Shining the Light on Women Worth Watching

James R. Rector
PUBLISHER

John S. Murphy

MANAGING EDITOR

Linda Schellentrager

W

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

elcome to our special Women Worth Watching issue. It’s always a treat to

Damian Johnson Laurel L. Fumic

MARKETING DIRECTOR

shine the light on so many talented women and to have them generously share their thoughts with the up-and-coming leaders of tomorrow. Their mentoring essays contain a rich blend of experience, passion and determination that is sure to inspire those just beginning their journey to the top. But the women are only part of the story. I think the real spotlight is on

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Cheri Morabito
ART DIRECTOR

Alina Dunaeva Jason Bice

OVERSEAS CORRESPONDENT

WEB MASTER

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

the companies and organizations that have created an atmosphere of success for women on the move. These companies get it. They don’t have to talk about the business case for diversity—they are living it every day. These firms are the ones every other company should emulate. We’d like to give special thanks to PepsiCo’s Chairman and CEO Indra K. Nooyi for her introduction to the feature. She truly is worth listening to! Some of the companies involved have been part of this feature for many years. Others are new to it, perhaps finally getting the traction they need to advance women into the upper ranks of management. What’s on display is their commitment, and we are proud to shine the light on their corporate accomplishments as well as on the women executives who work for them. We hope you’ll enjoy this issue as much as we enjoyed producing it.

Commentaries or questions should be addressed to: Profiles in Diversity Journal, P.O. Box 45605, Cleveland, OH 44145-0605. All correspondence should include author’s full name, address, e-mail and phone number.
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P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S IT Y J O U R N A L SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

People. Innovation. Technology.

DuPont
Today’s world is powered by knowlege and scie n ce .
We put science to work by creating sustainable solutions essential to a better, safer, healthier life for people everywhere. Operating in more than 70 countries, DuPont offers a wide range of innovative products and services for markets including agriculture and nutrition, building and construction, communications, transportation, safety and protection.

Visit us at www.dupont.com/careers

Uma Chowdhry Senior Vice President and Chief Science and Technology Officer

© 2007. DuPont. All rights reserved. The DuPont Oval Logo. DuPont™, and The miracles of science™ are registered trademarks or trademarks of E.I. duPont deNemours and Company or its affiliates.

On the cover

2 Editor’s Notebook
B Y J O H N M U R P H Y, M A N A G I N G E D I T O R

10 Momentum 14 Catalyst

ANNOUNCEMENTS

22

R E TA I N I N G P E O P L E O F C O L O R AT ACCOUNTING FIRMS

16 Perspective
B Y D AV I D L . C A S E Y, W E L L P O I N T, I N C .

18 Women Worth Watching Preface
BY INDRA K. NOOYI, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, PEPSICO

24

30 Women Worth Watching
S P E C I A L F E AT U R E

194 ADvantage

ADVERTISERS INDEX

196 MicroTriggers
REAL-LIFE MICROTRIGGERS

26

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

MTA Metro-North Railroad Congratulates

Sherry Lynn Herrington
Assistant Vice President, Operations Services

On Being Selected One Of Profiles In Diversity Journal's Women Worth Watching

Women Worth Watching
30 31 Stacey B. Adams
ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY

®

57 58 60 62 63

Uma Chowdhry
DUPONT

81 82 84

Eleanor Tabi Haller-Jorden
CATALYST

Marianne Ajemian
NUTTER, MCCLENNEN & FISH LLP / CREW NETWORK

Ellen Costello
HARRIS BANKCORP INC. (BMO)

Kathy Hopinkah Hannan
KPMG LLP

Lin Cummins
ARVINMERITOR, INC.

Doris Heim
LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

32 34 35 36 38 40 41 42 44 45 46 48 50

Elizabeth B. Amato
PRATT & WHITNEY

Jody Davids
CARDINAL HEALTH

Andrea Assarat
GENERAL ELECTRIC

85 86 88 89 90 92 93 94

Sherry Lynn Herrington
MTA METRO NORTH RAILROAD

Kimberly B. Davis
JPMORGAN CHASE FOUNDATION

Marylou Y. Bailey
ACCENTURE

Cheryl A. Howe
HEALTHNOW NEW YORK INC.

Janet P. Baker
AFLAC

64 65 66 68 69 70 71

Lisa DeBois
PITNEY BOWES INC.

Marjorie F. Hsu
VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Carol Barber
BERNARD HODES GROUP

Mary Delaney
CAREERBUILDER.COM

Swanee Hunt
HUNT ALTERNATIVES FUND

Janet Barnard
COX COMMUNICATIONS

Cindy Dellecker
HIGHMARK INC.

Yolanda Cash Jackson
BECKER & POLIAKOFF, P.A.

Candice R. Barnhardt
NATIONWIDE

Paula Dominick
BANK OF AMERICA

Elizabeth “Lee Lee” James
SYNOVUS

Kelly J. Barr
SALT RIVER PROJECT

Teri Ann Drake
HALLMARK CARDS, INC.

Carol J. Johnson
KELLY SERVICES, INC.

Wendy Beckman
STARBUCKS COFFEE COMPANY

Dr. Ann Evangelista
TALENTQUEST

Margaret L. “Peggy” Johnson
QUALCOMM, INC.

Carolyn Biggs
SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

Kathy Fawcett
WALT DISNEY PARKS & RESORTS

96 97 98

Patti A. Johnson
ECOLAB INC.

Amy Blair
LIBERTY GLOBAL, INC.

72

Irene Chang Britt
CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY

Margaret C. “Peggy” Fechtmann
METLIFE, INC.

Deborah P. Kelly
DICKSTEIN SHAPIRO LLP

Jo-Anne Kruse
TRAVELPORT LIMITED

Adriane M. Brown
HONEYWELL (HONEYWELL TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS)

74 75 76 77

Felicia Fields
FORD MOTOR COMPANY

100 Martha D. Leiper
UNUM

Julie A. Fream
VISTEON CORPORATION

51 52 53 54 56

Edith Pettway Brown
NATIONAL CITY CORPORATION

101 Debra M. Lewis
UNITED STATES ARMY

Sharilyn Gasaway
ALLTEL WIRELESS

Karen Dougherty Buchholz
COMCAST CORPORATION

102 Louise Liang, MD
KAISER PERMANENTE

Vicki Gordon
IHG (INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP)

Elizabeth “Beth” Bull
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

103 Cynthia Little
PARKER HANNIFIN

Kerry Anne Carter
STAPLES, INC.

78 80

Belinda Grant-Anderson
AT&T

104 Nancy Little
MCGUIREWOODS LLP

Denise Chaisson
SALLIE MAE

Tracey Gray-Walker
AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

106 Ning-Ning Mahlmann
FBI

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NYLIFE * POSITION REQUEST * Advertisement

Women Worth Watching
107 Dee Mahoney
PFIZER INC

®

136 Susan Penfield
BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON

162 Saumil Shukla
CONSOLIDATED EDISON COMPANY OF NEW YORK

108 Kim Martin
KINDRED HEALTHCARE

138 Beth S. Perlman
CONSTELLATION ENERGY

164 Lisa Shumpert
CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL

110 Gretchen McClain
ITT CORPORATION

140 Sheila Marie Person-Scott
WACHOVIA CORPORATION

166 Eileen Slevin
NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES

112 Antoinette P. McCorvey
EASTMAN KODAK

141 Carol Ann Petren
CIGNA CORPORATION

114 Pritha Mehra
U.S. POSTAL SERVICE

142 Melissa Plaisance
SAFEWAY INC.

168 Amanda Sourry
UNILEVER

115 Stacy P. Methvin
ROYAL DUTCH SHELL

144 Susan Margaret Ponce
HALLIBURTON

170 Nor Rae Spohn
HP

117 Janie Mitcham
RELIANT ENERGY

145 Carol M. Pottenger
UNITED STATES NAVY

172 Kimberly S. Stevenson
EDS

118 Christy Moberly
STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

146 Paula A. Price
CVS CAREMARK CORPORATION

174 Sonya V. Stewart
LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION

147 DeDe Priest
WAL-MART

120 Hala Moddelmog
SUSAN G. KOMEN FOR THE CURE

176 Melanie Stinnett
BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES (ATF), U.S.

148 Helen P. Pudlin
PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC.

122 Beth Mooney
KEYBANK

178 Teresa Taylor
QWEST COMMUNICATIONS

150 Rebecca Ranninger
SYMANTEC CORPORATION

123 Lisa Moriyama
WELLPOINT, INC.

180 Gabrielle Toledano
ELECTRONIC ARTS

151 Teckla Rhoads
GENERAL MOTORS

124 Nora E. Moushey
WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP

182 Suzanne Vautrinot
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

152 Nicole Ringenberg
MONSANTO

126 Shamla Naidoo
WELLPOINT, INC.

184 Joan H. Walker
ALLSTATE INSURANCE COMPANY

153 Lorie-Ann Roxburgh
VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA / CANADA

127 Debra Nelson
MGM MIRAGE

186 Margaret W. Wear
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP

154 Aurora M. Rubin
DELOITTE & TOUCHE USA LLP

128 Tracey Newell
CISCO

156 Deborah Schloss
SODEXHO

188 Charleen Antoinette Wheeless
RAYTHEON COMPANY

130 Linda Norman
HILTON HOTELS CORPORATION

158 Linda V. Schreiner
MEADWESTVACO CORPORATION

190 Valerie Williams
ERNST & YOUNG

132 Kathy Paladino
MOTOROLA

192 Carol J. Zierhoffer
NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

134 Martha Papariello
VANGUARD

160 Kayla Shell
DELL INC.

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Allstate Counsel Installed as President of the National Bar Association
NORTHBROOK, Ill.—Allstate Insurance Company has announced that Vanita Banks, counsel in its corporate litigation Banks group, was inducted as president of the National Bar Association (NBA) during the NBA’s annual convention in Atlanta. As president, Banks will lead an organization that is the oldest and largest national association of predominantly African-American lawyers and judges. Banks will serve in this position for one year while she continues her role in Allstate’s department of law and regulation. Banks is only the second female attorney from corporate America to be elected as NBA president since the organization was founded in 1925. Besides establishing a summer internship program at Allstate, Banks has also played an integral role in expanding the legal pipeline to minority high school students through her work with the Street Law program, an initiative that encourages students to continue their education and consider a career in the legal profession.

In the past 12 years at the company, Mitchell Gordon has worked to create a high-performance and inclusive culture for AOL’s employees. Under her leadership, AOL has embraced a list of best practices to encourage diversity and inclusion in the workplace. As in her previous role, Mitchell Gordon will continue to manage all initiatives designed to foster inclusive attitudes and opportunities among employees. She joined AOL in 1995 as director of human resources.

Original Impressions: From left to right: Jim Hyatt, Executive Vice President and Chief Global Operations Officer, BKC; Jay Rodriguez, Senior Director, Equipment & Facilities Purchasing, RSI; Roland Garcia, CEO and Founder, Original Impressions; George Hoffman, President and CEO, RSI; Mike Mesgleski, Vice President of the BURGER KING® Account, Original Impressions; John Newcomb, Chairman of the RSI Board; Steve Grover, Vice President, Food Safety, Quality Assurance and Regulatory Compliance, BKC.

Burger King Corporation Honors Original Impressions and Union Packaging with Supplier-of-the-Year Award
MIAMI—Burger King Corporation (KC) and Restaurant Services, Inc. (RSI), the supply chain manager for the Burger King system in the United States, honored two of their minority-owned suppliers, Original Impressions (OI) and Union Packaging, with the BKC-RSI 2007 Supplier-of-the-Year Award. These companies join an elite group of eight distinguished honorees nationwide, each selected for their impressive track record, along with their unwavering commitment to teamwork, dedication and excellence. OI has managed, produced and shipped a vital operational and informational resource, the Restaurant Daily Planner, to Burger King restaurants in the United States and Canada for the past eight years. Last year, OI created a Web-based, record-keeping solution to organize the documents and materials included in the Restaurant Daily Planner. Union Packaging provided manufacturing support for the introduction of the Frypod, a French fry container designed to fit a car’s drink holder. “As a global corporation, BKC is committed to maintaining a diverse portfolio of suppliers,” said Cirabel Lardizabal Olson, director, inclusion and external affairs at BKC.
Union Packaging: From left to right: Jim Hyatt, Executive Vice President and Chief Global Operations Officer, BKC; Anthony Menninger, Vice President, Purchasing, RSI; Michael Pearson, President, Union Packaging; George Hoffman, President and CEO, RSI; John Newcomb, Chairman of the RSI Board; Steve Grover, Vice President, Food Safety, Quality Assurance and Regulatory Compliance, BKC.

Burger King Corporation Appoints Telisa Roberson Yancy Vice President, Media and Multicultural Marketing
MIAMI—Burger King Corp. has appointed Telisa Roberson Yancy vice president, media and multicultural marketing. In this newly creYa n c y ated position, Yancy will oversee and direct the media planning and buying for all key Burger King brand targeted demographics. Previously, Yancy served in a variety of marketing and communications roles at Ford Motor Company, most recently as a director in Ford’s customer service division. In that position, she used a variety of digital and emerging platforms, such as mobile, video on demand

AOL Names Tiane Mitchell Gordon as Senior Vice President, D&I
DULLES, Va.— AOL has announced that Tiane Mitchell Gordon has been named senior vice president, diversity Gordon and inclusion, continuing to drive AOL’s efforts to ensure a more diverse and inclusive workplace. She reports directly to Chairman and CEO Randy Falco.
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and podcasting, to boost grass-roots marketing and develop a comprehensive loyalty strategy.

New Director of Diversity Joins Cadwalader
NEW YORK— Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP announced that Jeremiah DeBerry has joined the firm as director of diversity. “As director of DeBerry diversity, Jerry will be responsible for a series of interconnected programs, policies and initiatives that are designed to help all Cadwalader personnel understand and support our individual differences,” said Robert O. Link Jr., Cadwalader's chairman and managing partner. Prior to joining Cadwalader, DeBerry was the president of the National Attorney of Color Network, an organization he founded as a resource for legal employers seeking to establish a diverse workforce. Before that he was a partner at Thelen Reid & Priest. More information about Cadwalader can be found at www.cadwalader.com.

suppliers is key to Cardinal Health’s vision of becoming the premier global health-care company,” said Jody Davids, chief information officer and executive vice president of global shared services for Cardinal Health. Premier is the largest healthcare alliance in the United States dedicated to improving patient outcomes while safely reducing the cost of care. For more information, visit www.premierinc.com.

At K&L Gates, Jones will lead the firm’s diversity recruitment and retention efforts, further developing the firm’s mentoring proJones grams and raising and promoting awareness of diversity issues within and outside of the firm. For more information, visit www.klgates.com.

Clairesse Jackson Named Chief Diversity Officer for NCR
DAYTON, Ohio—NCR Corporation has announced that Clairesse Jackson has been named chief diversity officer, responsible for the design and development of a global diversity strategy that aligns and supports NCR’s business strategy. In this role, she will also continue managing NCR’s supplier diversity program. Jackson brings more than 20 years of NCR experience Jackson to her new assignment, including serving as NCR’s subjectmatter expert on supplier diversity as well as a number of project management, procurement, marketing and business analyst positions. NCR Corporation is a leading global technology company helping businesses build stronger relationships with their customers.

WellPoint’s Inaugural Supplier Diversity Summit

WellPoint Supplier Diversity Director Brenda Burke (second from right) discusses WellPoint's goals for its inaugural supplier diversity summit with attendees Tasha Phelps, Phelco Technologies (far left); Julie Kennedy, Moongate Technologies (second from left); and Wayne Patrick, Professional Data Dimensions (far right).

Premier Honors Henry Ford Health System and Cardinal Health
CHARLOTTE, N.C.—The Premier healthcare alliance has named Henry Ford Health System of Detroit, Mich., and Cardinal Health of Dublin, Ohio, as winners of the 2007 Premier Diversity Recognition Award for healthcare system and contracted suppliers, respectively, based on their efforts to promote the use of minority, women, veteran and small businesses. “Henry Ford is honored to be selected for this award,” said Nancy Schlichting, president and CEO, Henry Ford Health System. “Fostering diversity among our employees, our customers and our

Richard Jones Appointed Director of Diversity for K&L Gates
NEW YORK—Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Preston Gates Ellis LLP (K&L Gates) has appointed diversity strategist Richard Jones as the firm’s director of diversity. Jones, a former practicing lawyer and legal educator, has spent the past decade collaborating with clients of a Californiabased diversity consulting firm.

INDIANAPOLIS—Thirteen minorityand women-owned businesses joined Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce President Roland Dorson and WellPoint leaders for the company’s inaugural supplier diversity summit. The 13 suppliers, who represent some of Central Indiana’s top information technology and information management firms, met individually to showcase their businesses and their capabilities. Some of the summit attendees included Bucher & Christian, CREW, DSS, Entemps, Esource Resources, Mega Input Data, Moongate Technologies, Netwise Resources, Phelco, Prairie Quests, Professional Data Dimensions, RCR and Telamon. WellPoint, Inc. is the largest health benefits company in terms of commercial membership in the United States. Additional information about WellPoint is available at www.wellpoint.com.

PDJ
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P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

Attitude will
take you further than aptitude every time
— Tracey Gray-Walker

A good mentor can help you identify the tools you need to develop and maintain the right attitude. Over the last 22 years, I have been blessed to have various mentoring relationships. In my current role as a leader and manager, I am committed to developing people, both within and outside of my reporting line, through several mentoring relationships. I remember a time when my manager was not committed to development. One of my goals as a mentor is to help others be better managers. Often times, Corporate America promotes subject matter experts to management positions. They do not always have the managerial or leadership skills required to create, motivate or support their teams. The opportunity to work with and for great people has really enhanced my work/life experience. My words of advice to anyone starting out today are to show your value early, be a team player and remember that people can teach you what they want you to know, but you have to bring the right attitude to the game every day to get the opportunity to play.

Tracey Gray-Walker Vice President of Business Development and Opportunities AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company (1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY, 10104, 212-314-4600)

Retaining People of Color at Accounting Firms

By Catalyst
ccording to Retaining People of Color: What Accounting Firms Need to Know, Catalyst’s first report in the Women of Color in Professional Services Series, approximately 50 percent of people of color in the accounting industry who were surveyed do not feel obligated to stay with their current firm, and nearly one-third of women of color in the study were at risk of leaving within the year. In order to address why people of color are at risk of leaving accounting firms, Catalyst examined key factors that “push” people of color—particularly women of color—out of their firms. One primary issue cited includes the imperfect execution of a firm’s commitment to diversity. The study found that there is a perceived disconnect between a firm’s commitment to diversity and the execution of the practices that support that commitment. This disconnect is noticed by women and men of color, clearly demonstrating that diversity policies aren’t filtering down to racial and ethnic minority groups as effectively as they should.

Other push factors include: • A lack of access to informal networks

A

• Stereotyping/double standards • A lack of development opportunities. Although employers have little impact on pull factors that lead individuals to leave organizations, such as offers of high-paying jobs at other firms, employers can help retain their workforce by focusing on the push factors that frequently stimulate employees to leave. The following actions could help: • Assess the work environment to determine the systemic and cultural factors that impede the progress of people of color ~ Find out about your organization’s diversity strategy. ~ Use internal surveys, focus groups, and interviews to document, by subgroup, the experiences and perceptions of women and men of color. • Examine your own opinions, assumptions, and behavior ~ How inclusive are you about socializing with staff members from different backgrounds?

~ What priority do you give to institutional supports for staff members who are from backgrounds different from yours? ~ Do your expectations for the performance of your staff who are of color vary from those for your other staff? ~ Do you ever make assumptions based on stereotypes? • Develop closer relationships with women and men of color by learning about their perspectives ~ Make an effort to ask women and men of color about their perspectives, backgrounds, and interests. ~ Identify subgroups of women of color and men of color in your organization and go out of your way to learn about their unique experiences and challenges. ~ Increase understanding of differences and similarities between groups and within groups through education and informal dialogues, one-on-one and in groups. ~ Encourage differences in behavioral and work styles.

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“The retention of top talent
is particularly important … these firms can’t afford to train employees only to see many of their best and brightest
• Communicate and demonstrate your firm’s commitment to diversity ~ Use training programs, one-on-one mentoring with senior leaders, inclusion in high-visibility programs, and networking opportunities. ~ Integrate diversity initiatives into routine organizational practices such as recruitment, orientation, training, career-development tools, and succession planning. • Hold managers accountable for the retention and advancement of women and men of color ~ Create clearly articulated plans for long-term development of women and men of color. ~ Hold managers accountable for providing critical development opportunities and high-visibility assignments necessary for advancement. ~ Review managers’ performance evaluations of subordinates by race/ethnicity and gender of subordinates.

leave to pursue other options,” said Ilene H. Lang, president of Catalyst.

The retention of top talent is particularly important to accounting firms. “To stay competitive, these firms can’t afford to train employees only to see many of their best and brightest leave to pursue other options,” said Ilene H. Lang, president of Catalyst. “Organizations that work to break down the ‘concrete ceiling’ that impedes the advancement of people of color will benefit by capitalizing on the full talent pool.”
About Catalyst Founded in 1962, Catalyst is the leading nonprofit corporate membership research and advisory organization working globally with businesses and the professions to build inclusive environments and expand opportunities for women and business. To download a free copy of Retaining People of Color: What Accounting Firms Need to Know, visit www.catalyst.org.

PDJ

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15

by David L. Casey

No Qualified Minority Candidates—If We Could Only Get “Numbers!”
nd so it goes—the vicious cycle of intense recruiting activity to increase minority representation, satisfactory to mediocre results, complacency, decline in “numbers,” intense recruiting activity, and on and on and on. Even after forty years of government mandated affirmative action, less than 10 percent of C-level jobs are filled with women and people of color. I liken what we expect to happen in the hiring process to turning on a spigot, expecting water to come out, only to find it clogged with maybe a drip or two finding their way down the spout. Our first inclination is to reach for the plunger or gallon size jug of Drano to get rid of the clog. This we do by attending job fairs or running ads in publications that target the representation we are looking for (assuming we have taken the steps to specify the type of representation we want and why it matters to the organization). We have marginal success at getting a flow started, but never address what caused the clog in the first place or what might prevent it from happening again. What is missing is the understanding of strategic talent pipeline management. We have heard the stats about the dearth of minorities attending college campuses or occupying the executive suites of our

A

corporate competitors, but how deep does corporate America get involved in understanding and addressing the situations that cause the pipelines to congest? While internships and scholarships are requisite components of diversity strategies, organizations must think differently about how diverse pipelines are built. When you are approached to support an internship program, ask if there is a component that engages the family or home support structure in the student’s education. This is especially important for those students who may not have people at home to provide support and counsel in their academic careers. Instead of the standard issue “college relations” programs, how about designing “educational outreach” programs that incorporate the support of elementary and intermediate education before students become high school dropouts. Ask yourself if your organization has the ability to hire for capability versus experience. If you only seek candidates with experience in disciplines that have not historically had large numbers of

“What is missing is the understanding of strategic talent pipeline management.”

women and minorities, it will be impossible to make relevant progress. The socioeconomic issues that affect talent development are not customary and comfortable spaces for the board room. But even though 85 percent of new entrants into the workforce are women and minorities, we will be having this same discussion 20 years from now, unless corporate America takes a leading role in shaping early stages of talent development for historically disenfranchised children. I have spoken to a number of academics who would love to have that dialogue with companies, but we have never taken the first step. I have heard it said that society led the civil rights movement, and corporate America will lead the diversity management movement. Are you up for the challenge? A constant drip of water can be so painful, it has been used as a form of torture. Why settle for a constant drip, at best, when you can help open up the pipeline!

PDJ

David L. Casey is VP of Talent Management at WellPoint, Inc. His column appears in each issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal.

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Instead of glass ceilings, we believe in windows of opportunity.
At AT&T we believe that building our company around a talented, dedicated and diverse workforce is instrumental to our success. That’s why we foster an ongoing dedication to working women — to drive innovation, productivity and engagement. We understand that standing at the of workforce inclusion.
©2007 AT&T Knowledge Ventures. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Knowledge Ventures.

forefront of our industry means standing at the forefront

AT&T salutes Belinda Grant-Anderson as one of the 2007 Profiles in Diversity Journal’s WomenWorthWatching® .

PepsiCo has had a distinctive year, particularly when it comes to women. First, Indra K. Nooyi, who became chief executive officer of the company in October 2006, added chairman to her title in 2007. Then, PepsiCo won the Catalyst Award for its groundbreaking Women of Color (WOC) Multicultural Alliance, a support and resource organization focused on attracting, retaining and developing WOC within PepsiCo that we’ll profile in our next issue. In addition, the company was named LATINA Style’s Company of the Year and among Working Mother’s Top 5 Best Companies for Multicultural Women and Essence magazine’s 25 Best Companies for Black Women. Only a handful of Fortune 100 companies are headed by women who bear the chairman and CEO title, and even fewer are foreignborn. Because of her unique perspective, we asked Indra to set the tone for our special “Women Worth Watching” edition by talking about trends she sees and her personal observations. —James R. Rector, Publisher
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t’s worth noting that nearly 100 years ago, women were marching in the streets of New York City for voting rights and better pay. So, in a year when one woman is Speaker of the House of Representatives and another is the front runner for the Democratic party’s candidacy for president of the United States, it’s clear that progress has been made. However, it’s also clear that women still have a way to go. We are still celebrating too many “firsts” and “seconds”—and within the top leadership ranks of corporations, we’re still building on a small base. That’s why I appreciate having this opportunity to celebrate the accomplishments shared in Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 6th annual Women Worth Watching® issue and to add some word of encouragement to women who are breaking down barriers, taking companies to higher levels of performance and inspiring the next generation of leaders.

Authenticity: Bringing Your Whole Self to Work
Who you are is as important as your formal education and your professional skills. If that sounds simplistic, consider how long women were given career advice instructing them to emulate men. At PepsiCo, we strive to create a work environment that encourages every associate to bring his or her whole self to the workplace. Not just because it’s the right thing to do. But also because diversity of thought unleashes creativity and the power

of innovation. Having teams of people with different backgrounds and different experiences gives us marketplace insights that enable us to better serve our consumers, retail customers and communities. In fact, many of our new flavors and products had their origins in these discussions. And, several years ago, we noticed that our attrition rate among women of color was the highest of any employee group. Through research, we found they felt less connected, less satisfied and less committed than any other group. And their numbers were small. A major reason was that a lack of “authentic relationships” existed between women of color and their managers. They wanted to be understood and valued for who they were, to be true to themselves and to use the best of their skills and experience. Through the efforts of a crossgeographical, cross-divisional program, guided by a steering committee and executive sponsors, we launched a Women of Color Multicultural Alliance to focus on attracting, retaining and developing this crucial group. As a result, at the senior manager, director and VP levels, women of color have increased from 4 percent to just under 7 percent in four years. We also implemented a coaching program that has halved our turnover rate among the women of color who participated. We applied these insights and some of the same coaching programs to all women at PepsiCo, through our Women’s Initiative Network (WIN). We also added

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a few new channels of connection— networking pods, frequent interaction with leadership and social networking. The WOC numbers and the early WIN results clearly show the importance of authenticity and its link to performance, talent sustainability and much more.

using them strategically to make the most of our careers—and to identify and to be clear about work style options and career choices.

Being in a Position to Contribute to the Bottom Line
It’s clear that women are becoming ever more important to our operations, to our return on equity and to our total return to shareholders. Women increasingly are in positions affecting profit and loss: contributing to a company’s bottom line pays professional dividends. It’s certainly true at PepsiCo where, since 2001, the number of women in our sales, general manager and operations roles has increased an average of 6 percent. Second, women executives make up 54 percent of associates in marketing, a function which generates about half our senior leaders. Third, women have increased among the highest paid executives at PepsiCo in North America— growing 31 percent from 2001 to 2005.

we saw a dramatic improvement in the inclusiveness of the environment for all executives—39 percent since 2003. And with these changes, overall satisfaction with PepsiCo has increased among women of color (12 percent) and white women (4.3 percent) since 2004.

Amplifying Performance with Purpose
Performance must be complemented by purpose. All of us come to work each day looking for meaning. We want to construct a life as well as make a living; we want to make a difference, as well as earn a paycheck. While that’s true of most individuals, I think it’s especially true of women. Without a larger purpose to give our lives meaning, we can never reach our fullest potential or achieve deep satisfaction. Recognizing this, we’re raising awareness and understanding about “Performance with Purpose.” We’re challenging our employees to find creative solutions that leave to our children a healthier planet than the one we inhabit now and provide foods and beverages that taste great and are healthier.

Making Diversity a Global Priority with Women as a Unifying Focus
Much of what I have talked about here is North American in focus, but as a global company, our diversity and inclusion effort crosses almost 200 countries and touches approximately 168,000 associates. The cause of women serves as a global unifying focus for us—our only common D&I target across vast areas that have no affirmative action laws and which forbid many of the practices we regard as standard in the U.S. We set targets to ensure global representation of women in our management ranks. And we’ve had some dramatic results. The number of women in management in our international businesses has grown from 13 percent in 2003 to 19 percent at the end of 2006.

Sponsoring Those who are Different: Harnessing a Variety of Perspectives
Regardless of gender or background, at PepsiCo our top leaders sponsor our employee networks, and they sponsor a group that is dissimilar from them. We’ve found this relationship—of a senior leader who drives crucial business decisions and the ability to gain funding and raise awareness of priorities—can empower the network, making things possible that never seemed so before. We hold all leaders and managers accountable for supporting our companywide diversity and inclusion initiative, whether through training, representation and sponsorship, support and mentoring, or participation in events. Then we measure their impact and progress and recognize success. In our last major organizational survey,

Serving Market Diversity with Employee Diversity
Global companies like PepsiCo need a lot more great people to drive growth. To be successful, we must understand and serve the world’s many markets. We must be able to tap into a wide, deep and diverse talent pool and then retain the people we hire. I congratulate and celebrate the women recognized in this issue. They have recognized that diversity is a business strategy and that certain key trends can propel them to success. I want to thank them for their commitment to growing their careers and at the same time helping others move ahead. I challenge them to make the most of their continued focus on purpose and to change the workplace for the women who come after them. PDJ

Using Focus and Flexibility to Balance the Short and Long Term
Another significant trend I see is the need to be focused and flexible. To balance priorities and schedules is key. Setting expectations for yourself, and others of you, is absolutely crucial. And it’s important to be accountable: to yourself, your family and your professional goals. This year, our WIN has launched a work-life harmony program to focus on career effectiveness, trade-offs, managing transitions, timing and career cultivation. Part education, part common sense and part mentoring, the program helps associates understand what our own natural tendencies and needs are, while

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For women who want to go places,
Transportation is the obvious choice.

Mary Jane O’Meara
Acting Executive Director of the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority

Luisa M. Paiewonsky Jeanne Morrison
Assistant General Manager, Office of Diversity and Civil Rights, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Commissioner of the Massachusetts Highway Department

Mary A. Fernandes
Assistant General Manager, Silver Line Communications and Community Development, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority COMTO President, Boston Chapter

Jacquelyn I. Wilkins Anne L. Collins
Massachusetts Registrar of Motor Vehicles Senior Project Manager, Massachusetts Port Authority President of WTS, Boston Chapter

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority in collaboration with the Executive Office of Transportation, WTS, COMTO, and all of Massachusetts’ transportation agencies offer unprecedented opportunity to women from all walks of life. Among our ranks, women are encouraged to maximize educational benefits and reach for the next level.

Our collective workforce of ten thousand reflects a multitude of ethnic backgrounds, ages, orientations, skills, experience and abilities, all well represented and highly valued for the many ways they enrich our workplace. To learn more about us, visit mbta.com or eot.state.ma.us/. We’re building our workforce with the best of the best and women are leading the way.

Mass Aeronautics Commission

Massachusetts Executive Office of Transportation

Massachusetts Aeronautics Massachusetts Bay Commission Transportation Authority

Massachusetts Highway Department

Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles

Massachusetts Turnpike Authority

Conference of Minority Transportation Officials

Women’s Transportation Seminar

®

ROHM AND HAAS COMPANY Stacey B. Adams NUTTER McCLENNEN & FISH LLP /CREW NETWORK Marianne Ajemian PRATT & WHITNEY Elizabeth B. Amato GENERAL ELECTRIC Andrea Assarat ACCENTURE Marylou Y. Bailey AFLAC Janet P. Baker BERNARD HODES GROUP Carol Barber COX COMMUNICATIONS Janet Barnard NATIONWIDE Candice R. Barnhardt SALT RIVER PROJECT Kelly J. Barr STARBUCKS COFFEE COMPANY Wendy Beckman SAKS FIFTH AVENUE Carolyn Biggs LIBERTY GLOBAL, INC. Amy Blair CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY Irene Chang Britt HONEYWELL Adriane Brown NATIONAL CITY CORPORATION Edith Pettway Brown COMCAST CORPORATION Karen Dougherty Buchholz TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Elizabeth “Beth” Bull STAPLES, INC. Kerry Anne Carter SALLIE MAE Denise Chaisson DUPONT Uma Chowdhry HARRIS BANKCORP INC. (BMO) Ellen Costello ARVINMERITOR, INC. Lin Cummins CARDINAL HEALTH Jody Davids JPMORGAN CHASE FOUNDATION Kimberly B. Davis PITNEY BOWES INC. Lisa DeBois CAREERBUILDER.COM Mary Delaney HIGHMARK INC. Cindy Dellecker BANK OF AMERICA Paula Dominick HALLMARK CARDS, INC. Teri Ann Drake TALENTQUEST Dr. Ann Evangelista WALT DISNEY PARKS & RESORTS Kathy Fawcett METLIFE, INC. Margaret C. “Peggy” Fechtmann FORD MOTOR COMPANY Felicia Fields VISTEON CORPORATION Julie A. Fream ALLTEL WIRELESS Sharilyn Gasaway IHG (INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP) Vicki Gordon AT&T Belinda Grant-Anderson AXA EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Tracey Gray-Walker CATALYST Eleanor Tabi Haller-Jorden KPMG LLP Kathy Hopinkah Hannan LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Doris Heim MTA METRO NORTH RAILROAD Sherry Lynn Herrington HEALTHNOW NEW YORK INC. Cheryl A. Howe VERIZON COMMUNICATIONS, INC. Marjorie F. Hsu HUNT ALTERNATIVES FUND Swanee Hunt BECKER & POLIAKOFF, P.A. Yolanda Cash Jackson SYNOVUS Elizabeth “Lee Lee” James KELLY SERVICES, INC. Carol J. Johnson QUALCOMM, INC. Margaret L. “Peggy” Johnson ECOLAB INC. Patti A. Johnson DICKSTEIN SHAPIRO LLP Deborah P. Kelly TRAVELPORT LIMITED Jo-Anne Kruse UNUM Martha D. Leiper U. S. ARMY Debra M. Lewis KAISER PERMANENTE Louise Liang, MD

PARKER HANNIFIN Cynthia Little MCGUIREWOODS LLP Nancy Little FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION Ning-Ning Mahlmann PFIZER INC Dee Mahoney KINDRED HEALTHCARE Kim Martin ITT CORPORATION Gretchen McClain EASTMAN KODAK Antoinette P. McCorvey U.S. POSTAL SERVICE Pritha Mehra ROYAL DUTCH SHELL Stacy P. Methvin RELIANT ENERGY Janie Mitcham STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES Christy Moberly SUSAN G. KOMEN FOR THE CURE Hala Moddelmog KEYBANK Beth Mooney WELLPOINT, INC. Lisa Moriyama WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP Nora E. Moushey WELLPOINT, INC. Shamla Naidoo MGM MIRAGE Debra Nelson CISCO Tracey Newell HILTON HOTELS CORPORATION Linda Norman MOTOROLA Kathy Paladino VANGUARD Martha Papariello BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON Susan Penfield CONSTELLATION ENERGY Beth S. Perlman WACHOVIA CORPORATION Sheila Marie Person-Scott CIGNA CORPORATION Carol Ann Petren SAFEWAY INC. Melissa Plaisance HALLIBURTON Susan Margaret Ponce U. S. NAVY Carol M. Pottenger CVS CAREMARK CORPORATION Paula A. Price WAL-MART DeDe Priest THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC. Helen P. Pudlin SYMANTEC CORPORATION Rebecca Ranninger GENERAL MOTORS Teckla Rhoads MONSANTO Nicole Ringenberg VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA / CANADA Lorie-Ann Roxburgh DELOITTE & TOUCHE USA LLP Aurora M. Rubin SODEXHO Deborah Schloss MEADWESTVACO CORPORATION Linda V. Schreiner DELL INC. Kayla Shell CONSOLIDATED EDISON COMPANY OF NEW YORK Saumil Shukla CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL Lisa Shumpert NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Eileen Slevin UNILEVER Amanda Sourry HP Nor Rae Spohn EDS Kimberly S. Stevenson LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION Sonya V. Stewart ATF, U.S. Melanie Stinnett QWEST COMMUNICATIONS Teresa Taylor ELECTRONIC ARTS Gabrielle Toledano U. S. AIR FORCE Suzanne Vautrinot ALLSTATE INSURANCE COMPANY Joan H. Walker UNITEDHEALTH GROUP Margaret W. Wear RAYTHEON COMPANY Charleen Antoinette Wheeless ERNST & YOUNG Valerie Williams NORTHROP GRUMMAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Carol J. Zierhoffer

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Yolanda Cash Jackson Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Susan Penfield Booz Allen Hamilton

Saumil Shukla Consolidated Edison Company of New York Melanie Stinnett ATF, U.S. Irene Chang Britt Campbell Soup Company

Sharilyn Gasaway Alltel Wireless

Eleanor Tabi Haller-Jorden Catalyst

Mary Delaney CareerBuilder.com

Jody Davids Cardinal Health

Paula A. Price CVS Caremark Corporation

Marylou Y. Bailey Accenture

Paula Dominick Bank of America

Janet P. Baker Aflac Marianne Ajemian Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP CREW Network

Lisa Shumpert Capital One Financial

Janet Barnard Cox Communications

Beth S. Perlman Constellation Energy

Karen Dougherty Buchholz Comcast Corporation Carol Barber Bernard Hodes Group Carol Ann Petren CIGNA Corporation

Deborah P. Kelly Dickstein Shapiro LLP

Patti A. Johnson Ecolab Inc.

Gretchen McClain ITT Corporation Adriane Brown Honeywell (Honeywell Transportation Systems)

Vicki Gordon IHG (InterContinental Hotels Group)

Ning-Ning Mahlmann Federal Bureau of Investigation

Cheryl A. Howe HealthNow New York Inc. Gabrielle Toledano Electronic Arts

Swanee Hunt Hunt Alternatives Fund

Susan Margaret Ponce Halliburton Linda Norman Hilton Hotels Corporation

Kim Martin Kindred Healthcare

Andrea Assarat General Electric

Nancy Little McGuireWoods LLP Valerie Williams Ernst & Young

Nicole Ringenberg Monsanto

Kimberly S. Stevenson EDS

Doris Heim Los Alamos National Laboratory

Margaret C. "Peggy" Fechtmann MetLife, Inc.

Amy Blair Liberty Global, Inc.

Lisa DeBois Pitney Bowes Inc.

Carol J. Johnson Kelly Services, Inc.

Nor Rae Spohn HP

Kimberly B. Davis JPMorgan Chase Foundation

Hala Moddelmog Susan G. Komen for the Cure

Margaret L. "Peggy" Johnson QUALCOMM, Inc. Teresa Taylor Qwest Communications

Elizabeth "Lee Lee" James Synovus

Stacey B. Adams Rohm and Haas Company

Carol M. Pottenger United States Navy

Wendy Beckman Starbucks

Kerry Anne Carter Staples, Inc. Nora E. Moushey Western & Southern Financial Group

DeDe Priest Wal-Mart Rebecca Ranninger Symantec Corporation

Suzanne Vautrinot United States Air Force Helen P. Pudlin The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. Denise Chaisson Sallie Mae Jo-Anne Kruse Travelport Limited

Martha D. Leiper Unum

Elizabeth “Beth” Bull Texas Instruments

Julie A. Fream Visteon Corporation

Sheila Marie Person-Scott Wachovia Corporation

Kelly J. Barr Salt River Project

Debra M. Lewis United States Army

Dr. Ann Evangelista TalentQuest

WE WILL NOT BE PART OF

GENERATION XXL.
We b e l i e ve yo u ’re n e ve r to o yo u n g to l e a rn t h e i m p o rt a n c e o f b a l a n c e . T h a t b o d i e s yearn for both cupcakes and kickball. At Kaiser Permanente, we’re committed to h e l p i n g f i n d t h a t b a l a n c e t h ro u g h e xe rc i s e a n d n u t ri t i o n a l p ro g ra m s . L e a rn m o re a t k p . o rg

®

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Being committed to your vision requires courage and the ability to make unpopular and difficult decisions.”

Stacey B. Adams
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & R O H M LA N D H A E W C O M PA N Y FISH, LP / CR AS NETWORK

W O

enall know that leadership matters, whether in a quote from my desk sits a small plaque inscribed with government, business, professional groups many more hills to climb. course Nelson Mandela, “There are or nonprofits. During the I have of my a moment to rest here, to look back on the distance that taken career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, profession, industry and community who have helped me I have come … I dare not linger for my long walk has not yet grow personally and professionally. By their example, they ended.” were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally or not. I believe it is important that we impress upon the future I believe thatleadersof the mostof the following: never losing generation of some the value meaningful examples of leadership, success and achievement are those that surround us in sight of your goal, acknowledging successes along the way and our daily lives, but are often easily overlooked or forgotten. allowing yourself time to revitalize your mind and body for the For example, I have been blessed to be loved and supported next wonderful family who always inspire me and who taught by a leg of your journey. me, by their words and deeds, that success mentors throughI have been fortunate to have had great and achievement are all about character, doing the right thing and recognizing out my career, and all have impressed upon me the importance that kindness matters. of having a clear vision of where I am headed and moving In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit from colleagues who toward help when with purpose and intention. offered that vision I needed it most, mentors who guided and motivated me and friends to achieving your vision may love In addition, the path who provided unconditional not and support. These types of individuals and relationships always be linear and navigation can be quite tricky. If not carestrengthen us, encourage us and enable us to accomplish what ful, we can be seduced into going after things that bring only we could not achieve by ourselves. financial rewardsand increased visibility. However, it is imporBy watching or learning from such role models, I have tant to assess if those things guide my you closer to developed these principles thatare gettingprofessional life:your vision. While we all enjoy the promotion and the opportunity • Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change. for upward stays the same for long. to understand how and Nothing mobility, it is important where that fits into your overall building consensus. Often, • Recognize the importance of plan. Being committed to your

TITLE:

Global Director of Diversity BS from Widener University; MS from Villanova

EDUCATION:

University; currently pursuing PhD
FIRST JOB:

Management consultant with Andersen

Consulting (currently Accenture)
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

To whom much is given, much is required.

Proud mother of one child Sharing my passion for living a healthful lifestyle

INTERESTS:

by teaching vegetarian cooking, aerobics and Pilates classes
FAVORITE CHARITY:

Lupus Foundation of America

COMPANY:

Rohm and Haas Company Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.rohmhaas.com

BUSINESS: Creates and develops technologies and solutions for the specialty materials industry. 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

this requires courage than the ability to make any particular vision is more important and the actual outcome ofunpopular and decision. difficult decisions. • Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are times you will need to deliver bad news or important tothat you While working towards your vision, it is say no, and encourmust do so gracefully and directly. age yourself by acknowledging the progress along the way. Moving • Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have forward the star player.of celebration. Remind yourself to look back to be is also worthy on the distance that you have come. • There is no substitute for competence, hard work and thorough preparation. Finally, achieving your vision will require time and energy and • Be concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that can be get to theconsuming.that your comments add value.regroup you mentally point and Giving yourself permission to and re-energize is critical. • Never compromise your principles. Your reputation is priceless and irreplaceable. As I move through my career, I am learning the importance of • Determine what is important, focus on those priorities and let patience, commitment and self-care. My desire is to share and serve go of the rest. as a guide to those on the first leg of their journey. I truly believe • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a negotiation—just is given, much is required. that to whom much the points that are most important to your client or organization. • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.

$8.2 billion

16,000

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“Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change.”

Marianne Ajemian
N U T T E R M cc C L E N N E N & FF I S H L L P / C R E W N E T W O R K NUTTER M CLENNEN & ISH,

W W

e all know that leadership matters, whether in government, that leadership matters, whether in government, business, professional groups or nonprofits. During the course or nonprofits. During the course of my career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, of my career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, profession, industry and community who have helped me profession, industry and community who have helped me grow personally and professionally. By their example, they grow personally and professionally. By their example, they were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally or not. or not. I believe that some of the most meaningful examples of I believe success and the most meaningful that surround us leadership, that some of achievement are thoseexamples of leadership, daily lives, but are often easilythose that surround us in in our success and achievement are overlooked or forgotten. our daily example, are often easily overlooked or forgotten.supFor lives, but I have been blessed to be loved and For example, I have been blessedalways loved and supported ported by a wonderful family who to be inspire me and who by a wonderful family who always inspire success and achievetaught me, by their words and deeds, that me and who taught ment are all words and deeds, that success thing and recogme, by theirabout character, doing the right and achievement nizing that kindness matters. are all about character, doing the right thing and recognizing that In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit from colleagues kindness matters. who offered help when I lucky to it most, from colleagues who In addition, I’ve been needed benefit mentors who guided and motivated meI and friends whomentors who guided and offered help when needed it most, provided unconditional love and support. These types of individuals and relationships motivated me and friends who provided unconditional love strengthen us, encourage us and enable us to accomplish what and support. These types of individuals and relationships we could not achieve by ourselves. strengthen us, encourage us and enable us to accomplish what By watching and learning from such role models, I have we could not achieve by ourselves. developed these principles that guide my professional life: By watching and learning from such role models, I have • Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change. developed these principles for long. my professional life: Nothing stays the same that guide • Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change. Often, Recognize the importance of building consensus. Nothing stays importantfor long. actual outcome of any this is more the same than the particular the importance of building consensus. Often, • Recognizedecision.

