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Kansas Wing Supply Gets a New Look!
The Supply Team consisting of members Capt Lauri Emery, Capt David Franz, Maj Terry Boyle and Lt Beth Colby put their skills together for good use by revamping the Supply Area at Wing. Large donations were received from Texas Wing, McConnell ROTC and Kansas State—Salina Campus flooding the Wing with a surplus of uniforms. The team pulled outdated or damaged uniforms and cleared an additional 32 ft. area for organizing the uniforms into size and type for the Wing. Supply is also more comfortable now as our friendly neighborhood National Guard has replaced the heating/air units in the warehouse! Previously, each item in Supply had to be logged onto a handwritten sheet and was actually issued to the Unit instead of the individual. Now with the new ORMS system, each item in supply can be issued right at the Supply area. The information is entered into the inventory control ORMS provides making individuals responsible for items they have been issued, no matter which Unit they belong to in CAP. A special thanks to Supply Helpers Maj Carolyn Franz and Lt Dan Franz for their hard work completing the project.

by Donna Tope Wing Administrator

Supply Officer Responsible for all matters pertaining to supply. They shall: Ensure proper accountability for CAP property. Be responsible for receipt, issue, storage and proper disposal of all CAP property. Be responsible for effecting distribution and recovery of property in coordination with the transportation officer. Recommend to the commander the allocation or reallocation of property within the unit. The supply officer should be familiar with CAPP 206 and CAP directives in the 67 and 87 series.

KANSAS WING CIVIL AIR PATROL

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Kansas Cadets Right On Target
By 2 Lt. Nicole Strait, PAO Cunningham Composite Squadron

With the smell of gunpowder in the air & huge grins on the cadets faces, they could only be one place – the rifle range. At Commanders Call on September 18th the cadets who were present were able to spend the afternoon at the St. John’s Military Academy’s rifle range. After a full run through on safety protocol, the cadets filed one by one into the enclosed indoor range. Before long, the pop pop pop of .22s could be heard as the cadets began sending their practice rounds down range. Under the watchful eye of experienced senior members, the cadets slowly but surely began to fine tune their techniques until every single one of them was hitting the target. Each time the cadets were allowed to check their targets, there was a great deal of excitement as they ran around comparing targets with their friends. “Wow, I didn’t know I could actually hit anything!” said one cadet as she looked at her target. Overall, the majority of the cadets seemed to shoot much better than they expected, and all of them enjoyed it. Even now, some of the cadets are still talking about how much they enjoyed shooting. This is just another fantastic opportunity that our cadets are given to help them gain skills and knowledge that they might not otherwise learn anywhere else. Special thanks to everyone who made this activity possible!

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Wreaths Across America
Since 2007, CAP has teamed up with Wreaths Across America to place Christmas wreaths on veterans graves at nearly 500 locations across the country and overseas. This also helps out our squadrons by providing funds for their operations. For every wreath donated, $5.00 is returned to the squadron that sold the sponsorship. All squadrons are pre-enrolled this year, so please call Wreaths Across America at 877-385-9504 to get started, or, if your squadron would rather not participate, please visit the CAP Wreaths Across America website to donate a wreath for a veteran’s grave at http://www.wreathsacrossamerica.org/cap-members-landing-page.html. CAP Website: http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/ cap_national_hq/ fundraising/2010_wreaths_across_america.cfm

Encampment 2010 
Transforming Average Cadets   into Superb Leaders 
in Salina Kansas. Cadets can expect to learn important life skills such as how to work in a group, how to make their bed, how to keep organized and even how to manage time What is the military definition of effectively. On top of learning about leadership? The military definition of emergency services and aerospace, cadets will leadership is as follows: The art of be exposed to numerous hands on activities to influencing and directing people in such a stimulate their minds to aid in the learning way that it will win their obedience, confidence, respect and loyal cooperation in process. Cadets will walk into encampment as cadets and emerge a week later as leaders. This achieving a common objective. This is just one of the many things that is a great opportunity to grow. We are now cadets will learn at the Kansas Wing Training accepting basic applications. Come and experience the event of a lifetime. Group Encampment this winter. Questions can be directed to the Encampment Commander, Maj Mark Encampment will be held from Dec 26 Lahan at marklahan@yahoo.com or the Cadet Programs Management through Jan 2 at Kansas Wing Headquarters Officer, C/Col Mitch Edwards at mitchwedwards@gmail.com

