s future,”
Latham said. “Among the many formi-
dable skills that Hillary Clinton brings
as a presidential candidate is her ability
to listen and respond to what Americans
are saying. Senator Clinton has assem-
bled a team that looks like America, and
understands the complex issues that face
our nation.”
Latham is one of the country’s lead-
ing experts on discrimination law and
corporate diversity. He works with
major corporations, government officials
and quasi-government agencies when
faced with highly-publicized charges of
race and gender discrimination. He also
advises Fortune 200 CEOs on how to
create better and more productive
workplaces by fostering diversity and
inclusion. Latham has been a long-time
Democratic party leader, having been an
at-large member and trustee of the
Democratic National Committee
(DNC), as well as a vice-chair of the
Democratic Business Council. He was
also an honorary vice-chair of the
Clinton/Gore campaign.
10 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
St ephen s on
Gr a n ge n oi s
Lat h am
Amy Girdwood Promoted
to Executive Vice President,
Human Resources
SILVER SPRING,
Md.—Discovery
Communications
has announced the
promotion of Amy
Girdwood to execu-
tive vice president,
Human Resources.
In her new role,
Girdwood is responsible for leading the
human resources management team sup-
porting Discovery’s global work force,
covering more than 170 countries and
five continents.
In her previous roles at Discovery,
Girdwood was responsible for providing
the first dedicated in-house human
resources service to a rapidly expanding,
diverse workforce in Europe. Additionally,
she re-engineered business structures in
Europe and Asia and created a global
exchange program to develop talent and
regional operations as part of the
Discovery Networks International division.
Prior to joining Discovery,
Girdwood worked at Flextech Television,
a London-based cable broadcaster, where
she integrated employees into a new
entity following two separate company
acquisitions, oversaw the launch of a
company stock option initiative for all
employees and designed a graduate
management-training program.
Harley-Davidson Motor
Company Promotes Bozeman
to VP, Powertrain Operations
MILWAUKEE,
Wis.—Harley-
Davidson Motor
Company has
named Dave
Bozeman, 38, vice
president and gen-
eral manager,
Harley-Davidson
Powertrain
Operations. In his new role, Bozeman
will tackle manufacturing process and
product development innovation while
continuing to oversee the production of
transmissions and engines for Harley-
Davidson Sportster and Buell motorcycle
models.
Since joining Harley-Davidson as a
manufacturing engineer in 1992,
Bozeman has held multiple positions
within the company. He earned a bache-
lor’s degree in manufacturing engineer-
ing technology/mechanical design from
Bradley University and a master’s degree
in engineering management from the
Milwaukee School of Engineering.
An avid motorcyclist, Bozeman rides a
Harley-Davidson Ultra Classic Electra
Glide motorcycle, along with his wife,
Dawn, on her VRSCB V-Rod motorcy-
cle. The couple has four children and
lives in Menomonee Falls, Wis.
Harley-Davidson, Inc. is the parent
company for the group of companies
doing business as Harley-Davidson
Motor Company, Buell Motorcycle
Company and Harley-Davidson
Financial Services.
Denise L. Ramos Joins ITT
Corporation as Chief
Financial Officer
White Plains, N.Y.
– ITT Corporation
(NYSE:ITT)
announced that
Denise L. Ramos
will join the
Company as chief
financial officer,
effective July 1,
2007. Ms. Ramos,
50, currently chief financial officer of
Furniture Brands International, will
succeed George E. Minnich, 57, who
is retiring from the Company.
Ms. Ramos brings broad industry
and functional experience to this posi-
tion, with almost 30 years of financial
assignments at several industry-leading
companies. In her current role, which
she has held since February 2005, Ms.
Ramos was instrumental in designing
corporate strategy and enhancing the
planning process for this $2.4 billion
manufacturer, marketer and retailer of
residential furniture.
Ms. Ramos holds an M.B.A. in
finance from the University of Chicago.
In making the announcement, ITT
Chairman, President and Chief
Executive Officer Steve Loranger said,
“We are delighted to welcome Denise
to the strong leadership team of ITT.
I know she will be a tremendous asset
to our Company and to our senior
leadership team.”
ITT Corporation (www.itt.com)
supplies advanced technology products
and services in several growth markets.
ITT is a global leader in the transport,
treatment and control of water, waste-
water and other fluids. Headquartered in
White Plains, N.Y., the company gener-
ated $7.8 billion in 2006 sales. In addi-
tion to the New York Stock Exchange,
ITT Corporation stock is traded on the
Euronext and Frankfurt exchanges.
New York Life Announces
Executive Promotions in the
Office of General Counsel
NEW YORK –
New York Life
Insurance Company
has announced that
Sara Badler has been
promoted to senior
vice president and
deputy general
counsel and Richard
Taigue has been
promoted to first vice president and
deputy general counsel in the Office of
the General Counsel. Both executives
report to Senior Vice President and
General Counsel Thomas English.
Ms. Badler is responsible for managing
the unit within the Office of General
Counsel, which provides legal advice to
the Company’s life insurance, annuity,
long term care and group operations, its
Bo z eman
Ra mo s
Badl e r
Gi r d wood
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 11
12 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
agency department and to the
Company’s retail broker-dealer. She is
also responsible for the unit, which
provides legal support to the Office of
the Chief Investment Officer and on
M&A activity. Ms. Badler re-joined
New York Life in 2004 as vice president
and associate general counsel. In 2006,
she was promoted to first vice president
and deputy general counsel.
Ms. Badler received a bachelor’s degree
from Cornell University, a Juris
Doctorate from Fordham University
School of Law and a Master of Science
degree from Bank Street College of
Education. She resides in New York City.
Mr. Taigue is now
responsible for
managing several
areas within the
Office of General
Counsel, including
subsidiary corporate
governance and
oversight of the legal
operations for New
York Life’s subsidiaries. He is also
responsible for managing the intellectual
property, commercial contracts and legal
risk assessment units of the Office of
General Counsel.
Mr. Taigue joined New York Life as
assistant general counsel in 1990, was
promoted to associate general counsel in
1992, elected vice president and associ-
ate general counsel in 1995, and became
vice president and deputy general
counsel in 2004.
Mr. Taigue received a bachelor’s
degree from City College of New York,
and a Juris Doctorate degree from
St. John’s University School of Law.
He resides in Lynbrook, N.Y.
In addition, Karen Lamp has been
promoted to vice president and associate
general counsel in the Office of General
Counsel, reporting to Senior Vice
President and Deputy General Counsel
Michael DeMicco.
Ms. Lamp is now responsible for
helping manage the litigation unit of the
Office of General
Counsel, providing
counsel and super-
vising junior litiga-
tors on the compa-
ny’s most significant
cases. Ms. Lamp
joined the company
in 1991 as assistant
general counsel and was promoted to
associate general counsel in 1994.
Ms. Lamp received a bachelor’s degree
from the University of Iowa, and a Juris
Doctorate degree from the University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She
resides in New York City.
New York Life Insurance Company,
a Fortune 100 company founded in
1845, is the largest mutual life insurance
company in the United States and one
of the largest life insurers in the world.
Headquartered in New York City, New
York Life’s family of companies offers life
insurance, retirement income and long-
term care insurance.
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission Named Best
Diversity Company
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. – Diversity/Careers
in Engineering and Information
Technology magazine has recognized the
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as
a Best Diversity Company. The award is
based on the results of an online survey
in which participants were asked to
identify the diversity strengths of corpo-
rations, government agencies and other
organizations that employ technical
professionals. The 100 organizations
that scored highest with readers for
their support of minorities and women
were recognized.
The regulatory commission may
display a special icon acknowledging
the award in its advertising.
Northrop Grumman’s
Jennifer Murrill Receives
Women in Technology
Rising Star Award
MCLEAN, Va. –
Northrop
Grumman
Corporation’s
(NYSE:NOC)
Jennifer Murrill
was recognized as a
winner by Women
in Technology
(WIT) at its Eighth
Annual Women in Technology
Leadership Awards. Ms. Murrill, an
employee of Northrop Grumman’s
Information Technology (IT) sector, was
honored in the Rising Star category for
demonstrated leadership at an early
point in her career.
Murrill is a cost analyst for
Northrop Grumman IT’s Intelligence
group. In this role, she applies mathe-
matical concepts and statistical methods
to analyze engineering data in an effort
to predict the future cost of complex sys-
tems from development, through pro-
duction, to operations and support.
Murrill is also involved in cost research,
data collections, data normalization, and
independent cost estimates and methods
development for space systems in the
intelligence community.
“Jenny is highly regarded as a role
model within Northrop Grumman and
the community,” said Michele Toth, vice
president of human resources and
administration and competitive excel-
lence for Northrop Grumman IT. “She
has committed herself to the engineering
profession while staying actively involved
in her local and academic communities.
Her talents and perseverance merit this
distinguished award.”
Women in Technology is the pre-
mier organization contributing to the
success of professional women in the
greater Washington, D.C., technology
community. The awards recognize
women who embody WIT’s spirit to
Tai g ue
L amp
Mur r i l l
PDJ PDJ
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 13
“connect, lead, succeed.” (See
www.womenintechnology.org.)
Ms. Murrill earned bachelor’s and
master’s degrees in systems and informa-
tion engineering from the University of
Virginia, Charlottesville.
Northrop Grumman Corporation is
a $30 billion global defense and technology
company whose 122,000 employees
provide innovative systems, products,
and solutions in information and services,
electronics, aerospace and shipbuilding
to government and commercial
customers worldwide.
NRC Ranked Best Place
to Work in the Federal
Government
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission
captured the top ranking among large
federal agencies in the 2007 Best Places
to Work in the Federal Government
rankings announced by the Partnership
for Public Service and the American
University Institute for the Study of
Public Policy Implementation.
The NRC, along with others, was
recognized in a ceremony in
Washington, D.C., where NRC
Chairman Dale E. Klein said, “This is a
very great honor for all the men and
women at the NRC, who are committed
to our mission of protecting people and
the environment. The remarkable dedi-
cation and camaraderie at our agency
make it a great place to work, and we
will work hard to keep it that way.”
The NRC is recruiting about 400
employees each year for the next few
years because of the expected arrival of
close to two dozen applications for new
reactor licenses beginning this fall. This
ranking, along with new recruiting
authority provided by Congress, should
assist in the agency’s hiring efforts to
maintain an innovative and effective
workforce.
Rankings are compiled by the
Partnership using data from the Office
of Management and Budget’s 2006
Federal Human Capital survey. This
year, a record 221,000 employees at 283
federal organizations responded. The
survey data is analyzed by the
Partnership to develop detailed rankings
of federal agencies. Agencies are ranked
according to employee satisfaction and
engagement, plus by ten workplace cate-
gories including effective leadership,
strategic management, teamwork, and
training and development, plus pay/ben-
efits and work/life balance.
As a result of NRC employee
responses to the survey, the NRC ranked
number one in eight of ten categories
and scored well above the government-
wide average. It ranked consistently
higher in three key categories of effective
leadership, employee skills/mission
match and work/life balance. The NRC
also ranked first among all age groups
and for black and white employees.
Details of the survey can be found
at: http://www.bestplacestowork.org.
Raytheon Honored by Women
in Engineering Programs
& Advocates Network
ORLANDO, Fla.—Raytheon Company
(NYSE:RTN) received the Breakthrough
Award at the 2007 Women in
Engineering Programs & Advocates
Network (WEPAN) annual conference
in Orlando, June 10-13.
The Breakthrough Award honors an
employer for creating a work environ-
ment that enhances the career success
of women engineers of all ethnicities.
Raytheon was selected for its institutional
structures and programs that help foster
diversity, especially for its women employees.
“Diversity at Raytheon is about
inclusiveness, in terms of providing an
atmosphere where everyone feels valued
and empowered to perform at a peak
level, regardless of the many ways we are
all different,” said Lori Berdos, president
of Raytheon’s Global Women Network,
a companywide employee resource
group, which serves as a strategic busi-
ness partner in building and maintaining
a diverse workforce.
Since 1990, WEPAN has honored
individuals, programs and corporations
for extraordinary service, significant
achievement, model programs, and work
environments that support the career
success of women engineers. Raytheon
was the only organization WEPAN rec-
ognized as an entire company this year.
Raytheon Company, with 2006
sales of $20.3 billion, is a technology
leader specializing in defense, homeland
security and other government markets
throughout the world. With headquarters
in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs
73,000 people worldwide.
Nadine Vogel Receives
Humanitarian Award
The New Jersey
Broadcasters
Association pre-
sented the Howard
L. Green
Humanitarian
Award to Nadine
Vogel, president
of Springboard
Consulting LLC,
of Mendham, N.J. The award was given
at the Best of the Best awards luncheon
as part of the Mid-Atlantic States
Broadcasters annual conference at
Caesars Palace in Atlantic City, N.J.
Presenting the award was Elizabeth
Christopherson, executive director and
CEO, NJN Public Television & Radio.
Ms. Vogel was honored for having
made an outstanding contribution to
furthering humanitarian benefits to
society, specifically for individuals who
either have a disability or have a child
or other dependent with special needs.
Ms. Vogel has an M.B.A. from
Golden Gate University in San
Francisco, Calif., and a bachelor’s degree
in industrial psychology from the
College of Charleston in Charleston,
South Carolina. She resides in New
Jersey with her husband and two daugh-
ters, both of whom have special needs.
Vo gel
14 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
W
hat drives you to educate or train
others on the subject of diversity
management? Better yet, if you face
resistance from others on matters of
diversity education or training, why do
you think they resist? More often than
not it is because of how it is positioned.
Diversity management practitioners
often position educating and training
with fixing something or someone who
is abnormal in their thinking or
approach to managing diversity.
In fact, this was my perspective until
recently. I was attending a meeting of
fellow diversity management practitioners.
One of the featured speakers was
Dr. Samuel Betances, who many
of you know. Dr. Betances challenged us
all to think about how it is normal for
us all to have an unbalanced view of the
world and the people around us.
So, it stands to reason that we ALL
need diversity education and training
because we are normal. Got it? I have
over-simplified a very elegant and engag-
ing presentation, but I walked away with
a different way of thinking about how to
position the “what’s in
it for me?” for those
who don’t see the
value in developing a
diversity management
capability.
Why is our abnor-
mal normal? Because
we are all shaped by
life experiences and filters that make our
perceptions reality to us when they may
not be reality to others.
Here’s an example. If I were to walk
into a country western bar today, I
would have a visceral level of discomfort
and would probably assume that the
patrons would not want me there for no
other reason than the fact that I am
black—and people who like country
music do not like black people.
Now I know better than that, but my
life has been shaped by years of media
portrayals and personal experiences that
still give me that unfounded belief. I
know there is no reason to believe that
everyone who likes country is a racist.
That’s one of my abnormal normals.
(By the way, I’ve got
a little Toby Keith and
Sara Evans on the
iPod!)
All of us could
benefit from further
diversity training
precisely because we
are normal! As you
think about what this means to you,
keep a few things in mind:
• No matter how long you have been
a diversity practitioner, you must
acknowledge that our collective states
of normal may be skewed by our
abnormal views of the world.
• Your perceptions are your reality,
but remember that they are YOUR
reality and may not be THE reality
for others.
So the next time someone tells you they
don’t need diversity training, tell them,
“Sure you do, if you’re normal!”
David Casey is VP of Talent Management, and
Chief Diversity Officer, at WellPoint, Inc. His column
appears in each issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal.
by David Casey
“No matter how
long you have
been a diversity
practitioner,
you must
acknowledge
that our collec-
tive states of
normal may
be skewed by
our abnormal
views of the
world.’’
Is Normal Abnormal?
PDJ PDJ
At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with
diverse backgrounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, and arming
them with the best tools to ensure their success. We believe this
helps drive innovation and makes Dell a more dynamic company.
Through career development, mentoring programs, network
groups and products like the Dell Latitude D620 with Intel

Centrino

Duo Mobile Technology, we offer the resources to help
every employee achieve their potential. Our goal is to ensure
that Dell is a great place to work, grow and aspire.
Success real time. Capture it at Dell.
Dell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month
Dell and the Dell logo are trademarks of Dell Inc. ©2007 Dell Inc. All rights reserved. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside logo, Centrino and the Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other
countries. Dell Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Workforce diversity is an essential part of Dell’s commitment to quality and to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national
origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or veteran status.
www.dell.com/careers
CAREERS AT DELL. CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES.
Dell recommends
Windows Vista

Business
By Catalyst
In honor of Pride Month,
Catalyst focuses on lesbian,
gay, bisexual, and transgender
(LGBT) inclusion at work,
with a special focus on an area
for which most organizations
have not yet created policies:
transgender inclusion.
LGBT Inclusion: Understanding
the Challenges
More and more organizations recognize
that creating a lesbian, gay, bisexual,
and transgender (LGBT) inclusive
workplace is a competitive advantage.
By successfully recruiting, retaining,
developing, and advancing LGBT
employees, organizations increase their
ability to compete effectively for talent,
minimize attrition costs, and gain wider
access to LGBT consumer markets.
Initiatives focused on LGBT employees
are a vital component of a broader
diversity and inclusion strategy. Indeed,
most Catalyst members feature policies
and programs, such as domestic partner-
ship benefits and LGBT employee net-
work groups. While these are important
first steps, LGBT inclusion is a complex
issue and organizations need to do
more to address the concerns of LGBT
employees, especially transgender
employees.
When some people hear about
LGBT-inclusion initiatives, they think
it is a discussion about sexual behavior
in the workplace. As a result, they may
see an individual’s LGBT identity as a
sensitive and private matter that falls
outside of the concern of an employer
and should be left at home.
These beliefs often lie at the heart
of employee resistance to these
initiatives. Therefore, it is important for
diversity practitioners and managers to
communicate that the term “LGBT”
refers to a person’s sexual orientation,
and/or gender identity and mode of
gender expression, not an individual’s
sexual behavior or activity. It is also
critical to underscore that, for everyone,
sexual orientation, gender identity, and
gender expression are defining
individual characteristics that we all
bring to work.
Gender Identity and Gender
Expression: Transgender
Employees at Work
Transgender inclusion is the protection
and inclusion of employees on the basis
of gender identity and/or gender
expression. Gender identity is defined as
the inner sense of being female or male,
regardless of biological birth sex.
Gender expression is how an individual
manifests a sense of femininity or
masculinity through his or her looks,
behavior, grooming, or dress. Yet gender
identity and gender expression are
different from, and do not predict,
sexual orientation, which is a term
commonly used to refer to a person’s
emotional, romantic, or sexual attraction
to individuals of a particular gender.
Because transgender inclusion is
new territory for most organizations,
LGBT Inclusion at Work
16 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
continued on next page
Leading People. Leading Organizations.
www.shrm.org
I AM
Reginna Burns, SPHR
Sr. HR Director
Microsoft
Member since 1997
“SHRM has become a part
of who I am as an HR
professional and it reminds
me that I belong to a
profession that has a voice.”
18 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
transgender employees are often not
protected by existing sexual orientation
anti-discrimination policies and state-
ments. This lack of policy, combined
with a dearth of public education about
the transgender community, often leads
to misunderstandings and discrimina-
tion at work.