Partner Nutter McClennen & Fish, LLP, President of Partner, Nutter McClennen & Fish Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network EDUCATION: BA with honors in political science from Wellesley College; JD from Boston University School of Law FIRST JOB: Research Assistant assistant READING: God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, by Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and How They Have Changed America, 1789-1989, by Michael Beschloss; How Doctors Think, by Dr. Jerome Groopman PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. This one phrase the Do the right thing. This one phrase is the standard by which one should expect to be judged and the core value for which I aspire to be known. FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old grandmother (who Grandmother (who is a survivor of the Armenian Genocide) INTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop culture, yoga, Pilates, golf, spa treatments pilates, FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable Foundation, HomeStart, CREW Foundation
TITLE:

this is more important than the actual outcome of any particular • decision. and straightforward. Recognize that there are times Be honest you will need to deliver bad news or say no, and that you must • Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are do so gracefully and directly. times you will need to deliver bad news or say no, and that you • must do great team leaderdirectly. mean that you always have Being a so gracefully and doesn’t to be the star player. • Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have • to be the star player. There is no substitute for competence, hard work and thorough preparation. • There is no substitute for competence, hard work and • thorough preparation. time is at a premium. Make sure that you Be concise. Everyone’s get concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that • Be to the point and that your comments add value. • you get to the pointyour that your comments add value. Never compromise and principles. Your reputation is priceless and irreplaceable. your principles. Your reputation is priceless • Never compromise • and irreplaceable. important, focus on those priorities and let go Determine what is of the rest. what is important, focus on those priorities and let • Determine • go of the rest. Understand that you don’t have to win every point in a negotiation—justyou don't have to are most important to your • Understand that the points that win every point in a client or organization. negotiation—just the points that are most important to your client or organization. for help, or forget the people who were • Never hesitate to ask willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, others.forget your responsibility to reach out and support never responsibility to reach out and support others.
P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Boston, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.nutter.com BUSINESS: Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP is one of the oldest and most prominent full service law firms in Boston. The celebrated Justice Louis D. Brandeis was a founder of the firm (then called Warren and Brandeis) in 1879 and practiced for over 35 years at the firm before his appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court. EMPLOYEES: 352
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

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“Distinguish yourself and your group by striving for excellence.”

Elizabeth B. Amato
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P P R ATE W N E HW O R Y / CR T & WT ITNE K

D W

e uring my that leadership matters, whether in government,I all know career with United Technologies Corporation, have had exceptional relationships as both a mentor and business, professional groups or nonprofits. During the coursea mentee. Whether formal or informal, these relationships have of my career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, given me valuable experiences and insights have helped me profession, industry and community who that have allowed me to grow and and professionally. By their example, they grow personally advance in a company that offers tremendous opportunities and wonderful whether I know them personally were and remain my teachers, challenges. or not. these experiences, I have gleaned several key lessons From I have prepared of well for the business world. I have thatbelieve that some methe most meaningful examples of leadership, success and achievement are those that surround us in included some of the lessons below: our daily lives, but are often easily overlooked or forgotten. 1. Fully understand your customers’ requirements. We have For example, I have been blessed to be loved and supported jobs only because we have customers, and everyone has a by a wonderful family who always inspire me and who taught customer. Ask them what they want, deliver your product or me, by their words and deeds, that success and achievement service on time, and make sure it meets or exceeds their are all about character, doing the right thing and recognizing expectations. that kindness matters. 2. Continually improve your processes and performance. In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit from colleagues who Distinguish yourself and your group by striving for exceloffered help when I needed it most, mentors who guided and lence. You’ll satisfy your customers, and you’ll find tremenmotivated me and friends who provided unconditional love dous personal satisfaction along the way. and support. These types of individuals and relationships 3. Know your business. us and enable us to accomplish marstrengthen us, encourageUnderstand your product, your what weket, your competition ourselves. your organization supports could not achieve by and how and advances business imperatives.such role models, I have By watching and learning from Then work together with others in the principles that guide my success. developed theseorganization and drive forprofessional life: 4. Hire people better and yourself. It makes change. • Embrace flexibility thanthe need to manage your job much, much easier and allows for to focus on strategic initiatives. Nothing stays the same youlong. Having top talent allows organizations to thrive. • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often,

Partner Nutter McClennen & Fish, LLP, President of Vice President, Human Resources Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network EDUCATION: BA with honors in political science, from EDUCATION: Bachelor of Arts, political science Davidson Wellesley College; JD from Boston University School of Law University; JD from the University of Connecticut FIRST JOB: Research Assistant READING: God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, FIRST JOB: Waitress by Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and How They Have Changed America, 1789-1989, by Michael READING: A Thousand Splendid Suns, by Khaled Hosseini Beschloss; How Doctors Think, by Dr. Jerome Groopman PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. This one phrase the PHILOSOPHY: Make Each Day Count. standard by which one should expect to be judged and the core value for which I aspire to be known. FAMILY: Husband, Michael; a son,17; and a daughter,14 FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother (who is a survivor of the Armenian Genocide) INTERESTS: Reading, sports and cooking INTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop culture, yoga, pilates, golf, spa treatments FAVORITE CHARITY: Swim Across The Sound, St. Vincent’s FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable Medical Center, Bridgeport, Conn. Foundation, HomeStart, CREW Foundation
TITLE:

5. this isout and accept challengingactual outcome of any particular Seek more important than the roles and develop a portfolio of decision. accomplishments. Achieving results is valued and will position • Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are you for greater responsibility. Don’t ever underestimate what you times you will need to deliver bad news or sayability to that you can accomplish and have confidence in your no, and move to must do so gracefully and directly. new and exciting opportunities. • Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have 6. to be the star player. In business, we spend the majority of our Enjoy what you do. day at work. Be sure for competence, you absolutely • There is no substitute to do somethinghard work and love, be committed to continual growth and learning, and foster a thorough preparation. culture that encourages a positive premium. Make sure • Be concise. Everyone's time is at aworking environment. that 7. you get to the point and thatwell beyond work, and prioritize Remember that life exists your comments add value. • Never compromise is no one single formula for achieving workaccordingly. There your principles. Your reputation is priceless and balance. You must be prepared, create a strong support life irreplaceable. • Determine what is important, focus on those priorities and let network, prioritize, communicate openly, and be flexible. go of the rest. The foundation for these seven valuable lessons was built • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a through my mentoring relationships, and has formed the basis of negotiation—just the points that are most important to your how I approach work each and every day. client or organization. • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.

COMPANY:

Pratt & Whitney Hartford, Connecticut

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.pw.utc.com Aerospace $11.1 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

38,400

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Strengthening Our Communities Through Connections
Comcast is proud to be recognized for our commitment to diversity. We have been recognized by Diversity Inc. has named Comcast as one of the Top 50 Corporations for Diversity, and several leading diverse publications have heralded Comcast as a "best place to work." We are the nation’s leading provider of cable, entertainment and communications products and services, and we know that creating opportunities for the communities we serve goes hand in hand with the success of our business.

Comcast congratulates its own Karen Dougherty Buchholz for being featured in the 6th Annual Women to Watch issue of the Profiles in Diversity Journal.

To learn more about our commitment to diversity, go to www.comcast.com/diversity

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“My success became less about me and more about my team.”

Andrea Assarat
N U T T E R M c C L E N NN NR& L IE L E,CL L P C GE EE A F SH TRI /

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e all know in Thailand, I never imagined myself government, rowing up that leadership matters, whether in a future corbusiness, professional I have spent most of my adult the course porate executive. Yet, groups or nonprofits. During life workof my career, I’ve watched many different experience,my firm, ing in business. It has been an enriching leaders in and if I profession, industry and community who have helped me had to give advice to young women, I would say the followgrow personally and professionally. By their example, they ing: work hard and build expertise, seek challenging opportuwere and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally nities, or not.hire and motivate the best, and work for a company thatbelieve that some of the most meaningful examples of leadI values you. ership, success and achievement are those that surround us in I was an English major in college who landed my first job our daily lives, but are often easily overlooked or forgotten. on Wall Street. Unlike most of my peers, I had no formal For example, I have been blessed to be loved and supported training in finance or accounting. I studied hard to catch up, by a wonderful family who always inspire me and who taught sought their words and deeds, that success and achievement me, by a variety of jobs to enhance my skills, and focused on building expertise around investing. This expertise gave me are all about character, doing the right thing and recognizing that kindness matters.when we had to make difficult judgment confidence, especially In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit calls and during tough economic periods.from colleagues who offered help when I needed it most, mentors who guided and Looking and I learned the most when I was the love motivated meback, friends who provided unconditional most challenged. I These types of individuals and investments, and support. inherited a portfolio of distressed relationships strengthen us, encourage us and enable us to accomplish what primarily companies that had been funded during the peak of we could not achieve by ourselves. the losses. What seemed the market. My mandate was to stop By watching and learning from such role models, I have to be an impossible task turned out to be one of the best learndeveloped these principles that guide my professional life: ing experiences. We had to reinvigorate management, build • Embraceamongst investors, need fix manage change. With consensus flexibility and the and to business models. Nothing stays the same for long. hard work and luck, we ended up making money. • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often,

NAME: ANDREA ASSARAT TITLE: General Manager—Global

Business Development

TITLE: SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR-EQUITY, GE EDUCATION: BA in English from Yale; MBA from Harvard COMMERCIAL FINANCE EDUCATION: BA IN ENGLISH FROM YALE, Embassy in FIRST JOB: During college, worked for the U.S. MBA FROM HARVARD FIRST JOB: DURING COLLEGE, WORKED FOR THE

Thailand interviewing and processing applications for refugees from Southeast Asia seeking asylum in the United States PROU.S. EMBASSY IN THAILAND INTERVIEWING AND
CESSING APPLICATIONS FOR REFUGEES FROM READING: InterpreterSEEKING ASYLUM IN THE UNITED SOUTHEAST ASIA of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri STATES PHILOSOPHY: Excel at whatever you do. READING: INTERPRETER OF MALADIES BY JHUMPA LAHIRI FAMILY: Married with two daughters (2 and 4) PHILOSOPHY: EXCEL AT WHATEVER YOU DO INTERESTS: Reading, travel, swimming FAMILY: MARRIED WITH TWO DAUGHTERS (2 AND 4) FAVORITE CHARITIES: Multiple Sclerosis Society, educational INTERESTS: READING, TRAVEL, SWIMMING FAVORITEorganizations MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY, and youth CHARITIES: EDUCATIONAL AND YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS

this is more important than the actual outcome of any particular decision. • BeAs my responsibilities grew, I came to realize that there are honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that I could not times you will need tomyself. My success became less aboutyou know or do everything deliver bad news or say no, and that me must do so gracefully and directly. and more about my team. I had to provide the mission and the • Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have oversight and create the environment where they could excel. I to be the star player. gave the team a lot of independence to dohard workand gave them • There is no substitute for competence, their job and thorough preparation. the limelight in front of management. I was fortunate to have a • Be concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that good team that did not let me down. you get to the point and that your comments add value. Finally, I work your principles. Your reputation is priceless • Never compromisefor a company that values diversity. GE has and irreplaceable. reached out to me on numerous occasions as a woman and as a • Determine what that I have the appropriate exposure and career minority to ensure is important, focus on those priorities and let go of the rest. opportunities. I would encourage others to seek corporations that • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a similarly value a diverse workforce as a competitive advantage. negotiation—just the points that are most important to your client or organization. • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.

Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP HEADQUARTERS: Boston, Massachusetts
COMPANY: COMPANY:

General Electric Fairfield, Connecticut

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.ge.com Diversified industrial and financial corporation Over 300,000

EMPLOYEES:

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“Be in the moment—and set some boundaries.”

Marylou Y. Bailey
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N &AF I C E N T UP E C SH, LL R /

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eeingknow that leadership ongoing quest. However, I think all a good leader is an matters, whether in government, business, professional of staple ingredients During the course there are a handful groups or nonprofits. in the recipe for of my career, I’ve watched many the years leadersprofessionals success, which I’ve shared over different with in my firm, profession, industry and community who have helped me that I’ve mentored. grow personally and professionally. By their example, they Figure out your passion—and use it to inspire yourself were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally and others. This requires being open to various experiences or not. and intuiting what you really care about. This “passion” I believe that some of the most meaningful examples of leadgives you the extra energy to excel and provides an authentic ership, success and achievement are those that surround us in basis from which to motivate others. Once you find it, let othour daily lives, but are often easily overlooked or forgotten. ers know. Good leaders get it—and know they get the best For example, I have been blessed to be loved and supported results from people by helping them apply their passion to by a wonderful family who always inspire me and who taught the business. me, by their words and deeds, that success and achievement Think character, doing the right thing and a work in are all aboutof your role model as a mosaic and recognizing progress. My matters. that kindness role model is a mosaic of attributes, rather than a copy of one person. Growing up,benefit from colleagues who In addition, I’ve been lucky to I admired the drive and disciplined risk-taking needed it most, mentors who guided and offered help when Iof my father, while concurrently marveling at the grace and organizational provided mother, who love motivated me and friends whoskills of myunconditional kept our support. of nine running individuals and relationships and household These types of smoothly. I continue to update my model us, seek to adopt certain behaviors that fit my what strengthen and encourage us and enable us to accomplish overall could we style. not achieve by ourselves. By watching and learning journey androle models, I more Envision your career as a from such have in mind have developed these principles that guide my professional life: my than the next weigh station. I have always had a vision for career that flexibility and the the to manage I’ve made • Embracelooked well beyondneed next move. change. good Nothing stays the same for long. use of informal interactions with senior leaders several steps ahead of me the importance of was on consensus. about • Recognize to understand whatbuildingtheir minds Often,our

of Commercial Life Science Real Estate Women (CREW) Network EDUCATION: BA with honors in political science EDUCATION: University of Notre Dame, BBA and from Wellesley College; JD Concentration in MIS from Boston University School of Law FIRST JOB: Research Assistant FIRST JOB: Nursing home, food coordinator READING: God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons READING: The Memoirs of Paula Deen, famous Southern Everything, by Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: cook, and the latest Carl HiassenHave Changed America, 1789Brave Leaders and How They novel 1989, by Michael Beschloss; How Doctors Think, by Dr. PHILOSOPHY: Find out what “floats your boat” and take Jerome Groopman charge of your life so that you spend time on those things at work, home and play. the right thing. This one phrase the PHILOSOPHY: Do standard by which one should expect to be judged and the FAMILY: My husband Jim, our two Rat Terriers, and a large core value for which I aspire to be known. extended family, that includes 18 nieces and nephews FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother INTERESTS: I enjoythe Armenian Genocide) (who is a survivor of fly fishing, sailing, canoeing, white water rafting, renovating and decorating my historic bungalow and INTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop cooking.yoga, also very interested in developing the next generculture, I’m pilates, golf, spa treatments ation of women leaders and entrepreneurs and am active in a FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable number of Accenture training and mentoring venues for this.
FAVORITE CHARITY:

TITLE: Global Industry Managing Director, HealthPresident TITLE: Partner Nutter McClennen & Fish, LLP, &

Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo, particularly its Florida manatee hospital and conservation programs

this is more important than the actual outcome of any particular decision.

Accenture New York, New York WEB SITE: www.Accenture.com BUSINESS: Accenture is a global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company. Committed to delivering innovation, Accenture collaborates with its clients to help them become high-performance businesses and governments. REVENUES (AS OF AUGUST 31, 2006): $16.65 billion EMPLOYEES: More than 152,000 in 49 countries
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

• Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are business you will need to deliver badThis helped me formulateyou times and what motivated them. news or say no, and that my must do so gracefully and directly. longer term charter. Having a charter can help you navigate through a great team challenges and daily demands; it also enables • Being this quarter’s leader doesn't mean that you always have to be the star player. you to ask for and receive constructive help along the way. • There is no substitute for competence, hard work and Be in the moment—and set some boundaries. I try to thorough preparation. immerse myself in what is in front of me, even though I need • Be concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that to you get gears often. At work, being comments add value. focusswitch to the point and that your in the moment means ing on individual employee interactions, having time to reflect • Never compromise your principles. Your reputation is priceless quietlyirreplaceable. and on a client’s problem from their point of view, digging into what is important, focus on those priorities at stake, • Determinethe details and asking questions when a lot is and let and generally giving things my full attention (rather than multigo of the rest. tasking with cell and email overload).win every point inlife, I take • Understand that you don't have to In my personal a negotiation—just vacations” with most important to dogs— fabulous “adventurethe points that are my husband and your client or organization. the farther off the beaten path the better! And I really do turn off • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were work then. willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.
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“Believe in yourself and make sure you have a support base.”

Janet P. Baker
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W A FE T W ON C N LAC I RK

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elimbing the corporate ladder is hard enough—let alone all know that leadership matters, whether in government, business, professional groups pair of heels. Well, that is course climbing it with a nice, new or nonprofits. During the exactly of myIcareer, I’ve the guidance of great mentors. in my firm, what did with watched many different leaders They have profession, industry and as well as the soundhave helped me been the sounding board community who of reason for me grow personally and professionally. By their example, they as I’ve worked to achieve professional and personal growth. were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally I began my career as a 12-year-old bookkeeper/station or not. attendant at my family’s full-service gas station. The transition I believe that some of the most meaningful examples of leadover time to senior-level executive placed me in the paths of ership, success and achievement are those that surround us in some wonderful mentors who helped me achieve the growth our daily lives, but are often easily overlooked or forgotten. needed to succeed in the corporate environment. For example, I have been blessed to be loved and supported by a As a mentor and who alwaysyou must be self-aware and wonderful family mentoree, inspire me and who taught know your areas of and deeds, that success and potential of me, by their wordsimprovement. To maximize theachievement mentors, surrounding doing with others you can trust and are all about character,yourselfthe right thing and recognizing respect is key. These that kindness matters. individuals can be in the community, church, or career field that youto benefit tap into. In addition, I’ve been lucky aspire to from colleagues who offered help when I needed it most, mentors who guided and I recommend fostering relationships with more than one motivated me and friends whoseveral areas. For example, if mentor so you can develop in provided unconditional love and need public speaking skills, one of your mentors should be you support. These types of individuals and relationships strengthen us, encourage us you lack computer skills, seek out experienced in that area; if and enable us to accomplish what we could not achieveaccomplished computer whiz. I describe someone who is an by ourselves. By watching and learning from such role models, I have exceptional mentors as: developed these principles that guide my professional life: • People who are honest. • Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change. • Nothing stays the same for long. People you respect. • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often,

TITLE:

EDUCATION: BS in management and Master’s in human EDUCATION: BA with from Troy University resource management honors in political science from

PartnerVice President and Director,LLP, President of Senior Nutter McClennen & Fish, Client Services Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network

Wellesley College; JD from Boston University School of Law FIRST JOB: At 12, I became a full service gas station attenFIRST the family-owned business. dant in JOB: Research Assistant In the early 1960s, gas was 27 cents a gallon is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, and that price included checking the tire READING: God pressure, washing the windows and examining under the hood. by Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders READING: Attitude is Everything, by Keith Harrell by the Bible and How They Have Changed America, 1789-1989, andMichael Beschloss; How Trust in the Lord with Jerome Groopmanlean Doctors Think, by Dr. all your heart and PHILOSOPHY: PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. This one 3:5 not on your own understanding. —Proverbs phrase the standard by which one should expect to be judged and the FAMILY: Husband, a daughter, seven grandchildren, one core value for which I aspire to be known. great-grandchild FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother (who INTERESTS: Singing in the church choir and watching football is a my husband who is a diehard NFL withsurvivor of the Armenian Genocide) fan. INTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop FAVORITE CHARITIES: Any organization that is committed to culture, yoga, pilates, golf, spa treatments helping the youth realize there are options and they have a FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable bright future ahead of them. Foundation, HomeStart, CREW Foundation

• this is more important than the actual outcome of any particular People who want to mentor you. decision. • People who have your best interests at heart. • Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are times you will need to deliver bad news or say no, and that you must do so gracefully and directly. I am most often asked is Today, as a mentor, the question • Being a great team leader doesn't The best advicealways give is: “How can I get the job you have?” mean that you I can have to be the star player. • Be willing to start wherever you are and be the best at what • There is no substitute for competence, hard work and you’re doing. thorough preparation. • Be concise. Everyone's time isnot a premium. Make sure that Focus on your own progress, at other people’s progress. you get to the point and that your comments add value. • Work hard and seek out opportunities to increase your job • Never compromise your principles. Your reputation is priceless knowledge. and irreplaceable. • Determineyourself and make sure you have a support base. let Believe in what is important, focus on those priorities and go of the rest. • Always focus on what you can give back. • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a negotiation—justcan change that are most Iimportant to your Even though I the points tires and oil, don’t have the exact client or organization. formula for success. I do, however, believe that acquiring capable • Never and returning the favor or aspiring professionals does help mentors hesitate to ask for help to forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your everyone make it to the top. and support others. responsibility to reach out

COMPANY:

Aflac, Inc. Columbus, Georgia

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

aflac.com Voluntary benefits sold at the worksite $14 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

4,700 corporate headquarter employees and 69,000 field force agents

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I never imagined I’d find myself saying the words “career” and “love” in the same sentence.
But at Hallmark, I do it all the time. Here, I feel empowered as a Latina and as editorial director for Sinceramente Hallmark, our Spanish-language card line, to infuse all I do with the passion and substance of my heritage. At Hallmark we have one purpose—to enrich people’s lives. But I didn’t know that in fulfilling that purpose, my life would also be enriched in so many ways. So now I can truly say that meaningful work and purposeful life come together for me every day. And I can also say that at Hallmark— and in Kansas City—I’ve found my home.
arlette torres – editorial director

l i v e y o u r pa s s i o n . l o v e y o u r w o r k .

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HALLMARK CAREER OPPORTUNITIES, VISIT WWW.HALLMARK.COM/CAREERS.
© 2007 hal lmar k cards, inc.

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“Nothing brings me more satisfaction than seeing coworkers I’ve mentored build impressive careers.”

Carol Barber
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H ,E L L P / C R EO D E S T W O U P B RNARD H W NE GR RK

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ehen know askedleadershipthis essay, whether in wonder what all I was that to write matters, I began to government, characteristics these trusted or nonprofits. in common. So, I business, professional groups advisors had During the course conducted a little research, contacting colleagues, many of of my career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, whom are great mentors themselves, and posing this question: profession, industry and effective mentor? have helped me What makes someone an community who grow personally and professionally. By their example, they My colleagues described effective mentors as: were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally KNOWLEDGE BEARERS/SHARERS. Many mentioned that or not. mentors’ knowledge is indisputable and encompasses profesI believe that some of the most meaningful examples of leadsional know-how and an understanding of their company’s ership, success and and political eccentricities. They are openly landscape, culture, achievement are those that surround us in generous with advice often easily overlooked or forgotten. our daily lives, but are to help others achieve their professional goals and avoid pesky landmines along the way! and supported For example, I have been blessed to be loved by a wonderful family whoare optimistic me and who taught always inspire realists; they know CHEERLEADERS. Mentors nothing is perfect but exude the sense that can be. With an me, by their words and deeds, that successitand achievement exceptional ability to spot potential in others, and recognizing are all about character, doing the right thingan effective mentor always addresses mentee struggles with honesty, respect and that kindness matters. a positive outlook. In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit from colleagues who EXPERIENCED EXPLORERS. Mentors have “been there, done offered help when I needed it most, mentors who guided and that, and have the t-shirt.” They can provide road maps with motivated me and friends who provided unconditional love clear routes between points A and B. Every encounter with a mentee is an These types listen, empathize, achieve mutual and support.opportunity to of individuals and relationships understanding and create new possibilities. strengthen us, encourage us and enable us to accomplish what we could not achieve by ourselves. TRUSTWORTHY CONFIDANTS. Perhaps the most important aspect watching and learning from is trust. Effective mentors By of a mentoring relationship such role models, I have shun taking credit for mentees’ achievements. Theylife: developed these principles that guide my professional refrain from passing judgment, taking sides and spreading gossip. They are flexibility for maintaining strict confidentiality • Embrace respected and the need to manage change. regarding sensitive company matters. Nothing stays the same for long. • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often,

Partner Nutter McClennen & Fish, LLP, President of Executive Vice President Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network EDUCATION: College drop-out after two years EDUCATION: BA with honors in political science from FIRST JOB: Part-time auditor of long-distance truck driver Wellesley College; JD from Boston University School of Law trip records (Ryder) FIRST JOB: Research Assistant READING: Collapse, by JaredHow Religion Poisons Everything, God is Not Great: Diamond; Slaves in the Family, by Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders Edward Ball and How They Have Changed America, 1789-1989, by Michael PHILOSOPHY: Doctors the afflicted; afflict the comfortable Beschloss; How Comfort Think, by Dr. Jerome Groopman (Translation: question everything/challenge the status quo). PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. This one phrase the standard Husband, Bill; two married to be judged and the FAMILY: by which one should expectdaughters, and two grandcore value I’m fortunate to still have my parents, plus many daughters. for which I aspire to be known. FAMILY: Parents,cousins, and my dear sister and her family. aunts, uncles and siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother (who is a survivor of the Armenian Genocide) INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, interior decoratINTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop ing, cooking, tennis, bridge, writing and Scrabble culture, yoga, pilates, golf, spa treatments Smile Train and Habitat for Humanity FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable Foundation, HomeStart, CREW Foundation
TITLE:

COMPANY:

Bernard Hodes Group New York, New York

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.hodes.com Recruitment advertising and communications

. Many outcome of any felt that this is more important than the actualof my colleaguesparticular effective mentors are never too busy to spend time helping others. decision. No question their success on the job is probably part of company • Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are lore, but they’reneed to deliver bad news or say no, andathat you times you will also respected for having achieved healthy balance,do somight be the first to suggest, “Why don’t you take a must and gracefully and directly. few days off?” • Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have BIG PICTURE THINKERS. Most saw managers as focused on the to be the star player. day-to-day, while mentors focused on the larger landscape and • There is no substitute for see the futurehardtalented people and the greater good. Mentors competence, in work and thorough reporting lines to help improve performance in any nimbly crosspreparation. functional area. • Be concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that you get to the point and that your comments add value. IN CONCLUSION … This exercise helped me understand that striving • Never compromise your brings value to my company’s greatest to be an effective mentor principles. Your reputation is priceless and irreplaceable. asset, our people. Nothing brings me more satisfaction than seeing coworkers I’ve mentored build impressive careers. I hope they’ll • Determine what is important, focus on those priorities and let share of theexperiences with others, and find out for themselves just go their rest. how rewarding mentoring can be! • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a negotiation—just the points that are most important to your client or organization.
WINNERS IN WORK AND LIFE

2006 REVENUES: N/A (Hodes is a member of Omnicom Group, which reported $11.4 billion in revenue for 2006) EMPLOYEES:

800 globally

• Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.

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I N T E G R AT E D T A L E N T S O L U T I O N S

Talent Matters.

Carol Barber Executive Vice President Bernard Hodes Group

It takes talent to find talent.
Meet Carol Barber, Executive Vice President of Bernard Hodes Group and a Woman Worth Watching. Carol represents what makes Bernard Hodes Group so special – a commitment and dedication to diverse talent. 64% of our employees are women. So our clients know that when we offer solutions like Diversity Recruitment and Training it comes from more than research studies, but personal experience. Because
Managing Workforce Diversity Online
Download this free white paper on the challenges facing online diversity recruitment.
www.hodes.com/diversity

Talent Matters, whether it’s the many faces of your organization, or the team helping you to find them.

www.hodes.com/diversity
Recruitment Marketing Sourcing/Response Management Hiring Process Re-engineering

888 438 9911
Staffing Technology

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“Leadership requires us to break old paradigms that have historically gotten in our way.”

Janet Barnard
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S HC O L PC OC R E WNNC AT I O N K , L X / MMU I ETW RS

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e all know grew leadership matters, the countrygovernment, lthough I that up in an area of whether in that was as business, professionalmy parents instilled some of my deepest homogenous as any, groups or nonprofits. During the course of my career,about diversity and different leaders in instilled a motivations I’ve watched many inclusion. They my firm, profession, industry and community who have helped me tremendous work ethic and the expectation that I could do grow personally and professionally. By their example, they anything I set my mind to. were All three ofmy teachers, sisters, none of them personally and remain my older whether I know whom initially or not. college, settled in the DC area, taking jobs with the attended I believe that some Coming meaningful examples leadfederal government. of the mostfrom a country highofschool ership, 20 students achievement aare those that surround us in where success and comprised large graduating class, they our daily muchbut are often easily overlooked or forgotten. traveled lives, further than the physical 1300 miles from For example, I journey. What does all of this and supported Nebraska for this have been blessed to be lovedhave to do with by a wonderful family who always inspire race, gender or ethdiversity and inclusion? No matter your me and who taught me, background, toand deeds, you have toand achievement nic by their words succeed, that success first believe to are all about character, doing the right thing and recognizing you can. that In the early 80s, my husband and I bought a farm and kindness matters. In addition, I’ve been lucky to with from colleagues An began a joint farming operation benefitmy father-in-law.who offered help when I neededinterest rates forced us to abandon economic slump and high it most, mentors who guided and motivated me and friends Macon, Georgia, to begin my new that dream. We moved to who provided unconditional love and support. These typesThere we experienced relationships career in cable television. of individuals and for the first strengthen us,the remnants of intolerance, to accomplish what time some of encourage us and enable us centuries old, with we could not achieve by ourselves. two young children in tow. By watching and learning from such role models, I have As we moved about the country, I learned that to succeed, developed these principles that guide my professional life: we must make our own way. I have long believed that one • Embrace flexibilityresponsibility, to manage change. reward, must earn respect, and the need recognition, and Nothing stays the same for long. whatever your definition of success is. Closely related, I believe • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often, be that we’re all blessed with certain talents that are meant to
Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Cox Communications (Northern Virginia Division) Atlanta, Georgia ww.cox.com/fairfax Communications and Entertainment Private company

TITLE: Vice President McClennen & Fish, LLP, President of TITLE: Partner Nutter & Region Manager, Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network Northern Virginia Division EDUCATION: BA with honors in political science from EDUCATION: University of Nebraska, Lincoln Wellesley College; JD from Boston University School of Law FIRST JOB: Beatrice Assistant FIRST JOB: Research Construction Company

READING: God is Not Great: Howthe Question, by Everything, READING: The Question Behind Religion Poisons by Christopher John G. Miller Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and How They Have Changed America, 1789-1989, by Michael PHILOSOPHY: Maximize use of Dr. talents Groopman Beschloss; How Doctors Think, by my Jerome and the talents of those who I influence to leave the This one a betterthe world in phrase place than PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. I found it.by which one should expect to be judged and the standard core value for which I aspire to be known. FAMILY: My husband, Bryan, and I have two grown FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother (who daughters is a survivor of the Armenian Genocide) INTERESTS: Mentoring, reading, golf, interior decorating, INTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop traveling, live spectator sports of any kind culture, yoga, pilates, golf, spa treatments FAVORITE CHARITIES: Diller Community Foundation and FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable Foundation, HomeStart, Lutheran Family Service CREW Foundation

COMPANY: COMPANY:

this is more important than the actual outcome to be effective, maximized. Utilizing them properly allows us of any particular decision. because we’re engaging in things that are energizing to us. We’re • Be honest and straight-forward.talent with activity. there are enjoying the proper alignment of Recognize that that times you will need to deliver bad news or say no, and that you Mentoring is an excellent tool to must do so gracefully and directly. help our children and young professionals find that inner talent and passion. Mentoring minor• Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have ityto be female professionals—some of whom are hesitant to pursue and the star player. their talents because they may not readily see people like them• There is no substitute for competence, hard work and selves in successful leadership positions—is incredibly powerful. As thorough preparation. a female leaderEveryone's time is fortunate to receive such guidance • Be concise. in Cox, I’ve been at a premium. Make sure that from otherto the pointrole models, including myadd value. you get successful and that your comments current manager, JillNever compromise your principles. Your reputation is priceless • Campbell. and irreplaceable. Leadership requires us to break old paradigms that have historically gotten is important, our work place today, each of our • Determine whatin our way. In focus on those priorities and let go members team of the rest. seeks out the voices needed at the table. This • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a we’ve requires growing or searching out leaders with perspectives negotiation—just the points that task. It is our responsibility not had in the past; not a simpleare most important to your client or organization. to create an environment for all the voices to be heard, to be ful• Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were filled, and, yes, to have a desire to stay and grow inyour own willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget their leadership journeys. responsibility to reach out and support others.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

1,000 employees in Northern Virginia, the operation Ms. Barnard oversees.

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“Don’t believe any person who says you have to give up one thing for another.”

Candice R. Barnhardt
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R EN AT IE T W O R K W N ONWIDE

W T

e all know that leadership of successful female government, apping into the expertise matters, whether in mentors can business, you with guidance, nonprofits. Duringfellowship. provide professional groups or motivation and the course of my career,my career I have been fortunate to have had firm, Throughout I’ve watched many different leaders in my menprofession,helped build something within me. It helped me tors who industry and community who have helped me grow personally needed to do and do Bysuccessfully. Through focus on what I and professionally. it their example, they were and remain my teachers, whether I know my own experithese important relationships and through them personally or not. ences, I have learned many valuable lessons. I believe that some of the most meaningful examples of leadRECOGNIZE AND HONOR YOUR are those Corporations were ership, success and achievementABILITIES. that surround us in designed for but by men. I don’t believe it was done our daily lives,men,are often easily overlooked or forgotten. to For example, have been the workforce was and supported exclude women,Ibut becauseblessed to be loved predominantly by a wonderful family who womeninspire me and change how male, it created a need for always to sometimes who taught me, by their words and deeds,environment. and achievement they operated in the corporate that success are all about character, doing the right that are inclusive and We need to create organizations thing and recognizing that kindness matters. must come to the place where we honor work for everyone. We In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit from colleagues who those natural gifts and what individuals can bring to the table. offered help when I needed it most, mentors who guided and When we pay attention to that, we give way to the power to motivated me and friends who provided unconditional love make the right changes and truly create opportunities. and support. These types of individuals and relationships strengthen us, encourage us and enable us to HAVE TO GIVE UP DON’T BELIEVE ANY PERSON WHO SAYS YOU accomplish what we could not achieve by ourselves.are always choices and there ONE THING FOR ANOTHER. There are By watching and but there from such role models, have to always trade-offs, learning are some that just don’t I have developedYou can be a mother and you can be an executive— be made. these principles that guide my professional life:

Partner Nutter McClennen & Fish, LLP, President of Chief Diversity Officer Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network FIRST JOB: My first paying job was as a car-hop, but I didn’t EDUCATION: BA My honors in political science from have roller-skates. withfirst professional job was as a finance Wellesley College; JD from Boston manager with a car dealership. University School of Law FIRST JOB: Research Assistant READING: The Millionth Circle, by Jean Shinoda Bolen; READING: Change,Not Marianne Williamson. The Gift of God is by Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, by Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders PHILOSOPHY: My Changed America, 1789-1989, by She and How They Have philosophy is my mother’s legacy. Michael instilled in How Doctors Think, by that every human being Beschloss;me a fundamental beliefDr. Jerome Groopman has a right to be treated with dignity and respect and have PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. This one phrase the who they are uniquely should expect to be judged and the standard by which one honored. This belief has guided my career choices and how I do my work. core value for which I aspire to be known. FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother (who FAMILY: Husband, Steve; 13-year-old son and a 15-year-old of the Armenian Genocide) is a survivordaughter. INTERESTS: Reading, and reading. I am politics, pop INTERESTS: Gardeningmovies, shopping,also a workout fanatic. culture, yoga, pilates, golf, spa treatments FAVORITE CHARITIES: One of my primary charities is my FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemian Charitable church. I also support Compassion International. I am inclined Foundation, HomeStart, CREW Foundation toward charities that work for children.
TITLE:

and you don’t have to be the need to manage of us are! • Embrace flexibility andperfect, because nonechange. Nothing stays the same for long. are YOURS. We have a Your choices and your trade-offs • Recognize theand control than we sometimes think; we just lot more power importance of building consensus. Often, have to own Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP COMPANY: it!
HEADQUARTERS: COMPANY:

Boston, Massachusetts

Nationwide Columbus, Ohio

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.nationwide.com Insurance and financial services $22 billion

this is more important than the actual outcome of any particular decision. BREAK DOWN YOUR OWN BARRIERS. There are moments when I • Bemyself thinking that I am not big enoughthat whatthere are find honest and straight-forward. Recognize for that I am being times you will need to deliver bad news or say no, and that you called to do. By not trustingdirectly. and my heart, I get in my must do so gracefully and my mind own way great team leader for myself. • Being aand create barriers doesn't mean that you always have to Through my faith, I am able to break down those barriers. be the star player. Whatever no substitute for think it’s important to and • There isyour beliefs are, I competence, hard work recognize that thorough preparation. you are capable of being as big as you need to be, and you have to • Be that. trust concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that you get to the point and that your comments add value. FIND WAYS TO CONNECT AND NETWORK. These relationships are • Never compromise your principles. Your reputation is priceless and irreplaceable. invaluable to both your personal and professional growth. We have to find ways what is important, focus on time that is not always • Determine to connect and to take that those priorities and let go of the but easy to find,rest. which is critical to being healthy. • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a within We must position ourselves as a valuable resource negotiation—just the points that are most important to your the organization and find ways to connect and create powerful client or organization. networks. • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.
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“Ask questions and seek the counsel of others. You’ll be amazed by what you learn.”

Kelly Barr
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & FS S H , L LIP E R R RWJ NC T W O R K I A LT R V / C P E O E E (SRP)

S

alt River Project has a mentoring program in which hundreds of employees participate. Over the years, people have taken the time to mentor me, and I’ve returned the favor by mentoring others. While I’m a firm believer in the benefits of having a mentor, I have always believed that mentoring can be more than just a one-on-one relationship. This past year, a group of eight women at SRP and I decided to take SRP’s existing mentoring program in a new and exciting direction. After a series of meetings and informal discussions with other women at SRP, we launched the Women’s Interest Network (WIN), an employee interest group with the mission of “developing women leaders at SRP, providing networking opportunities, offering a setting for riskfree exchanges on career development, supporting SRP’s business objectives, and contributing to the improvement of the community.” WIN participants gather quarterly for presentations from women leaders. Our group is made up of women (and men) at all stages in their lives and careers. I’m proud to be a part of this program and believe that it will have a positive effect on many individuals and support SRP’s business objectives. When a coworker asks me for advice, I like to share these thoughts with them:

TITLE:

Manager, Regulatory Affairs & Contracts BA, General Studies, University of Arizona;

EDUCATION:

JD, University of Arizona College of Law
FIRST JOB: READING:

Bank teller at First Federal Savings Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner Treat others as you would like to be treated.

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband, Scott; two sons, 11 and 13 Outdoor activities, hiking, exercising and

INTERESTS:

anything to do with my family.
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Teach for America, Arizona

Association of Food Banks, St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation

Find something that you are passionate about. I believe in SRP’s mission to provide low-cost and reliable power and water to customers, which makes my work interesting and fulfilling. Find people you enjoy working with. At work, step up. Volunteer for projects that interest you, and even for those that don’t. If you do good work, you’ll become known as someone who can be counted on to get things done. Ask questions and seek the counsel of others. You’ll be amazed by what you learn. Get involved in your community. Find causes that complement your work activities. For example, I practice energy law. As such, I don’t often get the chance to work on education, food security or healthcare issues. Thus, I serve on the boards of Teach for America, the Arizona Association of Food Banks and the St. Joseph’s Hospital Foundation. This community involvement provides new opportunities for learning.

COMPANY:

Salt River Project (SRP) Phoenix, Arizona

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.srpnet.com

BUSINESS: SRP is the largest provider of electricity and water to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$2.21 billion

4,500

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Innovation has many faces.
At Lockheed Martin, that includes everyone.
Whether it’s breakthrough technology for fighter jets, spacecraft that explore the cosmos, or information systems that keep government running smoothly, Lockheed Martin has important work to do. We need the sharpest minds available. And when we find them, we welcome them.

www.lockheedmartin.com
© 2007 Lockheed Martin Corporation

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“Jobs can be fixed, roles can change, but human impact is everlasting.”

Wendy Beckman
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N S TA R B U C K S C O F F E E C O M PA N Y & FISH, LLP / CREW NETWORK

W

eelive in a world saturated in technology. It can seem impossiall know that leadership matters, whether in government, business, professional groups or nonprofits. During the course ble to keep up, and true communication and human connecof my career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, tion appear to have and community who have helped me profession, industry suffered. Technological tools have rapidly grow personally and professionally. By their example, they connected the globe, making it seem ever smaller. However, were and remain my teachers, whether I know them personally our virtual connections can create different dynamics in or not. I believe that relationships. some of the most meaningful examples of leadership, success and achievement are those that surround us in Our job as leaders is to ensure we are using technology our daily lives, but are often easily overlooked or forgotten. as For example, I have been blessed to be loved and supported a tool—not as a replacement for our humanity, but as a leverby a wonderful family who always inspire me and who taught aging point words and positive impacts we can make in the me, by theirfor the manydeeds, that success and achievement are all about character, doing where we serve and operate. The local and global communities the right thing and recognizing that kindness matters. impact we can I’ve beenno longerbenefit from colleagueswalls. In addition, make is lucky to restricted to our four who offered help reach of needed it most, mentors who guided and Indeed, the when I our influence can be far greater than we motivated me and friends who provided unconditional love will ever know. Many women have a great talent for commuand support. These types of individuals and relationships nication and encourage us and enable us to accomplish what strengthen us,personal interaction. Combining that with the we could not achieve by ourselves. education gained from school or life experience and the techBy watching and learning from such role models, I have nological these principles us can be my powerful. developedtools available to that guide very professional life: • Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change. Nothing stays the same for long. • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often,

Partner Nutter President, StarbucksLLP, President of Regional Vice McClennen & Fish, Coffee Company, Mid-Atlantic Region Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Network EDUCATION: BA with honors in political science from Bachelor’s degree, Michigan State University, but my real educationfrom Boston University ISchool from my Wellesley College; JD continues from what learn of Law family, my Starbucks partners and my travels. FIRST JOB: Research Assistant FIRST JOB: Apple picking in an orchard when I was READING: God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, 10 Christopher Hitchens; Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders by years old READING: I’ve read the first America, lot of really great and How They Have Changed page of a 1789-1989, by Michael books lately! Beschloss; How Doctors Think, by Dr. Jerome Groopman PHILOSOPHY: Do the right thing. Thisbelieve in living your Among other things, I one phrase the standard by whichhard, shouldfair and taking judged and the best life, working one being expect to be care of each other. core value for which I aspire to be known. FAMILY: Yes! Husband, two sons (13 and 10), a dog named FAMILY: Parents, siblings and 101-year-old Grandmother (who Mike, sisters, brothers, mother, and my extended family is a survivor of the Armenian Genocide) of friends INTERESTS: Reading, movies, shopping, politics, pop and I enjoy being outside, traveling, cooking, spending timepilates, golf, and friends. culture, yoga, with family spa treatments FAVORITE CHARITIES: John Gerald Ajemianthat I believe in anything Charitable inspires people to dig deeper than themselves and drive Foundation, HomeStart, CREW Foundation positive change.
TITLE:

this is more important than the actual outcome of any particular decision. • Be honest and straight-forward. Recognize that that there are Jobs can be need roles can bad news or say no, and that you times you willfixed, to deliverchange, but human impact is evermust As women in business, we lasting. do so gracefully and directly.are faced with different chal• Being a great team leader doesn't mean that you always have lenges than star player. faced before us. We have a responsibility to be the our mothers • There isand substitute for continue to drive positive change and as leaders no as women to competence, hard work and thorough preparation. to be thankful for the many sacrifices of those before us. Whether • Be concise. Everyone's time is at a premium. Make sure that you get to was about race, your comments add value. the struggle the point and thatequality, economics and/or social • Never compromise your principles. Your reputation is priceless injustice, we must continue their legacy of paving the way for those and irreplaceable. • Determine must make the world better. those priorities and let to come. We what is important, focus on go of the rest. • Understand that you don't have to win every point in a negotiation—just the points that are most important to your client or organization. • Never hesitate to ask for help or forget the people who were willing to offer you guidance. Likewise, never forget your responsibility to reach out and support others.

Starbucks Coffee Company Seattle, Washington WEB SITE: www.starbucks.com BUSINESS: Starbucks Coffee Company provides an uplifting experience that enriches people’s lives one moment, one human being, one extraordinary cup of coffee at a time. 2006 REVENUES: $6.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 139,601
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

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“You must be open to trying new things and to the unexpected because the unexpected is what makes business exciting.”