NCR Announces Awards at Conference
Safety Officer—1st Lt John Moore, Kansas Wing DDR Officer—SM April Smith, Kansas Wing Aerospace Education Officer—Captain Catherine Mages, Kansas Wing Character Development Officer—1st Lt Michelle A. Oakes, Missouri Wing Legislative Officer—Captain Michael Smith, Missouri Wing Communications Officer—Captain Tom Schaeffer, Nebraska Wing Director of Finance—Lt Col Dan Ranson, Missouri Wing John V. “Jack” Sorenson Cadet Program Officer—Captain Glenn Fortmayer, Kansas Wing Public Affairs Officer—1st Lt Gerald Lance, Missouri Wing Senior Member—Major Jason Johnsen, Nebraska Wing Squadron Chaplain—Chaplain (Lt Col) Homer Ontman, Kansas Wing Senior Chaplain—Chaplain (Lt Col) Gene Abrahms, Missouri Wing Cadet—C/Capt Tyler Hetland, North Dakota Brewer CAP SM—Captain Glenn Fortmayer, Kansas Wing Brewer CAP Cadet—C/2nd Lt Aaron Hooper, Missouri Wing Brewer AE Organization—Iowa Aviation Promotion Group, Iowa Wing Brewer AE Lifetime—Tim Busch, IAPG, Iowa Wing Col Ed Lewis Incident Command Staff—Col Joe Casler, North Central Region

SGT PHILIP SVITAK AMERICAN PATRIOT AWARD
LT COLONEL PHILLIP H. AYE, JR KANSAS WING
Phillip Aye was never one who was content to sit in an office when there was an opportunity to go out in the field or train cadets and senior members. Blue Beret was his summer vacation. And when his wife Regena pinned on her eagles and became the Kansas Wing commander, he was the proudest husband on earth. Lt Colonel Aye was a qualified competent ground team leader who was there to spend countless hours training anyone to a standard above and beyond the minimum requirement. Dedicated to helping others, Phillip touched the lives of more than fifty teenage boys through his service as a foster parent and countless others nationwide as a CAP officer. A patriot to the core, the mission always came first and he always found the time and energy for an elt mission, blood run, to help a cadet attend and activity or to teach marksmanship. Lt Colonel Aye served at more than 10 encampments including the 2005 Nebraska Wing encampment where he was named the most Outstanding Tactical officer. He served at Blue Beret 7 times and Hawk Mountain once. He earned CAP’s highest professional development award, the Gill Robb Wilson Award. While serving at Blue Beret in 2009, Phillip was hospitalized for a short time with respiratory problems. After being released from the hospital he went right back to work doing his Blue Beret duties. Because some attendees stayed one day past the end of Blue Beret, Lt Colonel Aye volunteered to stay that extra day and close up operations. On his way home his respiratory problems became more severe and he was hospitalized in St Louis. Lt Colonel Aye passed away there on October 8, 2009. Philip Svitak and Phillip Aye both shared a strong devotion to duty. Neither man would quit until the job was done. Men like this are what legends are made of. Lt Colonel Aye will never be forgotten in Kansas Wing or the North Central Region. His dedication, his integrity and his name will live on forever because Phillip Aye is a real American hero.

Great Plains Joint Training Center Honors CAP with Plaque
OPERATION SMOKY HILL 2010
Gen Norman Steen and Col J Jordan presented Kansas Wing with a gorgeous wooden plaque of the state of Kansas for our participation during this summer’s exercise at Crisis City dubbed “Operation Smoky Hill”. Great Job Kansas Wing!

