IOHANI WOLFGRAMM

Man of Faith and Vision
1911–1997
Tisina Wolfgramm Gerber
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IOHANI WOLFGRAMM
MAN OF
FAITH AND VISION
1911 -1997
Compiled by £ 4jD
Tisina Wolfgramm Gerber
k.
FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY
35 NORTH WEST '•
SALT LAKH CiTY I
IOHANI WOLFGRAMM
MAN OF
FAITH AND VISION
1911- 1997
Compiled by
Tisina W olfgramm Gerber
FAMILY HISTORY L1Pr:1' "Y
35 Nor' i- WEST
SALT u ",_ l,iT'i. . ~ . J __
Ivdt
Cf.;;( I, '"' ~ ~
q ~ \ S ~
P R E F A C E
Considering lohani Otto Melila Wolfgramm to be a person worthy of our consideration, we
have assembled this book in his remembrance. He was bom in the Tonga Islands, in the northern
group of Vava'u in the village of Ha'alaufuli. His parentage consisted of a German grandfather and
a Tongan mother from a highly respected family of the village. He had quite an amazing life
considering his humble beginnings, his large family of 17 children, immigration to the United
States, and undeviating devotion to the principles of truth and righteousness and his support and
whole hearted defense of the gospel of Jesus Christ and his life-long membership in the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
His daughter Tisina has accepted the responsibility of this collection. She spent many hours
helping her father record on cassettes much of his history, his missions, his healings, discourses
and prophesies. It was through a special manifestation on one hand and a covenant on the other that
began the focus of this work. Much of the voluminous amount of data had to be translated into
English. Then it had to be edited, typed and retyped until it reached its present state. Most of the
translation was done by his daughter Tisina Wolfgramm Gerber, with the typing and editing done
for the most part by her aunt Edna P. Wolfgramm Bumingham. Help has been received from many
other sources too numerous to mention. Many hours, adding up to about two years, have gone into
the production of this volume.
The book is not written in a narrative style, but is rather a compilation of numerous stories
and events that took place, frequently with lohani in the center of the event. If you look at the big
picture, there emerges an image of the times in which he lived that goes far beyond his personal
experiences, but in many ways typical of the whole social establishment into which he was bom.
In order to get a perspective on the time in which these events took place, we have tried to place a
date on as many items as we could. The name of the author or person telling the story is given
following the title of each item.
Many books have been written about Tonga going back to the mid 1800's. Almost without
exception these books have been authored by white Europeans who had spent time in Tonga. I
think the value of this book is that it is written from the perspective of a Tongan who was born and
raised in the culture and lived there into his middle age. There is nothing superficial about lohani's
experiences (and it is not an outsider that is sitting on the sidelines recording them). Who better
could explain the experience of family life, birth, death, obtaining money and its necessity in their
life than a Tongan?
Some of the concepts mentioned have no equivalence in American life. For instance, the
importance of the kava circle in the social and political life of Tonga cannot be easily explained,
so I shall not try. The importance of correct family lines is jealously guarded, and has everything
to do with land acquisition and passing on the titles of nobility. These concepts pre-date the
Christian era. In the case of weddings or funerals, there is a very exact order of things as to who
is in charge and makes decisions-and not the immediate family. Every person is inferior or superior
to other family members, a female always outranks a male, sometimes going back a couple of
generations to prove that someone is sitting in the proper place.
PREFACE
Considering Iohani Otto Melila Wolfgramm to be a person worthy of our consideration, we
have assembled this book in hi s remembrance. He was born in the Tonga Islands, in the northern
group of Vava'u in the vi llage of Ha'alaufuli. His parentage consisted of a German grandfather and
a Tongan mother from a hi ghly respected famil y of the village. He had quite an amazing life
considering his hLlmbl e beginnings, hi s large family of 17 children, immi gration to the United
States, and undeviating devotion to the principles of truth and ri ghteousness and his support and
whole hearted defense of the gospel of Jesus Christ and hi s life- long membership in the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
His daughter Tisina has accepted the responsi bility of this collection. She spent many hours
helping her father record on cassettes much of hi s hi story, hi s mi ssions, his healings, discourses
and prophesies. It was through a special manifestation on one hand and a covenant on the other that
began the focus of this work. Much of the \·oluminous amount of data had to be translated into
Engli sh. Then it had to be edited, typed and retyped until it reached its present state. Most of the
translation was done by hi s daughter Tisina Wolfgramm Gerber, with the typing and editing done
for the most part by her aunt Edna P. Wolfgramm Burningham. Help has been received from many
other sources too numerous to men\ion. Many hours, adding up to about two years, have gone into
the Production of thi s volume.
The book is not written in a narrative style, but is rather a compilation of numerous stories
and events that took place, frequently with Iohani in the center of the event. If you leok at the big
picture, there emerges an image of the times in which he lived that goes far beyond his personal
experi ences, but in many ways typical of the whole social establishment into which he was born.
In order to get a perspective on the time in which these events took place, we have tried to place a
date on as many items as we could. The name of the author or person telling the story is given
followi ng the title of each item.
Many books have been written about Tonga goi ng back to the mid 1800's. Almost without
exception these books have been authored by white Europeans who had spent time in Tonga. I
think the value of thi s book is that it is written from the perspective of a Tongan who was born and
raised in the culture and li ved there into his middle age. There is nothing supelficial about Iohani 's
experiences (and it is not an outsider that is sitting on the sidelines recording them). Who better
could explain the experience offamily life, birth, death, obtaining money and its necessity in their
life than a Tongan?
Some of the concepts mentioned have no equivalence in American life. For instance, the
importance of the kava circle in the social and political life of Tonga cannot be easi ly explained,
so I shall not try. The importance of correct family lines is jealously guarded, and has everything
to do with land acquisition and passing on the titles of nobility. These concepts pre-date the
Christian era. In the case of weddings or funerals, there is a very exact order of things as to who
is in charge and makes decisions-and not the immediate family. Every person is inferior or superior
to other fami ly members, a female always outranks a mal e, sometimes going back a couple of
generations to prove that someone is sitting in the proper place.
v
Some of the vignettes are concemed with early Tongan history back to the first white men
to be found in Tonga. Others show the expansion ofthe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
from Utah through Hawaii, then to Samoa, and then to Tonga and more outlying islands. The
gospel was first preached in Tongatapu with little success, and then to Vava'u where Ha'alaufuli
was the first stronghold of the Church in Tonga. Two missionaries from Samoa were sent to
introduce the gospel to Tonga in 1893. lohani served a total of seven missions for the Church. He
had a great gift of healing and people near and far sought him for blessings. Many of the stories
record those events.
We will touch only briefly upon his genealogy work, but it is very extensive and he was
invited many times to present his charts and lectures at firesides and to others interested. After
much research and inspiration, he made the connection to the Tongan Royalty and the Royal lines
of Europe back to King David who was promised: And thine house and thy kingdom shall he
established for ever before thee: thy throne shall be established for ever. II Samuel 7:16. Queen
Elizabeth of England heard of this and asked him for a copy, which was delivered by his son
Michael and family when they toured Europe.
E.P.W.B.
vi
Some of the vignettes are concemed with early Tongan history back to the first white men
to be found in Tonga. Others show the expansion of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
from Utah through Hawai i, then to Samoa, and then to Tonga and more outlying islands. The
gospel was first preached in Tongatapu with little success, and then to Vava' u where Ha' alaufuli
was the first stronghold of the Church in Tonga. Two missionaries from Samoa were sent to
introduce the gospel to Tonga in 1893. Iohani served a total of seven mi ssions for the Church. He
had a great gift of healing and people near and far sought him for blessings. Many of the stories
record those events.
We will touch only briefly upon hi s genealogy work, but it is very extensive and he was
invited many times to present his charts and lectures at firesides and to others interested. After
much research and inspiration, he made the connection to the Tongan Royalty and the Royal lines
of Europe back to King David who was promised: And Ihine house and thy kingdom shall be
eSlablished for ever before Ihee: thy Ihrone shall be established for ever. IT Samuel 7: 16. Queen
Eli zabeth of England heard of thi s and asked him for a copy, which was del ivered by hi s son
Michael and famil y when they toured Europe.
E.P.W.B.
VI
FAMILY OF IOHANI WOLFGRAMM
recap
Husband: lohani Otto Melila Wolfgramm (1911-1997)
Parents: Charles Fredrick Wolfgramm - Salome Fo'ou Afu
Wife: Salote Lasini Fakatou (1915- )
Parents: Penisoni Kaufusi Fakatou - Selu Vaia Mafi
Children: 1. Henilieta Ana Malina (Marlene) Wolfgramm (1934)
2. Ana Pau'u (Anna) Wolfgramm (1935 -1994)
3. Salesi Fritz Kuluni (Charles) Wolfgramm (1937)
4. Taiana Salome Fo'ou (Diana) Wolfgramm (1938)
5. Tisina Melila (Tisina) Wolfgramm (1940)
6. Samuela Vainga Fakatou (Sam) (1942)
7. Napoleone Finau (Napoleon) Wolfgramm (1943 - 1969)
8. Maikele Holger (Michael) Wolfgramm (1945)
9. Leilani Etina (Leilani Edna) Wolfgramm (1946)
10. Fololeni Nightingale (Florence) Wolfgramm (1948)
11. Uaileta Filipe (Walter Philip) Wolfgramm (1949)
12. Noma (Norma Going) Wolfgramm (1950)
13. Loleita Elisi (Elsie) Wolfgramm (1952)
14. Lisiate (LeGrand Richards) Wolfgramm (1953)
15. Tila Uei (Tila) Wolfgramm (1955)
16. luni Uei (luni) Wolfgramm (1955)
17. Ofa Moana (Moana) Wolfgramm (1959)
18. Italiame Lose (Rosie) Wolfgramm (1959) Adopted
19. Semisi Dci Tonga (James) Wolfgramm (1972) Adopted
vu
FAMILY OF IOHANI WOLFGRAMM
recap
Husband: Iohani Otto Melila Wolfgramm (19 1 1- 1997)
Parents: Charl es Fredrick Wolfgramm - Salome Fo'ou Afu
Wife: Salote Lasini Fakatoll (1915- )
Parents: Penisoni Kaufusi Fakatou - Selu Vaia Mafi
Children: I. Henilieta Ana Malina (Marlene) Wolfgramm (1934)
2. Ana Pall ' lI (Anna) Wolfgramm (1935 -1994)
3. Salesi Fritz Kuluni (Charles) Wolfgramm ( 1937)
4. Taiana Salome Fo'ou (Diana) Wolfgramm (1938)
5. Tisina Melila (Tisina) Wolfgramm (1940)
6. Samuelayai nga Fakatou (Sam) (1942)
7. Napoleone Finau (Napoleon) Wolfgramm (1943 - 1969)
8. Maikele Holger (Michael) Wolfgramm (1945)
9. Lei lani Eti na (Leil ani Edna) Wolfgramm (1946)
10. Fololeni Nightingale (Florence) Wolfgramm ( 1948)
II . Uail eta Filipe (Walter Philip) Wolfgramm (1949)
12. Noma (Norma Going) Wolfgramm (1950)
13. Loleita El isi (Elsie) Wolfgramm (1952)
14. Lisiate (LeGrand Richards) Wolfgramm (1953)
15. Tila Uei (Tila) Wolfgramm ( 1955)
16. luni Uei (Iuni) Wolfgramm (1955)
17. Ofa Moana (Moan a) Wolfgramm (1959)
18. ltaliame Lose (Rosie) Wolfgramm (1959) Adopted
19. Semisi Iki Tonga (James) Wolfgramm (1972) Adopted
Vll
Pedigree of IOHANI WOLFGRAMM
August Ludwig Wolfgramm
Karl Friedrich Wolfgramm
Dorothea Maria Heidemann
Fredrick Gustav Ludwig Wolfgramm
Carolina Wilhelmine Auguste Fritz
Friedrich Wilhelm Fritz
Maria Rohrbeck
Charles Fredrick Wolfgramm
Fakaua Tu'i Ha'ateiho
Afi'a Folola Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho
Kisaea Sisifa
Fusipala Pangai
Pita Havea Tuli
llaisa'ane Pita Haveatuli
Fane Kaufusi
IOHANI OTTO MELILA WOLFGRAMM
Fetuani Afu
Pita Afu
Uli Matangilelei Simione Nakalase Afu
Salome Fo'ou Sipa
Mele Ana Finau Toki
Paula Tu'ivuia Sipa
llaisaTangaloa
Salome Fo'ou Afu
Fuimaono
Viliami Selu
Emeline Kefu
Tahi si'i
Vakili Kaetafa
Ana Pau'u
llaisa Lolo
vm
Pedigree of IOHANI WOLFGRAMM
Fredri ck Gustav Ludwig Wolfgramm
Caroli na Wilhelmine Auquste Fritz
Charles Fredrick Wolfgramm
Afi'a Folola Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho
Kisaea Sisifa
lIaisa'ane Pita Haveatuli
IIOHANI ana MELILA WOLFGRAMM
Uli Matanqilelei Simione Nakalase Afu
Pita Afu
Salame Fo'ou Sipa
Salome Fo'ou Afu
Vi li ami Selu
Emeline Kefu
Ana Pau'u
V 111
Karl Friedrich Wolf ramm
Dorothea Maria Heidemann
Friedri ch Wilhelm Fritz
Maria Rohrbeck
Fakaua Tu'i Ha'ateiho
Fusioala Panaai
Pita Havea Tuli
Fane Kaufusi
Fetuani Afu
Mele Ana Finau Toki
Paula Tu'ivuia Sipa
Il aisa Tanqaloa
Fuimaono
Tahi si'i
Vakili Kaetafa
lIaisa Lolo
Pedigree of SALOTE WOLFGRAMM
Samuela Fakatou
Atunaisa Tuifakahema
Lavina Finau
Tevita Oto'ota
Alisi
Motekiai Taliki Mata'u
Ana Foli
Penisoni Kaufusi Fakatou
Folautautei Aho
Fanueli Fifita Loloko
Ateleita Fifita
Alisi
Maleane Halamehi Semisi
SALOTE LASINI FAKATOU
Soane Mafi
Isileli Mafi
Sela Vaia Mafi
Sokopesi
Sitiveni Matanivai
Kalisi Teputepu
Mele Kafoatu
Semisi Langi
Litea Na'a
Atunaisa Mafi
Salote Mafi
Sioape Puli
Seluvaia Kefu
Tava Slope - Chief of Hoi
Vika Umufakapotu i Pangai
Hua'anga Sioemata
Lupe Elenoa
IX
Pedigree of SALOTE WOLFGRAMM
T evi ta Oto'ota
Atunaisa Tuilakahema
Alisi
Samuela Fakatou
Motekiai Tali ki Mata'u
Lavina Finau
Ana Foli
Penisoni Kaulusi Fakatou
Folautautei Aho
Fanuel i Filita Loloko
Alisi
Ateleita Filita
Semisi Langi
Maleane Hal amehi Semi si
Litea Na'a
L
SALOTE LASINI FAKATOU
I
Atunaisa Mali
Soane Mali
Salote Mali
Isileli Mali
Sioape Puli
Sokopesi
Seluvaia Kelu
Sela Vaia Mali
T ava Siope - Chiel 01 Hoi
Sitiveni Matanivai
Vika Umulakapotu i Panqai
Kalisi T eputepu
Hua'anga Sioemata
Mele Kaloatu
Lupe Elenoa
IX
x
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter I: Background 1
German Ancestry 3
Tongan Ancestrty, Kisaea's Family Lines 4
Sisimataela'a and His Son, Fakatou'io 6
The First White Men who came to Tonga 9
Early Methodist History about King Siaosi Tupou I 10
David's Royal Line 12
The Gospel Reaches Vava'u 15
Vava'u Islands 16
Chapter E: lohani's Childhood 21
My Early History 23
A Special Gift for Choking Victims 27
Influenza Epidemic at Vava'u 29
Earthquake at Otualea Beach at Ha'alaufuli 1918 31
lohani was 10 Years Old 32
Apostle David O. McKay .• 32
Hunting Wild Goats 33
While lohani was Single (at Hangai) 34
While lohani was Single (at Vaomaile) 34
Churches at Ha'alaufuli 35
lohani's Body Arises from the Dead 36
The Day my Father Died 37
Chapter HI: lohani's Young Married Life 41
lohani's engagement 43
Early Married Life at Vaufisi 43
Early Translation of the Book of Mormon 45
Fishing at the Sea Shore 45
The Truth Must be Told 46
George Albert Smith Visits Tonga 48
Speaking Assignment at Tu'anuku 50
Attacked by a 75 Foot Whale at Otea Branch 51
Moving from Vava'u to Mapelu 52
Chapter IV: Salote, Supportive Wife 57
Salote's Beginnings 59
Faith and Prayer were Answered 60
Care for a New Mother and Her Baby 62
XI
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter I: Background ... .... ..... . . . . . ..... .... .. . .. . ..... .. ..... . .......... . . I
Gelman Ancestry ... ... . . .. .. .. .. . ..... .. ..... .. ... . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . . .•... 3
Tongan Ancestrty, Kisaea's Fami ly Lines .....•.... .. •.. . .• . .... .... . .. . .. . ... 4
Sisimataela' a and Hi s Son, Fakatou' io . ...... . .... .... . .. . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . .. . . 6
The First White Men who came to Tonga ......... . . .... .. ... . .. . . .. . . . .. ..... 9
Earl y Methodist History about King Siaosi Tupou I ... .. . . ...... .. . . ......... . . 10
David's Royal Line .. .. .. . . . ........ ...... . . . ... . .... .. ... . . . ... . ....... 12
The Gospel Reaches Vava' u .. .. . . . . .. . . ... ... . . .. ... . .. . . .. . ... .. .. . .. . . . 15
Vava' u Islands . .. . .... . .. . . ......... . .. . . ...... . .. .. . . ... . .. .. ... . . . ... 16
Chapter IT: Iohani 's Childhood .. .. . . . ..... .. . . . . . ... . ... . .. ... .. .... ... .. . . .... 21
My Early History . . . .... . . ..... .. .. . • .. . ...... . .. . . .. . .. . . ..... . . . .. .... 23
A Special Gift for Choking Victims . . .. ....• . .. .... . . .. . ..... . ... . . ........ 27
Infl uenza Epidemic at Vava' u .. . . .... . ... . . .. . . . . •.. . .•. .... .... . . .. . . . . .. 29
Ealt hquake at Otualea Beach at Ha 'alaufuli 19 18 . . . ...... . .... .. .. .. .. .. . . .. . . 31
Iohani was 10 Years Old . .... . . ... . . .. .... . . . .... . .. . . . ... . . . ... . .. . .. . .. 32
Apostle David O. McKay .· .. . . .. . .. . .. ...... .. . . . . . .. . .. .. .. .. ... .. ..... . . 32
Hunting Wil d Goats ... . .... .... . . .. . ...... .. . .. . . . . . .....•.. . . ... ....... 33
Whil e lohani was Single (at Hangai) ..... .. . . .... . ...... . . . ..... .•... . . .. . .. 34
While lohani was Single (at Vaomai le) .. ...... . . ..•. .... . . .. .. . ... .. . . .. .... 34
Churches at Ha'alaufu li ......... .... . . . . .. ... .... .. .. ...... . .. .. .... ..... 35