Carolyn Biggs
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P A K SRF IW H E T W O R K S / C E F T N AV E N U E

W A

s Iall know that leadership matters, whether surface as having e reflect on my career, many key moments in government, business, professional groupswellnonprofits. During the course an impact on my success as or as my leadership style. of my career, I’ve watched many different leaders in my firm, I took industry and community who have helped me profession, my first job, which was in retailing, while going to grow personally andfirst of many mentors, toldexample, they school. My Dad, the professionally. By their me if I acceptwere and remainImy teachers, whether I know them personally ed the position was making a commitment to the company or not. and the people. With that commitment came the responsibilI believe that some of the most meaningful examples of leadity to success and achievement are being given, and to do it ership,deliver on the position I was those that surround us in to daily lives, but are often this overlooked have an incredourthe best of my ability. Toeasily day, I feel Ior forgotten. For example, responsibility to those I loved and to not let ible amount of I have been blessed to be work with supported by a wonderful family who always inspire me and who taught them down. me, by their words and deeds, that success and achievement Mentors have played a key right my and recognizing are all about character, doing therole inthingown growth and that kindness matters. development. They were always challenging me beyond my In addition, I’ve been lucky to benefit from colleagues who own personal comfort zone. More importantly, however, they offered help when I needed it most, mentors who guided and helped me to see what was possible. My open-to-learn attitude motivated me and friends who provided unconditional love allowed me to step types of individuals and relationships and support. These into the unfamiliar and succeed. I was strengthen us, encourage us and my career:to accomplish what taught two lessons very early in enable us be open to change weevery day will be different, and in management, “time is of as could not achieve by ourselves. By watching and learning from such role models, I have no importance.” Lucky for me, I have always had a strong developed these principles that guide my professional life: work ethic, remaining focused on getting the job done, and • Embrace flexibility and the need to manage change. not on howstays thetakes. for long. Nothing long it same • Recognize the importance of building consensus. Often,

TITLE:

Executive Vice President/Director of Stores, Visual, Store Planning and Construction Pre-med major University of Memphis Selling in a department store in Memphis,

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Tennessee
READING: The Power of Nice, by Linda Kaplan Thaler and Robin Koval PHILOSOPHY:

I believe that one person can make a difference, but teamwork is how you build a great organization. Success to me is when my team wins. Husband and son Family, reading, golf, and travel American Cancer Foundation, Hospice

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

I have been fortunate to work in every aspect of the retail business, from selling to buying to management. In the years it has taken me to get to my current position in which I oversee many stores, I have garnered an appreciation for every position because I once held them. It takes every member of the team playing his or her position for winning to happen. One of my biggest challenges as a leader has been overcoming the belief that I have to know everything. To be successful, I believe you must be passionate about what you do. You must be open to trying new things and to the unexpected because the unexpected is what makes business exciting. You must be willing to make mistakes; mistakes are lessons learned. I believe that one person can make a difference, but teamwork is how you build a great organization. Success to me is when my team wins.

COMPANY:

Saks Fifth Avenue New York, New York www.saks.com, www.saksincorporated.com Retail $2.9 billion 16,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITES: BUSINESS: REVENUES:

EMPLOYEES:

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“I strongly believe that influential leaders are those that have experienced more through trying more.”

Amy Blair
LIBERTY GLOBAL INC

W

hile it may be true that some people are born leaders, I believe that strong leaders are developed. Throughout our careers, most of us are likely to remember the people along the way that recognized our potential and who offered opportunity, direction and encouragement. As a leader myself today, I take the responsibility to provide this same foundation to those I lead, with great commitment. I have always appreciated the value of hard work, to which I may expressly credit my father, the very first of my mentors. From my earliest job at age 16, I experienced personally how much more one can accomplish with hard work when supported by the guidance and confidence of someone who is rooting for you to succeed. Upon joining the company which is now Liberty Global, I have had the great fortune of working with solid, dynamic leaders, who often lent their experiences and knowledge to help me shape my career. While each contributed their own strengths, offering directional, practical or inspirational motivation, all instilled a sense of empowerment enabling me to seek continued growth. With that focus on growth, alongside the support of trusted leaders, I have been able to forge a path I have immensely enjoyed. Ultimately, my most challenging decisions have been

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources BA, Colorado College; MBA, University of

EDUCATION:

Denver
FIRST JOB:

Office assistant in Coldwell Banker affiliated The Emperor’s Children, by Claire Messud

office
READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

“I not only use all the brains I have, but all I can borrow.” —Woodrow Wilson Married Running, animals, and lots of laughter People for the Ethical Treatment

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

my most fulfilling, whether accepting an international role in the Netherlands where I remained for seven years, or later, returning to the United States to lead global Human Resources. Throughout these milestones, I have relied immeasurably upon the wisdom and example of my mentors to guide me personally as well as professionally. Today, it is this key platform of both opportunity and empowerment that I aim to provide to the upcoming leaders I encounter. With a company that extends across 17 countries, my job presents an expansive and exciting forum to reach and impact new leaders. Liberty Global also highly values the recognition of its employees and encourages opportunity for long-term growth. After almost 15 years with the company, I am a proud example. I strongly believe that influential leaders are those that have experienced more through trying more. It is therefore our task to ensure that new and upcoming leaders have goals to pursue, challenges to welcome and the confidence to do so with vigour.

COMPANY:

Liberty Global, Inc. Englewood, Colorado

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.lgi.com Broadband cable operator $6.5 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

20,500

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D E D I C AT I O N

At Pfizer, our goal is to become the world’s most valued company to patients, customers, colleagues, investors, business partners and the communities where we work and live. We are dedicated to helping people live longer, healthier, happier lives — adding both years to life, and life to years.

Working for a healthier world™

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“If you are not willing to work on yourself in a dedicated and disciplined manner, no one else will be willing to help you.”

Irene Chang Britt
C A M P B E L L S O U P C O M PA N Y

I

’m often asked for advice on career development, and the first

TITLE:

thing I tell people is that developing yourself is hard work. What I’ve found helpful is to have some basic principles to live by: Work hard; have a positive, can-do attitude; take personal responsibility for your actions; and know your personal values. But beyond that, I have found it beneficial also to be open to all possibilities. I truly believe that, to a large extent, you make your own luck. Good things happen when you are prepared and of open mind and spirit when opportunities come knocking. This means being willing to take risks, push past your comfort zone and take on the ugly challenges, because some of the prettiest opportunities initially come dressed in the ugliest clothing. With all that said, it is safe to say that I believe that you are your own best mentor. If you are not willing to work on yourself in a dedicated and disciplined manner, no one else will be willing to help you. So, push yourself, experiment, reflect, learn, and seek feedback from others on your team.

Vice President and General Manager, Sauces & Beverages, Campbell USA University of Toronto, undergraduate; MBA, University of Western Ontario

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Kimberly-Clark Corporation, assistant brand manager READING:

True North, by Bill George

PHILOSOPHY:

Work hard. Be happy. Do good. Be passionate. Be grateful. Spread joy. Reach down and lift up. Husband, 2 children Cooking, walking, charitable work

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Refugees International; any organization that helps fight homelessness

On formal mentorship, I do think that it is a great way to further develop yourself. I have been very fortunate to have had many mentors in my career. Some of them knew they were mentoring me, while some never knew that they were serving that role. It is important to seek out mentors and not wait for one to be given to you. Know your development needs and find people who can help you improve. Make certain that the relationship is founded on honesty and trust. Be clear in your own mind that mentorship is not sponsorship, and that your mentor should help you improve, not necessarily guarantee advancement to the next job. Also, seek out a broad network of mentors and advisors, not just one individual relationship. As hard as self-development seems, I have found that you reap what you sow.

Campbell Soup Company HEADQUARTERS: Camden, New Jersey WEB SITE: www.campbellsoup.com BUSINESS: Consumer goods 2006 REVENUES: $7.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 23,000
COMPANY:

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“Deliver results and do so with integrity.”

Adrianne M. Brown
HONEYWELL

M

y parents were my first mentors. They instilled in me a drive to excel, a strong work ethic and the self-confidence to take intelligent risks without fear of failure. My father was a teacher who worked summers as a realtor. When I was 10 years old, he took me to the real estate office where I met his boss, an African American woman who made a big impression on me. I immediately saw an image of what I wanted to do when I grew up—it would require that I wear a nice suit and carry a briefcase! While I refined my aspirations considerably over the next decade, the image of Mrs. Madison stayed with me. African American women in business were scarce in those days, so I didn’t have many role models who looked like me. In turn, I have come to appreciate that today I have the ability to inspire others in the same way. They say that when the pupil is ready the teacher will appear. I have found that to be true and have always opened myself up to the idea of learning. Mentors have appeared at just the right time throughout my career. Early in my career I learned that I could achieve greater results by embracing my inexperience. With the help of more experienced people in the organization, I adopted an “ask, don’t tell” approach that helped me build a strong, cohesive,

TITLE:

President and CEO, Honeywell Transportation Systems

EDUCATION:

BS in Environmental Health from Old Dominion University; MS in Management as a Sloan Fellow from Massachusetts Institute of Technology

FIRST JOB: Shift supervisor at a 500-person electronics component manufacturing plant READING: All Too Human: A Political Education, by George Stephanopoulos PHILOSOPHY:

“Risk more than others think is safe. Care more than others think is wise. Dream more than others think is practical. Expect more than others think is possible.” —Cadet Maxim

FAMILY:

Husband and 9-year-old daughter, an adult stepson and his family and an incredible extended family

INTERESTS: Family time and mentoring youth and experienced professionals FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Jobs for America’s Graduates;

Alzheimer’s Association

high-performing team by drawing on the knowledge and experience of the employees in the group. When I joined Honeywell in 1999, I found a demanding, performance-driven organization that suits my personal management style. I also found passionate, knowledgeable mentors who helped me negotiate the twists and turns of a complex, global company that touches the lives of millions of people. Today, as head of Honeywell’s $4.6 billion global Transportation Systems business, I often find myself in the position of paying back all the great mentors I’ve had in my career by sharing what I’ve learned with the next generation of Honeywell leaders. My advice is consistent. First, deliver results and do so with integrity. Be a person of your word. Find bright and successful people to be a part of your team, making sure they complement your weaknesses. And never, ever stop learning.

COMPANY:

Honeywell Morristown, New Jersey

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.honeywell.com

BUSINESS: Aerospace, automation and controls solutions, transportation systems and specialty materials 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$31 billion

120,000

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“Know when your student wants advice and give it.”

Edith Pettway Brown
N AT I O N A L C I T Y C O R P O R AT I O N

D

o you have the teachable spirit?

TITLE:

Senior Vice President/Director, Enterprise Production Services—IS Division MS in information technology from The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Graduated summa cum laude from Alabama State University, Montgomery, Alabama, with a BS in accounting. Computer programmer

That is the most important component of a mentor’s relationship with her student. Without it, the relationship becomes little more than a one-way street, a path down which a mentor dictates, never knowing if her message is understood or well received. I did not benefit from the direction of a mentor. My early career was built on trial and error. It is one of the most painful ways to learn. That is why I am particularly sensitive to the need for, and benefit of, mentoring. It is also fortuitous that I work for a bank, as my approach to mentoring is similar to that of the investor—plan for the long term. When I sit down with someone for the first time, I ask that she consider her passion. What do you love to do? We talk about where she would like to see herself in five years, or ten. Does that align with her passion? If not, why? This is important, since it is easier to get up in the morning and go to work if you love what you do. If passion and path connect, we back-schedule her career. In other words, we list the skills and experience she will need to gain to achieve her goal. Then we develop a plan to obtain those skills and that experience.
COMPANY:

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: READING:

Good to Great, by James C. Collins; Spiritual Leadership, by Henry and Richard Blackaby

PHILOSOPHY:

Be a lifelong learner. Bring your whole self to whatever you do: your faith, family, energy, and humor. Help others and take risks. Husband, two boys Museums, spending time with the family, music, Feed the Children

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

theater, travel
FAVORITE CHARITY:

The success of this plan is determined by two factors that must be possessed by both mentor and student: the ability to listen and the teachable spirit. I advise everyone to develop these skills early and heed them often. As mentors, our first instinct is to talk about ourselves. Do not do it. Instead, ask questions. Listen for words and phrases that reveal a passion, a frustration or both. Know when your student wants advice and give it. Know when she wants to vent, and let her. This ability will allow you to refine that long-term plan and reach success. Finally, check your ego at the door. Those we mentor offer us as much education as we give them. Live to learn and learn to live. Embrace the teachable spirit.

National City Corporation Cleveland, Ohio

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.nationalcity.com 2006 REVENUES: $12.9 billion EMPLOYEES: 31,000
BUSINESS: National City Corporation is one of the nation’s largest financial holding companies. Its core businesses include commercial and retail banking, mortgage financing and servicing, consumer finance and asset management.

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“I am committed to returning dividends on the investment my mentors have made in me.”

Karen Dougherty Buchholz
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W C OT W O R K NE MCAST

I

have been fortunate throughout my career to have been the beneficiary of committed mentors—several of Philadelphia’s most prominent business, political and community leaders— who have taken a chance on me. In return, I have dedicated myself to success and to exceeding their expectations at every stage of my career. My career has included politics, the development of a private club and a sports arena, attracting and hosting a national political convention, establishing a corporate communications department for Comcast and now reshaping Philadelphia’s skyline with the development of Comcast’s new headquarters building. In addition, I lead Comcast’s corporate administration, including diversity. In politics, I gained a great appreciation for the value of reputation and networks. I saw new laws passed for the nation, and international policy changed, based on the trust of relationships. Because of that experience, I stand by my word and work hard on building personal connections. Building support in a predominantly democratic city for the 2000 Republican National Convention was all about communication. Prior to the convention, the city, suburbs and the bordering states had not cooperated on large-scale ventures; the convention brought the entire region together for the first

TITLE:

Vice President, Administration, Comcast Corporation

EDUCATION:

MS from the University of Pennsylvania; graduate of Dickinson College and the Dickinson Center for European Studies in Bologna, Italy

FIRST JOB: Special assistant to U.S. Senator John Heinz, Washington, D.C. READING: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, by Doris Kearns Goodwin PHILOSOPHY:

Be straight with people and take a long view of

relationships.
FAMILY:

Husband, son and daughter Family and community involvement

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

I’m actively involved with United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Abington Memorial Hospital, People’s Emergency Center and the Pennsylvania Ballet

time. By successfully communicating and attracting business, political and civic leadership early in the process, we were able to secure the financial, public and volunteer support for the convention. We also impressed the 50,000 delegates, media and attendees who put our region on the map. At Comcast, I’m proud to be part of a company that is committed to connecting our customers to the information, news and entertainment that is so important to them. With 90,000 employees nationwide, Comcast is dedicated not only to having a diverse workforce, but also to doing business with diverse suppliers, providing diverse programming to our customers and investing in the communities where our customers and employees live and work. I am committed to returning dividends on the investment my mentors have made in me; also by taking chances on people—especially women—and helping them reach their career goals.

COMPANY:

Comcast Corporation Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.comcast.com Entertainment and electronic media $24.9 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

90,000

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“And, finally, communicate! communicate! communicate!”

Elizabeth (Beth) Bull
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

I

am a big believer in mentoring. Throughout my life, I have had the good fortune to be mentored by a number of people who provided information and guidance, both personal and professional. In turn, I have served as a formal and informal mentor to a number of people, both inside and outside of TI. Growing up in a small town in Illinois, I was raised to believe that I was capable of doing whatever I wanted to— regardless of whether I knew of anyone who had done it before. Whether as a high school foreign exchange student to Sri Lanka or as one of very few female math majors at my university, I became accustomed to being “one of the first” and learned to seek advice from others who had similar experiences. Today, I find myself spending more time mentoring than being mentored. I encourage the people I mentor to think about their next two career moves. Often, people focus on their next job, but what about the one after that? Consider making a lateral move if that position provides experience that enables you to ultimately get where you want to be. While I didn’t formally map out my career, I’ve made many deliberate decisions along the way—including at least two lateral moves that gave me experience that helped obtain subsequent promotions.

TITLE:

Vice President and Treasurer, Texas Instruments Incorporated BA in mathematics, business minor from DePauw University; Master of Management in finance and marketing, from Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University File clerk in my doctor’s office Simple Genius, by David Baldacci

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

If you stay in your comfort zone, you’ll never grow. New and exciting challenges often come at seemingly inconvenient times—nevertheless, embrace them. Husband, daughter and son Music, reading, traveling abroad and most sports

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Big Brothers—Big Sisters and Girl Scouts (It’s all about mentoring!)

I also encourage people to “bloom where you’re planted.” At times, you may find yourself in a role that isn’t quite what you wanted. Yet, one sure way to get noticed is to excel at whatever you are doing. So, despite your feelings about your current role, make the most of it. And, finally, communicate! communicate! communicate! In my case, I had consistently talked about wanting an international business assignment. When one came open in Taipei, Taiwan, it seemed natural for management to ask if I was interested. It was natural to ask because of my expressed interest in such a role, but it was not necessarily natural considering I was pregnant at the time! Lacking other information, well-intentioned people often make judgments based on what they think you want in your career. Be certain they’ve heard what you want directly from you and you’ll find you’re better able to steer your career in the direction you want it to go.

COMPANY:

Texas Instruments Dallas, Texas www.ti.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

BUSINESS: Semiconductor and education technology solutions 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$14.5 billion

30,986

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“Don’t be afraid to deviate from a traditional path.”

Kerry Anne Carter
S TA P L E S I N C

W

omen of my generation were told as children that we could do anything and could eventually have it all. As I’ve matured and faced the challenge of managing my career and family, the one thing I’ve learned is that no decision I make is set in stone. This mindset has led to an unconventional and fulfilling career. During the first ten years of my career, my path was fairly traditional. However, since the arrival of my three children in the past eight years, my path has taken some twists and turns. I went from working at Staples full time to part time, owned my own consulting practice, taught at a university and worked full time from home. Now, I’m back at Staples, full time, in a position that challenges me and allows me to grow and develop as a leader. My advice to you is: Don’t be afraid to deviate from a traditional path. With the right planning and perspective you can reap great rewards. Here are some tips if you want to tackle the untraditional.

TITLE:

Vice President, B-to-B eCommerce, Staples Contract Division BA, Boston College; MBA, Harvard University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Lifeguard/swim instructor (as a kid); Sales representative for Simmons Company (adult) READING:

Blood Memory, by Greg Isles Add value every day.

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband Chris, daughter 8, and two sons, both 6 Reading, running, gardening, college football Food For The Poor

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

your value. Seize every opportunity to establish yourself as an “A” player. “A” players get opportunities and flexibility that “B” players don’t get. At the end of every day ask yourself, “Did I add value today?”
KEEP YOUR HAND IN THE GAME.

BUILD AND MAINTAIN RELATIONSHIPS. Business, like anything, is based on relationships. Go out of your way to help others. Build up your bank of goodwill. The payback may not be immediate, but there will be one. BECOME INDISPENSABLE.

Before you attempt to carve an unorthodox path through the business world, you must prove

When I left the workforce to be at home full time, I found ways to keep my hand in the game. I kept in touch with friends, mentors and former bosses. I stayed on top of company and industry news. I sent pertinent articles to former colleagues. All of these steps enabled me to land part time consulting work for Staples, which eventually led to my current position. When making career decisions it’s easy to lose perspective. Every move appears to be wrought with weighty long-term implications. It’s important to remember that not every decision will affect your entire career. You can take chances. Life is long and there are lots of twists, turns and opportunities. So what’s the payoff been for me? I’ve been able to achieve my goal of balancing family with a fulfilling career over the long term. That’s my definition of “having it all.”

COMPANY:

Staples, Inc. Framingham, Massachusetts

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.staples.com / www.staplescontract.com Office products and business services $18.2 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

74,000 worldwide
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

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— Amy M. Blair

At Liberty Global, we are privileged to work with colleagues in 17 countries, bringing valuable international diversity to our group of companies.

Liberty Global supports the continued education and development of our employees, a quality Amy M. Blair, our Senior Vice President of

Amy M. Blair…a woman worth watching.

Liberty Global is the leading international cable operator offering advanced video, voice and broadband Internet services to 16 million customers principally located in Europe, Japan, Chile and Australia. Liberty Global has over 20,000 employees worldwide. For more information about Liberty Global, visit our website at www.lgi.com
Figures presented as of June 30, 2007

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“A key quality for success, as well as effective leadership, is listening.”

Denise Chaisson
SALLIE MAE

I

challenge women just starting a career to become the change they want to see in the workplace and the world itself. My work ethic stems from my parents, who instilled in me the belief that when someone gives you a paycheck, make sure your work is worth that money. Give more than you receive and put forth your best effort on every task. Whether you’re peeling crawfish (as I did at age 13), working at the local grocery or being an officer of a bank, do your work with pride. Early in my career a mentor told me that success required much more than simply doing a good job at the position for which you were hired. Rather, you needed to know everyone else’s job. In my mentor’s case, that covered everything from emptying garbage cans to making coffee for clients to balancing the company’s accounts. This idea of knowing a company inside and out has since served as my personal benchmark and one that has guided me in my own career. Today’s world is a fast-paced one where you must constantly juggle many balls. To be effective, figure out what is important from a spiritual, professional and personal position, giving time to each area. Above all, remember that only you can define yourself.

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, HBCU Initiatives Delta School of Business

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Age 13, peeling crawfish The Secret, by Rhonda Byrne

PHILOSOPHY:

Everyone has a lesson to teach; everyone has a lesson to learn. Husband, three children Horseback riding, gardening

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

St. Jude Hospital for Children; Catholic Service Center in Lafayette, Louisiana

A key quality for success, as well as effective leadership, is listening—hearing someone with resolve and passion. We don’t all think alike, nor do we have the same beliefs. Yet, every belief is important. Every person on this earth has a lesson to teach and every person has a lesson to learn. This concept has allowed me to build the excellent team that I have in place today at Sallie Mae. My team members feel very comfortable in coming to me— whether they agree or disagree with me—because they know they can freely provide their point of view. Lastly, remember that mistakes are a given in life. The challenge is to understand that every action produces a consequence,

COMPANY:

Sallie Mae Reston, Virginia

one that can be good, bad or indifferent. The idea is to embrace the resulting lesson. If we don’t, we are not learning; if we are not learning, we will never grow. And if we don’t grow, we can never realize our full potential and evolve into the unique individuals we are meant to be.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.SallieMae.com Education finance $8.7 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

12,000
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

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“Having a leadership role is a great privilege and it is truly humbling.”

Uma Chowdhry
DUPONT

W

e are a product of our experiences, and my style was shaped by my youth in India. Respect for elders, religious tolerance, nonviolence, humility, sharing whatever one has, value for education, and faith in democracy are fundamental teachings Indians learn. Encouraged by my father to get the best education possible, I courageously left India with $8 in my pocket for a foreign land. The amazing faculty who served as my role models at school awarded me opportunities to learn and grow in ways that I had not dreamed possible. Hard-earned successes that followed inspired me to believe in myself and in the power of a nurturing environment that brings out the most in all. My advice to all aspiring young women is to believe in yourself, be guided by your own internal compass of values, leave your comfort zone, and make courageous moves to achieve your goals. Throughout my career I have been very fortunate. My leaders and mentors believed in me and provided me opportunities to grow. From my role models I have learned that in a supportive and inclusive environment, people rise to any challenge. At one stage in my career, I was asked to lead an organization that had been downsized several times, felt a loss of identity, demoralized, and unappreciated. I spent time understanding their history, achievements, skills and capabilities.

TITLE:

Senior VP and Chief Science & Technology Officer,

DuPont
EDUCATION:

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), materials science & engineering Member of research staff, central R&D, DuPont

FIRST JOB:

PHILOSOPHY:

Be clear about purpose of career, make choices, and enjoy learning from every opportunity and challenge. Appreciate diversity of thought, race and gender, and learn from each to complement your own skills. Make people feel valued and include them in decision making to gain alignment and commitment to goals. Put ego aside and work with everyone to create the best results for the company, while ensuring that people feel valued and recognized. Husband, no children, family lives in India Walking, reading, travel, fusion food, ceramics

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

I created opportunities for them to be visible and excel so that they could reclaim their pride. Today they are a highly valued organization in the company. Working for a company that supports opportunities for women and supports diversity has contributed to my success. Comfort with my style, a track record of credible results, and the courage to speak out on issues and take on difficult challenges are some of the reasons I have been given ever increasing responsibilities at DuPont. Thanks to the guidance from my mentors, I am now giving the next generation of leaders the same opportunities that my mentors gave to me. Having a leadership role is a great privilege and it is truly humbling. The greatest contribution you can make is to take the organization you lead to a new level of excellence by creating an environment in which goals are clear, people learn from and teach one another, people feel valued and rise to their maximum potential, adapt to change, and have fun along the way! PDJ
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COMPANY:

DuPont Wilmington, Delaware www.dupont.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

DuPont offers a wide range of products and services for markets, including agriculture, nutrition, electronics, communications, safety and protection, home and construction, transportation and apparel.
2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$27.4 billion

60,000

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“It’s important to take every opportunity to seek out those you respect as strong, capable leaders.”

Ellen Costello
HARRIS BANKCORP INC

T

o me, mentoring means listening, learning and developing.

TITLE:

Chief Executive Officer, Harris Bankcorp, Inc.

Over my career, the mentors who stand out listened, offered feedback and had confidence in me. They gave me ideas and insights on how to stretch myself and, just as importantly, how to recover from setbacks. My first mentor was my father. He instilled values of honesty, integrity and respect for others in all of his children. With seven of us and a successful career, he was stretched in many directions. His work ethic, fairness, tireless determination and passion for life inspired me and continue to influence me. When I moved into the workforce and throughout my career, the mentors I sought were those who had strong values, a broad view of the organization, and acted in the interests of the overall company. They helped me better understand my capabilities. They coached me as I tackled difficult challenges head-on, while still allowing me to be true to my personal values. As I’ve moved into leadership roles and had the good fortune to mentor others, I focus on four areas: • The first is giving a perspective on the company, our strategy, the roles within the organization and the skill profiles needed to succeed. • The second is cultivating an honest self-awareness of strengths and areas for development.

EDUCATION:

Bachelor’s degree in business administration, St. Francis Xavier; MBA, Dalhousie University, both in Canada

FIRST JOB: Librarian and retail sales, before graduation. Personal and commercial lending officer, after graduation. READING:

A Thousand Splendid Suns, by Khaled Hosseini

PHILOSOPHY:

Live your values, lead by example, be accountable for your actions and decisions, be passionate about what you do. Married Family, art, travel and theater Supporting educational opportunities

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

for disadvantaged youth

• The third is to help identify career priorities in areas such as job content, title, progression and financial rewards. • Finally, I focus on being a safe, confidential sounding-board and advisor. A mentor should be a safe haven to talk about doubts and frustrations and seek feedback and advice. We all have setbacks and doubts along the way. Dealing with them is part of what helps us grow. I truly love to be there to celebrate successes. But when things don’t go as expected, being there and providing continued support are critical. In my experience, successful mentoring relationships seldom just happen. It’s important to take every opportunity to seek out those you respect as strong, capable leaders. And, most importantly, as you progress to a position of leadership and influence, give back. Reach out to talented individuals in your company, help them understand their capabilities and opportunities, and open as many doors as you can. Mentoring develops your company’s talent, affects performance and gives you valuable insight into what’s really happening out there.

COMPANY:

Harris Bankcorp, Inc. (part of BMO Financial Group) Chicago, Illinois

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.harrisbank.com Financial services $800 million (Harris Bankcorp, Inc.)

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

3,500

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our power comes from our people
Committed to Diversity. Committed to Excellence.
Pratt & Whitney has 38,000 employees in 253 locations worldwide and for more than 80 years, we ve drawn our real power from our employees’ individual talents and multitude of backgrounds. That s why we re so proud to receive “A Best Diversity Company” award from the readers of

Pratt & Whitney.

Diversity/Careers in Engineering & Information Technology Magazine. At Pratt & Whitney,
our strength comes not just from our similarities, but from our differences.

THE EAGLE IS EVERYWHERE. www.pw.utc.com

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“I continue to be passionate about what I do and enjoy every day.”

Lin Cummins
ARVINMERITOR INC

M

y parents encouraged their children to shoot for the stars. We all became successful professionals. I started college at age 16 and paid my own way. I began my career at Ford Motor Company, where I learned from the most knowledgeable people in the business. They took me under their wing and in turn I’ve mentored others throughout my career. To succeed in the traditionally male-dominated auto industry I’ve had to blaze my own trail. I did it by holding myself to the highest standards and motivating those who work for me to stretch professionally—to be the best they can be. As a communications professional for 30 years, providing strategic counsel to executives is an inherent part of my job. I’ve had to present honest and sometimes tough messages to coach upcoming leaders to reach their full potential. I’ve guided colleagues on skill sets and experience they need—like continuing their education—to take them to the next level. Great leaders successfully collaborate with peers, manage subordinates and exemplify teamwork. As mentors, we must raise the bar with the highest level of professionalism, even in stressful situations. If your colleagues trust and respect you they will deliver for you.
ArvinMeritor, Inc. Troy, Michigan

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Communications, ArvinMeritor,

Inc.
EDUCATION: BS in education; MA in speech and communication, Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. FIRST JOB: Photo media specialist, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan READING:

The Secret, by Rhonda Byrne

PHILOSOPHY:

See it—believe it—plan for it—then make it happen. I have always visualized my goals: having a successful career, being happily married and fostering a close-knit family. My husband and I are true partners and together we’ve been blessed with a family that enjoys and values each other. Husband, four children, three grandchildren Decorating, entertaining, reading, traveling American Heart Association

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Empowerment is a hallmark of my leadership style. I don’t micromanage. I give people the tools to succeed and then watch them shine. They’ve told me that my open door policy gives them the support they need to help them work through the obstacles along the way. To thrive in the business world people must create and execute a career plan. I’m proud that so many of my colleagues whom I’ve mentored are now in senior communications positions in global Fortune 500 companies. I still mentor them to this day. My advice: Add value every day; measure results not activity. My successful mentoring method is to share war stories of what works and what doesn’t to have a fruitful career. I continue to be passionate about what I do and enjoy every day.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.arvinmeritor.com

BUSINESS: Premier global automotive supplier of a broad range of integrated systems, modules and components 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$9.2 billion

Approximately 19,000 people in 24 countries

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“Remember that mentoring is important at every stage in your career development.”

Jody Davids
C A R D I N A L H E A LT H

T

hroughout my career, I’ve been fortunate to work at some great companies, and to work with some very talented people. Now, at this stage in my career, my highest priority is to help Cardinal Health develop its future leaders. Here’s some key advice I share with them and with others who are committed to maximizing their career potential: Take advantage of educational and personal development opportunities when they’re available. I started my career in the 1970s, at General Electric, in an administrative position. GE offered an array of educational programs after work hours, and I enrolled in many of the IT and programming courses. Then, thanks to a tuition reimbursement opportunity at Apple Computer, I was able to earn both my bachelor’s degree and MBA. Pursuing these educational opportunities really helped me gain experience and learn new skill sets that helped me build my career in IT. Get involved in leadership opportunities outside your place of work, and in your community. Community service and volunteerism are excellent ways to give back, build your personal network and develop leadership skills that can serve you well in your career. At Cardinal Health, we encourage employees to get involved in the community in a number of ways, including offering grants to nonprofit organizations in honor of individual employee and team volunteer efforts. Regardless of where you are in your career, volunteer work

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Global Shared Services, and Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in business administration from San Jose State University FIRST JOB: READING:

Merry-go-round operator at a local amusement park Suite Francaise, by Irene Nemirovsky

PHILOSOPHY:

Through the service of my two Marine sons, I’ve learned that the right inspiration can motivate a team of otherwise ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary things. That’s why I believe the most important contribution I can make to Cardinal Health is to help develop its future leaders. That's also why, at this stage in my career, my greatest aspiration is to become an inspirational leader for teams I serve.

FAMILY:

Husband, two sons (Wes, a U.S. Marine, killed in Iraq in May 2005; Steven, who just became a U.S. Marine in April 2007) and three dogs

provides a great opportunity to hone your ability to work with and inspire others. These are key qualities that most companies seek in future leaders. Don’t underestimate the value networking and mentoring can play in your personal and professional growth. Invest time in understanding how decisions are made about promotions and career development within your company. Proactively seek mentoring relationships with people who inspire you. And remember that mentoring is important at every stage in your career development. Even now, in my current position on the executive leadership team at Cardinal Health, I benefit greatly through the mentoring relationships I’ve formed through the years. Likewise, I sincerely enjoy leading corporate initiatives that focus on the development of women leaders within our company. Doing so helps me feel meaningfully connected to the needs of our future leaders and provides me the chance to help some of our best talent really tap into their full career potential.

COMPANY:

Cardinal Health Dublin, Ohio

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.cardinal.com Health care $80 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

40,000
SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

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“Never ask for permission to lead.”

Kimberly B. Davis
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E J P& O I S HA N LC H AC R EF O U N D AT I O N N M F RG , L P / SE W NETWORK

P

ersonal power and influence are key ingredients for success in life. Developing power begins with preparation and a strong focus on leadership, but the intersection of power and leadership is more intricate than that. Leadership is about who you are and how well you harness the resources available to you. Be committed to something. Be passionate. Create a path to power that is defined by purpose. The successes in my career and my ability to navigate the challenges are rooted in early mentoring and strong leadership models. From the examples of preparation, courage and service set by my mother and grandparents, to the support provided by sponsors and mentors throughout my professional career, I have always had a passion, and been driven, to coach and mentor. I view it has an obligation. Early in my career, that meant assuming leadership roles in professional and community organizations. Later on in my career, it meant exposing and encouraging young blacks and Latinos to enter the world of Investment Banking, and today it means coaching, mentoring and leading by example within JPMorgan Chase and my community. Mentoring has been a passion driven by purpose to leave a legacy of unlimited possibilities. Recognizing the importance of strong leadership skills as a success factor in corporate America, in 2003 I co-developed and implemented in partnership with the president of Spelman College, Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, the first

Senior Vice President, Global Philanthropy; President, JPMorgan Chase Foundation EDUCATION: BA in economics, Spelman College; Aspen Institute Executive Leadership Program FIRST JOB: Summer counselor for Inner-City Girls Chicago, Illinois (Age 16, they thought I was 20!) READING: The End of Poverty, by Dr. Jeffrey Sachs PHILOSOPHY: Your path to success is guided by Preparation, Passion and Purpose. Build power networks and bridges for others to cross. “Be the Change” you want to see. FAMILY: My husband, St. Clair, of 23 years is my best friend, supporter and confidant. My children are my proudest accomplishments. INTERESTS: Entertaining friends and traveling. FAVORITE CHARITY: Youth and community-based initiatives of Grace Baptist Church, Mt.Vernon, New York
TITLE:

Leadership Center for Women of Color: Spelman LEADS, Center for Leadership and Civic Engagement. Each year, the Spelman Leadership Center nurtures the ability, strength and dynamic intellect of women of color, preparing them for the world of work. Truly, the Spelman Leadership Institute is the realization of my passion for mentoring and building networks of power and influence for women of color. I count it a blessing that I was exposed to powerful examples of courage and leadership early in my life. The examples provided by my family taught me the following: • Faith and family always come first. • Never ask for permission to lead. • Never ask if it is okay to take a step in a new direction. • Leadership is a willingness to leave your mark. The lessons of preparation, faith, family and community that I’ve learned from my mother, grandmother and influencers in my life have built bridges that I am now proud to usher others across.

COMPANY:

JPMorgan Chase Foundation

The JPMorgan Chase Foundation’s social investment extends across the globe, reaching nearly 500 cities in 57 countries. Last year, JPMorgan Chase and its Foundation partnered with more than 2,800 not-for-profits and contributed over $110 million to programs that revitalize communities and help them thrive through access to housing, education and cultural arts. Since 2004 the firm has invested $241 billion toward its 10-year $800 billion pledge to low-to-moderate income communities through mortgages, small business lending and community development.

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“He passed the importance of integrity and compassion on to me, and I’ve kept this close to my heart throughout my career.”

Lisa DeBois
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P I TC R E W O W E S ON C P / NEY B NETW I RK

M

entors have played a vital role in shaping who I am today. They have greatly influenced my leadership style, my values and how I balance life and work. My greatest mentor was my father. An immigrant from Italy, he worked as a contractor in one of the most challenging, dog-eat-dog businesses that exists, the fashion industry in New York City. As a small-business man, my father demonstrated that he possessed a great sense of integrity and compassion in an industry that didn’t have very much at the time. These values not only helped him stay grounded, they helped set the foundation for his success. He passed the importance of integrity and compassion on to me, and I’ve kept this close to my heart throughout my career. Another important lesson that I learned early in my career is that you can have it all—a wonderful family life and a successful career. At Brownstone Studio, a direct marketing catalogue company, I had the privilege of working for women who were great role models. The owner of the company was a mother of three children, a grandmother, and her own mother lived with her. On top of this, she was also a very successful business woman. During a time when the status quo seemed to be “live to work,” what I learned instead was that one can live first and also work. In other words, you can have it all.

TITLE:

Executive Vice President and President, Pitney Bowes Global Financial Services, Pitney Bowes Inc. BA degree, political science, Georgetown University; MBA degree, Fordham University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Friendly’s Ice Cream in New Rochelle, N.Y., when I was in high school READING:

Wild Fire, by Nelson DeMille

PHILOSOPHY:

Lead with integrity and compassion. They can help set the foundation for success. Also, remember that you can have it all—a wonderful life with your family and a successful career.

FAMILY: Husband, two children, three step-children and one grandchild INTERESTS:

Spending time with my kids, running and golf

The National Foundation of Teaching Entrepreneurship. The nonprofit organization teaches entrepreneurship to young people from low-income communities to enhance their economic productivity by improving their business, academic, and life skills. I’m passionate about the organization and serve on its board (Fairfield, CT and Westchester, NY chapters).
FAVORITE CHARITY:

Pitney Bowes Inc. Stamford, Connecticut WEB SITE: www.pb.com BUSINESS: Pitney Bowes is a mailstream technology company that helps organizations manage the flow of information, mail, documents and packages 2006 REVENUES: $5.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 35,000 worldwide
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

I’ve also learned valuable lessons through negative experiences. For example, at a past job I worked for a battle-axe of a woman who was completely opposite of my mentors at Brownstone. Her life was her job and she didn’t respond well to other women who didn’t play the game the same way she did. This cost me an executive job opportunity. However, my leadership style and virtues helped pave the way to another opportunity. An old colleague thought I would be a good fit for a position at Pitney Bowes. He interviewed and hired me in 1995, and I’ve been with the company ever since. By working for an organization that encourages work-life balance and provides a myriad of opportunities, I’ve been able to continue to grow in my career. And by serving as a mentor to others, I have the honor of helping to educate the next generation of leaders.

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“Make decisions that are best for you.”

Mary Delaney
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L LA R E C R B W L D E R . C O M C P / E E UI NETWORK

I

owe much of my success to the mentors who provided me with both knowledge and encouragement throughout my life. Without their support, I wouldn’t have had the foundation to build the career I currently have. I continue to carry with me the lessons they imparted and would like to take this opportunity to pass them along to you —tomorrow’s corporate leaders.

TITLE: Chief Sales Officer EDUCATION: BS in business and marketing, Indiana University; currently pursuing an MBA at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management FIRST JOB: Management training program at Nestle Corp. READING: The Goal, by Eliyahu M. Goldratt, and The Long Tail, by Chris Anderson PHILOSOPHY: Make a difference. These three words are what drive me. I want to make a difference at home, at work; in everything I do each day. FAMILY: Husband, two daughters and a son. INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, golf, school, board member of the Business Marketing Association (Chicago Chapter) FAVORITE CHARITY: Habitat for Humanity

PUT YOURSELF IN A POSITION TO LEARN. My first job out of college was in a management training program where I learned the basics of how to be an effective manager. As I moved on from there, I continued to seek out companies that offered training and learning opportunities so that I could improve my skills as a leader. HAVE A HEALTHY WORK/LIFE BALANCE. I always try to be fully engaged in whatever I’m doing at the moment. Keeping this balance allows me to be better at everything I do. BE A MENTOR.

FIND YOUR OWN PATH.

Being a mentor is a great learning experience. For 12 years I mentored teenagers. My greatest hope is that I’ve taught them how to identify and remove obstacles and have helped them find their true potential. I take this same approach with my employees. However, it isn’t simply a oneway street, as I’ve learned just as much from them as they have from me.
CareerBuilder.com Chicago, Illinois www.careerbuilder.com Internet recruiting $672 million 2,000

My best piece of advice is to make decisions that are best for you. All of my mentors have provided me with a great deal of guidance but have also taught me how to trust myself and my instincts. One of the reasons I chose to work at CareerBuilder.com was because they believed in this value. The company strives to treat every employee as a leader and implement programs that allow them to have a great deal of disciplined freedom. Finding a place that allows you to cultivate your own leadership style will help you build the confidence and skill set you need to become the kind of leader you want to be.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“The reason I’ve accomplished what I have is because no one ever told me that I couldn’t.”

Cindy Dellecker
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C H I G H M E T W ON C REW NARK I RK

A

lot of what anyone accomplishes is a result of the start you

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Senior Products

get in life. I was lucky enough to be raised by hard-working parents who encouraged my brothers and me. They helped all of us develop confidence—and, just as importantly, a work ethic—that there was nothing we couldn’t accomplish if we worked hard to achieve our goals. Many of the lessons my parents taught me have stayed with me and helped me succeed in my work and family life:

EDUCATION: MS from Penn State University; Master’s in Public Management from Carnegie Mellon University FIRST JOB: READING:

Clinical audiologist Cookbooks, Bon Appetit

PHILOSOPHY: “Tis better by far to forget and be happy than to remember and be sad.” FAMILY:

Husband and two children, a son who is 20 and a daughter, 15

INTERESTS:

Golf, cooking, entertaining, reading, being with family and friends Arthritis Foundation, Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf

BE HONEST.

That’s important in your words and your actions,

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

because people will know when you’re not being truthful.
WORK TOGETHER.

It’s nearly impossible to accomplish anyENCOURAGE ONE ANOTHER.

thing on your own. You need to respect the people you work with and truly believe in the value of teamwork. You also need to understand that many things in life involve compromise. Nobody has all the answers, but, working together, you can accomplish your goals.

My parents taught me many valuable

lessons, but maybe the most important is that people may forget what you say, but they will never forget how you made them feel. I really believe that the reason I’ve accomplished what I have is because no one ever told me that I couldn’t.
BE PASSIONATE ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE DOING.

If you love getting up

in the morning and truly believe in your work, you’ve taken a big
COMPANY:

Highmark Inc. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania www.highmark.com

step in the right direction. Talent and capabilities can only take you so far. Real success requires inspiration. I’ve found that inspiration in my family, friends and co-workers, whose support and confidence have helped me throughout my career.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Largest health insurance company in Pennsylvania, based on membership
2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$11.1 billion

18,500

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“Be true to your own work and leadership style, even as you modify it to fit the organization’s culture.”

Paula Dominick
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L PB/AC R E O F N E T E R I C A NK W AMWORK

A

s a child, I was always encouraged to get involved, put forward my best effort, and see things through. My father taught me that, with hard work, I could achieve whatever I set out to do. I found that I was always looking for an opportunity to do more, and I think that drive helped set me apart from my peers during my first job on a trading floor at Morgan Stanley and throughout my career. There are several pieces of advice I would offer to professionals looking to distinguish themselves in their careers and as leaders:

TITLE:

Managing Director, Bank of America Securities, LLC BS in economics, Quinnipiac University Morgan Stanley research analyst

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

PHILOSOPHY:

It is important to listen; engage in conversation and help address individuals’ weaknesses as well as develop their strengths, which continually creates growth opportunities for them. Married in 1994 to Sal Dominick; daughter, 11 Gardening, cooking InnerCity Scholarship Fund, and son, 8

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

New York City

Take a long-term view of your career—choose something that you are truly interested in and go for it. Also, don’t be afraid to speak up. Every meeting, every presentation, every client call is essentially an interview. These connections and interactions will move your career forward. Finally, be true to your own work and leadership style, even as you modify it to fit the organization’s culture.
FOLLOW YOUR INTERESTS AND BE BOLD.

BUILD YOUR PERSONAL NETWORK.

Early in my career, I assumed individuals on my team would understand where they needed to develop and how to take action on those development opportunities. I realized quickly that was not the case, and learned to give individuals early, honest and constructive feedback to help ensure their growth.
GIVE REAL-TIME FEEDBACK.

Build relationships and network in and out of your industry or area of expertise. This is the most important and career-sustaining activity you will undertake. Your network should include all types of people: those you can learn from or lean on, those at various levels in the organization and those in your direct area or beyond it.

I believe that true leaders reach out to their communities to give something back.
GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY.

As I look back over my career, I would like to be remembered for creating a strong team of professionals in research and helping to create a network of women who feel it is their responsibility to help the next generation have a successful career on Wall Street.

COMPANY:

Bank of America Charlotte, North Carolina www.bankofamerica.com Financial services $73 billion 203,425

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

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“The better you understand yourself, the better prepared you will be to support others in their leadership journeys.”

Teri Ann Drake
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , H A PL/ C R E W N E T W ON C LLL MARK CARDS I RK

I

n a recent conversation with one of my mentors the talk turned, as it often does, to the notion of balance. She wisely suggested that I think about balance differently than the familiar work/life quest. She said “Think about balance as balancing the fact that you have been called to lead and that you need to do so by being authentic to yourself.” I loved this advice. Being true to who I am lets me sleep peacefully at night. Despite years of studies, the Harvard Business Review claims there is no clear profile of the ideal leader. How gratifying if you think about this in terms of diversity and inclusion. When I recommend articles and books about leadership to my team or someone I’m coaching, I'm quick to remind them to be themselves and leverage their unique gifts. I believe people trust you if you are genuine—not a replica of someone else. To be authentic, we must be willing to devote ourselves to personal understanding and growth. I recommend taking time to be reflective, seeking frequent feedback from sources throughout the organization and being willing to step out of your comfort zone. As you do so, here are some questions to consider: What motivates me extrinsically? Intrinsically? Which people and experiences in my early life/career had the greatest impact on me? Are there blind spots or gaps that I should be aware of? If so, whom can I rely on to tell me that they exist?