Traditional cultural norms and
stereotypes of gender identity and
gender expression are infrequently
challenged at work. Most employees
conform in behavior and dress to the
gender norms that our culture assigns
to each biological sex. Transgender
employees challenge the norms and
beliefs about the relationship between
gender and biological sex. By disclosing
themselves as transgender in the work-
place, they may do a number of things
that break the mold: change their
names, ask coworkers to refer to them
with a new pronoun (“he” instead of
“she”), and dress in a way that does not
conform to gender norms.
Breaking the “rules” of gender iden-
tity and gender expression is, by nature,
extremely public and sometimes a
necessary component of transition.
In fact, transgender employees who elect
surgery may have to live their new
gender role for at least one year in order
to be deemed eligible. Therefore,
transgender employees are frequently at
risk of facing extreme discrimination.
Coworkers are often confused about the
process; they may feel uncomfortable
when transgender employees start using
a different bathroom or dressing in a
different manner.
Transgender employees face a diffi-
cult process. They must see a medical
professional and rigorously discuss their
thoughts on their gender identity, may
take hormones, and may participate in
expensive surgery. Society can make this
transition even more arduous—from
strangers questioning gender to coworkers
confused about which pronoun to use—
and the responses are not always positive.
Organizations are often inexperi-
enced in supporting transgender employ-
ees. Rather than letting the arrival of a
transgender employee in an organization
create confusion, organizations can
incorporate transgender education into
LGBT-inclusion efforts, as well as
include gender identity and expression
in diversity and inclusion policies.
1
PDJ PDJ
Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading
nonprofit corporate membership research and
advisory organization working globally with
businesses and the professions to build inclusive
environments and expand opportunities
for women and business. To purchase your
copy of Making Change: LGBT Inclusion—
Understanding the Challenges or to down-
load free copies of our research reports, visit
www.catalyst.org.
Jenna, a male-to-female
transgender employee at a
Fortune 500 company, told
her supervisor that she
was planning to have sex
reassignment surgery. She
explained that living fully
as a woman for at least one
year was one of the necessary
prerequisites for the surgery.
Jenna had always been a
top performer in the company,
was well-liked by others, and
was considered a “team
player.” Because this is a
key learning opportunity,
Jenna’s supervisor needs to
be able to turn to a human
resources or diversity
practitioner on staff for
direction on how to manage
the situation appropriately,
ensuring that Jenna is
supported and that her
coworkers are educated on
the process.
Dealing with the questions,
concerns, or even fears that
Jenna’s coworkers might
have is an important facet
of transgender inclusion.
1
For more information, see Human Rights Campaign,
Transgender Issues in the Workplace: A Tool for Managers
(2004).
LGBT Inclusion at Work
continued
In a global marketplace, a rich tapestry of ideas, skills and perspectives is a key competitive advantage.
At Chevron, we support diversity initiatives around the world, fostering growth and opportunity for
everyone. To find out more, visit us at chevron.com.
Bring the world together, and you help develop a better one.
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PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 21
Combine a background in business and the military with an MBA and you have a powerful
package. That’s an apt description of Cardinal Health’s Jeanetta Darno, who is responsible
for enterprise-wide D&I efforts that serve more than 40,000 employees worldwide.
Please describe Cardinal Health’s global presence. Describe the scope and scale of the company
to a reader who may not be familiar with it.
Cardinal Health is ranked No. 19 in Fortune magazine’s Fortune 500. Our success is fueled by more than 40,000 employees in 29 countries,
and we operate globally, with business operations on five continents. We provide the health-care industry with products and services that help
hospitals, physician offices and pharmacies reduce costs; improve safety, productivity and profitability; and deliver better care to patients.
How does Cardinal Health define diversity and inclusion, as it relates to the efforts within the company?
We view diversity through a broad lens. We focus on the individual dimensions of diversity that each employee, customer, and recruit
with whom we interact represents. And, we also focus on the diversity of the communities where we live and work, and the diversity
that exists at the organizational level, too.
When we define diversity at an individual or personal level, we focus on primary dimensions like age, ethnicity, gender, race, sexual
orientation, and mental/physical abilities. But we also think it’s important to focus on secondary dimensions—which happen to be
dimensions that don’t instantly come to mind when many people think ‘diversity.’ These secondary dimensions, like communication
style, education, family status, military experiences, primary
language, income, geographic locations, organizational role and level
—even religion, work experience and work style—also have an
impact on how we interact with each other.
We view inclusion as creating an environment where all employ-
ees can reach their maximum potential. It’s the process of leveraging
the power of our diverse differences and similarities to better serve
our customers and to make Cardinal Health a great place to work.
What are the main components of your D&I
program? Is the management of D&I programs
largely U.S.-based or present throughout the
worldwide organization?
The main focus of Cardinal Health’s diversity and inclusion program
is to create an environment which unleashes the potential of all
employees. We also recognize that we’re operating within an increas-
ingly complex workplace and community—so we’re also focused
on helping the company effectively manage the challenges and
opportunities associated with the ever-evolving marketplace that we
operate within.
Our diversity and inclusion programs are largely U.S.-based, but
as Cardinal Health expands its global presence, we expect to expand
our D&I effort to mirror our geographic growth.
Are there unique opportunities in your
particular industry for implementing
diversity programs?
Yes. As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, so do the
healthcare products and services that our workforce, market-
place and communities seek. Whether it is due to an aging Baby
Boomer generation; increased awareness of specific risk factors
and health issues in African-American communities; the
growing affluence of GLBT households; or an influx of immi-
grants from other nations; healthcare needs are changing.
These changes enable us to leverage diversity as a competitive
advantage, because the more diverse our employee base is, the
better we’ll be able to develop products and services that reflect
a broad range of cultural differences and demands. In this
respect, diversity impacts the bottom line in a variety of ways.
Diversity helps us foster creativity of thought and innovation. It
helps us encourage unique solutions to problems, broaden our
awareness of need, and appeal to broader markets.
Do you have any examples of how tapping employee
diversity has yielded significant product or profit
breakthroughs? Inter-business synergies?
Absolutely. For example, this year alone, Cardinal Health CEO
Kerry Clark has recognized 11 different teams with special awards
that recognize customer-driven innovations that are helping to make
health care safer and more productive. Each of these teams is
comprised of a diverse mix of team members—from engineers to
warehouse workers, from marketing specialists to technical consult-
ants, from scientists to financial analysts. These teams are geograph-
ically dispersed around the country. Each of these “Innovation
Award” winners recognized a customer need, solicited diverse
customer insight to learn more about that need—and then brought
diverse internal teams together to create a solution to meet that need.
The solutions these teams created leveraged inter-business syner-
gies and many were considered break-throughs. For instance, one
team created a new product that helps premature infants breathe
more easily. This product was such a breakthrough that 95 percent
of our hospital customers who tested the product now use it.
Another of the solutions created a software system that would help
hospitals provide compassionate care to a greater number of their
community’s uninsured.
22 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
Interview Jeanetta Darno Cardinal Health
Headquarters: Dublin, Ohio
Web site: www.cardinalhealth.com
Primary business: Health care and pharmaceuticals
Industry ranking: Cardinal Health is ranked No. 19
in the Fortune 500 and is also ranked by Fortune
as the most admired company within its industry
(health-care wholesalers).
2006 revenues: Approximately $81 billion
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 23
Interview Jeanetta Darno Cardinal Health
CORPORATE LEADERSHIP
What resources (financial and manpower) are
allocated on diversity? How do these reflect your
company’s leadership commitment to diversity?
When I look at Cardinal Health’s leadership commitment to diversity,
I see it reflected at various levels, from our CEO and board of direc-
tors to the 40,000 employees across the company.
For example, diversity and inclusion is a regular agenda item for
our board of directors meetings. D&I is also an ongoing agenda
item at each quarterly business meeting hosted by our executive lead-
ership team. These venues ensure that we’re constantly fostering
meaningful discussion around quantitative and qualitative progress
toward our D&I goals. It also ensures that our senior leaders
effectively understand, support and feel ownership of our diversity
and inclusion initiatives.
At Cardinal Health, diversity is a center of excellence, reporting
directly to the Chief Human Resource Officer along with the Total
Rewards and Talent Management Centers of Excellence. Our team
works with other centers of excellence throughout the company,
business leaders, and employees across the country.
I’m proud of Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity and
inclusion. My second year into the role, we delivered diversity and
inclusion training to 99.6% of our employees, directors and above.
We continue to sustain that foundation of awareness by ensuring all
new directors and above participate in diversity and inclusion train-
ing and those below that level enroll in one of our diversity sessions
online or on our diversity Web site.
Does your company address diversity in its annual
report? Is it important to talk about diversity with
shareholders?
Cardinal Health’s commitment to diversity was a key visual theme
for its 2006 annual report.
To reinforce our commitment to diversity, the report’s cover
prominently featured employees from diverse ages, ethnicities, and
backgrounds, spanning 3 countries, to ensure inclusion of the most
Cardinal Health’s Diversity and Inclusion teams host monthly Webinars
to share diversity best practices, enterprise-wide.
24 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
diverse array of Cardinal Health employees and customers.
Prominently featuring employee and customer photos, worldwide,
created excitement and a sense of shared ownership for the annual
report.
We also included key diversity metrics in this year’s annual
report, including diverse supplier spend and senior management
diversity training statistics.
Our employees seemed to really appreciate seeing themselves
reflected in what is one of the most important communications
materials we produce all year.
Our commitment to diversity is also integrated into our EPPIC
Core Values, which are the timeless, guiding principles of our
culture. Specifically, key diversity-focused values that we regularly
communicate to shareholders and employees include:
• We practice inclusion, value diversity and encourage work/life
effectiveness
• We embrace a culture of compliance, operate within the letter
and spirit of the law and avoid conflicts of interest
• We treat others with dignity, respect and compassion
• We speak up when something is not right and confront the
difficult issues
• We recognize the unique contribution of each individual and the
value of teamwork
• We encourage respectful debate and disagreement
• We communicate openly and candidly
• We enhance the customer experience by seeking opportunities to
work globally with customers and others across the organization.
Do you have any programs in place to increase
the cross-cultural competence of your senior
management team? Can mid-level managers
acquire similar training?
In 2003, we rolled out “Inclusion Awareness” training to all employ-
ees, which included real-life examples of the business implications
of diversity as well as tools and strategies to enhance workplace
interactions. The objectives of this training were to:
• Build a common language and foundation for diversity and
inclusion at Cardinal Health;
• Increase participants’ understanding of the business case
for diversity;
• Engage participants in a positive dialogue that encourages
proactive support of Cardinal Health’s initiative; and
• Help participants understand how to apply inclusion principles
in the workplace.
So far, 99.6 percent of Cardinal Health directors and above have
completed this training. We also plan to roll out diversity and
inclusion e-learning curricula to help all employees increase their
cross cultural competence.
How are decisions about diversity made in your
organization? Is there a diversity council and who
heads it up? Who participates?
Decisions about diversity are made on a number of levels at Cardinal
Health.
First, we have a diversity and inclusion steering council comprised
of executives representing each of our business segments. The chair-
person for the council is a direct report to our CEO. In addition,
the other members of the steering council are also direct reports to
segment CEOs or C-level leaders of our corporate functions.
Cardinal Health is an $80 billion, geographically-dispersed
company—so to make diversity and inclusion ‘real’ for all employ-
ees, we also created segment diversity councils, which play a key role
in promoting diversity and inclusion in each of our operating
segments. These segment diversity councils are sponsored by a
senior executive and are made up of individuals who represent the
various businesses and corporate functions.
The councils exchange diversity best practices, promote account-
ability and align Cardinal Health’s diversity initiatives with segment
and corporate objectives across the company. Finally, we have
enterprise-wide employee network steering councils: A Minority
Leaders Network and a Women’s Initiative Network.
The Chief HR Officer and I regularly review the diversity
strategy, objectives and progress with our CEO. He sets the overall
direction for our initiative.
EMPLOYEE INCLUSIVENESS
How does your company gauge inclusion of employ-
ees? What are the tests, measurements and bench-
marks (metrics) that indicate where the company is
on the inclusion graph?
We measure inclusion of our employees through various means.
In many ways, we use the same metrics other companies utilize:
Interview Jeanetta Darno Cardinal Health
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 25
Interview Jeanetta Darno Cardinal Health
Jeanetta Darno Executive Profile
Company: Cardinal Health
Title: Director, Diversity & Inclusion
Years in current position: Three
Education: M.B.A. from The Ohio State University,
a master’s degree in human resources from the
University of Central Texas (a Texas A&M campus),
and a bachelor’s degree in political science from
Jackson State University.
First job: As a junior in high school, I worked as a
hostess at the local steak house.
What I’m reading: I am reading three books:
Barack Obama’s The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts
on Reclaiming the American Dream; T.D. Jake’s
Reposition Yourself: Living Life Without Limits;
and a biography of Thomas Jefferson.
Family: I grew up in a military family. My siblings
have been spread around the globe. I recently
married the love of my life, my best friend. We have
two little dogs: a French Mastiff and a white Boxer
with a combined weight of 200 lbs.
Interests: Family and travel. Access to higher
education and quality education. Leading a
healthy lifestyle.
26 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
employee engagement, workforce
diversity metrics, increased aware-
ness through training, number of
diverse suppliers, spend with
diverse suppliers, employee bene-
fits. We also benchmark our
progress against other Fortune
100 companies and against rank-
ings produced by diversity experts
like Catalyst and Diversity Inc.
Some say diversity is a
“numbers game.” How
does your company know
its culture is not just tied
up in numbers? How do
you celebrate success?
Earlier, I referenced our innova-
tion awards, various levels of
training, and how we communi-
cate to our employees, customers
and suppliers. I believe that how
we communicate, measure, and celebrate diversity are indications
that we view diversity as a key pathway to innovation. Celebrating
success is critical to ensuring constant progress in any initiative, par-
ticularly those related to diversity and inclusion.
One of the most successful ways we celebrate success is through
our Diversity Best Practice Webinars. We introduced the webinars in
January 2006 as a forum for Cardinal Health’s diversity councils—
which are located throughout the United States—to share and
leverage best practices in diversity and inclusion, enterprise-wide.
Corporate leaders and employees from across the country partic-
ipate in monthly webinars from the comfort of their own offices, and
we invite external speakers to attend virtually, as well. Internal and
guest speakers share insights related to topics including building a
business case for diversity, how to form employee networks, mentor-
ing, the importance of strategic partnerships, benchmarking, gener-
ational differences and more.
Diversity councils also share their successes and best practices.
Following each presentation, we encourage active discussion and
Q&A, and then we post the audio and video files of the webinars to
our intranet for all employees to access.
These webinars provide a regularly-scheduled, replicable forum
for our diversity councils to share the exciting progress they’re mak-
ing. And, they also fuel excitement and continued momentum for
diversity efforts across the organization, because employees and
corporate leaders really enjoy and become motivated by learning
about progress and best practices from other areas of the company.
How did you get to your present position? What
was your career path?
One of my favorite aspects of the diversity and inclusion career path
is that there are so many roads that lead people to be involved in the
field. I started in this field in 1990. While completing a master’s degree
in human resources, I researched the disparities of race relations.
That research really piqued my interest in the field, and I imme-
diately realized that this was a career I could really feel passionately
about. After completing my master’s degree, I held operational,
human resources and recruiting roles in a variety of organizations. I
served as a captain in the United States Army, worked in the logis-
tics team at Wal-Mart and also served as a human resources consult-
ant on diversity and talent acquisition issues.
“While completing
a master’s degree
in human
resources, I
researched the
disparities of race
relations.
That research
really piqued my
interest in the
field, and I imme-
diately realized
that this was a
career I could
really feel
passionately
about.”
Jeanetta Darno
Interview Jeanetta Darno Cardinal Health
I also took advantage of every opportunity for special assign-
ments or to serve lead roles to support diversity initiatives of the
organizations I served. That all ultimately led me here, to Cardinal
Health, where I’m now fortunate enough to help lead an
enterprise-wide D&I effort that serves more than 40,000 employees
worldwide.
Who were/are your mentors? What about their
business skill or style influenced you? How did
they help in your professional and personal life?
Are you mentoring anyone today?
I’ve been inspired by a number of different mentors, each influ-
encing me in unique ways at different times in my life. In my high
school years, my track coach was an incredible mentor. She helped
me understand the critical importance of setting goals, sticking
to your commitments and constantly conditioning yourself for
constant self-improvement.
In the military, the commanding officer for my battalion taught
me the importance of being prepared prior to taking on any chal-
lenge—and the importance of making sure that your team mem-
bers are fully prepared, too. From the private sector, two executives
at Wal-Mart—Larry Duff and Mike Duke—taught me how to
articulate a vision, develop a strategy and rally support to accom-
plish it.
If it were not for a combination of all these individuals, I
know I wouldn’t be where I am today. That’s one reason why I
always feel it’s my responsibility to mentor others—and to encour-
age fellow leaders to do the same.
PDJ PDJ
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 27
Cardinal Health’s
commitment to diversity
is reflected in its
companywide career
opportunities.
Interview Jeanetta Darno Cardinal Health
There’s a place where everyone
is welcome. Where everyone is
treated the same. Boeing strongly
supports the never-ending mission
to ensure that every workplace is
that welcome place.
Myrtha B. Casanova
Price M. Cobbs
Taylor Cox Jr.
Rafael Gonzalez
Lewis Brown Griggs
Steve Hanamura
Bailey W. Jackson
Frederick A. Miller
Francie Kendall
Armida Mendez Russell
Alan Richter
Terrence R. Simmons
George Simons
Gary A. Smith
Janet Crenshaw Smith
Sondra Thiederman
Trevor Wilson
Herbert Z. Wong
Anita Rowe
T h e P i o n e e r s
Barry and Elsie Y. Cross
Edie Fraser
Lee Gardenswartz
V. Robert Hayles
Jeff Howard
Edward Hubbard
Kay Iwata
Judith H. Katz
Marilyn Loden
Juan T. Lopez
Myrna Marofsky
Julie O’Mara
Patricia Pope
Margaret Regan
Edith Whitfield Seashore
Karen M. Stinson
R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr.
Michael L. Wheeler
Mary-Frances Winters
o f D i v e r s i t y
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Myrtha B.Casanova, Ph.D.
By Myrtha B. Casanova, Founder, European Institute for Managing Diversity
T h e F u t u r e H a s S t a r t e d
It has taken more than a century to develop the corporate
operating principles that prevail today in areas of the world with
an advanced economy and technology. Yet the key role of people
as true drivers of development has been a business strategy only
since the ’80s.
UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization) declared in the 2002 Cultural Diversity Patrimony
of Humanity that “. . . cultural diversity generates the develop-
ment of humanity.”
In the future, diversity inclusion management will be respon-
sible for corporate results. New attitudes and new tools are
required. As Albert Einstein once said, “I cannot solve prob-
lems with the same tools used to create them.”
• Information: A shrinking world with falling barriers is
making it evident that the nature of the world is diverse.
• Governance: China, India and Islamic countries are emerg-
ing as new powers on principles that respond to their tradi-
tional cultures, rather than to established democratic codes.
• Technology: The United States and Europe will share
research and development with China and India, with vast
pools of researchers bringing new perspectives.
