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Characterisation of Ericsson UTRAN P7.

1 PDF counters

This section provides system characterisation data with respect to enabling the
Probability Density Function (PDF) counters as part of the Ericsson UTRAN P7.1
Tech Pack. The figures presented below show the difference in activating 7.1 PDF
counters on the 7.1 Tech Pack for a specific environment that is in turn detailed in the
next section. Due to the large number of counters that are PDF counters and which are
being introduced as part of this release, the information provided below should be
used when deciding what the projected system impact would be by enabling PDF
counters on the Ericsson UTRAN Tech Pack. By default, all PDF counters are
deactivated in the gateway configuration. Please consult the Tech Pack gateway
documentation for guidance of how to activate and deactivate the PDF counters.

Setup
Sample Data used during Characterisation
The Ericsson UTRAN P7.1 characterisation results presented below are based on a
UTRAN that consists of 20 RNCs and 4000 NodeBs, all feeding performance
management (PM) data related to 12000 cell instances to a single 9.2 TNPMW
instance. System characterisation measurements were also performed on PM data
being feed to a baseline Tech Pack in parallel to feeding PM data the Ericsson
UTRAN 7.1 Tech Pack. These measurements were used to show the impact of
processing PDF counters has on other Tech Packs that are also installed on the same
TNPMW instance. The Siemens UTRAN UMR 6.5 was used as the baseline Tech
Pack.

Hardware Environment
The hardware configuration that was used to characterise the impact of PDFs is
depicted in Table 1:

Function Hardware Type Instances


Loader Server Type: IBM 2 instances. 1 loader
BladeCenter HS21 xm instance was used to load
OS: Red Hat Enterprise the non PDF and and a
Linux Server release 5.1 second loader instance
(Tikanga) was used to load PDF
Kernel: 2.6.18-53.el5 counters related to the
CPU: Two * Quad core Ericsson UTRAN 7.1 Tech
Intel Xeon CPU E5345 @ Pack. Each loader
2.33GHz, (Ref [12]). instance was configured
Cache: 4MB per with 2 read threads and 4
Processor write threads with 3GB of
Memory: 16GB memory.
Disks: 2 * IBM 73.4GB
10K SFF SAS HDD.

Loader Server Type: IBM 1 loader instance was


BladeCenter HS21 xm used to load the counters
OS: Red Hat Enterprise related to Siemens
Linux Server release 5.1 UTRAN UMR6.5 Tech
(Tikanga) Pack. This loader instance
Kernel: 2.6.18-53.el5 was configured with 2
CPU: Two * Quad core read threads and 4 write
Intel Xeon CPU E5345 @ threads with 3GB of
2.33GHz, (Ref [12]). memory.
Cache: 4MB per
Processor
Memory: 16GB
Disks: 2 * IBM 73.4GB
10K SFF SAS HDD.

Gateway Server Type: IBM 1 gateway instance was


BladeCenter HS21 xm used for the entire
OS: Red Hat Enterprise
Ericsson related PM
Linux Server release 5.1
(Tikanga) data, i.e. parsing both
Kernel: 2.6.18-53.el5 PDF and non PDF
CPU: Two * Quad core counters related to a
Intel Xeon CPU E5345 @ UTRAN that consisted
2.33GHz, (Ref [12]). of 20 RNCs, with 12000
Cache: 4MB per
Processor
cells, and 4000 NodeBs.
Memory: 16GB
Disks: 2 * IBM 73.4GB A Loader Input File
10K SFF SAS HDD. (LIF) generator was
used to feed the
Siemens Tech Pack
loader with LIF files as
separate gateways are
used for each Tech
Pack.
Database Server 1
Table 1Hardware configuration used

Ericsson UTRAN P7.1 Gateway Parse Time Results


Table 3 presents the various parse times experienced when PDF counters for different
object types were activated.

Scenario % Parse Time increase


PDF counters related to RNC and NodeB 0.78%
object types enabled
PDF counters related to Cell, Carrier and 36.73%
CDMA Channel object types enabled
PDF counters related to Carrier and 25.46%
CDMA Channel object types enabled
All PDF counters enabled 54.51%
Table 2 % Gateway parse time increase for PDFs enabled
As can be seen from Table 3, the impact on parse times in the gateway of activating
all PDF counters is approximately a 55% increase. By extrapolating based on the
figures in Table 3, it is projected that all PDF counters activated on a Cell level will
result in approximately an 11% increase in parse times. Finally, care should be
exercised when activating all PDF types on a Carrier and CDMA channel level as the
parse time increase is expected to be in the region of 25%. Due to the large increase in
counters related to the introduction of PDF counters, it is recommended that a
hardware resizing be undertaken for the gateways if PDF counters are enabled.

Ericsson UTRAN P7.1 Load Time Results


Table 2 shows the % increase in overall load time when certain categories of PDF
counters belonging to different object types are activated. The mapping of PDF
counters to object types can be determined from the PRS.

Object Type PDF’s enabled %loadTime increase


(approx)
NodeB 4.92%
Radio Link 27.10%
RNC 0.23%
RNC Capacity 0.01%
Uplink Baseband Pool 0.69%
Neighbour_RNC 0.01%
Iub 0.14%
Downlink Baseband Pool 0.39%
Cell 14.77%
BS Carrier 5%
CDMA Channel 38%
VCL TP 0.21%
Table 3 % Load time increase for PDF enabled
As can be see from the Table 2, care should be exercised when activating PDF
counters related to the Radio Link, Cell and CDMA Channel objects as these object
types, together with all their PDF counters impact the overall loading time the most.