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Creative and Corporate Officer at Hallmark Cards, Inc.

EDUCATION: BFA from Syracuse University; MBA from University of Missouri, Kansas City FIRST JOB: Babysitting for my minister’s newborn twins and waitressing. WHAT I’M READING: PHILOSOPHY:

The Speed of Trust, by Stephen M. R. Covey; History, by Elsa Morante Lead by winning hearts and minds

FAMILY: Husband, William Cox; one son and two stepchildren INTERESTS:

Leadership learning, reading, spending time with family, and traveling Those associated with HIV/AIDS, both locally and globally

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

COMPANY:

Hallmark Cards, Inc. Kansas City, Missouri www.hallmark.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Kansas City-based Hallmark is known throughout the world for its greeting cards, related personal expression products, and television’s most honored and enduring dramatic series, the Hallmark Hall of Fame. $4.1 billion. 16,000

The better you understand yourself, the better prepared you will be to support others in their leadership journeys. But it requires commitment and time—especially time to listen. As I do more listening, I seek to understand people’s mindsets and help them shift their thinking for greater results. I know being honest is crucial. Having the courage to address difficult situations openly but with sensitivity will create a sense of trust and confidence between you and the people around you. Finally, one of my professors once reminded me not to worry so much about providing a lofty vision, but to focus instead on “offering yourself and your spirit to those you lead.” Perhaps that’s why I love working at Hallmark so much. Our brand mission is about enriching the lives of others. If I can do that for the people I work with and the consumers we serve, then perhaps I’ll be able to say someday “job well done.”

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Create measurable goals and stick to them.”

Dr. Ann Evangelista
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C RTA L E N T Q U ER K EW NETWO ST

T

he future of executive leadership depends upon increasingly greater focus on developing the leadership pipeline through effective succession planning and subsequent leadership development. A growing emphasis on enhancing skills and capabilities will help current and future leaders optimize potential. Oftentimes, the missing link to bring this vision to fruition is the personal investment of leaders on both sides of the succession equation. Many executives claim to be too busy to carve out time for individual development planning and coaching of their high-potentials. Concurrently, these highpotentials are often uncertain what types of questions to ask or how to create a tangible ownership plan for continued success. The result is a black box phenomenon—top talent with high aspirations and capabilities, but no true knowledge of what the formula is to attain such success. As future corporate leaders, prevent a lack of experience or clarity from determining your course. Request mentoring/coaching. Ask your boss, or another executive you admire, to spend time with you on your individual development. Most executives will gladly do so if you initiate the request and ensure realistic expectations. Create a development plan. Compose a specific, workable plan that will help you attain both short-term and long-term goals. Share these goals with your boss/coach and ask for feedback and modifications. The more these goals dovetail with corporate objectives, the greater the positive organizational impact. Follow the plan. Create measurable goals and stick to them. A well-structured plan that is never put into action is a

Executive Consultant EDUCATION: Bachelor of Arts, psychology, University of Michigan; Doctorate in clinical psychology and MBA, Widener University, Philadelphia, PA FIRST JOB: Like Lucy in “Peanuts,” I had my desk set up like a therapy ‘booth’ in the 6th grade: “Ann the Analyst.” I charged 5 cents to talk to kids in my class, but I was quickly “laid off” by my teacher, who was not thrilled about me running a business out of her class! READING: The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama, and A Drink Before the War, by Dennis LaHane. PHILOSOPHY: I believe people are ultimately the most satisfied when they have stretched themselves to achieve success. We cannot force motivation, but we can encourage, inspire, counsel and support so others can find a place of happiness and satisfaction. FAMILY: Youngest of seven children; divorced, no children, except for a 10-year-old Newfoundland dog. INTERESTS: Actively compete in triathlon, hiking, camping, and traveling FAVORITE CHARITIES: East Atlanta Kids Club, a nonprofit dedicated to enriching the lives of the youth of East Atlanta; Team in Training, a fundraising arm of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
TITLE:

TalentQuest Atlanta, Georgia WEB SITE: www.TalentQuest.com BUSINESS: Talent and Performance Management Solutions 2006 REVENUES: N/A EMPLOYEES: 34
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:
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tragedy. Show the organization, and executive leadership, that you are serious about your development by planning your own success, not relying on others to do so for you. Make your achievements known. Gaining visibility for the right reasons increases your positive reputation in all areas of the organization. It is not self-aggrandizing if done tastefully. Find your place in the succession plan. Respectfully and appropriately engage your boss in a discussion of your fit with respect to future leadership of the organization. Ask questions about the succession planning. Inquire how you can together ensure you are growing in accordance with the organization’s goals, as well as your own. To summarize, take a proactive role in your own development by seeking out resources and assistance to help you stay on track. Both you and the organization will be better off for it.

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“Successful leadership is all about character.”

Kathy Fawcett
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N &TF I E H , L LT D IC R E W C O M PA N Y H S WA L P / S N E Y N E T W O R K

M

y parents were my first leadership role models, and they taught me that I could do anything I set my mind to do. I believe in the sheer power of will. That belief has helped me meet adversity with courage and a positive outlook. As a cancer survivor and a professional with 25 years’ experience in the technology industry, I believe successful leadership is all about character. I won my cancer battle because of a strong will to live and a positive attitude. The way people pursue and achieve their goals says a lot about their character. I offer these success principles as a model for achieving goals in life:

Vice President, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts Information Technology EDUCATION: BSBA, computer science major with high honors, University of Florida FIRST JOB: Restaurant food prep and hostess at age 14 READING: Raising Girls, by Gisela Preuschoff and Steve Biddulph; Competing on Analytics: The New Science of Winning, by Thomas H. Davenport and Jeanne G. Harris PHILOSOPHY: To be a positive influence in the lives of others through my words and actions. FAMILY: 3-year-old daughter INTERESTS: Beach (snorkeling, shelling, diving, fishing); playing, reading and learning with my wonderful child; traveling with family and friends FAVORITE CHARITY: American Cancer Society
TITLE:

ACT WITH INTEGRITY. Always be honest and open and do what is right, not what is easy. You have to be willing to say what needs to be said and do what needs to be done, even when it isn’t popular.

The way to build trusting relationships is by showing respect for everyone and caring about individuals. When someone brings an issue to you, think first about the people and their needs, and then consider the work. Genuinely caring about others and putting individuals first will help you build loyalty and trust.
BUILD TRUSTING RELATIONSHIPS.

One of your greatest opportunities in life is to make a difference in the lives of others. You can do this daily by inspiring and challenging others to do their best work, believing in the intrinsic value they bring and treating everyone with respect.
MAKE A DIFFERENCE. FOCUS ON THE GREATER GOOD.

I work to model servant leadership by focusing on the good of our team and our business. One of the ways you can do this is by being an enabler. When you find great ideas among your team, work to help make those ideas a reality. Focus on building up the team rather than bolstering your own resume or reputation.

MAKE FAMILY A PRIORITY.

COMPANY:

The Walt Disney Company Burbank, California www.disney.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

Life is precious. Make your choices wisely each day, so that at the end of your life you are satisfied with the amount and quality of time you have spent with loved ones. My foundation for all of my life lessons and perseverance is my faith. I know that having a strong faith helps me face every personal and professional challenge, stay positive and be courageous. As you pursue your life goals, remember that your actions reflect your character.
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KEEP THE FAITH.

BUSINESS: The Walt Disney Company is a diversified worldwide entertainment company with the following divisions: Consumer Products, Studio Entertainment, Media Networks and Parks and Resorts. 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$34.2 billion

133,000 worldwide

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“Continue thoughtful leadership even when it seems that no one may be there to appreciate it.”

Margaret C. “Peggy” Fechtmann
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W EN E T W ON C M TLIFE I RK

I

was born the fourth eldest child of five, where education

TITLE:

and learning was an integral part of our family value system. Both of my parents graduated college and pursued educational careers in some fashion. My mother taught English as a second language; my father, after years in the corporate arena, decided to pursue a career in education and became an adjunct professor at New York University. My very first exposure to mentoring was through my family. Therefore, my passion for learning—in the role of a mentor and as a student—began at an early age and continues to this day. Like a teacher, a mentor may not ever know the impact he/she has on an individual. But it is the duty of such role models to continue thoughtful leadership even when it seems that no one may be there to appreciate it. Mentoring is what you make of it. Like most relationships, it can blossom and fade with time, but its success lies in how much you put into it as well as how much you receive in return. Mentorship does not need to be a rigid structure or plan; it does not need rules or restrictions unless you create them. And most importantly, as I have learned later in life, one should be open to mentoring from any individual who inspires you.

Executive Vice President, Individual Business, Operations and Services, MetLife Bachelor’s degree in accounting from the State University of New York and an MBA in finance from New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business A salesperson in men’s apparel at Macy’s

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

in 1973
READING: Skylight Confessions, by Alice Hoffman, and Shantaram, by Gregory David Robert PHILOSOPHY:

Surround yourself with wonderful people with whom you can enjoy all those moments that color your life.

FAMILY: My mother, two brothers, two sisters, 10 nieces and nephews, and one great-niece and one great-nephew INTERESTS:

Traveling, reading, going to the theater or the movies, and spending time with family and friends Junior Achievement of New York

FAVORITE CHARITY:

The individuals I have met throughout my career have shaped who I am both professionally and personally, and that is the power of a mentor. During my time at MetLife, I continue to be exposed to people who are just as much my teachers as I am a teacher to them. I have been very fortunate to have been exposed to mentors early in my life, through my parents and siblings, at the beginning of my career, and still to this day. As my sixth-grade teacher wrote to me recently, when I contacted him after all these years, “A bricklayer builds a fireplace and can feel the warmth of the fire; a carpenter builds a cabinet and can instantly take pride in his craft; but when a teacher teaches, he never truly knows the lifelong impact he has on his students.” Be passionate about what you are doing, and seek out that guidance, encouragement and wisdom from a mentor—an individual to guide you not only through your career but also through your personal development.

MetLife, Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Long Island City, New York WEB SITE: www.metlife.com BUSINESS: Insurance/financial services 2006 REVENUES: $53.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 36,000 (U.S. employees) 47,000 (worldwide)
COMPANY:

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“Have a clear sense of values and a clear sense of your life’s purpose.”

Felicia Fields
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H ,O R D M C R OW C O M PA N Y F LLP / OTE R NETWORK

M

y career path at Ford has been greatly influenced by mentoring, both from being a mentor and from being mentored. My philosophy is that mentoring must be approached from a 360 degree perspective—that it is important to have mentors in higher levels of the organization, but it is equally important to have mentors that are peers and subordinates. I find that candid discussion about how effective I am as a leader, how my actions are being perceived, and how well others relate to my leadership style is incredibly important if I want to continue to grow into the most effective leader I can be. The advice I try to provide as a mentor, and the best advice I can share with others who aspire to a career in business, is to have a clear sense of values and a clear sense of your life’s purpose. This may sound lofty, but it’s really about setting attainable short- and long-term goals. This means not simply thinking about what you want your title to be or what material possessions you want to acquire, but about the type of person you want to be and the type of impact you want to have on the world. Then, stay focused on those goals and make assessments and adjustments along the way so that in the end, you have the kind of life you want in every way. That also means paying attention to work-life balance. This has required a strong circle of support from extended

TITLE:

Vice President, Human Resources, Ford Motor Company BA, psychology, University of Michigan and a Master’s degree in business administration from Central Michigan University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Systems Analyst/Programmer at Ford Motor Company READING:

Know-How, by Ram Charan; Appreciative Inquiry, by David L. Cooperrider and Diana Whitney; What Got You Here Won't Get You There, by Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter

PHILOSOPHY:

Accept life as a gift of growth. Continue to learn, remain open to new ideas and opportunities, and devote some time every day to your self-development and to the things you are passionate about. Husband; a daughter, 16; and a son, 12 Tennis, cooking and spending time with Children or youth-focused charities

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

my family
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

COMPANY:

Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan www.ford.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Manufactures or distributes automobiles in 200 markets across six continents. $160.1 billion 260,000

family, friends and colleagues, as well as strong and open communication within our family, so that I am clear about the things that are most important to them and can prioritize my time accordingly. I believe that having a strong family foundation early in my life has set the stage for everything I’ve been able to accomplish. I was fortunate that my parents consistently provided a solid foundation for me as I was growing up, and I am committed to providing the same for my children. So, in addition to my career goals, I have set high personal goals. One of the most important lessons I’ve learned from my mentors that I try to pass along to those I’m mentoring is that the key to success is finding happiness and fulfillment in the professional and personal aspects of your life. You can’t have one without the other.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Choices aren’t always black and white.”

Julie A. Fream
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S HV IL L P O N R E W P O R AT I O N , STE / C COR NETWORK

M

uch has changed in the world since I graduated from college almost 25 years ago. As I work with people today, I encourage them to recognize three things. First, we operate in a truly global economy. Second, success in our global business society requires collaboration and communication. And finally, change is constant. With these underlying items, I suggest the following guidelines for people as they navigate their careers, as well as their lives: In life today, there is rarely a yes or no answer for every situation. Choices aren’t always black and white. Recognize that much of life is lived in the gray, and those who learn to manage and live in this space will be the happiest.
LEARN TO LIVE IN THE GRAY.

TITLE:

Vice President, North American Customer Groups

EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, 1983; MBA, Harvard Business School, 1987 FIRST JOB: General Motors, Fisher Body Division, manufacturing development engineer READING:

People’s History of the United States: 1492 to Present, by Howard Zinn; American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil and Borrowed Money in the 21st Century, by Kevin Phillips. Give something back. Married for 11 years with 2 children, ages 8 and 9 Skiing and golfing with family, reading,

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

volunteering
FAVORITE CHARITIES: Currently, work with Michigan Technological University and Oakwood Hospital System

One of the best things you can do for yourself is to establish goals and write them down. I started writing my goals about the time I finished college. Personally, I find it a very powerful tool to create focus and energy toward accomplishing what you really want to do.
WRITE DOWN YOUR GOALS.

MAINTAIN BALANCE IN YOUR LIFE.

This piece of advice is easy to give, but often hard to follow. Make time to do things that are important to you, whether they relate to your career, your friends, your family, your faith, or your service to the community. Define your life not by what you are, but by who you are.

Sometimes it may be a trial and error process to find your true calling. Just keep moving in the direction of things you like to do most. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, there is a good chance you will be successful at it.
FOLLOW YOUR PASSION.

GIVE SOMETHING BACK. I believe we each have a responsibility to our community, our nation and the planet. I encourage every individual to accept this responsibility and to give something back. How you choose to do it is up to you: you can give of your time, your treasure or your talent.

COMPANY:

Visteon Corporation Van Buren Township, Michigan www.visteon.com Automotive supplier $11.4 billion 45,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

It is the fundamental philosophy of giving back that I use most often. It can be easy at times to forget we have much to be thankful for; by challenging myself to give something back, I’m able to stay better connected to a sense of gratefulness.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“One of the best ways to earn the respect of others is to show respect to them.”

Sharilyn Gasaway
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P /AC R EE L WE R W O R K L LT W N I T E L E S S

A

t Alltel Wireless, we have adopted eight core values which

TITLE:

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

guide our leadership practices, and those are reflected in what we call the Alltel Leader’s Pledge: “I will show COURAGE, INTEGRITY and RESPECT. I will give KNOWLEDGE, INSPIRATION and VISION. I will make positive CHANGE and deliver RESULTS.” Some of those come more naturally. Others must be cultivated. Some are constant. Others must be summoned. But a genuine leader at a corporation or small business, in a community or nonprofit organization, or even in a family must apply each of these in her or his life. As I reflect on the people who have made a difference in my life and career, there seems to be one value that they all share, and it is one I strive to practice daily. That value is respect. It began with a childhood in a small Southern city, where my first role models, my mother and father, showed respect not only to each other but also for their mission in life and toward me and my three siblings. They didn’t read us the list of ‘dos and don’ts’; instead it was a climate of support, of opportunities, of encouragement and of mutual respect.

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Certified Public Accountant, BS in accounting from Louisiana Tech University Office assistant for a hometown surgeon

Leadership requires collaboration. Leaders should not only accept different viewpoints and ideas—they should encourage them among all members of the team.
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband, twin daughter and son, age 7 Swimming, boating and skiing American Red Cross and Arkansas

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Children’s Hospital

I saw it again in one of my first jobs as an accountant, and the most influential mentor was a man who willingly invested his time to help me understand the why of our activities and showed me that questioning methods was not only welcomed, but encouraged. Years later, I had a chance to join Alltel in a leadership role. As a dynamic Fortune 500 company, growing in a vibrant industry, headquartered in a charming city, it had plenty of positives. But the final test was: “Do I respect the people who work here? And would they show me that same respect?” Since I had already had a chance to work with many people from Alltel for many years, the answer was easy and obvious. Sometimes the best advice is the simplest. I would encourage

COMPANY:

Alltel Wireless Little Rock, Arkansas www.alltel.com Wireless communications and applications $7.9 billion 15,000

young women and men to remember that one of the best ways to earn the respect of others is to show respect to them. The rewards will be measured in many ways.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

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“Finally, understand that leadership and success are most often not accomplished single-handedly.”

Vicki Gordon
N U T T E R M I H G E N N E N C OF I T I N EL LTA/ C R E W LN EG R O U P ) cCL (INTER & NSH, N P L HOTE S TWORK

“W

hen the work’s done right, with no fuss or boasting,

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs—Americas Daily and on-going! Assistant to librarian at county library Mexifornia, by Victor Davis Hanson

ordinary people say, ‘Oh, we did it.’”—Lao-Tzu, philosopher and teacher, sixth century B.C. For me, this quote from Lao-Tzu very simply captures the essence of leadership—trusting and empowering others and working quietly to help them be their best. True leaders are quite often not the people we read and hear about in the media. They are the individuals who are quietly making a difference in their communities, their families and in their businesses. They are focused on outcome, not recognition. They take satisfaction in knowing that they have made a difference. Many of us are conditioned to think that leadership and success are tied to high-profile, big-income careers. Maybe, maybe not. I believe that each of us must determine our own definition of success and know that we have the power to create our personal success. Never let someone else set your personal agenda. When mentoring young professionals today, I have the same three pieces of advice for everyone. First, take the time to

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

“True leaders are hardly known to their followers. Next after them are the leaders the people know and admire; after them, those they fear; after them, those they despise. To give no trust is to get no trust. When the work’s done right, with no fuss or boasting, ordinary people say, ‘Oh, we did it.’”—Lao-Tzu, philosopher and teacher, sixth century B.C. Husband, 7 step-children Travel, public policy issues, volunteerism UNICEF

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

truly think about and articulate to yourself what success means to you. Is that a fast-track career? A blend of career and family? An advocate for social change? Only you know the answer, but you must be clear on the answer before you can be successful. Secondly, once you know what you want, don’t wait for breaks. Create your own opportunities. In the business world this may mean moving beyond publicized job openings within your organization and finding a critical business need that isn’t currently being addressed. If you can envision a solution for

COMPANY:

IHG (InterContinental Hotels Group) Windsor, England www.ihg.com Hospitality Total gross revenue $16.7 billion

that need, you have a good chance of owning it. Congratulations, you’ve just created your own opportunity! Finally, understand that leadership and success are most often not accomplished single-handedly. Honor and respect those who have contributed to your success. You will shine through them.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

350,000 including our managed and franchised hotels

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“What sets you apart from others is the ability to go the extra mile.”

Belinda Grant-Anderson
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T W O&K AT R T

A

successful business leader has an individual formula for success. My personal formula includes consistently exceeding expectations, taking measured risks, being a team player and helping others develop. This combination of skills, once developed, is transportable and applicable to most leadership roles. One fundamental tenet of performance is exceeding expectations by over-delivering on business results. The minimum requirement is to fulfill the assignment, which helps you maintain the status quo. What sets you apart from others is the ability to go the extra mile and demonstrate your knowledge of the business by showing, for example, how you can achieve more revenue and more cost savings, all ahead of schedule. We all have tough objectives; the ones who rise to the top are those who gracefully and/or enthusiastically accept the challenge and then accomplish it. Second, become a risk taker. There is an old adage that says “nothing ventured, nothing gained.” Your career is a series of investments made by you and other interested parties. As with any investment, there are inherent risks that, if managed appropriately, can become valuable learning experiences. I discovered that by remaining open and flexible, there were countless opportunities available to me to take risk, make necessary career investments, and enlist others to do the same on my behalf.

TITLE:

Vice President, Leadership Development & Diversity

EDUCATION: BS in engineering, MBA from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee FIRST JOB:

Products researcher at Proctor & Gamble in The Other Boelyn Girl, by Philippa Gregory Always treat others as you would like to be

Cincinnati
READING: PHILOSOPHY:

treated.
FAMILY:

Married with two daughters, age 7 and 10

INTERESTS:

Reading mystery and suspense, sewing, and being a Girl Scout troop leader Imagine It!—The Children’s Museum of Atlanta

FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

AT&T San Antonio, Texas www.att.com Telecommunications $117 billion 301,760

GLOBAL HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

The most rewarding assignments have been those that took me outside of my comfort zone: moving from a strategic to an operations role and taking on an assignment in regulatory or human resources. All of these moves were risks that increased my skill set, exposed me to new parts of the business and added value to the company. Third, demonstrate your ability to be a true team player. This means that on any given issue, learn to listen to your colleagues, understand what success means to them, and craft solutions that are true win-win situations. If you can gain a reputation for working to build and recognize the team, other high performers will look for opportunities to work with you, which will increase your ability to succeed. Finally, make investments in others by cultivating their talents. As a leader, it’s your responsibility to develop others, but it is also critical to help the business succeed. As the nature of our work becomes more complex, we can only achieve our results by supporting coworkers—helping them build skills for future success and putting them in positions that allow their strengths to shine.

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Thanks to you,
women are helping to shape an America in which all citizens, regardless of gender, are free to live out their dreams.

WellPoint congratulates all of the WomenWorthWatching®, including our own current and past recipients Shamla Naidoo, Dijuana Lewis, Lisa Moriyama and Alice Rosenblatt.
At WellPoint, we are addressing tomorrow's health care issues today. WellPoint has taken a leadership role in women's health. Focusing on the medical issues that most affect women, we've developed a four-pronged approach that addresses wellness and prevention, disease management, quality improvement and community involvement. Some of the numerous resources we provide to help women take control of their health include: Women's Health e-Newsletter, Baby Connection and MaterniCall, Mammography Compliance Initiative and a Breast Cancer Resource Center. Working to better people's lives is not something you do everyday - but it can be, at WellPoint.

Better health care, thanks to you.
Visit us online at wellpoint.com/careers and wellpoint.com/diversity
EOE ®Registered Trademark, WellPoint, Inc. ©2007 WellPoint, Inc. All Rights Reserved ®Registered Trademark, WomenWorthWatching ©2007 Profiles in Diversity Journal All Rights Reserved

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Change is constant and those who adapt and make change work for them, are those who are more likely to succeed.”

Tracey Gray-Walker
N U T T E R A Xc C E E N N E N L E FL I F E, IL LS U/ C R E W C O M PA N Y M A L Q U I TA B & ISH N P RANCE NETWORK

O

ne of the greatest joys of my career has been sharing what I’ve

learned along the way with others, especially those who are starting out in their professional lives. I’ve had the great fortune to work for organizations of many shapes and sizes. The following are a few rules I live by, which I hope will be helpful to others:

TITLE: Vice President, Business Development and Opportunities EDUCATION:

BS in accounting, Fairleigh Dickinson

University
FIRST JOB:

Auditor for a public accounting firm

READING: The Power of Positive Thinking, by Norman Vincent Peale; Why Bad Things Happen to Good People, by Harold S. Kushner. PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

TAKE RISKS.

We are blessed to live in a society where risk tak-

Attitude will take you further than aptitude

ing is not something that is required to live a healthy and decent life. The risks I have taken in my career have provided the biggest returns. Whether it is taking a non-linear approach to career development, finding time to dedicate yourself to a needy civic or philanthropic cause, or simply taking the road less traveled, risks make you stronger and more valuable to your employer and to your family, communities and society.
DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS.

Husband and son

INTERESTS:

Traveling, volunteering with special children, parent advocacy Center for Outreach and Services for

FAVORITE CHARITY:

PRACTICE HUMILITY.

Humility is a trait that benefits by practice,

I don’t believe career development ever

and one that I believe is a fundamental trait of good leadership. It is the trait which allows you to see the bigger picture, to listen to others before you offer your own opinions, to know when you don’t have the answer, and to put the welfare of your team before yourself.
ENCOURAGE DIVERSITY.

ends. There is always a new discipline, a new technology, a new language, a new way of doing business. Change is constant and those who adapt and make change work for them, are those who are more likely to succeed.

Echoing what I wrote earlier, I am blessed

to have worked with a wide variety of individuals in corporate, nonprofit and government organizations throughout my career,
COMPANY:

AXA Equitable Life Insurance Company New York, New York

from one end of our country to the other. This exposure to people of different backgrounds and beliefs has been invaluable to my own professional development, and I think it has made me a more competent professional. I encourage you to embrace the diversity that makes our country and our economy great.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.axa-equitable.com Financial services $108 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

11,000

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“The act of mentoring can be as rich and varied as the individuals involved.”

Eleanor Tabi Haller-Jorden
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W C ATA LYR K NETWO ST

M

entoring denotes a wide range of relationships, including sponsorship, advocacy, a formalized buddy system, and a strong commitment to a subordinate’s career growth. But in my experience, a mentor is that individual who can be depended upon to share personal insights, lessons learned tied to mistakes, and even to assume some career risk in sponsoring a protégé for high-visibility, high-reward assignments. In my own case, mentoring started early. I was raised in a household of mavericks—individuals who chronically challenged conventional wisdom. My mother was a beacon in that regard. A world-renowned Japanese linguist, she showed me firsthand the strength that comes from displaying professional commitments alongside personal convictions. On numerous occasions when our school calendars permitted, she demanded that her children be allowed to accompany her on business trips so that her absences did not come at too high a personal cost. My first personal and external mentor was a family friend and television producer who encouraged me to take risks and question the assertion “this is the way it’s done.” Tragically, he died at a young age, but his words of advice still resonate in the decisions I make today. I should point out that a good mentoring relationship is not always comfortable. The mentor’s job is to stretch the mentee: to provide constructive criticism and to intervene if the protégé slips up. Skilled mentors know when their protégé needs help, even when the protégé doesn’t, because they’ve had similar experiences.
Catalyst New York, New York www.catalyst.org Nonprofit $10,720,825 (revenue and support) 70

General Manager, Catalyst Europe AG EDUCATION: Princeton University; AB magna cum laude, Bryn Mawr College; MSc, London School of Economics FIRST JOB: Environmental planning consultant, HNC, New York READING: Stumbling on Happiness, by Daniel Gilbert PHILOSOPHY: Conventional wisdom is a poor substitute for true north. A life’s journey is never unidirectional and monolithic. We need an equal measure of courage, resilience, and compassion to navigate the unforeseen road blocks, pot holes, and detours. And on the way, we should remind ourselves to give back more than we get. The journey is never traveled alone. FAMILY: Two sons INTERESTS: Windsurfing, backpacking, playing the conga drums, Japanese calligraphy FAVORITE CHARITY: The Humanity Initiative

TITLE:

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

A case in point would be my first professional mentor, my manager at Morgan Guaranty Trust Company. He was a risk-taker and stretched my comfort zone with almost maddening frequency. I recall his request that I make a presentation to the chairman at the ripe young age of 23. Surely, I asserted, I wasn’t experienced enough to venture into the hallowed board room of Morgan Guaranty Trust Company; yet my mentor primed me for success with his vast professional experience, good humor, and uncompromising faith in my ability to deliver. In short, he helped me get out of my own way. These positive experiences with mentoring have made me even more committed to mentoring others. The benefits of a few minutes of well-timed mentoring have legs; these benefits are longlasting and far-reaching. In the final analysis, what makes a mentoring relationship so compelling is that it introduces the idea of personal sponsorship into an inherently impersonal system. As a result, the act of mentoring can be as rich and varied as the individuals involved.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Don’t dwell on why things are the way they are—be positive and create change.”

Kathy Hopinkah Hannan
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W K P MW O R P NET G LLK

T

hroughout my 23-year career, I have embraced diversity, both from an ethnic and gender perspective. As a Native American Indian female of the Ho-Chunk Nation Tribe and the first female area managing partner in my firm, I know first-hand the importance, as well as the challenges, of diversity. Diversity is not about being different; it’s about being dynamic. One of the key messages I try to convey to young professionals is that throughout their careers, they will encounter various types of thinking and management styles. Having the skills to work with all types of people is a powerful asset, and one that should be consciously developed. I believe the most successful people in any organization are those that understand that there is a far greater power in diverse thought. Mentoring is one way to understand how other people think. The key to broadening your perspective is choosing mentors who have “dissimilar” backgrounds, educations and experiences. Women should not look solely to other women for mentoring, since it can be very educational to see things from men’s eyes. I personally have had mentors who have had very different operating styles than I, but I found it very enlightening to learn their perspective, as I knew I would encounter those different personalities throughout my career and life. I also believe that taking risks is a critical component to both professional and personal growth. It is very important, however, not to confuse taking risks with saying yes to everyKPMG LLP New York, New York www.us.kpmg.com Audit, tax and advisory firm $16.9 billion 113,000

TITLE:

Managing Partner of Tax Services for KPMG’s Midwest area BA in accounting and political science, Loras College, IA; a graduate of the Institute of Comparative Political & Economic Systems at Georgetown University Lifeguard Simple Genius, by David Baldacci

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY: Believe in and be true to yourself. Always ask what the possibilities are and then challenge yourself. FAMILY:

Husband and two daughters Golf and laughing Those that focus on underprivileged

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

populations.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

thing—one needs to be strategic and selective. Young professionals should also expect to fail, and likely more than once. However, one WILL learn from any missteps; that I can guarantee. To become a leader, you must understand that there is an inherent responsibility in helping others succeed. Developing a team is essential to success. Sharing and giving credit is equally important to ‘tooting your own horn.’ Criticizing in private and praising in public go hand in hand with building trust within the team. And lastly, never compromise your principles in life, especially outside of work. Ask yourself, “What are the possibilities?” and be optimistic. Don’t dwell on why things are the way they are—be positive and create change. A quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson has always stayed with me and grounded me: “The years teach much which the days never know.” Something to keep in mind.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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doin d i g it with doing it with

Styl S le Style

Is it a man’s world? it man’s world?

Not when the subject is cars. sub bject

Th ree female GM designers Three fem a le G M des ign er s — C rys tal Win dh am , Crystal Windham, design manager design manage for midsize car int er interiors; Liz Wetzel, teriors; Wetzel, global brand design dire d director; and H ector; Helen Emsley, global Emsley, y l dire director of color and trim — discuss how they approach ector colo or discus ss approach r h styling, their sources of inspiration and the challenges styling, their sources of inspiration and the challenges of of designing w women in mind. with

Today, Today, more than 80 percent of y all new vehicle purchases are pu urchases women, according to industry g estimates. And the number e seems to keep growing. growing.

“We observe the world around o “We observe the world around look at all things beautiful th and functio onal functional as sources of inspiration — art, of inspiration art, architecture even nature.” e, architecture,

Liz Wetzel: Wetzel:

Crystal Windham: C Windham m:
“W “We draw inspiration from m “We design facets of many products s, non-automotive products, such as footwear, cell phones, such as footwear, cell phones, computers, furniture computers, furniture and clothing.” and clothing.”

Helen Emsley: E
“I’d add architecture and arch hitecture makeup to that mix, too. The tha at help inspire vehicle colors.” ve ehicle vehicle design, durability, ma vehi icle durability, materials and quality at Gen y aterials General Motors neral these days. Couple this with the automaker’s latest technologies, and these t automaker ’s technologies, drivers are seeing new interior and exterior styling with distinct drivers are seeing new interior and exterior styling with distinct trims, fabrics and options. trims,

photogra photography by Roy Ritchie aphy

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“There is a certain presence; selfassuredness without arrogance, around some of the best leaders I’ve known.”

Doris Heim
N U T T E R M c C L E N N AN A M F I S H , AT IP N A L E WBN E T W O R Y L O S E L & O S N L L O / C R L A O R AT K

L

eadership has so many different definitions and meanings, not all of them just right or all wrong for many of us. I think true, enduring leadership is really something you grow into. There are common attributes like honesty, integrity, decisiveness, authority and respect that different people possess in different ways, but there is a certain presence; self-assuredness without arrogance, around some of the best leaders I’ve known that I think comes after many years of experience. These are the leaders that I remember best, want to emulate, and know that we need more of. My advice for those seeking to be the best leaders they can is:

TITLE:

Associate Director for Business Administration BS in accounting, University of Tennessee Waitress David Baldacci

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Let the good times roll; and live well, love much, and laugh often. Husband, Will; son, daughter and cat Snow skiing, scuba diving, travel, theater

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Various local groups that support battered women, March of Dimes

LEARN HOW TO EXPRESS YOUR EXPECTATIONS EARLY ON.

FIND A MENTOR OR COACH EARLY ON (AND FREQUENTLY).

Someone you trust and respect to bounce ideas off and help you make better decisions in those gray areas and someone to help guide you on how to present ideas, not just what to say. Perceptions are formed early on, and style and tone are often more remembered than content.
DEVELOP YOUR INSTINCTS AND LEARN TO TRUST THEM.

It helps others to be successful and helps you avoid disappointment. It also creates an opportunity for dialog that builds a foundation of trust.

Guard it carefully and always. It is your shadow and will follow you your whole life, no matter how many times you change jobs.
WORK CONSTANTLY ON BUILDING A GOOD REPUTATION. YOU HAVE TWO EARS AND ONE MOUTH. Use them on that ratio. Listen to learn and to allow others time to hear themselves, too; sometimes that is all it takes to guide them to their own conclusions. PURSUE EXCELLENCE IN YOURSELF AND IN OTHERS.

This becomes increasingly important as you are called upon to make tougher decisions.

BE WILLING TO ADMIT YOUR MISTAKES QUICKLY, AND FIX THEM.

Resist the temptation to blame others, especially your staff. They never forget.

You are never finished learning; don’t let others stop either. You need the best and brightest around you at all times.

Los Alamos National Laboratory HEADQUARTERS: Los Alamos, New Mexico WEB SITE: www.lanl.gov BUSINESS: Government research laboratory 2006 REVENUES: $2.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 10,000 employees
COMPANY:

Be consistent, maintain a constant state of integrity, be dependable and humble and say thank you.
LET PEOPLE KNOW YOU AND RESPECT YOU. HAVE FUN AT WORK AND AWAY.

Cherish your family and friends and nurture those relationships. You set the tone for your staff; you will influence how much they enjoy their work as well.

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“Encourage new ideas and differing opinions.”

Sherry Herrington
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N M TA S H E T R P -/ C R E W R A I LWO A D & FI M , LL O NORTH NET R ORK

A

s leaders, our responsibility is to develop future leaders—

TITLE:

Assistant Vice President, Operations Services

people who are ready, willing and able to take our place and build on our accomplishments to support our company’s continued success. Although organizational success is our primary focus, we also have a unique opportunity to instill our management philosophy and our vision through our leadership. One of my best and most influential mentors was competent and professional but took sole credit for every departmental achievement. This was extremely discouraging for all those who worked tirelessly to support his vision. Consequently, existing achievements were maintained with the occasional minor improvement, but an environment of excellence where managers took pride in their individual efforts and the efforts of the team always seemed out of reach. I learned from that experience that good leadership is more about building and developing the team and less about the leader. As you become empowered, empower others to attain their professional goals.

EDUCATION: BS in business management, Albertus Magnus College; JD, Quinnipiac University School of Law PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Pay it forward

Life partner and my dogs

INTERESTS:

Fishing, boating, spending time with my parents and siblings, travel

Build diverse teams and allow them to build productive relationships and find their way, guided by your vision. Be willing to provide direction. Encourage new ideas and differing opinions. Provide them with opportunities for professional development and advancement. Celebrate their achievements and recognize their efforts, and when they succeed, you and the organization succeed as well. Good leaders are confident, competent and comfortable with their leadership. Only then can they inspire others to follow. Remember, “every team has a leader … but not every leader has a team.”

COMPANY:

MTA Metro-North Railroad New York, New York www.mta.info/mnr/ Transportation $490.5 million 5,895

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Passion and tenaciousness are essential to professional success.”

Cheryl A. Howe
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & HI S H , L L PO/W R E W N E T W ON C F E A LT H N C N E W YO R K I R K

D

edication to health, experience as a registered nurse and

TITLE:

Executive Vice President, Operations

interest in business are a few factors that influenced my decision to pursue a career with a health benefits plan. As executive vice president of HealthNow New York Inc., a multibillion-dollar plan serving nearly one million members throughout the country, I help shape policies and practices that improve the health of thousands of people every day. I believe my success reflects the support I’ve received from leaders who have told me that I could make a difference. I joined HealthNow nearly 25 years ago (when it was Blue Shield of Western New York), and received mentoring by a female executive whose candor and confidence encouraged me to take risks. Today, one of my greatest supporters is our president and CEO, Alphonso O’Neil-White. He has given me the opportunities to do what I love: create programs that improve access to high-quality health care and the resources and time to volunteer. Passion and tenaciousness are essential to professional success. Every risk worth taking and every great idea face roadblocks. If you love what you’re doing and believe in its worth, you’ll get through them stronger, smarter and prepared to lead. That is how I progressed from managing a department of

EDUCATION: BA, communications, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY; MS, health services administration, D’Youville College, Buffalo, NY FIRST JOB: READING:

Account manager at a local dairy farm

The Sixth Target, by James Patterson

My philosophy is derived from a Chinese proverb: “Happiness is having people you love in your life, work that you’re passionate about and something, always, to hope for.”
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband, daughter and son Running, reading and relaxing Hospice

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

60 to becoming part of a dynamic executive leadership team for a company with $2.1 billion in annual revenue and nearly 2,000 employees. As HealthNow’s staff is predominantly women, I have mentored dozens who have risen from entry- and mid-entry-level positions to become senior vice presidents and vice presidents. As a past mentor of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Mentoring Program Fellowship, I had the honor of mentoring a woman who is making her own significant contributions to health care in life sciences. Sharing experiences through mentoring is not one more demand on our time. My career may have been different if it

COMPANY:

HealthNow New York Inc. Buffalo, New York

wasn’t for those who have helped me grow and I, too, have made it a goal to ensure that more women have leadership opportunities wherever life takes them. Mentoring is an opportunity to thank those who helped us and to honor their legacies; being entrusted with the task is one of the greatest achievements of any successful woman’s career.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.bcbswny.com; www.bsneny.com; www.healthnowny.com. Health benefits plan $2.1 billion 2,000

BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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Discovering the best in ourselves while improving the lives of others.
At HealthNow, our workforce plays a vital role in improving the health of millions of people and is critical to the success of our multi-billion dollar health benefits plan. It may come as no surprise, then, that women make up nearly 80 percent of it. As HealthNow’s Executive Vice President, Operations, Cheryl Howe’s profession and passion are to help people receive the best health care possible. HealthNow is proud to provide a challenging yet supportive environment where mentoring and growth are encouraged, and where women like Cheryl have opportunities to thrive – discovering the best in themselves while improving the lives of others.

Our mission in life is to enhance yours.

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“Leadership is a privilege and a responsibility.”

Marjorie F. Hsu
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E V E& I Z I SN ,CL LM M U N I C AT I OT W ON C N R F O H O P / CREW NE NS I RK

M

y life and work has been blessed by great opportunities, as well as the support and shared wisdom of diverse family members, friends, mentors, and champions. This good fortune, along with a willingness to embrace change, learn quickly, work hard, focus on results and have the confidence that I can make a difference, have all contributed to my accomplishments and perspectives. An infant when my parents and I immigrated to the United States, I have learned many important life lessons about staying true to oneself while extracting the best from all cultures and people. From the unconditional support I continue to receive from my family to the many leaders who have broadened my perspective, it is a diversity of opinion and life experiences that I most value. Now, when I mentor others, I recall what I most appreciate in the excellent sponsors I have had over the years. These talented leaders have listened, encouraged, pushed and inspired me to take on new challenges. I appreciate their candor and strength of character in balancing what is best for the individual, the team, and the firm. Finding the right mentoring relationship is more about respect, trust, and chemistry than the title and level of the persons involved. Leadership is a privilege and a responsibility. There are some rare individuals who are born leaders, but the rest of us are made through our experiences, education, and a mindset and confidence about stepping up to the front of the crowd.

TITLE:

Vice President, Services Technology

EDUCATION: BS in electrical engineering, Boston University; MBA, Boston University FIRST JOB: China, crystal and silver sales at Hahne’s department store READING: Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell; Open Business Models, by Henry Chesbrough PHILOSOPHY:

Life is not a dress rehearsal, so maximize every experience for greatest joy, contribution, and learning. Be crystal clear on your priorities and absolutely live true to these. Make an impact on the things you can control, and let go of that which you cannot. Husband and two sons Cooking, traveling, reading, cycling, skiing and watching at the boys’ sports and recitals Medecins Sans Frontieres

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

Verizon Communications, Inc. New York, New York www.verizon.com Communications: broadband and wireless $88 billion 232,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Mentors, family, and others nurture mindset and confidence, but it is really up to the individual to make the deliberate choice to prepare for and accept leadership responsibilities and challenges. For the long-term success of a company, selecting and developing future leaders is as critical as managing the balance sheet, because employees are every firm’s most valuable assets. High potential (Hi-Po) employees at every level of the business are tracked, developed, assessed, and rotated through job assignments. The company makes a large investment in our Hi-Po employees, but it is up to each person to take accountability for their own career development and path. This is where a mentor can be an invaluable resource. Every person is presented with different life challenges and opportunities. Take some risks, have some adventures, do your best and live with no regret.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“A career cannot be planned; it will unfold.”

Swanee Hunt
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I SU N T L P / E R N AT I N E S W U N D H H , L A LT C R E W V T F O R K

I

’ve always been a zealot, championing causes, waving banners,

TITLE:

President, Hunt Alternatives Fund

persuading, cajoling, insisting. My mission is to achieve gender parity, particularly as a means to end war, rebuild societies and reduce poverty and other human suffering. Over five decades, history has gradually changed my charted course, but I’ve managed to keep my balance. I’ve learned to absorb privilege and oppose patriarchy to become an independent woman. Let me be clear: I’m a hard worker, but no hero. Gutsy, sometimes noble, and always flawed. I’m flawed, but determined. I’ve always tried to formulate how I could take whatever health, wealth, knowledge, experience or ability I have to make the greatest affect on the world. But the destination is never reached. The goal is never met. Some days, my success is no more than my kind word in someone's dark hour, my dollar well spent to ease a worry, my talent applied to solve a problem. If I don’t succeed at any given time, I’m not deterred. The possibility of achievement is encapsulated in every moment and released when we bring to fruition the fulfillment of another. My passion is for a squaring of opportunity and existence for all humankind. I ache when I read of child laborers

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BA in philosophy; two master’s degrees, psychology and religion; doctorate in theology Co-director of a halfway house for the mentally I and Thou, by Martin Buber

ill in Denver
READING: PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

“We are all co-creators, and as such bear responsibility for others’ suffering.” Married with three children, ages 19, 24, 37 Bowling, photography, composing, “I fund change, not charity.”

INTERESTS:

writing books
FAVORITE CHARITY:

in China, of young Thai women enslaved in brothels, of mentally ill men in shackles. And my spirits soar when I see the courage of a social reformer like Jim Wallace, the philanthropy of Roxbury neighbors, or a documentary on the first woman president in Africa. But care comes at a cost. It requires courage; a willingness to step out into uncertainty. I try to live by the courage to be, a faith that includes the acceptance of despair. If anything, I’ve learned that a career cannot be planned; it will unfold. But I tell my students at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, “Whatever your estimation of your capability, triple it. Seize opportunities that don’t exist. Discover paths no one can see. And always, always, choose jobs that awaken your passion.”

Hunt Alternatives Fund HEADQUARTERS: Cambridge, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.huntalternatives.org; www.swaneehunt.com BUSINESS: Nonprofit 501(c)(3) REVENUES: Since its founding in 1981, the Fund has contributed more than $60 million through a blend of grant making and operating proposals EMPLOYEES: 46
COMPANY:

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“Have confidence in yourself and know that you too are blazing a trail for future generations.”

Yolanda Cash Jackson
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I SE C K E R & C R E W K O F F, O R K B H , L L P / P O L I A N E T W P. A .

W

hen I first started out in the professional world, I didn’t have

TITLE:

Attorney & Shareholder, Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. BS and JD, University of Florida

a blueprint for success, but I was fortunate to have had a strong network of mentors who supported me and gave me the courage to take risks I wouldn’t normally take. My first job after college was in a management training

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

A gift wrapper at Jordan Marsh Department Store at age 14 Genealogy books
PHILOSOPHY:

program at a department store. After working there for five years, I was passed by for a promotion for a white male coworker with little experience and no college degree. I left that job shortly thereafter to pursue a law degree, but the experience made me realize that I would have to push myself harder and overcome a lot of barriers in order to be successful. Former Congresswoman Carrie Meek, my good friend and lifelong mentor, constantly encouraged me to “kick butt with grace,” a motto I used to build a successful government lobbying practice and become only the second female shareholder at the international law firm Becker & Poliakoff. At Becker & Poliakoff, I have the opportunity to devote my efforts to lobbying for causes I believe in, such as helping historically black colleges obtain funding and making sure that the small, primarily minority communities have their voices heard in front of the state legislature. The firm’s founder, Alan Becker, has also served as my mentor, encouraging

Be comfortable with who you are and never stop having fun. If you love what you do, then everything else will fall into place. Widowed, large extended family Shopping, playing golf, and researching my NAACP Legal Defense Fund,

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

family history
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

my church

me to be a leader within the firm and teaching me how to combine success and profit with making a positive difference in the community. I’ve also learned that the roles of mentor and mentee are often interchangeable, and I find myself learning and being inspired by leaders of all ages and backgrounds. I’m a firm believer in peer mentorship because mentoring isn’t about age or title, but about sharing the lessons you’ve learned and setting a good example that inspires others to develop their strengths and become leaders in their own way. My experiences with mentoring have made me feel very passionately about serving as a mentor for others. My best advice for other women is to have confidence in yourself and know that you too are blazing a trail for future generations. Women have a tendency not to toot their own horns, but you should never be afraid to stand up and make the world take notice of your achievements.