Iohani's Body Arises from the Dead .. . . . . . . .. .. . .... .. ... ... ........ . . .. . . . 36
The Day my Falher Died . . ..... . ... .. .. .. . .. . . . . .... .. .. .. .... • ... . . ... .. 37
Chapter ill: Iohani 's Young Married Life ............... ... .. .. . ... . . ........ . . . . 41
lohani 's engagement . . ..... .. .. . ... .. .... .... .•.. . .•.. . .. . ....... . .. . ... 43
Earl y Marri ed Life at Vaufis i .. . .. ...... .. . . . . .. . ..... . .. . .... . ........ . ... 43
Earl y Trans lation of the Book of Mormon ..... ..... . .. .. .. ..... . .... .... .. . . . 45
Fishing at the Sea Shore ... .. ... .... . .. . . . ...... ....... .. . . . ...... . ..... .. 45
The Trulh Must be Told ... . . ..... .. .. ....•. . . . . . ..... . .. . .•.. . ... .. . . .. . . 46
George Albert Smith Visits Tonga .. .. . . . ..... . . . .......... .. ... . .... . . . .... 48
Speaking Assignment at Tu' anuku . .... ... ........ .. . . ... .... ... ... . . . ..... 50
Attacked by a 75 Foot Whale at Otea Branch . . ... .. . . . . .. .. ..... .. . .. ... ..... 51
Moving from Vava' u to Mapelu . .. ... . . . ... . .... . . .. . ..... .. .. . ..... . .. .. . 52
Chapter IV: Salote, Supportive Wife . . . . . . ... ..... . . .... ... ... . .. . . .... .. . . ...... 57
Salote's Begi nnings ........ . . ... ... . .. . ..... . • .. .. ... .. . . . . . ... . ........ 59
Faith and Prayer were Answered . .. ... . ...... ... . ........ .... . . .. . ..•...... 60
Care for a New Mother and Her Baby ... . ..... . . .. . ... ...... .. .. .. ... ....... 62
XI
Ana 62
Relief Society at Ha'apai about 1938 63
After the Death of my Son Napole 65
Coconut Palms 66
Napoleone and his Son Napoleone Jr 66
Story of Gary Frandsen 68
Food Storage in Ha'apai 69
The Day President Spencer W. Kimball Died 71
A One Dollar Bill 73
The Missing Wallet 73
Chapter V: lohani' s Missionary Years 75
Missionary Life in Tonga 1941 - 1943 77
Item I: Beginning in Houma 77
Item II: Our First Area - Ha'utu and Fahefa - 1942 80
Item BQ: At Kolovai, Tongatapu, Tonga 81
Item IV: A Special Blessing 81
Item V: Tracting at Ha'atafu - 1942 82
Item VI: A Tomado at Fo'ui 82
Item VE: Assisting the War Effort - 1942 84
Item VEL War Years at Fo'ui -1942 85
Item IX: Missionary Life at Fo'ui, March 1943 88
Item X: Tisina Retumed to Life 89
Item XI: Transfer to Halalotu Branch - 1943 92
Sam and Helene's Mission at Niuafo'ou 94
Item I: Mission to Niuafo'ou in 1944-1945 94
Item II: Blessing Patisepa 95
Item BJ: Harvest 96
Item IV: The Ulu'ave Family 97
Blessing of Missionary Work 99
lohani and Motulalo Tonga at Nukunuku 99
lohani's Carpentry Skill 100
Home Made Car 101
Carl Weiss, Labor Missionary 103
Item I: Carl Weiss Tells of His Father 103
Item B: Carl Weiss heals Walter - 1950 105
Labor Missionaries and Liahona College 106
Matthew Cowley's Help 107
Item I: Matthew Cowley's First Visit 1947/1948 107
Item U: More of Matthew Cowley's Visit 109
Item III: Unseen Presence 1970 in Salt Lake City I l l
xn
Ana . . . ...... . .... . .. . . .. . .. . ...... .. . . . . .. .... ... .. . .. . ... .. . . ... .. .. 62
Relief Society at Ha ' apai about 1938 ....... . .... . ..... . ... . . . . ... . .. .... .. .. 63
After the Death of my Son Napole . ... . . . .. . .... . ......... . . ... . ... . .. .. . .. . 65
Coconut Palms . .... .. .... .. ... .. .. .... .. . .... . .. .. . . . . .... . . .. . ... . .. . . 66
Napoleone and his Son Napoleone Jr. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. . • . ... .... ... . .. .. .. . . 66
S tory of Gary Frandsen ..... . .. . ... .... ............ . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. . ... . . 68
Food Storage in Ha'apai .. . ... .. .. .. .. ...... .. . •. .. . . . .... ... ... . . .... . . . 69
The Day President Spencer W. Kimball Died . .. . . .... ... . . . . ... . .. . . ... ... .. . 71
A One Doll ar Bill ......... . . .... . .... ... .. .. .... ... .. .. .. ...... . ... . . ... 73
The Missi ng Wall et . ... . .. .. .. . . . .. . ....•. . . . . . • . . .. .. .. ... .. . . . .. . ..... 73
Chapter V: Iohani's Missionary Years ..... . ...... . .... .. .. . . . . . . ....... .. .. ... .. 75
Missionary Life in Tonga 194 1 - 1943 ... . . . .. .... . . . .. . ....... .... . . ... . ... 77
Item I: Beginning in Houma .. . . .. . . ... ... .. . ..... . . . . . . ..... . .. .... . 77
Item IT: Our First Area - Ha' utu and Fahefa - 1942 ... . ... . . . . ... . .... . .... 80
Item ill: At Kolovai, Tongatapu, Tonga ...... ... ... ... . .. .. . ... .... .. .. 81
Item IV: A Special Blessi ng . .. . . . . . . . .... .. ... . . ... . .... . . .... . . . .... 81
Item V: Tracting at Ha' atafu - 1942 .. .. .. . . . . . ......... . .. . . . . ..... . ... 82
Item VI: A Tornado at Fo' ui . ... . ..... . ...... .. .... ... . .. ... .. .. . ... . 82
Item VIT: Assisting the War Effort - 1942 . . . . . . ............. . .. . . .. . . ... 84
Item Vill: War Years at Fo' ui - 1942 .... .. . . ....... . . . .... . . ...... .... . 85
Item IX: Missionary Life at Fo' ui, March 1943 . . ... . .. . . . . .. .. .. . .. .. . . .. 88
Item X: Tisina Ret urned to Life ....... . ..... . .... . .. . .. .. . ... . ........ 89
Item XI: Transfer to Hala10tu Branch - 1943 .... . •............ . .. . . ..... . 92
Sam and Helene's Mission at Ni uafo' ou . ... ....... . . . . ... . •....•. .. ... .. .. .. 94
Item I: Mission to Ni uafo' ou in 1944-1945 .. .. ....... .... ...... ... . . . . ... 94
Item II: Blessing Patisepa . . . .............. . .. . ...... . . .. . ........ . . .. 95
Item ill: Harvest ........... . . . ....... . . .. . ... .. . ................. .. 96
Item IV: The Ulu' ave Fami ly ... . ... . .. .. ... .. . .. ...... . .......• . . ... . 97
Blessing of Missionary Work . ...... . ...... . .. . . ... .... . . . . .. . .. . ... ... . .. 99
Iohani and Motulalo Tonga at Nukunuku ..... .. ... . .. . .. . . ... . .. . .. . .. .. . ... 99
lohani 's Carpentry Skill ............. . ... . .... . .. . . . ... . . .. . . .. . .. . .... . . 100
Home Made Car .. . . . . .. . . . . . .... . . . . ....•...... . .. . . . ..... . ... . .. . .. . . 101
Carl Wei ss, Labor Missionary . ...... .. . . ....... . ... . . .. ... . .. . .. . . . ... 103
Item I: Carl Wei ss Tell s of His Father .... . ... . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . .. .. ... . .. 103
Item II: Carl Wei ss heal s Walter - 1950 . .. . ... . ... .. ... . . .... . . . . ... .. . . 105
Labor Mi ssionaries and Liahona Coll ege .... . . . ..... . . . . . . .. ........ . . . . .. . 106
Matthew Cowley' s Help .. ....... . .. ........ . . . . .. . . ... .. .. .... . . . . . . .. . 107
Item I: Matthew Cowley's First Visit 1947/ 1948 . . . . ....... . ... . . ....... . 107
Item II: More of Matt hew Cowley' s Visit ........ . ... . . . . . . ....... .... .. 109
Item ill: Unseen Presence 1970 in Salt Lake City .. . . .. .. .. ... . .......... 111
Xli
Item IV: Story of Makongai, Fiji, the Leper Colony I l l
An Do Kava Circle at Te'ekiu I l l
lohani's tape from the Missionfield 113
Davidic Line in America 121
The Day of Reckoning 123
The Seini Kivalu's Story 133
Evil Spirit Between Mata'ika and Feletoa 137
Chapter VI: Imigration to U.S.A 143
Preparation for America 145
A Copy of my Birth Certificate 148
Chapter VE: Growing up with lohani and Salote 151
Tributes to lohani and Salote 153
Last Days of Samuela Fakatouv 164
Memories of Tila Uei 165
Memories of luni Uei 167
Sketches of Mike and Vake 173
Item I: Love Affair of Mike and Vake 173
Item E: Contribution ot Temple Fund 174
Item IE: Family Bus Trip 176
Leilani's Great Expediences 177
Item I: Blessed by the Prophet 177
Item E: Leilani's Missionary Experience at Ha'apai abt 1968 177
Item EI: Lelani's Missionary Experience in Tongatapu abt 1969 180
Item IV: Leilani's Crisis 1974 181
Tisina's Growing up Years 182
Oh! To be Bom in Tonga 187
Elisi Tells it Like it Is 190
Chapter VEI: Healings, Visions, Prophecies 199
A Patient at St.Marks Hospital 201
Blessing to Glendale Relief Society President 202
A Mother in Bountiful 203
Blessing of Norma's Baby 203
lohani Sought from a Dream 204
Healing a Gunshop Wound 205
Story of Manu Matanga 206
Liahona Taufa Tonga Fifita 206
Sione Olive 208
Healing of Piuela Fonua Tonga 209
xm
Item IV: Story of Makongai , Fiji , the Leper Colony ..... . . .. . ... . ... . ..... II I
An Do Kava Circle at Te'ekiu .... .. ... ......... . . . ..... .. . .. .. . .. .... . ... 1 II
Iohani's tape from the Missionfield . . . .. .. . ... .... .... .......... .. .. . .. .. . . 11 3
Davidic Li ne in Amelica . ... . ..... .. ....... . . .. ... ... ..... .. . .. .. . . .. .. . 121
The Day of Reckoning .. . ... ... ...... .. .. ..... . . ... ... .. ...... . .. . .. . .. . 123
The Sei ni Kivalu's Story . ... . .. . ... .. ...•..... . . . . . .............. .. .. . . . 133
Evi l Spirit Between Mata' ika and Feletoa ......... . . . ... . . . . ................ 137
Chapter VI: Imigration to U.S.A . ... ... . ....... ... .. . . . .......... . . ... . . .. . .. . .. 143
Preparation for America .. .. ......... .. ... ........... . ... .. ... . .... .. .. . . 145
A Copy of my Birth Certificate .... ...... . .. . .. ..... .. ......•.. . .. . .. .. . .. 148
Chapter VIT: Growing up with lohani and Salote . . ...... . . ... . .... ..... . . . . . ..... 15 1
Tri butes to lohani and Salote ..... ..... . .... . .... . ... . ... . ... . . . .. .... .... 153
Last Days of Samuela Fakatouv ........... .. ... .. ... .. .. . ..... .. ..... .. .. . 164
Memori es ofTil a Uei . .. . .... .... . ...... . ........ . ....... ... " .. .. . ... . . 165
Memories ofIuni Uei . ... .. . .... .. ... .. . . . .... . .. ... . ........ . . .... . .... 167
Sketches of Mike and Vake ........... . .. . .. . .. . .. . . ....... . ..... .. .. . .. . 173
Item I: Love Affair of.Mike and Vake ....... . .... .. . . .. .... .... . .. ... . . 173
Item IT: Contribution ot Temple Fund ... .... ..... . . . . . . .. ... . ........ . . 174
Item ill: Fami ly Bus Trip .... .... . ... .. . . ..... .. ............ . . .. .. .. . 176
Leil ani 's Great Expelfiences .... . .. ... . . •... .................. .. . . . .. .. .. 177
Item I: Blessed by the Prophet . . ........... . ............... .......... . 177
Item IT: Leilani's Missionary Experience at Ha ' apai abt 1968 . . ... . .... . .. . . i77
Item ill: Lelani 's Missionary Experience in Tongatapu abt 1969 . . ..... . .... . 180
Item IV: Lei lani's Crisis 1974 .. .... ..... . .... . ... . . .. .............. . . 18 1
Tisina's Growing up Years ... . ........ . ..... . .... .. ... .. ..... . . .. ....... 182
Oh! To be Born in Tonga ............. . .. .. . . . . .. . .. .. . ........ . ...... ... 187
Elisi Tells it Like it Is ....... .. ............... . ............... . . . .. .. .... 190
Chapter Vill: Healings, Visions, Prophecies .. .. ... .................... . . .. ....... 199
A Patient at St.Marks Hospital . .. ........................ . . .. ... . .. ....... 20 I
Blessing to Glendale Relief Society President ...... . . . . .. . . . .... . . . .. .. . . .... 202
A Mother in Bountiful .. . ....... ..... ...... .. .. . .. ...... .. . . ........ .. .. 203
Blessing of Norma's Baby ... . ... .•....... .. ..... . . . ..... •... .. . ......... 203
lohani Sought from a Dream . . .... ..... ... . . . .. .. . . . ......... . ..•........ 204
Healing a Gunshop Wound ........ ..... .. . .. . . ... . ... . . .. .. . . . . ... . ..... 205
Story of Manu Matanga .. ............ . ..... ... ...... .. . . . . ........ .. ... . 206
Liahona T1'.ufa Tonga Fifita .. .. ...... .. .. ...... . .. . . . . .. . .... .. ...... ... . 206
Sione Olive . .. . . ....................... .. ........ . ...•. . .. .. ... ... .... 208
Healing of Piuela Fonua Tonga ... . ....•.....•....... . .... ...... . ... ...... 209
XIII
Home Repairs at the Gerber's 209
Story of Sister Adams 211
The Woman from Califomia 213
Elder Brown's Experiences and Testimony 213
Ana's Friend in Orlando, Florida 215
Unexpected Help 217
A Retum Missionary from Zion Visits lohani 218
Item I: Visit from Former Missionary about 1974 218
Item E: Needed Temple Work Done 219
Item EI: German Man in the Temple 219
Item FV: Help from Beyond the Veil 220
Blessing of Twins 220
Healing Polio 221
My Friend Inoke 222
Healing of Siueti Vea 223
My Son Lisiate (Richard) 224
Tisina and the Coins 224
Samuela's Eye, at Vava'u 225
Leprosy 225
Two Coincidental Car Crashes 226
Escape from a Rapist 227
Samuela and Walter Serve in Vietnam 228
Oscar's Newsletter from Florida 231
Chapter FX: Farewell 233
lohani's Farewell 235
KSL TV Coverage of Funeral 236
Till the Resurrection Rises Thee (poem) 238
Grandpa lohani (poem) 239
And You Heard His Call (poem) 240
Walter's Problems 241
Item I: Problems 241
Item E: Exhausted Traveler 242
Mighty Miracle of Healing 242
Bibliography 247
xiv
Home Repairs at the Gerber's . . .. . . ...... .. .... . .... . ... .. ... . ..... .. .... 209
Story of Sister Adams ...... . . . . . . .... . .. . . . . . ........ . ...... . ......... . 2 1 I
The Woman from California ..... . .. . . . . . .... . .... .. .. .. . .. .. . .. . ........ 213
Elder Brown's Experiences and Testimony ..... . .. ... .. ... .. . . .. ............ 213
Ana's Friend in Orlando, Florida ............... . . . .... . . . . . . . .•... •....... 215
Unexpected Help ..... . ........ . ... ..... ...... .. .......... ... .... ... ... 217
A Return Missionary from Zion Vi sits Iohani . . .. . .... . ... . ... .... . . . . ..... .. 218
Item I: Visit from Former Missionary about 1974 ... .. .. . .. . .... . .. . ..... . 218
Item II: Needed Temple Work Done . . . ........... . . ... .. . . ... .. ... .... 219
Item ill: German Man in the Temple .......... . . . ... . ........ . . ... . .... 219
Item IV: Help from Beyond the Veil .. . . . ..... . ........ .. ...... . . . ..... 220
Blessing of Twins . . .. . . .. .. . . . .... . .... . . .... . . . . ... . ....... . ... . . .... 220
Healing Polio ........ . ......... . ... .. .. . . . ......... .... . ........ .. .... 221
My Friend Inoke . .......... . .... . .... . ...... . .......... .. . .. . .. . . ... ... 222
Healing of Siueti Vea ... ...... .. . ....... .. . . ........ ... ... ... .. . .. .... .. 223
My Son Lisiate (Richard) ... . ... . ...... .... .. .. . . . . .. .. ........ .. . ....... 224
Tisina and the Coi ns . . .. .. . .. ... .... . . . .. . .. ... .. . .. . . ...... . . . .. ... .... 224
Samuela's Eye, at Vava ' u ....... . .. . . ... ...... . ....... .... . .. ........ ... 225
Leprosy .... .. . .. .. .. .. . .. . . . ... .. . . . .. ... . . . . . .. ... .. .. . . . .. .. ..... . . 225
Two Coincidental Car Crashes .........•............. .. .................. 226
Escape from a Rapist ... .......................... . .... .•..... ........ .. 227
Samuela and Walter Serve in Vietnam . .... .. . .. . . .......... . .... . ........ . 228
Oscar's Newsletter from Florida . .. .. .................... ... ... . ......... . 231
Chapter lX: Farewell . .... . . . .. . . ........... . .... . . ... .. .. .. . ...... ..... ... . . . 233
Iohani 's Farewell ...... . .. .. .. .. . . ..... .. ... . .... . . . .. . .. ...... . ... .. .. 235
KSL TV Coverage of Funeral ..... . ... . ..... . . . . .... . .... . ....... ... ... .. 236
Ti ll the Resurrection Ri ses Thee (poem) .... . .. . . . .... .. . ....... . . .... ... . .. 238
Grandpa Iohani (poem) . .. . ........ . ..... . ..... . ................. • .. . ... 239
And You Heard Hi s Call (poem) . . . . .... . . .. ......... .. .... .. .... . . .. . . ... 240
Walter's Problems ..... .. . .. .. . .... . . . . .. .. ....... ... .. .. ... .. ... .. ... . 241
Item I: Problems . . ..... ... . ..... . . . . . .. .. . . ...... .. ... .. .. . . . . ..... 241
Item II: Exhausted Traveler . .. .... . ... . ...... . .. .... .. . .... .......... 242
Mi ghty Miracle of Healing ..... . . ... . . .. .... . . . ... . .... .. . . .. . . . . . . . .... . 242
Bibliography . .. ........ . ..... . .. . . .. .. . .... . .... . . ...... .. . . . ... . . .. . .. ..... 247
XIV
CHAPTER I
BACKGROUND
CHAPTER I
BACKGROUND
T
l
German Ancestry
By Edna P. Wolfgramm Bumingham
^here was considerable excitement among members ofthe family when the announcement
was made, "We got a letter from Uncle August today." It was received in Pyritz.
Pommern, Prussia, an area about 100 miles north of Berlin across the Oder River in the early 1870's.
Because ofthe distance and slow transportation, to get a letter was a big event-especially from Uncle
August to find out where he was and what he was doing.
This was an event in the family because Uncle August was an adventurous spirit and left his
home country heading for the New World, U.S.A. Landing in Boston in 1848 he heard that gold had
been found in California. During the gold rush of 1849 he made it to California where he settled down
for a few years of panning and prospecting for gold, and did quite well.
But again, learning ofthe new continent down under, Australia, his adventurous spirit urged
him to see that country and its potential for making a livelihood there. He boarded a ship and made
it to the gold fields in Queensland and tried his luck there for a few years, but was not content with his
finds.
While in Queensland he heard ofthe Pacific Islands with its coconut oil which was almost as
good as gold in those days. Again he thought this over seriously, and finally made up his mind to visit
the islands. He found a ship bound for Tonga, boarded it and arrived in Nuku'alofa in 1855. After
a few years he went on to Ha'apai and then to Vava'u. He thought Vava'u ideal for a trading station
so he settled there. He obtained a leasehold on some beach front property where he first established
a business of importing general wares from Germany and exporting copra to Hamburg..
August was quite positive that he had found what he had been looking for. He wrote back to
his relatives in Germany and also a young girl that he knew there by the name of Sophie Doemer
asking her if she would like to come down under and enjoy the hospitality ofthe Friendly Islands. She
eventually made her way to Tonga, and on the day she arrived they were married on board ship by a
white Weslyan minister.