• Women: The 20th century was the era of technology; the
21st century will be the era of the feminine.
• Corporate citizenship: The economy will move to agile
SMEs (small- and medium-sized enterprises) and micro
enterprises, spurred by micro credits granted mainly to
women.
• Entrepreneurial regions: In the 19th century, companies
chose sites close to raw materials. In the 20th century, they
chose logistics hubs and client proximity. In the 21st century,
they must choose sites according to existing profiles of the
human resources critical to their businesses.
• Diverse work force: The inclusion, not the segmentation, of
diverse profiles of peoples in the organization will generate
creativity, innovation and efficiency.
• The business case: Measuring costs and benefits of diversity
policies will be a key business imperative for corporations to
achieve efficiency in global, diverse environments.
• Time: Measuring people by their results and not by time
spent at work will change the values, structure and definition
of the business world as the time pattern vanishes.
• Changing demographics: As gender and age become critical
indicators, new social transformation behaviors and legisla-
tion will emerge to leverage aging populations and the par-
ticipation of women.
• Alternative energies: The explosion of developing countries
will shift the grounds of growth to alternative energies in a
new global balance.
The 15-year scenario is people-centered. It requires a new
social contract, profound rethinking, an inclusive process of
the diverse peoples that form the global community, respect
for cultures and competence. The most challenging policy that
leaders must manage in the future is diversity inclusion.
32 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Price M. Cobbs, M.D.
By Price M. Cobbs
W h e r e A r e We H e a d e d ?
It is a daunting task to contemplate future opportunities and offer
predictions for diversity and inclusion over the next 10 to 15 years.
Forecasting the future for a field of work in which one has been
present from the beginning is tricky. Statements intended as the
wisdom of experience may strike readers as the utterances of an
old fogey. To further complicate matters, the work performed
under the umbrella of diversity and inclusion has a conceptual
newness and, as a result, is permeated with the smell of fresh paint.
I am reminded of an essay, “Reflections of an Old
Hand,” that I prepared for the first symposium of the
Diversity Collegium held at Morehouse College in
1993. An excerpt follows:
It is a field which to some appears to have emerged almost
overnight . . . [and] the skills and competencies applied
in this work are from divergent places: Organizational devel-
opment, training, human resources, education, psychology,
law and business management are but a sampling of the
disciplines represented.
While I once thought ideas emanating from these divergent
places would limit the growth of our field, I have come to
appreciate the strengths of synergy that derive from a variety of
disciplines and backgrounds. In the recent past, what was ini-
tially a set of activities aimed at resolving contentious issues,
first centering on race and then gender, has now grown into an
endeavor to produce expanding management skills and
competencies. Much of this progress has occurred because the
people developing approaches to these issues brought a variety
of perspectives. Research and study on why diversity and
inclusion are necessary for the effectiveness of organizations
will continue.
The emergence of an interdependent global economy
means that diversity and inclusion as concepts are much more
widespread. What they mean and what organizational and
societal issues they bring forth will vary from country to coun-
try and region to region. But as legitimate societal and business
goals, they will undoubtedly continue and expand.
Finally, diversity and inclusion are being linked to other
global issues such as environmental sustainability and ethics.
Where this path may lead is still unsettled, but it means that
diversity and inclusion are no longer passing fads, but are
entering the realm of core values.
Price M. Cobbs, M.D. is a psychiatrist,
author and management consultant.
His most recent book is a memoir,
My American Life: From Rage
to Entitlement.
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 33
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Dr. Taylor Cox Jr.
By Taylor Cox Jr., CEO Taylor Cox and Associates
C h a l l e n g e s a n d O p p o r t u n i t i e s
F a c i n g Wo r k p l a c e D i v e r s i t y a s
a F i e l d W i t h i n O r g a n i z a t i o n a l
D e v e l o p m e n t
The challenges of macroeconomics
Diversity practitioners, perhaps to a greater extent than experts on
other organizational challenges, are impacted by the health of the
economy. The U.S. economic forecasts indicate a pending crisis in
the fiscal soundness of the U.S. government itself due to factors
such as unfunded Social Security and Medicare obligations for
almost 80 million baby boomers (now moving into their retire-
ment years) and the cost of the Iraq war (now estimated at around
$2 trillion).
To respond to this challenge, diversity specialists will need to
become increasingly multi-skilled. For example, they will need
to develop a track record of expertise on team building and
effective communication in parallel with diversity dynamics.
In addition, we continue to need more and better research,
especially on the economics of investments in managing diver-
sity and the relative effectiveness of various organizational
interventions. These steps will help by expanding our capabil-
ity to have positive economic impact on organizations
(through diversity-related interventions) and by raising aware-
ness of the potential for such impact.
New product development
A second major challenge facing the work on workplace
diversity within the organizational development field is that
core elements of our traditional product line (e.g., building
state-of-the-art affirmative action programs and diversity train-
ing) have entered the mature phase of the product life cycle.
The working assumption of all who are involved with the
diversity agenda in organizations should be that the legal
framework for affirmative action will disappear within the next
decade. Thus, a shift in product focus is needed here.
In addition, during the past 15 years a majority of U.S.
organizations have completed initial diversity training, and
many have developed internal expertise for continuing training
on diversity fundamentals. What is needed, therefore, is atten-
tion to new product development. For example, organizations
will need to shift from traditional affirmative action programs
toward other aspects of the equal employment opportunity
agenda, such as social-identity-targeted employment prepara-
tion efforts and changing sources of supply for labor.
Finally, we will need to look more closely at the use of
correlates of race, national origin and gender in selection, for
differences such as in ways of thinking and the ability to speak
multiple languages.
Other directions for new product development include a
move away from general awareness training and toward
training targeted to specific, diversity-related dynamics such as
race and performance appraisals or social identity effects on
communications in groups. Also needed in training are more
content on culture, (both organizational and identity-group
culture), more integration of diversity content in other training
courses, and more development and marketing of nontraining
interventions such as management systems analysis, executive
coaching and strategic planning.
Taylor Cox and Associates is a research
and consulting firm founded in 1982
that has worked with dozens of major
organizations for educational
development.
34 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
Barry & Elsie Cross
By Barry Cross, President, Elsie Y. Cross Associates, Inc.
U n d e r s t a n d i n g t h e
P o w e r D y n a mi c s
o f G r o u p s
I believe that the future challenge for diversity
firms is helping clients win the war for talent.
The task of recruiting, retaining, promoting
and developing a work force that represents
the rapidly changing demographics of
America involves more than traditional inclu-
sion programs. The best way to win the talent
war is to move beyond the bland, politically correct
philosophy of inclusion that celebrates individual dif-
ferences and start paying attention to the different
experiences people have based on their group member-
ships, e.g., race, ethnicity, skin color, gender, sexual
identity, physical ability, religion and age.
We need to recognize that there are power dynamics attributed
to each group membership. We need to ask, “Who is on top
and who is on the bottom of the organization chart? What
groups are in and which are out?” If corporate leaders can
acknowledge that these dynamics exist in American society,
then they should also know that these dynamics spill over into
their work environments.
Some organizations are meeting their representation and
hiring goals. However, most organizations are not tracking the
different employee experiences by group membership. Moving
past inclusion means tracking group patterns, not just individual
experiences within an organization. Once an organization
begins to track dynamics at the group membership level
the next challenge emerges—the power dynamics between
these groups.
As American demographics continue to change, so too will
the power dynamics shift. This phenomenon can be seen right
now in local city governments in New York, Miami, San
Francisco, Philadelphia, Chicago, Dallas and Los Angeles.
Each city has different demographics and different group hier-
archies. Some people-of-color groups have no power or are
under-represented. When the group in power is not white,
tension still occurs between groups. These intergroup dynam-
ics will magnify as Hispanics (of many different ethnic groups
and cultures) eclipse blacks as the largest minority group.
Understanding power dynamics between groups is a challenge
for diversity firms.
Three other dimensions affecting organizations are religion,
sexual identity and generational difference. The future chal-
lenge for diversity firms is to assist organizational leaders in
seeing and working with the power dynamics of these issues at
the group and organizational levels.
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 35
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Edie Fraser
By Edie Fraser, Chair, Diversity Practice and Managing Director, Diversified Search
D i v e r s i t y 2 0 2 0 P r e d i c t i o n s
By 2020, America and the world will have changed dramatically.
In the United States, more than 12 states will have minorities as
the majority population. (Right now, there are five states.) Huge
demographic shifts prove it is going to be a “New America.” One
in every five youths will be Hispanic, or 20 percent of the youth;
and the Hispanic population will account for close to 60 million
U.S. citizens. Immigration will be the norm as the need for
service workers in particular becomes critical.
The tickets for president, U.S. Senate and House of
Representatives, and state houses will reflect diverse slates.
In the Senate there will be 26 women senators, five Hispanic
senators and three African-American senators. (Right now, there
are 16 women, three Hispanics and one African American.)
In February 2007, Harvard University named its first
woman president, Drew Gilpin Faust. Half of the Ivy League
universities will have women presidents by 2020.
• Board of directors’ representation will have changed. Today
women are approximately 15.3 percent of major boards. By
2020, women will be 25 percent of boards here and 40 per-
cent in Scandinavia. Minorities will have gained a similar
footing on boards.
• Recruiting a senior level diverse executive team will be a
top priority.
• We will have 30 women CEOs and 25 minority CEOs.
• Chief diversity officers will report to CEOs and boards and
make an average of $350,000 per year base.
• Chief environmental officers (sustainable development
officers) will be in evidence everywhere.
• There will be talent wars prompted by a major shortage of
talent.
• Diversity as part of the bonus plan will average 20 percent.
• Work life: Half of the work force will be telecommuting and
working remotely, and work-life benefits will be universal
not only for women, but also for all, as the young and old
want different lifestyles. Older workers will be invited to stay
on. Few will retire at 65.
• Marketplace: Women and the multicultural marketplace are
the backbone of the economy. Women, minorities and
GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender) groups alone
hold the major purchasing power of the economy, account-
ing for approximately 88 percent of all sales of products and
services. Women and minorities will control 92 percent
of the purchasing power by 2020.
• Globalization will be fundamental to success for all those
operating in 2020.
36 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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determines a company’s success.
www.kodak.com/go/careers
© Eastman Kodak Company, 2006
DIVERSITY
Eastman Kodak Company’s commitment to diversity and inclusion
involves our employees, customers, suppliers and communities worldwide.
In our global marketplace, Kodak’s innovations reflect the creativity and
rich tapestry of our diverse workforce and winning culture.
erm det om mines a c e c s suc y’ pan s. es
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
Lee Gardenswartz,Ph.D.,
B y L e e G a r d e n s w a r t z , P h . D . ,
D i v e r s i t y i n t h e D e c a d e s A h e a d
Over the last quarter of a century, diversity has become a common
word in the lexicon of business and a strategic issue with bottom-
line implications. Most organizations have taken steps to create
more inclusion in the workplace and remove discriminatory
barriers. While progress has been made in increasing awareness,
knowledge and sensitivity, much still needs to be done. The
following are a few recommendations.
Approach diversity from a global perspective. As organizations
extend operations around the world and as immigration and
migration bring the world to the workplace, a more global ori-
entation is needed. Leveraging diversity and capitalizing on its
potential benefits will be possible only if organizations work to
increase awareness and knowledge about the cultural differ-
ences in their employee and customer bases. This calls for
developing an attitude and approach that our colleague Dr.
Melanie Trevalon calls “cultural humility.” Tailoring diversity
and inclusion processes to take into account the different polit-
ical, economic, cultural and social factors at play in global
operations is essential.
Use technology creatively to engage and connect staff.
While much diversity training historically has depended on
relationship development through in-person interactions,
innovative ways of building connections and training that
enlist technology need to be created to overcome time and
distance barriers. Examples include virtual team meetings via
teleconferencing and online training.
Recognize generational differences and deal with the
workplace implications they present. Not only does each gen-
eration bring its own set of values, experiences and preferences
to work, but each also brings its own take on diversity. How
diversity looks through the lens of a “20-something” is not
necessarily the same as it looks to a “50-” or “60-something.”
Organizations will need to be cognizant of these variations and
continue to use an evolving approach to defining and manag-
ing diversity.
Take a continuous improvement approach to diversity.
No matter how much work an organization has done or
accomplished through its diversity initiative, it begins again
with each new employee. Training and skill development need
38 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
to be continuous. Also needed is an ongoing focus on making
changes, both strategic and tactical, in systems, policies and
feedback loop uncovers new areas of exclusion and new oppor-
tunities for improvement.
Take the next step in diversity by focusing on emotional
intelligence. Dealing with differences triggers emotional
responses, from curiosity and excitement to frustration,
resistance and anger. Employees need help in managing
these feelings.
The field of diversity, like all of life, will continue to
evolve. The best thing a practitioner can do is to be mindful of
the changes as they happen and be open and flexible in
responding to them.
Lee Gardenswartz, Ph.D, and Anita
Rowe, Ph.D. are partners in
Gardenswartz & Rowe, a manage-
ment consulting firm that since 1980
has helped organizations build
productive, cohesive work teams,
develop inclusive environments and
create inter-cultural harmony and
understanding in the workplace.
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
and Anita Rowe, Ph.D.
a n d A n i t a R o w e , P h . D . , G a r d e n s w a r t z & R o w e
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 39
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Rafael Gonzalez
By Rafael Gonzalez, Senior Consulting Associate, Leading Edge Associates
F u t u r e P o s s i b i l i t i e s o f D i v e r s i t y
After decades of doing corporate diversity work in the United
States and internationally, I believe there are some exciting possi-
bilities for the future. In the United States, we have an opportunity
to leverage two of our greatest strengths: our culture and our intel-
lectual flexibility.
Diversity in the future will be full of new opportunities and
familiar challenges. An immediate opportunity is the lack of
skilled workers in the United States. Companies investing
strategically in communities and schools to train diverse young
people in these specialized skills will find a ready and motivated
work force that lives around the corner rather than around
the world.
Innovation will continue to be a vital ingredient to a
successful business. Companies that build diverse teams that
include domestic and international talent and tap into their
unique perspectives will be more in touch with a global
consumer who increasingly wants personalized products and
services. Those companies that are prepared to move quickly
and collaboratively to connect with diverse customers will have
a huge advantage.
The absence of credible leadership has created an opportu-
nity and a challenge for leaders. The United States and the
world are looking for leaders who have a clear vision, leaders
who value inclusion. Leaders need to pay more than lip service
to diversity. If they can find ways to incorporate our country’s
strengths to leverage diversity, they will find loyal consumers
ready to believe in an organization that gives them what they
want. Core competencies in creating learning environments,
getting timely results, and understanding and effectively work-
ing with diverse groups will be the difference-makers with cus-
tomers and employees.
Finally, those organizations that are still blind to the need
for diversity in their core strategies and values will feel increas-
ing marketplace and legal pressure to join the 21st century.
They will have to move urgently to evaluate their guiding prin-
ciples, learn diversity best practices that may apply to their
situation, and develop a strategic plan that utilizes diversity
to identify and leverage the opportunities that will allow them
to capture the hearts and minds of the consumer.
Rafael Gonzalez has applied human and
organizational transformation concepts
to diversity for over 25 years. He works
with private and public sectors to
re-think inclusion as a strategic market-
place and community partnership that
would be mutually beneficial.
40 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Lewis Brown Griggs
By Lewis Brown Griggs, Chairman, President and Executive Producer, Griggs Productions
T h e S p i r i t u a l Di me n s i o n o f Di v e r s i t y
For diversity consciousness to grow beyond compliance and good
business practices, we must expand our inclusion of diverse forms
of spirituality in the workplace. We must recognize that we can
best continue to teach authentically only what we continue to
learn and experience on the ever-growing edge of our own mind,
body and spirit.
My body is that of an ethnocentric, straight, white, 12th-
generation Anglo-American father of a girl and a boy, with an
Amherst ’70 B.A. and a Stanford ’80 M.B.A., and a golden
retriever in my white Volvo wagon. It was from a near-death
experience 30 years ago on March 11, 1977, that my spirit was
called to develop cross-cultural diversity consciousness within
my mind. I became able to share with others various ways we
might, each in our own self-interest, move beyond compliance,
fairness and equity by fully expressing our own and valuing
each other’s uniquely diverse personal, interpersonal and
organizational potential.
The most passionate and effective interpersonal training
requires more time and money than most organizations can
afford. The future, therefore, calls for more diversity training
videos, guides and e-learning tools to reach all employees at the
least expense. Working from the outside in, managers and
employees continue to need greater consciousness about our
cultural differences, our individual uniqueness, our interper-
sonal relationship dynamics, our capacity to enhance rather
than deplete the energy within ourselves and each other, and
our individual opportunity to maximize our personal, inter-
personal and organizational effectiveness.
The most profound challenge facing us all now is not just
to tolerate kindly the inclusion of various diverse religions, but
to recognize that deep spirituality is at the core of every
religion and faith. Spirit is the one thing we have most in
common at the center of the vast diversity in our mind and our
body, which, when fully expressed, will best help us all
maximize our human potential.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Steve Hanamura
By Steve Hanamura, President, Hanamura Consulting Inc.
E n g a g i n g i n t h e D i v e r s i t y
C o n v e r s a t i o n : A F o r e c a s t
f o r t h e F u t u r e
As we look to the future of diversity, it is important to understand
its evolutionary process. What began out of compliance became
an issue of ethics and good business practices. Today many organ-
izations have their own diversity initiatives. Following are my
thoughts on critical issues we will need to address in the future.
In 10 to 15 years we will be managed and led by Generations
X and Y. These groups believe in work-life balance and high
tech. They value significance more than success. Will they be
able to manage and lead us with the values they ascribe to
today? If these leaders of the future hold true to their values,
we may be able to work in a much more collaborative setting
than we do at the present time.
Currently we are operating globally, but we are thinking
domestically. The notion of patriotism in America, though
very important, has sometimes gotten in the way of our ability
to respect and honor those from other countries. We often are
perceived and experienced as arrogant. We need to become
more competent in the culture and language of our global
partners.
We will need to become more unified within our own
industry. The field of education has its own diversity experts, as
does the corporate world. The two groups need to come
together for effective dialogue. We also will need to integrate
diversity as a social justice conversation with diversity as
a globalization construct and align ourselves with the work
that is being performed as a result of the Declaration of
Human Rights.
In order to effectively recruit and retain minorities, organ-
izations will need to become more involved with the local
communities. Effective mentoring and coaching may make it
possible to develop and grow hometown talent for business
success.
I hope one day to attend a diversity conference where peo-
ple with disabilities are a part of the mix. Currently people
with disabilities meet separately and are not a part of the
national diversity movement.
Finally, I believe that the biggest challenge will be the issue
of class. The gap between the “haves” and the “have nots” is
widening, leading to a greater sense of hopelessness. And when
people feel hopeless they resort to violence. This is a sad
commentary, but we don’t seem to grasp the concept of a level
playing field. So, even as we are seeing now, the violence in our
community and in our world will only increase.