COMPANY:

Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Fort Lauderdale, Florida

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.becker-poliakoff.com Commercial law N/A

2006 REVENUES:

EMPLOYEES: More than 120 attorneys in 14 Florida offices and international and affiliated offices in the Czech Republic, China, Germany, France and Israel

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DIVERSITY
determines a company’s success.
Eastman Kodak Company is committed to becoming a truly diverse corporation. Embracing the ideals of diversity enables us to better meet the needs of our customers, employees, suppliers, and the communities in which we live and work. All of which ensures our continued success in the global marketplace.

www.kodak.com/go/supplierdiversity
© Eastman Kodak Company, 2007

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“Everyone is a potential leader, whether through leading people, leading thought or leading projects.”

Elizabeth “Lee Lee” James
NUTTER McCLENNEN & FISH, LLP / CREW NETWORK SYNOVUS

M

y personal leadership philosophy mirrors Synovus’ Leadership

TITLE:

Vice Chairman and Chief People Officer

Model, which is comprised of three main areas of focus. Our model begins with living our values, where we focus inwardly on becoming the best leaders we can be; making others successful, where servant leadership is lived outwardly; and growing the business, where the fruits of effective leadership are seen through growth, team-member rewards and increased shareholder value.

EDUCATION: BA, Auburn University; Graduate of Duke University Executive Education Program; Graduate of Cannon Financial Institute Trust School FIRST JOB: Commercial development with the Woodruff Company READING: FAMILY:

Facing Your Giants, by Max Lucado

Husband, sons 13 and 10

Whatever sports the boys are participating in at the moment.
INTERESTS: FAVORITE CHARITY:

Supports multiple causes

LIVING OUR VALUES:

Our company is a dynamic, fluid, moving

organization subject to constant change. But in every decision we make as leaders, we must go back to our core values as a touchstone: We value the worth of every individual; we value service to others, our customers and our communities; and we value a passion for excellence. We expect leaders to act with integrity and openness, say what needs to be said, provide feedback in a timely manner and demonstrate courage and candor. Our values expect leaders to exhibit energy, drive and passion, strive for personal learning and take 100 percent responsibility for their actions.
MAKING OTHERS SUCCESSFUL:

inspires top performance and loyalty. We have to be willing to reach out to and lift up others. We do this by creating lasting relationships, communicating for clear understanding, coaching for high performance and building a collaborative environment.
GROWING THE BUSINESS:

As leaders, we have a responsibility

to keep our team members focused on our vision and goals. Our shareholders have made an investment in us, and we have a responsibility to grow the business and produce a profitable return for them. Whether it is an individual or corporate issue, we all have to work on keeping the big picture in mind. We must think strategically and embrace change, make sound decisions and execute for results. Everyone is a potential leader. I believe great leadership is about serving others. It requires an honest look at yourself to determine if you are enabling others to develop the skills, abilities and confidence to become great leaders themselves.

A leader who genuinely

cares about people and puts their needs before his or her own

Synovus HEADQUARTERS: Columbus, Georgia WEB SITE: www.synovus.com BUSINESS: Financial services 2006 REVENUES: $32 billion EMPLOYEES: 13,000
COMPANY:

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“Watch and observe what good leaders do, then incorporate what’s natural for you.”

Carol J. Johnson
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P L LYRS E R V IE T W ON C KE/ C EW N CES I RK

I

grew up working in my family’s business, a dairy farm in

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Corporate Accounts

southwestern Wisconsin. From a young age I learned the importance of working hard, taking advantage of opportunities and being a team player. Strong leadership, discipline and honesty are among the values I learned. The same holds true when working for a major corporation. Other core values that have guided me throughout my career include: • Being responsible for one’s actions • Earning the respect of fellow co-workers and customers • Leading by example • Participating as a team player. My first job out of college was with Dun and Bradstreet as an account supervisor, supporting the company’s team of global sales executives. Throughout my career, I often have been faced with being the youngest person in my peer group. While hard work and commitment earned me the roles, strong bosses who became coaches and mentors helped me learn and grow into being a professional capable of handling larger responsibility.

EDUCATION:

BS, Northern Illinois University; MBA, Loyola University of Chicago Working on my parents’ dairy farm in Wisconsin

FIRST JOB: READING:

The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman; Building the Bridge As You Walk On It, by Robert Quinn; The Loved Dog, by Tamar Geller

PHILOSOPHY: Word hard, do the right thing. Treat people with respect, deliver results and you will be rewarded. FAMILY:

Husband, married 21 years

INTERESTS: Spending time with my family, raise and show Boxer dogs, golf, reading and needlepoint FAVORITE CHARITIES:

United Way, March of Dimes, United

Methodist Church

My superiors challenged me, like my parents, to be the best and enabled me to try new roles that helped to develop my skills and experience. My managers were engaged and gave me feedback because they truly wanted me to succeed. Today, I work hard to do the same—to care about my staff and those that I mentor and to give back to them the learning and support that my mentors gave me during the early days of my career. Advice that has served me well is to watch and observe what good leaders do, then incorporate what’s natural for you. Leadership is developed from your experiences and it influences

COMPANY:

Kelly Services, Inc. Troy, Michigan www.kellyservices.com Temporary staffing $5.5 billion 8,600

how you successfully operate in the business world as well as how effective you are in building relationships with clients. The foundation we grew up with forms the basis for who we are as adults and the success we are capable of experiencing in our career. Be accountable, be a leader, and your dreams will come true.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Do what makes your heart leap.”

Margaret L. “Peggy” Johnson
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E WCN E T M ON C QUAL OM W I RK

I

had the privilege to be mentored early in my career. I was not

seeking a mentoring relationship, but two very bright individuals saw potential in me and helped me to reach my career goals. I’ve learned from them, and have carried this on by being a mentor to others. My first mentor was during my time at General Electric in their Military Electronics division. There were very few women in the engineering department at GE in those days and my mentor was able to connect with me and share her experiences as a fellow female in the division. She taught me to speak up with respect to my interests at GE outside of my role as an engineer. As an example, I had a strong interest in the international business at GE, but felt that because I was a woman, in a non-HQ location, I would never be accepted. She encouraged me to pursue my interests and be vocal about my desires. I did as she advised, and managed to work my way successfully into the international side of business at GE. My second mentor was at QUALCOMM, where I started as an engineer, and often traveled with the business teams to customer visits to translate the technical details of a solution into language the customer could understand. I loved working

TITLE: Executive Vice President and President, QUALCOMM Internet Services and MediaFLO Technologies EDUCATION: BS in electrical engineering from San Diego State University FIRST JOB: Software engineer for General Electric’s Military Electronics Division READING:

The Age of Innocence, by Edith Wharton Do what makes your heart leap.

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband: Eric; Children: two sons, ages 18 and 8; daughter, 16
INTERESTS:

Running, reading, traveling with my family Sulpizio Family UCSD

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Cardiovascular Center

with customers. The head of the business unit saw the passion and joy I had in this work, and encouraged me to make the leap from a technical role to a business role. It took me a month to make the decision, but because my mentor saw something in me that I did not instantly see myself, I entered into a new facet of my career— one that has led me to where I am today. I’ve benefited tremendously from these mentoring relationships and now have the opportunity to be a mentor to others. I’ve taken a very informal approach to mentoring, as I believe people will often be more candid and honest in an informal setting. Through my informal efforts I’ve been privileged to play a part as others have risen within QUALCOMM. I would never have taken on the role of a mentor if it weren’t for the two individuals who took an interest in me early in my career and now I enjoy being able to give something back.

COMPANY:

QUALCOMM, Inc. San Diego, California www.qualcomm.com Technology / communications equipment $7.5 billion 11,200

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“When we stop challenging ourselves to grow and change, we fail as leaders.”

Patti A. Johnson
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E WCN E T W ON C E OLAB I RK

E

arly in my career, I tried hard to adapt to what I felt the cul-

ture of the organization would accept from me, and it led to stress and internal conflict. Today, I have learned to appreciate my own unique way of viewing the world, business situations and relationships. Looking back, my female peers were the ones who helped me find success while staying true to my own values and communicating in a manner that was comfortable to me. I am grateful to have been surrounded by a network of women during critical development periods in my career. I could not have achieved my goals or be where I am without them. Studies show that women aren’t as involved in mentoring as they could be. It’s essential that we, as women, recognize the power of mentors in career development and make time to guide those around us. I’d like to pass on a few principles that have served me well throughout my career:
STRETCH YOURSELF.

Vice President of Tax and Public Affairs EDUCATION: CPA; accounting degree, University of Iowa; JD, William Mitchell College of Law, St. Paul, Minnesota
TITLE: FIRST JOB:

Wrapping packages at a children’s clothing store

READING: Power of One, The Fountainhead, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, and The Book Thief, Eat Love Pray, Garlic and Sapphires, Honeymoon with my Brother, Marley FAMILY: Husband, Kai Bjerkness; three children and two stepchildren, ages 8 to 16 INTERESTS:

Traveling, cooking, reading and yoga

PHILOSOPHY: Be positive and grateful. Let others know you appreciate their efforts. FAVORITE CHARITY:

Chrysalis, a Center for Women

COMMIT TO LIFELONG LEARNING.

In your own career and in build-

ing teams, always value the ability to be intellectually nimble. Lifelong learning expands our perspectives and keeps our minds open to address issues that we may never have realized were staring us in the face.
CHALLENGE OLD THINKING, TEST LIMITATIONS AND CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVE.

Volunteer for experiences that challenge

your comfort zone and expand your competencies. Charting unknown territory provides new ideas, new information and greater understanding of what we can achieve.

Nothing is more frustrating than to hear, “But that’s the

way we do things around here.” When we stop challenging ourselves to grow and change, we fail as leaders.
COLLABORATE.

While the power of one may inspire you to make a

difference, the power of multiple perspectives can create the best
Ecolab Inc. HEADQUARTERS: St. Paul, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.ecolab.com BUSINESS: The world’s leading provider of cleaning, sanitizing, food safety and infection prevention products and services. 2006 REVENUES: $5 billion EMPLOYEES: 23,000
COMPANY:

plan. Develop your own ideas—then find those with expertise to share, inspire, refine and supercharge the outcome. Remember that each of us contributes differently. Your job as a leader is to find the best in each member of your team. Respect the different talents and abilities of your team, and provide each member the opportunity to contribute in his or her own way.

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“I pay it forward by working as a mentor.”

Deborah P. Kelly
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , I CL P T E I N E W A P IT W O R P D L KS / CR SH NE RO LLK

M

ine is not the traditional career path. After many years in academia, I grew restless as a political science professor and enrolled in law school while teaching full time. Among unexpected benefits, I earned great grades and received an offer from Dickstein Shapiro LLP. I started at the firm in November 1988—especially pregnant—and quickly became known as the associate carrying triplets. In my first year, I volunteered to name the babies Dickstein, Shapiro, and Morin if the firm would pay for them (offer declined), took five months off, and then asked to work an 80 percent schedule (offer accepted). Such an arrangement was unprecedented for a litigator who wanted to stay on partner track. The firm took a chance on me. The firm was creative and supportive. I was offered greater responsibility for fewer cases, and in return, I resolved to be flexible so opportunities did not pass me by. Over time, I realized that I am a better lawyer and enjoy my life more when I am passionate about my work. I asked to specialize in an undeveloped area, and then hustled to build the firm’s Employment Law Practice. Again, the firm took a chance and it worked. Employment law fits me—it taps my street smarts and people skills, is frequently outrageous, and is never dull. While climbing the partner ladder, I have been a classroom-writing assistant, starter for the swim team, field hockey team reporter, baseball coach, and skateboard-mom.

TITLE: Deputy General Counsel, Employment Practice Leader, Partner EDUCATION: BS from University of Vermont; MA from Johns Hopkins University; JD from American University Washington College of Law FIRST JOB: Research Assistant at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. READING:

The Road, by Cormac McCarthy

Strike a balance in your life. Be excellent at work and passionate about what you do, but not at the expense of having fun and living a full life. Take time to exercise, think, read, go to the movies, laugh, maintain close friendships, listen to music and make memories.
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Mother of triplets—two girls and one boy Long-distance swimming and competitive Swim Across America

INTERESTS:

tennis
FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

Dickstein Shapiro LLP Washington, D.C. www.dicksteinshapiro.com Law firm $281 million 955

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Now, my babies soon leave for college. The firm remains stunningly supportive of me; I am its Deputy General Counsel, a Practice leader, and member of the Executive Committee. I pay it forward by working as a mentor to associates in a formal professional development program, and supporting our women’s leadership initiative. The firm is a leader in letting attorneys know that both professional success and a life outside the office are possible. Being a lawyer isn’t easy, clients never call to say “everything is perfect—please bill me.” And, being a partner isn’t everybody’s dream job. Some days, it is not mine. But at Dickstein Shapiro, we accept attorneys for who they are and do not mold them into clones. We embrace differences and take chances. After all, if a new mother who is ten years older than her peer group can start a second career and make it—anything is possible.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“The best choices you can make today are those that leave you with the greatest number of options in the future.”

Jo-Anne Kruse
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , LT R AVC RP O R T E TM IO R D LP / EL EW N LI W TE K

M

uch like anyone else, I am a product of my environment and

TITLE:

EVP Human Resources

circumstances. I believe, as Aldous Huxley states, “Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you.” Those experiences—personal, professional, positive and negative—serve to shape us all. When I look back on many of the decisions I’ve made in the past, I can see how these decisions impacted my future options. As tomorrow’s corporate leaders face their own metaphorical fork in the road, my counsel is this: choose the path that seems to have the greatest number of crossroads ahead. I believe that the best choices you can make today are those that leave you with the greatest number of options in the future. It’s those choices, and the decisions you make, right and wrong, that build the context for your future. These crossroads can sometimes be difficult to navigate, so keep in mind the people you meet along the way. Some of the most important decisions I have made on my journey were often guided by the simplest counsel, and rarely from a mentor in the traditional sense of the word. These important guides come from surprising places; the trick is to take the time to listen and internalize these thoughts. But not all of this counsel has been positive; some of the best feedback and

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BS, Cornell University; MA, Columbia University HR management trainee, Chase Manhattan

Bank
READING: The Enthusiastic Employee, by David Sirota, Louis A. Mischkind and Michael Irwin Meltzer PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Change the world one action at a time.

Husband and two children Gardening, travel, biking, time with family Cornell University

INTERESTS:

and friends
FAVORITE CHARITY:

guidance I have received has come from the most negative interactions. Conflict often provides the chance for you to crystallize views and values; truly difficult decisions force you to make a call. Someone once told me “feedback is a gift”—something I often joke about today, but there is some real truth to this statement. This gift is something you should pass on. As you learn from others, take the time to provide that same level of insight and support to others. Sometimes the process of helping someone through a difficult decision or choice gives you an opportunity to reevaluate your own choices. I believe we make our own destiny and choose our own path. As you progress on your journey, allow yourself the time to grow and learn from the people and experiences you meet along the way. This will provide the best grounding for your future leadership position no matter what your final destination.

Travelport Limited HEADQUARTERS: New York, New York WEB SITE: www.travelport.com BUSINESS: Travelport technology services 2006 REVENUES: $2.55 billion EMPLOYEES: 8,000 worldwide
COMPANY:

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CHEVRON is a registered trademark of Chevron Corporation. The CHEVRON HALLMARK and HUMAN ENERGY are trademarks of Chevron Corporation. ©2007 Chevron Corporation. All rights reserved.

When we’re all equals, things really start to add up.

eq ua lit y an d Th e po we r of of is th e po we r pa rt ne rs hi p dr iv es . It’ s wh at hu m an en er gy th e re as on pa ny , an d it’ s ou r co m s in th e fa irn es we pr om ot e h pa rt ne rs hi ps pl ac e. Th ro ug wo rk ed d wo m en -o wn - an wi th m in or ity , we ’re ou nd th e wo rld bu sin es se s ar es fo r te op po rt un iti he lp in g cr ea vi sit us le ar n m or e, ev er yo ne . To n. co m . at ch ev ro

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“In order to succeed, it is essential to build a strong team with diverse talents.”

Martha D. Leiper
NUTTER McCLENNEN & FISH, LLP / CREW NETUNUM WORK

A

chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and my chain of

TITLE:

success has largely been driven by the contributions of my team. At a young age, I learned the importance of teamwork, building alliances and collaboration in achieving goals. Growing up as the seventh of twelve children, it became apparent that the ability to communicate effectively and to negotiate became critical to achieving my goals. When I began my career in the investment field 20 years ago, the value of my life skills was evident. The field was predominately male. However, I was fortunate to be mentored by bright, open-minded professionals, and to work for a company that provided equal opportunities and encouraged employees to strive for excellence. I was fortunate to have worked through a down cycle— the savings and loan crisis of the mid-1980s—which led to a significant devaluation of commercial real estate. Strong analytical skills, holding firm to fundamental principles, a sense of reason and the ability to judge character led me to negotiate resolutions that were acceptable to management. I set a few key priorities, knew the break points and was willing to give on less material issues to get problems resolved, thus avoiding lengthy, expensive court battles.

Senior Vice President and Deputy Chief Investment Officer

EDUCATION: MBA, University of Tennessee; BS, Finance, University of Tennessee FIRST JOB:

Business manager for an architect firm

READING: Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, by Chip Heath PHILOSOPHY: As a leader, it is my role to reinforce the importance of ethics in the workplace. An organization’s ethics policy must be explicitly stated and supported, by top management, to be effective. INTERESTS: FAMILY:

Cooking, gardening, sports

Husband of 23 years, Michael; three children, age 19, 15 and 9
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Boys & Girls Club, Chattanooga

Room in the Inn

That experience has been extremely valuable throughout my career. When economic analysis does not support valuation, a change in a market cycle can wipe out years of gains. If we cannot quantify and understand the risk we are taking for the expected return, we will not make the investment. My success is measured not only in terms of achieving my goals but also by my ability to take results to the next level. To push past the status quo, I must accept challenges and take risks. In order to succeed, it is essential to build a strong team with diverse talents, encourage open debate and stick to fundamental principles. I believe it is critical to place the right people in

COMPANY:

Unum Chattanooga, Tennessee www.unum.com Employee benefits $10.5 billion 10,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

the right roles at the right time. In cultivating talent, I must set high goals, provide frequent feedback and give credit where credit is due. One measure of my success will be the future success of the organization, and that will depend on the team I put in place for tomorrow.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Together we can accomplish anything!”

Debra M. Lewis
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P T EC RS TAT EE T A R M Y UNI / D EW N S WORK

M

y earlier challenges pale in comparison to what I’m doing now. The talented and diverse people I work with each day (military, civilians, Iraqis and contractors from all over the world) are making a difference in the lives of the Iraqi people. Together, we manage the construction of a $2.3 billion program in essential infrastructure projects, including those that support water, sewer, electricity, medical care, education and transportation. Several Iraqis have asked me, “Why does the media hate us so much?” I’ve experienced doubters before as a member of West Point’s first class with women. In tough situations, I remind myself:

TITLE:

Colonel; Commander, Central District, Gulf Region Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baghdad and Al Anbar Provinces, Iraq

EDUCATION: BS, United States Military Academy; MBA, Harvard University; MS in National Resource Strategy, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, Washington, D.C. FIRST JOB: Platoon Leader, 63rd Engineer Company (Topographic), Fort Bragg, North Carolina READING:

Enlightened Leadership, by Doug Krug and

Ed Oakley
PHILOSOPHY:

My own—“A change in attitude has the power to change my day.” Towards others—“Treat people as if they were what they ought to be and you will help them become what they are capable of becoming.”—Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe Husband, Doug Adams; three children Horses, Oriental art, dining out—especially West Point Equestrian Team

OPTIMISM IS AN ENERGY MULTIPLIER.

Negativism is toxic to our health and can derail even the best plan, diverting precious energy and focus away from overcoming our challenges. Set high interpersonal standards and stop negative thinking and behaviors. Skillfully frame things to be productive as you enhance trust and teamwork. Surround yourself with positive reminders such as quotes, mementos and photos of smiling faces and people who inspire you to greater achievements.

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

desserts
FAVORITE CHARITY:

DISCOVER THE CONTEXT.

Give others the benefit of the doubt. Initial reports are often wrong, so ask good questions. Not obtaining available information can result in unsuccessful strategies.

ONLY ONE PERSON CAN DERAIL YOUR TEAM, IF YOU LET THEM.

WHEN BEING FLEXIBLE IS NOT ENOUGH, BE FLUID.

We need each other. In Iraq, over 15 percent of our team rotates monthly. Before a team member runs the ball in the wrong direction, ensure everyone knows what success looks like and are working together to get there.

Be aware of the situation and anticipate all outcomes. Otherwise, an unexpected riptide may pull you away from your intended goal. Your timing for presenting good ideas is also important. Use the current to your advantage, rather than ignore it at your peril or miss important opportunities.

REAL COMMUNICATION IS HARDER THAN EVER.

COMPANY:

United States Army Baghdad, Iraq www.army.mil U.S. Defense 480,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

EMPLOYEES:

Work environments are stressful and tasks more complex. Time spent including others early and often, being respectful and fair, and finding out who else needs to know pays big dividends. The bottom line is that people are the ones who make a difference. Let each one know that they are valued because, “Together we can accomplish anything!”

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“It is a leader’s responsibility to create situations so each person can perform at their best.”

Louise Liang, MD
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L LA I S E R E W N E TN EO R K K P / CR PERMA W NTE

M

y career has not turned out as I expected. I planned and trained to be a pediatrician spending my

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Quality and Clinical Systems Support; Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc. and Kaiser Foundation Hospitals MD, Georgetown University School of Medicine

days, as well as some nights and weekends, taking care of children. Instead I have had one experience after another that has expanded my skills, my work, and my life. I have lived all over the country, from Boston to Hawaii and places in between. I have worked in non-profit and for-profit settings; health insurance, hospitals, and medical groups; health policy, regulation, federal grant funding and care delivery. In my current position, I oversee the world’s largest civilian implementation of an electronic health record. No one could have predicted that, including me. Men and women alike have frequently asked my advice on how to develop a diverse, stimulating career. I always advise them to take the opportunities offered with open arms and an open mind. Some opportunities will be small—a new project, a new department, an additional location. Some opportunities will be large—a new company, a big promotion, a different city or country. Opportunities come with challenges: new skills, new responsibilities, different cultures and norms. Be ready to ask a lot of questions and ask for help. Find out who you can go to
COMPANY:

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Babysitter The Lexus and the Olive Tree, by Tom Friedman

PHILOSOPHY: Customer-focused organizations committed to continuous quality improvement FAMILY:

Wonderful husband and two adult children who are developing worthwhile lives and careers Hiking, cooking, knitting, reading

INTERESTS:

First Place in Seattle, Washington (a transition home for homeless mothers and children)
FAVORITE CHARITY:

for subject matter expertise, management coaching, and company history and norms. Talk to people deeply involved in your work, customers of your work, and those peripheral who have a broader context. Suspend coming to firm conclusions until you have made your own assessment based on direct experience and results. It is a leader’s responsibility to create situations so each person can perform at their best. Find the right balance between continuing effective practices, preserving culturally important traditions, and making changes to improve individual and group performance. There is great satisfaction in continually learning and applying new concepts, bringing past experience to bear on new challenges, and producing higher performance than previously thought possible.

Kaiser Permanente Oakland, California www.kp.org Health care $34 billion 156,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“You have to be driven to delight your customers.”

Cynthia Little
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P PA R K E R N E T W O RN / CREW HANNIFI K

F

rom my 30 years’ experience in the business world, I have

TITLE:

General Manager

found that there are two overriding factors associated with success: customer service and respectful treatment of others. At an early age, I was exposed to an environment in which both of my parents were role models with professional careers. On many occasions through the years, my father would take me into his office with him on Saturday mornings. I observed first hand how he treated his work and how he dealt with others. It became very obvious that he was committed to excellence in everything he was involved with. Additionally, he always took the time to stop and listen to people’s concerns, and it was quite obvious he genuinely cared about them. He was a true role model and set example after example for me to follow. He definitely set the highest of standards of customer service. Through the course of my career, from administrative assistant to general manager, no matter what my responsibilities were, it all came down to customer service. My customers may have been my supervisors, my peers, my subordinates, or even…my actual customers. In every case, the manner in

EDUCATION: BA in business administration with marketing concentration, Baldwin Wallace College; MBA, Ashland University FIRST JOB:

Administrative assistant in sales/marketing dept.

READING: The Toyota Product Development System, by James M. Morgan and Jeffrey K. Liker PHILOSOPHY: Treat others with respect, as you would like them to treat you. If you do this one thing, success will follow. FAMILY:

Husband, daughter 26, granddaughter 7 Jogging, piano, reading, traveling ASPCA

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

which we respond to our customers is what really makes the difference. Whatever your functional area of responsibility, you must remember to provide the best customer service that you can in your capacity. In particular, that boils down to living up to your commitments, treating others with genuine concern and respect, and going a step further than what is expected of you. Along with that comes a can-do attitude. When you are enthusiastic and optimistic, and exude a positive attitude, it multiplies and spreads to those around you. With that outlook comes an

Parker Hannifin HEADQUARTERS: Cleveland, Ohio WEBSITE: www.parker.com BUSINESS: Parker Hannifin is the world’s leading diversified manufacturer of motion and control technologies and systems, providing precision-engineered solutions for a wide variety of commercial, mobile, industrial and aerospace markets. 2006 REVENUES: $10 billion EMPLOYEES: 57,000
COMPANY:

energy that propels you to get things done. This only serves to enhance your ability to serve your customers. Above all else, you have to be driven to delight your customers—a commitment to excellence.

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“You can never truly move forward unless you plan for the future.”

Nancy Little
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L PC/ C R EE W N E T W O R K M GUIR W OODS LLP

I

n offering advice to other women internally or externally who

TITLE:

Deputy Managing Partner

strive to become leaders, I suggest they first become really good at their craft; whether they are lawyers, salespeople, engineers or entry-level managers. Leading others will be much easier if you are knowledgeable and respected in your profession. As you move up the organizational ladder, become aware of which skills you are particularly good at and make the most of them. At the same time, be aware of areas where you need to improve and try to enhance these abilities. Most importantly, put the organization first instead of yourself. The payoff will include more personal success; you will focus on what a leader should do. Other advice specifically for women who become leaders is to be confident in your own personal management style. Years ago when I first became a department manager, I tried to build consensus by soliciting input, often more so than my male counterparts, which made me question my own leadership. Later on, when I went to a seminar on women and leadership, one of the takeaways was that women leaders are more collaborative than their male counterparts. I began to realize that my personal leadership style is strong on developing team building.

EDUCATION:

University of Virginia School of Law, Charlottesville, Virginia, JD; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, BS

READING: Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool's Guide to Surviving with Grace, by Gordon MacKenzie FIRST JOB: I worked fast food and retail in high school, and subsequently at a bank. PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Look for solutions that move the organization forward. Husband, Ronald M. Landes Running, golfing, hiking: basically, anything outdoors Children’s Home Society

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

All new managers need to remain focused on the big picture of where you want to take your organization, not just the daily demands of your position. It is very easy to get caught up just on what needs to get done in the short term, but you can never truly move forward unless you plan for the future. In doing this, it also is important to think out of the box to seek solutions for challenges that confront your organization. Don’t be afraid to take risks. This leads to my final advice: accept the fact you will make mistakes along the way. Everyone does. Some people look at these failures as obstacles to success. A key to being successful in management is that when you make a mistake, pick yourself up, fix the problem, learn from the mistake, and move forward. Soon you will be running again.

COMPANY:

McGuireWoods LLP National law firm with 16 offices

HEADQUARTERS:

worldwide
WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.mcguirewoods.com Legal 1,700

EMPLOYEES:

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[ BANK OF THE WEST ]

WANT O WORK WA TO WORK FOR A ANT TRULY GREAT TRULY G A T LY GREAT BANK? L ? AT

AT BANK ANK WEST, T O S AT BA OF THE WEST, WE BELIEVE OUR CUSTOMERS ARE WEL LL EM MPLOYEES SERV VED. WELL SERVED BY EMPLOYEES WHO ARE WELL SERVED.
perspectives generate fresh ideas. That’s why at Bank of the West, we value diversity and h That’s k West, dive ersity Different p employe Year ees. year, cont tinue than nks equal opportunity for all our employees. Year after year, we continue to grow stronger thanks to our opportunity end to s oday’ e emplo oyees unique ble of people. After all, in today’s competitive banking environment, it is our employees with blend e ahead rest innovative ideas that keep us a step ahead of the rest.

www.bankofthewest.com www.bankofthewest.com

West subsidiarie es employers. e Bank of the West and its subsidiaries are equal opportunity/affirmative action employers. M/F/D/V

k © 2007 Bank of the West. Member FDIC. West.

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Setbacks and trials are great character-building opportunities.”

Ning-Ning Mahlmann
F E D E R A L B U R E A U N U T TN V EMT I G AT I N E N L A NIG U A G L PS/ R V I C E S S E C T I O N OF I ER S cCLEN ON, & F SH, L E E CREW NETWORK

A

common thread in every job I have had is that I have wanted

TITLE:

Assistant Section Chief PhD, Georgetown University Newspaper reporter

to make a difference. This desire propelled me to accomplish innovative and lasting projects that benefited the organization and the people in it. When I look back, I know that I did not do everything alone. I had supervisors who believed in me, colleagues who trusted me and staff who supported me. Below are some important points of advice that have helped me: • Ask yourself what you want to accomplish when you take a job, and stick to it until it is done. Once you accomplish it, look for another meaningful project. • Share your vision with the people you lead, and give them the autonomy to do the job. All of us want to have a clear goal and to get involved in achieving something bigger than ourselves. The sharing and achieving energize us all. • Develop your employees so that the talent pool can be sustained. When your staff members are top performers, you become a top performer. • Be grateful to those who helped you and reciprocate. They will be your loyal assets. • Keep on learning because the world keeps on changing. In addition to sharpening your trade skills, you should

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, by Howard Gardner

PHILOSOPHY:

The shade we enjoy comes from the trees planted by our predecessors. Husband, John J. Mahlmann; son Justin and his family; my mother and my brothers Tennis, jazz, ballet, music and travel Missionaries of Charity

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

continuously develop your interpersonal and leadership skills. You can always learn from others. Imitate their strengths; reflect upon yourself when observing their weak-nesses. Learn from your own mistakes. Listen to constructive criticism carefully. • Focus on positive thinking. Setbacks and trials are great character-building opportunities. The struggles, endurance, suffering and patience help people mature and prepare them to face greater challenges in the future. • Examine yourself frequently. Did you try to do your best? Were you faithful when conducting business with others? Have you kept your promises to others? As a chef would say, all good food starts with fine ingredients. The recipe for success in your job and in life begins with a healthy body and mind, happy family life and caring friends.

COMPANY: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Language Services Section HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

Washington, D.C.

www.fbi.gov Law enforcement Approximately 190

EMPLOYEES:

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“The best leaders are those who are committed to developing other leaders.”

Dee Mahoney
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E WP NIE T W ON C F ZER I RK

D

ealing with change has been a large part of my life. Having

grown up as a child of a career military officer (a.k.a. “Army brat”), I moved frequently and learned to adjust quickly. I realized early on that I needed to learn from those around me. One of my earliest and most influential mentors was— and still is—my father. As a general in the Army, he not only set clear expectations, but also routinely used the same leadership skills he learned in the military as he went about his life. I saw the respect he generated from those under his command and found myself wanting to instill that same feeling in others. I still come to him for his insight and advice about my business challenges. Other mentors supported my career and advocated my talents to senior executives. Each helped me in different ways. They saw potential in me, advocated on my behalf and helped me develop the skills I needed at each phase in my career. I joined Pfizer in 1988 as a field sales representative in Washington, D.C. My mentor and hiring manager helped me develop the sales skills I needed in my entry-level role. As I moved up into sales leadership, mentors helped me see the value of building high-performing teams. My current position overseeing Pfizer’s $2.65 billion business unit for oncology, infectious disease and HIV (human

TITLE: Senior Vice President/General Manager for Specialty Markets EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

BS, Stephen F. Austin University; Leadership Certificate, Harvard Business School Medical technician

READING: What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, by Marshall Goldsmith PHILOSOPHY: Be the best you can be at the job you are doing. All of us have risen to the positions we are in by successfully employing the skills and abilities each of us possesses. We need to understand and build upon our strengths, while recognizing our weaknesses. FAMILY:

Married with three children Family activities, exercise and skiing New York City Leukemia and

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Lymphoma Society

immunodeficiency virus) requires different skills. Once again, mentors and advocates continue to help me develop my strategic thinking and navigate our complex organization. Keeping your focus on succeeding in the job at hand, while keeping an eye to the future, is a philosophy that serves any leader well. It is important for all of us to understand that we must excel in our current position before we can be considered for more responsibilities. While it is our responsibility to gain an understanding of the career opportunities that lie ahead of us, we also should look back and assist other colleagues coming up through the ranks. I’ve come to see what my mentors obviously knew—the best leaders are those who are committed to developing other leaders. What a great legacy it would be to know I’ve been able to help others grow and develop as others have helped me.

COMPANY:

Pfizer Inc New York, New York

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.pfizer.com Pharmaceuticals $48.37 billion 100,000

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Successful careers are not absent of mistakes; they are just outnumbered by things done right.”

Kim Martin
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , K I N D/RC R EH E A LT H C O R K LLP ED W NETW A E

I

heard a joke a few years ago about a reporter interviewing an executive. The reporter asks, “How did you become successful?” The executive answers, “By making good decisions.” “Well, how do you make good decisions?” inquires the reporter. “By experience,” says the executive. “Well then, how do you gain experience?” the exasperated reporter asks. “By making bad decisions,” answers the executive. Well, it is a bit more complicated than that, but I can’t think of a story that sums it up more succinctly. A successful career is a culmination of personal and professional decisions, mistakes and chances taken. Navigating successfully through the years will depend on deciding not “what” you want to be, but “who” you want to be. Staying true to that decision will make future decisions a lot easier. As women, we possess a great level of intuition. Some call it a gut feeling, but “intuition” sounds a bit more palatable. Learning to trust that intuition takes courage and confidence and a willingness to accept the mistakes that flow from not trusting it.

TITLE:

Corporate Senior Vice President of Risk Management and Compliance

EDUCATION: BA in communications, University of South Alabama; JD, Walter F. Jones School of Law FIRST JOB:

Billing clerk for a freight company

READING: A Short History of Nearly Everything, by Bill Bryson PHILOSOPHY:

A quote by Martin Luther King Jr.: “Cowardice asks the question, is it expedient? Expedience asks the question, is it politic? Vanity asks the question, is it popular? Conscience asks the question, is it right? There comes a time when one must take the position that is neither safe nor politic nor popular, but he must do it because conscience tells him it is right.” Husband of 11 years, Mike, and our amazing 8-yearold son, David Baseball and the Sunday New York Times Toys for Tots

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

Kindred Healthcare Louisville, Kentucky

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

www.kindredhealthcare.com

BUSINESS: Kindred Healthcare Inc. is a Fortune 500 health care services company based in Louisville, Kentucky, that provides services in approximately 600 locations in 38 states. Through its subsidiaries, Kindred operates long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing centers, institutional pharmacies and a contract rehabilitation services business, Peoplefirst Rehabilitation Services, across the United States. 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

Intuition in hiring is a good example. Ask one hundred executives whether they have ever made a bad hire. Chances are, every one of them will raise a hand, except the ones who are lying to themselves. There are some principles I would encourage you to explore for examples in your own lives. Look around you. The most successful people have hired very smart people and have served them well. Servant leadership is an overused term and an underused skill. Be known as a person of honesty and integrity. Treat people well, not because you think it will advance your career, but because it is the right thing to do. Successful careers are not absent of mistakes; they are just outnumbered by things done right. Making good decisions often begins with the question: “What is the right thing to do?”

$4.3 billion

56,000

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mgmmiragediversity.com
N e v a d a : B e l l a g i o • M G M G r a n d • M a n d a l a y B a y • T h e M i r a g e • Tr e a s u r e I s l a n d • M o n t e C a r l o • N e w Yo r k - N e w Yo r k • L u x o r • E x c a l i b u r • C i r c u s C i r c u s Railroad Pass • Primm Valley Resorts • Silver Legacy • Circus Circus Reno • Colorado Belle • Edgewater • Gold Strike • Nevada Landing O u t s i d e N e v a d a : B e a u R i v a g e • G o l d S t r i k e - Tu n i c a • G r a n d V i c t o r i a • M G M G r a n d D e t r o i t

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Be skilled at what you do best, deliver results, broaden your thinking, be committed to making a difference and follow your dreams.”

Gretchen McClain
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P I/T C R E W P O R AT I O N T COR NETWORK

R

ight out of college, I started working for Hercules Aerospace,

where my father worked and both my brother and sister did internships—all of us engineers. Early in my career there, someone came up to me and said, “Oh, its another Walker” (my maiden name). Being the youngest in a family of engineers and having a very strong support system in place, the comment pushed me to make a name for myself. I didn’t want to just be “George’s daughter,” despite being proud of that. You have to work very hard and stretch yourself. Never give up and never ever think you can’t do it. It is very important to be intellectually curious. One of the things that I truly enjoy is learning something new. If you challenge yourself and work with others who have been through similar situations, you can get over any hurdles. In my career, I moved from very technical mechanical design work to program management—running the International Space Station program—and ultimately to running a global division of a multi-industry, multi-national company. Moving from an analytical/design perspective to the challenges you face when you actually have to build and

TITLE: Senior Vice President, ITT Corporation and President, ITT Fluid Technology EDUCATION:

BS in mechanical engineering, University

of Utah
FIRST JOB: READING:

Order taker at Burger King Snow, by Orhan Pamuk

PHILOSOPHY:

You create a legacy from what you do on a day-to-day basis. I really enjoy watching people grow…helping them stretch out of their comfort zone and achieve something that they never thought they could. Married, 21 years Golf, hiking, travel Stockholm Junior Water Prize

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

market something taught me that you shouldn’t be focused in one narrow area. You have to be able to understand all areas of a particular business and understand how they relate to the bigger picture. Be skilled at what you do best, deliver results, broaden your thinking, be committed to making a difference and follow your dreams. Those are attributes that will pull you through tough times and ultimately make you successful. These traits will also attract other people who want to work with you. You will only be as good as your ability to integrate ideas and experience from others around you to create a better solution.

COMPANY:

ITT Corporation White Plains, New York www.itt.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

ITT Corporation supplies advanced technology products and services in several growth markets. $7.8 billion 41,000

2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

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perspectives

backgrounds

We each have a unique story to tell

thoughts

experiences

Our di erent backgrounds, experiences, thoughts and perspectives have helped shape us into who we are today. As we help you protect the things that matter most to you, we know one approach won’t work for everyone. Truly listening to our customers is at the heart of our On Your Side® promise. And at Nationwide, we care about helping you meet your unique needs.

Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark and On Your Side are federally registered service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. 1-877-On Your Side is a service mark of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2007 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, All Rights Reserved.

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“Make sure that you have a very solid network, one that will provide you with good, honest feedback.”

Antoinette P. McCorvey
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P /EC R E W A N T W O A K ASTM NE KOD R

E

arly in my career, a boss of mine advised me to be ready to tackle a problem for the company and deliver on the solution. Successful performance such as this provides a platform for future growth. I believe that women and minorities can avoid becoming pigeonholed by being prepared. Part of that preparation calls for creating a support system, or network. The key to anyone’s success depends upon his or her support systems. I’ve had caring parents, siblings and mentors who instilled in me solid family values, a strong work ethic and the confidence to believe in my abilities. With a foundation like that, it’s pretty hard to fail. Make sure that you have a very solid network, one that will provide you with good, honest feedback. Your network should include people who are like you and unlike you. You need honest feedback to help you manage through all situations as you advance in your career. Prior to joining Kodak, I gained a broad set of experiences both inside and outside of finance, taking jobs that put me outside my comfort zone. I was hired into Kodak as the finance director for what was then the manufacturing group. In that job, I tried to learn as much as I could about the broad base of Kodak. This set me up to go from that role into a broader corporate analyst position.

TITLE:

Director and Vice President, Investor Relations

EDUCATION:

Bachelor’s degree in finance and accounting and MBA from the University of West Florida, Pensacola; certified management accountant

FIRST JOB: Loan analyst, Small Business Administration, Pensacola, Florida READING:

Red River, by Lalita Tademy

PHILOSOPHY:

The lessons I learned when I was young permeate every aspect of my life, including my role as a wife, mother and manager. By listening to people’s concerns and responding to them fairly and honestly, I hope to inspire others to work effectively with one another and to give their very best performance possible. Married, two sons Reading, walking, ballroom dancing United Way of Greater Rochester

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

Eastman Kodak Rochester, New York

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.kodak.com Digital imaging and imaging technology $10.7 billion 40,900 worldwide

I’ve been extremely fortunate in that Kodak really respects the need for mentoring. It’s part of how we work. If your employer doesn’t have a formal mentoring program, it’s essential to build a mentoring structure for yourself. Yet, a coaching and mentoring relationship only works if both parties get something out of it. As you’re seeking a network or a mentor or coaching relationship, be prepared to bring something to the party. If you don’t, you will have difficulty finding a mentor. Senior executives need people who can articulate issues calmly that impact the culture in their organizations. Those leaders value that feedback. If you can be the kind of person who can articulate what’s going on and what it feels like to work in the organization, reach out. They’re likely to be willing to reach out to you.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Those who are fully engaged, dedicated to progress and committed to excellence are guaranteed success.”

Pritha Mehra
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , LU . S . P O S TA L E T W O R K THE LP / CREW NSERVICE

E

very path to leadership and accomplishment is an individual one, with unique circumstances and trials and opportunities. My journey began as a young Indian woman entering this country with some trepidation, but with a spirit of adventure to embrace a new land. I faced many challenges, missed my family and the pulsing community of India. Accompanying me was the mentoring and advice I received as a child from my father: “A job worth doing is worth doing well.” Those who are fully engaged, dedicated to progress and committed to excellence are guaranteed success. I also believe one must be fearless in approaching the future and embracing change. I value the words of Marcel Proust, “We must never be afraid to go too far, for truth lies beyond.” The truth of any situation and the solution to problems usually lies beyond the obvious, the routine or the habitual. Whether it is devising strategic program direction for the U.S. Postal Service or teaching Indian cooking, I always try to provoke, enlighten and engage all at once; moving beyond the stereotypes that limit our vision and ability to change for the better. At the Postal Service, I have been involved in communicating the value of change and technical innovation, and found that by involving a spectrum of stakeholders and perspectives, change truly can be transformative. Our back-

TITLE:

Manager, Marketing Technology and Channel Management BS, computer science, University of Maryland; International Executive MBA, Georgetown University Computer programmer, Rexnord Automation

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

READING: Palace Walk, by Naguib Mahfouz; Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, by Jared Diamond PHILOSOPHY:

The only way to predict the future is to create it. You must be the change you wish to see in the world. Married, one son Reading, tennis, teaching Indian cooking, travel, world music, collecting Indian art

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

COMPANY:

The U.S. Postal Service Washington, D.C. www.usps.com Mail and delivery service $73 billion 700,000 across the country

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

grounds and communities lend us strength, definition, and character. But it is the diverse communities of thought and talent we create that executes a vision that brings new value and innovation. I see my work as enabling these communities by communicating a vision that energizes individuals to work toward a common goal. Staying grounded and carefully measuring progress is essential. Winston Churchill concluded that however beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results. I am known within the USPS for being focused and demanding extraordinary effort. As a leader, I know I must constantly keep our focus on our vision and see to it that we get the results we need. I know that hard work will take me as far as I can dream. In this country my status as a woman was less important than the value I could bring to whatever goal I set. This was a true freedom: a freedom to choose what is best of one’s background, while inhabiting a variety of thought and learning to enable new visions.

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“Leadership development accelerates when you are stretched beyond your current skill set.”

Stacy P. Methvin
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C L E W TN E T W O R K R OYA R D U C H S H E L L

M

y primary advice is to follow your passions because mine have taken me to some unexpected and exciting places. I originally dreamed of being a doctor, until I saw the Rockies and learned that the formation of those fantastic structures could be scientifically explained. When I graduated, I sought a place where applying this knowledge could be a career.