Hands-on Training

Reprinted with permission by The Emporia Gazette (Aug. 21, 2010) By Monica Springer/ Each year, hundreds of people who volunteer for the Civil Air Patrol help with flightspringer@emporiagazette.com

line operations and emergency services at a large fly-in airplane show in Oshkosh, Wis. This year, four people from the Emporia area helped in the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Fly-In Convention, now known as EAA AirVenture Oshkosh. CAP Capt. Derek Montgomery, Majs. Marah Carney and Samantha Montgomery and 1st Lt. Kenyon Fryman attended AirVenture from July 17 to Aug. 2. “It’s a humbling experience to get to see the things we see,” said Derek Montgomery. Last week, the group met for a squadron meeting, where the four who traveled to Wisconsin explained the trip to younger cadets. Thousands of people volunteer for the air show, and the event attracts about 10,000 airplanes. More than 500,000 people see the show annually. The two runways are 2.5 miles and 1.5 miles long, and can land three aircraft at a time. The CAP members spend time during the day working to make sure the airplanes are taxied onto the right runway and parked in the appropriate spot during the show. If they complete their tasks successfully, members of the CAP are given a beret and a cross. “If you like airplanes, it’s the coolest place you’ll ever go,” said 2nd Lt. Mark Carney, Marah’s father. Montgomery said during the air show, the group of four Emporians were able to focus on the skills they use locally. For example, Montgomery said, part of the group’s emergency services training is to locate an emergency locating transmitter, or a missing airplane. In Oshkosh, they might have to find one airplane among a fleet of 10,000. “There’s no other place we can do that,” Montgomery said. As members of the CAP, the group gets a behind-the-scenes look at what goes on during the air show. Many of the thousands of members who attended got to talk to pilots who flew vintage airplanes and toured aircraft that are not accessible to the general public. The CAP is an auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force with more than 61,000 members nationwide. It’s operated entirely by volunteers, and provides emergency services, such as inland search and rescue, aerospace education and cadet programs. Locally, the CAP is on call every day of the year, and can be called to assist with disaster recovery associated with tornadoes and floods. They also do search and rescue looking for aircraft and provide youths with leadership skills during squadron meetings. On a local level, the CAP is recruiting youth and adults to join. A person must be 12 years old to become a cadet. Other membership requirements are that a person be a United States citizen, not married and not a member of the active-duty armed forces. To become an adult member, a person must be at least 18 years old and must pass a background check. Montgomery said there is something for everyone in the CAP, including those who want to be paramedics, nurses, teachers and other professions. Montgomery is a paramedic in Coffey County, and Carney is a freshman at Emporia State University.

Orientation

Anton Zouplna and Desmond Sandoval climbed out of a small airplane at the Emporia Municipal Airport on Saturday and smiled. Although a bit wobbly, they felt fine and wanted to take another flight. Zouplna, 12, and Sandoval, 13, both from Emporia, are two of nine cadets with the Civil Air Patrol who participated in orientation flights over the weekend at the airport. While two cadets flew with Aaron Diller, CAP pilot, the rest completed classes and training, including practicing on how to find an emergency locator. Cadets from Emporia and Junction City participated in the orientation flights. The CAP hosts the orientation flights to get the cadets, many of whom have recently joined the CAP, into the air and used to flying. Members of the CAP said they want to get kids involved and around airplanes to encourage them to stay in school. The kids in CAP could be the next generation of engineers who work on the planes. Zouplna and Sandoval said they were excited yet nervous before stepping onto a Cessna 182 airplane Saturday afternoon at the Emporia Municipal Airport.