As diversity practitioners, we have a tremendous amount of
work in front of us. The goal beyond diversity is to create an
inclusive environment to allow people to bring all of who they
are to the marketplace.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
V. Robert Hayles, Ph.D.
By V. Robert Hayles, Ph.D., Diversity Consultant
A p p l i c a t i o n o f D i v e r s i t y a n d
I n c l u s i o n K n o w l e d g e
In the world of scientific knowledge, theories that have been vali-
dated typically get applied 15 to 25 years later. This is also true for
knowledge about diversity and inclusion. The science of this work
is now at least 15 years old and more than ready for application.
As practitioners and users of such services get smarter, they will
use and demand state-of-the-art implementation. What do we
know now about diversity and inclusion that we have known
for at least 15 years?
1. How individuals grow and change: From research in psy-
chology (clinical, social, neuro, experimental, learning and
memory, developmental, etc.) we now know what kinds of
interventions stimulate knowledge, behavior and attitude
change. We even understand how this knowledge applies to
a small set of specific prejudices, biases, isms and phobias.
2. What impacts group and team performance: From research
in social psychology, organizational behavior, management
science and leadership, we have an understanding of actions
and circumstances that facilitate or detract from high
performance in diverse groups.
3. Which differences matter: We know how some differences
and diversity mixtures affect performance on specific types
of tasks. We know a lot about age, culture, disabilities,
gender, intelligence, job function, personality, political
pluralism, race and sexual orientation. We need more knowl-
edge about other differences, a greater variety of mixtures
and a broader range of tasks.
4. How organizations change and develop: Research-based
change models are abundant. Change and development
models specific to diversity and inclusion have been used
and tested for more than 15 years. Normative paths—from
exclusive homogeneous organizations to inclusive, diverse,
high-performing organizations—are fairly well-defined.
5. Measurement: Validated measurement technologies (includ-
ing software-based tools) have been available for diversity
and inclusion for at least a decade. Some tools have been
around for more than 15 years.
The need for high-impact, cost-effective diversity and
inclusion services is strong today. During the next 10 to 15
years, practitioners must apply the current state-of-the-art
knowledge and fine-tune it in partnership with researchers
and scholars.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Dr. Jeffrey P. Howard
By Dr. Jeff Howard, Founder, J. Howard and Associates, CEO, JPH Learning
T h e N e x t 1 5 , 0 0 0 Ye a r s o f D i v e r s i t y
a n d I n c l u s i o n
The diversity and inclusion movement is a creature of the
American problem-solving impulse as it relates to the difficulties
caused by ill-tempered human reactions to differences. The differ-
ences, and the negative reactions to them, are ubiquitous and will
last as long as there are human groups to find ways to distinguish
themselves from other human groups.
Defining ourselves relative to others is what human groups do
—often quite inventively. If it’s not race, it’s gender. If not
gender, religion. Or sects within religions. Or language. Or
accent. Or national origin. Or political orientation. Or sexual
orientation. Or anything else that can be used to distinguish
“us” from “them.” With humans, there is always something.
Fixated as we are on the differences between us, humans can
be counted on to continuously generate issues, problems, crises
and wars. (Name a war that wasn’t, at base, “us” fighting
“them” over something they did to us; or because they took
something of value from us; or simply had something of value
that rightfully belonged to us.) We are tremendously adept at
creating and righteously justifying these issues and conflicts,
and we will continue to do so into the indefinite future.
So here’s the good news for the field: There will always be
a need for practitioners of the arts of diversity and inclusion.
In the short term, we really do help by diverting energies away
from the primitive impulses of “us” versus “them” and toward
the rational faculties. We help folks focus attention on the real
value of operating in peace and harmony. (“Can’t we all just get
along?”) And we discover that, with our help, folks can focus
on the positive and behave rationally, at least for a while.
But humans will always revert to human nature. They will
fail to tolerate. They will discriminate, brutalize and worse.
When they grow tired of the mayhem or experience an attack
of rationality, they will turn to us. There will always be a diver-
sity and inclusion business.
Dr. Jeff Howard is the founder and
long-time CEO of J. Howard and
Associates, a corporate training and
consulting firm that became part of
the Novations Group, Inc. He is now
CEO of JPH Learning and works as a
consultant to corporate executives
and senior managers of Fortune 1000
companies.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Dr. Edward E. Hubbard
C o m m e n t s o n t h e F u t u r e
o f D i v e r s i t y
Predictions: The future of diversity and inclusion work is laced
with an abundance of opportunity if we are bold enough to seize
it. Some organizations and diversity practitioners are beginning to
really understand that diversity and inclusion must be strategically
linked to the bottom line and measured in financial and nonfi-
nancial terms.
The successful organizations will use automated technologies
linked to their business systems to strategically utilize diversity
and inclusion techniques to make measurable differences
in organizational performance. The specific savings will be
documented in diversity return on investment (DROI
®
) case
studies. They will put to rest claims that there is little
documented evidence that diversity and inclusion can either
be measured or make a critical difference.
In the future, there will be competency standards for
managers, diversity practitioners and consultants that help
organizations get the best possible support for their diversity
change processes and that weed out those who are not
prepared to deliver proven, diversity-enhanced performance
solutions. In the future, I see diversity and inclusion evolving
as a well-regarded, credible discipline with solid, data-rich
theory and fully applied sciences to support its value.
Recommendations: When I started this work more than 25
years ago, businesses saw diversity as the right thing to do.
Many looked at me as if I had two heads because I said we
needed to measure diversity. But at some point, when we train
thousands of employees on diversity and start to put a budget
behind these kinds of activities, it will dawn on some executive
to say, “We’ve spent ‘X’ amount of dollars on this process
called diversity. What has it yielded? What’s the ROI? Do we
really need this? Where’s credible evidence that this stuff makes
a performance difference in our business?”
I feel diversity practitioners in the future must be driven to
succeed in showing DROI
®
. Many of them may be doing
superb work, but without the appropriate measurement tools
and solid diversity metrics in place they will be doomed to fail.
If you can’t communicate what you’re doing in diversity in
financial and other performance terms, you stand a good
chance of being cut out of the budget. It might not be because
you weren’t doing your job. It might be because you just
couldn’t prove it in terms that made business sense. It puts you
in a vulnerable place. The real payoff for us as diversity practi-
tioners should be, in part, seeing an organization grow and
really demonstrate the true, measurable value of utilizing
diverse human capital assets and processes for strategic busi-
ness performance.
DROI
®
is a registered trademark of Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.
46 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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By Dr. Edward Hubbard, Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Kay Iwata
By Kay Iwata, President, K. Iwata Associates Inc.
F a c i n g F o r wa r d : T h r e e C r i t i c a l
O p p o r t u n i t i e s
Facing forward, diversity professionals need to move on three
critical opportunities: standardization of the field, global diversity
and Gen Y/millennial relevance.
1. Standardization of the field: As a profession, the field of
diversity is ill-defined at best. There is no agreement upon
basic constructs such as a common language to describe our
work (i.e., the definitions of diversity, inclusion, diversity
management, etc.); validity-checked models and processes;
standards and certification requirements for diversity profes-
sionals; and standard, measurable outcomes. If we, as diver-
sity professionals, both internal and external, don’t seize the
opportunity to fill the void, it will be filled for us.
2. Global diversity: As we struggle for greater clarity on the
domestic front in terms of the nature of our work, the chal-
lenge is even greater for global diversity. In some cultures
there is no word for “diversity.” What are the issues? What
does an effective global diversity strategy look like in other
parts of the world? How do we maintain consistency
while respecting and including the norms of the local
cultural context?
3. Gen Y or millennial relevance: For many diversity practi-
tioners, stereotypes, prejudices and biases have been funda-
mental in developing diversity awareness and sensitivity,
especially across racial lines. In two recent polls conducted
with Gen Ys (ages 18-27, and 76 million strong), 95 percent
said they had friends across racial and ethnic lines, and 60
percent said they dated across racial and ethnic lines. They
don’t deny that racial injustices occur. How do we need
to adjust our approach to make diversity relevant to this
generation?
Recommendations
Standardization of the field and global diversity: We can
address the first two opportunities and leverage our resources
by positioning these as a global endeavor. In other words, we
make the focus worldwide, with the United States being one
member of the global community, rather than starting with the
United States and dealing with the rest of the world as an after-
thought. The first step in making this a reality is to convene a
body to organize a broad, well-balanced and credible group of
thought leaders charged with establishing language, processes
and standards for global diversity.
Gen Y or millennial relevance: This opportunity requires a
three-pronged approach. First is controlling tendencies to
automatically impose historical diversity paradigms on this
generation while dealing with issues that continue to be rele-
vant today. Second is to find out and incorporate what is
meaningful from their diversity perspective. Third is to attract
talented young people from this group into the field to help
shape diversity in the new millennium.
Time is of the essence and the stakes are high. The window
for these opportunities may be closing as we speak.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Bailey W. Jackson
By Bailey W. Jackson
S o c i a l I d e n t i t y a n d I n c l u s i o n :
To w a r d a H e a l t h y S o c i a l S y s t e m
In 10 to 15 years, it is likely that our social identities (race, ethnicity,
gender, sexual orientation, religion, class, age, and physical and
developmental ability) will be as salient for each individual and to
the various structures in our society as they are today.
Individuals, families, communities, states and nations still will
draw upon the unique social and cultural attributes embedded
in these social identities to shape their self-concept, self-esteem
and way of acting in the world. Organizations’ missions,
values and operating structures also will continue to be influ-
enced by the social identities of those who own them, run
them, work in them and who are served by them. And finally,
the leaders of our nations, their governing bodies and the
citizenry of our nation-states also will continue to be influ-
enced by the salient social identities of the time.
Hopefully, within the near future, we will have moved from
our current position of trying to establish social justice for
members of all social identity groups to making significant
headway toward creating and maintaining societies where
social justice is present, and much of our energy is devoted to
maintenance. Continued vigilance in identifying new and
newly morphed manifestations of social injustice, a.k.a. social
oppression, will be essential as we build both self-renewing
diagnostic systems for identifying manifestations of social
oppression and an automatic response that ensures their
elimination.
At this point it should be clear that we must move toward
the realization, appreciation, and benefits of a diverse, open
and inclusive society. It is also at this point that we will realize
that, to achieve the vision of a free, open, diverse and inclusive
society, we must be able to maintain social justice. The chal-
lenge, therefore, will be to define and embrace more fully a
vision of social justice for individuals, social groups and
nations.
Once social justice is fully affirmed, conditions will be right
for realizing a proactive vision of social and cultural identity-
based inclusion that will foster an inclusive society and an
inclusive social system in which all individuals, groups and
social institutions are not only respected, but also valued and
appreciated for their contributions to a healthy society.
Bailey W. Jackson has done pioneering
work in multicultural organizational
development, black identity develop-
ment and social justice education.
His work has served as a foundation
for justice and diversity development in
public and private organizations, and
K-16 schools and campuses.
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Creativity means taking
a chance. And that’s
the only way to grow.
I’m interested in a lot of different things. At Hallmark—
working in several different departments—
I’ve had the chance to explore all those interests.
With every job, I came in as a beginner and grew to be an expert.
Within one opportunity, there is always another.
As a creative person, advancing in my career gives me even more
freedom to express myself. I use my mind in ways I never imagined.
That’s what lets me say I love where I am and I love what I do.
rachel britt—production art supervisor
for i nformati on on hallmark career opportuni ti es, vi si t www. hallmark. com/ careers.
l i ve your pas s i on. l ove your work.
© 2007 hallmark li censi ng, i nc.
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
Judith H. Katz
B y J u d i t h H . K a t z a n d F r e d e r i c k A . M i l l e r ,
I nc l us i on 3. 5: Our Vi ew of t he F ut ur e
Through our work over the past 30 years, we have seen several
shifts in the approach to diversity and inclusion. During the 1970s
and ’80s, the work was focused on compliance—the new Equal
Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action laws.
In the ’90s, developing a solid business case for the benefits of
a diverse workplace became critical. Now, as we enter the 21st
century, most organizations no longer are debating the need
for a high-performing, diverse work force.
Young people today expect organizations to have policies,
practices and supports for people of all backgrounds—not just
their particular group. If an organization wants to be success-
ful, respected and attract the best talent, it must take the
necessary actions to achieve the results that come from having
global cultural competency.
Organizations are being pushed to think differently about
employees and how they work. This is requiring a major shift
from the structures, policies and practices of the Industrial
Revolution, when workers were merely “hands” and “feet.”
Now, creating community within the organization, connect-
ing, collaborating and bringing your brain to work are how
most tasks will be accomplished. This will require global cul-
tural competencies and inclusive behaviors that far exceed
today’s best practices. Emerging technologies are creating the
ability to connect and collaborate anywhere at anytime at
unprecedented levels. Think Flickr

, Second Life
®
,
InnoCentive
®
and YouTube

, just a few of the community
platforms and collaborative environments changing how and
with whom we work.
Companies that want to be successful 21st-century organ-
izations will need to act in the next 18 to 24 months to create
highly inclusive work environments. Organizations will need
to be nimble and fluid, creating networks rather than
hierarchies, moving from command and control to
leveraging knowledge.
Inclusion is the Big Idea for the 21st century. Just as the
Internet has evolved into what is now referred to as Web 2.0,
50 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
Inclusion 3.5 is upon us—differences of perspective, back-
ground and experience that are fundamental to an organiza-
tion’s operational success. As one client recently said,
“Inclusion changes everything—how we make decisions and
problem-solve, what questions we ask, who is at the table and
how we function.”
Inclusion is a sense of belonging that occurs when people
in the organization feel respected, valued and seen for who
they are. It occurs when there is a level of supportive energy
and commitment from leaders, colleagues and others, so that
people—individually and collectively—can do their best work.
Inclusion is one of the key tools to creating organizations
that are truly global, seamless and highly productive. With this
landscape ahead and the realities of our global village, inclu-
sion will be the mindset and skill set for success.
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
and Frederick A. Miller
T h e K a l e e l J a m i s o n C o n s u l t i n g G r o u p I n c .
For a Posthumous
dedication
to Kaleel Jamison,
see page 78.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Francie Kendall, Ph.D.
By Francie Kendall
C h a n g i n g t h e L a n d s c a p e
o f D i v e r s i t y a t I t s R o o t s
For 35 years, my work has focused on racial justice, particularly in
relation to organizational change and white privilege. In that time,
I have worked with corporations as they implemented diversity
training to address employees’ race and sex biases.
As a consultant, I have been part of diversity initiatives in aca-
demic institutions where goals have included increasing the
recruitment and retention of faculty and students of color
While there have been varying degrees of success, American
organizations—corporate and academic—remain, for all
intents and purposes, places in which white men are far more
likely to be successful than anyone else. This is not necessarily
because they are the most talented, but because they belong to
a group that receives unearned and disproportionate access to
power, resources and ability to influence. More than any other
time in history, we cannot afford to continue doing what we
have always done.
During the next 10 to 15 years, root changes must be made
in the landscape of our corporate and academic worlds:
fundamental changes that require basic shifts in the mind-set
of the institutions. For example, rather than bringing in
people of color to change the organization’s complexion and
then expecting them to act like “honorary” white people,
institutions must create environments in which all people are
valued because of, not in spite of, who they are in terms of
their race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, religion and
socioeconomic class. This change requires a commitment to
regularly examine and address the biases that are built into the
organizational culture and into its policies and practices.
Determination to make change at all levels is essential to build
an institution in which everyone has an equitable opportunity
to be successful.
Finally, those of us who are white—men and women—
must work in authentic partnership with people of color to
provide leadership in creating genuinely diverse and inclusive
organizations. We must be clear that we invest our energy
because it is in our best interest to do so. Otherwise, nothing
will change. Our challenges for the near future are enormous.
Our responses must be bold and courageous.
Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D., began
working actively on white privilege
and social justice in 1965. That
became her passion and the career
path she has followed for the past 40
years. Her books include Diversity in
the Classroom and Understanding
White Privilege.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Marilyn Loden
By Marilyn Loden, Founder, Loden Associates, Inc.
D i v e r s i t y a n d t h e F u t u r e
As I ponder the future of diversity, I believe we’ve reached a major
fork in the road. Depending on decisions made now, diversity’s
impact is likely to range from incidental to transformative. This is
because its long-termpotential is directly linked to alignment with
underlying institutional values.
When diversity is an outward expression of an organization’s
commitment to employees, communities, the environment
and global society, it can be transformational. When it does
not reflect an organization’s core values, diversity is likely to
produce little meaningful change. As such, I see a future in
which organizations will line up along a continuum. Each
one’s placement will represent the degree to which diversity
reflects its core institutional beliefs about employees, commu-
nities and global society.
At one end will be organizations where diversity is a kind
of window dressing and its primary value cosmetic. In such
cases, “how we look” will be the principal measure of progress,
rather than “how we operate.” Within this group, I would
expect to find organizations that “talk the talk” of diversity in
advertising campaigns but refuse to pay a living wage to all
employees or provide health care benefits at a reasonable cost.
Somewhere in the middle will be institutions where diversity
and core values do not align. These would be global businesses
that proclaim, “Diversity is the right thing to do,” as they deny
responsibility for environmental stewardship or for ending
unfair labor practices. In each case, we see diversity being little
more than a thin smoke screen used to deflect attention from
greed-driven and unethical core business practices.
At the opposite end of the continuum, I expect to see organ-
izations where diversity is a key element of socially responsible
corporate policy. Employees at every level would be treated
with dignity and respect. Differences in wages between execu-
tives and workers would remain reasonable. These organiza-
tions would demonstrate concern for employees by providing
living wages, safe working conditions and merit-based
advancement. They would show commitment to communities
by encouraging volunteerism and renewal projects and by
dealing with neighbors in an open, honest and collaborative
manner. Finally, their global business practices would reflect
a fundamental commitment to social justice and environ-
mental stewardship.
While the task of moving organizations up this continuum
will be daunting, it is the critical work that lies before us. For
those comfortable with cosmetic change, this task may appear
too risky. For those committed to fulfilling the promise of
diversity, it is the essential work that must be done now.
Marilyn Loden is the author of award-
winning books on diversity manage-
ment, with over 20 years of research
and consulting experience working
with clients in the Fortune 500, federal
and state governments, higher
education and law.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Juan T. Lopez
By Juan T. Lopez, President, Amistad Associates
T h e U n f o l d i n g D i v e r s i t y J o u r n e y
Over the next 10 years, I believe these five areas will consume our
thinking: talent recruitment/retention, diversity competency,
health and wellness, sustainability and globalization.
Leading companies are reorienting their business strategies to
address these areas. In doing so, internal diversity thought leaders
or steering committees are tapped to help shape direction and
approach. For example, in the retention area, racial, ethnic and
other primary groups will provide candid feedback on exclusive
organizational practices. This information will be used to develop
performance metrics that hold individuals and organizations
accountable for using diverse talent.
The focus on diversity is entering a new phase characterized by
inquiry and study. More time will be devoted to research, sym-
posia and application. New insights and knowledge will be
used by organizations to improve their diversity performance.
The benefits of leveraging diversity will continue to grow in
acceptance across many disciplines. Furthermore, a decrease in
the derision and political scrutiny of diversity will lead to more
academic acceptance of diversity as a legitimate field of study.
Doing business in other countries will require diversity com-
petency. U.S. companies will not get a pass. There’s an expec-
tation that North Americans will demonstrate fluid
cultural competency toward people from different nations,
including sensitivity to political and religious mores. Business
leaders from different countries will bring their international
experience and best practices to corporate headquarters, forc-
ing changes in diversity strategies.