TITLE:

President/CEO Shell Chemical LP

EDUCATION: BA, geological and geophysical sciences, Princeton University FIRST JOB:

Camp counselor during the summer in The World is Flat, by Thomas Friedman

high school
READING:

At Shell, I started as a geologist visiting offshore rigs, an environment that was not accustomed to women. The awkward reactions I received offshore also occurred in the corporate office, but they were subtler. I quickly learned that the way I reacted to comments could relax the tension in the room. To succeed around the guys, I had to fit in. The trick was learning how to do it without giving up the unique qualities I could bring to the team.
FITTING IN:

I would like to inspire young women to achieve their best potential by learning and growing in a career they love.
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Husband, Dee, and 20-year-old son Snow skiing, water skiing, running the Houston United Way and the Girl Scouts

INTERESTS:

half-marathon
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

GROWING AS A LEADER:

Throughout my journey, I wanted to show I could solve tough problems, be a strong team player and go the extra mile. Through a variety of roles, I learned how the business worked from many angles. After 18 years, I received a promotion that transported me from my comfortable home in exploration and production to a new role as president of Shell’s largest U.S. refinery.
ENJOYING THE JOURNEY:

Leadership development accelerates when you are stretched beyond your current skill set or when you are placed in an environment where you don’t know the basics. I faced both at the refinery and learned valuable lessons that helped me formulate my leadership style. The first is to be a fast learner. The second is to ask when you don’t understand, rather than pretend that you do. Finally, developing mutual trust and respect is key, beginning with leaders respecting employees, regardless of titles. With these principles, you create an environment in which problems are put on the table, challenged and quickly resolved. People are proud to be a part of a winning team, and success drives more success. Throughout my career, mentors both inside and outside of work have guided me. They picked me up during difficult times and stretched me with new opportunities. In time, I began to help others discover their potential. Much like the movie Pay it Forward, if we could each make a difference in the lives of a few individuals, imagine the impact we could have.

COMPANY:

Royal Dutch Shell The Hague, The Netherlands
LEAVING A LEGACY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

www.shell.com

BUSINESS: Global group of energy and petrochemicals companies. 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$318.8 billion

108,000

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Diversity…the power behind our vision.

The ability of an organization to create and deliver value for its stakeholders will be determined in part by
its success in ensuring a safe, healthy and enjoyable workplace culture that attracts and retains a highly motivated, valued and diverse workforce. Diversity is a key part of our business strategy. It’s the power behind our vision and the catalyst that sparks our energy in support of women breaking barriers and going beyond. Reliant Energy proudly recognizes Janie Mitcham, Senior Vice President, Reliant Energy Retail Services and supports women and their accomplishments.

reliant.com

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“Done right, managing people takes time and a commitment to the success of others.”

Janie Mitcham
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / R E LEA N T E T W R G Y CR I W N ENE ORK

I

f I had written this essay 10 years ago, I probably would have focused on all the things I’ve learned as a woman working in the male-dominated electric utility business. Now that I’m further along in my career, my perspective has changed. The part of my job I value the most are the people I am privileged to work with. Let’s face it, we spend more time at work than we do with our families, and after 22 years many of my co-workers feel like family. Being part of a team and helping others reach their full potential is as rewarding as closing the biggest deal. I get teased about protecting my employees as if they were my children. I could get offended, but it really is an accurate description of my management philosophy. Parents want the best for their children and help them by setting the proper example, providing quality education, and teaching them to make good decisions and act independently. Parents support their children when they fail, correct bad behavior with fair discipline and praise successes no matter how small. Why should our employees deserve less? Done right, managing people takes time and a commitment to the success of others. I had always been an individual contributor. When I became a good manager, my career took off. Becoming a leader took more. Leadership doesn’t come from a promotion or a title, and it is both an honor and a burden.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Smart Energy

EDUCATION: BS in industrial distribution and MS in industrial technology, Texas A&M University; JD, University of Houston College of Law FIRST JOB: I grew up working alongside my father in his paint and hardware store, but my first “real” job was at Dairy Queen. READING: I am addicted to true crime novels. They fascinate me because, unlike TV crime shows where cases are solved in one day, most involve years of hard, tedious work by dedicated men and women who want to bring closure to the victim’s family. PHILOSOPHY:

Integrity matters. I have always focused on earning the respect of those who work for me. It removes the temptation to be anything less than open and honest with those above me.

FAMILY: I have a wonderful husband, who has fully supported my career, and two great daughters. INTERESTS:

I love traveling with my family and buying and fixing up old houses.

FAVORITE CHARITY: Anything related to disadvantaged children tugs at my heart.

COMPANY:

Reliant Energy Houston, Texas

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.reliant.com

One of the largest independent power producers in the United States $9.7 billion 3,651

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

I remember the exact moment when the enormity of the responsibility sunk in. Reliant was caught in the industry energy crisis, and our stock had dropped to 99 cents. Bankruptcy was a daily risk. As a result, I lost my life savings in our 401(k), and I was shaken. One of my employees came to my office, closed the door and let me have it. Her message was simple: “Everyone trusts you, and they watch you to see if they should be worried. Don’t come out of this office until you respect that.” I was overwhelmed and stayed in my office all day. Somewhere in my career, I had gone from manager to leader. Over time, I became comfortable in the role and more thoughtful about my actions. Being a woman clearly influenced my career evolution. Embracing leadership and putting Reliant, our employees and our customers ahead of myself helped me find my personal reward.

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“Accomplish as much as you can every day.”

Christy Moberly
N U T T E R M c C L E N N EE FA R M H N SL P A N C E W O M T W O R K S TAT N & F I S I , L U R / C R C N E PA N I E S

I

have been blessed with many experiences that shaped me for leadership. Growing up, my father and mother had careers that required long hours and frequent travel. Therefore, I was responsible for preparing dinner, cleaning the house and taking care of my younger brother. My mother was trained as a home economist and was a very good cook, so she shared many recipes. When she decided to pursue a career in radio and television media sales, I was able to jump in and help out our family. She was my first mentor and helped build my selfconfidence at an early age. I learned to juggle many tasks, manage my time and work efficiently. Many colleagues and friends have mentored me over the years, and I think it’s critical that both parties in the relationship take accountability for their roles. As a mentor, I prepare for each meeting to ensure that I’m asking the right questions and providing thoughtful feedback to each individual. In return, I expect individuals to come to our sessions with questions and topics that are important to their development. This year, I have engaged in a reverse mentoring relationship with one of our talented Hispanic employees. He’s helping me build a better understanding of his culture so we can provide a strong climate for Hispanics in our company.

TITLE:

Agency Vice President

EDUCATION:

BS in English and business administration, DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana

FIRST JOB: During high school, ride operator at Six Flags amusement park; after college, store manager, the Limited Inc. READING: From Beirut to Jerusalem, by Thomas L. Friedman; I Feel Bad About My Neck, by Nora Ephron PHILOSOPHY:

It is critical for leaders to create an energetic and open environment where people feel productive and valued. Husband, two dogs Music, reading, golf DePauw University and

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

When I am mentoring others, I challenge them to LEARN:

Lean into a situation and accept differences. To do this, you need active listening skills, adaptability, acute instincts and powers of observation. Exude energy and enthusiasm. Create a consistent, positive
climate.

Accomplish as much as you can every day. I counsel people to come into the office and pretend they’re going on vacation the next day. The result: They get more done. Renew yourself daily. Make time for your mental, physical and spiritual health. Note your triumphs and your mistakes. Write down the details
and file them. Review the folder every so often so you don’t forget your foibles or your successes. You often learn more from your low points than your high points. My goal is to foster a comfortable environment where people can thrive. I can think of no better way of promoting this type of environment than by having mentoring relationships that nurture the leaders of the future.

COMPANY:

State Farm Insurance Companies Bloomington, Illinois

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE:

www.statefarm.com

BUSINESS RANKING: 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

No. 31 on the Fortune 500, No. 1 insurer of autos and homes in the United States. $60.5 billion 68,000 associates and 17,000 agents nationwide and in three Canadian provinces

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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

We Value Your Leadership.
Entrepreneur. Volunteer. Mother. Friend. At National City, we value the many leadership roles women take on and the positive impact they make in our communities. Log on to see how we help our communities and their leaders succeed.

NationalCity.com/community

NationalCity.com Member FDIC • ©2007, National City Corporation®
CS-27520

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“If you believe in yourself, you’ll be surprised at what you can overcome.”

Hala Moddelmog
N U T T E R M c C L E N N ES U & A NSG . K L P / N R E W NH T W O R K N S FI H, LOME C FOR T EE CU E

O

bstacles and challenges have defined my life. From breaking through the glass ceiling as the first woman to lead an international quick-service restaurant chain, to surviving breast cancer and a double mastectomy, I’ve taken on and overcome challenges and incorporated what I’ve learned into my life and leadership style. My most recent challenge was accepting the position in September 2006 of president and CEO of the global leader in the breast cancer movement: Susan G. Komen for the Cure, formerly known as the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. A model for advocacy groups globally, Komen for the Cure presented an especially daunting challenge because I had never before worked in the nonprofit sector. Nancy Brinker, the organization’s inspirational founder, challenged me to be an agent of change. The first order of business for any new CEO is to talk to as many people as possible and truly listen to what they have to say. For my first 90 days at Komen, I did just that. I spoke with staff, with our national and international affiliates, our board of directors, our activists in the field and numerous breast cancer survivors. I listened, and I attended major conferences to discuss breast cancer with researchers and physicians.

TITLE:

President and CEO

EDUCATION: BA in English, Georgia Southern University; MA in journalism and mass communications, University of Georgia FIRST JOB: READING:

Waitress at a catfish restaurant in Hartwell, Ga. The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver

PHILOSOPHY:

Overcoming obstacles and challenges in your personal life and professional career is all about believing in yourself. And if you believe in yourself, you’ll be surprised at what you can overcome.

FAMILY: My husband, Steve, and I have been married for 22 years. We have a son, Ty, 21, and a daughter, Kirsten, 18. INTERESTS:

My family, Pilates, reading, water skiing and Susan G. Komen for the Cure, of

snow skiing
FAVORITE CHARITY:

course!

COMPANY:

Susan G. Komen for the Cure Dallas, Texas

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.komen.org and www.25komen.org

Susan G. Komen for the Cure is a 501(c)(3) organization and the world’s largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists fighting to end breast cancer forever. More than $200 million

2006 REVENUES:

EMPLOYEES: 160 full-time employees at headquarters; more than 100,000 volunteer activists and survivors in the United States and around the world

I learned that the people working for Komen and all those who support the cause are extremely passionate about breast cancer awareness and education. They are dedicated to finding the cures and ending this devastating disease once and for all. When people believe in what their organization strives for, they are willing to work that much harder to achieve every goal. I never stop listening, but there comes a time when a leader has to make decisions for the betterment of the organization. Based on what I had heard throughout the organization, I was able to make critical decisions early on that resulted in positive responses from all of Komen’s key constituents. Everyone felt energized and a part of a greater whole. They knew that I had listened and that they had provided input into the decision-making process. It showed them that change is a good thing. Overcoming obstacles and challenges in your personal life and professional career is all about believing in yourself. If you believe in yourself—and listen to those along the way—you’ll be surprised at what you can overcome.

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finally
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Your workplace has become more diverse . . .

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to Inclusion!

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“Mentors don’t guarantee success; they open a door.”

Beth Mooney
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T WA N K KEYB OR

I

believe that mentoring is an extension of good leadership because it’s a form of feedback. Today, I advocate it, practice it and reward it in others. When I began working, however, I didn’t know there were mentors or how helpful they could be. Fortunately, I had people I thought of as fans who expressed interest in my career. One of my early fans gave me my first job in banking. He was a little skeptical at first. I didn’t have an MBA at that time, and women were scarce in banking. But by offering me the position, he gave me an opportunity to succeed. And when I did, he not only was highly supportive, but he also became one of my biggest fans. Another fan was a bank president who put me in charge of crucial client relationships that traditionally were managed by men. His action prompted calls from worried clients: “Do you not want my business any more? Why are you sending a woman to handle my accounts?” But he stuck by me, saying he wouldn’t have sent me if he hadn’t thought that I could do the work. He gave me the chance to prove myself. As these examples illustrate, mentors don’t guarantee success; they open a door. That open door may lead to a particular job or career or, even more powerful, insight on how to manage yourself.

TITLE:

KeyCorp Vice Chair MBA, Southern Methodist University Secretary at First City National Bank in Texas A Thousand Splendid Suns, by Kahled Hosseini

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Work with focus, pace and intensity, and make your work fun. My father and sister, who live in Boulder, Col.; my niece Libby, of whom I am deeply proud; and my brother, who lives in Dallas.

INTERESTS: Attending Cleveland events with intermissions and half times, travel. FAVORITE CHARITIES:

The Cleveland Orchestra, for which I am trustee and treasurer, and the Cleveland arts community

In my experience, one of the biggest career de-railers is the inability to see yourself as others see you. So, I think it’s vital to seek out mentors who will reflect you to yourself and help you strengthen specific behaviors. This is not easy. You may hear some tough feedback, but you will build a better career if you listen carefully and accept the guidance. If you are successful, reconnect with and thank those whose support, encouragement or advice helped you. Then share their gift. Reach out to other promising individuals and support, when and where you can, their career journey toward success.

COMPANY:

KeyBank Cleveland, Ohio

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.key.com Financial services $4.9 billion Approximately 20,000

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Managers manage but leaders have a vision and act upon it.”

Lisa Moriyama
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W P O IT W ON C W LL NE NT I RK

A

s I reflect on my personal life, education and career track, I

TITLE:

Vice President, Human Resources

can say that I was fortunate and privileged that some outstanding persons took an interest in me early on during a time when there were no women in management and there was little or no diversity in the workplace. These individuals who became my mentors became very interested in what I could contribute to the company and wanted to bring out the best I had to offer. They approached me with the idea that I could be a leader, so consequently I was afforded the tools and classes that would help me become a manager. Being raised in a Japanese family, my culture played a key role in my development. It was ingrained in me early on that the good of the organization was far more important than the goals and aspirations of the individual. An early mentor strongly suggested that I be the best me. However, I could be a first-rate me or be a second-rate someone else. It was a suggestion that I never forgot. If I could impart some essential wisdom to those women aspiring to move up the corporate ladder it would be the following:

EDUCATION: BS in sociology, graduate work in organizational development FIRST JOB: READING:

Social worker

Travels With Charley: In Search of America, by John Steinbeck
PHILOSOPHY:

Be generous. Help others shine. Focus on the

right thing.
FAMILY:

Married, four children, nine grandchildren Chamber music, jazz, poetry, architecture Global Fund for Women

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

BE OPEN.

Life changes and you have to be prepared to respond. By not being present you can miss an opportunity. Find those individuals that can help

BE MINDFUL.

LOOK OUTSIDE OF YOURSELF.

you learn.
DREAM.

Have a vision and think of the possibilities. Managers

manage but leaders have a vision and act upon it. Although it’s certainly easier today for women to move up the corporate ladder, we can’t neglect the contributions of the first generation of women. They paved the way and broke through the glass ceiling creating ample opportunities for today’s woman executive. I’m proud of my company, WellPoint, Inc., because it excels at modeling women leaders and promoting a number of women to the executive suite.

COMPANY:

WellPoint, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.wellpoint.com Health benefits $57 billion 41,000

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Be sure to learn from your experiences, the good ones and the bad ones.”

Nora E. Moushey
N U T T E R M cE S T E R N N & O U TH ,E L L P F I N A NWI A L T W O R K W CLENNE & S FIS H RN / CRE C NE GR UP

E

ach person’s path to success is unique, but there are common

TITLE:

Senior Vice President and Chief Actuary BS in mathematics, Miami University,

elements that impact all of us. To succeed in the corporate world, I would recommend that you establish an area of expertise and find a mentor who can guide you in your career. In my opinion, mentors cannot be assigned. You will find them through working with people you admire and with whom you share a common interest. Your mentors should be people who will push you to do better and be available to advise you. In addition to having a mentor, it is important that you study and work hard to learn about your chosen profession. Think big and aim high. Always focus on the ideal state. Where should things be? How should the process work? What should be happening? Then figure out how to get there. Be sure to learn from your experiences, the good ones and the bad ones. Take time to reflect upon why something was successful, along with celebrating that success. Mistakes and missteps can be painful, but be sure to analyze the causes so that you do not repeat your error. Focus on people. Always try to understand others’ interests and motivations and treat them with dignity and respect.

EDUCATION:

Oxford, Ohio
FIRST JOB: READING:

Baby-sitting

The Elements of Influence, by Alan Kelly; Grave Secrets, by Kathy Reichs
PHILOSOPHY:

Focus on people.

FAMILY: My husband, Mike; son Doug and daughter-in-law Erin; daughter Laura; my parents, Margaret Jane Eyre and Harry Eyre; brother Curt Eyre; and sister Carla Eyre— a wonderful family and a great support system. INTERESTS:

Reading, theater and travel Junior Achievement

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Gaining knowledge of your field through your mentors, study and experience will give you expertise, which will give you credibility and, ultimately, influence. Setting clear priorities and goals, for your life as well as for your work, will help you develop a plan of action and follow through on it. It is important not to make commitments that you cannot keep, as that has an effect on your credibility with your mentors and peers. Also, a key to success is building a support system of family, friends, church or other organizations that broaden your view and reenergize you. Never forget to recognize and thank all the people who support and help you in your career. Finally, be a mentor. Surround yourself with the best and the brightest, and give them every opportunity to succeed.

COMPANY:

Western & Southern Financial Group Cincinnati, Ohio

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.westernsouthern.com

Insurance, investments and other financial services $4.8 billion 4,500

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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Her work opens the door for tomorrow’s Women Worth Watching.
Beth Mooney
Vice Chair of KeyCorp

®

At Key, we know that diversity drives success. We congratulate Vice Chair Beth Mooney, selected as one of the Women Worth Watching in 2008 by Profiles in Diversity Journal. As the highestranking woman in Key’s history, she has a positive effect on our clients, shareholders, employees and communities.

©2007 KeyCorp

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“Balance in life is essential for the body, the mind and the soul.”

Shamla Naidoo
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W P O IT W ON C W LL NE NT I RK

M

y childhood circumstances drove my ambitions and led me to where I am today. I grew up in one of the poorest parts of South Africa, which was, at the time, under the rule of apartheid. I wanted to break out of that cycle of poverty. One of my first guides and mentors was my mother, who raised three children by herself while working 14-hour days to provide the bare necessities for us. With my mother’s determination as a guide, I applied for a full-time job that required no experience after graduating from high school. Of the 500 job applicants, I was chosen for the position purely on the results of an aptitude test. That was my lucky break. For the next several years, I attended college while working full time. I learned the subject matter of my positions every chance I got, while I sought out and accepted help. I learned technology skills from anyone who would teach me. I tried to be the best employee I could be, executing both my job and education with passion and energy. But career-related interests should have only been part of my life at that time, not my entire life; but my circumstances were extreme. I do not advocate this kind of singular-focused lifestyle. Balance in life is essential for the body, the mind and the soul. My advice to anyone wanting to move forward in her company or any endeavor is to determine what your ambitions are. Be creative and stretch your imagination, but balance the ambition with reality. Take a holistic approach. Include work, relationships, activities and well-being. Don’t be afraid to aim

TITLE:

Vice President and Chief Information Security Officer

EDUCATION: Information systems and economics degrees,

University of South Africa; JD, John Marshall Law School, Chicago
FIRST JOB: Computer operator for South African Druggists, a

pharmaceutical distributor
READING: Failure Is Not an Option: Mission Control From

Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond, by Gene Kranz; Perfectly Reasonable Deviations from the Beaten Track: The Letters of Richard P. Feynman, by Richard P. Feynman, edited by Michelle Feynman
PHILOSOPHY: Life is an invitation. I pass on to others what I have received. FAMILY: Daughter INTERESTS: Reading, nature and anything that flies (birds of prey, aircraft, etc.) FAVORITE CHARITIES: Apna Ghar, a women’s shelter in

Chicago, and World Vision

WellPoint, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana WEB SITE: www.wellpoint.com BUSINESS: Health benefits 2006 REVENUES: Nearly $57 billion EMPLOYEES: Approximately 42,000
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

high and bring to bear all of your resources—your intellect, experience, energy, intuition and courage. There will be times, however, when your ambition (what you want to become) does not coincide with your reality (your current state and circumstances), and you may be disappointed. The key is to adjust. Adjust either your reality or your ambition, always knowing that you will be surprised at what is possible when you are willing to do what’s needed. In my story, my ambition was to get out of the slum, and my reality was that poverty meant I was not going anywhere. I needed to change my reality by working harder and studying more. In adjusting my reality, I realized the power of ambition and the magnitude of the result.

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“Let nothing stand in the way of your dreams.”

Debra Nelson
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C RM G M E T I R O R K EW N M WAGE

N

oted historian David McCullough once said, “Real success is

TITLE:

finding your lifework in the work that you love.” This statement says it all. No matter what path you find yourself on, it is essential to have passion for what you do. There are three principles that have guided me in my career:
VISION.

Vice President of Corporate Diversity, Communications and Community Affairs

EDUCATION: BA, University of Alabama FIRST JOB: Director of Community Affairs, WSGN Radio READING:

The Eighth Habit, by Stephen Covey

When I was a child, my mother encouraged me to

dream the greatest dream that I could. This strategy provided me with the vision for my career and life, enabling me to consider and establish specific goals to propel me on my path. I believe that having a vision keeps you motivated when facing obstacles and inspires you to seek solutions to meet goals. Successful leaders are often visionaries who are always thinking ahead to what comes next.
FOCUS.

PHILOSOPHY: To be considered as someone who is acutely conscious of giving back, making a meaningful difference in the lives of others and inspiring those with whom I work to reach their highest potential. INTERESTS: Travel, dancing, language FAVORITE CHARITIES: Nevada HAND (Housing and

Neighborhood Development), I Have A Dream Foundation

Let nothing stand in the way of your dreams. Being in life is change; so it is important to be flexible, yet focused on the end result.
DISCIPLINE.

focused means having a plan, a road map to get from point A to point B. In some respects, you can draw an analogy to business. Most successful companies have business plans and longterm strategies. This is the same approach I encourage in mapping a career. To be successful, it is important to set realistic goals with realistic time lines. As we all know, the one constant

Successful leaders know how to execute their plans.

Your plan for life must always be a work in progress. It is important to adapt to change and know when to have self-control. Being successful is like running a marathon. Education and experience are your training, and being patient, persistent and determined will get you to the finish line.

COMPANY:

MGM MIRAGE Las Vegas, Nevada

There are many ways to achieve success, but if you enjoy what you do, the rewards are inevitable.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.mgmmirage.com Gaming, hospitality, entertainment $7.2 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

67,000

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“The recipe for a strong team is to hire gifted people with diverse backgrounds and strengths.”

Tracey Newell
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T C I OC O WS RK

O

ver the years, I have worked with some very strong leaders

TITLE:

Vice President, Commercial West, Cisco Systems

who have taught me important lessons along the way. Below I have compiled these lessons to create my Building Blocks for success. Here are just a few of my rules to live by. Set lofty goals, and then help others to do the same. Many people sell themselves short. I was taught at an early age to always aim high. I have made it my goal to share that lesson, always encouraging those around me to think big and achieve big. Look for game changing opportunities. In any organization, there is always an opportunity to do things differently. I always look for ways to change the rules, working with the smartest people I can find to make a difference. Communicate, communicate, communicate. People need to hear your organization’s vision and strategy over and over again. Consistently communicating on the same theme tells people you really do plan to stick to the goals at hand, and ensures your intent is clearly understood. Accepting a cross-functional role can be a fast track to success. Rounding out my career and looking for new challenges has always been important to me. I have made several career moves that were not promotions, but a new position in a

EDUCATION:

BA in business economics, University of California, Santa Barbara Account executive The Lake House, by James Patterson

FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

Anything is possible, and any goal can be achieved. Most goals worth achieving are a journey, so celebrate milestones along the way. Never compromise on integrity; no end result is worth it. The quickest path to success is to surround yourself with people smarter than you. Husband, two daughters Running, tennis, golf and reading Junior Achievement

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

different functional area. In most cases, these were the roles I learned from the most. You are only as good as your team, so hire your dream team. I look for people who think differently from me and challenge my beliefs. The recipe for a strong team is to hire gifted people with diverse backgrounds and strengths. Mentors are critical. Without question, my career has progressed because of the stellar people I have worked with over the past 20 years. Surround yourself with a few role models who will push you, debate with you, and who will always tell you the truth.

COMPANY:

Cisco San Jose, California www.cisco.com Telecommunications $28.5 billion 56,790

The advice I often give to colleagues, as well as my own daughters, is to create your own personal building blocks for success, and aim high. You can achieve anything you want to achieve; you just need the right people in your life to help you get there.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Connectedness—the ability to encourage and support our teams to achieve individual and organization goals.”

Linda Norman
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N H I LT O N , H O P E/L S R E W P O R AT I O N & FISH LL T C COR NETWORK

M

entoring has always meant more to me than just a word or a

TITLE:

General Manager Duke University, BA Political Science 1986

program description. Throughout my childhood, I have had access to individuals who have directly and positively influenced my life. When I began my career in hospitality, I was a recent college graduate interested primarily in working to make enough money to pay my bills until I decided what my true career would be. I had been supported by a family and community with a vested interest in my success, and I did not want to disappoint. Our public school system and after-school programs prepared me to be both a scholar and a well-rounded individual with a deep appreciation for the gifts I’d been given and of my responsibility to pay it forward. The philosophy of the generation who raised me was that we were citizens of the world and not just of our neighborhoods. When I joined the Hilton Family, I quickly found that same atmosphere of sharing wisdom and personal development—encouraging me to work to reach my potential.

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

Camp Counselor Good to Great, by Jim Collins

PHILOSOPHY:

My philosophy is that to whom much is given, much is required. Single Music, dancing, singing, travel Children’s Cancer Center

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Throughout my career, I have been fortunate to have had mentors who stressed the importance of developing my strengths and the strengths of those around me, preparing us to embrace change, utilize our resources and be prepared for all that the business has in store for us. These philosophies define my management style today. I refer to it not as mentoring but as connectedness—the ability to encourage and support our teams to achieve individual and organization goals. Guided by my Christian belief that, to whom much is given, much is required, I utilize my great passion for life and the wisdom

COMPANY:

Hilton Hotels Corporation Beverly Hills, California www.hiltonworldwide.com

of those who have and continue to support me, to improving the experiences of those around me and to mentor the team into the future.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Hilton Hotels Corporation is the leading global hospitality company, with more than 2,800 hotels and 480,000 rooms in 76 countries and territories, including 100,000 team members worldwide.
EMPLOYEES:

100,000

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OPPORT uni t y. un i
Harris is committed to helping build vibrant communities and is driven by corporate values that foster a diverse workforce and an equitable, supportive workplace in which all employees are given the opportunity to meet their professional goals. At the very heart of our promise is the drive to create a culture that encourages diversity and inclusion, recognizes the importance of being a strong corporate citizen and rewards those who deliver exceptional service to our customers. It’s called leading by example.

Harris® is a trade name used by Harris N.A. and its affiliates. Member FDIC

harrisbank.com

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“Be sure to drive for success with great integrity and personal conviction.”

Kathy Paladino
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T W O RA MOTOR L K

I

’ve had the great pleasure of mentoring many young women throughout my career and when I’m pressed for the best piece of advice, I often quote Michelangelo: “The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but rather that it is too low and we reach it.” My advice is simple, “aim high.” Whether you’re motivated by the true spirit of competition or are simply motivated by beating your personal best, always aim high and push yourself beyond your limits and you’ll achieve success. At the same time, be sure to drive for success with great integrity and personal conviction. I’ve found that leading with integrity carries me through the day and lets me sleep well at night. When it comes to leadership, I look to the “Rule of 10”: Build on character and integrity. Tell the truth, and don’t stretch, distort, or come in late with it. Live up to your word and be genuine. Value people. Serve your team and treat people as partners. Don’t let an organization chart get in the way. Raise your game. Define a new game and expect everyone to play. Hire people who are smarter than you are. Embrace change. Make change a top priority.

TITLE:

President, Motorola Enterprise Mobility business BS, foreign service, Georgetown University Worked at a farm stand selling fruits

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

& vegetables.
READING: I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman, by Nora Ephron PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Make a difference

Husband Mike; son, 10 Reading, traveling and weight-training

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: The Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund; dedicated to helping military personnel who have been catastrophically disabled in operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Challenge definitions and welcome new mindsets. Make optimism a priority. Spread it around the organization. Make it the catalyst for bold moves. Take Risks, you are likely to accomplish more. Don’t punish failure, learn from it. Be a great communicator. Communicate early and often; always listen. Be clear and consistent. Be human and humorous. Seek out humor and set the tone for others. Strive for balance. Perform. Believe that execution is everything. Measure everything that’s important. Dare to dream big Imagine the possible and imagine the impossible.

COMPANY:

Motorola Schaumburg, Illinois www.motorola.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Motorola is known around the world for innovation and leadership in wireless and broadband communications. $42.9 billion 66,000

Leadership is personal; its meaning will vary from individual to individual. Always be on the lookout for great leaders. Seek out others who inspire you and embrace those leadership attributes…make them your own. A simple question to ask yourself: How do you know if you are a leader? … Turn around and see if anyone is following you.

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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WWW.MFHAPRODUCTS.COM has launched!
The Multicultural Foodservice & Hospitality Alliance’s new e-commerce site is now open. Please visit our site for convenient and cost-effective solutions to your diversity product needs. Customization also available. Order online today!

Best Practices Guide

Multicultural Marketing Guides MFHA QuickVue translation guides

The MFHA-People Report 2007 Diverse Workforce Study

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“Some of the best ideas come from unexpected sources.”

Martha Papariello
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N NT W A R D VA E G U O K

I

have learned many lessons over the course of my 22-year career. Here are the fundamental truths that have served me well every step of the way.
WORK HARD. BELIEVE IN YOUR ABILITIES. NEVER STOP

TITLE:

Principal, Vanguard Financial Advisor Services

EDUCATION: BS in finance, Bloomsburg University; Wharton’s Advanced Management Program, University of Pennsylvania FIRST JOB:

Accountant at Vanguard

LEARNING.

When I began my career at Vanguard after college, I started out as an accountant. The irony of this was not lost on me. As those who know me can appreciate, accounting was not my passion. Nevertheless, I believed in my ability to learn what was necessary to do the job well. What I lacked in technical knowledge I would overcome with lots of hard work. I was ready for any challenge. These beliefs served me well in my very first job and have ever since.

READING: Truman, by David McCullough; Defining Moment, by Jonathan Alter PHILOSOPHY:

Do the right thing, no matter what. There is

no “I” in team.
FAMILY:

One daughter Running, reading and riding horses United Way and environmental

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

conservation

PROBLEMS ARE OPPORTUNITIES. SEARCH FOR SOLUTIONS. ALWAYS DO THE RIGHT THING.

Stay focused, get the facts and evaluate solutions when confronted with problems, challenges or surprises. There is something very energizing about working through tough situations for the best possible solution. Furthermore, doing the right thing, even when it is unpopular and difficult, has been incredibly rewarding. Why? Well, being able to stand by my decisions and respect myself are a part of it. More importantly, though, others have come to know that they can rely on me to do what’s right.

TREAT EVERYONE YOU MEET WITH RESPECT, CONSIDERATION AND DIGNITY. VALUE DIVERSITY. BE OPEN TO DEBATE. I learned these lessons at a very young age (thanks to my parents, three sisters and a brother), and they’re just as relevant today as they were then. No matter how far you may go in your career, or how impressive your credentials may be, never hold yourself in higher esteem than you do those around you. Some of the best ideas come from unexpected sources. By inviting diverse points of view and being willing to debate issues, I’ve made better decisions. WORK FOR A COMPANY YOU RESPECT AND WHICH RESPECTS YOU.

COMPANY:

Vanguard Valley Forge, Pennsylvania www.Vanguard.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Vanguard is one of the world’s largest investment management companies, serving individual investors, institutions and financial professionals at offices in Valley Forge, Pa.; Scottsdale, Ariz.; and Charlotte, N.C. More than 12,000

Getting up every day and going to work has always been easy for me because I love the company I work for and the work that I do. My final bit of advice to others is to find this for yourself. Many of you will spend more hours working than in any other endeavor in your lifetime. If you haven’t found a company you respect, don’t stop looking until you do.

EMPLOYEES:

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No barriers. Just opportunities.
Bring your leadership, strategic thinking, and commitment to excellence to one of the world’s largest investment management companies. You’ll enjoy a comprehensive total rewards program, long-term career growth, and best-inclass training from Vanguard University, ranked as one of Training magazine’s “Top 125” programs. Join a company where diversity is a core value, backed by mentoring, monthly awareness activities, community volunteer programs, and a Diversity Leadership Team.

Connect with Vanguard®
www.vanguardcareers.com
Vanguard is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Named one of Training magazine’s “Top 125” programs, March 2007 Vanguard, Connect with Vanguard, and the ship logo are trademarks of The Vanguard Group, Inc. All other marks are . the exclusive property of their respective owners. © 2007 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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“There is seldom one right answer to anything.”

Susan Penfield
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H B OL P /A LR E N H A MW OO N , L O Z C L W N E T I LT R K

G

rowing up in a small town in Pennsylvania, I learned a lot about leadership from playing sports—everything from swimming to basketball to knock-hockey. But it was serving as captain of my high school basketball team that taught me a lesson for life: In team sports, you learn quickly that success happens when everybody works together as a unit. It was no accident that my best games always seemed to be the ones in which most of my teammates outscored me. By the time I joined Booz Allen Hamilton, I’d had a varied career. As a teenager, I had volunteered in a hospital, which made me interested in pursuing a career in health care. In college, I focused on computer science and was president of my sorority. After college, I was a radio disc jockey and a newscaster and worked for a company that developed shopping malls. Each stop provided me a new opportunity to make things happen. I began to enjoy taking risks and building networks. This was incredibly important because being an effective leader means building a diverse network. At Booz Allen, I realized the importance of building a health care team that broke the mold. We brought in clinicians, scientists and industry experts who thought differently but spoke the language of our clients. From them, and from all of my colleagues, I learned to

TITLE:

Vice President

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

BS in technology management, Lock Haven University Radio disc jockey at WKSB 102.7 KISS FM The Alchemist, by Paulo Coelho

PHILOSOPHY:

Always put yourself in somebody else’s shoes. That allows you to be empathetic to different kinds of people and their situations. Brian Penfield Italian cooking and wine, travel, and my golden retrievers Maxie and Tabatha

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: The Children’s Inn at the National Institutes of Health, a residential “place like home” for sick children and their families. I’m proud to be a board member.

appreciate and honor different styles and skills, appropriating lessons for my own use. Listening to and learning from others around you are essential skills for anyone in an organization as there is seldom one right answer to anything. I’ve learned to reach out to everyone, not only to my peers, but also to the most junior people on my staff. I relish the opportunity to nurture all relationships and, in doing so, tap into their networks (what I call the “hub”) and expand my own. Because relationships are such a natural source of strength, women in particular need to reach out to and support one another. I look around me and marvel at the talent of my Booz Allen colleagues. They work hard and do extraordinary work for our clients. And they’re a walking, talking billboard for the ideal of diversity—the most talented people for the task, regardless of their background or heritage. A leader can’t ask for more.

COMPANY:

Booz Allen Hamilton McLean, Virginia www.boozallen.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Strategy and technology consulting for major international corporations and government clients $4 billion 19,000

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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t see You may no our store, ere. but we’re th

At CVS/pharmacy, we put a lot more into the communities we serve than a store. Like achievement, through our continuing work with Special Olympics. Confidence, with our hitting clinics for children with disabilities, in partnership with the Red Sox. And support, with things like our CVS/pharmacy Charity Classic golf tournament, which has raised millions of dollars for hundreds of family and children’s charities. We do all this because every community that we serve is also a community where we live. This is our home. And home is always where your heart is.

CVS/community. Working in it. Working for it.

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“Focus on being the best leader you can be by being true to yourself and your employees.”

Beth S. Perlman
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S C O NL P E L LR E W N E T W R G Y H , L S T / C AT I O N E N E O R K

D

on’t be afraid to have a sense of self and a strong character.

TITLE:

The attributes that make you a strong woman in life are the same ones that make you a successful woman in business. My grandmother and mentor taught me you can be both strong and feminine—celebrate yourself everyday. When I first started my career in IT over 20 years ago, I didn’t have female role models, and I wasn’t treated well, so I learned what type of leader I didn’t want to be. I surrounded myself with successful people—individuals who valued honesty, integrity and hard work, and were active participants in their own success—and spent as much time as possible cultivating my leadership style. As a leader, it’s important that you take control of your own destiny. There are no handouts in business, just as there are no handouts in life. Deliver your work on time, on scope and on budget—nobody can dispute that. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes along the way, but do everything you can to learn from them. I always learn more from my mistakes than from my successes. I think about what I should never do again, but I don’t dwell on it.

SVP, Chief Administrative Officer and Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION: BS in management information systems and finance, Syracuse University FIRST JOB:

Trainee in the Letter of Credit department at The Other Boleyn Girl, by Philippa Gregory

JP Morgan
READING: PHILOSOPHY:

We’re all here to be successful, so let’s partner with each other to build the best company and product possible. As a leader you have to do what you say and say what you do. Most importantly, have fun. Happily Single Golf, shopping, travel, the arts, philanthropy

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: American Technion Society, an organization promoting science and technology in Israel

Spend time learning about the people you work with. By taking an active interest in their lives, you show them they are more than just a worker. Some of my most rewarding moments as a leader have come from watching people around me succeed. Many women could do better as leaders if they made it a priority to develop a wide network of support both inside and outside the office. I’m a member of several committees dedicated to developing women in technology. I rely on these networking opportunities to keep a pulse on the IT industry, and in return I have the opportunity to offer advice to women working in a predominately

COMPANY:

Constellation Energy Baltimore, Maryland www.constellation.com Energy $19.3 billion 10,000

male industry. Focus on being the best leader you can be by being true to yourself and your employees. Take control of your own career, ask for help when you need it and have fun every day.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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Our Diverse Universe Boasts Some Very Bright Stars
At Constellation Energy, we’re very proud that Beth Perlman, Sr. Vice President, Chief Administrative Officer and Chief Information Officer, has been chosen by Diversity Journal as one of its “Women Worth Watching in 2008.” Pictured above are a few more of the talented leaders who are helping us expand our lead as the #1 national provider of energy and energy services to large commercial and industrial customers, and as the nation’s largest wholesale power seller. We value and support a broad range of experience and perspectives. By encouraging diverse ideas and opinions, Pictured at the Eubie Blake Jazz Institute and Cultural Center in Baltimore, Maryland, are (left to right) Martha Duggan, Vice President, Mid-Atlantic Region, Constellation NewEnergy; Leanne Posko, Managing Director, Community Partnerships, Constellation Energy; Wynne Hayes, Chief Technology Officer, Corporate Applications, Constellation Energy; and Janese Murray, Director, Corporate Diversity, Constellation Energy. we create and cultivate business ideas that give our company a leadership position in an ever-changing world.

constellation.com

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“Insert yourself where you add value.”

Sheila Marie Person-Scott
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I WA C H O V I A R E W P O R AT I O N SH, LLP / C COR NETWORK

M

y dad was my first mentor. We had a special connection. One of my earliest memories was watching him grab his attaché case and head off to work every morning. I knew that one day I would be carrying an attaché case, too. I have never been a stranger to hard work. For four summers in a row, starting at the age of 10, I was a waitress, working early mornings and late nights, seven days a week, at a refreshment stand that my parents managed. This is where I built a strong work ethic. The job provided the family with additional income and taught me the importance of being a contributing member of a team. As an adult moving into corporate America, I joined an association for women. This association provided me with the opportunity to interact with senior leaders dedicated to the advancement of women. I soon realized that I needed to give back and take on a leadership position within this organization. Before long, I had a statewide role that allowed me to travel and speak to women’s groups. This is probably where I first coined the phrase I use today: “Insert yourself where you add value.” In other words, find a place where you can show what you know and learn from others.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President

EDUCATION:

Bachelor’s degree in organizational behavior, University of Cincinnati; Master’s degree in organizational management, University of Phoenix Bank teller in Philadelphia, Pa.

FIRST JOB: READING:

Reposition Yourself: Living Life Without Limits, by T.D. Jakes

PHILOSOPHY:

I believe in possibilities. For every reason that we tell ourselves, “I cannot,” there is a reason that we can. I encourage people to look for different ways to assess a difficult situation and find opportunities. When we limit ourselves, we limit our possibilities. Remove the word “can't” from your vocabulary and replace it with the question, “How can I?” My answer is that I can do all things through Him who strengthens me. Have faith and believe in yourself. It is the only way that people will believe in you. Husband, son and daughter Reading, relaxing on the beach, meditation, yoga Habitat for Humanity

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Having a network of people to mentor you is crucial, regardless of where you are in your career. The more senior you become, the less likely you will receive candid feedback or advice. Nurture your contacts. Meet periodically with them, even if it is just to check in. You then will find that when you need advice or counsel, those people will be there to support you. Now, as I head to work each morning with my own briefcase in hand, it is a physical reminder of my father’s work ethic. I also carry with me each day the knowledge that I belong to a team. No matter how senior I become in an organization, that team is counting on me to work to achieve the common goal. I also know that I need to give back, add value where it matters most and build to “feed” my network. It is a lot to carry, both physically and psychologically. But it also is worthwhile and rewarding.

COMPANY:

Wachovia Corporation Charlotte, North Carolina www.wachovia.com Financial services $29.9 billion 108,238

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Rewarding different contributions encourages diversity of thinking, which benefits the company in the end.”

Carol Ann Petren
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L LIP N A R E W P O R AT I O N C G / C COR NETWORK

T

hroughout my 20-year career, I have recognized the importance of encouraging the open and honest exchange of ideas from people at all levels of the workplace. The ideal work team brings a variety of perspectives to the table. Encouraging diversity of thought enables people to engage constructively in achieving the goals of the organization and leads to the best decisions for the business. The years that I spent as a partner in a law firm gave me exposure to the importance of working collaboratively within a team that held diverse perspectives. As I moved from firm practice to general counsel in major corporations, I experienced first-hand the value of surrounding myself with people who are better and brighter than I am, and letting them do their jobs. Leaders cannot possibly know or become directly involved in all of the issues and must rely on their team. The need to recognize my associates’ varying skills and capabilities has been a constant in my career. People add value to their organizations in different ways, and the key to a successful legal department is to draw upon everyone’s strengths. It is often tempting to use a standard measurement in evaluating the workforce; but with that approach, it would be easy to overlook individuals who add a unique set of skills or expertise to the team. Rewarding different contributions encourages diversity of thinking, which benefits the company in the end.

TITLE:

Executive Vice President and General Counsel of CIGNA Corporation BA, Boston College; JD and LLM, University

EDUCATION:

of Missouri
FIRST JOB:

Jackson County Prosecutor, Kansas City,

Missouri
READING: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, by Malcolm Gladwell PHILOSOPHY: Surround yourself with people of outstanding talent, impeccable judgment and a good sense of fairness— then give them the freedom to excel and challenge them to their highest potential. FAMILY:

Husband, three stepdaughters and many wonderful Golf, travel, reading and keeping fit Equal Justice Works

relatives
INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

CIGNA Corporation Philadelphia, Pennsylvania WEB SITE: www.cigna.com BUSINESS: Health and related employee benefits 2006 REVENUE: $16.5 billion EMPLOYEES: 27,000
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

Organizations are learning to respect individual perspectives regardless of gender and, in turn, are creating advancement opportunities for top talent. Companies are becoming more willing to accommodate the conflicts that many women face in balancing the demands of work and family. One bit of advice I offer all women, and follow myself, is to make time to take care of personal priorities and recharge your batteries—not only for your own health and well-being but to remain productive and make the best contributions to your professions. It is often easier said than done, but it is truly important to spend quality time with family and friends and to do things that you enjoy completely away from the work environment.

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“Find a company whose products and people you can truly relate to and enjoy.”

Melissa Plaisance
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R S WF E WAY ON C EA NETW I RK

I

knew early on that I wanted to go to college, pursue a career and be in a position to support myself, and eventually, my family. In school I really enjoyed math and science, and while I seriously thought about becoming a doctor, I realized that was a long road to follow, and I needed to support myself a lot sooner than I could by going to medical school. My earliest employment opportunities were as a babysitter, a camp counselor, a cashier at Burger King, and as a hotel clerk; all of which required interaction with people, which I thoroughly enjoyed. My interest in the corporate world was developed as I observed my mother, who worked as a secretary at a large consumer products company, and my best friend's father, who was a top corporate executive with a manufacturing firm. I began to understand that it took teamwork to accomplish goals in a corporation, and since I was good with numbers and enjoyed developing relationships with people, it seemed financial management would be a good fit for me. My advice to women entering the corporate world is to find a company whose products and people you can truly relate to and enjoy. Build strong relationships inside and outside the company, and constantly find ways to learn, grow and contribute more to the success of the company.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Finance and Investor Relations

EDUCATION: BSBA, business administration, Bucknell University; MBA, UCLA Anderson School of Management FIRST JOB: Post Undergrad—corporate banker, Bankers Trust Company READING:

Tough Choices: A Memoir, by Carly Fiorina; Two Little Girl's in Blue, by Mary Higgins Clark; and I love Harry Potter books!

PHILOSOPHY:

Find a company whose business and people you truly can relate to and enjoy; learn, grow, contribute and help develop people; keep some balance in your life. Married 20 years; daughter, 16, and a son, 12 Major sports fan (youth, college and professional), travel with family, aerobics, recreational softball, community service Education-related and cancer research charities

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

I was fortunate to begin my career in banking, where I learned about companies in different industries, and found that my favorite was food retailing. Later I joined Safeway Inc. handling investor relations. I was later given opportunities to manage the public affairs and treasury departments, and to get involved in strategic development. I have worked with some wonderful people who have taught me so much through the years, and for that I am truly grateful. It has also been very helpful that I work for a company that values diversity, and has provided opportunities for women. Today,

Safeway Inc. HEADQUARTERS: Pleasanton, California WEB SITE: www.safeway.com BUSINESS: Food retail 2006 REVENUES: $40.2 billion EMPLOYEES: 207,000
COMPANY:

Safeway has a terrific women’s network that provides a forum for women to hear from speakers, share concerns and interact in informal settings. Developing future leaders is a focused effort at Safeway today, and I plan to do my part in ensuring a strong leadership for years to come.