Uncle August came from a family of six children. While he was traveling the world, his sister
Caroline Wilhelmine Juliane Sanft married Friedrich Wilhelm Wolfgramm and had eight children and
brother Wilhelm Heinrich Gottlieb Sanf t married Christine Caroline Guerr and had 12 children.
These children were all first cousins. Friedrich Wilhelm Wolfgramm had a brother August Ludwig
Wolfgramm who married Caroline Wilhelmine Auguste Fritz and had 14 children, making them first
cousins also to the Wolfgramms.
It was into this close family of cousins that Uncle August's letter was received. Many of the
cousins were young adults by now and when it was suggested that they might like to come to this
Utopia that he had found, his suggestion fell on fertile ground. It was early in 1872 that several
nephews of August arrived in the kingdom. They were made up of Sanft and Wolfgramm brothers.
Most of them settled in Vava'u, but one of the Sanft boys went to Ha'apai.
Eventually there were four Sanft Brothers belonging to Wilhelm Sanft and Caroline Guerr, four
Wolfgramm brothers belonging to Juliane Sanft & Friedrich Wilhelm Wolfgramm, and three brothers
that came from August Wolfgramm and Caroline Fritz. The first ones to come arrived in 1872.
3
German Ancestry
By Edna P. Wollgramm Burningham
T
here was considerable excitement among members of the family when the announcement
was made, "We got a letter from Uncle August today." It was received in Pyritz.
Pommern, Prussia, an area about 100 miles north of Berlin across the Oder River in the early 1870's.
Because of the di stance and slow transportation, to get a letter was a big event-especially from Uncle
August to find out where he was and what he was doing.
This was an event in the famil y because Uncle August was an adventurous spirit and left his
home country heading for the New World, U.S.A. Landing in Boston in 1848 he heard that gold had
been found in Cali fornia. During the gold rush of 1849 he made it to California where he settled down
for a few years of panning and prospecting for gold, and did quite well.
But again, learning of the new continent down under, Australia, hi s adventurous spirit urged
him to see that country and its potential for making a livelihood there. He boarded a ship and made
it to the gold fields in Queensland and tried hi 3 luck there for a few years, but was not content wit h his
finds.
Whi le in Queensland he heard of the Pacific Islands with its coconut oil which was almost as
good as gold in those days. Again he thought this over seriously, and finally made up hi s mind to visit
the islands. He found a ship bounq for Tonga, boarded it and arrived in Nuku' alofa in 1855. After
a few years he went on to Ha'apai and then to Vava'u. He thought Vava ' u ideal for a trading station
so he settled there. He obtained a leasehold on some beach front property where he first establi shed
a business of importing general wares from Genmany and exporting copra to Hamburg ..
August was quite positive that he had found what he had been looking for. He wrote back to
hi s relatives in Genmany and also a young girl that he knew there by the name of Sophie Doerner
asking her if she would like to come down under and enjoy the hospitality of the Friendly Islands. She
eventuall y made her way to Tonga, and on the day she arrived they were married on board ship by a
white Weslyan minister.
Uncle August came from a fami ly of six children. While he was traveling the world, hi s sister
Caroline Wilhelmineluliane Sanft married Friedrich Wilhelm Wolfgramm and had eight chi ldren and
brother Wilhelm Heinrich Gottlieb Sanf t married Christine Caroline Guerr and had 12 children.
These chi ldren were all first cousins. Friedrich Wilhelm Wolfgramm had a brother August Ludwig
Wolfgramm who maITied Caroline Wilhelmine Auguste Fritz and had 14 chi ldren, making them first
cousins also to the Wolfgramms.
It was into this close family of cousins that Uncle August 's letter was received. Many of the
cousins were young adults by now and when it was suggested that they might like to come to thi s
utopia that he had found, his suggestion fell on fertile ground. It was early in 1872 that several
nephews of August arrived in the kingdom. They were made up of Sanft and Wolfgramm brothers.
Most of them settled in Vava' u, but one of the Sanft boys went to Ha'apai.
Eventuall y there were four Sanft Brothers belonging to Wilhelm Sanftand Caroline Guerr, four
Wolfgramm brothers belonging to 1 ul iane Sanft & Friedrich Wilhelm Wolfgramm, and three brothers
that came from August Wolfgramm and Caroline Fritz. The first ones to come arrived in 1872.
Because of age differences, it is not logical that they all came together. Life in Pyritz was difficult
especially with large families to support and the boys were anxious to better their lot. Before leaving,
each had to serve a two-year stint in the Prussian army. Herman Wolfgramm was one ofthe youngest
and it is known from his autobiography that he traveled to the Islands by himself after his two brothers
were well established.
With this background established, we will bring it down to our principal subject, lohani.
Friedrich Gustav Ludwig Wolfgramm, fifth child of August Wolfgramm and Caroline Fritz, was a
trader for staple items of food and miscellaneous items in exchange for copra made by the natives from
the coconut meat rich in oil. Lever Brothers was one of the exporters to use the copra in their soap
manufacturing in Australia and the United States. It was probably about 1885 that Fritz, as he was
known, arrived at Vava'u. He lived with a beautiful Tongan woman, Kisaia Sisifa and had five sons.
They didn't marry until 1892 and she passed away in 1898. After her passing he married Martha Emile
Sanft, daughter of one of the original Sanft immigrants from Pyritz. He was 25 years her senior.
Of the five sons of Kisaia and Fritz, only the eldest grew to maturity and married. He was
known as Charles, also various Tongan nicknames. Charles married Salome Fo'ou Afu, daughter of
Pita Afu of Ha'alaufuli. Charles and Salome had 12 children and lohani was the eldest. Many of
them grew to maturity and most emmigrated to the United States at various times, each having a large
posterity. After the death of Charles his wife married Josifa Naeata. Apparently they did not take
responsibility forthe children and they were split up and divided among the relatives to raise, including
Grandfather Fritz and his new wife Martha Sanft.
TONGAN ANCESTRY
KISAEA'S FAMILY LINES
Kisaea Sisifa came from the nobles and high chiefs ofthe three great lines: (1) Tu'i Tonga, (2)
Tu'i Ha'atakalaua, and (3) Tu'i Kanokupolu, whose origins go backto Aho Eitu, the first King of
Tonga who ruled in the year 950 A.D.
Her father came from the nobles of the Fale Fisi (Fiji) which descended from the Tu'i Tonga
Fefine (female) being superior in rank to the Tu'i Tonga (male). She was so high in rank that no
Tongan was permitted to marry her.
However the Tu'i Tonga Fefine Sinai Takala I Langi Leka left Tonga for a short visit to
Vasivasi, Fiji Islands. On a warm afternoon she went out to the lagoon for a swim. Prince Tapuosi
ofthe royal family of Fiji came by. He noticed this beautiful princess and picked up a fresh mapa fruit,
bit into it with his teeth, and threw it at Sinai Takala I Langi Leka. It landed on her chest. It is a
Polynesian way to let someone know that she is very beautiful and you are attracted to her.
She quickly looked around to see who did that trick. She saw Prince Tapuosi with a big smile
on his face. She immediately liked the whiteness and how fine his teeth looked. It was love at first
sight. Soon the time arrived for her to leave Fiji for Tonga. Shortly after she arrived back at
4
Because of age differences. it is not logical that they all came together. Life in Pyritz was difficult
especially with large families to support and the boys were anxious to better their lot. Before leaving,
each had to serve a two-year st int in the Prussian army. Herman Wolfgramm was one of the youngest
and it is known from his autobiography that he traveled to the Islands by himself after his two brothers
were well establi shed.
With thi s background establi shed, we will bring it down to our principal subject, Iohani.
Friedrich Gustav Ludwig Wolfgramm, fifth chil d of August Wolfgramm and Caroline Fritz, was a
trader for staple items of food and miscellaneous items in exchangeforcopra made by the natives from
the coconut meat rich in oi l. Lever Brothers was one of the exporters to use the copra in their soap
manufacturing in Australia and the United States. It was probably about 1885 that Fritz, as he was
known, arrived at Vava'u. He li ved with a beautiful Tongan woman, Ki saia Sisifa and had five sons.
They didn't marry until 1892 and she passed away in 1898. After her passing he married Martha Emile
Sanft, daughter of one of the original Sanft immi grants from Pyritz. He was 25 years her senior.
Of the five sons of Kisaia and Fritz, only the eldest grew to maturity and married. He was
known as Charles, also various Tongan nicknames. Charles married Salome Fo'ou Afu, daughter of
Pita Afu of Ha'alaufuli. Charles and Salome had 12 children and Iohani was the eldest. Many of
them grew to maturity and most emmigrated to the United States at various times, each having a large
posterity. After the death of Charles his wife married Josifa Naeata. Apparently they did not take
responsibility forthe chi ldren and they were split up and divided among the relatives to raise, including
Grandfather Fritz and hi s new wife Martha Sanft.
TONGAN ANCESTRY
KISAEA'S FAMILY LINES
Kisaea Sisifa came from the nobles and hi gh chiefs of the three great lines: ( I) Tu ' i Tonga, (2)
Tu' i Ha'atakalaua, and (3) Tu'i Kanokupolu, whose origins go backto Aho Eiru, the first King of
Tonga who rul ed in the year 950 A.D.
Her fat her came from the nobles of the Fale Fisi (Fij i) which descended from the Tu'i Tonga
Fefine (female) being superior in rank to the Tu'i Tonga (male). She was so high in rank that no
Tongan was pelmitted to marry her.
However the Tu ' i Tonga Fefine Sinai Takala I Langi Leka left Tonga for a short visit to
Vasivasi , Fiji Islands. On a warm afternoon she went out to the lagoon for a swim. Prince Tapuosi
of the royal family of Fiji came by. He noticed this beautiful princess and picked up a fresh mapa fruit,
bit into it with his teeth, and threw it at Sinai Takala 1 Langi Leka. It landed on her chest. It is a
Polynesian way to let someone know that she is very beautiful and you are attracted to her.
She quickly looked around to see who did that trick. She saw Prince Tapuosi with a big smile
on his face. She immediately liked the whiteness and how fine his teeth looked. It was love at first
sight. Soon the time arrived for her to leave Fiji for Tonga. Shortly after she arrived back at
Tongatapu, her father, the Tu'i Tonga, could tell that she was in love. She refused to eat and she was
love sick for Tapuosi and asked if her father the king, could send to Fiji and bring Tapuosi to Tonga.
The king sent 29 big war canoes to Fiji and soon returned at Holonga, Vava'u with Tapuosi.
As an honor they didn't let him walk, but several men carried him with poles on their shoulders all the
way from Holonga to Ta'anea and to Mata'ika, and the place where they carried him to at Mata'ika
was given a new name, Ha'amotuku. They finally left the Vava'u group or the northern islands and
sailed to the middle islands or the Ha'apai group. There they rested again for a while and decided to
continue on their trip until they came to the small isalnd of Uiha. They ate and rested there and finally
sailed back on their boat to the southem islands of Tongatapu. Close to the island of Tungua and
Ha'afeva they found a perfect place to get Tapuosi ready to meet the Tongan Princess. They took him
into a small lagoon, and there they lit a torch so they could trim his hair in the current Tongan style.
They used sharp bamboo sticks to shave him.
Finally the king's men were ready at last to sail on to the Tongatapu group and later landed at
Lapaha, Mu'a (the old capitol of Tongatapu), the home ofthe Tu'i Tonga (Royalty) and they called
their landing place Tuipui.
When Tapuosi and Tamaha Sinai Takala I Langi Leka were preparing themselves for their
royal wedding at Tongatapu, Tapuosi's family also came from Fiji to attend the ceremony and brought
with them gifts for the wedding. The area given to the Fijians they named Peka (Mbega) after their
island in Fiji. Later they moved to another area and gave it the Fijian name Lambasa after another
island in the Fiji group. The land given to the Fijians, Tu'i Lakepa, was the richest part of that area.
Tapuosi and Sinai Takala I Langi Leka had two children: Fonomanu a son, and Fono Ki Moana
a daughter who later became the tamaha. Daughter of the female Tu'i Tonga and niece of the male
13
lh
Tu'i Tonga Fatafehi was the person of highest rank in the kingdom of Tonga around the 17
th
century. Fonomanu was the father of the second Tamaha, Tu'imala for he married the next female
Tu'i Tonga Eiki Tonga Pipiki, the daughter of his mother's brother.
The highest chief's line is where Kisaea Sisifa, her aunt Anau Ki He Sinai, Ulu Ki Lupea Lea,
and Pauline Fakahiku O Uiha descends from and the lineage ofthe house of Fiji has six representatives
among the landed chiefs of modern Tonga. It is said also to be represented in Fiji. This lineage traces
its descent to the Tu'i Lakepa of Vasivasi, Fiji who was married to the female Tu'i Tonga Sina Takala
first about 1643.
Tongan chiefs of this lineage are Tui Lakepa, Tu'i Ha'ateiho, Malupo, Tu'i Ha'angana, Tu'i
Afitu and presumabley Lasike. Tu'i Lakepa is the head of this lineage The first Tu'i Ha'ateiho,
Malupo, and Tu'i Ha'angana are said to have been the sons of a Tu'i Tonga by a daughter ofthe Fijian
Chief Tu'i Neau of Lakemba.
When Afi A Foloha Havea was the chief of Talafo'ou, Tu'i Ha'ateiho came to Mata'ika he
discovered that Mata'ika had not yet had any chief assigned to that village, so Chief Havea Tuli was
sent to be the chief of Mata'ika.
Afi Afolaho heard about the civil war at Ha'amene'uli at Hihifo and immediately left Ha'apai
for Tongatpu to join the war about the year 1837. Many of the men from Hahake and other districts
died in this war. They had no idea that Afi A Foloha had joined those who came from the Mu'a district
and Lapaha. The only clue they had was the tattoo marks on his tongue. His whole face was badly
damaged by a war club on his face and head. After they found his body, a war canoe was brought with
other man to escort him back to Lapaha for burial. While men were paddling and repeating their sad
5
Tongatapu, her father, the Tu' i Tonga, could tell that she was in love. She refused to eat and she was
love sick for Tapuosi and asked if her father the king, coul d send to Fij i and bring Tapuosi to Tonga.
The king sent 29 big war canoes to Fiji and soon returned at Holonga, Vava' u with Tapuosi .
As an honor they didn ' t let him walk, but several men carried him with poles on their shoulders all the
way from Holonga to Ta'anea and to Mata'ika, and the place where they carried him to at Mara' ika
was given a new name, Ha' amot uku. They finall y left the Vava' u group or the northern islands and
sail ed to the middle islands or the Ha' apai group. There they rested again for a whi le and decided to
continue on their tlip until they came to the small isalnd ofUiha. They ate and rested there and finally
sail ed back on thei r boat to the southern islands of Tongatapu. Close to the island of Tungua and
Ha' afeva they found a perfect place to get Tapuosi ready to meet the Tongan Princess. They took him
into a small lagoon, and there they lit a torch so they could trim his hair in the current Tongan style.
They used sharp bamboo sticks to shave him.
Finally the king's men were ready at last to sai l on to the Tongatapu group and later landed at
Lapaha, Mu'a (the old capitol of Tongatapu), the home of the Tu'i Tonga (Royalty) and they call ed
their landing place Tuipui.
When Tapuosi and Tamaha Sinai Takala I Langi Leka were preparing themselves for their
royal weddi ng at Tongatapu, Tapuosi's family also came from Fiji to attend the ceremony and brought
wit h them gifts for the wedd ing. The area gi ven to the Fijians they named Peka (Mbega) after their
island in Fiji . Later they moved tc! another area and gave it the Fijian name Lambasa after another
island in the Fij i group. The land given to the Fiji ans, Tu' i Lakepa, was the richest part of that area.
Tapuosi and Sinai Takala ILangi Leka had two children: Fonomanu a son, and Fono Ki Moana
a daughter who later became the [amaha. Daughter of the female Tu ' i Tonga and ni ece of the mal e
13
1h
Tu' i Tonga Fatafehi was the person of highest rank in the ki ngdom of Tonga around the I T!>
century. Fonomanu was the fat her of the second Tamaha, Tu' imala for he married the next fema le
Tu' i Tonga Eiki Tonga Pipiki, the daughter of his mother's brother.
The highest chi ef's line is where Kisaea Sisifa, her aunt Allau Ki He Sinai, Ulu Ki Lupea Lea,
and Pauline Fakahiku 0 Uiha descends from and the lineage of the house of Fiji has six representatives
among the landed chi efs of modern Tonga. It is said also to be represented in Fiji. This lineage traces
its descent to the Tu' i Lakepa of Vasivas i, Fiji who was married to the female Tu' i Tonga Sina Takala
first about 1643.
Tongan chiefs of this lineage are Tui Lakepa, Tu' i Ha'ateiho, Malupo, Tu'i Ha ' angana, Tu'i
Afitu and presumabley Lasike. Tu' i Lakepa is the head of thi s lineage The first Tu ' i Ha' ateiho,
Malupo, and Tu' i Ha' angana are said to have been the sons of a Tu' i Tonga by a daughter of the Fijian
Chi efTu' i Neau of Lakemba.
When Afi A Foloha Havea was the chief of Talafo' ou, Tu' i Ha'ateiho came to Mata' ika he
discovered that Mata' ika had not yet had any chi ef ass igned to that vill age, so Chi ef Havea Tuli was
sent to be the chief of Mata' ika.
Afi Afolaho heard about the civil war at Ha'amene'uli at Hihi fo and immediately left Ha'apai
for Tongatpu to join the war about the year 1837. Man)1 of the men from Hahake and other di stricts
died in this war. They had no idea that Afi A Foloha had joined those who came from the Mu'a di strict
and Lapaha. The onl y clue they had was the tattoo marks on hi s tongue. His whole face was badly
damaged by a war club on his face and head. After they found hi s body, a war canoe was brought with
other man to escort him back to Lapaha for burial. While men were paddling and repeati ng their sad
songs with torches burning, on the shore Laufili Tonga commented that it might be a high chief that
had been killed. And sure enough, it was Afi A Foloha. He is now buried at the langi at Mu'a,
Lapaha.
Kisaea Sisifa descended from the Ha'a Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho. Her father was Tu'i Ha'ateiho
Afi A Foloha Havea from Lapaha, Mu'a, Tongatapu, Tonga. He was given this title dating back to
about 1837. Her mother was Ilaisa'ane Havea Tuli of Mata'ika, Vava'u, Tonga.
The son of Havea Tungua was Fa Otu Sia Veasi'i Amelia Seini was given title Tamaha and was
responsible for the first written record ofthe oral Tongan Genealogy along with King Mumu'i, Queen
Salote Tupou, chiefs, nobles and other genealogists from Tonga.
Kisaea's father was Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho Afi A Foloha Havea. He was quite a character. He
was a little more on the feminine side. Afi a Foloha Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho came on a short visit to
Vava'u and met Havea Tuli's daughter Ilaisa'ane and they fell in love. They lived together a few
months. Later Ilaisa'ane discovered that she was pregnant and the news reached Afi A Foloha Havea
Tu'i Ha'ateiho. Since Christianity had been accepted in the islands, a new law was enacted that if a
woman had a child out of wedlock, the man involved must serve six months in jail. This would be a
great disgrace to the chief, so he begged and made arrangements with Havea Tuli to serve his jail time
for him. This he did. So Afi A Foloha Havea Tu'li Ha'ateiho left Vava'u for his wife Ha'lauvalu at
Ha'apai. He had tattooed his tongue and wanted her to have hers done also. She refused and later left
him for King Laufili Tonga at Mu'a. Nine months later Ilaisa'ane gave birth to a beautiful girl and
they named her Kisaea Sisifa and they gave her to her grandfather Havea Tuli whose last name was
Tu'i Nahoki
SISIMATAELA'A ANDHIS SON, FAKATOU'IO
Story of Salote's Family Name, Fakatou'io of Felemea
A True Story
Tl
ihere was once a lady by the name of Fataimoeloa who lived in Felemea (an island
belonging to the Ha'apai Group). Everyday, very early in the moming, she would go and
take a swim on the beach of Felemea, and when the sun came up, she would get out of the water and
sit on the sand, warming herself, always sitting with her back to the sun. One day she discovered that
she was expecting, and finally gave birth to a baby boy. She name him Sisimataela'a. (Sisi means a
festoon made of flowers, Mata-e-la'a means the face of the sun).