High-performance teams will be linked across multiple func-
tions and different locations. To excel, individuals will be
expected to manage diversity, and organizations will continue
to raise the bar on what is expected. Middle managers will be
a focus in terms of their ability to drive diversity initiatives,
develop talent and change deep-rooted organizational beliefs,
values and practices that undermine diversity competency.
This will be a priority because retention is influenced by the
employee-manager relationship.
Organizations will be scrutinized on how their products
impact the health and wellness of the community. Particular
focus will be on communities of color. PepsiCo is an example
of a company that is committed to creating healthy products
and educating consumers on nutrition and diet.
Environment and sustainability issues are important to
many consumers. The Home Depot and Wal-Mart are mov-
ing toward demanding smarter environmental practices from
their vendors as a condition of doing business. We will see
more organizations making these demands as corporate social
responsibility is expected from the consumer base. It’s no sur-
prise that these companies also have good diversity programs.
Talented people will have more options for where to work.
Future leaders will choose wisely, based on actions, not words.
Juan T. Lopez is co-authoring a book on
Latino leadership based on 20-plus
years of conducting LLEAD seminars
(Latino Leadership Education and
Development Program). He also is a
co-founder of Diversity 2000, now
entering its 14th year as a learning
community.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Myrna Marofsky
By Myrna Marofsky, former President, ProGroup, Inc.
K e e p i n g D o m e s t i c D i v e r s i t y A l i v e
i n a G l o b a l M a r k e t p l a c e
Have you noticed the globes and world maps popping up in our
offices, touting the foreign countries we visit and our new cultural
competency? These are signs of what’s coming fast.
While offices of global diversity have been around for years,
the emphasis of these offices is increasingly on the global piece
rather than the domestic. Diversity leaders who once enjoyed
having a platform to raise workplace issues near and dear to
them—such as race, gender and sexual orientation—now will
be faced with becoming experts in an often unknown territory.
Frankly, global has become sexier.
Watch how easily global initiatives will be funded. You
won’t have to prove the business case because countries such as
China are doing it for us. And the events related to the Iraq
war have forced executives and managers to face their lack of
global awareness, so they are open to getting help.
Race, gender, sexual orientation, religion and the many
dimensions of diversity that we have worked so hard to address
over the past 20 years still will be there, but out of the lime-
light. Think about how much more impressive it will be to talk
about a successful diversity training program in Singapore than
to talk about one in Cleveland where a manager learns how to
create a respectful workplace for her black and Latino employ-
ees. For those who never wanted to talk about domestic diver-
sity, the shift in focus will be a relief. They might even get that
checklist they’ve been asking for; only now it will be about how
to interact with people in other countries.
The responsibility of diversity professionals in the years
ahead is to keep both conversations going. We need to pro-
mote understanding of the global arena and at the same time
keep the realities of domestic diversity alive and visible.
We may see a shift in terminology, but whether it’s “inclu-
sion,” “intercultural,” or “intergalactic,” the human element
remains the same. Our work should always be about creating
opportunities for people to do their best in an environment
that respects them, no matter where in the world that may be.
Myrna Marofsky is the former president
of ProGroup, Inc. Growing up in the
’60s, Myrna developed sensitivities to
issues of social justice that she turned
into “real” work when she joined
Karen Stinson and built ProGroup
®
, Inc.
in 1986. Her contributions include
instructional designs and innovative
products.
56 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Julie O’Mara
Julie O’Mara, President, O’Mara and Associates
B u i l d i n g o n t h e ‘ 9 0 s F o u n d a t i o n
Over the last several months, I’ve been going through 35 years’
worth of files to move my home and office. It caused me to reflect
on the progress of the diversity and inclusion field, the work itself
and what I will concentrate on for the next 10 years.
Most good diversity work today is much like the work we did
in the 1990s. Back then, we knew that effective diversity work
was about more than human resource practices and
compliance. We knew that it was important to design and sell
products for all customers, and that change-management or
systems-intervention approaches were more effective than
initiating training programs, even if the programs were out-
standing. We knew that it was important to have a substantial
business case, that the authentic involvement of leaders was
crucial, that relevant ROI measurement sustained continuing
change, and that training was key, but not the only solution.
To move the field forward, we as diversity professionals
need to:
• Get better at what we did in the 1990s. Continuous
improvement that builds on the fine work of the ’90s will be
an important step forward.
• Take the time to share our best practices with one another.
Many organizations and consultants see the work they do as
a competitive advantage, but we need to be more willing to
share for the greater good of the world.
• Show more leadership in the political arena—as individuals
and as corporations—by pushing heads of state, insurgents
and others with influence to end conflicts that stem from
ethnic, class and gender differences, as well as religious
beliefs and other deeply held convictions.
• Forge strong alliances between the branches of our field—
diversity/inclusion, cross-cultural communication, multi-
culturalism, social justice and diversity management.
• Show more respect for the work done in different sectors.
For example, those working in the corporate arena think
they can’t learn from those working in government, and
vice versa. But good work is often transferable from sector
to sector.
• Think and act globally. It’s catchy to say, “Think global and
act local.” However, there are times when we need to both
think and act globally, because diversity and inclusion work
is almost always impacted by world events.
Julie O’Mara is a consultant and author,
currently working on Diversity Best
Practices Around the World,
due out in 2009. She is co-author with
Alan Richter of the recently published
Global Diversity and Inclusion
Benchmarks, a free online tool.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Patricia Pope
By Patricia Pope, CEO, Pope & Associates, Inc.
T h e F u t u r e o f D i v e r s i t y
a n d I n c l u s i o n
Wouldn’t it be great if diversity experts had a crystal ball to foresee
what organizational strategies, if embraced, would promote the
active inclusion of all talented people, regardless of their back-
ground? Based on my experiences over the last 30+ years, I
believe our future opportunities lie in the following areas.
Integration is key. Diversity has been a separate silo, with the
focus primarily on training, which I’ve called the “spray and
pray” approach. Spray everyone with training. Pray that it does
some good. By definition, diversity refers to all human and
organizational differences. It’s inherent in everything an
organization does.
Technology is key. Organizations have to do more with less.
The days of conducting two-day diversity sessions are history.
We must leverage new technologies to provide the learning
that previously occurred in classrooms.
Safety is key. Initially, some diversity training was perceived
as too confrontational. Then the pendulum swung too far in
the opposite direction. Many programs became entertaining
and fun, and no one felt uncomfortable. The challenge is to
create a safe environment, along with substantive content, to
produce real learning and behavior change.
Culture is key. Training alone is insufficient to create
culture change. No matter how good the training is, if the
organization doesn’t put mechanisms in place to sustain the
learning, participants quickly normalize.
Globalization is key. Many corporations are international in
some way, so the “U.S.-centric” approach to diversity fails to work.
Valuing differences more than conformance is key. Most
organizations operate somewhere between tolerating differ-
ences and managing differences. Valuing differences requires
culture change. That’s far more challenging than organizing a
“Black History Month” event. The paradox of diversity is that
differences won’t be truly valued until they are experienced as
adding value. Yet, it is very difficult to add value when one
doesn’t feel valued.
Inclusion is key and the outcome of doing the right work,
with the right people, in the right sequence. If we don’t
proactively seek to include, we unintentionally exclude.
Representation is not necessarily indicative of success. Those
who rise to senior levels often have to conform too much to get
the corner office. Despite the awards companies may receive
for their “good numbers,” without true culture change they
lose the opportunity to leverage these differences.
Our opportunity lies in our willingness to ask the diversity
question on an individual, organizational and societal level.
Were “differences” a factor in this situation? If not, we move
on. If so, we assess how they contributed to the outcome. But
we have to ask. Our tendency to avoid exploring the impact of
differences is our biggest obstacle and our most significant
opportunity in the years ahead.
Patricia C. Pope is also co-founder of
Myca-Pope, Inc. which leverages new
technologies and Pope’s extensive
intellectual property to create award-
winning e-learning/web-based training.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Margaret Regan
By Margaret Regan, President and CEO, The FutureWork Institute, Inc.
®
D i v e r s i t y 2 0 1 7 : Wh a t D o e s
t h e F u t u r e H o l d ?
As a futurist and member of the World Future Society, I have
spent the last 20 years researching and preparing clients for the
future workplace, work force and marketplace. As I look at the
predictions for diversity and inclusion over the next 10 years, I
think our opportunities are in three directions—diving deeper,
moving forward and upward, and expanding sideways.
We will need to go deeper into the traditional issues of race
and gender. We cannot move to true inclusion without aggres-
sively addressing the racism and sexism that still permeate the
halls of corporate America, entertainment, government and
other institutions. The recent incidents with Imus, Michael
Richards and U.S. Senator Biden, as well as the backlash of
Katrina, 9/11 and the Virginia Tech massacre, sound the alarm
to deepen our work, break the silence and push our clients to
make real progress on the traditional issues.
Expanding our horizons sideways will immerse us in newer
issues such as managing religious diversity and generational
issues in the workplace. In the marketplace and the workplace,
the emerging majority and cross-cultural issues will provide
opportunities that many of our organizations are not prepared
to meet. The acceptance of GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual and
transgender) employees will continue as societal responses
shift. Emerging technologies will enable people with disabili-
ties to contribute more fully. Our job will be to open the
doors, minds and systems of the organizations we serve, so that
they embrace these diverse employees and customers.
And finally, we need to move forward and upward into the
future by addressing issues that arise as science and technology
give us the ability to change skin color and enhance ourselves
through genetic determination or the implantation of brain
chips. We will need to plan for a generation that will have 10
careers in a lifetime. We will move to the next era of retirement
—rewiring or “rehirement”—as 50 becomes the new 30.
As managers witness the death of distance and pervasive
computing becomes the new reality, we will need to manage a
work force that is virtual and flexible. We will see a dramatic
redistribution of the global demographic picture as the popu-
lation in the developed world declines and retires, and China
and India vie for political and economic dominance on the
world stage. Finally, diversity practitioners will come to see
that the future is not some place where we are going, but one
we are creating. The paths to it are not found, but made; and
the activity of making them will change both us as the makers
and our destination on the journey to inclusion. Are we ready?
60 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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www.pw.utc.com
At Pratt & Whitney, you’ll find diversity at the core of who we are
and what we offer. With so many different talents and perspectives,
we continue to find a better way. From design to manufacturing to
service, from commercial flight to space exploration, we help our
customers grow and prosper. Working together, we all succeed.
The Eagle is everywhere.
“OUR GREATEST ASSET IS OUR
DIVERSITY. TOGETHER, WE DRIVE
INNOVATION.”
Earl Exum, Director, Global Repair Services
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Alan Richter, Ph.D.
By Alan Richter, President, QED Consulting
T h e F u t u r e o f D i v e r s i t y
Here’s an equation that may explain the future of diversity in the
21st century: (RC)
2
= FoD (Future of Diversity).*
The first “R” equals the rate of change. There’s little doubt that
our world is changing very fast. The speed of computers dou-
bles every 18 months (Moore’s Law), so it’s no surprise that our
lives change so fast. Consider the speed at which new knowl-
edge is accumulated and how fast old knowledge becomes
obsolete. Accelerated change means constant challenges to the
status quo, hence the need to manage across changing differ-
ences is an ever-increasing necessity.
The first “C” equals connectivity. Globalization implies that
the world is shrinking, meaning that more and more connec-
tions are possible today and will expand in the future. Thanks
to the Internet and telephony, we can connect quickly across
the world today, unlike any previous time in history, and this
connectivity will expand. Global connectivity is at the heart of
the diversity challenge, as more and more connections will
be across differences that we need to manage peacefully and
effectively.
The second “R” equals reputation. Our organization’s rep-
utation (how it is perceived) will grow in importance as the
world becomes ever more complex, based on the “RC” above.
Diversity (covering inclusion, respect for differences, etc.) and
integrity (covering social responsibility) will become key suc-
cess factors for all global organizations.
The second “C” equals creativity. Creativity certainly con-
tributes to reputation, but more importantly it enables
pioneers to emerge with breakthroughs and best practices.
The links between diversity and creativity (and innovation)
are close and complex, and much more research is
needed to explore the connections. But as creativity becomes a
greater business necessity, so does the effective management
of diversity.
So, what is the future of diversity? I believe it’s wrapped up
in these four elements or drivers multiplied together: rate of
change x connectivity x reputation x creativity. The better we
understand each of them and their interconnections, the
better we can grasp the future of diversity.
*This essay is indebted to the book, Blur, by Stan Davis and Christopher Meyer,
published in 1999, in which the authors describe the future of business as a blur
using the equation: speed x connectivity x intangibles = BLUR.
Alan Richter specializes in the areas
of leadership, values, culture and
change. Dr. Richter holds a Ph.D. in
Philosophy from London University.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Armida Mendez Russell
By Armida Mendez Russell
A G l i m p s e o f D i v e r s i t y a n d
I n c l u s i o n i n 2 0 1 7
The complexity of societal change and the long-term gains made
by enlightened organizations in the past decade have driven
others to elevate diversity and inclusion to a higher, more
strategic level.
Business growth and success are dependent on leaders from multi-
dimensional cultures who understand and can react quickly to
changes in their environment. Diversity-competent leaders:
• Are self-aware, charismatic, genuine, tuned in to their attitudes
and behaviors, and understand their impact on others.
• Understand the needs and desires of their constituencies;
they scan the environment, listening and learning from the
many voices of all stakeholders.
• Maintain a workplace where people from all groups can
create and innovate.
• Ensure full utilization of an organizational infrastructure,
aligned with a strong, performance-driven diversity strategy.
• Take an active role in supporting the implementation of
meaningful change. They focus on small and targeted diver-
sity and inclusion initiatives that trigger large effects.
Today’s labor force—smaller and less skilled, increasingly
global, virtual, self-empowered and vastly diverse—requires
redefining HR processes, policies and practices. Aided by
advancing technology, HR professionals work to meet the
needs of our multidimensional work force. Organizations are
forming strategic alliances with diverse educational institutions
and community organizations to develop critical competencies
for now and in the future.
Hiring the best calls for new and creative ways to tap talent
from various groups of demographics. Talent acquisition and
retention are supported by an environment that goes beyond
inclusion to one that:
• Empowers employees by providing solid direction and sup-
port from the beginning.
• Uses consistent and multichannel communications that adopt
multicultures while appreciating the nuances of each region.
• Offers continuous professional development that takes into
account the needs of the organization as well as the employee.
• Removes obstacles and trusts employees to bring their
“whole self ” to work to meet business goals and objectives.
Ever mindful of the changing marketplace, organizations must
integrate diversity to help advance their market position. They
must use advancing capabilities such as technology and
alliances to meet the varied needs and tastes of the consumer.
They must use internal affinity groups to help identify diverse
marketplace opportunities.
Change and complexity in the world demand that organ-
izations work actively to take the next steps in the evolution of
their cultures. Strategic, targeted action should be the norm,
not “smoke and mirrors.” Present day actions will determine
tomorrow’s reality. Is your organization ready for the future?
Armida Mendez Russell has earned an
international reputation for developing
practical tools for managing diversity.
Her work is used by numerous global
organizations as the foundation for a
wide range of diversity initiatives.
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 63
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Edith Whitfield Seashore
By Edith Whitfield Seashore
D i v e r s i t y D o e s n ’ t J u s t H a p p e n
My general experience has been that the most effective aspect of
work regarding diversity in organizations was largely increased
awareness.
Awareness programs were effective in one way but very often
did not result in systemic change that could be sustained when
there were changes in leadership. It was better described as
moving from clueless to spineless. In the future, what can be
added after spineless? I believe that in the years ahead it will be
the deliberate, conscious use of self—because diversity doesn’t
just happen.
If one lived in an all-white neighborhood, it had to have
been by choice. Was the choice made with awareness or
unawareness, and was it made consciously or automatically? If
the choice was conscious, then one is accountable for choosing
to live in an all-white neighborhood. If it was an automatic
choice, what motivated the decision? If top leadership is over-
whelmingly white and male, how did that happen? Was it a
deliberate choice, or did it just happen that way?
When we are conscious and deliberate about our choices,
we can be accountable for them. But when we are on automatic,
responding unknowingly to our socialization or previous pro-
gramming, we often do not hold ourselves accountable and
tend to blame others for our choices.
If we live in an all-white neighborhood, for example, we can
blame the Realtors or school systems, or say that we didn’t real-
ize that’s what we were doing. And if top leadership is over-
whelmingly white and male, we can blame the pipeline, the
recruiters or the lack of experienced people. And if all else fails, we
can blame our socialization—that we were duped by society.
Our socialization helps to form the belief systems that
determine our thoughts, emotions and, finally, our behaviors
and actions. We need to become aware of these out-of-date
belief systems and redo them, so that we can make conscious
and deliberate choices about living and working with people
who are different from us. We can take back control of
our own choices and deliberately build diversity into our
organizations, our lives and our communities. This must
be done through conscious, deliberate use of self—diversity
doesn’t just happen.
64 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Terrence R. Simmons
By Terrence R. Simmons, Simmons Associates Inc.
T h e F u t u r e o f D i v e r s i t y
About 10 years ago, I gave the keynote speech at a major diversity
conference and opened the proceedings by saying that diversity
and inclusion were fundamental spiritual tools. I remember
detecting an audible shift in the audience when I uttered the “S”
word. This was a business conference, not a religious gathering!
I remember holding up my hand, fingers spread as wide apart
as possible, and saying that diversity was about each of us
being like a finger. We look out from the vantage point of the
tip and note our differences from the other people-fingers,
without realizing that we’re all part of the hand. The work of
diversity and inclusion is to help people recognize that we’re
part of a team-hand or company-hand or country-hand or,
ultimately, a global community-hand.
Although many participants came to me afterward to say
how much they appreciated what I had said, I also had the feel-
ing that most of my audience didn’t quite get it. I certainly
wasn’t the first to discuss this concept. But given the reaction
of that audience, I left the conference feeling that I must have
been either a little ahead of the times or totally spaced out in
my views.
Fast forward to 2007, more than a decade later. Most of our
larger organizations, be they corporations, universities, health
care providers, government agencies or others, have begun to
embrace diversity and inclusion. We’ve helped them to discov-
er strategies, relevant metrics, accountability systems and
implementation plans that have aligned diversity with their
business- and mission-related results. The same organizations
also have articulated values and are either operating globally or
recognizing the impact of being part of a global business place.
Most of us now can see that we have entered a century in
which we either find ways to function as one global hand or
the whole body will die. The challenges include broadening
our personal views, especially as Americans, to see the full
global picture; figuring out how to make personal and organi-
zational results align positively with the common good; and
finding ways of communicating across languages, cultures,
time zones and vast distances about diversity and inclusion. It’s
possible that the new global vocabulary won’t even include
these words, which don’t translate very well around the planet.
To be successful, we may need new words. As obvious as it may
seem to me, I promise not to suggest any that begin with an “S.”