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We Welcome the World!
The rich cultural mix of the communities we serve is constantly changing. We have always responded positively to these neighborhood shifts. Our diversity programs ensure opportunities for people from every background to work together and pursue their potential. The Safeway community of employees, customers and vendors represents a true global spectrum. And as the world keeps changing, so will we. Our doors, as always, remain wide open.

For more information visit www.safeway.com

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“Good leaders translate theory into action.”

Susan Margaret Ponce
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R H WL L IE T W OO N E A N BURT RK

W

ith responsibility for 31 lawyers in 14 offices, I focus on the key areas of employee management, leadership and development. Early in my career, I observed many attributes of good and bad leaders. I learned that my impact on the organization is only as great as the impact I have on those who work for me and with me. My observations on leadership can be distilled to the following: Good leaders are able to weigh all the information at hand, make informed decisions and take the risk that they might be wrong, without regard for personal consequences. Good leaders translate theory into action. It’s nice to discuss great ideas and make detailed plans, but successful leaders know how to execute those plans. Whether they do the work themselves or put the right people in place to get the job done, good leaders are willing to work to make their visions reality. Good leaders can communicate both the good news and the bad. Effective communication involves more than good public-speaking skills. It calls for the ability to deliver a message that other can truly hear, understand and act on. The worse the news, the more critical the messenger’s role becomes.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Commercial Law

EDUCATION:

University of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College, LLM, 1990, with Merit; University of Texas School of Law, JD, 1988, with Honors; University of Texas at Arlington, BA, 1985 with High Honors Receptionist in college career counseling office

FIRST JOB: READING:

It's OK to Be the Boss, by Bruce Tulgan; The Land of Lincoln, by Andrew Ferguson; finished reading Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy; and The Hundred Secret Senses, by Amy Tan
PHILOSOPHY:

If at the end of your life you can say that you made some small difference because of what you did and who you were, that you never stopped learning new things, and that the people who were important to you knew it, you will have been successful.

FAMILY: My two cats/roommates, Willoughby and Bartholomew; my parents, two brothers and two sisters and their families; and a family of dear friends who span a lifetime and are spread out from Texas to Australia INTERESTS:

Reading, dancing, travel, jigsaw puzzles, movies, learning to play golf The Nature Conservancy

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Good leaders adopt different styles in the way they deal with others. One size does not fit all. An attitude of, “Well, that’s just the way I am,” only makes conflict inevitable. Learn what makes others tick. Good leaders take care of their shoes. It may sound silly, but it goes back to my childhood when on Sunday nights I would watch my father pull out his shoeshine kit to ready his wingtips for the workweek. Those sessions taught me that attention to your appearance leads to the inward feeling and the outward projection of confidence. More importantly, I learned that people who take care of the small things can be counted on to take care of the big things. And leadership is a big thing.

COMPANY:

Halliburton Houston, Texas, and Dubai, United

HEADQUARTERS:

Arab Emirates
WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.halliburton.com Energy services $22.5 billion 45,000

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“I view mentoring as one of my most important responsibilities.”

Carol M. Pottenger
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L LN I T E D E W NE S W O R Y U P / C R S TAT E T N AV K

W

hen I was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy in 1977, I could not serve aboard ships or fly aircraft. That was considered combat duty, and women were not permitted assignment to such duty. Now, 30 years later, I am the first female commander of a Combat Strike Group Forward deployed in Sasebo and Okinawa, Japan. I am responsible for the operations of eight ships and a range of exercises with nations in the Pacific theater. I also have been the commanding officer of two ships and held several commands ashore. These achievements were only possible because the Navy understands that every sailor has the potential to excel; and the Navy gives each sailor—as it gave me—the opportunity to prove it. I react very strongly to claims that the military’s integration has hurt readiness. Nothing could be further from the truth. I am astounded daily at the quality and commitment of our service members. They work as a team; they ignore or mitigate obstacles that would crush most; and their race, color, religious creed and gender are transparent. These characteristics hold true for any business or profession that wants to be an employer of choice and set the standard in its industry. The mentors I have had throughout my career are among the finest citizens of our nation. Their examples of setting

TITLE:

Rear Admiral; Commander, Amphibious Force, U.S. 7th Fleet BA in history and PhD honoris causa in social sciences, Purdue University. Engineering division officer, USS Yosemite

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB:

(AD 19)
READING: Cobra II: The Inside Story of the Invasion and Occupation of Iraq, by Michael R. Gordon and Bernard E. Trainor; A Peace to End All Peace: Creating the Modern Middle East, 1914-1922, by David Fromkin PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

If you work hard, seek selfimprovement and ensure that those who work for you have the opportunity to develop, the rest will take care of itself. Husband, my best friend and supporter Spending precious downtime with family

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

and friends
FAVORITE CHARITY: Any foundation dedicated to improving literacy around the world

COMPANY:

United States Navy Washington, D.C.

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS:

www.navy.mil

National defense: maintain, train and equip combat-ready naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression and maintaining freedom of the seas 340,636 active duty sailors and 129,077

career goals, continually seeking improvement, and using patience and a sense of humor as important leadership tools taught me much about how to succeed. In turn I have mentored hundreds of young men and women, experiences at the foundation of my personal reward in service. I view mentoring as one of my most important responsibilities. I try to convey the many positives that accrue from a service ethos, whether someone is joining the military, the Peace Corps or a community or national service-based organization. Service teaches young people about leadership, discipline and those in the world who are less fortunate. Service teaches them how to invest in their future and their families’ futures and to mentor others to do the same. I believe service can reshape how young people decide to live their lives. It certainly did for me.

EMPLOYEES:

reserve sailors
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“Surround yourself with excellence.”

Paula A. Price
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E NC& S IC A R E M A / K R E W P O R AT I O N V F SH, LLP RC COR NETWORK

B

e open and receptive. I’ve tried hard not to overplan my career and to be open and receptive to new opportunities. I have many varied interests, and these are reflected in my professional and personal life. I thrive in environments where the challenges are greatest, so I often have sought out projects or roles that others shy away from. Succeeding in these roles has allowed me to earn credibility and broadened my career options. Being open to taking calculated risks has resulted in an exciting career journey that has crossed disciplines, industries, states and oceans. Get grounded and be resilient. I have learned through gardening that roots make all the difference. It’s important to be steadfast and consistent in your basic beliefs, values and principles, and to nourish them often. Career journeys involve pitfalls and setbacks that can blow you away like a bush in a storm if you don’t have deep, strong roots. If your roots are strong and your values are intact, your resiliency will allow you to stand tall and stay the course. Surround yourself with excellence. Early on in my career as a manager, I began incorporating “develop great people” into my annual goals, and I’ve kept it there ever since. Once I saw how much I could accomplish by working through others, I made it a point to identify people with top raw talent and to

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer, CVS Caremark Corporation Bachelor’s degree in accounting, DePaul University; MBA in finance and strategy, University of Chicago Clerical intern at Liquid Carbonic Corp.

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

in Chicago
READING: Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Season, by Jonathan Eig; The New Leaders: Transforming the Art of Leadership into the Science of Results, by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis and Annie McKee PHILOSPHY: FAMILY:

Give a hand up! Painting, gardening, traveling with family

Michael, husband of 21 years, and Tyler, 6

INTERESTS:

and friends
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Pact, An Adoption Alliance; Alzheimer’s Association; American Cancer Society; CVS All Kids Can, focused on children with disabilities

CVS Caremark Corporation Woonsocket, Rhode Island WEB SITE: www.cvs.com BUSINESS: The nation's premier integrated pharmacy services provider INDUSTRY RANKING: America’s largest retail pharmacy (most number of stores), No. 2 in sales 2006 REVENUES: $80.6 billion, CVS Corp. and Caremark Rx combined; $44 billion, CVS Corp. pre-merger EMPLOYEES: 180,000
HEADQUARTERS:

COMPANY:

develop, reward and promote them so that they and I could continue to flourish. If you do what you love and surround yourself with excellent people who love to do the same thing, you can’t help but excel. Give a hand up. I’ve been blessed with a lot of mentors. Some have looked like me; others have not. Some have served as career coaches; others as life coaches. I have found mentors among my work colleagues, physicians, family and friends. I haven’t called them all mentors, but I’ve recognized them by their grounded wisdom, sage counsel and helpful deeds. In turn, I have strived to be just as generous with my time and to offer others a willing ear, sound advice and, whenever possible, an unwavering hand up the corporate ladder. There’s nothing better!

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“Stay true to yourself.”

DeDe Priest
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E WWA L -W O R K NET MA T

A

wise man once said, “A mentor is someone whose hindsight can become your foresight.” I consider myself blessed to have received invaluable mentoring from many strong leaders and family members. My career has afforded me incredible access to some of the world’s best business leaders. Because of this, I do not have a sole mentor, but many. These days, as I work with young rising stars, I try to pass on several pieces of advice that shaped my career. Forget that you’re female. Over the span of my career, I’ve seen more and more women progress up the ladder and earn a seat at the executive table. The female leaders of previous generations made this possible by deservedly earning their seats. My advice? Whether you’re male or female, simply work hard, make big results happen, and you will be noticed. Love what you do. If you have passion for your job, then the best of what you have to offer will be apparent in all you do. Stay true to yourself. Never compromise your values for anyone. Have courage to stand up for what you know to be right. If you do not let fear manage your actions, you will thrive.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President and General Merchandising Manager BBA in marketing, Ohio University

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: Brand assistant on Shasta beverages and Capri Sun brands at the Shasta Beverage Co. in Hayward, Calif. READING: Revolt in the Boardroom: The New Rules of Power in Corporate America, by Alan Murray; favorite books: Clicking, by Faith Popcorn; Good to Great, by Jim Collins PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Most business challenges and rewards are completely within our control and influence. Nothing can stop you from conquering success if you know where you want to go. One four-legged baby, Murphy Food, entertaining and hiking

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY: Any group that caters to women dealing with hardships, such as the Single Parent Scholarship Fund of Benton County, Ark.

Focus on winning today. Too often young professionals are focused on the next position. You create your own success, so make it a priority to win today. If you achieve success in your current job, people will rally behind you, and you will grow. Develop strong networks. Surround yourself with the best and the brightest. Don’t restrict yourself to relationships with leaders in your area of expertise. Get outside the box and interact with lots of groups. You never know what opportunities might arise from new and different relationships. Finally, as you grow in your career, make it a point to share what you’ve learned. It feels great to see others achieve their highest potential and know that you have played a small part in that growth.

COMPANY:

Wal-Mart Bentonville, Arkansas

HEADQUARTERS: WEBSITE: BUSINESS: RANKING:

www.walmart.com, www.walmartfacts.com Retail

Wal-Mart this year reclaimed its spot at the top of the Fortune 500 list $344.9 billion 1.3 million in the United States, 1.9 million worldwide

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“I would not be where I am today without the mentors who guided me.”

Helen P. Pudlin
N U T T E R M c C LP N C E NN& N C I H , L LE R/ C R E W N E T W ON C THE E N FI A FISAL S P VICES GROUP I RK

I

attribute my success, in large part, to past and current mentors. As a leader, I believe it is my responsibility to mentor others. After graduating from law school in 1974, I joined a large Philadelphia law firm. There, one of the very few female lawyers at the firm became my first mentor. When she saw me carrying my files home in a shopping bag, she told me to buy a briefcase. She taught me how to dress and how to be comfortable in a male environment. Other senior lawyers in the firm also became mentors. They taught me how to be an advocate and gave me challenging and high-profile assignments. They gave me client responsibilities and helped me to become a partner. I continue to have mentors at work and in professional organizations to this day. I joined PNC in 1989. Since that time, I have had many opportunities to mentor employees at several levels of the organization. Four years ago, I served as a formal mentor and sponsor for an African-American Employee Resource Group at PNC. Although I was different from the group’s members, I had the opportunity to facilitate conversation and networking, and we all learned a great deal from each other. The group’s diversity was one of its strengths. Because we came from varied backgrounds, we provided different perspectives that ultimately led to recommendations to improve our company.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President and General Counsel BA, MS in education, JD, University of

EDUCATION:

Pennsylvania
FIRST JOB: READING:

Camp counselor

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, by Doris Kearns Goodwin.

PHILOSOPHY:

As leaders, we have the responsibility to set a tone for integrity, high ethical standards and professional excellence; mentor others and give them opportunities for development and recognition; foster a diverse workplace; and serve our communities. It also is important to continue to learn and grow and to have fun.

FAMILY: Husband, David Pudlin, attorney; son Alex Pudlin, 25, graduate of Brown University, currently works for a production company; daughter Julia Pudlin, 22, graduate of Yale University, currently works for the Department of Justice and will begin a JD program at the University of Pennsylvania in August INTERESTS:

Jogging, watching movies and traveling

FAVORITE CHARITY: The Wistar Institute, a nonprofit biomedical research institute for which I am co-vice chair of the board of directors

COMPANY:

The PNC Financial Services Group Inc. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania $10.9 billion www.pnc.com 27,500

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

Mentoring has many facets. Mentors can give critical feedback, trumpet the achievements of others and open doors for the people they mentor. Mentors can guide people through political minefields, coach people on building cooperative relationships and counsel them on balancing career and family. Mentors also can teach people that it is OK to take reasonable professional risks and to fail and learn lessons through these efforts. As my experiences show, good mentors can be very different from you, and successful mentoring can be informal or formal. Mentoring is one of a leader’s most important roles. I would not be where I am today without mentors who guided me, looked out for me, challenged me and gave me opportunities. Similarly, one of my greatest professional rewards has been watching people whom I have mentored move up in their careers and achieve great things.

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With women leaders like you, we’re all in Good Hands®.

Allstate congratulates the senior executive business women who were recognized as “Women Worth Watching” and applauds their unique and personal contributions and achievements.

TO LEARN ABOUT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN AT ALLSTATE, VISIT US AT WWW.ALLSTATE.JOBS
“Good Hands” is a registered service mark of Allstate Insurance Company. ©2007 Allstate Insurance Company, Northbrook, IL

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“Opportunities present themselves when we do our best.”

Rebecca Ranninger
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F IS Y ML LN T/ C R E W P O R AT I O N SH, A P E COR NETWORK

S

uccess in any career field comes from demonstrating passion. Far too often, we hope for prestigious titles, promotions or recognition that will place us in positions of power or leadership. In reality, our ability to make a significant and valuable contribution to any community or organization is made possible through the dedication and passion we demonstrate, not a fancy title or a corner office. Opportunities present themselves when we do our best and, most of all, when we truly enjoy what we do.

TITLE:

Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer JD, Stanford University; bachelor’s degree in jurisprudence, Oxford University; and bachelor’s degree magna cum laude, Harvard University; Human Resources Executive Program, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University; and the Stanford Directors College, Stanford Law School. Bartending parties

EDUCATION:

FIRST JOB: READING:

Freakonomics, by Steven D. Leavitt and Stephen J. Dubner; The Power of a Positive No, by William Ury
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Leadership is the art of getting people to want to do what you want them to do. Married, two daughters Animals, especially cats The Humane Society

PURSUE YOUR PASSION

The true path to success presents itself when you’re doing something you’re passionate about. Don’t be afraid to change career paths if you find yourself disinterested or lacking enthusiasm. Life rarely works out the way you plan. Often it takes learning what you don’t like before finding the right fit. I attended law school because I loved figuring out problems and putting them into a coherent story. However, I disliked spending hours arguing on the phone or in a courtroom. When I had an opportunity to change career paths and lead human resources, I was hesitant to make the transition. As a result of this change, however, I found a career that has provided me with a sense of satisfaction, and my enthusiasm has guided me the rest of the way.

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS OF TRUST

You will encounter many different personalities in a corporate environment. To progress, it is imperative that you learn to work with all of them and to recognize that your competition is not within the organization. You must discover ways to work effectively with colleagues through open communication.
REMAIN EMOTIONALLY DETACHED

COMPANY:

Symantec Corporation Cupertino, California www.symantec.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

BUSINESS: Symantec is a global leader in infrastructure software, enabling businesses and consumers to have confidence in a connected world. The company helps customers protect their infrastructure, information and interactions by delivering software and services that address risks to security, availability, compliance and performance. FY 2007 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

Finally, you should never allow yourself to become so emotionally involved in what takes place at work that sentiments cloud your judgment. Keeping a degree of separation between your own concept of self-worth, your job and what’s important will allow you to maintain proper perspective when difficult decisions arise. At the end of the day it’s business, not family.

$5.25 billion

17,500 employees in 40 countries

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“Success comes from knowing that you are doing what you love.”

Teckla Rhoads
NUTTER McCLENNEN & FISH, LLP GENERAL MOTORK / CREW NETW S

W

omen have many opportunities for growth and success in today’s business community. We have unique talents, attitudes and skills that allow us to make a positive effect in all areas of business. Even in areas traditionally considered male-dominated territory, women can make significant contributions and change the way business is done.

TITLE:

Director, Industrial Design & North America Design Operations BA, College for Creative Studies, Detroit, Michigan Graphic Designer for Wilson Design, a package Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

design firm
READING: PHILOSOPHY:

Success is measured differently for each individual. It is important to understand what motivates you, what makes you happy and what legacy you want to leave in your professional and personal lives. There are a few tenets that I share with those who ask what motivates me.
DISCOVER YOUR PASSION.

To know at the end of every day that I gave it my best, and that I am making a positive difference for others Husband, Michael and dog, Caesar

FAMILY:

Needle arts, reading, entertaining, charitable activities
INTERESTS: FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society,

Scleroderma Foundation

From an early age I knew that I wanted to follow a creative path. I was fortunate to have parents and teachers who recognized my talents and gave me the encouragement to explore my passion for design. I enjoy my job, and appreciate all the experiences and opportunities that it has provided me. Success comes from knowing that you are doing what you love, with people that you value, and making a difference not only in the work but for the greater enterprise.

be successful or merely tread water until the next change comes along. Some of my greatest achievements have come about in the most unexpected and unplanned ways. I am grateful for the challenges and believe that they have made me a more grounded leader and given me perspective that I would otherwise not have found.
BUILD YOUR NETWORK.

We are all confronted with changing situations, job assignments and business climates. The choices we make in responding to these changes dictate whether we will
EMBRACE CHANGE.

We are only as good as the people with which we surround ourselves. It is important to find caring mentors, trusted colleagues and good friends to support and guide us through the journey. Success comes from building and nurturing relationships, working together to achieve common goals.

COMPANY:

General Motors Detroit, Michigan www.gm.com Automotive design operations $207.34 billion 284,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

The responsibility of success is to invest yourself in the community and to make a difference. Everyone can make a difference, whether it is mentoring a colleague, volunteering for a charitable group, or raising funds for a worthy cause. You will find yourself learning from others, making important connections and gaining new perspectives that will help you grow in your profession and as a leader.
GIVE BACK.

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“Identify and stay true to your core values.”

Nicole Ringenberg
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T W O RO MONSANT K

B

ecoming a successful leader requires a commitment to core values. Attention to your personal core values can help you make decisions, fulfill responsibilities and focus on what is important to you. I encourage emerging leaders to identify and stay true to their core values, which are the foundation for achieving your goals. Below are some of the guiding principles that have helped me along the way.
SET AN EXAMPLE.

TITLE:

Vice President of Finance

EDUCATION: BS in French, University of Michigan, Masters in International Business, University of South Carolina FIRST JOB: READING:

Working in an ice cream shop

What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, by Marshal Goldsmith

PHILOSOPHY: Whatever you choose to do, do it with passion, commitment and integrity and, above all, do it with respect for others. INTERESTS:

Spending time with family and traveling abroad

Approach each job with standards for yourself. This is integral to success. As you do less and lead more, hold tight to quality and integrity through actions, not just words.

FAVORITE CHARITY:

I am on the board of directors of the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA)

LEVERAGE SELF-AWARENESS. There is nothing more powerful than understanding and acknowledging your strengths and weaknesses. Apply your strengths in all situations. Seek out people who are strong in your weak areas so you can learn from them. BE YOURSELF. Early in my career I found myself trying to emulate others whom I admired. Once I realized that I needed to learn from these great leaders, not be them, I became more confident in relying on my own expertise and instinct. MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICES FOR YOU.

choices that brought me there. We can’t always control the circumstances of our lives, but we can make choices that help meet our need for balance.
TAKE RISKS. I have taken jobs that colleagues told me not to take and taken on roles that I thought I could never do. Have I been scared and worried I would fail? Yes! But the rewards have been greater because I am willing to step out of my comfort zone.

As my career grew, so did my family. One day I woke up overwhelmed with the weight of so many responsibilities until I realized it was my
Monsanto St. Louis, Missouri

Whether it is a daily encounter or a major decision impacting many, be respectful of others. My success increasingly relies on mentors, peers, team members and networks. In addition, my decisions affect more and more people. Respecting others, their values and culture is key to success.
BE RESPECTFUL OF OTHERS.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Writing this essay has given me reason to reflect on my career and what I think has helped me along my path. As I continue my journey, these guiding principles will continue to be my compass.

www.monsanto.com Agriculture $7.3 billion 17,000 (regular) 4,300 (seasonal)

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“You can be whatever you want to be.”

Lorie-Ann Roxburgh
N U T T E R M c C LV O L K S WA G I S H , L LA M E R I E W / C T WA D A ENNEN & FEN OF P / CR CA NEAN ORK

M

y first two mentors, my mother and father, taught me to believe that I could be anything I wanted to be. My first job taught me the importance of that belief. I had been working for a company as a payroll clerk for a little over a year when the corporate office posted a position for an accounts receivable collector. Enthused, I applied. When a helpful senior co-worker found out, he said to me, “You will only set yourself up for disappointment. You only have one year of experience.” I was deflated. When I arrived home that night and told my parents what had happened, they said, “You can be whatever you want to be.” Sure enough, I became the accounts receivable collector and was given additional responsibility only six months later. Over the course of my career, positive leaders have surrounded me, and I observed their accomplishments and failures. One special mentor told me, “No question is a stupid one. Be persistent. Always be yourself. Don’t worry about what others think. If your question helps you learn or understand something you need to get the job done, then go for it.” Every group has that annoying person, the one that asks a million questions. I am that person.

TITLE:

Corporate Controller Birchmount Collegiate Institute Payroll clerk

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

READING: Customer Satisfaction Is Worthless, Customer Loyalty Is Priceless, by Jeffrey Gitomer PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

You can do anything you want to do.

Husband, Ian; and dog Boating, golf, family American Cancer Society

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Many opportunities have presented themselves to me in my career at Volkswagen, and I took each one as it came, participating in several high-potential programs such as Volkswagen Global Junior Executive Program, Restructuring Committees, Leadership Development Program and Cost Transparency Leaders, to name a few. When mentoring future leaders I use the six points of success to advise them: 1. Make things happen rather than let things happen to you. 2. Surround yourself with positive influencers who can be measured not only by their words, but also by their actions. 3. Share your experiences with others and remain open-minded to their circumstances. 4. Set high goals for yourself. 5. Make decisions based on what is right, rather than who is right. 6. Listen to others’ points of view in the way you want others to listen to yours.

Volkswagen of America / Canada Auburn Hills, Michigan WEBSITE: www.vw.com BUSINESS: Automotive 2006 REVENUES: $10 billion EMPLOYEES: 1,437
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

In closing, I believe it is important to help others achieve personal success by encouraging them to believe in themselves and their ideas, learn from setbacks and face their fears. After all, you can be whatever you want to be.

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“Treat others as you would want to be treated.”

Aurora M. Rubin
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F IL O I , T E P&/ T O U C H E E T W O R P DE SH T LL CREW N USA LLK

T

hirty-eight years ago, I arrived in New York City armed with an immigrant’s visa, a college education and work experience at a professional services firm in the Philippines. A month after my arrival, I accepted a position with Haskins & Sells, which later become Deloitte & Touche.

TITLE:

Chief Global Ethics Officer and Managing Partner, Global Risk BS in business administration cum laude, University of the Philippines Research and training specialist for SGV & Co.

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB:

Imagine being an immigrant Asian woman in a maledominated profession at a time when there were no women partners across the profession or any female leaders within our clients’ organizations. Back then, visible women role models did not exist anywhere in corporate America. Overcoming the odds meant establishing an early mentoring relationship. I was fortunate to have had an enlightened manager who took an interest in my career and served as my mentor. I remember him saying, “You must be good, with all the strikes against you.” Instead of taking offense, I welcomed his candor, direction and advice. He took me under his wing and recommended me for engagements that broadened my skill set. He even “talked me up” to partners across the organization. His support was especially valuable to my career advancement because I was raised to let my work and accomplishments speak for themselves. Over the years, I’ve learned a number of life lessons and good advice, namely: • Know and be true to yourself. Hold true to your values. They define and ground you, and they let you sleep well at night.
Deloitte & Touche USA LLP New York, New York www.deloitte.com Professional services $8.7 billion 37,118

READING: A number of fiction novels by writers Julie Garwood and Jonathan Kellerman PHILOSOPHY:

Know what’s important to you and be guided accordingly. Treat others as you would like to be treated. Put things in perspective, and don’t forget to smell the roses. Husband, Mel; daughter, Joanna, 28; son, Paul, 21 Theater, traveling, reading and collecting miniatures The Center for Asian Pacific American Women, United Way and others

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

• Be organized and learn to prioritize. Learn how to get things done effectively and efficiently, despite time constraints. • Don’t stop learning. Education is a lifelong pursuit. • Seek help, not answers. Consulting others, especially those with differing viewpoints, is a sign of strength. • Treat others as you would want to be treated. If you can only remember one piece of advice, remember this. The year I made partner at Deloitte, I was only the second woman in auditing admitted into the firm’s partnership and the first Asian woman partner among the Big 8 in the United States. Back then, women made up less than 1 percent of the total partnerships within the Big 8. Today, I am pleased to say that I am a part of an organization that leads the profession, with women making up about 20 percent of the partnership. Now that is progress.

COMPANY:

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUE: EMPLOYEES:

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There’s a place where everyone is welcome. Where everyone is treated the same. Boeing strongly supports the never-ending mission to ensure that every workplace is that welcome place.

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Help someone along the way without being asked.”

Deborah Schloss
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T WX H O SODE ORK

T

he skills you bring to the table include more than those derived from work. Real-life experiences with parents, grandparents, siblings, friends and colleagues provide much of the fabric for who you become as an adult. Growing up with my nine brothers and sisters taught me negotiation skills I couldn’t have learned in a classroom. Independence and self-sufficiency are traits I learned from my mother. Working hard for things that matter and celebrating life come from my father. My faith and spirituality remind me to treat each day as if it were my last and to make a difference in the lives of those I serve. Learn to be a great listener. Some of the best friends, spouses and leaders are those with great listening skills. We all make mistakes. Embrace the human element of the job. Learn from your mistakes to become a better person, leader or parent. Know your weaknesses and work to improve them; ignoring them will only make them greater liabilities down the road. Observe. Watch those leaders who demonstrate the attributes you want to develop. See how they interact and communicate with other people in different situations, how they

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, Operations

EDUCATION: BA in human biology, Stanford University; MA in science, University of the Incarnate Word FIRST JOB: READING:

Dietitian Thirteen Moons, by Charles Frazier

PHILOSOPHY:

Every day is a gift. Use each day as an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others.

FAMILY: Married to Howard for 20 years; one son, 14; one daughter, 10; nine brothers and sisters INTERESTS:

Horseback riding, hiking and family American Cancer Society, American

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

Leukemia Society

reward and recognize accomplishments. Study how they use their natural strengths to work smarter, not necessarily harder. Know and understand your strengths. Ask for feedback from those who know you at home and at work. Research shows that leaders who instinctively have the strengths required for their particular position are those who not only excel, but also enjoy their work and have a passion for it. Find a profession or job that has meaning and purpose for you. With this will come the passion and commitment sought in great leaders. Help someone along the way without being asked. We all have needed help at one time or another. With the right tools and information, leaders can foster independence and remove barriers for others. People have unlimited potential to learn and develop. Help others achieve their potential and become valuable leaders and resources.

COMPANY:

Sodexho Gaithersburg, Maryland www.SodexhoUSA.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE:

BUSINESS: Sodexho is the leading provider of outsourced food and facilities management services in North America. Sodexho serves more than 6,000 corporations, schools, hospitals, health care facilities and college campuses. Additionally, Sodexho is the official food service provider for the United States Marine Corps. 2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$6.7 billion

110,000

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© 2007 Verizon. All Rights Reserved.

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We believe there’s a strong connection between personal success and professional success. Fostering a workplace that embraces diversity, inspires innovation and provides the tools for success has positioned us as a leader in communications, entertainment and technology. To learn more, visit verizon.com/about Verizon and its business units – Verizon Wireless, Verizon Telecom and Verizon Business – are honored to be recognized by Diversity Journal’s Women Worth Watching.

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Serving others is what matters most.”

Linda V. Schreiner
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N E AF I W E,SL L P C O R E W P O R AT I O N M & D S H T VA / C C O R N E T W O R K

“T

o laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people… to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to leave the world a little better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success.” I keep this quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson near my desk as a reminder to live my life by helping others to succeed. My graduate training and subsequent first job were in career counseling. My primary focus is still on helping others think through what they love to do and then helping them find a way to do it. Through the years, I have been privileged to work with many remarkable people in pursuit of noble personal and organizational goals. Growing up in a U.S. Army family, dedicated to “Duty, Honor, Country,” I learned that serving others is what matters most. In addition, I learned that teamwork, flexibility and the ability to “bloom where you are planted” are essential qualities of success.

TITLE:

Senior Vice President

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

BA, University of Georgia; MEd, University of Vermont Salesperson at a clothing store

Know-How: The 8 Skills That Separate People Who Perform From Those Who Don’t, by Ram Charan
PHILOSOPHY:

To treat others as I would like to

be treated.
FAMILY:

Married 22 years to Serge; one daughter, 15 Golf, skiing, reading and fitness walking My church and the United Way

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITIES:

COMPANY:

MeadWestvaco Corporation Richmond, Virginia www.meadwestvaco.com

Leadership was a natural part of our family life. I was expected to do the harder right rather than the easier wrong and to watch out for those less able. The golden rule was followed, and my sister and I were encouraged to do our best and to set our personal goals high. My parents constantly reinforced that we could do anything we chose to do and that we should not settle for anything less than our dreams. This strong foundation enabled me to move confidently in the direction of my dreams and to help others do the same. Along the way, I realized that being a learner is very important. Approach things with a beginner’s mind and ask questions for understanding. In the end, each of us is accountable for our thoughts, words and actions, so it is important to spend time thinking, reflecting and then sharing our views with others. Helping others achieve their goals gives me the greatest pleasure and sense of accomplishment. I am blessed to be supported by a wonderful family who understands me and my motivation. In closing, I trust that each of you will follow your passion and invest yourself completely in the pursuit of the noble goal of your dreams.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Packaging. MeadWestvaco is a global packaging company that provides packaging solutions and products for the food and beverage, media and entertainment, personal care, home and garden, cosmetic and health care industries. The company also has market-leading positions in its consumer and office products, specialty chemicals and specialty papers businesses. MeadWestvaco, with operations in more than 29 countries, has been selected for the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes and manages all of its forestlands in accordance with internationally recognized forest certification standards.
2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

$6.5 billion

23,530 worldwide

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H E AT, P R E S S U R E A N D C O A L C A N W O R K T O G E T H E R TO CREATE SOMETHING OF UNMATCHED STRENGTH. A DIVERSE WORKFORCE CAN DO THE SAME. At SRP, diversity is a value we strongly embrace. Founded over 100 years ago, we have suppor ted an environment where people with different backgrounds, experiences and skills come to define their futures. Today, we’re a leading public utility and we have our employees, like Kelly J. Barr, to thank for it. A 15-year SRP veteran, Ms. Barr has made countless contributions to SRP and her community. Her compassion towards the community and leadership skills recently earned her the honor of being named one of the Women Wor th Watching.™ Congratulations. Your accomplishments make all of us stronger.

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“Demonstrating trust and empathy are critical components of building strong teams and influencing others.”

Kayla Shell
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N EE L L ON C D TW I RK

“A

ctions speak louder than words.” Most of us have heard that

TITLE:

Legal Director BA, Hendrix College; JD, University of Tulsa

phrase. I heard it from my parents and grandparents when I was growing up in rural Arkansas on a farm that has been in my family for three generations. My parents raised me to believe I could accomplish anything as long as I worked hard and respected others. Those lessons in leadership have served me well throughout my career. The leaders I have respected most have been those who lead by example and “walk the talk.” Thurmond Woodard, the former vice president of Diversity at Dell, was that kind of a leader. Because Thurmond respected all people, he and I forged a bond that gave me the courage to be an openly gay executive at Dell. His willingness to learn from me and my willingness to trust him helped put Dell on the path to becoming a great place to work for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender employees. It hasn’t happened overnight. Together we learned that much can be accomplished around the controversial issue of respect and inclusion for GLBT employees by working within the system, sometimes slowly, and building consensus to move forward. I assumed a broader role in the company and became the Chair of the Executive Board of PRIDE, Dell’s GLBT network group, so others would see an openly gay executive actively participating in the effort.
Dell Inc. Round Rock, Texas www.dell.com Technology and services $57.5 billion 88,100

EDUCATION:

College of Law
FIRST JOB:

Arkansas Extension Service, summer

cotton scout
READING: Active Liberty, by Stephen Breyer, U.S. Supreme Court Justice PHILOSOPHY:

Don’t be afraid to fail. Never stop learning. Your team’s success is more important than your success. Be present. Speaking up and taking a stand, even when unpopular, is far more rewarding than staying silent and being regretful. With a little courage and encouragement, we can all make a difference. Randi, partner; 16-month-old son Gardening, reading, rediscovering the world through Ethan’s eyes Atticus Circle

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Demonstrating trust and empathy are critical components of building strong teams and influencing others, but when someone is gay and “in the closet,” trust and empathy are impossible to fully achieve. Knowing the people with whom you work, on a personal as well as professional level, leads to greater understanding of motivations, which in turn leads to more cohesive teams that achieve the best results. Through my leadership roles, I have learned from others and

COMPANY:

others have learned from me. To be successful, in the workplace or in the community, you have to set the right tone as a leader. When you respect and trust others, through your actions not just through your words, you are rewarded time and time again.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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“Often it is hard to spot those that mentor us in our careers since they come in various forms.”

Saumil Shukla
N UC OE R O Lc C ATN D E N I& O N H , L LPA/NC RO W N EE T W O R K TT NS M IDLE EN ED S FIS COM P Y E F N W YO

I

credit my success to being fortunate to have worked for and

TITLE:

General Manager, Steam Distribution Babysitter, age 12 The Lincoln Lawyer, by Michael Connelly

having been challenged by highly successful and well respected leaders throughout my career. I came to this country with immigrant parents who wanted a better life for their family. My parents were professionals who worked hard and became successful through their own means. As I attended college unsure of my future aspirations, I was guided by my mother’s advice to pursue a career in engineering. Although this wasn’t a typical profession chosen by most women, I found it interesting and was excited by the possibilities of getting into a field that offered me both academic and hands-on learning. I was fortunate to start a career at Con Edison that provided an internship program and assigned a mentor. During the first few months, I had realized that I was to have the benefit of not one, but several mentors that taught and challenged me through numerous ways. During one of my first assignments, I had the opportunity of encountering a difficult manager who started by asking me questions on areas that I had no knowledge of. However, this manager expected I should know the answers and expected a response the next day. I followed through by trying to

FIRST JOB: READING:

PHILOSOPHY:

Always enjoy what you do, or do something else that you do enjoy. Husband and two teenage sons Traveling UNICEF

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

learn and understand everything that I could possibly put my hands on to respond to his questions. I would have my responses ready only to find out that he had additional questions which I would again have to follow up on. This continued every day for several weeks. I later realized that I came to learn a great deal more and credit the fact that this difficult manager actually was instrumental in influencing me to push beyond my limits. As I have moved up in my career, I feel it is now my role to ask and challenge those young minds that need the push to learn all they can. Often it is hard to spot those that mentor us in our careers since they come in various forms, such as supportive individuals that can provide you guidance and advice, and then those not easily recognized who may give you a difficult time expecting you to rise to their challenge. As I evolve in my career, I still remain in contact with the individuals that have helped me attain my success. I am able to laugh with them on the challenges they provided and still seek their advice.

COMPANY:

Consolidated Edison Company of New York New York, New York www.coned.com Utility $9.3 billion 13,500

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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Dell Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month
At Dell, we’re committed to bringing together individuals with diverse backgrounds, thinking, leadership and ideas, and arming them with the best tools to ensure their success. We believe this helps drive innovation and makes Dell a more dynamic company. Through career development, mentoring programs, network groups and products like the Dell Latitude D620 with Intel™ Centrino™ Duo Mobile Technology, we offer the resources to help every employee achieve their potential. Our goal is to ensure that Dell is a great place to work, grow and aspire. Success real time. Capture it at Dell.

Dell recommends Windows Vista™ Business

CAREERS AT DELL. CONSIDER THE POSSIBILITIES.

www.dell.com/careers
Dell and the Dell logo are trademarks of Dell Inc. ©2007 Dell Inc. All rights reserved. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside logo, Centrino and the Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. Dell Inc. cannot be held responsible for errors in typography or photography. Dell is an AA/EO employer. Workforce diversity is an essential part of Dell’s commitment to quality and to the future. We encourage you to apply, whatever your race, gender, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or veteran status.

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“Good leaders meet people where they are.”

Lisa Shumpert
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P /L C RN E FN EA N C I R K C A P I TA O EW IN TWO AL

W

hen I think about leadership, I am reminded of an axiom that

TITLE:

Managing Vice President, Human Resources

inspired Nelson Mandela, who once said, “A leader is like a shepherd. He stays behind the flock, letting the most nimble go out ahead, whereupon the others follow, not realizing that all along they are being directed from behind.” For me, first and foremost, a leader has a vision and understands the “what” and “how” of achieving that vision. One true measure of leadership is to assess the way a team functions when the leader isn’t present. Good leaders meet people where they are. They paint a compelling and inspiring picture of the future that makes others want to journey with them. A leader directs the way, creating an environment where one can take a risk and “fail forward.” In explanation, I present the following three principles of success that have inspired me: • Know your end game and believe in yourself. Know what you are trying to accomplish and why it’s important to you.

EDUCATION:

BA in communications, Arizona State University

FIRST JOB: Contingent sales associate in a retail department store READING: Good to Great, by Jim Collins; recently finished Wild Fire, by Nelson DeMille PHILOSOPHY: My formula for success is to have an end game. If you know what you are trying to accomplish and why it’s important, you can get there much more easily. FAMILY: My family is my inspiration: husband, Darryl; a daughter; and a very loving and supportive extended family. INTERESTS:

Spending time with my family, reading, mentoring, and NFL and NBA professional sports Junior Achievement

FAVORITE CHARITY:

• Focus on your development. Build skills that support your getting to your end game. • Fail forward, meaning learn from your mistakes. Don’t be afraid to ask for feedback. Replicate what you do well and learn from what challenges you. Reaching success—however you define it—is a personal journey, but be sure to enlist others along the way to help you reach your end game.

COMPANY:

Capital One Financial McLean, Virginia

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

www.capitalone.com Financial services $12.1 billion

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

32,000

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Different perspectives.
Diverse minds create solutions
At Deloitte & Touche USA LLP and its subsidiaries, diversity isn’t just a philosophy – it’s how things get done. It’s how ideas are presented from the organization’s many people with different backgrounds, experiences and skills. It’s giving clients a 360º perspective on complex business issues they face, from assurance, and tax to financial advisory and consulting. Respect for their business and their culture, and the conviction that teamwork invariably produces the best results helps build strong, enduring relationships with clients – clients who appreciate a multi-disciplined, multidimensional approach to their business issues. To learn more, visit us at www.deloitte.com.

About Deloitte Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, a Swiss Verein, its member firms and their respective subsidiaries and affiliates. As a Swiss Verein (association), neither Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu nor any of its member firms has any liability for each other’s acts or omissions. Each of the member firms is a separate and independent legal entity operating under the names “Deloitte”, “Deloitte & Touche”, “Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu” or other related names. Services are provided by the member firms or their subsidiaries or affiliates and not by the Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Verein. Deloitte & Touche USA LLP is the U.S. member firm of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu. In the United States, services are provided by the subsidiaries of Deloitte & Touche USA LLP (Deloitte & Touche LLP, Deloitte Consulting LLP, Deloitte Financial Advisory Services LLP, Deloitte Tax LLP, and their subsidiaries), and not by Deloitte & Touche USA LLP. Member of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Copyright © 2007 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved.

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“Don’t shy away from the tough stuff.”

Eileen Slevin
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N R K FL I F E, IL LS U/ C R E W C O M PA N Y N E W YO & ISH N P RANCE NETWORK

I

began my career on the business side of New York Life. As time went on, I became interested in the business uses of technology and took a job in the company’s information technology area. Also, I began to observe how other managers led teams, and felt that one day I could do that, too. Over time, I took on more and more responsibility and eventually became chief operating officer of the information technology department. This position gave me an indepth working knowledge of all areas of the company’s technology. It also prepared me for my current role as chief information officer. When I look back and think about how I got to where I am today, a few things come to mind. At the top of the list are sincerity and fairness. I think that the vast majority of people at New York Life want to be treated with those qualities and also behave with those qualities in mind. Bringing integrity to all that you do, a core company value at New York Life, is vital to succeeding. It’s one of the main reasons that people have done business with New York Life over the last 160 years. I’ve embraced that value as a standard of conduct, and I believe that future generations of New York Life employees will do the same.

TITLE:

Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

BA, Herbert H. Lehman College, City University of New York Sales clerk for retail department store

The Rebels of Ireland: The Dublin Saga, by Edward Rutherfurd
PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Integrity, fairness, sincerity

Married Family, animals, photography, gardening Education

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

To put it another way, you cannot separate performance and results from ethics. Trying to isolate them, or acting as if they don’t have a bearing on each other, leads to trouble. To me, this is a universal principle that provides a fundamental platform for personal behavior as well. That said, you also have to demonstrate that you’re capable of delivering, and of doing so consistently. Although it may seem risky, volunteer for the most difficult assignments you can find to prove that you’re capable of taking on challenges and dealing with them successfully. When you do, people will notice, and you’ll often get the opportunity to take on more responsibility. Don’t shy away from the tough stuff. Business is a series of unpredictable challenges. How they’re handled tells you a lot about the

COMPANY:

New York Life Insurance Company New York, New York www.newyorklife.com Insurance $12.3 billion 8,380 in the United States

people involved. Last but not least, stick to your beliefs, and do not confuse this with being stubborn. People who maintain their beliefs while solutions are being developed have credence and authority.

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

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Inspiring leadership.
We love that about you.
By incorporating values like integrity and vision, respect and diversity, leading women are proving every day that great leadership results in great communities. We’re proud to salute those women whose leadership inspires us and continues to make a real difference in the communities where we work and live. Alltel proudly celebrates the achievements of leading women executives.

alltel.com 1-800-alltel-1

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“Manage your career as a marathon, not a sprint.”

Amanda Sourry
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / C R E W N E T L EO R R UNI W VE K

I

am privileged to have this opportunity to share the leadership lessons I have learned on a journey that spans living and working on three continents. Leadership has never been more important as the business world grows exponentially more complex. Outstanding performance requires a compelling vision and a focus on execution. On both of these fronts, clarity of direction and communication are leadership prerequisites. As leaders, we have to be extremely thoughtful about the resources needed for success and be engaged personally in removing barriers. Great ideas come from collaborative and inclusive environments. Listen to diverse points of view. Value all perspectives and be open and approachable so that people will give them to you. Talent management is paramount. Create real opportunities for people at all levels to lead and to grow. I am grateful for all the investment in leadership development that Unilever has provided to me, as well as to all the leaders I have worked with who have been generous in their mentoring and wise in their counsel. I recognize the importance of giving back within the organization through coaching and mentoring that seeks to be both inspiring and honest.

TITLE: Vice President and General Manager, Meal Solutions and New Vitality EDUCATION: MA in Modern and Medieval Languages, University of Cambridge, England FIRST JOB: Working in Italy as a student for a British vacation company, Canvas Holidays READING: Off-Ramps and On-Ramps. Keeping Talented Women on the Road to Success, by Silvia Ann Hewlett and The Definitive Drucker, by Elizabeth Haas Edersheim PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Be in one place at one time.

Husband and two children, ages 13 and 11 Tennis, yoga, great food and travel Dwight Englewood School Financial

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Aid Fund

COMPANY:

Unilever Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey www.unileverusa.com Home & personal care, foods $50 billion 179,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

Invest in your own vitality. I am fortunate to work for a company whose mission is to add vitality to life and to help consumers look good, feel good and get more out of life. Leading teams and running businesses require a huge amount of energy and resilience. As a working mom, it took me a little while to learn that no one takes care of this for you. It has to become a personal priority. Manage your career as a marathon, not a sprint. Choose assignments or people to work for because you can learn from them. Get the balance right for you at each point in time between career and family. I chose some years ago to work part time for seven years when my children were younger. Recently, I became a member of the Global Diversity Council at Unilever and, as such, I hope to be able to further the opportunities for people who want flexible work options as well as vibrant careers. Above all, be passionate about what you do, never compromise on integrity, treat others as they would want to be treated and maintain both a healthy dose of reality and a sense of humor.