Sisimataela'a grew up to be a very handsome young man. One day, the king, Tu'i Tonga, and
his men arrived on the island of Felemea in search of an appropriate husband for his only daughter,
Princess Fatafehi. When they landed in Felemea, he ordered them to go and search the island. They
found Fataimoeloa and her son at their little home, so they came back to inform the Tu'i Tonga, saying,
"King, we have searched the whole island and found not a single trace of life except for an old woman
and her son. This man is the most handsome man we have ever seen."
The Tu'i Tonga said, "Go then and tell that woman that the Tu'i Tonga wants her son to join
his crew."
6
songs with torches burning, on the shore Laufi li Tonga commented that it might be a hi gh chief thaI
had been killed. And sure enough, it was Afi A Foloha. He is now buried at the langi at Mu'a,
Lapaha.
Kisaea Si sifa descended from the Ha'a Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho. Her father was Tu'i Ha ' ateiho
Afi A Foloha Havea from Lapaha, Mu 'a, Tongatapu, Tonga. He was given thi s title dating back to
about 1837. Her mother was naisa'ane Havea Tuli of Mata' ika, Vava'u, Tonga.
The son of Havea Tungua was Fa Otu Sia Veasi ' i Amelia Seini was given title Tamaha and was
responsibl e for the first written record of the oral Tongan Genealogy along with King Mumu ' i, Queen
Salote Tupou, chiefs, nobles and other genealogists from Tonga.
Kisaea 's father was Havea Tu 'i Ha'ateiho Afi A Foloha Havea. He was quite a character. He
was a little more on the feminine side. Afi a Foloha Havea Tu'i Ha'ateiho came on a short vi sit to
Vava'u and met Havea Tuli 's daughter llaisa'ane and they fell in love. They li ved together a few
months. Later naisa' ane di scovered that she was pregnant and the news reached Afi A Foloha Havea
Tu ' i Ha' ateiho. Since Christianity had been accepted in the islands, a new law was enacted that if a
woman had a chi ld out of wedlock, the man involved must serve six months in jail. This would be a
great di sgrace to the chief, so he begged and made an-angements with Havea Tuli to serve hi s jail time
for him. Thi s he did. So Afi A Foloha Havea Tu' li Ha' ateiho left Vava' u for hi s wife Ha ' iauvalu at
Ha' apai. He had tattooed hi s tongue and wanted her to have hers done also. She refused and later left
him for King Laufili Tonga at Mu' a. Ni ne months later llai sa'ane gave birth to a beautiful gi rl and
they named her Kisaea Si sifa and they gave her to her grandfather Havea Tuli whose last name was
Tu ' i Nahoki
SISIMATAELA'A ANDHIS SON, FAKATOU'IO
Story of Salole's Family Name, Fakalou'io of Felemea
A True Story
T
here was once a lady by the name of Fataimoeloa who li ved in Felemea (an island
belonging to'the Ha'apai Group). Everyday, very earl y in the moming, she would go and
take a swim on the beach of Felemea, and when the sun came up, she would get out of the water and
sit on the sand, warming herself, always sitting with her back to the sun. One day she di scovered that
she was expecting, and fi nall y gave birth to a baby boy. She name him Si simataela'a. (Sisi means a
festoon made of flowers, Mata-e-Ia'a means the face of the sun).
Sisimataela'a grew up to be a very handsome young man. One day, the king, Tu'i Tonga, and
his men arrived on the island of Felemea in search of an appropri ate husband for hi s only daughter,
Princess Fatafehi. When they landed in Felemea, he ordered them to go and search the island. They
found Fataimoeloa and her son at their little home, so they came back to infon-n the Tu'i Tonga, saying,
"King, we have searched the whole island and found not a single trace of life except for an old woman
and her son. Thi s man is the most handsome man we have ever seen. "
The Tu'i Tonga said, "Go then and tell that woman that the Tu'i Tonga wants her son to join
hi s crew."
When the men came and told this to the old woman, she was very sad. Ever since her son was
a little boy, she hid him fearing that somebody might come and take him away from her and now it had
come to pass. She could do nothing about it. So she told her son to go and fetch some piu (leaves of
the fan-palm), and she made some clothes for him out of them. Sisimataela'a then came and joined
the Tu'i Tonga and his crew.
They sailed all around the Tonga islands and then on to Uvea and Futuna: they even came to
Samoa, but they could not find any other man that was as handsome as Sisimataela'a, so they sailed
straight from there to Tongatapu. For eight days and eight nights they sailed and on the eighth
night Sisimataela'a came into the presence of the Tu'i Tonga and said to him, "Your Majesty, if you
would allow me, I would like to go ashore here, while you and your men continue on your way to
Tongatapu."
The Tu'i Tonga then answered him, "Where and which island do you want to go to?"
"Right now, we are pretty close to the shores of Felemea."
"Do not go, but sail with us to Tonga, and when we get there, some of my men will bring you
back to your mother."
Not knowing what the Tu'i Tonga had in mind, Sisimataela'a again said, "Your Majesty, it is
best that you let me off here now rather than giving your men the trouble of having to bring me back
here."
He was right when he said that they were quite close to the shores of Felemea, but the Tu'i
Tonga was determined to take him to be the husband of his daughter. The king ordered that the canoe
not stop but to sail round Tofua and Kao so Sisimataela'a would not know they were in the seas ofthe
Ha'apai Group. They timed it perfectly so that it would still be dark when they passed Tofua and Kao.
It is said that Sisimataela'a could tell that they were quite close to Felemea by simply feeling the flow
of the current, and he knew that it was from the strait in Felemea.
At last they reached Tonga, and went to Olotele, which was the Tu'i Tonga's residence in
Lapaha, Mu'a. Here Sisimataela'a was told to stay and marry the Tu'i Tonga's daughter Fatafehi. She
was informed that a man had been brought for her to wed, and she came to where Sisimataela'a was
to see what he was like. When she set eyes upon him, his good looks overcame her and she fainted
right on the spot. The minute she regained conscious, she told her father that she would like to marry
this young man right away, for she was afraid of losing him. It was then announced throughout all of
Tonga that the royal wedding was to take place. Sisimataela'a, too, was informed. He sought the Tu'i
Tonga and asked him to postpone the wedding date for a later time, because he wished to go back to
Ha'apai and tell his mother, and then he would retum, and do as Fatafehi wished.
Sisitamatela'a then sailed to Felemea and told his mother that the Tu'i Tonga wished him to
marry his daughter. Fataimoeloa instructed him to go and tell his father about the coming royal
wedding. He was told to go to the sun for that was his father. She had to give Sisimataela'a directions
about the way because he did not know. She thus said, "Go straight up to the east, and in the very deep
ocean, you will find a great big rock. Here you will sit and wait, and when the sun comes up, you will
then speak to it."
7
When the men came and told this to the old woman, she was very sad. Ever since her son was
a little boy, she hid him fearing that somebody might come and take him away from her and now it had
come to pass. She could do nothing about it. So she told her son to go and fetch some piu (leaves of
the fan-palm), and she made some clothes for him out of them. Sisimataela'a then came and joined
the Tu'i Tonga and his crew.
They sailed all around the Tonga islands and then on to Uvea and Futuna: they even came to
Samoa, but they could not tlnd any other man that was as handsome as Sisimataela'a, so they sai led
straight from there to Tongatapu. For eight days and eight nights they sail ed and on the eighth
night Sisimataela'a came into the presence of the Tu'i Tonga and said to him, "Your Majesty, if you
would allow me, I would like to go ashore here, while you and your men continue on your way to
Tongatapu."
The Tu'i Tonga then answered him, "Where and which island do you want to go to?"
"Right now, we are pretty close to the shores of Felemea."
"Do not go, but sail with us to Tonga, and when we get there, some of my men will bring you
back to your mother."
Not knowing what the Tu'i Tonga had in mind, Sisimataela'a again said, "Your Majesty, it is
best that you let me off here now rather than giving your men the troubl e of having to bring me back
here."
He was right when he s a i ~ that they were quite close to the shores of Felemea, but the Tu'i
Tonga was detennined to take him to be the husband of hi s daughter. The king ordered that the canoe
nol stop but to sail round Tofua and Kao so Sisimataela'a would not know they were in the seas of the
Ha'apai Group. They timed it perfectly so that it would still be dark when they passed Tofua and Kao.
It is said that Sisimataela'a could tell that they were quite close to Felemea by simply feeling the flow
of the current, and he knew that it was from the strait in Felemea.
At last they reached Tonga, and went to Olotele, which was the Tu'i Tonga's residence in
Lapaha, Mu'a. Here Sisimataela'a was told to stay and marry the Tu'i Tonga's daughter Fatafehi. She
was infonned that a man had been brought for her to wed, and she came to where Sisimataela'a was
to see what he was like. When she set eyes upon him, his good looks overcame her and she fainted
right on the spot. The minute she regained conscious, she told her father that she would like to marry
this young man right away, for she was afraid of losing him. It was then announced throughout all of
Tonga that the royal wedding was to take place. Sisimataela'a, too, was infon11ed. He sought the Tu'i
Tonga and asked him to postpone the wedding date for a later time, because he wished to go back to
Ha'apai and tell hi s mother, and then he would return, and do as Fatafehi wished.
Sisitamatela'a then sailed to Felcmea and told hi s mother that the Tu'i Tonga wished him to
marry his daughter. Fataimoeloa instructed him to go and tell hi s father about the coming royal
wedding. He was told to go to the sun for that was his father. She had to give Sisimataela'a directions
about the way because he did not know. She thus said, "Go straight up to the east, and in the very deep
ocean, you will find a great big rock. Here you will sit and wait, and when the sun comes up, you will
then speak to it."
Sisimataela'a rowed out in his canoe and reached the rock that his mother had told him
about. It was quite dark when he reached it, so he sat down on it and very soon fell asleep. Dawn
came and he was still fast asleep, for he was very tired from rowing the canoe. He was awakened
when he felt the sun on his face the following moming. He sprang up just in time to see the sun rising
slowly. He spoke to it: "I am Sisimataela'a, and I have come to talk to you." One of the sun's rays
reached out and took him up into the sky, and at the same time pulled a dark cloud to hide them from
the earth below. They settled down to talk and Sisimataela'a said to the sun, "My mother told me that
you are my father, and that I should come and let you know of my coming wedding. I am to marry the
Tu'i Tonga's only daughter, the Princess Fatafehi, so I have come here to find out what you think and
what you want me to do."
The sun then answered him, "Very well, you will take these two packages with you. One is
Good Fortune, and other Misfortune. Never open the one called Misfortune." When their
conversation ended, the dark cloud moved away and the sun put his son down onto the rock again and
started rising high in the sky. It is said that when the sun rises in the moming, it is always covered
from the earth by a dark cloud at a certain time every day. This is when the sun and his son had their
conversation. It can still be seen to this day.
Sisimataela'a got into his canoe again, and taking the two packages with him, rowed home.
Halfway to Felemea, he could not hold back his curiosity any more. The package Misfortune,
happened to be a very pretty package compared to the package ofGood Fortune which was really ugly.
It was then that he opened Misfortune and peeped inside. Suddently there was thunder and lightening
everywhere. Rain started to pour down upon him which developed into a very bad storm. The sea got
very rough and it started to shake with earthquakes as well. The little canoe sank and Sisimataela'a
started to swim. The sun looked down upon him and felt sorry for his son. So he took Sisimataela'a
up into the sky again, together with the two packages. "Why have you disobeyed me? You will go
back again and this time, do not ever touch Misfortune until the ceremony is over," was the sun's last
warning to Sisimataela'a.
Sisimataela'a once again found himself with the two packages on his canoe, and this time he
was determined to do as his father had told him. At last he was back at Felemea again. He and his
mother readied themselves to go to Tonga taking with them the two packages. The only other thing
his mother took with her was a Tongan kie (fine mat) and this, she wove herself. This is said to be the
first Tongan fine mat here in Tonga. Sisimataela'a and his mother reached Tonga and were taken to
a place called Pale'amahu (Wreath of Bountiful). People flocked in to see them, and mocked them,
saying, "They are only very poor peasants. They have no wealth or any Tongan handicrafts in their
possession, and they do not even have any people with them to prepare for and attend the ceremony."
Even though Sisimataela'a and his mother had no riches or wealth, they had something more
valuable, his good looks, the only important thing to Fatafehi. She did not care about the riches. H ;r
only desire was to get married to Sisimataela'a right away for he had captured her heart. It was the
moming of the big day, and Olotele was packed with people. Even the beach was full of little canoes
of people coming in to see the royal wedding ceremony. Almost every eye was on those two who had
nothing in their possession.
8
Sisimataela'a rowed out in his canoe and reached the rock that hi s mother had told him
about. It was quite dark when he reached it, so he sat down on it and very soon fell asleep. Dawn
came and he was st i II fast asleep, for he was very tired from rowing the canoe. He was awakened
when he felt the sun on his face the following morning. He sprang up just in time to see the sun rising
slowly. He spoke to it: "I am Sisimataela'a, and I have come to talk to you." One of the sun's rays
reached out and took him up into the sky, and at the same time pulled a dark cloud to hide them from
the eal1h below. They settled down to talk and Sisimataela'a said to the sun, "My mother told me that
you are my father, and that I should come and let you know of my coming wedding. I am to marry the
Tu'i Tonga's onl y daughter, the Princess Fatafehi, so I have come here to fi nd out what you think and
what you want me to do."
The sun then answered him, "Very well, you will take these two packages with you. One is
Good Fortune, and other Misfortune. Never open the one called Misfortune." When their
conversation ended, the dark cloud moved away and the sun put his son down onto the rock again and
started ri sing high in the sky. It is said that when the sun rises in the morning, it is always covered
from the earth by a dark cloud at a certain time every day. This is when the sun and his son had their
conversation. It can still be seen to thi s day.
Sisimataela'a got into his canoe again, and taking the two packages with him, rowed home.
Halfway to Felemea, he could not hold back his curiosity any more. The package Misfol1une,
happened to be a very pretty package compared to the package of Good FOl1une which was really ugl y.
It was then that he opened Misfortune and peeped inside. Suddemly there was thunder and lighteni ng
everywhere. Rain started to pour down upon him which developed into a very bad storm. The sea got
very rough and it started to shake with earthquakes as well. The little canoe sank and Sisimatael a'a
stal1ed to swim. The sun looked down upon him and felt sorry for his son. So he took Sisimatael a' a
up into the sky again, together with the two packages. "Why have you disobeyed me? You will go
back again and thi s time, do not ever touch Misfortune until the ceremony is over," was the sun's last
warnjng to Sisimataela'a.
Sisimataela'a once again found himself with the two packages on his canoe, and thi s time he
was determined to do as his father had told him. At last he was back at Felemea again. He and his
mother readied themselves to go to Tonga taking with them the two packages. The only other thi ng
hi s mother took with her was a Tongan kie (fine mat) and thi s, she wove herself. This is said to be the
first Tongan fine mat here in Tonga. Si simataela'a and his mother reached Tonga and were taken to
a place called Pale'amahu (Wreath of Bountiful). People flocked in to see them, and mocked them,
saying, "They are only very poor peasants. They have no wealth or any Tongan handicrafts in their
possession, and they do not even have any people with them to prepare for and attend the ceremony. "
Even though Sisimataela'a and his mother had no riches or wealth, they had something more
valuable, his good looks, the only important thing to Fatafehi. She did not care about the riches. Her
only desire was to get married to Sisimataela'a right away for he had captured her heart. It was the
morning of the big day, and Olotele was packed with people. Even the beach was full of little canoes
of people coming in to see the royal wedding ceremony. Almost every eye was on those two who had
nothing in their possession.
Everything was ready, and all the Tongan handicrafts were brought in before the Tu'i Tonga.
A messenger was sent to fetch Sisimataela'a as the big hour was approaching. Sisimataela'a then
unwrapped the package called Good Fortune, and in a instant, a very long row of houses appeared.
They were full of every kind of Tongan handicraft. There appeared many people as well as sumptuous
food presentations ready to attend the ceremony. Everybody present was amazed at the wonder being
performed. The people said that it was done by magic or witchcraft.
Fataimoeloa then made some sort of costume out of her Tongan fine mat for her son to put on.
It was something special as she had made it herself. Since that day every bridal costume or dress is
made up of Tongan fine mat.
When the wedding was performed, it was noticed that the groom's side had more wealth and
Tongan handicrafts than that of the bride. When all these were brought before the King, or the Tu'i
Tonga, he then told those who brought them to come and sit by him. Today, in big ceremonies such
as this, the people of Felemea still put their umu and Tongan handicrafts down before the King, and
then come and sit down by him. This was done because the groom and his mother were believed to
be out of this world.
After the wedding ceremony, Sisimataela'a opened up the other package, Misfortune. There
came a big storm which blew away all the garbage and rubbish from the town, making it clean again.
Even the big houses that were built by the wonder work of Good Fortune were blown away. The name
Felemea was started from this ceremony, which really means "things were scattered about."
Fatafehi and Sisimataela'a lived at Olotele, and a son was bom to them. The Tu'i Tonga named
him Fakatou'io which means, "Yea to either one: yes, he was the son of a living human being, and yes,
he was also the son of a god." One day, Sisimataela'a asked the Tu'i Tonga if he and his family could
go back to his home island and live there. The King reluctantly agreed, so Sisimataela'a, Fatafehi, their
son and many people who were given to them, moved and lived on Felemea. The name Fakatou'io is
still used in Felemea up to this day. There was also a special kind of kie, which was called the
Sisimataela'a kie, and it was under the keeping ofthe late Queen of Tonga. The first name ofthe island
Felemea is not known.
V.
THE FIRST WHITE MEN WHO CAME TO TONGA
^he first European residents in Tonga were beachcombers. Those who arrived before 1797
appear to have been convicts from New South Wales who left the American ship Otea at
Nomuka and Eua in March 1796. Morgan Bryan, an Dishman living in the Ha'apai group, was perhaps
the most influential of these. He was certainly the first European to move about the group and, in
retrospect, he was the first white man of whom the natives have any knowledge.
He was the protege ofthe hedonistic low-cultured beachcomber, skilled in the use of iron tools
and weapons, but otherwise deficient in communicating the advantage of Westem civilization.
The first missionaries who arrived on ihe Duff in April 1797 found him singularly depraved.
No doubt he was near naked and tattooed and they did not like him near them.
9
Everything was ready, and all the Tongan handi crafts were brought in before the Tu'i Tonga.
A messenger was sent to fetch Sisimataela'a as the big hour was approaching. Sisimataela'a then
unwrapped the package call ed Good Fortune, and in a instant, a very long row of houses appeared.
They were fu ll of every kind of Tongan handicraft. There appeared many people as well as sumptuous
food presentations ready to attend the ceremony. Everybody present was amazed at the wonder being
performed. The people said that it was done by magic or witchcraft.
Fataimoeloa then made some sort of costume out of her Tongan fine mat for her son to put on.
It was something special as she had made it herself. Since that day every bridal costume or dress is
made up of Tongan fine mat.
When the wedding was performed, it was noticed that the groom's side had more wealth and
Tongan handicrafts than that of the bride. When all these were brought before the King, or the Tu'i
Tonga, he then told those who brought them to come and sit by him. Today, in bi g ceremonies such
as this, the people of Felemea still put thei r umu and Tongan handicrafts down before the Ki ng, and
then come and sit down by him. This was done because the groom and hi s mother were believed to
be out of this world.
After the wedding ceremony, Si simataola' a opened up the other package, Misfortune. There
came a big storm which blew away all the garbage and rubbi sh from the town, making it clean again.
Even the bi g houses that were built by the wonder work of Good Fortune were blown away. The name
Felemea was started from thi s ceremony, which reall y means "things were scattered about. "
Fatafehi and Sisimataela'a lived at Olotele, and a son was bom to them. The Tu'i Tonga named
him Fakatou'io which means, "Yea to either one: yes, he was the son of a li ving human being, and yes,
he was also the son of a god." One day, Sisimataela'a asked the Tu'i Tonga if he and hi s family could
go back to his home island and live there. The King reluctantly agreed, so Sisimataela'a, Fatafehi, their
son and many people who were given to them, moved and li ved on Felemea. The name Fakatou' io is
still used in Felemea up to thi s day. There was also a special kind of kie, which was called the
Sisimataela'a kie, and it was under the keeping of the late Queen of Tonga. The fi rst name of the island
Felemea is not known.