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 65
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Dr. George F. Simons
By Dr. George Simons
C o n t i n u i n g t h e M o me n t u m
o f D i v e r s i t y
The good news: Diversity initiatives have largely been developed
and refined in a U.S. context, and many of the achievements and
best practices that have emerged are provocative resources for use
in a global environment. Diversity and inclusion have contributed
to the quality of life for countless people in U.S. organizations and in
civil society. We hope that inclusion may grow and benefit others.
Now the bad news: Over the next 10 or 15 years, U.S.-based
organizations will face two major obstacles in seeking to max-
imize their diversity and inclusion initiatives. First, they will
face the challenge of seeing inclusion from the perspective of
the problem sets existing in the non-U.S. cultures in which
they operate. This will require serious research into the factual
(economic and social) dynamics that demonstrate exclusion, as
well as into the attitudes of people in situ. Assumption of U.S.
categories and issues of targeted segments of the U.S. popula-
tion can otherwise be specious.
Second, the implementation of U.S.-sponsored or U.S.-
inspired diversity initiatives will be tainted for at least a gener-
ation by the deterioration of the U.S. reputation worldwide.
From being largely respected for its values, the United States
has become in the last half dozen years the most hated and
feared nation worldwide. This perceptual shift creates great
skepticism, if not cynicism, toward U.S. values and social poli-
cies. Human rights abuses, domestic social inequities and what
more and more people are beginning to recognize as hypocrit-
ical moralism in U.S. policies and practices will tempt them to
reject U.S.-proposed social solutions out of hand.
Is there a silver lining to this dark side of our recent history?
Only if we come to grips with this shadow side of our story
and take a closer look at where inclusion needs to go in more
than the legal and organizational framework in which it has
grown up.
Pioneering diversity since 1966,
Dr. George Simons consults and trains
workplace diversity, gender competence
for men, intercultural communication
and global teamwork worldwide. He
has authored numerous works.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
Gary A. Smith and
A L ook a t t he F ut ur e of Di ver s i t y
Like a group of jamming musicians that come together and pro-
duce great music, we believe that if you placed the pioneers of
diversity in a room, we would be able to once again prove the
truth of the diversity thesis statement . . . that the more diverse
team does indeed outperform the less diverse team.
We are honored and humbled to be featured in such illustrious
company. We write this perspective on the future of diversity
as our entry into the “band” that will continue to lead the
collective thinking on diversity and inclusion.
The legacy of diversity will be built around separate but
connected platforms:
• The emerging global economy
• The more diverse corporation as an agent for social change
• The power of one
No longer is diversity a matter of if or when. Yesterday’s
work began with “proving that diversity is coming to your
organization.” Today the world is diverse. Your life is diverse.
How you choose to operate within that reality is up to you.
But in every way you live, diversity improves, alters, and influ-
ences your life. Ivy is known for its approach to diversity as a
business imperative. The world has come to understand that
diversity is both a work and life imperative.
The Emerging Global Economy
The world is shrinking. The largest economy in the world
is moving from the United States to China. An enormous,
insular culture knows how we in the United States live.
Technology has enabled the global village. The dish has won.
If technology enabled that connection, diversity provides the
grease that manages the friction that would otherwise tear
us apart.
The More Diverse Corporation as an Agent
for Social Change
Diverse people, with more access to wealth, resources and
know-how, will become the new agents for social change.
Corporate contributions will reflect the preferences of new and
different decision-makers. Diverse communities will benefit
from the knowledge gained in the workplace on “how things
operate” and deployed back at the home front. Improved
access to resources will equip different people to achieve the
social change that also benefits them.
B y G a r y A . S m i t h a n d J a n e t C r e n s h a w S m i t h ,
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The Power of One
The key to the future is that difference—diversity—will not be
seen as less than. Organizations will cease to operate from a
place of scarcity, no longer taking the minimalist view of
diversity. They will not take a “Noah’s Ark” approach because
two of everything simply may not be enough. Because the
thesis statement is true, we know that we must have as much
of it as possible. We cannot have too much.
Adding difference can only make us better because it is the
difference that continues to protect us from our blind spots
and to create breakthrough opportunities. This happens when
we truly see power in the individual—not in the masses and
the majority but in the power of one. Our ability to effectively
engage at that level creates a different world.
These platforms are the future, because diversity is.
D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R S
Janet Crenshaw Smith
C o - f o u n d e r s , I v y P l a n n i n g G r o u p , L L C
Ivy Planning Group is a full service
management consulting and training
firm. Ivy provides strategy, change
management and leadership
development with a focus on diversity
as a workforce, workplace and
marketplace opportunity.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Karen M. Stinson
By Karen M. Stinson, Founder and former CEO, ProGroup, Inc.
C D O s O b s o l e t e b y 2 0 2 0
As I gaze into my crystal ball and view our industry 10 to 15 years
out, I see a world that has no chief diversity officers, no directors
of diversity and inclusion, and no EEO/AA managers.
There are no diversity consultants or firms like ProGroup that
specialize in diversity training and consulting. There is no pub-
lication named Profiles in Diversity Journal. In fact, the term,
“diversity,” has gone back to being a term used, mainly in the
United States, for stock portfolios and opinions.
There is no reason to be concerned about what has disap-
peared because the field will have morphed into something
that is more challenging and stimulating. The global market-
place and labor pool will be a reality for the majority of suc-
cessful corporations, and they will be looking for people who
have experience, knowledge and an understanding of creating
global teams that work.
By the year 2020, I believe the people in the positions
described above will have titles such as global inclusion officer,
vice president of global recruitment and retention, manager of
employee engagement, director of cross-cultural competency
and chief respect officer. A daunting challenge for these global
workplace experts and the new versions of diversity consultants
and companies will be the labor pool shortage, which will be
very real for every American corporation. This shortage will be
the result of our country’s changing demographics combined
with governmental restraints that held back the flow of inno-
vative and creative geniuses from other countries. If companies
do find enough engineers, scientists or programmers, some
will most likely be based in China, India or Brazil. Diversity
experts in the year 2020 will be expected to guide our leaders
in creating cohesive, productive teams with members based all
over the world.
Those of us who will be most successful in the next couple
of decades are creating strategies and solutions for these chal-
lenges today. I hope we take the time to get together and share
them with each other because there is so much to do, and the
world we serve is changing faster and faster.
Karen Stinson, ProGroup’s founder and
former CEO, started ProGroup more than
20 years ago with a vision of creating a
better world. She and her team have
worked with thousands of clients to create
cultures where every employee is respected
and every customer feels valued.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Sondra Thiederman, Ph.D.
By Sondra Thiederman, Ph.D.
D i v e r s i t y : T h e N e x t G e n e r a t i o n
I began my diversity work in 1979. Not all of us called it “diversity”
back then; and internal and external practitioners were scattered
philosophically and geographically over a wide swath of terrain.
Today there is more agreement on language, some agreement on
goals, and an almost universal belief that having diverse people in
the work force is good for business.
Judging from what I have witnessed over the last decades, I
predict that managing and encouraging diversity will continue
to be linked to business success. At the same time, I see a
return to diversity as the “right thing to do.” Both views
increasingly inhabit the thinking of the same leaders. This is
because business and values are connected in an increasingly
tight circle that spins something like this: Good business
requires creativity, which demands diversity of thought, which
requires diverse employees, which necessitates respect for
people of all backgrounds, which requires values that are
respected by consumers and investors, which results in good
business, which, to be sustained, requires creativity . . .
What do we need to do to make diversity work? To find the
answer, I went back to 1979, the year of the TV mini-series,
“Roots: The Next Generation.” The mini-series and its prede-
cessor, “Roots,” were the darlings of critics and public alike.
We were touched by the characters, repelled by the horrors
depicted and moved by the message. But there was something
naïve and self-serving in the country’s adoration. Some
believed that if we suffered through watching the horrors of
this world-class diversity offence and sympathized with and
admired the characters, we could feel good about ourselves and
even a bit self-righteous.
But those of us who felt that way missed one of the most
important points of the broadcasts. “Roots,” you see, was
about valuing individuals—about seeing the uniqueness of
Kunta Kinte and Chicken George and Fiddler. The most
successful organizations will be those that encourage team
members to look past categories and see people’s unique
characteristics, strengths and weaknesses. It is that clear and
bias-free vision that is the key to success in diversity and
in business.
My father—a man whose attitudes toward race were far
from pristine—learned this truth. He learned it perhaps too
late to help him live a better life, but not too late to teach his
children an important lesson. His revelation came as he lay
dying in a Los Angeles hospital. Somehow the subject of bias
came up and my father turned to me and admitted that he had
been wrong all of his life. “People are people,” he said. “We
have to take ’em all just one person at a time.”
Sondra Thiederman, Ph.D., is a speaker
on diversity, bias reduction and cross-
cultural issues and author of Making
Diversity Work: Seven Steps for
Defeating Bias in the Workplace.
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DI VE RSI T Y P I ONEER
Dr. R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr.
By R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr., CEO, Roosevelt Thomas Consulting and Training
D i v e r s i t y : I n N e e d o f D i s c i p l i n e
As I think about the future of diversity, I anticipate that the field
will have to become more disciplined. If it does not, it will be seen
as less and less relevant—indeed, as not worthy of being taken to
the next level. So, at this juncture, we can say that diversity is at a
crossroads.
What do I mean by discipline? For many, the word screams
“academic,” “theoretical,” and “irrelevant”—the perceived
antitheses of “practical” and “action-oriented.” That is not
how I am using the word.
John Hutcheson, former Georgia State University profes-
sor, has described discipline as a “lens through which one may
view a field.” Another compatible definition is that of Peter
Senge, author of The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of
the Learning Organization. He defines discipline as “a body
of theory and technique that must be studied and mastered
to be put into practice . . . a developmental path for acquiring
certain skills or competencies.”
Discipline, then, is developed so that it may be practiced.
Stated differently, a discipline is not idle, academic theorizing,
but rather a practical prescription for gaining mastery with
respect to a specific capability.
In The Fifth Discipline, Senge also writes, “To practice a
discipline is to be a lifelong learner. You ‘never arrive;’ you
spend your life mastering disciplines . . . The more you learn,
the more acutely aware you become of your ignorance.”
Implicit in the above discussion of discipline is the question
that has neither been raised nor answered sufficiently with
respect to the field of diversity: What is the developmental
path for acquiring diversity management capability as an indi-
vidual or an organization?
Is the field of diversity likely to become discipline-driven?
I think so. Some have noted that the lack of discipline is char-
acteristic of evolving fields. Also, increasingly, I hear calls for
more discipline—albeit sometimes positioned as arguments
for more professionalism. Once practitioners become
convinced that seeking “silver bullet” words and interventions
cannot generate sustainable progress, serious movement will be
made toward the generation of diversity disciplines.
R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr. is often called
the “Father of Diversity.” He founded
the American Institute for Managing
Diversity and has authored two
seminal works: The Harvard Business
Review article, “From Affirmative
Action to Affirming Diversity,” and the
book, Beyond Race and Gender.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Michael L. Wheeler
By Michael L. Wheeler, President, OEStrategies Inc., and CEO, Medici Innovations
A F u t u r e P e r s p e c t i v e o n G l o b a l
D i v e r s i t y a n d I n c l u s i o n
The future of global diversity and inclusion will be determined by
what we do today and how we do it. It requires a real vision—a
higher purpose—of what it will look like for individuals, organi-
zations and our world.
The vision has been given to us by greats such as Martin
Luther King Jr., whose famous speech, “I Have a Dream,”
paints a vivid picture of what that world should look like. The
United Nations Universal Declaration on Human Rights
provides another vision for a universal set of standards. Even
a corporate diversity vision can inspire, such as GM’s, “A win-
ning culture of inclusion that naturally enables GM employees,
suppliers, dealers and communities to fully contribute to the
success of GM around the world.”
American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead said,
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed
citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that
ever has.” I believe our future starts with the individual. Each
of us holds the power and has the responsibility to demonstrate
and live inclusion. Corporations lead, too, by bringing together
people of many differences for a common purpose. Leading
companies will provide a productive and innovative workplace
while driving and teaching inclusion and building skills in
people and, as a result, in our communities.
Nearly 20 years ago, I was asked by a reporter from one of
the nation’s top newspapers if diversity was another fad, another
“flavor of the month.” I responded, “Diversity is our reality
and a force of change that will only increase over time.”
Indeed, I have seen tremendous growth in the field and in
corporate, government, education and communities. I’ve also
seen too many of the same old problems.
Diversity is a global fact, yet inclusion is not a global value.
Corporations will continue to increase innovation through
diversity because a global economy will force it. Diversity and
inclusion will be increasingly identified as performance factors.
The chief diversity officer will become a critical position in
management. There will be greater accountability, and diversity
will grow as a performance indicator.
At the same time, gaps in education in the United States,
resulting in skills gaps and labor shortages in our fastest grow-
ing populations, will continue, but with improvements. Global
competition will make it tempting to seek talent elsewhere.
Racism still will be an issue that needs to be resolved, and there
will be increasing cross-race/ethnicity competition and power
struggles.
Still, there will be a new breed of leaders who will drive
change more quickly because they understand the value of
diversity and inclusion. Diversity is our reality. Diversity and
inclusion drive innovation. Through innovation we will find
the solutions for today and our future.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Trevor Wilson
By Trevor Wilson, TWI Inc.
D i v e r s i t y : R e a d y t o E v o l v e
It’s time for a change! The diversity industry has hit a wall and is
poised to evolve to the next stage.
One of the most intriguing arguments I’ve heard for the evo-
lution of diversity came from a scientist explaining the process
used to map the human genome. He explained that one of the
first steps in the mapping process was to determine the various
combinations of human DNA. He said that before the genome
was mapped, conventional wisdom held that there were infi-
nite combinations of the three billion pairs of DNA biochem-
icals in the double helix. However, this imprecise estimate
needed to be accurately quantified to complete the mapping.
After doing the math, scientists found that there were a star-
tling ten to the power of 2.5 billion possible combinations of
human DNA. The scientist went on to say that if you divide
that number by 6.5 billion (the current population in the
world), you get to see the true diversity of the human family.
It was not long after hearing this speech that I was reading
an excellent article by talent management guru Marcus
Buckingham, who wrote, “Differences of trait and talent are
like blood types. They cut across the superficial variations of
race, sex and age and capture each person’s uniqueness.”
This is what diversity needs to focus on—discovering the
many variations that make everyone unique. It is so trite and
demeaning to reduce diversity to conversations about the color
of my skin, my gender or my sexual orientation. Even though
these characteristics do inform, they do not define, who I am.
It is time the conversation and the meaning of diversity
evolve. Allow me to introduce you to Human Equity

, a con-
cept that focuses on maximizing the diverse talents of your
total work force. It is the next step in the evolution.
To find out if you need to evolve your diversity program,
download and complete the Total Equity Solution
©
Scorecard
from www.twiinc.com. Share it with your colleagues. Start a
brutally honest conversation about where you have been and
where you want to go next with diversity.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Mary-Frances Winters
By Mary-Frances Winters, President, The Winters Group, Inc.
T h e F u t u r e o f D i v e r s i t y
In the 30-plus years that I have been involved in some form or
another with the issues of fairness, equity and diversity, so much
has changed and yet so much has remained the same. Charles
Dickens’ words still fit: “It was the best of times. It was the worst
of times.”
In the United States, legal discrimination was abolished with
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other legislation; apartheid
ended in South Africa; and there has been notable progress in
solving human rights atrocities around the globe. However, as
we are all painfully aware, too much injustice, too many
inequities and far too much intolerance of differences continue
to cripple our ability to move closer to the type of world that
inclusion advocates such as Gandhi and Martin Luther King
Jr. envisioned—a nonviolent world where people would
be judged by the content of their character, not the color
of their skin, sexual orientation, physical abilities, gender or
religious affiliation.
The issues of intolerance and injustice are at crisis propor-
tions, and I believe that our ability to survive as a civilization
is inextricably linked to our willingness to accept, leverage and
optimize our differences for the collective good of the planet.
The future conversation about inclusion must focus on
the accelerating global interdependence for natural resources,
labor and technology. The business case is compelling. We
either learn mutual respect and appreciation, how to share
power and collaborate, or we will suffer what could be dire
consequences.
Time is of the essence. The power base is shifting from West
to East, and many of us lack the cross-cultural competencies
needed to work effectively with cultures very different from
our own. We haven’t gotten it right yet at home, but it is clear
that we need to expeditiously incorporate a global framework,
even if the scope of operations is within U.S. boundaries.
Myopic, ethnocentric thinking must give way to world views
that are more relative than absolute and more fact- than
assumption-based.
We have a lot of work to do. It is hard work, but we must
persevere because our very survival depends on it.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
Herbert Z. Wong, Ph.D.
By Herbert Z. Wong, Ph.D., Herbert Z. Wong & Associates
T h e F u t u r e o f D i v e r s i t y P r o g r a m s
a n d I n i t i a t i v e s
Current United States and global-wide demographics clearly indi-
cate that our families, communities, organizations and countries
are getting more diverse, not less diverse, with every passing day.
Diversity leadership and management not only will be desired and
expected for workplace and community skill sets, but also will be
necessary and required competencies for effective, productive and
successful outcomes in business, education, community and global
venues. Given the forecasted diversity changes and conditions, the
following three predictions are provided as core strategies for
diversity leadership and management competencies.
1. Integration of the global, international, multicultural and
diversity models (to include concepts, tools, training and
competencies) into a holistic framework and system for
application in business, education, government, and com-
munity venues: Current diversity approaches tend to focus,
more or less, on distinct areas of work and skill sets among
global, international, multicultural and diversity fields of
competencies, with limited opportunities for overlap.
Greater integration of diversity programs with these other
areas will be needed for diversity leadership and manage-
ment in this next decade.
2. Implementation of more language- and culture-specific
training initiatives and programs to address changing global
and local demographics and conditions for success: Given
the changing world and U.S. demographics in the
Latino/Hispanic, Asian/Pacific and Middle Eastern popula-
tions, diversity leadership and management programs will
require greater focus on language- and culture-specific train-
ing of skill sets for executives, managers and professionals.
For example, programs containing both language instruction
and cultural awareness that help executives, managers and
supervisors work with the changing work force would be
beneficial both in the United States and in global venues.
3. Expansion of partnerships among business, education,
community and government diversity initiatives and diver-
sity leadership and management: Diversity initiatives and
programs will need to achieve greater coordination and part-
nerships among collaborative business, education, commu-
nity and government entities, given the complexities and
changes in demographic needs and concerns. Designs for
solutions that address multiple levels within diverse commu-
nities and environments will be more effective than those
focusing on unitary levels, populations and programs. These
partnerships will enhance the quality of life, well-being and
satisfaction within diverse environments and venues.
The complexities of the changing demographics within the
United States and the larger world context will necessitate
better integration of the models, concepts, methods, tools and
skill sets for diversity leadership and management. Infusion
of these three core strategies will advance our diversity leader-
ship and management research, education and training in
the coming decade.
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
A Tribute to Kaleel Jamison
A Posthumous Dedication
Kaleel Jamison was a true pioneer in management
consulting, organization development, human
relations, and personal growth.
She was raised in an era in which women in positions of power
and influence were a rarity in business, and people’s roles and
expectations were defined by gender and race. Through her
marriage to Bill Jamison, a well-regarded corporate leader who
attended professional development workshops, Kaleel had the
opportunity to participate in the “spouses’ programs” that
accompanied Bill’s executive training sessions.