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TO LEAD. To lead is to venture down new paths. To turn vision into success.
To invent the future. Congratulations to the Women Worth Watching.
www.northropgrumman.com

© 2007 Nor throp Grumman Corporation

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“We garner our strongest results by encouraging team members to achieve their highest potential.”

Nor Rae Spohn
NUTTER McCLENNEN & FISH, LLP / CREW NETWORK HP

D

uring a recent trip to China, I received an invitation to visit a

TITLE:

Senior Vice President, LaserJet Business

local factory. My hosts explained that they wanted the factory’s several hundred female employees to observe and understand that U.S. women served in the executive ranks similar to their male counterparts. My hosts wanted the female factory workers to see that they, too, could have similar roles within their own organization. To see an organization so fully committed to supporting its employees, regardless of their educational background or present career path, was deeply moving. It emphasized my belief that tomorrow’s corporate leaders first need to be enabled and encouraged. I never intended to become an engineer, but after taking one computer science course I fell in love with it. Twenty-seven years later, I’m still doing what I love. Had it not been for that college course, I might never have discovered my passion. At HP, we believe that education is the single most effective lever for increasing economic prosperity and growing a highly skilled work force. I currently serve on a variety of public committee boards and the Governor’s Science and

EDUCATION: Bachelor’s degree in computer science, Iowa State University; Master’s degree in electrical engineering, Stanford University FIRST JOB: Research and development engineer in HP’s disc drive division READING:

The collection of Agatha Christie’s books

PHILOSOPHY:

Look at data, use your intuition and make a decision. Don’t become paralyzed by data analysis or fear. If the data changes, then simply make a new decision. Husband and two sons Quilting, gardening, canning jams and jellies Women’s and Children’s Alliance

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Technology Advisory Council for the state of Idaho, and I’m very interested in opportunities that expose children to new fields of study. It’s our responsibility, as current and aspiring business leaders, to support educational programs that enable young women to pursue careers in math, science and technology. I also believe that as leaders, we garner our strongest results by encouraging team members to achieve their highest potential. As a female engineer and a working mother, I have always tried to impart the knowledge gained from my personal experiences to my

COMPANY:

HP Palo Alto, California www.hp.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

team, whether it’s championing for flexible, family-friendly policies, actively recruiting women for engineering positions, or sharing successes and mistakes through mentoring programs with female employees. By knocking down walls, building up employees and reaching out with new ideas, technologies and humanity, all of us have the opportunity to influence and unlock the potential that exists within each other.

HP focuses on simplifying technology experiences for all its customers, from individual consumers to the largest businesses. With a portfolio that spans printing, personal computing, software, services and IT infrastructure, HP is among the world’s largest IT companies, with revenue totaling $97.1 billion for the four fiscal quarters ended April 30, 2007. $91.7 billion worldwide Approximately 156,000 worldwide

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“Mentoring and coaching are important to any successful professional.”

Kimberly S. Stevenson
NUTTER McCLENNEN & FISH, LLP / CREW NETWORK EDS

S

uccess has no gender or boundaries and is rarely the same for any two individuals. It is important that anyone engaged in a mentoring relationship understands what success means for him or her and is open and nonjudgmental about differences. Regardless of the end point, success is about performance and a commitment to continuously improve yourself and provide value to your organization. Multifaceted feedback is the key to continuous improvement, personally and professionally. We learn from our own experiences and the experiences of others. I view mentoring as sharing your experiences with others and gathering insight from others. Mentoring and coaching are important to any successful professional. Just as a professional golfer might have a swing coach, an agent and a sports psychologist, professionals in business also need a mentor network to succeed. Your mentor network should include at least four key players, each filling a specific need. First, you should find someone above you in the corporation to expand your perspective about the company and industry. Next, you should have a close peer. Peers help you solve problems, provide direct counsel and ultimately help you get

TITLE:

Vice President of IT Service Management and Engineering

EDUCATION: BS in business, Northeastern University; MBA, Cornell University FIRST JOB: READING:

Accountant at IBM The 6th Target, by James Patterson

Be authentic. Really care about the people around you, both in business and in life.
FAMILY:

PHILOSOPHY/LEGACY:

Marc, husband of nine years, and daughter Kasey

INTERESTS:

Golf, travel, reading and, most importantly, spending time with my family. Susan G. Komen for the Cure

FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

EDS Plano, Texas www.eds.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

EDS is a leading global technology services company delivering business solutions to its clients. EDS founded the information technology outsourcing industry 45 years ago. Today, EDS delivers a broad portfolio of information technology and business process outsourcing services to commercial clients and governments around the world. $21.3 billion 130,000

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

your job done. Third, select an individual outside your company. He or she will provide you with an unbiased perspective, giving you a different viewpoint on how to face an issue or overcome a challenge. And fourth, it is important to include someone in your mentor network who is junior to you. This allows you to stay connected with what’s really going on. Mentoring is bi-directional. While these four individuals serve a purpose for you, you also serve a purpose for them. You may be the superior or the outsider your mentor is relying on. You may not think of yourself as a mentor or a coach, but you have a unique set of experiences. By sharing those experiences, you can learn from others and have a greater impact on your organization. Your mentor network is a dynamic structure and should change over time. It should evolve as you continue to grow professionally. Whatever path you choose, you must be true to yourself and never underestimate the importance of the roles you’ve had along the way. Each position you’ve filled defines who you are within your organization and who you’ll be as a leader.

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Some think exclusive. We think inclusive.

Diversity and Inclusion is an integral part of Credit Suisse's strategy and core to our principles and values. As a global employer, we look to draw talent and ideas from all areas of the world. Diversity and Inclusion encourages innovation, motivates our staff, strengthens client relationships and develops new business opportunities. At Credit Suisse, we have a culture where all employees are treated with dignity and respect and are given opportunities to realize their full potential. We are proud to have been selected as one of the Top Ten in 2007 for our Innovations in Diversity by Profiles in Diversity Journal. www.credit-suisse.com

Thinking New Perspectives.
Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate in its employment decisions on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, veteran or military status, disability or any other protected category. Investment banking services in the United States are provided by Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC, an affiliate of Credit Suisse Group. ©2007 CREDIT SUISSE GROUP and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

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“We must determine a style that is effective for us individually, but also communicates to others a style they desire to work with and follow.”

Sonya V. Stewart
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N K HF IE D ,M A P T I N R E W P O R AT I O N LOC & E SH LL R / C COR NETWORK

T

he career path to the executive suite is an elusive pathway to define. I would suggest it is a combination of competencies, behaviors and demonstrated performance coupled with seeking breadth of progressive opportunities for well-rounded development. What does that mean? Having a combination of competencies means knowing your domain discipline extremely well. Then, expand your capabilities to include associated competencies necessary to be a leader of excellence such as leadership, finance, contracts, products, markets, customers, etc. The soft skills of relationship building, negotiation, persuasion and influencing are also important competencies. Having these capabilities and knowing when and how to use them is essential to forging ahead on the executive career path. Our behaviors shape the perceptions of our subordinates, co-workers and leaders of the type of leader we are becoming. It is important for leaders to make decisions, lead in varying contexts, consistently deliver results and have strategic visioning capability. How we do this defines our style. On the way to the executive suite, we must determine a style that is effective for us individually, but also communicates to others a style they desire to work with and follow. Achieving this requires intentional effort in self assessment, feedback solicitation and managing our impact on others through continuous style development. By the way, we all have developmental edges;

TITLE:

Vice President, Diversity and Equal Opportunity Programs

EDUCATION: BS and MS in electrical engineering from North Carolina A&T State University FIRST JOB: READING:

Lieutenant, USAF The Bible

PHILOSOPHY:

I can achieve all things, if I remember who I am and to whom I belong. I am the product of a living legacy. My Aunt Cloveice believed she could touch many by helping one. My aunt determined her baby sister would be the first of 15 siblings to go to college. Now, two generations are educated. I am a beneficiary of this legacy and will continue it. I will touch at least one…

FAMILY: Nieces and nephews, five godchildren, parents, siblings and my dog, Shana INTERESTS:

Shared conversation with close friends, reading, sewing and volunteering Church

FAVORITE CHARITY:

COMPANY:

Lockheed Martin Corporation Bethesda, Maryland www.lockheedmartin.com Aerospace & defense industry $40 billion 138,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

but a strong dose of integrity, genuineness and accountability softens others’ judgment while providing opportunity for coaching and mentoring. Demonstrated performance and breadth of opportunity are relatively self-evident tools. Yet, keep an open mind. Opportunities and executive career progression don’t always come in traditional ways. Did you wonder why an engineer with a successful track record of profit and loss (P&L) leadership is now the executive for Diversity and Equal Opportunity Programs? Well, it is open-mindedness, opportunity and vision: Diversity has a business imperative requiring operational excellence that contributes to profitability. Translating operational experience into a diversity framework will provide new and different ways to operationally implement diversity within the Lockheed Martin culture. When I’ve made some progress here … look for me back on the frontline of P&L.

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At UnitedHealth Group, unique is everywhere. In our approach to health care. In each segment of our business. In every professional. In the career opportunities we offer. As a global leader in health care, UnitedHealth Group is committed to creating a workforce of unique individuals. Their unique perspectives bring about innovative ideas. It is the unique backgrounds, lifestyles and beliefs our professionals bring to their work that fuels innovation, creates a healthy environment and drives us towards our goal of creating a better health care system. Founded in 1974, UnitedHealth Group has since grown into a Fortune 100 company. Our family of businesses work tirelessly to advance the quality and access to care while making services more affordable and easier to use for everyone. Our work impacts the lives of nearly 55 million people and helps coordinate care for more than 20 million more. As unique as the many businesses that unite to form UnitedHealth Group, are the career opportunities they offer. From accounting to marketing, clinical to claims, the employment experience at UnitedHealth Group is second to none. Regardless of their unique talents, our professionals are united to improve health care for everyone.

Let us hear your unique voice in these careers available nationwide throughout our family of businesses.

• Business Analysts • Customer Care Professionals • Financial Analysts • Information Technology • Inside & Field Sales • Product Associates • Underwriting Analysts
Through innovative leadership in health care, UnitedHealth Group provides ongoing career opportunities for diverse individuals, enriching the employment experience and creating a healthier atmosphere for all. UnitedHealth Group is an equal opportunity employer and employs individuals based on job-related qualifications regardless of race, religion, sex, national origin, age, or other protected characteristics. M/F/D/V.

To view current career opportunities, and to apply online, visit our CAREERS page at www.unitedhealthgroup.com.

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“Inner strength and a sturdy moral compass will offset private turmoil.”

Melanie Stinnett
B U R E A U O F A L C O H O L , T O B A C C ON UIT T E R M Sc& L E N N ES I V& SF IU .H . D E PA / T M E N T O F T U SOIR K , F REAR M C EXPLO N E , S S , LLP R CREW NEJ W T CE

I

began my career at ATF as an attorney in 1983. I had no aspirations for a career in management and administration, much less for an appointment to the position of chief financial officer. But my life demonstrates a pronounced tendency to embrace change and confront and overcome adversity. In college, I triumphed over an eating disorder that caused me to drop from 130 pounds to 84 pounds in eight months. I eventually returned to a healthy weight, gaining self-esteem and a balanced perspective on diet. While the support of friends and family was critical, I realized I had strong survivor and coping skills to draw upon as I accepted new challenges and advanced my career and life goals. I have mentored colleagues with eating disorders or confidence issues, helping them channel their inner strengths to achieve a realistic perspective on their strengths and weaknesses. I was heartened as I helped a colleague persevere and begin to free herself from a debilitating, dangerous eating disorder. During the first 10 years of my career, my father gradually succumbed to Alzheimer’s disease. I watched my mother shoulder an unyielding burden without complaint, with an abiding faith in God and with a calm demeanor. She is an inspiration to me, reinforcing my conviction that inner strength and a sturdy moral compass will offset private turmoil. The toll that Alzheimer’s disease exacted on my family increased my sensitivity to life issues that employees

TITLE:

Assistant Director of Management and CFO

EDUCATION:

JD, Washington College of Law, American University; BA, Virginia Tech

FIRST JOB: Cashier in the toy and tropical fish department of a local variety store. READING:

The House of Mirth, by Edith Wharton

PHILOSOPHY:

There are many qualities that are essential in a good leader. I think one of the most critical is a good and appropriate sense of humor. It takes the edge off tension in a stressful situation, restores a healthier perspective in anxious employees and energizes them so they can move forward.

FAMILY: Mother, three siblings, two in-laws, and a wealth of friends and mentors INTERESTS:

Physical fitness, reading, music and old movies

face on a daily basis. My staff and I continually search for mechanisms to support our work force as they cope with family and personal hardships. In 2006, I left the position of deputy chief counsel to become ATF’s CFO, an atypical career choice for a law school grad. One of my colleagues characterized me as the “Challenger.” I readily accept this characterization. I also would like to say that I accept every challenge without fear or reservation, but that would not be true. When I venture outside my comfort zone, anxiety is an initial traveling companion. My therapy is to jump right in and start tackling the challenge so that anxiety is soon replaced by the excitement and creative potential inherent in the challenge. As a close friend reminds me, it is important to recognize that we do have control of our lives and circumstances even though at times it feels like just the opposite.

COMPANY: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), U.S. Department of Justice HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Washington, D.C.

www.atf.gov Federal law enforcement agency 5,000

EMPLOYEES:

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Great Achievements Deserve Our Respect.
You do us all proud. Well done!

We admire the persistence and accomplishments of Helen Pudlin, a Woman Worth Watching in 2008. Your success speaks well of PNC as well as your community and we’re all thankful to be a part of it. We’d also like to celebrate the other honorees for their achievements. Bravo!

©2007 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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“Our only limits are those we impose on ourselves.”

Teresa Taylor
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I SW,E L L PC OC R E WNNC AT I O N K Q H ST / MMU I ETW RS

M

y first role models and mentors were my mother and grand-

mother, both strong women who taught me that our only limits are those we impose on ourselves. They also taught me the value of hard work and a good education. My grandmother was a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse in rural Wisconsin. My mother raised my brother and me by herself, while working and going to college. Their influence is reflected in how I guide others, always looking at what is possible instead of what is not. Mentors are extremely important to our development, both personally and professionally. I’ve been fortunate to have had many mentors over the years, and they’ve come from a wide variety of places and perspectives. It’s important to realize that mentors don’t have to come from a certain level in an organization. We can gain valuable insight about ourselves and our work through people all around us. At Qwest, our diversity focus, flat organizational structure and nonhierarchical culture create an ideal environment for mentorship. I advise people in my company and elsewhere to

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer EDUCATION: FIRST JOB: READING:

BS, University of Wisconsin—LaCrosse

Advertising sales for a skiing magazine

The Working Poor: Invisible in America, by David K. Shipler
PHILOSOPHY:

Walk in other people’s shoes. Try to understand where they’re coming from and how their experiences have shaped their perspectives. Only then can we truly communicate and move forward together. Husband and two sons Outdoor activities, including hiking, fishing, and water and snow skiing Colorado Children’s Campaign

FAMILY:

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

take charge of their career development. Seek mentors who can offer advice and guidance from various viewpoints. With their support, take on new challenges, and volunteer for roles in different areas of the company to gain experience and perspective. When we take an active role in our own growth and development, we quickly find ourselves in a position to mentor others. In my experience, the best mentoring relationships are born out of a mutual interest or common experience, not a formal program. And they are most rewarding and fruitful when both people make an effort to learn from each other. Giving and receiving mentorship are the best investments we can make in our careers. And our success is the ultimate compliment to those who’ve invested their time in us.

COMPANY:

Qwest Communications Denver, Colorado www.qwest.com Telecommunications $13.9 billion 38,000

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

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Thinking of you... g
and your loved ones fires our passion for keeping people in touch. and your loved ones fires our passion for keeping people in touch. The Qwest family understands your needs and offers you the ser vices The Qwest family understands your needs and offers you the services t h a t c o n n e c t y o u w i t h y o u r f r i e n d s a n d f a m i l y, s o that y o u ’ r e always that connect you with your friends and family, so t h a t you’re a l w a y s with them, no matter what. with them, no matter what.
Call Qwest and say it with passion. Call Qwest and say it with passion.

Let’s Talk Passion. Let ’s Talk Pa ssion.
1 8 0 0 - 9 6 2- 6 6 2 2 800-962-6622 qwest.com q we s t . c o m Visit any Qwest store V i s i t a n y Q we s t s t o r e Business? 800-522-4811 Busines s ? 1 8 0 0 - 52 2- 4 811
Contact Qwest for more details. Copyright 2007 Qwest. All Rights Reserved. Contact Qwest for more details. Copyright © 2007 Qwest. All Rights Reser ved.

Q w e s t was recognized by Qwest w a s r e c o g n i z e d b y LATINA Style Magazine as one of LATINA Style Magazine as one of the 50 best companies for Latinas the 50 best companies for Latinas to work for in the United States. to work for in the United States.

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“Be true to yourself and have confidence in your abilities.”

Gabrielle Toledano
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P E LC R E WON E C W O R S / ECTR NI T ARTK

T

he most important advice I can give to future leaders is to be

TITLE:

true to yourself and have confidence in your abilities. This is true for everyone but has particular importance for women. The trap that often snares women as they rise in the ranks of a male-dominated business landscape is the loss of self-confidence. They begin to question their abilities and increasingly suppress the opinions that reflect their unique perspective as women. It is difficult to achieve lasting and fulfilling success when you’re playing a part that isn’t you. It takes a great deal of self-confidence to trust that your knowledge in a given field makes your opinion an important one. It takes confidence to admit when you’ve made a mistake, to ask a question when you don’t understand and to express your point of view when you think it will further the discussion. A strong sense of confidence and the ability to listen and express your point of view clearly and concisely, but without arrogance, are central to strong leadership. Doing all of this takes practice and a continued commitment. It’s easy to doubt your abilities, especially when trying to balance work and family commitments. One of the best ways to overcome self-doubt is to build a network of other women leaders who face similar issues. Together you can bolster one another when needed and share ways to prioritize life, not just prioritize work.

Executive Vice President, Worldwide Human Resources, Corporate Services, Real Estate and Facilities

EDUCATION: BA in modern thought and literature, Honors Humanities, Stanford University; MA in education, Stanford University FIRST JOB: READING:

Spanish intern teacher in Palo Alto, Calif. Eat, Pray, Love, by Elizabeth Gilbert Family and community first

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

A great husband, Kurt; two great children, Ben Gantert, 6, and Amelie Gantert, 3
INTERESTS:

Hiking, camping, traveling internationally, movies, speaking Spanish or other foreign languages, and playing tennis, bowling or boxing with friends and family on the Wii games console

FAVORITE CHARITY: CASA, Court Appointed Special Advocates, an organization for abused, neglected and abandoned children

Confidence in who you are and in your role will help you acknowledge and support the team. Integrity, honesty, collaboration, directness and instinct are recognized, valued and do make a difference. You don’t need an agenda or to be the most important person in the room, and often this will be a big differentiator between you and your counterparts. You can be solution-oriented, looking for new ways to solve problems without being mired in maintaining the status quo. A different way of thinking and operating generates more ideas, and ideas lead to change and progress. Most importantly, once you are able to present your true self with confidence in the workplace, you serve as a role model for other women trying to strike the same balance, ensuring that future female leaders will be equipped and positioned to tackle the challenges that come their way.

COMPANY:

Electronic Arts Redwood City, California www.ea.com Interactive entertainment, video games $2.9 billion 7,900

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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Raytheon People

Innovation. Driven by Diversity.
At Raytheon, diversity is more than a competitive advantage. It is a competitive imperative. By recognizing the uniqueness of individuals, empowering employees and truly valuing their input, our company consistently performs beyond all expectations. Diversity of talent and thought is the cornerstone for our company. It’s right for people, and it’s right for business.

We’re proud to feature Raytheon employees in our ads. To join them in a rewarding career, visit

www.rayjobs.com
© 2007 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Raytheon is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer and welcomes a wide diversity of applicants. U.S. citizenship and security clearance may be required.

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“The decision to seek mentoring, especially criticism, is a sign of character.”

Suzanne Vautrinot
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I SN I,T L L P S TAT E S A I R TF OO R K U H ED / CREW NE W RCE

“B

ring Me Men.” Those three words, forged into towering steel, greeted me as I marched through the entrance to the Air Force Academy in 1978, a member of the Academy’s third class with women. Weeks later, I discovered the phrase came from a poem by Samuel Walter Foss, “The Coming American.” When I heard it sung by cadets in our hallowed Academy chapel, it served as the first of many mentoring lessons: That meanings often go far beyond the words. Foss’s powerful verse is a call for citizens of impeccable character to serve and defend our great nation. An eloquent poem, it speaks clearly about who and what the Air Force prizes. Integrity, excellence, service and the desire to make a difference are the core values of the Air Force. Diversity categories of gender, creed, heritage or hometown simply aren’t important relative to the ability to contribute. The lesson: It’s vitally important to understand the characteristics your profession holds dear. Those who succeed will inevitably be those who are comfortable, and thus effective, within that value system. In my organization, it’s about warrior wingmen striving to make a difference. Throughout the years, I’ve been fortunate to be around people who placed teamwork ahead of personal gain. Airmen who “have your back” are known as wingmen. This ethos creates a team atmosphere and inspires heroes to fight courageously, side by side, to win.

TITLE: Brigadier General; Commander, Air Force Recruiting Service EDUCATION: BS, U.S. Air Force Academy; MS, University of Southern California; Air Command and Staff College; Joint Forces Command and Staff College; National Security Fellow, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University FIRST JOB: Worked at a cattle ranch in Boulder, Wyo., during high school; worked requirements and development of national satellites as a 2nd lieutenant READING: Sandra Day O’Connor, by Joan Biskupic; Freakonomics, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner PHILOSOPHY: Solving world hunger starts with getting meals on the table every day. Big ideas take small, consistent and generally unrewarded actions. FAMILY: My husband, Bill, our four parents, nine brothers and sisters (including in-laws and outlaws), three nieces, four nephews and a support structure of friends that long ago became family INTERESTS: Traveling, biking, water sports, gardening and, because I love my husband, golf FAVORITE CHARITIES: Scouting, Make-A-Wish Foundation and Cancer Foundation

COMPANY:

United States Air Force Washington, D.C. www.af.mil National defense

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

EMPLOYEES:

683,000 including personnel on active duty, Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard and civilians

Mentoring also plays a strong role in Air Force culture. On my first day as an officer, my boss asked me, “Do you understand the difference between professional and personal criticism?” I was about to receive loads of the first kind. Today I’m no worse for the wear and entirely grateful. It made me a smarter technician, an effective commander and, hopefully, a stronger leader. The decision to seek mentoring, especially criticism, is a sign of character. Leaders, in any organization, will not devote precious time to a member who won’t listen when the news is tough. I continue to serve because I’m proud of our core values. I enjoy the wingman spirit and the contributions we make as a result. When Foss wrote “The Coming American” in 1894, he summoned mankind to be inspired, to match mountains, make celestial claims, guard mighty ramparts and, most importantly, to stand at freedom’s door. He asked for me—an American—to serve proudly and make a difference.

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I AM
Prudence Allen
HR Manager Netlist, Inc. Member since 2004 “I consider my SHRM membership a prerequisite in the HR profession. It helps me stay ahead of the game.”

Leading People. Leading Organizations.

www.shrm.org

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Change is constant and those who adapt and make change work for them, are those who are more likely to succeed.”

Joan H. Walker
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N L S TAT E, IL LS U/ C R E W C O M PA N Y AL & FISH N P RANCE NETWORK

O

ne of the greatest joys of my career has been sharing what I’ve

TITLE:

Senior Vice President of Corporate Relations

learned along the way with others, especially those who are starting out in their professional lives. I’ve had the great fortune to work for organizations of many shapes and sizes. The following are a few rules I live by, which I hope will be helpful to others.

EDUCATION: BA in sociology, Douglass College at Rutgers University; MA in sociology from Rutgers University FIRST JOB: READING:

Social worker

Blink, by Malcolm Gladwell, and New England White, by Stephen L. Carter
PHILOSOPHY:

TAKE RISKS.

We are blessed to live in a society where risk tak-

Seek challenge in everything you do, and reach your goals by working with others and learning as much as you can from them.

ing is not something that is required to live a healthy and decent life. The risks I have taken in my career have provided the biggest returns. Whether it is taking a non-linear approach to career development, finding time to dedicate yourself to a needy civic or philanthropic cause, or simply taking the road less traveled, risks make you stronger and more valuable to your employer and to your family, communities and society.
DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS.

FAMILY: Great husband, two children, two stepchildren, five grandchildren and two dogs. INTERESTS:

Travel, volunteering, art, reading, sailing, my

two dogs.
FAVORITE CHARITIES: Boys & Girls Club of America, The Chicago Children’s Museum, The Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum and the Museum of Science and Industry

I don’t believe career development ever to listen to others before you offer your own opinions, to know when you don’t have the answer, and to put the welfare of your team before yourself.
ENCOURAGE DIVERSITY.

ends. There is always a new discipline, a new technology, a new language, a new way of doing business. Change is constant and those who adapt and make change work for them, are those who are more likely to succeed.
PRACTICE HUMILITY.

Echoing what I wrote earlier, I am blessed

Humility is a trait that benefits by prac-

to have worked with a wide variety of individuals in corporate, nonprofit and government organizations throughout my career, from one end of our country to the other. This exposure to people of different backgrounds and beliefs has been invaluable to my own professional development, and I think it has made me a more competent professional. I encourage you to embrace the diversity that makes our country and our economy great.

tice, and one that I believe is a fundamental trait of good leadership. It is the trait which allows you to see the bigger picture,

Allstate Insurance Company HEADQUARTERS: Northbrook, Illinois WEB SITE: www.allstate.com BUSINESS: Insurance and financial services 2006 REVENUES: $35.8 billion EMPLOYEES: 40,000
COMPANY:

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W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“You have to demonstrate clearly your ability and your desire to move to the next level in the organization.”

Margaret W. Wear
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , U NPT/ D H E A LT H T W O R K LL I E CR W NE GR UP

I

n my experience, there are a few things to keep in mind

TITLE:

Vice President, Pharmacy Actuary

when trying to getting ahead in business and in life. One is knowing that things aren’t going to happen unless you make them happen. Oftentimes, people in the early part of their career think that promotions are just going to happen. Well, there isn’t any promotion fairy that flies in and says, “I pick you.” You have to demonstrate clearly your ability and your desire to move to the next level in the organization. You have to make it clear that you want it and then demonstrate that you can do it and even push a little bit to get there. Generally, it is not just handed out. Another way to get ahead is having the ability to be flexi-

EDUCATION: BS in business administration, Georgia State University FIRST JOB: READING:

Working part-time at actuarial consulting firm

Nineteen Minutes, by Jodi Picoult

PHILOSOPHY: I think in everything you do, but especially when you come to work, there has to be an element of fun. It’s important to stay true to yourself. Be certain that you don’t give up your values. Especially in your career, there’s always a balance between being certain you stay true to your values as you also stay true to the corporate mission. FAMILY:

Three daughters, ages 13, 14 and 20 Travel, theater, music and reading Ronald McDonald House

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

ble. You must keep yourself well-educated and learn new things all the time. You have to have that thirst for knowledge. How you present yourself is also critical. Does your behavior in meetings with company executives demonstrate that you have leadership ability, that you can handle things? One thing people have always said about me is that even when I'm in the middle of a very stressful project, I come across as not being nervous or stressed over it. As a manager of other people, you need that outward calm in order to keep them understanding that the project is not as overwhelming as it seems; you have to be the calming force and the leader. Sometimes people get flustered, and you have to take a step back and talk through the best way to move ahead and get the project completed. I think, for women especially, demonstrating that calm and that leadership ability is a key to moving ahead. Within UnitedHealth Group and Ovations, we have such strong female leadership examples in Lois Quam and Jackie Kosecoff. In addition, we have the Women in Corporate Leadership mentoring program here, so it’s a good place for women to get the kinds of
UnitedHealth Group Minnetonka, Minnesota WEB SITE: www.unitedhealthgroup.com BUSINESS: Making health care work better 2006 REVENUES: $71.7 billion EMPLOYEES: 59,000
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

opportunity and the kinds of support that will really help them on a long term basis.

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Adding Vitality to Life

Embracing differences, creating possibilities, growing together -- that’s what diversity is all about. Unilever understands the importance of diversity and that’s why it is a critical component of our business strategy and an integral part of everything we value and do.

www.unileverusa.com

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Become known as someone who finds solutions, not just identifies problems.”

Charlene Antoinette Wheeless
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L LAY/T C R OW C O M PA N Y RP HE E N NETWORK

T

hroughout my career, I’ve had a multitude of experiences that allowed me to grow personally and professionally. While not all of them were good ones, I learned something from each of them that helped me chart a course for my career. Below is my “Top 10 List of Lessons Learned.” Some thoughts are original, some I picked up along the way, but all have been amplified through my personal experience.
10.

If you don’t like your circumstances; change them. In the end, it’s not what you think about in life that matters; it’s what you do that counts.
QUIT WHINING.

9.

Don’t rely on others to keep track of your accomplishments. Make them known, respectfully.
WHEN YOU DO SOMETHING GOOD, TELL SOMEONE. ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT.

8.

After I was promoted to vice president at a company where I had worked for 10 years, I questioned the chairman, my mentor, on why it had taken so long for me to receive this recognition. His response: “It never came up. Why didn’t you tell someone you wanted to be a vice president?” Seek out a mentor, now. Don’t be afraid to take on new assignments. Step up to new challenges and venture outside of your comfort zone. Become known as someone who finds solutions, not just identifies problems.

TITLE: Vice President, Communications and Site Executive Falls Church, Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems EDUCATION: BA in journalism, New Mexico State University; MA in communications, the American University FIRST JOB: Summer cheerleading instructor for the National Cheerleaders Association READING: The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell; The Measure of a Man: A Spiritual Autobiography, by Sidney Poitier; You're Wearing That? Understanding Mothers and Daughters in Conversation, by Deborah Tannen, PhD PHILOSOPHY: Be positive and be passionate. Everything else will take care of itself. FAMILY: Husband, Greg; two daughters, 13 and 11; and three dogs (Cognac, Kahlua and Chivas) INTERESTS: Reading, rollerblading, creative dance, golf, shoes FAVORITE CHARITIES: Fairfax Futures, for which I am the chairman, and UNOS, the United Network for Organ Sharing, Organ Donation and Transplantation

5.

FIT MATTERS.

7. 6.

EVERYONE NEEDS A CHAMPION. STEP UP.

I’ve seen more executive women leave organizations because they didn’t fit with the leadership team than because they were incompetent. Fit matters, but it doesn’t mean one size fits all. Choose companies and teams that value diversity and diverse thinking.

4.

WORK IS PERSONAL.

By now we’ve all heard: “It’s not personal, it’s business.” To me, if it involves people, it’s personal. Period. Recognize it early and move on.

3.

NOT EVERYONE IS INVESTED IN YOUR SUCCESS.

2.

Raytheon Company Waltham, Massachusetts WEB SITE: www.raytheon.com BUSINESS: Technology, specializing in defense, homeland security and other government markets 2006 REVENUES: $20.3 billion EMPLOYEES: 73,000
COMPANY: HEADQUARTERS:

If you can’t be passionate about what you do, why bother? When it comes to change, ask yourself: “If not you, then who?”
BE PASSIONATE AND MAKE CHANGE HAPPEN. IT’S NOT ALL ABOUT YOU.

1.

Most of us didn’t get to where we are today on our own. While we are proud of our individual and collective accomplishments, they mean little in the long run if we don’t reach out and help those who will come after us.

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® Six days a week, 146 million addresses a day, no one keeps you connected to your readers like the U.S. Postal Service.

©2007 United States Postal Service. Eagle symbol and logotype are registered trademarks of the United States Postal Service.

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Stay positive, ask for what you want, and take risks.”

Valerie Williams
N U T T E R M c C L E N N E N & F I S H , L L P / E R N W N E T WU N G C R E S T & YO O R K

M

y advice for tomorrow’s corporate leaders:

TITLE: Southwest Managing Partner for Assurance and Business Advisory Services EDUCATION:

FIND A MENTOR AND BE A MENTOR. It’s important to not only be interested in your career, but also other people’s careers. Early in my career, someone gave me some good advice. They said, you can’t just work hard—you have to really manage your own career. Until that time, I thought people would just notice how hard I was working, but I needed to learn how to take charge of my career. I’ve always been involved in counseling, mentoring, and recruiting—because I enjoyed it, but also because I felt, as an African American woman, there were a lot of women and minority professionals that needed someone like me to encourage and advise them. There were people who did that for me when I was younger, and I feel I have to do the same for those that come after me. STAY POSITIVE, ASK FOR WHAT YOU WANT, AND TAKE RISKS.

MBA, University of Houston; BS, University of North Texas

FIRST JOB: Medical technologist, Herman Hospital, microbiology lab READING:

John Grisham novels Maintain a positive attitude.

PHILOSOPHY: FAMILY:

Married with one stepson

INTERESTS: Traveling, reading, shopping
FAVORITE CHARITIES:

United Way, my church

As an African American woman, I’ve had to overcome negative perceptions of my abilities and not allow those biases to define me. I’ve had to learn how to maintain a positive attitude despite these reactions and focus on my goals. Once people see you perform well, biases go away. You have to ask for what you want, take risks, take on new opportunities, and work diligently to accomplish your goals.

COMPANY:

Ernst & Young New York, New York www.ey.com Professional services $18.4 billion 114,000 worldwide

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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OPENING OUR POSSIBILITIES
Creating the next generation of consumer packaging for the world’s leading brands is what we’re all about at MeadWestvaco. Shaping how consumers see, interact with and buy products requires a diversity of talent and viewpoints coupled with a dynamic, inclusive work environment. That’s why diversity and inclusion aren’t just words at MeadWestvaco—they’re part of our business strategy. We have operations in more than 30 countries. Customer relationships that extend worldwide. And a growth plan built on delivering innovative solutions. For all these reasons, we prize individual differences and our collective experience as fundamental to the value—and vision—we’re opening. www.meadwestvaco.com

W O M E N W O R T H WAT C H I N G I N 2 0 0 8

“Remove roadblocks and ensure recognition of the team’s success.”

Carol J. Zierhoffer
N U T T E R O P C L EU M M A N IF I S O , L LAT/ O N E W N E T WO G Y NORTHR Mc GR NNEN & NF H RM P I CR TECHNOL ORK

I

am often asked how I mapped out my career, as if there were a secret formula. The fact is, there is not. I have worked with some very successful women who carefully planned each career move. I had a different approach to becoming a chief information officer in a major corporation. I chose Northrop Grumman 20 years ago because I believed in the company mission and its progressive ideas about growing their people. My career growth was based on passion and commitment, performance, a series of tough choices, influential mentoring, some old fashioned luck and being willing to risk. Several philosophies have shaped my career and are concepts that I pass on to my teams:

TITLE:

Sector Vice President and Chief Information Officer

EDUCATION: BS in business administration, University of New Hampshire; MS in computer information systems, Bentley College FIRST JOB:

Financial analyst, Avco Systems Textron

READING: Leading Change, by John P. Kotter; The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini; and for my daughter, Queen Bees and Wannabes, by Rosalind Wiseman PHILOSOPHY: Go above and beyond in everything you do, for your people and your customers. Lead with passion. FAMILY:

Husband Gary, daughter, 14 and son, 12 Family, boating, gardening and gourmet cooking Sudden Infant Death

INTERESTS:

FAVORITE CHARITY:

Syndrome Foundation

MENTORING AND SELF-INSPECTION.

I have had mentors who never told me what to do, but provided sound, compassionate and sometimes hard-to-hear advice. They provided counsel on tough decisions and encouraged me to assess the skills I needed to grow. A key lesson I learned was that as you move up, your strengths at a lower level can become a weakness at the next. You have to let go of some of the tasks and control that made you successful in the past, and step up to new roles— growing and trusting your team to perform.

PERFORMANCE.

Performance is the greatest equalizer on an inherently unfair playing field. A talented and diligent worker will be noticed and rewarded.

TEAMS.

A good leader builds cohesive teams and strong relationships. I strive to build an environment where a team will have a clear vision and mission, a passion for success and a culture of learning from each other. As leaders, we need to remove roadblocks and ensure recognition of the team’s success. A few years ago I attended a seminar conducted by Jim Collins, author of Good to Great. I was influenced by his views on “Level 5 Leadership” and “getting the right people on the bus, and in the right seats.” The two key concepts are the “right people” and the “right seats.” By filling those seats with people who are complimentary, you ensure a blending of strengths. As leaders, our success is based on building and enabling our teams, and never forgetting to reward and say thank you.

COMPANY:

Northrop Grumman Information Technology McLean, Virginia www.northropgrumman.com

HEADQUARTERS: WEB SITE: BUSINESS:

Provider of advanced IT solutions, engineering and business services for government and commercial clients. $4 billion 18,500

2006 REVENUES: EMPLOYEES:

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35 36 184/149 76/167 60/61 78/17 176 80/13 68 105 185 90 38/39 155 136 48 164 62 65 81 99 141 128/129 52/33 162 138/139 40 173 31 146/137 160/163 154/165 97 57/3 112/91 96 172 180 190 106 74/C1 34 151/83 144 69/37 58/131 86/87 66/67 130 50 170 89 77 110 121 63 102/28 93 122/125 108

ACCENTURE www.accenture.com 82/171 AFLAC www.aflac.com 46/55 ALLSTATE www.allstate.com 174/43 ALLTEL www.alltel.com 84 ARVINMERITOR, INC. www.arvinmeritor.com 20 AT&T www.att.com 104 ATF www.atf.gov 158/191 AXA EQUITABLE www.axa-equitable.com 72 BANK OF AMERICA www.bankofamerica.com 133 BANK OF THE WEST www.bankofthewest.com 127/109 BAUSCH & LOMB www.bausch.com 152 BECKER & POLIAKOFF www.becker-poliakoff.com 132/C3 BERNARD HODES www.hodes.com 85/5 BOEING www.boeing.com 51/119 BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON www.boozallen.com 41/111 CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY www.campbellsoup.com 166/7 CAPITAL ONE www.capitalone.com 192/169 CARDINAL HEALTH www.cardinal.com 193 CAREERBUILDER.COM www.careerbuilder.com 103/73 CATALYST www.catalystwomen.org 49 CHEVRON www.chevron.com 107/47 CIGNA www.cigna.com 64 CISCO SYSTEMS www.cisco.com 148/177 COMCAST www.comcast.com 32/59 CONSOLIDATED EDISON NY www.coned.com 94 CONSTELLATION ENERGY www.constellation.com 178/179 COX COMMUNICATIONS www.cox.com 188/181 CREDIT SUISSE www.credit-suisse.com 117/116 CREW NETWORKS www.crewnetwork.org 30 CVS CAREMARK www.cvs.com 142/143 DELL INC. www.dell.com 45/95 DELOITTE www.deloitte.com/us 56 DICKSTEIN SHAPIRO LLP www.dicksteinshapiro.com 42/159 DUPONT www.dupont.com 115/9 EASTMAN KODAK www.kodak.com 183 ECOLAB www.ecolab.com 156/113 EDS www.eds.com 54 ELECTRONIC ARTS www.ea.com 44 ERNST & YOUNG www.ey.com 118/11 FBI www.fbi.gov 120 FORD MOTOR COMPANY www.ford.com 150 GENERAL ELECTRIC www.ge.com 92 GENERAL MOTORS www.gm.com 70 HALLIBURTON www.halliburton.com 53 HALLMARK www.hallmark.com 98 HARRIS BANKCORP, INC. 182 (PART OF BMO FINANCIAL GROUP) www.bmo.com 101 HEALTHNOW NEW YORK INC. www.healthnowny.com 145 HIGHMARK www.highmark.com 114/189 HILTON HOTELS CORP. www.hiltonworldwide.com 168/187 HONEYWELL www.honeywell.com 186/175 HP www.hp.com 100 HUNT ALTERNATIVES FUND www.ksg.harvard.edu 134/135 INTERCONTINENTAL HOTELS GROUP www.ichotelsgroup.com 88/157 ITT www.itt.com 75 IVY PLANNING www.ivygroupllc.com 153/161 JPMORGAN CHASE www.jpmorganchase.com 140 KAISER PERMANENTE www.kaiserpermanente.org 147 KELLY SERVICES www.kellyservices.com 71/C4 KEYBANK www.key.com 123/126/79 KINDRED HEALTHCARE www.kindredhealthcare.com 124

KPMG www.kpmg.com LIBERTY GLOBAL www.lgi.com LOCKHEED MARTIN www.lockheedmartin.com LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY www.lanl.gov MASS BAY TRANSPORTATION www.mbta.com MCGUIREWOODS www.mcguirewoods.com MEADWESTVACO www.meadwestvaco.com METLIFE www.metlife.com MFHA www.mfha.net MGM MIRAGE www.mgmmirage.com MONSANTO www.monsanto.com MOTOROLA www.motorola.com MTA METRO-NORTH RAILROAD www.mta.nyc.ny.us/mnr NATIONAL CITY CORP. www.nationalcity.com NATIONWIDE www.nationwide.com NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE www.newyorklife.com NORTHROP GRUMMAN IT www.northropgrumman.com OWENS & MINOR www.owens-minor.com PARKER HANNIFIN www.parker.com PEPSICO www.pepsico.com PFIZER INC www.pfizer.com PITNEY BOWES www.pb.com PNC FIN. SVS. GROUP INC. www.pnc.com PRATT & WHITNEY www.pw.utc.com QUALCOMM www.qualcomm.com QWEST COMMUNICATIONS www.qwest.com RAYTHEON www.raytheon.com RELIANT ENERGY www.reliant.com ROHM AND HAAS www.rohmhaas.com SAFEWAY www.safeway.com SAKS FIFTH AVENUE www.saksincorporated.com SALLIE MAE www.salliemae.com SALT RIVER PROJECT www.srpnet.com SHELL OIL www.shell.com SHRM www.shrm.org SODEXHO www.sodexhoUSA.com STAPLES www.staples.com STARBUCKS www.starbucks.com STATE FARM www.statefarm.com SUSAN G. KOMEN FOR THE CURE www.komen.org SYMANTEC www.symantec.com SYNOVUS www.synovus.com TALENTQUEST www.talentquest.com TEXAS INSTRUMENTS www.ti.com TRAVELPORT www.travelport.com U.S. AIR FORCE www.af.mil U.S. ARMY www.army.mil U.S. NAVY www.navy.mil U.S. POSTAL SERVICE www.usps.com UNILEVER www.unilever.com UNITEDHEALTH GROUP www.unitedhealthgroup.com UNUM www.unum.com VANGUARD www.vanguard.com VERIZON www.verizon.com VISTEON www.visteon.com VOLKSWAGEN www.vw.com WACHOVIA www.wachovia.com WAL-MART www.walmartstores.com WALT DISNEY PARKS & RESORTS www.disneyparks.com WELLPOINT www.wellpoint.com WESTERN & SOUTHERN FIN. GRP. www.westernsouthern.com

BOLD denotes Advertiser
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Real-Life MicroTriggers

M

icroTriggers are those subtle—and not so subtle—behaviors, phrases and inequities that trigger an instantaneous negative response. This issue, we offer more examples submitted by real people whose identities and places of business are being protected for obvious reasons.

Wedding in Paris

I grew up in a close knit Jewish community where we rigorously observed our traditions and customs. Most of my friends still live in that community. I was one of the few who moved away. When one of my childhood friends fell in love with a French woman and moved to Europe, we were happy for him. A group of us decided to travel to Paris for the wedding. The wedding was beautiful. However, when we arrived at the wedding reception, we couldn’t believe that no kosher meals were provided. Worse than that, the entrée was pork! We couldn’t believe that our friend had not only strayed so far from his upbringing, but also had not provided for our culinary needs after we had traveled more than 3,000 miles for his wedding. Maybe we were triggered even more because he was one of our own.” —Investment Banker, New York City

“As I gave my presentation, I watched my peers typing away on their BlackBerry devices and even answering phone calls on their cell phones. I was insulted.”
their cell phones. I was insulted. I had sat through other presentations, was conscious and aware of what was going on, and I expected that same courtesy. If your phone call is that important, why not leave the room? And 90 percent of the emails aren’t business related anyway.” —Anonymous question looking at my husband. I was furious! She did not realize that I was the one doing the banking at home. So I said, ‘Excuse me. We are closing the account.’ She went to get her supervisor, and I explained what the rep had done, and why I was closing the account. Even though I closed the account I was still angry. I really think that it happened because both my husband and I are Asian, and she assumed that the man was in charge.” —Marilyn C, San Diego, CA

The Banker

BlackBerries and Bluetooth

We had a big meeting coming up, and each presenter was required to practice and receive feedback from our team. As I gave my presentation, I watched my peers typing away on their BlackBerry devices and even answering phone calls on

I was having some troubles with my bank checking account. An automatic withdrawal that I had set up was taking out more than it was supposed to. So one day when my husband and I were running errands, we went into the branch to complain. I started to explain the problem, and noticed that the whole time I was talking, the customer service representative was looking at my husband. If I asked a question, she would look AT ME, and then she would provide the answer to the

Janet Crenshaw Smith is president of Ivy Planning Group LLC, a consulting and training firm that specializes in diversity, strategy and leadership. Her book is titled MicroTriggers: 58 Little Things That Have a Big Impact.

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P RO F I L E S I N D I V E R S I T Y J O U R N A L

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2007

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