THE FIRST WHITE MEN WHO CAME TO TONGA
T
he first European residents in Tonga were beachcombers. Those who arrived before 1797
appear to have been convicts from New South Wales who left the American ship Olea at
Nomukaand Eua in March 1796. Morgan Bryan, an Irishman li ving in the Ha' apai group, was perhaps
the most influential of these. He was certainly the first European to move about the group and, in
retrospect, he was the first white man of whom the nati ves have any knowledge.
He was the protege of the hedoni stic low-cultured beachcomber, skilled in the use of iron tools
and weapons, but otherwise deficient in communicating the advantage of Western civili zation.
The first mi ssionaries who arrived on the Duff in April 1797 found him si ngul arly depraved.
No doubt he was near naked and tattooed and they did not like him near them.
10
Benjamin Ambler and John Connelly (or Kennelly) the other two convict beachcombers still
in the group in 1797, were seemingly less offensive to godly men. Ambler from London, England, and
Connelly from Cork, Ireland, both young men in their twenties, had come to Tongatapu soon after
landing at Eua.
Connelly resided with Fatefehi, the Tu'i Tonga designate at Mu'a, while Ambler appeared to
be attrached to the family of the Tu'i Kanokupolu. In fact, he was married to the daughter of the
Commander-in-chief of thc fleet of Tukuaho.
Both Ambler and Connelly were fluent in Tongan and served the missionaries as interpreters.
Ambler later was put to death and Connelly was promised by the missionaries a clock to be given to
Fatafehi and when they didn't he was removed by Capt. Wilson of the Duffin September 1797. Bryan
removed to Vava'u, but was clubbed to death in 1799 for raping a chief's daughter.
The first three missionaries were killed in Tonga on May 10, 1799. They were (1) Daniel
Powell, (2) Samuel Harper, (3) Samuel Gaulton at their house at Pea village together with the
beachcomber Benjamin Bumham. To the Christian world they became the first martyrs of Polynesia.
In January 1800 there was a ship wreck of the Argo in the Lau islands of Fiji. One survivor
named Doyle was responsible for the massacre of the captain and crew of the American ship Duke of
Portland at Hihifo on June 1,1802. All that survived of this disaster were four boys, a diminutive man,
a Malasian and an American woman Elizabeth Morey and her negro maid Eliza.
Elizabeth Morey lived as a wife ofthe important chief Teukava until she was able to make her
escape on the Union on September 30, 1804. Eliza was carried off to Numuka, her fate unknown.
After this, Doyle, the four boys and the diminutive maid murdered their captors and themselves
sailed away.
Another sea man, presumably from the wrecked ship Argo was Charles Savage. He was
afterwards taken from Tonga in the Eliza by Capt. Correy on May 16, 1808.
Charley, the Malasian servant from the Duke of Portland attempted to leave the Union and
KuiKui, a Hawaiian, was leader in the capture of the PortAu Prince at Lifuka on December 1, 1806.
William Mariner, a young Englishman of intelligence and feeling, lived with the family of
Finau Ulukalala I. Later he wrote an almost complete history of what was going on in Tonga while
he was captive there after the Tongans seized their ship PortAu Prince at Lifuka. Later he stowed off
on another ship and left for England and there he wrote the Tongan history.
EARLY METHODIST HISTORY ABOUT KING SIAOSI TUPOU I
T
ihis story was found in the joumal of an early Methodist missionary who came to Tonga in
1839 and they explain how Siaosi Tupou I was so open minded in knowing how to run his
govemment and brought new leadership to his people.
The first thing the early Wesleyan missionaries noticed was his great love and concern for his
people. Second his strength to be a leader among his people. Third he had no fear and was not afraid.
10
Benjamin Ambler and John Connell y (or Kennelly) the other two convict beachcombers still
in the group in 1797, were seemingly less offensive to godly men. Amblerfrom London, England, and
Connell y from Cork, Ireland, both young men in their twenties, had come to Tongatapu soon after
landi ng at Eua.
Connell y resided with Fatefehi , the Tu' i Tonga designate at Mu ' a, while Ambler appeared to
be attrached to the family of the Tu ' i Kanokupolu. In fact, he was marri ed to the daughter of the
Commander-in-chief of the fleet of Tukuaho.
Both Ambler and Connell y were fluent in Tongan and served the mi ssionaries as interpreters.
Ambler later was put to death and Connell y was promised by the missionari es a clock to be given to
Fatafehi and when they didn't he was removed by Capt. Wilson of the DlIilin September 1797. Bryan
removed to Yava ' u, but was clubbed to death in 1799 for raping a chief's daughter.
The first three missionaries were killed in Tonga on May 10, 1799. They were (1) Daniel
Powell , (2) Samuel Harper, (3) Samuel Gaulton at their house at Pea vill age together with the
beachcomber Benjamin Burnham. To the Chri stian world they became the first martyrs of Polynesia.
In January 1800 there was a ship wreck of the Argo in the Lau islands of Fiji. One survivor
named Doyle was responsible for the massacre of the captain and crew of the American shi p Duke of
Portland at Hihifo on June 1, 1802. All that survived of thi s disaster were four boys, a diminutive man,
a Malasian and an Ameri can woman Elizabeth Morey and her negro maid Eli za.
Elizabeth Morey li ved as a wife of the important chi efTeukava until she was able to make her
escape on the Union on September 30, 1804. Eliza was carri ed off to Numuka, her fate unknown.
Afterthis, Doyle, the four boys and the diminutive maid murdered thei r captors and themselves
sa il ed away.
Another sea man, presumably from the wrecked ship Argo was Charles Savage. He was
afterwards taken from Tonga in the Eliza by Capt. Correy on May 16, 1808.
Charley, the Malasian servant from the Duke of Portland attempted to leave the Union and
KuiKui, a Hawaiian, was leader in the capture of the POri Au Prince at Lifuka on December I , 1806.
Willi am Mari ner, a young Engl ishman of intelligence and feeling, li ved with the family of
Finau Ulukalala 1.. Later he wrote an almost compl ete history of what was goi ng on in Tonga while
he was captive there after the Tongans seized their ship Pori All Prince at Lifuka. Later he stowed off
on another ship and left for England and there he wrote the Tongan hi story.
EARLY METHODIST HISTORY ABOUT KING SIAOSI TUPOU I
T
hi s story was found in the journal of an early Methodist missionary who came to Tonga in
1839 and they explain how Siaosi Tupou I was so open minded in knowing how to run hi s
government and brought new leadership to hi s people.
The first thing the early Wesleyan missionaries noticed was his great love and concern for hi s
people. Second hi s strength to be a leader among his people. Third he had no fear and was not afraid.
11
As he was reading this from Misi Tomasi's writing about the first Tui Kanokopulu Siaosi
Tupou I of Tonga, he was amazed at how he was able to become a great king at this time. (Misi
Tomasi had the honor to baptize the king when he was just a small infant.)
He grew up and at a young age was able to make new laws at Pauono, Vava'u and in that
meeting he said, "This building with the great posts will stand as a monument of your freedom to
choose democracy. All laws will be the same for royalty and other people. "
Second was the law about keeping the Sabbath day holy. He encouraged his people to feel free
to choose any church that they might like to join. Third, he had seen so many men and women who
weren't married but living together, that he put a stop to it when they became Christian. Their lives
changed to the Lord's way and no longer wanted to dwell in sin.
Fourth, he wanted to divide all his land equally among his people so they could raise a family
and be able to care for them also. I assume that is why King Siaosi Tupou I wanted to sail to Sidney,
Australia, so he might leam how to lease his land.
In October 1,1853 there was an English man named Robert Young who came to Tonga as a
special guest speaker at a conference ofthe Methodist missionaries who first came to the south seas
on a vessel called John Wesley. King Siaosi Tupou I needed to go to Australia for more information
on how other countries run their govemment. This is where he witnessed how some people were
sleeping out on street comers, some were begging for money, some were sleeping in parks. After
seeing the towns of Sydney, Australia, they again sailed to Hobart, Tasmania with some other leaders
of the Wesleyan Church and missionaries on the same vessel John Wesley.
On the trip to Tasmania, King Siaosi Tupou I wanted a pair of new shoes. They didn't have
the right size, so when he went to the store, they took a long stick and used that to measure the length
and width of his feet. The shoe store decided to keep those sticks as a memory of the Royal King of
Tonga. Never in their history had a Royal King entered their shoe store. Shortly after that trip the
store owner gave those sticks to the Methodist Church at Tasmania to keep.
After they left Tasmania on this vessel, Robert Young sat down and was interviewing the king
how he liked the trip, their beautiful cities and especially their wharf, their bright lights. The king
replied, "Oh yes, I like everything that I can see and witness for myself. But the main thing in my
mind, I want to know how these people live and are they really happy, and if they had their freedom
to share and to choose for themselves, what they would like in the future."
In another book called Southern World, Robert Young mentioned that he had been with high
officials throughout their trip in the South Seas but had never met anyone like Siaosi Tupou I of Tonga.
Robert Young said the King of Tonga is one of the bravest with a very dignified character. In
meekness and love he ruled his people as he pledged at the beginning of his reign, that God and Tonga
are my Heritage, and he would leave Tonga to guide and rule by God above.
Again Siaosi Tupou I promised his people that the land in Tonga would not be allowed to be
bought, but he would protect his own people and those foreigners who might like to come and lease
for a business or otherwise, if they are Tongan citizens or not.
When the crown Prince of Tonga, Tupou IV joined some ofthe missionary children at school
in Nuku'alofa, he really enjoyed it. Later he attended Tupou college and joined Tupou College chorus.
When he was a young adult they left for Sydney, Australia on a singing trip. During this trip one of
I I
As he was reading thi s from Misi Tomasi's writing about the fi rst Tui Kanokopulu Siaosi
Tupou I of Tonga, he was amazed at how he was able to become a great king at this time. (Misi
Tomas i had the honor to baptize the king when he was just a small infant.)
He grew up and at a young age was able to make new laws at Pauono, Vava' u and in that
meeting he sai d, "Thi s building with the great posts will stand as a monument of your freedom to
choose democracy. All laws will be the same for royalty and other people. "
Second was the law about keeping the Sabbath day holy. He encouraged hi s people to feel free
to choose any church that they might li ke to join. Third, he had seen so many men and women who
weren' t married but li ving together, that he put a stop to it when they became Chri stian. Their lives
changed to the Lord's way and no longer wanted to dwell in sin.
Fourth, he wanted to divide all his land equall y among hi s people so they could raise a family
and be able to care for them also. I assume that is why King Siaosi Tupou 1 wanted to sail to Sidney,
Australia, so he mi ght learn how to lease his land.
In October 1, 1853 there was an English man named Robert Young who came to Tonga as a
special guest speaker at a conference of the Methodist missionaries who first came to the south seas
on a vessel called .Iohn Wesley. King Siaosi Tupou I needed to go to Australia for more information
on how other countries run their government. This is where he witnessed how some people were
sleeping out on street corners, some were begging for money, some were sleeping in parks. After
seeing the towns of Sydney, "\ustralia, they again sai led to HobaJt, Tasmania with some other leaders
of the Wesleyan Church and missionaries on the same vessel .Iohn Wesley.
On the trip to Tasmania, King Siaosi Tupou I wanted a pair of new shoes. They didn't have
the right size, so when he went to the store, they took a long stick and used that to measure the length
and width of his feet. The shoe store decided to keep those sticks as a memory of the Royal King of
Tonga. Never in their hi story had a Royal King entered their shoe store. Shortly after that trip the
store owner gave those sticks to the Methodist Church at Tasmania to keep.
After they left Tasmania on this vessel, Robert Young sat down and was interviewing the king
how he liked the trip, their beautiful cities and especially their wharf, their bright lights. The king
repli ed, "Oh yes, I li ke everything that I can see and witness for myself. But the main thing in my
mind, I want to know how these people live and are they really happy, and if they had their freedom
to share and to choose for themselves, what they wou ld like in the future."
In another book called Southern World, Robert Young mentioned that he had been with hi gh
officials throughout their trip in the South Seas but had never met anyone like Siaosi Tupou I of Tonga.
Robert Young said the King of Tonga is one of the bravest with a very dignified character. In
meekness and love he ruled hi s people as he pledged at the beginning of his reign, that God and Tonga
are my Heritage, and he would leave Tonga to guide and rule by God above.
Again Siaosi Tupou I promi sed his people that the land in Tonga would not be all owed to be
bought, but he would protect hi s own people and those foreigners who might like to come and lease
for a business or otherwise, if they are Tongan citizens or not.
When the crown Prince of Tonga, Tupou IV joined some of the missionary children at school
in Nuk u' alofa, he really enjoyed it. Later he attended Tupou college and joined Tupou College chorus.
When he was a young adult they left for Sydney, Australia on a singing trip. During this trip one of
12
the missionaries from the Wesleyan Church gave him these sticks his grandfather Siaosi Tupou I used
for his shoe measurement at the shoe store. Tongans display them at their museum at Tupou College
which is now called Toloa College in the year 1933. The sticks had been at the missionary's home
from 1853 to 1933 and it was almost 80 years that these sticks were kept by the Wesleyan missionaries
in Sydney, Australia, and now are kept at the museum at Toloa, Tongatapu, Tonga.
T;
DAVID'S ROYAL LINE
ihe promise was given to King David: And thine house and thy kingdom shall he established
for ever before thee: thy throne shall he established for ever. II Samuel 7:16.
At the end of the 70 years of Babylonian captivity the Jews were restored to Palestine-a
kingdom without a king of Davidic line. If Daniel and his associates were of that line, they made no
claim to the throne. Publicly, in Judea, the royal line of David disappeared and seemingly has been
lost, as they said, to latter days.
Long after the ten tribes had been carried away by Shalmaneser, Nebuchadnezzar came up from
Babylon and subdued the Jews and made the reigning King prisoner. Zedekiah had a number of sons.
The Bible tells us that they were all put to death before their father, that his eyes were put out, and that
he was carried down into Babylon where he lived in darkness the remainder of his days. (II Kings 25:7)
Thus it seemed that the royal house of Judah was at last obliterated, for since then the Judean throne
confined to the area ofthe Holy Land has known no royal son ofthe house of David. But in supposing
that he had obliterated the Davidic line, the Babylonian King was mistaken, as are all those secular
historians who name the foregoing events as the ending of that line.
We leam from the Book of Mormon (Helaman 8:2) that Mulek, a young son of Zedekiah was
taken secretly by friends and removed from the jurisdiction of the Babylonian ruler. Probably they
traveled to Egypt initially, with other Jewish exiles of whom a number were distinguished personages;
and the company conveying him, probably impressed with the warning of the prophet Jeremiah that
the Jews who remained in Egypt would be put to death (Jeremiah 44:12-14) took a hasty departure.
The only way to safety was by sea, westward along the Mediterranean and passing the Pillars
of Hercules, and the Straight of Gibralter from the latter point, ships from all along the Mediterranean
coast frequently went to "the isles beyond the sea"-the British Isles, but in this instance, willing or
otherwise, the ship's company was drawn across the Atlantic ocean instead and reached the Western
hemisphere. Here they flourished for centuries (from about 585 B.C. to after 200 B.C.; yet having no
records of scriptures for a guide in divine instruction, they wandered from the worship of the God of
Israel into idolatry {Book of Mormon Omni 15-17)
The Nephites had their own problems in the new world, and through inspiration Mosiah lead
a group of righteous Nephites to the people of Mulek. They were embraced by the Mulekites and
merged with them and although the Mulekites were more numerous, accepted Mosiah as their King
and were delighted with the information he brought them about their ancestry and history. Even their
language had been corrupted and King Mosiah taught them in his language. The Mulekites were lead
by a man by the name of Zarahemla, who was a direct descendant of Mulek, thus the Davidic line
carried from there to the Nephites through their merging.
12
the missionaries from the Wesleyan Church gave him these sticks hi s grandfather Siaosi Tupou I used
for his shoe measurement at the shoe store. Tongans display them at their museum at Tupou College
which is now called Toloa College in the year 1933. The sticks had been at the mi ssionary' s home
from 185310 1933 and it was almost 80 years that these sticks were kept by the Wesleyan missionaries
in Sydney, Australia, and now are kept at the museum at Toloa, Tongatapu, Tonga.
DA VlD'S ROYAL LINE
T
he promise was given 10 King David: And thine house and thy kingdom shall be established
for ever before thee: thy throne shet/! be establishedfor ever. II Samue!7:16.
At the end of the 70 years of Babylonian captivity the Jews were reslOred to Palestine-a
kingdom without a king of Davidic line. If Daniel and his associates were of that line, they made no
claim to the throne. Publicly, in Judea, the royal line of David disappeared and seemingly has been
lost, as they said, to latter days.
Long after the ten tribes had been carried away by Shalmaneser, Nebuchadnezzarcame up from
Babylon and subdued the Jews and made the reigning King prisoner. Zedekiah had a number of sons.
The Bible tell s us that they were all put to death before their father, that hi s eyes were put out, and that
he was carried down into Babylon where he lived in darkness the remainderof hi s days. (II Kings 25:7)
Thus it seemed that the royal house of Judah was at last obliterated, for since then the Judean throne
confined to the area of the Holy Land has known no royal son of the house of David. But in supposing
that he had obliterated the Davidic line, the Babylonian King was mistaken, as are all those secular
historians who name the foregoing events as the ending of that line.
We learn from the Book of Mormon (Helaman 8:2) that Mulek, a young son of Zedekiah was
taken secret ly by friends and removed from the juri sdiction of the Babylonian ruler. Probably they
traveled to Egypt initially, with other Jewish exiles of whom a number were di sti ngui shed personages;
and the company conveying him, probably impressed with the warning of the prophet Jeremiah that
the Jews who remained in Egypt would be put to death (Jeremiah 44:12-14) lOok a hasty departure.
The onl y way to safety was by sea, westward along the Mediterranean Hnd passing the Pillars
of Hercules, and the Straight ofGibralter from the latter point, ships from all along the Mediterranean
coast frequently went to "the isles beyond the sea"-the British Isles, but in thi s instance, willing or
otherwise, the ship' s company was drawn across the. Atlantic ocean instead and reached the Western
hemisphere. Here they flouri shed for centuri es (from about 585 B.C. to after 200 B.c.; yet having no
records of scriptures for a guide in divine instruction, they wandered from the worship of the God of
Israel into idolatry (Book of Mormon Omni 15-17)
The Nephites had their own problems in the new world, and through inspiration Mosiah lead
a group of righteous Nephites to the people of Mulek. They were embraced by the Mulekites and
merged with them and although the Mulekites were more numerous, accepted Mosiah as their King
and were deli ghted with the information he brought them about their ancestry and hi story. Even their
language had been corrupted and King Mosiah taught them in hi s language. The Mulekites were lead
by a man by the name of Zarahemla, who was a direct descendant of Mulek, thus the Davidic line
carried from there to the Nephites through their merging.
13
From that direct line of David was born a man named Hagoth who built ships. He needed a
captain for his ship and found one of his royal cousins named Hawaiiloa from David's royal line lo
help find these Nephi te people a new home. Another way our Heavenly Father wanted to scatter the
House of Israel around the world and later will gather them through the gospel. It was God's plan from
the beginning. Prophet Spencer W. Kimball told us it took 400 years to scatter these people out to the
South Seas, and they were Nephite people. From the area of colonization, Hawaiiloa left 88 B.C. His
wife was Hualalai. His oldest son Maui ai Alu was bom 65 B.C. A second child, a daughter named
Oahu was bom 63 B.C. and another son Kanai was bom 61 B.C., and the Hawaiian islands were
named after him. Later his royal descendants were Tangaloa. Monuka, Tangarkoa Rangi, Tangaloa
Motua, and Hawaiiloa's younger brother Kei. Kei wanted to sail and find him new islands. He
discovered Tahiti. After being there he found out that some Tahitians were cannibals and he joined
with them. He was surprised that the people in Tahiti spoke the same language as he.