Ericsson UTRAN P7.1 Database Resource Results


Figure 1 and 2 illustrates the CPU utilisation and IO writes for the database server
measured when processing Ericsson UTRAN counters. The first half of both Graphs
depicts when the PDF counters were enabled and the second portion depicts when the
PDF counters were disabled. No noticeable difference was seen on the Database
server with respect to CPU utilisation when the PDF counters were enabled.

CPU Utilisation monitor=vm

120
CPU Precentage Utilisation

100

User
80
System
60 Idle
Wait
40
Stolen

20

0
16:00:00
16:15:40
16:31:20
16:47:00
17:02:40
17:18:20
17:34:00
17:49:40
18:05:20
18:21:00
18:36:40
18:52:20
19:08:00
19:23:40
19:39:20
19:55:00
20:10:50
20:26:30
20:42:10
20:57:50
21:13:30
21:29:10
21:44:50
22:00:30
22:16:10
22:31:50
22:47:30
23:03:10
23:18:50
23:34:30
23:50:10

Tim e (10 second sampling)

Figure 1 Database server CPU utilisation


It can be seen from Figure 2 that the first part of the graph exhibits more activity that
the second part. This is to be expected due to the extra volume of counters included
with PDF counters. However, the database server was seen to be able to handle the
extra volume of counters without degrading its service.

IOSTAT w_ps T010909

800

700

600
oradata01
IOSTAT w_ps

500 oradata02
400 oradata03

300 oradata04
Total_w _ps
200

100

0
16:00:00
16:16:30
16:32:50
16:49:10
17:05:30
17:21:50
17:38:10
17:54:30
18:10:50
18:27:10
18:43:30
18:59:50
19:16:10
19:32:30
19:48:50
20:05:10
20:21:30
20:37:50
20:54:10
21:10:30
21:26:50
21:43:10
21:59:30
22:15:50
22:32:10

22:48:30
23:04:50
23:21:10
23:37:30
23:53:50
Tim e (10 second sam pling)

Figure 2 Database server IO write statistics.

Ericsson UTRAN P7.1 Loader Server Resource Results


Figure 4 illustrates the CPU utilisation for the loader server when it is PDF counters
are both enabled and disabled. The first half of the graph is when the PDF counters
are enabled and the second half is when the PDF counters are disabled.

CPU Utilisation monitor=vm

120
CPU Precentage Utilisation

100

User
80
System
60 Idle
Wait
40
Stolen

20

0
16:00:00
16:15:40
16:31:20
16:47:00
17:02:40
17:18:20
17:34:00
17:49:40
18:05:20
18:21:00
18:36:40
18:52:20
19:08:00
19:23:40
19:39:20
19:55:00
20:10:50
20:26:30
20:42:10
20:57:50
21:13:30
21:29:10
21:44:50
22:00:30
22:16:10
22:31:50
22:47:30
23:03:10
23:18:50
23:34:30
23:50:10

Tim e (10 second sampling)

Figure 3 Loader Server CPU Utilisation

The CPU utilisation for the loader server measured approximately 5% when the PDF
counters were disabled as opposed to approximately 11% when the PDF counters
were enabled. Even though there is approximately 100% increase on the loader server
CPU utilisation, the loader sever overall resource utilisation is still very low. Figure 4
and Figure 5 illustrates the impact of enabling PDF counters on the loader server IO
statistics. Similarly to the other graphs already presented, the first half of both these
graphs exhibit the IO behaviour when the PDF counters are enabled and the second
half shows the behaviour when the PDF counters are disabled.
IOSTAT w_ps IOSTAT r_ps

0
100
200
300
400
500
600
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400

16:00:00
16:00:00
16:16:10
16:16:20
16:32:10
16:32:30
16:48:10
16:48:40
17:04:10
17:04:50
17:20:10
17:21:00
17:36:10
17:37:10
17:52:10
17:53:20
18:08:10
18:09:30
18:24:10
18:25:40
18:40:10
18:41:50
18:56:10
18:58:00
19:12:10
19:14:10
19:28:10
19:30:20
19:44:10
19:46:30
20:00:10
20:02:40
20:16:10
20:18:50
20:32:10
20:35:00
20:48:10
IOSTAT r_ps T010909

Time (10 second sam pling)


IOSTAT w _ps T010909

20:51:10
Tim e (10 second sampling)

21:04:10
21:07:20
Figure 4 Loader Server IO Read statistics

21:20:10
21:23:30
21:36:10
21:39:40
21:52:10
21:55:50

Figure 5 Loader Server IO Write statistics


22:08:10
22:12:00
22:24:10
22:28:10
22:40:10
22:44:20
22:56:10
23:00:30
23:12:10
23:16:40
23:28:10
23:32:50
23:44:10
23:49:00

bottlenecks were observed on the loader server during the characterisation.


counters were enabled due to the size increase in the LIF files. However, no IO
As expected, “IO Write” statistics exhibited a noticeable increase when the PDF
root_boot
root_boot