In the late 1960s she began running workshops on the dif-
ferences in communication styles between women and men in
her local church in Cincinnati. She was especially vocal in
challenging the notion that women should make themselves
appear smaller and less significant so men could feel larger
and more significant. Kaleel was a staunch believer in self-
empowerment and the empowerment of others. “By being
more of myself, I am able to share more of me with you.”
In the 1970s she addressed differences of color and race in
the workplace when she consulted to several large companies.
In 1983, Kaleel wrote “Managing Sexual Attraction in the
Workplace,” which was published in the August issue of
Personnel Administrator. She was one of the first management
consultants to address sexual attraction as a workplace issue.
Kaleel was also a pioneer in applying organization develop-
ment technology to Affirmative Action and diversity issues.
She expanded the scope of this work beyond the classroom
and training site and positioned it as a system-wide issue rooted
not just in individual skills and attitudes, but in organizational
policies, practices, and managerial methods.
Kaleel spent the last fifteen years of her working life as “one
of the first” and “one of the few” in many areas. In addition to
being a pioneer on issues of gender, race, affirmative action,
and diversity, she was also one of the first and few women to
work as a management consultant. Shortly before dying of
cancer in 1985, Kaleel published a book that summarized
many of her views on human relations and personal develop-
ment, The Nibble Theory and the Kernel of Power (Paulist
Press), which has sold more than 160,000 copies.
For more info, see: www.kjcg.com
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D I V E R S I T Y P I O N E E R
A Tribute to Merlin G. Pope Jr.
A Posthumous Dedication
Merlin G. Pope Jr., one of the first pioneers of the diversity
movement, attended Kent State University (KSU) for three
years before being drafted into the U.S. Army. His two years of
honorable military service included a combat tour in Vietnam.
Upon returning to the United States, Pope completed his
undergraduate degree and a year of graduate studies at the
University of Akron. In 1970, he was accepted into the doctoral
program at Yale University, where he earned two master’s
degrees and his Ph.D. A.B.D. in comparative sociology and
social psychology.
Merlin’s career as a diversity consultant began in 1973
when Procter & Gamble Co. in Cincinnati hired him to pro-
vide racial awareness training. Merlin used the term, “diversity,”
to refer to the changing demographics of the U.S. work force.
He was very clear, however, that the term included white
males. By making every organization more receptive to differ-
ences, Merlin believed that the culture of the organization
became healthier for everyone.
He was one of the first consultants to link increasing
personnel diversity to organizational productivity. As a result,
numerous corporations began to appreciate that diversity and
inclusion could strengthen an organization.
On February 10, 1998, at 55, Merlin lost his yearlong
battle with cancer. Despite his untimely death, he left behind
an incredible legacy—an organization that had worked with
more than 250 of the Fortune 500 and had trained more than
500,000 participants at all organizational levels.
Merlin devoted his great talents as a social scientist to a
highly successful career in applied social science, helping
organizations turn ethnic and gender diversity from an obstacle
into an asset, thus helping women and minorities to realize
their potential and advance their careers. Merlin was also a very
generous and warm-hearted person who shared his success
with friends and the wider community. He was beloved by all
whom he touched. He left the world a better place.
His important contributions were honored by two of his
former classmates at Yale University, Dr. Evelyne Huber and
Dr. John Stephens, who dedicated their book, Development and
Crisis of the Welfare State, published in 2000, to his memory.
His accomplishments have been recognized by the Merlin
G. Pope Jr. Founders Medallion Scholarship at KSU, an annual
scholarship for minority students majoring in sociology; the
Merlin G. Pope Jr. Outstanding U.S. Army Reserve Equal
Opportunity Noncommissioned Officer of the Year Award;
and the annual Merlin G. Pope Jr. Outstanding Diversity
Leadership Award of the Cincinnati Human Relations
Commission, first awarded in 2003 to John Pepper, former
CEO of Procter & Gamble.
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 79
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We each
have a
unique story
to tell
Our dierent backgrounds, experiences, thoughts and perspectives
have helped shape us into who we are today.
As we help you protect the things that matter most to you,
we know one approach won’t work for everyone.
Truly listening to our customers is at the heart of our On Your Side® promise.
And at Nationwide, we care about helping you meet your unique needs.
backgrounds
experiences
thoughts
perspectives
Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company.
1-877-On Your Side is a service mark of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2007 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, All Rights Reserved.
82 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
1st Place
WHILE MANY FIRMS HAVE EMPLOYEE RECOGNITION PROGRAMS IN PLACE, Sodexho’s Champions of
Diversity Program is the gold standard against which all others are judged. At Sodexho, leveraging
diversity and inclusion is an ongoing process where employees work together to improve the quality
of the services offered to clients. In many cases, the result might be a quality-enhancing or cost-
saving solution.
Under the guidance of the company’s chief diversity officer and with strong support from the exec-
utive team, Sodexho’s employees have created a large menu of programs and best practices designed to
meet the needs of its employees and its customers. Individuals or teams may be recognized for a wide
variety of actions that support the creation of a diverse and inclusive culture.
Nominations are made online and need be submitted only once. They are considered active for
four consecutive quarters. Nominees are interviewed by the market senior director of diversity with
input from diversity council members.
Staff members and clients join the celebration at which the winner receives an award certificate
from Global Diversity Officer Rohini Anand and a commendation letter. They also enjoy a team-
building event at their unit and are recognized in company media.
What makes this program so strong is the ease with which it is executed. The award process is
rigorous and thorough, yet exceptionally streamlined. Sodexho’s busy managers can submit nominations
for deserving employees at all levels. The program epitomizes the way even the largest of organizations
can gain momentum at the grassroots level.
Sodexho’s Champions of Diversity Program
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 83
Progression and
Retention of Women in
Royal Dutch Shell
2nd Place
THE ATTRACTION, RETENTION AND
PROGRESSION OF WOMEN is one of
several areas being targeted by Shell to
improve the representation and inclusiveness of specific under-
represented groups. With more diversity, including better gen-
der balance, at all levels of the organization, Shell believes it will
be able to attract the best talent, be more responsive to cus-
tomers, reduce turnover, and be more productive and creative.
Shell has seen steady progress toward the goal of achieving at
least 20% women in senior leadership, but more slowly than
originally anticipated. At the end of 2004, women’s representa-
tion at senior levels was 9.6 percent. Given a desire to acceler-
ate progress, during 2005 a study was initiated by the
Netherlands Women’s Network to identify barriers and enablers
for women’s retention and career progression. Similar studies
had been conducted in other parts of Shell and externally, but
this was the first such study supported by senior leadership
across multiple businesses and countries.
Based on the barriers identified, recommendations were
developed to accelerate recruitment of women and filling the
talent pipeline through:
• Increasing the visibility of existing female role models
• Improving the effectiveness of partnerships between men and
women through better understanding of different leadership
styles and work/career patterns
• Enabling women and men to use a variety of flexible work
options to support family/personal needs
• Monitoring potential pay equity issues
• Enabling the formation of women’s networks throughout
the world.
In all, the CEO and Executive Committee endorsed 21 rec-
ommendations, with initial implementation in 2006.
Accountabilities have been established and quarterly monitor-
ing of progress takes place through a coordinated effort within
Shell’s Global D&I Network, with overview by the HR
Executive Committee.
Implementation is proceeding well and year-end 2006 rep-
resentation has improved. As reported in Shell’s Annual Report,
the proportion of women in senior leadership positions has
increased to 11.6 percent. In terms of the talent pipeline, female
representation among all managerial positions worldwide has
increased to 16.2 percent, and in supervisory/professional posi-
tions has increased to 23.2 percent.
Kudos to Royal Dutch Shell for tackling the progression of
women issue head on and for producing such positive results in
a short period of time. Company executives and women in
business must be gratified by the effort, commitment and
results produced by this global company.
InterContinental Hotels Group’s
Disability Mentoring Day
3rd Place
IN OCTOBER 2006, IHG’S (INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS
GROUP) AMERICAS REGION COMMEMORATED DISABILITY
MONTH, with the start of a new program called Mentoring
Students with Disabilities Day. IHG hosted 25 Atlanta-area
high school students with various disabilities for a day at four of
its hotels.
The program was designed to provide students an up-close
look at the different careers and opportunities available to them
in the hospitality industry when they are ready to enter the
workforce.
Many of the students’ only knowledge of hotels and the
hospitality industry was from staying a night or two in a hotel.
However, the mentoring day changed all of that. Each student
had their own mentor who provided them with a behind-the-
scenes look at hotel operations. The students shadowed mentors
from various departments, including guest relations, concierge
services, human resources and restaurant management.
Having received positive feedback in its first year from the
students, teachers and parents, the company plans to expand the
program to include more people with disabilities.
We applaud InterContinental Hotel Group’s sensitivity to
students and workers with special needs. Too often neglected by
society, disabled persons bring a wealth of talent and experience
to the workplace that few others can understand. Reaching out
to these students, and encouraging them to pursue business
careers, is the kind of corporate gesture of which everyone can
be proud.
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
84 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
KPMG’s Future Diversity Leaders
Program
4th Place
KPMG LLP CONTINUES ITS COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY AND
EXPANDING the opportunities available to minority students
with the launch of the Future Diversity Leaders Program
(FDL).
Following in the tradition of KPMG’s successful Ph.D.
Project—created more than a decade ago to increase the num-
ber of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native
Americans on business school faculties—and expanding on the
firm’s Fast Forward National Leadership program, FDL is
designed to support high-performing college freshman who
demonstrate a commitment to diversity and may be interested
in pursuing a career at KPMG.
Fifty students will be selected each year to participate in a
three-year program that includes an annual leadership confer-
ence, internship opportunities for as many as three years, and
scholarships totaling as much as $6,000.
This year, the inaugural FDL event begins with a three-day
conference in Hollywood, Calif., that will focus on preparing
participants with the skills and perspectives they’ll need to
become business leaders. After the conference, each student will
receive a $1,000 scholarship and be provided with the opportu-
nity to interview for a summer 2008 internship. This first
internship will give participating students a head start by pro-
viding them with rotational opportunities through a job shad-
ow program, as well as a mentoring relationship with a KPMG
professional.
In addition, the students will be mentored by one of several
Future Diversity Leaders’ faculty advisors who have been selected
to serve based on their involvement with and commitment to
diversity in higher education. These professors also are charged
with identifying and nominating students for the program; stu-
dents must have a cumulative 3.5 or higher grade point average
and be interested in pursuing a career in business to be consid-
ered for entry to the program.
More than 30 universities will be represented and partici-
pating in the Future Diversity Leaders program in 2007, and
KPMG’s goal is to have more than 150 students in the program
at different levels by 2009.
Lockheed Martin’s Diversity
Maturity Model
5th Place
LOCKHEED MARTIN’S DIVERSITY MISSION IS TO CREATE A ‘ONE
COMPANY, ONE TEAM’ ALL-INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENT where
diversity contributes to the Lockheed Martin vision; this goal is
being accomplished through the Diversity Maturity Model

.
Lockheed Martin is facing a shift in demographics resulting
from vast numbers of the workforce approaching retirement. In
order to create the change needed to make D&I a competitive
advantage, the corporation developed the Diversity Maturity
Model

(DMM).
The DMM measures and tracks four characteristics
(Leadership Commitment, Organizational Climate and
Culture, Workforce Strategy and Development and Customer
Experience Management), with five levels of maturity for each
characteristic.
All levels have behavioral descriptions explaining what
conditions will exist in an organization to achieve certain levels.
The corporation is evaluated on a yearly basis to determine
DMM levels, with a portion of executive incentive pay tied to a
specific goal.
DMM levels have been assessed for 2005 and 2006 and
have shown improvement. In 2006, the overall corporate matu-
rity assessment indicated Lockheed Martin “embraces” diversi-
ty. This achievement indicates strong support from our
Chairman, President and CEO Bob Stevens and the entire
Lockheed Martin Community.
The most significant indicator of success is derived from
the surveys that show continued improvement and benefit
from Lockheed Martin’s diversity and inclusion activities—
spanning from recruitment and new hire orientation to engag-
ing long-term employees. More information can be found at
www.lockheedmartin.com.
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007 85
Kaiser Permanente’s Diversity, Data
& Demo-graphics Program (DDDP)
6th Place
THIS INNOVATION CAUGHT OUR ATTENTION, BECAUSE IT SEEKS
TO IMPROVE BOTH THE PATIENTS’ AND THE DOCTORS’ EXPERI-
ENCES with Kaiser Permanente. This focus on outcomes, not
just numbers, is refreshing.
The nation’s largest nonprofit health maintenance organ-
ization serves nearly 9 million members in nine states and the
District of Columbia. How does such a large organization
wrestle with the need to assess and improve patient and physician
satisfaction?
The DDDP is an innovative, replicable, and culturally sen-
sitive patient and physician satisfaction evaluation method that
was introduced in 2005. It provides physicians with culturally
specific survey data in order to improve the care experience and
quality of outcomes of Kaiser Permanente’s memberships.
“This program was borne out of ‘seeking to improve one’s
own performance’, which produced significant results,” reports
Calvin B. Wheeler, M.D., Kaiser Permanente’s physician-in-
chief and CEO. “These early results have led to a gift that just
keeps on giving. The enlightenment that comes to the providers
who have participated in this program has been career-changing
and, at times, life changing. This program has become the
prompt for much innovative thinking and analysis in the arenas
of patient-member satisfaction, physician-practice satisfaction
and practice sustainability.”
The DDDP originated from an OB/GYN physician whose
data showed increased patient satisfaction with older female
patients than with younger women, ages 18-35. Women in this
age group often don’t want to see a male physician, leading to
physician bias. After identifying the bias, he adjusted his behav-
ior and increased his knowledge and care skills of this group and
in one quarter increased his subset service score. His personal
experience was the genesis for this innovation.
Departmental Chiefs now have tools to effectively coach
and provide feedback to their physicians on the various aspects
of diversity: gender, ethnicity, age and levels of familiarity. The
educational program is seen as an innovative practice to be used
throughout Kaiser Permanente.
Best Buy’s Memphis Cultural
Immersion
7th Place
THE CULTURAL IMMERSION IS A 90-DAY LEADERSHIP DEVELOP-
MENT PROGRAM THAT BEGINS IN MEMPHIS, TENN. The program
meets the needs of different learners by providing a variety of
experiences: video, small and large group discussion, self-reflec-
tion, self-guided learning, team collaboration and problem solv-
ing.
Particularly interesting to us is the way this program’s effects
cascade throughout the organization. The program exemplifies
a method of driving change all through the company.
Unlike other programs that select only top performers, Best
Buy’s program takes only intact teams. Together, they coach
each other and influence lasting cultural change.
Participants spend three days in Memphis, and then execute
their 90-day action plans. After the 90 days, the Diversity and
Strengths Team visits stores over the next six months to assess how
well the change has become a natural part of business rhythms.
Particularly appealing is the program’s cost effectiveness.
The average cost per participant is just over $900, including
travel, lodging, catering, printing and expenses.
The transformational stories provided by participants and
their direct reports, customers and families have helped change
the way diversity is discussed at Best Buy.
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
86 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
Dell’s Online Library
For African-American
Political History
8th Place
In September 2006, Dell launched the first virtual and most
comprehensive library on the political history and legislative
legacy of African Americans in shaping the nation’s democracy.
What a great idea! It was unveiled during the Annual Legislative
Conference of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation
(CBCF).
Called Avoice, or African American Voices in Congress,
www.avoiceonline.org, the library is the product of a collabora-
tive partnership among CBCF, The University of Texas at
Austin, Howard University and Dell. The online educational
portal provides a central source of information about historical
and contemporary African American policy issues important to
many Americans, and of particular interest to researchers, edu-
cators and students.
“Avoice represents the official history of the Congressional
Black Caucus and much more,” said U.S. Rep. Kendrick B.
Meek, D-Fla., chair of the CBCF. “We believe that Avoice will
promote civic engagement among youth through its rich
content and interactive learning tools. In doing so, the Avoice
site will benefit all Americans.”
“Dell’s sponsorship of this milestone project reflects our com-
mitment to diversity and is a unique opportunity to help
educate the public about the contributions of African
Americans to our nation’s history,” said Dell CEO Kevin
Rollins, who introduced the new site during the event. “We are
privileged to be a part of Avoice and will continue to support it
with technology that can enrich the site content.”
Today, African Americans represent 13.4 percent of the U.S.
population; 60 percent of black citizens age 18 and older voted
in the 2004 presidential election, up 3 percent from the previ-
ous election. African Americans had the highest turnout rate of
any minority group in 2004.
MGM MIRAGE’s Aligning
Diversity to Drive
Performance
9th Place
The purpose of this initiative is to maximize strategic partner-
ships with diverse groups and organizations to drive business to
MGM MIRAGE properties. In an effort to align diversity to
drive business performance, MGM MIRAGE created a dedicat-
ed sales position to develop relationships with meeting and con-
vention planners for multicultural and emerging markets. In
2006, Dzidra Junior was appointed national diversity sales man-
ager. Additionally, marketing and advertising programs specifi-
cally targeting diverse consumers were created and the company
increased participation in relevant multicultural trade shows.
In 2006, the corporate diversity department developed a
pilot program for the National Urban League Conference.
MGM MIRAGE sponsored the Women of Power Luncheon at
the organization’s national conference. A marketing incentive
was created offering a special rate during a two-night stay at one
of the company’s properties. The production cost for the collat-
eral material was approximately $2,000. A tracking code was
associated with the incentive to track the redemption of the
incentive, and after the three-month pilot period, the estimated
revenue for the property was $45,740. The program was clearly
a success and totally consistent with the company’s business
objectives.
The program was so successful, MGM MIRAGE
Corporate Diversity plans to expand the pilot program and
work with all its properties to support their business objectives.
Members of the corporate diversity department are already
meeting with property diversity councils to discuss how this can
be implemented.
Credit Suisse’s Keys to
Leadership—Unlocking
Potential Program
10th Place
The Keys to Leadership program was initiated to attract, retain
and develop a more diverse pipeline of future leaders at Credit
Suisse. The bank is active in over 50 countries and employs
about 42,000 people from over 100 nationalities.
In its first year, the program specifically targeted mid-level
females and minority managers. One innovative aspect of the
program is that participants conduct an executive interview
with a senior manager in order to study leadership perspectives
and discover shared values within the organization. One key
result is that the program has created a strong network and sup-
port group for the participants that has lasted well beyond the
duration of the formal program.
To date, 107 people have successfully completed the pro-
gram, and the results appear to be quite impressive. In 2005, 20
percent of the female participants were promoted. The follow-
ing year that number increased to 35 percent.
The program has also improved retention. Over the two-
year period the program has been in existence, 94 percent of
participants are still with the bank, compared to 86 percent of
the comparative population. What’s more, there has been a
marked improvement in the performance of the participants,
new relationships have been forged and networks formed which
continue to enhance teamwork.
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
88 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to honor the following
companies with our Award of Excellence for their innovations
in diversity. They are presented here in alphabetical order.