There was a Nephite man named Opuka Honua who married a Lamanite named Lana in the
year 263 A.D. who used to live in Central America. He left with his family because he didn't like
wars. He sailed out to sea and found Easter island. They populated that island and war again began
on Easter island and the land was getting too small for their population, so some decided to head out
to sea and look for new land. That's when they found Tahiti. Later they found New Zealand, the land
with the long white cloud, Rarotonga, and other islands. Tangaloa Moruka found Fiji, but when diey
first arrived it was inhabited by some dark skinned people living up by the mountain. They came from
the Solomon Islands in a ship that wrecked during a hurricane. They drifted out to sea and landed at
Fiji. But the Tongaloa people lived by the sea.
Tangroa Langi said he needed to head out to sea also and to look for a new island for himself.
When they sighted the tall mountain of Samoa it reminded him of Hawaii, so they called the island
Savaii. He remained in Samoa.
Tangaroa Motua the oldest, decided to look for a new land for himself and his people so they
left Samoa and headed out to sea like the other two. It didn't take him long before they sighted the two
Nuia islands and Tafahi, and the third one was Toku Island. That is where the first royal line of King
David resided. It is a beautiful small island with beautiful white sand and lots of different colored fish
around so Tangaloa Motua stayed at Toku. To this day the descendants of Tangaloa still own that
island. Later the king found out that big foreign ships would come and trick these islanders to come
inside their ship to trade their wares, penny nails for a pig or food or tapa dom or mats or whatever
the Tongans had, as they didn't know any better. As 75 to 100 people were inside their ship, they
closed and locked the doors. They used the people in the hold as slaves to clean their boats, even sold
the children for 50 cents, women for 50 cents and men for one dollar. They did this throughout the
south seas.
We leam that the Lord took the royal line of David (the male heir lo the royal line) because it
came from Mulek and hid him upon this tiny island of Tonga, so he could remain there without fear
and to protect him. And he will not go to war. The blood lines from the Royal house of Judah, Levi,
Ephraim and Manasseh flow in the veins of the Royal couple.
n3
From that direcI line of David was bam a man named HagOlh who built ' hips. He needed a
captain for his ship and found one of hi s royal cousins named Hawai iloa from D:I\' id-, royal line to
help find these ephite people a new home. Another way our Heavenly Father wam<!d to sameI' the
House ofIsrael around the world and later will gatherthem through the gospel. It w' - God-;;, plan from
the beginning. Prophet Spencer W. Kimball told us it took 400 years 10 scaner these people OUI to Ihe
South Seas. and they were Nephile people. From Ihe area of col onization. Hawaiiloa len B.C Hi-
wife was Hualalai . Hi s oldest son Maui ai Alu was bom 65 B.C. A econd child. a daughler Iltmled
Oahu was bom 63 B.C. and another son Kanai was born 61 B.C.. and the Hawaiian islands. were
named after him. Laler hi s royal descendants were Tangaloa . . Monula T:mgarkoa Rangi. Tangaloa
Motua, and Hawaiiloa 's younger brother Kei. Kei wanted to sail and find him new island.,. He
discovered Tahiti. After being there he found out that some Tahitians were cannibal and he joined
with them. He was surprised that the people in Tahiti spoke the same J:mguage a. he.
There was a Nephite man named Opuka Honua who marri ed a Lanlanite named Lana in Ihe
year 263 A.D. who used to li ve in Central Ameri ca. He left wilh his fami ly because he didn'l like
wars. He sailed out to sea and found E3ster island. They populated that i land ,md war again began
on Easter island and the land was gelli ng too small for their populati on. so ome decided to he<ld OUl
to sea and look for new land. That ' s when they found Tahiti. Later they found New Zealand. the land
wi th the long whi te cloud, Rarotonga, and other islands. Tangaloa Moruka found Fiji . but when they
first arrived it was inhabited by some dark skinned people li ving up by the mountain. Theycame from
the Solomon Islands in a ship that wrecked during a hurricane. They drifted out to sea and landed at
Fiji. But the Tongaloa people li ved by the sea.
Tangroa Langi said he needed to head out to sea also and to look for a new island for him elf.
When they sighted the tall mountain of Samoa it reminded him of Hawai i. a they called the isltmd
Savaii. He remained in Samoa.
Tangaroa Motua the oldest, decided to look for a new land for himself ,md his people so they
left Samoa and headed alit to sea I ike the other two. It didn't take him long before they ighted the two
Nuia islands and Tafahi , and the third one was Toku Island. That is where the first royal line of King
David resided. It is a beautiful small island with beautiful white sand and lots of different colored tish
around so Tangaloa Motua stayed at Toku. To thi s day the descendant s of Tangaloa still own that
island. Later the king found out that big foreign ships would come and trick these islanders to come
inside their ship to trade their wares, penny nail s for a pi g or food or tapa cloth or mats or whatever
the Tongans had, as they didn't know any better. As 75 to 100 people were inside their ship. they
closed and locked the doors. They used the people in the hold as slaves to clean their boats. even sold
the children for 50 cents, women for 50 cents and men for one dollar. They did this throughoul the
south seas.
We learn that the Lord took the royal line of David (the male heir to the royal line) because it
came from Mulek and hid him upon thi s ti ny island of Tonga, so he could remain there wi thout fear
and to protect him. And he will not go to war. The blood lines from the Royal house of Judah, Levi.
Ephraim and Manasseh fl ow in the veins of the Royal couple.
14
Now we will retum to the time of King Zedekiah at the time of his captivity. Zedekiah at that
time had two daughters. The prophet Jeremiah was the great grandfather of these two girls. His
granddaughter was the wife of Zedekiah, the King. In order that they might be protected against the
Babylonians, they were left in the care of Jeremiah,the prophet. He became their guardian and
custodian of their welfare. Jeremiah escaped with them down into Egypt, it is said, to the same place
where Joseph and Maiy went with Christ, our Lord, at the time of the decree of Herod by which the
children of Bethlehem were put to death. They abode there at a place called Taphanes, the ruins of
which are now well known. The natives refer to it to this day as the palace of the Jews' daughters or
the house ofthe old Prophet (see Jeremiah 41:10,11,14,15, and 43:1-7).
After the conquest of Palestine, the Babylonian armies invaded Egypt and it became evident
that they would be victorious over the Egyptians.
At this time we loose sight of Jeremiah and the two girls so far as the Bible is concerned. At
this time the ships of Tyre were sailing the Mediterranean. The tribe of Dan, one ofthe sons of Jacob,
was the sea faring nation. Their ships brought in from the British Isles the tin used to make the brass
that went into the Temple of Solomon. After the fall of Jerusalem, a ship landed upon the coast of
Spain, from which an old man and his secretary and two young women disembarked. They remained
for a short period in that country where one of the girls married into the reigning house of Spain.
The old man, who is referred to in Deland as Ollamh Fodhea (old prophet) in their traditions
and songs which they will sing of him, crossed the channel and landed on the coast of Deland, taking
with him the elder ofthe two girls whose name was Tamar Tephi, which translated from Hebrew into
English means, "The Beautiful Palm or The Beautiful Wanderer."
Eochaidh was the reigning King of Deland (there were two kings at that time on the little
island). When there was an invasion from the outside they all joined together and had one king, who
was acknowledge their leader. When there was no danger from the outside, they fought against each
other.
Eochaidh solicited the hand of Tamar Tephi in marriage, to which the old prophet consented,
provided the king would accept the religion which he brought. He brought with him a small chart,
strongly bound, which was very jealously guarded and the contents of which were unknown. The King
of Ireland agreed to this. The marriage ceremony was performed, and the religion of Ollamha Fodla,
which corresponded almost exactly to the service to God under the law of Moses, was established in
Ireland. After a time the king went over and effected the conquest of the southern part of Scotland.
Both he and his Queen finally died and were buried at Tara in Ireland. A great monument stands there
today over their graves.
Modem genealogists now at work upon the collection and definite establishments of
genealogical records, trace both the Tudor and the Stuart lines of Kings from the present Queen
Elizabeth of England directly back to the girl Tamar Tephi. So it would seem that, unknown to men
at the time, the Lord has preserved that lineage.
So the Lord has kept the royal blood of the house of Israel until today; and when the final
determination of it all is made we will find out that he has been watching over those people, that it is
he and not their numerical strength that has made Great Britain and European countries the dominant
powers of the world. Put them together in union and they lead the world financially, in civilization,
in development, in education and modem thought.
14
Now we wi ll ret urn to the time of King Zedekiah at the time of hi s captivity. Zedekiah at that
time had two daughters. The prophet Jeremiah was the great grandfather of these two girls. Hi s
granddaughter was the wife of Zedekiah, the King. In order that they mi ght be protected against the
Babylonians, they were left in the care of Jeremiah,the prophet. He became their guardian and
custodian of their welfare. Jeremiah escaped with them down into Egypt, it is said, to the same place
where Joseph and Mary went with Chri st, our Lord, at the time of the decree of Herod by which the
children of Bethlehem were put to death. They abode there at a place call ed Taphanes, the ruins of
which are now well known. The natives refer to it to this day as the palace of the Jews' daughters or
the house of the old Prophet (see Jeremiah 41 : 1 0, 11 , 14, 15 , and 43: 1-7).
After the conquest of Palestine, the Babylonian armies invaded Egypt and it became evident
that they would be victorious over the Egyptians.
At thi s time we loose sight of Jeremiah and the two girls so far as the Bible is concerned. At
this time the ships of Tyre were sailing the Mediterranean. The tribe of Dan, one of the sons of Jacob,
was the sea faring nation. Their ships brought in from the British Isles the tin used to make the brass
that went into the Temple of Solomon. After the fall of Jerusalem, a ship landed upon the coast of
Spain, from which an old man and hi s secretary and two young women di sembarked. They remained
for a short period in that country where one of the girls married into the rei gning house of Spain.
The old man, who is referred to in Ireland as Ollamh Fodhea (old prophet) in their traditions
and songs which they will sing of him, crossed the channel and landed on the coast of Ireland, taking
with him the elder of the two gi rl s whose name was Tamar Tephi , which translated from Hebrew into
Engli sh means, "The Beautiful Palm or The Beautiful Wanderer. "
Eochaidh was the reigning King of Ireland (there were two kings at that time on the little
island). When there was an invasion from the outside they all joined together and had one king, who
was acknowledge their leader. When there was no danger from the outside, they fo ught against each
other.
Eochaidh soli cited the hand of Tamar Tephi in marriage, to which the old prophet consented,
provided the king would accept the reli gion whi ch he brought. He brought with him a small chart,
strongly bound, which was very jealously guarded and the contents of whi ch were unknown. The King
of Ireland agreed to thi s. The marriage ceremony was perfOlmed, and the religion of Ollamha Fodla,
whi ch corresponded almost exactly to the service to God under the law of Moses, was established in
lJ·eland. After a time the king went over and effected the conquest of the southern part of Scotland.
Both he and hi s Queen finall y died and were buri ed at Tara in Ireland. A great monument stands there
today over their graves.
Modern genealogists now at work upon the collecti on and definite establishments of
genealogical records, trace both the Tudor and the Stuart lines of Ki ngs from the present Queen
Eli zabeth of England directly back to the girl Tamar Tephi. So it would seem that, unknown to men
at the time, the Lord has preserved that lineage.
So the Lord has kept the royal blood of the house of Israel until today; and when the final
determination of it all is made we wi ll find out that he has been watching over those peopl e, that it is
he and not their numerical strength that has made Great Britai n and European countries the dominant
powers of the world. Put them together in union and they lead the world financially, in civilization,
in development, in education and modern thought.
15
In 1989 lohani and Salote finally completed the Royal line. The genealogy of the King and
Queen of Tonga had been traced, researched, and checked over and over, and finally connected with
the Royal line of Queen Elizabeth of England. The Tongan Royal line from Mulek and Queen
Elizabeth's line came from Mulek's sister Tamar Tephi, and the royal line of Spain from the younger
sister. All are from David's Royal line.
-Excerps taken from Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine, Vol23, pp 6-8
And Ancient Israel Pedigrees told by Pres. Anthony W. Wins.
T!
THE GOSPEL REACHES VAVA'U
ihe first missionaries ofthe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who came by boat,
called S.S. Ovalau, arrived from Tongatapu to Ha'apai, then to Vava'u around the 8
th
of
Sep. 1895. Elder Walker and Elder Jensen came to start the missionary work there.
Before they left for Vava'u they visited the King at his palace at Tongatapu and showed him
how the church missionary work is done and made church history and records; and also showed him
some pictures of Salt Lake City. There were three missionaries who visited Elder Andrew Jensen who
was an assistant to the historian for the Church. He was sent down to teach the missionaries how to
keep records, arriving on the 17
th
of August 1895. The Church had been in Tonga four years.
Some Elders had been serving at Tongatapu: Elder Robert Smith, Elder Walker, and Elder
Schill since November 18941 believe. The 8
th
of September 1895 these missionaries were transferred
to Vava'u. There was a meeting held that aftemoon. There were about 50 Europeans who were all
living at Vava'u and all came. I believe our German Wolfgramm and Sanft families who were living
at Vava'u at that time were present at this meeting, and lots of sailors from the ship also came to join
them.
About 6:00 am the next morning these missionaries walked up to the Mount Talau area about
two miles away and sang We Thank Thee 0 God for a Prophet. After that they went down on their
bended knees in a very humble prayer offered to the Lord, and dedicated the land and the people of
Vava'u for preaching and that missionary work would thrive there.
These three missionaries were filled with the spirit of our Heavenly Father. At that moment,
their prayer had been received and gratefully accepted, they felt His love and peace and joy come upon
them. The happiness they felt revealed to them through God's spirit that they were worthy and grateful
to serve him and needed to continue his work among these people.
A few days later Elder Jensen left for Samoa and left the two elders to continue to work at
Vava'u.
(This was recorded by Elder Jensen)
15
In 1989 lohani and Salote fi nally completed the Royal line. The genealogy of the King and
Queen of Tonga had been traced, researched, and checked over and over, and finally connected with
the Royal line of Queen Eli zabet h of England. The Tongan Royal line from Mulek and Queen
Eli zabeth 's line came from Mulek' s sister Tamar Tephi, and the royal line of Spain from the younger
sister. All are hom David's Royal line.
-Excerps taken from Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine, Vo123, pp 6-8
And Ancient Israel Pedigrees told by Pres. Anthony W. Ivins.
THE GOSPEL REACHES VA VA'U
T
he first missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who came by boat,
called 5.5. Ova/au, arrived from Tongatapu to Ha'apai, then to Vava'u around the 8'" of
Sep. 1895. Elder Walker and Elder Jensen came to start the mi ssionary work there.
Before they left for Vava' u the)' visited the King at hi s palace at Tongatapu and showed him
how the church mi ssionary work is done and made church history and records; and also showed him
some pictures of Salt Lake City. There were three missionaries who visited Elder Andrew Jensen who
was an assistant to the historian for the Church. He was sent down to teach the mi ssionaries how to
keep records, arriving on the 17'" of August 1895. The Church had been in Tonga four years.
Some Elders had been serving at Tongatapu: Elder Robert Smith, Elder Walker, and Elder
Schill since November 1894 I believe. The 8'" of September 1895 these missionaries were transferred
to Vava' u. There was a meeting held that afternoon. There were about 50 Europeans who were all
living at Vava'u and all came. I believe our Gelman Wolfgramm and Sanft families who were living
at Vava' u at that time were present at this meeting, and lots of sai lors from the ship also came to join
them.
About 6:00 am the next morning these missionaries walked up to the Mount Talau area about
two miles away and sang We Thank Thee 0 God for a Prophet. After that they went down on their
bended knees in a very humble prayer offered to the Lord, and dedicated the land and the people of
Vava' u for preaching and that missionary work would thrive there.
These three missionaries were filled with the spirit of our Heavenly Father. At that moment,
their prayer had been received and gratefully accepted, they felt His love and peace and joy come upon
them. The happiness they felt revealed to them through God's spirit that they were worthy and grateful
to serve him and needed to continue his work among these people.
A few days later Elder Jensen left for Samoa and left the two elders to continue to work at
Vava' u.
(This was recorded by Elder Jensen)
V;
16
VAVA'U ISLANDS
Described by Tu'ifua. aunt of Queen Mata'aho from Vava'u, Tonga Is.
'ava'u Islands were chosen by the early German and European visitors above other
islands in the South Pacific.
Two hundred years ago on March 4, 1781, the first European visitor landed in Vava'u. He
was the Spanish commander, Francisco Antonio Mourelle, ofthe frigate LaPriausa, who chanced
upon this northem group of the Tonga Islands while on his way from the Philippines with
dispatches to the viceroy of Mexico. The modern visitor will discover that some aspects of
Vava'u's lifestyle have changed little since Mourella's time. Foot power is still the chief means of
transport on these islands where horses outnumber vehicles. People find time to walk and are
rewarded by absorbing the pace and way of life, while discovering interesting sites at every knoll
and tum.
Vava'u group population of 40,000 was spread over most of its 50 or so islands. The name
is so old that its meaning is not clearly understood in the Tongan language of today. My favorite
explanation is that Vava'u expresses a feeling of security, particularly in face of the hurricanes that
visit the southwest Pacific periodically.
Vava'u is also called Fonua Mounga—mountainous country. For wherever the wind blows,
there is always a sheltered place, even though the highest point in Vava'u is a mere 204 meters (650
feet) above sea level.
Mourelle named the harbor "Port of Refuge" when he found safe anchorage during his two-
week stay in 1781. The name is applied to the length of the land-locked channel into Neiafu. He
called Vava'u Islands de don Martin de Mayorga, after the viceroy of Mexico, but the name never
caught on. Vava'u enjoys a subtropical climate with temperatures seldom rising above 32 degrees
Centigrade or falling below 10 degrees Centigrade. The hot and humid rainey season lasts from
December to April, while it is cooler and relatively dry from May to November. The hurricane
season usually runs from November through April most places. The roads and tracks are unsealed,
so walkers require suitable footwear, especially because of the sticky clay underfoot in wet
weather. Vava'u offers pleasant weather. There are no snakes or malaria-carrying mosquitos to
worry about and no aggressive wild animals except loud Tongan domestic dogs and loose pigs
roam everywhere.
OLD NEIAFU, population 5,600, is at the heart of the Vava'u Archipelago. During the
13th and 15th centuries, belief was that some ofthe Tongan ancestors came from Samoa—a village
on the island of Savaii in Westem Samoa is also called Neiafu. In ancient times, Neiafu was a
sacred place. There was a saying that all who went to Neiafu should wear a Ta'ovala (waist mat) as
a mark of respect. It was a burial area and a taboo place between the fighting of tribal war. About
1808 Finau Ulukalala E "The Warrior King of Vava'u" built a fortress at Neiafu.
Today at Neiafu as you stand on the wharf, just above you can be seen the beautiful
European cemetery called Aho Mata Folau that stood by the home of Percy and Ana Wolfgramm
Harris by Mount Talau. Most ofthe German families have been buried there. You'll find beautiful
16
VA VAtU ISLANDS
Described by Tu'ifua. aunl of Queen Mata'aho from Vava'u, Tonga Is.
V
ava' u Islands were chosen by the earl y Gennan and European visitors above other
islands in the South Pacific.
Two hundred years ago on March 4, 178 1, the first European visitor landed in Vava' u. He
was the Spanish commander, Franci sco Antonio MOUl'ell e, of the fri gate LaPriausa, who chanced
upon this northern group of the Tonga Islands whil e on hi s way from the Phi li ppines with
di spatches to the viceroy of Mexico. The modern visitor will discover that some aspects of
Vava'u's lifestyle have changed little si nce Mourell a's time. Foot power is still the chi ef means of
transport on these islands where horses outnumber vehicles. People find time to walk and are
rewarded by absorbing the pace and way of life, whil e di scovering interesting sites at every knoll
and turn.
Vava'u group population of 40,000 was spread over most of its 50 or so islands. The name
is so old that its meaning is not clearly understood in the Tongan language of today. My favorite
explanation is that Vava' u expresses a feeling of securi ty, particularl y in face of the hurricanes that
visi t the southwest Pacific periodicall y.