Reprinted with permission by The Emporia Gazette (Sept. 13, 2010) By Monica Springer/ springer@emporiagazette.com

“I’m excited,” Zouplna said before his first orientation flight. Sandoval, a cadet airman with the CAP, said he had never been on an airplane before. Zouplna, a cadet basic, said he had. The CAP is an auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force with more than 61,000 members nationwide. It’s operated entirely by volunteers, and provides emergency services, such as inland search and rescue, aerospace education and cadet programs. Locally, the CAP is on call every day of the year, and can be called to assist with disaster recovery associated with tornadoes and floods. They also do search and rescue looking for aircraft and provide youths with leadership skills during squadron meetings. Before the orientation flights, Diller took each cadet around the airplane and explained parts of the airplane and safety protocols. For example, Diller explained to look on the ground around the airplane for any puddles. That could indicate a leak, Diller said. Diller also explained to look for dents on the airplane and check the tire pressure on the landing gear. He explained to the cadets that the take off and landing would be bumpy, but the mild temperatures and light wind should make for a smooth ride. “It’s a beautiful day to fly,” Diller said. After the initial inspection of the plane, Zouplna and Sandoval climbed into the airplane with Diller then took off down the runway. The flights last about an hour. They flew in a circle around Emporia and the airport. Capt. Derek Montgomery said the orientation flights are often a cadet’s first time flying or the first time flying in a small airplane. Each cadet is given five front seat flights and five back seat flights, Montgomery said. After the flight, Zouplna and Sandoval said they liked it. “Everything looked really little, like toys,” Sandoval said. The pilot also lets cadets make basic maneuvers with the airplane, such as turning, ascending and descending. Diller said he flew the cadets about 2,000 feet above the ground. On a local level, the CAP is recruiting youth and adults to join. A person must be 12 years old to become a cadet. Other membership requirements are that a person be a United States citizen, not married and not a member of the active-duty armed forces. To become an adult member, a person must be at least 18 years old and must pass a background check. Montgomery said there is something for everyone in the CAP, including those who want to be paramedics, nurses, teachers and other professions.
Photo by Matthew Fowler Anton Zouplna and Desmond Sandoval exit the plane after taking a flight during training for the Civil Air Patrol.

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Kansas Wing Welcomes
Major " Smooth Landin' " Lou Volpato
Lou is a single dad to Mark and resident of aviation's historic Long Island, New York. He has been a New York City high school teacher and varsity coach (boys bowling, boys & girls volleyball and girls gymnastics) since 1985. Lou is also the school's Aviation Club advisor. Prior to working for the Division of Education he was owner/operator of the Lou Volpato School of Gymnastics in Jericho, New York and also Women's Varsity Gymnastics Coach at Hofstra University. Lou joined Civil Air Patrol in 1999 to pursue a lifelong dream of flying. He qualified as mission scanner, observer, then Form 5 pilot. After prompting from a respected CAP colleague, he also qualified as Ground Team Member then Ground Team Leader. He has served as Squadron and Group Aerospace Education Officer. Lou attended National Blue Beret in Oshkosh, Wisconsin in 2002 and first served on the Flight Line and in Emergency Services. His passion, though, is in serving as NBB's Aerospace Education Officer. At NBB he arranges high profile guest speakers (such as Dick Rutan, Patty Wagstaff & Tuskegee Airmen) and schedules cadet aerospace education training lead by experts in their particular fields. Lou also coordinates and is referee for the activity's volleyball tournament. Lou is an active member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is the district staff officer for aviation member training (ADSO-AVT) and the Division Staff Officer for Publications. He has been nominated for several awards for recent newsletters he has published. He is also the Immediate Past Flotilla Commander of an aviation flotilla. He recently passed his Coast Guard flight check and now flies safety and ice patrols. Currently Lou is proud to be serving as a Kansas Wing Aerospace Education Officer. His duties include compiling, editing and publishing the Wing AE Newsletter and assisting Squadron AEO's in setting and reaching their annual AE goals. "Except for 'face time', distance will not stop me from getting the job done!", Lou said. Lou makes his own homemade wine, sails his 30 foot Pearson sailboat on Long Island Sound to relax and flies his Piper Cherokee 180 to "get places".

The Eyes of America's Skies
3024 Arnold Ave. Salina, Kansas 67401-8105 785-825-0009 FAX 785-825-1116

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