Identifying
Performance Variation
and Addressing
it Through
Collaboration
Blue Cross
of California
BLUE CROSS OF CALIFORNIA IS A SUBSIDIARY OF WELLPOINT,
INC. (NYSE:WLP) that provides health care services to 7.5
million members and employs 7,000 associates. A review of its
California Quality Scorecard and supplemental analyses showed
that the Inland Empire lagged behind other California regions
in most clinical quality and patient satisfaction measures. The
reasons for this performance gap were not clear, but Blue Cross
senior leadership charged the Quality Improvement
Department with looking for ways to improve performance in
the area.
Blue Cross held a two-day meeting with the Inland
Empire’s medical leadership and, with the help of a consultant,
facilitated discussions on barrier analysis and solutions develop-
ment. Representatives from provider organizations, employer
groups, local medical societies, government agencies, and mul-
tiple Blue Cross departments also attended.
Since then, a multi-stakeholder Inland Quality
Collaborative was launched to provide monthly training, share
best practices, and check in on quality improvement. The com-
pany also initiated a five month course that introduced provider
group leadership teams to the key changes necessary to improve
clinical performance and patient satisfaction, and manage IT
implementation across practice sites. Lastly, Blue Cross visited
individual provider groups to provide mentoring as needed and
will begin to share group specific healthcare disparity data. Over
85 percent of Inland Empire groups were engaged in at least one
of these initiatives and gave positive feedback such as “Thank
you, Blue Cross!”
Based on the success realized to date, Blue Cross is working
with other health plans in regions with relatively low perform-
ance on quality indicators and expect the next roll out in third
quarter 2007.
Cardinal Health’s Best
Practices Webinar
Series
THIS INNOVATIVE WEBINAR SERIES was
introduced in January 2006 as a forum
for Cardinal Health’s diversity councils.
The Webinars allow council members
from all over the country to share
and leverage best practices in diversity and inclusion, enterprise-
wide.
Not long after the company encouraged employees to par-
ticipate in diversity councils, Director of Diversity Jeanetta
Darno recognized that diversity councils were gaining momen-
tum throughout the organization. However, because Cardinal
Health is a global healthcare company with 40,000 employees
at dozens of locations throughout the United States and abroad,
the diversity councils faced a challenge when it came to sharing
those successes and best practices with each other.
That was the genesis of Cardinal Health’s launching the
Diversity and Inclusion Best Practices Webinar Series.
Corporate leaders and employees from across the country par-
ticipate in monthly Webinars from the comfort of their own
offices, and the team invites external speakers to attend virtually,
as well.
“Our Webinars provide a regularly-scheduled, replicable
forum for our diversity councils to share the exciting progress
they’re making,” said Darno. “They also fuel excitement and
continued momentum for diversity efforts across the organiza-
tion, because employees and corporate leaders really enjoy and
become motivated by learning about progress and best practices
from other areas of the company.”
Award of Excel l ence
Ne v a da : Be l l a gi o • MGM Gr a nd • Ma nda l a y Ba y • T he Mi r a ge • Tr e a s ur e I s l a nd • Mo nt e Ca r l o • Ne w Yo r k - Ne w Yo r k • L ux o r • Ex c a l i bur • Ci r c us Ci r c us
Ra i l r o a d Pa s s • Pr i mm Va l l e y Re s o r t s • Si l v e r L e ga cy • Ci r c us Ci r c us Re no • Co l o r a do Be l l e • Edge wa t e r • Go l d St r i ke • Ne v a da L a ndi ng
Out s i de Ne v a da : Be a u Ri v a ge • Go l d St r i ke - Tuni c a • Gr a nd Vi c t o r i a • MGM Gr a nd De t r o i t
mgmmi ragedi versi t y. com
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
Dow Chemical
Company’s Diversity
& Inclusion Forums
“LEADERS CAN MAKE OR BREAK A COM-
PANY, and therefore it’s in everyone’s
best interest that we appropriately
develop this group.” –Andrew Liveris,
president, CEO and chairman.
Dow’s Diversity and Inclusion Team developed Diversity &
Inclusion Forums to align and engage all leaders with the D&I
strategy as a first, major step toward cultural change.
The D&I Forum is a two-hour interactive communications
workshop for all of Dow’s people leaders. These face-to-face ses-
sions are held in major locations around the world. Groups are
limited to 30 leaders to create an intimate learning environment
and foster discussion and debate. To leverage the power of leaders
teaching leaders as a mechanism of culture change, and under-
score D&I as integral to the company’s business strategy, every
session is hosted by a senior leader.
Dow’s Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) established a
set of breakthrough D&I goals in early 2006, grounded in accel-
erating the implementation of the company’s global growth
strategy. The results from the D&I forums are impressive:
• 98 percent of participants understand why Diversity &
Inclusion is a key element of Dow’s ability to implement its
strategy.
• 90 percent have a better understanding of what it means to be
an inclusive leader.
• 99 percent understand accountability as a leader for creating
a diverse and inclusive culture at Dow.
• 98 percent plan to take action to create a more diverse &
inclusive culture.
Freescale
Semiconductor’s
Europe, Middle East,
Africa (EMEA)
Leadership Summit
IN AN EFFORT TO INCREASE THE NUMBER
OF WOMEN IN MANAGEMENT POSITIONS,
Freescale Semiconductor’s EMEA leadership team sponsored a
regional conference to bring awareness to the need, and to provide
opportunities for networking and personal development among
the participants.
The 3-day conference had a mixed gender audience of about
50 individuals representing 12 countries, all business groups
and multiple levels of the firm’s hierarchy. Key speakers covered
topics as varied as the dimensions of diversity, gender stereotyp-
ing and executive-level communication skills. Executive panel
debates and animated breakout sessions tackled the key business
issues potentially contributing to the under-representation of
women in management.
Since the summit, work has been done to create an inte-
grated action plan for the region, with full engagement from
country directors and regional business leaders. Country specific
plans are now in place, and other work underway includes the
creation of an inclusion-focused development curriculum,
targeted project initiatives and an internal and external focus to
attract, retain, and progress key talent. In addition, the event is
now seen as a model of success for similar events globally.
Where previously there was purely a recognition of the need
for inclusive practices, the Inclusive Leadership event has pro-
vided the launch pad for a comprehensive, pragmatic plan that is
sure to drive the success of Freescale, now and in the future.
Kelly Services’ Supplier
Diversity Summits
KELLY SERVICES, A LEADING HUMAN
RESOURCE SOLUTIONS PROVIDER, SUP-
PORTS ITS COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY
THROUGH THE SUPPLIER DIVERSITY
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. This initia-
tive operates with an annual goal of five
percent and is supported by a team of diversity professionals, led
by Vice President of Supplier Diversity Nicole Lewis.
As part of its continuous improvement efforts, Kelly conducts
supplier surveys to see if the program is meeting expectations.
Based on supplier feedback, Kelly launched the Supplier
Diversity Summit series in June 2005.
The Supplier Diversity Summits are specifically designed to
strengthen diverse suppliers so they can more effectively compete in
a global marketplace, whether they do business with Kelly or not.
These regional, quarterly Summits provide a networking
forum for staffing companies to share best practices within the
supply chain. The forums are designed to inform, engage and
generate business opportunities among Minority, Women and
Disabled Veteran Business Enterprises (MWDBE).
The Supplier Diversity Summit program has given participat-
ing suppliers the opportunity to develop strategic relationships
and showcase their unique services and products. Supplier feed-
back consistently ranks the Summits at an average of 4.75 out
of 5, both in the value and quality of the information received.
Most importantly, these Summits have increased MWDBE
opportunities in the higher margin professional and technical
90 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
staffing space. About one-quarter of Kelly’s diverse supplier
spend falls into its commercial division, which typically has
thinner margins; while three-quarters falls into our professional
and technical division, with higher margins.
Kelly plans to update the Summit curriculum to stay current
with changing market demands. The company has launched a
quarterly newsletter for its supplier community and will contin-
ue to identify new markets in which to host future Summits and
gain access to new suppliers.
New Jersey
Department of
Environmental
Protection Diversity
Action Plan (DAP)
ON AMERICA’S FIRST OFFICIAL “EARTH
DAY”—APRIL 22, 1970—THE NEW
JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRON-
MENTAL PROTECTION (NJDEP) WAS BORN. Since that day,
NJDEP has managed natural resources and solved pollution
problems. NJDEP has a staff of approximately 3,500 and is a
leader in the country for its pollution prevention efforts and
innovative environmental management strategies.
The DAP was formally introduced in the spring of 2006. It
evolved out of concerns form minority employees about fairness
in the workplace on issues related to promotional opportunities
and other human resource concerns. The DAP is a compilation
all of the issues, concerns and recommendations from employees
who provided comments. All employees were provided oppor-
tunity to make comments to the plan.
The DAP has the support of the entire management chain
right up to the Governor of New Jersey, who has been a key
advocate for a diverse workforce. In fact, the New Jersey
Department of Personnel (NJDOP) is looking to the
Department of Environmental Protection as a model for state
government on this issue.
The DAP has resulted in changes in the hiring process. The
organization aggressively sought out minority applicants for
new openings. As a result, it produced a 10 percent increase in
minority employees. The success rivaled that of New Jersey’s
major corporations with advanced diversity programs.
The DAP also establishes a performance measurement and
accountability process, which provides a system for measuring
and monitoring the department’s progress related to the DAP.
The plan also establishes a system to integrate diversity
performance standards for supervisors and managers through-
out the Department.
New York Life’s
Networking for
Innovation Employee
Network Groups
THROUGH THE FORMATION OF FOUR
NEW EMPLOYEE NETWORKING
GROUPS (ENGS), New York Life is
taking further steps to foster employ-
ee diversity to best develop its next generation of leaders. The
ENGs are: the African American Employee Network Group;
Hispanic Employee Network Group; Asian Employee Network
Group; and Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Employee
Network Group (GLBT).
The ENGs are an important part of the overall mission of
the Office of the Chief Diversity Officer, which is to guide the
continued progress of the company in the areas of recruitment;
training of a diverse workforce; development and promotion of
minority and women employees; and the maintenance of an
environment of inclusion.
Each of the four ENGs has a sponsor from the Executive
Diversity Council (EDC). The EDC is made up of executive
management members and the chief diversity officer. The com-
pany gives each group financial resources to sponsor events.
The ultimate goal of the Diversity Office is to continue to
foster a “level playing field” based on merit regardless of race,
gender, age, sexual orientation, or any other protected status. By
fostering this type of environment, New York Life achieves pos-
itive results, both within and beyond the confines of diversity.
The ENGs are a positive forum for career development,
recruitment, information sharing, education and the exchange
of ideas. This year, each ENG has already held a networking
event and has planned future events.
“We will continue to attract and retain the best and bright-
est employees as long as we have an inclusive culture, one that
celebrates diversity,” says Chief Diversity Officer Katherine
O’Brien, who oversees the program. Developing and promoting
minorities and women is good for business and recruiting, she
adds. “It sends a message that New York Life is inclusive and
understands that the world in which we operate is made up of a
wide variety of people.”
92 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
PROFI LES I N DI VERSI TY JOURNAL 2007 I NTERNATI ONAL I NNOVATI ON I N DI VERSI TY AWARDS
Wal-Mart’s Career
Preference System
Wal-Mart has developed a Career
Preference Program where associates
can learn detailed information about
different positions within the company,
including career paths and compensa-
tion details. Career Preference allows
Wal-Mart’s current associates to develop a strategic career path
and move forward with those career opportunities and on-
the-job experiences.
The program is offered in not only in the retail facilities,
but in the distribution sector and in the Corporate Home
Office. As the career opportunities continue to grow, the
systems and processes that facilitate these openings are expected
to grow to meet the demand.
Career Preference empowers Wal-Mart associates to plan and
take ownership over their career, with functionality that includes
being able to research positions, indicate positions of interest, and
indicate the desire for career guidance and planning.
The program is innovative because of the sheer scale and scope
of operations at this retail giant. During 2006, more than
770,000 positions were filled with either internal or external
applicants for the position. To focus on one position, more
than 140,000 cashiers were selected into the position via
Career Preference.
The program offers tangible proof that at Wal-Mart, associates
are not numbers, but individuals with career goals and
aspirations the company wants to meet.
PDJ PDJ
SHRM Workplace Diversity Conference & Exposition
October 18–20, 2007
Philadelphia, PA
Learn how to leverage workplace diversity in your organization
and network with colleagues who share your interest in diversity
management. Keynote speakers will motivate and inspire you,
and educational sessions will discuss current issues,
best practices and contemporary research.

For full program details and to register visit
www.shrm.org/conferences/diversity
Leading, Changing, Transforming
www.shrm.org/conferences/diversity
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5
Real-Life MicroTriggers
M
icroTriggers are those subtle—and
not so subtle—behaviors, phrases
and inequities that trigger an instanta-
neous negative response.
This issue, we offer more examples
submitted by real people whose identities
and places of business are being protected
for obvious reasons.
I AM THE ONLY FEMALE
MANAGER IN MY DEPARTMENT.
We sometimes have afternoon meetings
that run into the evening. This can be a
problem for several members of my team
with young children who need to be
picked up from daycare or driven to
afterschool activities.
At a recent team meeting, one of my
male colleagues said to me, ‘It’s almost
5 p.m. and we have more agenda items
to cover, but let’s stop now because Mary,
I know you need to pick up the baby.’
I was furious. Although I was not the
only person in the meeting who needed
to leave to pick up their child, I believe
that I was singled out because I am the
only female.”
—Mary, Engineering Firm,
Reston, Virginia
I AM A LICENSED AIRCRAFT
MECHANIC. I have had several people
look at me (I’m a petite female) and ask,
‘Are you sure you’re not a stewardess?’
Even after I say no, they will say things
like, ‘Are you sure you’re a mechanic?’
‘You don’t look like a mechanic.’
Or, “You’re not big enough to be a
mechanic.”
And I think that is the comment
disturbs me the most. That you don’t
look like, or act like a mechanic.
Although it doesn’t make me angry, it
makes me very aware that people have
expectations when they meet me. And it
is very difficult to overcome it.”
—Anonymous
I TRAVEL EXTENSIVELY AND
HAVE LIVED IN SEVERAL
COUNTRIES. My MicroTrigger is
when people assume that I speak English.
I lived in Japan for four years. Japanese
children would often come up to me and
assume that I spoke English because I am
a Caucasian male. I could have been from
France or Germany, too. Of course, it
wasn’t that big of a deal, but I still recall
that it triggered me.”
—Anonymous
WHEN MY CO-WORKER ASKS
PEOPLE WHAT THEY THINK, he
puts his hand on his chin, looks them in
the eye and nods his head up and down.
But whenever I say something, he just
smiles. And he never asks me any further
questions. The impact on me is that I am
amusing, but in a professional environ-
ment where opinions are being shared,
I don’t want to be amusing. I want to be
taken seriously.”
—Michelle
Janet Crenshaw Smith is President of Ivy
Planning Group LLC, a consulting and
training firm that specializes in diversity,
strategy and leadership. Her book is titled
MicroTriggers: 58 Little Things That Have
a Big Impact.




“The impact on me
is that I am amusing,
but in a professional
environment where
opinions are being
shared, I don’t want
to be amusing. I
want to be taken
seriously.”
94 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
healthy business
a rare combination
As a recipient of a recent award
from the INROADS program,
UnitedHealth Group is becoming
better known for its efforts in
supporting educational oppor-
tunities for African-American,
Hispanic and Native American
college students. This year, the
UHG Foundation will be offering
over $700,000 in scholarships
to diverse minority and rural
students.
At UnitedHealth Group, we are a healthy business in more ways than
one. We are a Fortune 100 company identified as one of the two most
admired companies in the health care industry by rankings published
in Fortune magazine. Each day we also have the privilege to make a
significant difference in someone’s life. Sound like a rare combination? It is.
• Nursing
• Marketing
• Operations
• Sales
We are UnitedHealth Group…
Whether it’s a nurse answering questions on the phone, a technologist managing a health
information database or any of us holding thousands of positions at UnitedHealth Group, each
person’s role is important. Every single one of us is valued. Become one of us! Join one of our
winning teams and you’ll be inspired to discover your own mix of professional advantages and
personal rewards.
At UnitedHealth Group, we believe diverse viewpoints, cultural backgrounds, beliefs, lifestyles,
and a number of various dimensions of difference are assets – assets that help us generate the
innovations of tomorrow. You can join our dynamic culture of excellence at any of our 200 loca-
tions across the U.S. Here are just few areas with available positions:
• Finance
• IT
• Actuarial
• Medical Directors
To find out more about these and other opportunities with UnitedHealth Group nationwide and
to apply online, visit our CAREERS page at www.unitedhealthgroup.com. Feel free to perform
a search using location and/or keywords. Or, you may send your cover letter and resume to
DiversityOffice@uhc.com. UnitedHealth Group offers a full range of comprehensive benefits,
including medical, dental and vision, as well as a matching 401(k) and an employee stock
purchase plan.
At UnitedHealth Group, we want to celebrate you as a unique individual, complimenting the richness of
our diverse culture and talent. UnitedHealth Group is an equal opportunity employer.
Diversity creates a healthier atmosphere:
An equal opportunity employer. M/F/D/V.
Bausch & Lomb 87
www.bausch.com
Bank of the West 7
www.bankofthewest.com
The Boeing Company 28
www.boeing.com
Chevron 19
www.chevron.com
Cisco 5
www.cisco.com
Dell, Inc. 15
www.dell.com
Diversified Search 77
www.diversifiedsearch.com
Eastman Kodak Company 37
www.kodak.com
Ford Motor Company cover 2, pg 1
www.ford.com
Hallmark 49
www.hallmark.com
Ivy Planning 91
www.ivygroupllc.com
Lockheed Martin 9
www.lockheedmartin.com
MFHA 55
www.mfha.net
MGM MIRAGE 89
www.mgmmirage.com
National City Bank 67
www.nationalcity.com
Nationwide Insurance 80
www.nationwide.com
PepsiCo, Inc. 43
www.pepsico.com
Pfizer Inc 3
www.pfizer.com
Pratt & Whitney 61
www.pw.utc.com
SHRM 17, 93
www.shrm.com
Sodexho cover 3
www.sodexhousa.com
Shell 59
www.shell.com
UnitedHealth Group 95
www.unitedhealthgroup.com
WellPoint cover 4
www.wellpoint.com
96 PROFILES IN DIVERSITY JOURNAL JULY/ AUGUST 2007
Now, more stop means more go.
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Also Featuring ... Front-Runners in Diversity Leadership Series: Cardinal Health’s Jeanetta Darno • David Casey • Catalyst
Volume 9, Number 4 JULY / AUGUST 2007
$
12.95 U.S.
WellPoint proudly recognizes diversity and celebrates
the unique experiences of our associates that
positively impact our environment.
At WellPoint, you can be addressing tomorrow’s health care issues today.
Significant issues, like improving the lives of the people we serve. In
Juan’s case, it was simply the task of finding the right plan for him and his
family. But what an impact it made. And what an impact you can make by
joining WellPoint today.
Better health care, thanks to you.
Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers
EOE ®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. © 2007 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Thanks to you,
Juan’s family has access to affordable health care. And
that’s one huge weight off his shoulders.

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