Vava'u is also call ed Fonua Mounga--mountainous country. For wherever the wind blows,
there is always a sheltered place, even though the hi ghest point in Vava' u is a mere 204 meters (650
feet) above sea level.
Mourelle named the harbor "Port of Refuge" when he found safe anchorage during hi s two-
week stay in 178 1. The name is applied to the length of the land-locked channel into Neiafu. He
call ed Vava'u Islands de don MaI1in de Mayorga, after the viceroy of Mexico, but the name never
caught on. Vava'u enjoys a subtropi cal climate wi th temperatures seldom rising above 32 degrees
Centigrade or falling below 10 degrees Centigrade. The hot and humid rainey season lasts from
December to April , while it is cooler and relatively dry from May to November. The hUITicane
season usually runs from November through Apri l most places. The roads and tracks are unsealed,
so walkers require suitable footwear, especially because of the sticky clay underfoot in wet
weather. Vava' u offers pleasant weather. There are no snakes or malaria-carrying mosquitos to
worry about and no aggressive wild ani mals except loud Tongan domest ic dogs and loose pi gs
roam everywhere.
OLD NEIAFU, population 5,600, is at the heart of the Vava'u Archipelago. During the
13th and 15th centuries, belief was that some of the Tongan ancestors came from Samoa--a vill age
on the island of Savaii in Western Samoa is also called Neiafu. In ancient times, Neiafu. was a
sacred place. There was a sayi ng that all who went to Neiafu should wear a Ta'ovala (waist mat) as
a mark of respect. It was a burial area and a taboo place between the fight ing of tribal war. About
1808 Finau Ulukalala II "The Warrior King of Vava'u" built a fort ress at Neiafu.
Today at Neiafu as you stand on the wharf, just above you can be seen the beautiful
European cemetery called Aha Mata Fa/au that stood by the home of Percy and Ana Wolfgramm
Harris by Mount Talau. Most of the Gennan famil ies have been buried there. You'll find beautiful
17
marked tombstones on each one of their graves; mostly the Wolfgramm, Guttenbeil, Schulke,
Schaumkel, and other families. But the Sanft's have been buried at Neiafu Tahi Cemetery by the
sea. This cemetery was called Houmelei. lohani's parents Sale and Salome Wolfgramm are buried
in the Ha'alaufuli cemetery. So is Herman and Maele Wolfgramm. Kisaea was buried at Mata'ika.
I believe Fa'alupenga Makehele Sanft's husband Alipate Sanft and his brother Sione Unga Sanft
are also buried in Ha'alaufuli. Osika's son Palauni Lisi and Minna Ula Naeata's son Lisitoa are
buried there also. Onesi and Kalolaine Wolfgramm are buried at Makongai, Fiji, and Ana
Wolfgramm is buried at the Telekava cemetery by Matavaimoui in Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu.
Just above Mata Folau, the European cemetery, you'll see the beautiful area for the Royal
Tongan armed forces, their living headquarters and training center. Just one-fourth mile from there
stands the beautiful palace of King Taufa Ahau Tupou IV surrounded with wild tropical forest,
vines, tropical flowers, and wild birds.
CENTRAL NEIAFU, GERMAN ARRIVALS - SANFTS AND WOLFGRAMMS
Today the town spreads out from the traditional site, commanding a view over the most
picturesque harbor in the South Seas. Around the Post Office property you see the arrival of cruise
ships. It transforms the area into a bus line, market place where people come to sell their
handicrafts, the excellent baskets and mats and tapa cloth, black coral jewelry, food and clothing.
The Post Office does a busy trade on boat days with stamp collectors seeking Tonga's usual free-
form commemorative stamp issues which have eamed up to 18 percent of the Kingdom's revenue
in recent years.
In the early 19th Century this malae was at the center of the Finau Ulukalala Fortress which
extended to the seafront. It's name, Vaha'akeli, means between trenches, referring to the deep
ditches that surrounded the fortesss. The exploits of this warrior king were made famous through
the book, Tonga Islands by William Marriner, one of the survivors of the Port au Prince massacre
in 1806, who spent several years in Vava'u.
POU'ONO is the historic spot where the first written law of Tonga was promulgated on
November 9,1839. It was a first step towards the end of serfdom. It was also at Pouono that the
Governor of Vava'u entertained the Spanish navigator, Alejandro Malaspina, whose ships the
Peseubierta and the Atrevida reached Vava'u on 20 May 1793. Malaspina intended to annex
Vava'u on behalf of the Spanish Crown following Mourelle's discovery. He was on a mission of
scientific examination and to conduct a ceremony to ratify the claim in the eyes of Europe. His
journals describe the beautiful Tongan fales that stood at Pou'ono (six-posts) referring to the large
fale with six posts that once occupied the center of the malae, and that is where the L.D.S. Stake
center is at now. Pouono, the Neiafu Malae or village green, has the court house at one comer. At
the opening of each court session a tatoo is sounded on the hollow log drums which can be seen in
a small shelter outside the veranda.
17
marked tombstones on each one of their graves; mostly the Wol fgramm, Guttenbeil , Schulke,
Scbaumkel , and otber families. But the Sanft's have been buri ed at Neiafu Tahi Cemetery by the
sea. This cemetery was called Houmelei. [ohani 's parents Sale and Salome Wolfgramm are buried
in the Ha 'alaufuli cemetery. So is Helman and Maele Wolfgramm. Kisaea was buried at Maca'ika.
J believe Fa' alupenga Makehele Sanft' s husband Ali pate Sanft and hi s brother Sione Unga Sanft
are al so buried in Ha'alaufuli . Osika's son Palauni Lisi and Minna Ula Naeata's son Li sitoa are
buried there also. Onesi and Kalol ai ne Wolfgramm are buried at Makongai, Fiji, and Ana
Wolfgramm is buried at the Telekava cemetery by Matavaimoui in Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu.
Just above Mata Folau, the European cemetery, you' ll see the beautiful area for the Royal
Tongan aImed forces, their li ving headquarters and training center. Just one-fourth mil e from there
stands the beautiful palace of King Taufa Ahau Tupou IV surrounded witb wild tropi cal forest,
vines, tropical flowers, and wild birds.
CENTRAL NElAFU, GERMAN ARRIVALS - SANFTS AND WOLFGRAMMS
Today the town spreads out from the traditional site, commanding a view over the most
picturesque harbor in tbe S o u ~ h Seas. Around the Post Offi ce property you see tbe arrival of crui se
ships. It transforms tbe area into a bus line, market place where people come to sell tbeir
handicrafts, the excellent baskets and mats and tapa cloth, black coral jewelry, food and clothing.
The Post Office does a busy trade on boat days wit h stamp coll ectors seeking Tonga's usual free-
fonn commemorative stamp issues whi ch have earned up to 18 percent of the Kingdom's revenue
in recent years.
In the early 19th Century thi s malae was at the center of the Finau Ulukalala Fortress which
extended to the seafront. It's name, Vaha'akeli, means between trenches. referring to the deep
ditches that surrounded the fortesss. The exploits of thi s warrior king were made famous through
the book, Tonga Islands by William Marriner, one of the survivors of the Port au Prince massacre
in 1806, who spent several years in Vava'u.
POU' ONO is the hi stori c spot where the first written law of Tonga was promul gated on
November 9,1839. It was a first step towards the end of serfdom. It was al so at Pouono that the
Governor of Vava'u entertained tbe Spani sh navigator, Alejandro Malaspi na, whose ships the
Peseubierta and the Atrevida reached Vava'u on 20 May 1793. Malaspina intended to annex
Vava'u on behalf of the Spanish Crown following Mourell e's discovery. He was on a mi ssion of
scientific examination and to conduct a ceremony to ratify the claim in the eyes of Europe. Hi s
journals describe the beautiful Tongan/ales that stood at Pou ' ono (six-posts) referring to the large
jale with six posts that once occupied the center of the malae, and that is where til e L.D.S. Stake
center is at now. Pouono, the Neiafu Malae or village green, has the court house at one corner. At
the opening of each court session a tatoo is sounded on the hollow log drums whi ch can be seen in
a small shelter outside the veranda.
18
POUONO CEMETERY-an ancient rectangular slab-faced mound forming the center of
the modem cemetery. This mound is a "Langi" or Royal Tu'i Tonga's burial ground known as
Pangai. It is the langi or royal Tu'i Tonga's burial ground for the daughter of Tu'ipulotu Langi
Tuoteau, the 35th Tu'i Tonga. The princess was called Tae mo Mimi. Her name was not unusual
in that era. The dynasty of the Tui Tonga once ruled as the earthly representatives and divine
descendants ofthe Gods. The 39th and the last ofthe Tui Tonga died in 1865. At Pou'ono
cemetery two ofthe early Wesleyan missionaries who came from England in 1840 and became the
first Wesleyan missionary to die in Tonga. They were Rev. Francis A. Wilson, buried beside
David Cargill.
NEIAFU TAHI, once the main harbor because of its shallow water over the reef and sandy
beach area, made it most suitable for the landing of sailing canoes. Otumohemohe Cemetery has
some of the Sanft's buried there.
PALESI-Pasis Hill thought to be named by the French priests who established the first
Catholic Mission in Vava'u or the hill in 1859. From the Catholic Cemetery at the top, there is an
excellent view of the archipelago.
A strange phenomena was reported there during the burial of the fathers who founded the
mission. A century ago Father Joseph Brenton died after 18 years in Vava'u leading the solitary
life of an ascetic. He was buried at Palesi in 1881. When the vault was opened for the burial of
Father Pierre Caslanier 27 years later, Father Brenton's body appeared whole, startling the
onlookers. It crumbled to dust when examined, and only the head remained whole. There was an
opening in the forehead through which the brain could be seen in tact. It was removed, sealed in a
glass phial and reburied. The next burial on the spot was not until 1938 when the mourners were
amazed to find the brain still in tact. Another grave of Sister Marie Albine was the first and the
last French sister stationed in Vava'u who died in 1975. She was the founder of St. Bemadette
Convent north of Vava'u.
GERMAN pioneers had home businesses and built straight from Vaha'akeli on both sides
of the street along Hala road, now Fatafehi, that whole area was theirs, Mangele, Fungamisi and
Villa. Everything was built up by them. They used to have stores, copra, factories, trains, workers,
sewing, and big homes at Neiafu. They used to have Lotuma, Fofoa Island. Some of the
WOLFGRAMM and SANFT cousins had homes at Otea, Falevai, Utungeke, Ha'alaufuli, Mata'ika,
Feletoa, Makave, Leimatua, Holonga, and Vaimalo. There was SCHULKE and cousins named
GUTENBEEL who stayed in Neiafu, Neiafu Tahi, Koloa, Otea, Vakaeitu, Hahake, Tuanekivale:
and in Tongatapu, Ha'ateiho, Liahona, Mapelu moe Lau and Nuku'alofa, and in Ha'apai, Pangai,
Hoi and Kanokupolu.
The two concrete pillars beside the path mark the spot where French astronomers observed
the eclipse ofthe sun on April 19, 1911. The sun was obscured at 9:37 A.M. and the crickets sang
their evening chorus while chickens roosted in the trees for the night that lasted three and a half
minutes.
LOLO A HALAEVALU-oil of the Princess Halaevalu, is a poetical name given to the Port
of Refuge harbor referring to the time when the water becomes so smooth it looks as if oil has been
poured on the surface. This glass effect is due to the many fresh water springs along the shoreline
18
POUONO CEMETERY --an ancient rectangular slab-faced mound forming the center of
the modern cemetery. This mound is a "Langi" or Royal Tu'i Tonga's burial ground known as
Panaai It is the lanai or royal Tu'i Tonaa's burial "round for the daughter ofTu'ipulotu Langi
o . 0 0 0 '-'
Tuoteau, the 35th Tu'i Tonga. The princess was called Tae mo Mimi. Her name was not unusual
in that era. The dynasty of the Tui Tonga once ruled as the earthl y representatives and divine
descendants of the Gods. The 39th and the last of the Tui Tonga died in 1865. At Pou ' ono
cemetery two of the early Wesleyan mi ssionaries who came from England in 1840 and became the
first Wesleyan mi ssionary to die in Tonga. They were Rev. Francis A. Wilson, buried beside
David Cargill.
NEIAFU T AHI, once the main harbor because of its shallow water over the reef and sandy
beach area, made it most suitable for the landing of sailing canoes. Otumohemohe Cemetery has
some of the Sanft's buried there.
PALESI--Pasis Hill thought to be named by the French priests who establi shed the first
Catholic Mi ssion in Vava'u or the hill in 1859. From the Catholic Cemetery at the top, there is an
excellent view of the archipelago.
A strange phenomena was reported there during the burial of the fathers who founded the
mi ssion. A century ago Father Joseph Brenton died after 18 years in Vava'u leading the solitary
I ife of an ascetic. He was buried at Palesi in 1881. When the vault was opened for the burial of
Father Pierre Caslanier 27 years later, Father Brenton' s body appeared whole, startling the
onlookers. It crumbled to dust when examined, and only the head remained whole. There was an
opening in the forehead through which the brain could be seen in tact. It was removed, sealed in a
glass phial and reburied. The next burial on the spot was not until 1938 when the mourners were
amazed to find the brain still in tact. Another grave of Sister Marie Albine was the first and the
last French sister stationed in Vava'u who di ed in 1975. She was the founder of St. Bernadette
Convent north of Vava'u.
GERMAN pioneers had home businesses and built straight from Vaha'akeli on both sides
of the street along Hala road, now Fatafehi , that whole area was theirs, Mangele, Fungarnisi and
Villa. Evelything was built up by them. They used to have stores, copra, factories, trains, workers,
sewing, and big homes at Neiafu. They used to have Lotuma, Fofoa Island. Some of the
WOLFGRAMM and SANFT cousins had homes at Otea, Falevai, Utungeke, Ha'alaufuli , Mala ' ika,
Feletoa. Makave, Leimatua, Holonga, and Vaimalo. There was SCHULKE and cousi ns named
GUTENBEIL who stayed in Neiafu, Neiafu Tahi, Koloa, Otea, Vakaeitu, Hahake, Tuanekivale:
and in Tongatapu, Ha'ateiho, Liahona, Mapelu moe Lau and Nuku'alofa, and in Ha'apai , Pangai ,
Hoi and Kanokupolu.
The two concrete pillars beside the path mark the spot where French astronomers observed
the eclipse of the sun on April 19, 1911. The sun was obscured at 9:37 A.M. and the clickets sang
their evening chorus while chickens roosted in the trees for the night that lasted three and a half
minutes.
LOLO A HALAEVALU--oil of the Princess Halaevalu, is a poetical name given to the Port
of Refuge harbor referring to the time when the water becomes so smooth it looks as if oil has been
poured on the surface. Thi s glass effect is due to the many fresh water springs along the shoreline
19
and that some may be actually releasing an oily substance into the harbor. On the wharf road, the
Neiafu Town Hall is named Utukalongalu after a small spring that used to enter the harbor at this
point. It nears a point where the sea can be choppier than anywhere else in the harbor-very
appropriate for most Friday and Saturday night dances are held at the hall. Across the road stands
the flag pole and memorial to the Vava'u soldiers who Served and fell in the World War I.
FALALEU was the name given to this area by the early residents in memory of their former
home in Wallis island or Uvea island.
MAT ALA VE at Neiafu Tahi is still a popular bathing place. You get the red clay from
Hola Tafengatoto to wash your hair with, for there is the fresh water spring further around the
shore line.
MAKAVE was once a capitol of Vava'u. It was founded during the reign of Puipuifatu, the
26th Tui Tonga, when told of regular sightings of some tall and very dark people in the area.
Puipuifatu sent out his warriors to investigate. They landed at the cave and made their way around
to the beach Fietoa. They shouted while searching for the intruders. The challenge means, Do you
want to do combat? And ever since then the beach has been called Fietoa. The legend doesn't say
if the mysterious dark people responded, but Puipuifatu's warriors remained as founders of
Makave.
Many years later, in the early 1800's, the beach was the source of an ambush and
particularly cruel massacre. After making peace with his Aunt Toe'umu, Finau Ulukalala called
for a kava party and general meeting to which he invited most of the chiefs and warriors who had
been particularly active against'him in the late war. During the meeting Ulukalala's men emerged
from the bush and slaughtered most ofthe warriors. The remainder were taken prisoner and piled
into leaky canoes, which were towed out to the deep water near the Isle of Lekeleka where they
were left to slowly sink.
MAKAVE means to remove a stone. This refers to an ancient Kilikilitefua custom in the
area where the parents of every first bom son carried one stone and added it to the pile, which
forms an ancient wall. In the 1920's this wall was 200 to 250 feet long and six feet wide
(investigated by an archaeologist). In places it was five feet high, but in 1921 it was partly
destroyed. The date this wall started is unknown.
EUROPEAN CEMETERY: Most of our German families, the Wolfgramm, Sanft,
Gutenbeil, Schulke, Schaumkel, and missionaries are buried there. There is so much bush covering
the hill, but the prettiest is by the German or European cemetery where the scenery has changed
little since the days when Polynesian canoes sailed up the sheltered waters to the old Tongan fort at
Feletoa. Some outrigger canoes and small boats on the water belong to villages from Taoa and
Vaimalo, who cross over to the Neiafu shore daily. A short bush walk to the water's edge at
Mata'aho (where Ana Percy Harris now has a beautiful home at Vava'u) the boat landing place is
enjoyable in itself, but it is possible to continue to take a boat across Vaipua for a longer bush
walk. You can climb Sia Ko Kafoa which offers a splendid view of Vava'u.
VEITATALO. Matangi Malie-pleasant wind-the home of Ulukalala EI, the holder of the
title Tui Vava'u or called Loto A Lahi. Later moved to Veitatalo and later moved up to Talau hill
called Takaunove, then later shipped to Pangaimotu, facing south. The Sailoame market offers
local produce and fruit that is plentiful in Vava'u including lesi (papaya), pineapple, a variety of
bananas, vi, avacado, and oranges. The best ufi, breadfruit, and kape are plentiful.
19
and that some may be actuall y releasing an oi ly substance into the harbor. On the wharf road. the
Neiafu Town Hall is named Ut ukalongalu after a small spring that used to enter the harbor at thi s
point. It nears a point where the sea can be choppier than anywhere else in the harbor--very
appropriate for most Fri day and Saturday ni ght dances are held at the hall. Across the road stands
the flag pol e and memorial to the Vava'u soldiers who Served and fell in the World War I.
FALALEU was the name given to thi s area by the earl y residents in memory of thei r former
home in Walli s island or Uvea island.
MA TALA VE at Neiafu Tahi is still a popular bathing pl ace. You get the red clay from
Hola Tafengatoto to wash your hair with, for there is the fresh water spring furt her around the
shore line.
MAKAVE was once a capitol of Vava'u. It was founded during the reign ofPui puifatu, the
26th Tui Tonga, when told of regular sightings of some tall and very dark peopl e in the area.
Pui pui fatu sent out hi s warri ors to investi gate. They landed at the cave and made their way around
to the beach Fietoa. They shouted whil e searching for the intruders. The chall enge means, Do you
want to do combat? And ever since then the beach has been call ed Fietoa. The legend doesn't say
if the mysterious dark people responded, but Puipuifaru's warriors remained as founders of
Makave.
Many years later, in the earl y 1800's, the beach was the source of an ambush and
particu larly cruel massacre. After making peace with hi s Aunt Toe' umu, Finau Ulukalal a call ed
for a kava party and general meeting to whi ch he invited most of the chi efs and warrio'rs who had
been particularly act ive against'him in the late war. During the meeting Ulukalala' s men emerged
from the bush and slaughtered most of the warri ors. The remainder were taken pri soner and pi led
into leaky canoes, whi ch were towed out to the deep water near the Isle of Lekeleka where they
were left to slowly sink.
MAKAVE means to remove a stone. This refers to an ancient Kili ki li tefua custom in the
area where the parents of every first born son carried one stone and added it to the pi le, whi ch
forms an ancient wall. In the 1920' s this wal l was 200 to 250 feet long and six feet wide
(investigated by an archaeologist). In places it was five feet high, but in 1921 it was partl y
destroyed. The date thi s wall started is unknown.
EUROPEAN CEMETERY: Most of our Gennan families, the Wolfgramm, Sanft,
Gutenbeil , Schulke, Schaumkel, and mi ssi onaries are buried there. There is so much bush covering
the hill , but the prettiest is by the German or European cemetery where the scenery has changed
little since the days when Polynesian canoes sai led up the sheltered waters to the old Tongan fort at
Feletoa. Some outri gger canoes and small boats on the water belong to vi ll ages From Taoa and
Vaimalo, who cross over to the Neiafu shore dail y. A short bush walk to the water's edge at
Mata'aho (where Ana Percy Harris now has a beautiful home at Vava'u) the boat landing place is
enjoyable in itself, but it is possible to continue to take a boat across Vaipua for a longer bush
walk. You can climb Sia Ko Kafoa which offers a splendid view of Vava'u.
VEIT ATALO. Matangi Mal ie--pleasant wind--the home of Ulukalala III, the holder of the
title Tui Vava'u or call ed Loto A Lahi. Later moved to Veitatalo and later moved up to Talau hill
call ed Takaunove, then later shipped to Pangaimotu, facing south. The Sai loame market offers
local produce and fruit that is plentiful in Vava' u including lesi (papaya), pineapple, a variety of
bananas, vi, avacado, and oranges. The best ufi , breadfruit, and kape are plentifu l.
20
TOULA-VEIMUMUINI. Shaded water, is a subterranean cave holding a large amount of
fresh water. It's a good place for bathing. The cave looks dark sometimes. Take a flashlight so
you can take a good look at the cave. This cave and pool used to be owned by a Tu'i Tonga's
daughter Princes Lasini and that's where she used to come to bathe daily.
OFU. It was after leaving Ofu that William Mariner, a survivor of the PortAu Prince
massacre (Ha'apai 1806) met with disappointment when he was refused permission to board an
American ship on his first attempt to escape after several years in Tonga.
ANA OTUA. God's cave is set in the low cliffs above the high tide level. It covers human
remains which have since been removed. At one time strangers to the village were not allowed to
be buried alongside the local people. They were considered outcasts and when mortally ill, they
were brought to this cave to die.
HA'A KALUA LANDING. A name once applied to the whole village. It refers to the
lowering of sails of the old Tongiakis war canoes as they passed this point, slowing the approach to
Feletoa near the end of the inlet
FELETOA means an abundance of brave warriors, about 1808 and early 19th Century.
NGU HOSPITAL. It is named after Wellington Ngu, a grandson of King George Tupou I,
rebuilt with Australian aid. The 61 bed hospital was operated by H.M. King Taufaahau Tupou IV
on 26th Feb 1981.
KULIFEKAI. Wild Dogs Bay, by Vava'u club. Under Ulukalala, unruly warriors were
once stationed on this stretch of shoreline. Now we just visit and leam of the beautiful islands for
which all our Wolfgramm and Sanft's decided to leave Germany.
20
TOULA-VEIMUMUINL Shaded water, is a subterranean cave holding a large amount of
fresh water. It' s a good place for bathing. The cave looks dark sometimes. Take a fl ashli ght so
you can take a good look at the cave. This cave and pool used to be owned by a Tu'i Tonga's
daughter Princes Lasini and that's where she used to come to bathe daily.
OFU. It was after leaving Ofu that William Mariner, a survivor of the Port Au Prince
massacre (Ha'apai 1806) met with disappointment when he was refused pemlission to board an
American ship'on his first attempt to escape after several years in Tonga.
ANA OTUA. God's cave is set in the low cliffs above the high tide level. It covers human
remains which have since been removed. At one time strangers to the village were not allowed to
be buri ed alongside the local people. They were considered outcasts and when mortal1y ill, they
were brought to thi s cave to die.
HA'A KALUA LANDING. A name once applied to the whole village. It refers to the
lowering of sail s of the old Tongiakis war canoes as they passed thi s point, slowing the approach to
Feletoa near the end of the inlet. .. . .... . ..... . ... . . . ..... . ........ . . .. .. .... .
FELETOA means an abundance of brave warriors, about 1808 and early 19th Century.
NGU HOSPITAL. It is named after Wel1ington Ngu, a grandson of King George Tupou I,
rebuilt with Australian aid. The 61 bed hospital was operated by H.M. King Taufaahau Tupou IV
on 26th Feb 1981.
KULI FEKAI. Wild Dogs Bay, by Vava'u club. Under Ulukalala, ufU'uly warriors were
once stationed on this stretch of shoreline. Now we just vi sit and learn of the beautiful islands for
which all our Wolfgramm and Sanft's decided to leave Germany.
CHAPTER II
lOHANI'S CHILDHOOD
CHAPTER II
IOHANI'S CHILDHOOD
i;
23
MY EARLY HISTORY
^From personal tapes recorded hy lohani
'was interested and capable of working and creating with my hands. This grew and developed
-in me even as a small child. Each spare piece of lumber found around my father's store,
along with any tool available, would be put to good use by me. Each day as I played carpenter in my
father's store, my talent for building became a part of my life. My mother complained to father ofthe
waste of lumber filled with nails, but father reminded her that they should allow me to use this talent
which came so natural and easy to me. "Some day lohani may become a very fine carpenter." In later
years, I was able to use my talent to construct many lovely edifices.
My first toy was made from an empty tuna fish can with a stick nailed to it. I would saw
leftover lumber and nail the pieces together to form boxes. Empty corned beef cans became wheels.
Two narrow pieces of wood became the handle which pulled the cart which I had created. This
brought much joy to my little brothers and sisters who rode in it.
My favorite pastime was to take food to my grandparents. I was served first, and was allowed
to eat anything I wished from their table. I took them corned beef, sausages, fish, yams, breadfruit,
sweet potatoes, cocoa, bread, milk, butter, pork and biscuits. My kind and loving grandparents wanted
very much to have me live with them, but I grew lonesome for my parents and other members of my
family. My younger brother Osika decided to go over and make his home with them, as the
grandparents would go boating'and fishing each day, or sometimes to their plantation.
As I grew older I spent time with my friend Pita Pauni. We would build play houses of three
different sizes. While down at the beach, my friend would go out to swim. Still carrying my hammer
and nails, I would be busy on the beach building a small wharf or perhaps canoes or a steamer ship.
One aftemoon I attached all the boats to the little wharf and went home for a bite to eat. Two hours
later I retumed to check on my little wharf. I heard loud noises, such as a group of children perhaps
swimming near our play area. As I approached the spot I was greatly surprised to see 50 or so rats of
all different sizes having a wonderful time running up and down my wharf and sitting inside the canoes
and steamer. The instant they saw me they all scrambled into the water. I laughed and laughed.
FLOODING IN HA'ALAUFULI
Sometimes it rained hard for three weeks straight on the island, causing much damage to the
roads. One day, I remember being asked to go to the store for some sugar and flour. It was very
difficult to cross the school field to Malakai Manu's store. I swam for about 25 yards and as I looked
back I could see all the pigs, chickens (?), and ducks swimming in my direction. I put the sugar and
flour in my vaia, and tied it upon my head and swam back home. That was so much fun.
One day Mufale Vaipapalagi, a Samoan Relifef Society Sister was swept out of her home by
the waters, over across the school field and down to a 200-foot deep hole. She wasn't sure she could
survive, so she waved goodbye to us. Finally the flood waters took her down to the ocean below. She
was caught between two Tonga trees, and remained there until someone rescued her. For this she was
very thankful.
23
MY EARLY HISTORY
'From personal rapes recorded by lollani
I
was interested and capable of working and creating. with my hands. This grew and d e ~ e l o p e d
111 me even as a small child. Each spare pIece of lumber found around my father s store,
along with any tool available, would be put to good use by me. Each day as I played carpenter in my
father's store, my talent for building became a part of my li fe. My mother compl ained to fat her of the
waste oflumber filled with nail s, but father reminded her that they should all ow me to use this tal ent
which came so natural and easy to me. "Some day lohani may become a very fine carpenter." In later
years, I was able to use my talent to construct many lovely edifices.
My first toy was made from an empty tuna fish can with a sti ck nail ed to it. I would saw
leftover lumber and nail the pieces together to form boxes. Empty corned beef cans became wheels.
Two narrow pieces of wood became the handle whi ch pulled the cart which I had created. Thi s
brought much joy to my little brothers and sisters who rode in it.
My favorite pastime was to take food to my grandparents. I was served first, and was allowed
to eat anything I wi shed from their table. I took them corned beef, sausages, fish, yams, breadfruit,
sweet potatoes, cocoa, bread, milk, butter, pork and biscuits. My kind and loving grandparents wanted
very much to have me li ve with them, but I grew lonesome for my parents and other members of my
fami ly. My younger brother Osika decided to go over and make his home with them, as the
grandparents would go boating 'and fishing each day, or sometimes to their plantation.
As I grew older I spent time with my friend Pita Paun; . We would build play houses of three
different sizes. While down at the beach, my friend would go out to swi m. Sti ll carrying my hammer
and nails, I would be busy on the beach building a small wharf or perhaps canoes or a steamer shi p.
One afternoon I attached all the boats to the little wharf and went home for a bite to eat. Two hours
later I retumed to check on my little wharf. I heard loud noises, such as a group of children perhaps
swimming near our play area. As I approached the spot I was greatly surpri sed to see 50 or so rats of
all different sizes having a wonderful time running up and down my whaIf and sitting inside the canoes
and steamer. The instant they saw me they all scrambled into the water. I laughed and laughed.
FLOODING IN HA'ALAUFULI
Sometimes it rained hard for three weeks st raight on the island, causing much damage to the
roads. One day, I remember being asked to go to the store for some sugar and flour. It was very
difficult to cross the school field to Malakai Manu's store. I swam for about 25 yards and as I looked
back I could see all the pigs, chickens (?), and ducks swimming in my direction. I put the sugar and
flour in my vala, and tied it upon my head and swam back home. That was so much fun.
One day Mufale Yaipapalagi, a Samoan Relifef Society Sister was swept out of her home by
the waters, over across the school field and down to a 200-foot deep hole. She wasn't sure she coul d
survive, so she waved goodbye to us. Finally the flood waters took her down to the ocean below. She
was caught between two Tongo trees, and remained there until someone rescued her. For this she was
very thankful.
24
BONFIRES FOR MOSQUITOES
After a rainy season in Tonga we would be plagued with mosquitoes, millions of them. We
had only one mosquito net for the family. Naturally the youngest children would be the lucky ones
protected at night by the net. Sometimes the Tongans would bum a certain kind of bark off a tree
for smoke in the hut. We suffered with the smoke in our lungs, but it helped get rid of the
mosquitoes. We often were badly bitten and the bites were painful and could become infected if
scratched.
BAPTISM
1919: On November 25,1919 I had reached the age of eight and was baptized into the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. My father Sale, and his grandfather's brother Hamani
(Herman), were all baptized by Sekope Olsen (Norwegian). I received much enjoyment at this
period in my youth.
TOYS AND HANDIWORK
I created by hand, home made coaches, very well constructed from scrap materials I might find.
Firecrackers were made by sawing a scrap of iron to pieces, removing the dust particles, place
in a small sack together with a piece of long thread and wrap it around with newspaper. I would then
shape them to look like a firecracker. After lighting the firecracker, I would throw it into the air to
explode. The children enjoyed these for holiday fun. Firecrackers were different sizes as well as all
colors. Mother taught me how to knit doilies, dresses, scarves and afghans. I also mastered the art of
weaving baskets and assembled tongo slicks together to make beautiful trays. I wove beautiful Tongan
objects from the leaves.
I used different dyes for the leaves I wove, thus creating lovely napkin holders. These I would
sell to the tourists on boat days. Because of their exceptional workmanship, they would lend their
beauty to many lovely homes. I taught myself while young to be proud of the work I created with my
hands. I was blessed with innumerable talents which I developed even at an early age.
1920: At the age of nine I made toy guns out of tapa cloth and bamboo sticks, cutting a small
piece of tapa cloth and folding it into a small ball and cutting bamboo sticks about nine inches long.
Both ends would be tied with long tie threads, so it wouldn't break. A small square hole would then
be cut in the top of the bamboo so air could go through. After cleaning the inside of the bamboo stick,
I would then insert one tapa ball inside the bamboo and another ball behind it. Taking a slender stick
I would push it through veiy quickly. The little ball would fly out just as if firing a real gun. It would
fly through the air because of the air pressure created.
I also made home made flutes out of bamboo sticks and raw papaya sticks. I would create the
same instrument out of coconut leaves and coconut sticks, which when played, sounded exactly like
the flute.
I made a humming bird twist fly. This small toy would be made out of coconut leaves and
sticks. The faster you twisted this object the louder the noise it made. It sometimes sounded like an
airplane flying.
24
BONFIRES FOR MOSQUITOES
After a rainy season in Tonga we would be plagued with mosquitoes, millions of them. We
had only one mosquito net for the family. Naturally the youngest children would be the lucky ones
protected at night by the net. Sometimes the Tongans would burn a certain kind of bark off a tree
for smoke in the hut. We suffered with the smoke in our lungs, but it helped get rid of the
mosquitoes. We often were badly bitten and the bites were painful and could become infected if
scratched.
BAPTISM
1919: On November 25, 1919 I had reached the age of eight and was baptized into the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. My father Sale, and hi s grandfather's brother Hamani
(Herman), were all baptized by Sekope Olsen (Norwegian). I received much enjoyment at this
period in my youth.
TOYS AND HANDIWORK
I created by hand, home made coaches, very well constructed from scrap materials I might find.
Firecrackers were made by sawing a scrap of iron to pieces, removing the dust particles, pl ace
in a small sack together with a piece of long thread and wrap it around with newspaper. I would then
shape them to look like a firecracker. After lighting the firecracker, I would throw it into the air to
explode. The children enjoyed these for holiday fun . Firecrackers were different sizes as well as all
colors. Mother taught me how to knit doilies, dresses, scarves and afghans. I also mastered the art of
weaving baskets and assembled tongo sticks together to make beautiful trays. I wove beautiful Tongan
objects from the leaves.
I used different dyes for the leaves I wove, thus creating lovely napkin holders. These I would
sell to the tourists on boat days. Because of their exceptional workmanship, they would lend thei r
beauty to many lovely homes. I taught myself while young to be proud of the work I created with my
hands. I was blessed with innumerable talents which I developed even at an early age.
1920: At the age of nine I made toy guns out of tapa cloth and bamboo sticks, cutting a small
piece of tapa cloth and folding it into a small ball and cutting bamboo sticks about nine inches long.
Both ends would be tied with long tie threads, so it wouldn't break. A small square hole would then
be cut in the top of the bamboo so air could go through. After cleaning the inside of the bamboo stick,
I would then inselt one lapa ball inside the bamboq and another ball behind it. Taking a slender stick
I would push it through very quickly. The little ball would fly out just as iffiring a real gun. It would
fly through the air because of the air pressure created.
I also made home made flutes out of bamboo sticks and raw papaya sticks. I would create the
same instrument out of coconut leaves and coconut sticks, which when played, sounded exactly like
the flute.
I made a humming bird twi st fly. Thi s small toy would be made out of coconut leaves and
sti cks. The faster you twisted this object the louder the noi se it made. It sometimes sounded like an
airplane flying.
25
COOKING
In 1920 I became very interested in leaming the art of cooking. My parents were very happy
and encouraged me, as they needed my help in preparing the food for the royal family whenever they
visited Vava'u. My grandfather and grandmother's family was responsible and in charge of food for
the royal feast.
I was able to leam how to bake bread, sweet buns, and pies. I also mastered the art of special
cowboy pancakes. I would cook them and then toss them in the air and try to catch the pancake with
a frying pan. I became an expert at this.
I was taught by my parents how to make Tongan Pudding. (It's a huge pudding that is made
out of flour, sugar, milk, baking powder, oil and coconut milk, raisins and nutmeg). The mixture is
poured inside a floured cooking cloth, tied, and boiled in water for one hour. This pudding would
serve 30 to 50 people.
I also learned to make special drinks: lime, raspberry, pineapple, and orange. I was taught
about special gravies and sauces for salads and desserts. 1 leamed how to prepare different types of
seafood—jelly fish, kuku-vasua, kuku kuku-kuku, aga, lobster, shark, whale and tofuaa.
I would prepare these dishes and take them to the horse races where people were happy to buy
them from me. I would sell them to the public on boat day. People would look for me as the food
was delicious as well as being priced that they could afford my delicacies.
FIRST TRIP TO TONGATAPU
During the same year I visited Tongatapu for the first time. I was invited by the parents of my
friend Feleti Vi, to accompany them. They sailed on a mail steamer called the Mokoea (Bums
Phillips boat). This boat used to come there every two weeks. 1 stayed with Ve'ehalu, a nobleman
at Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu. I got to see a movie for the first time in my life. I also tasted my first ice
cream cone and ice block. They showed me around the telegraph office and how they sent messages
back to Vava'u and Ha'apai. I was very excited to watch the cowboys riding horses in the Western
movie. I saw my first truck while visiting Nukualofa. After a month I had to return home.
On the retum trip between Tongatapu and Ha'apai the boat was attacked by a huge whale.
Everyone on board got wet, but luckily no damage was done to either the ship or passengers. In
Ha'apai we stayed at the home of Ula, a friend. He was a member of the Latter-day Saints Church,
as I was. I also visited the Lavaka family. They gave me two female cats which I named Vasiti and
Tema. We spent two weeks in Ha'apai.
BACK IN VAVA'U
We finally retumed to Vava'u on that same boat. After seeing the movies at Tongatapu I
wanted to leam how to walk on wire. So I hung a wire between two orange trees and would practice
walking on it day after day. I finally leamed how to do it well and people would come and watch me
perform. They enjoyed this skill I had developed by perseverance.
I leamed how to wrestle. I organized a Boy's Club and taught them boxing. I taught myself
to ride horses, to round up cattle, and rope them. I accomplished anything I set my mind to because
I didn't mind spending my time learning about those things I was interested in.
25
COOKING
In 1920 I became very interested in learning the art of cooking. My parents were very happy
and encouraged me, as they needed my help in preparing the food for the royal family whenever they
visited Vava' u. My grandfat her and grandmother' s family was responsible and in charge of food for
the royal feast.
I was able to learn how to bake bread, sweet buns, and pies. I also mastered the an of special
cowboy pancakes. I woul d cook them and then toss them in the air and try to catch the pancake with
a frying pan. I became an expert at th is.
I was taught by my parents how to make Tongan Pudding. (It's a huge pudding that is made
out of flour, sugar, milk, baking powder, oil and coconut milk, rai sins and nutmeg). The mixture is
poured inside a fl oured cooking cloth, tied, and boiled in water tor' one hour. This pudding wou ld
serve 30 to 50 people.
I also learned to make special drinks: lime, raspberry, pineapple, and orange. I was taught
about special gravies and sauces for salads and desserts. I learned how to prepare different types of
seafood--jell y fish, kuku-vasua, kuku kuku-kuku, aga, lobster, shark, whale and lo./ilCla.
I would prepare these dishes and take them to the horse races where people were happy to buy
them from me. I would sell them to the public on boat day. People wou ld look for me as the food
was delicious as well as being priced that they could afford my delicacies.
FlRST TRIP TO TONGA T APU
During the same year I visited Tongatapu for the first time. I was invited by the parents of my
friend Fcleti Vi , to accompany them. They sail ed on a mai l st.eamer call ed the Mokoea (Burns
Phillips boat). Thi s boat used to come there every two weeks. I stayed with Ve'ehalu, a nobleman
at Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu. I got to see a movie for the first time in my life. I al so tasted my first ice
cream cone and ice block. They showed me around the telegraph office and how they sent messages
back to Vava'u and Ha'apai . I was very excited to watch the cowboys riding horses in the Western
movie. I saw my first truck while visiting Nukua'i ofa. After a month I had to return [lOme.
On the return trip between Tongatapu and Ha'apai the boat was attacked by a huge whale.
Everyone on board got wet, but luckily no damage was done to either the shi p or passengers. In
Ha'apai we stayed at the home of Via, a friend. He was a member of the Latter-day Saints Church,
as I was. I also vi sited the Lavaka family. They gave me two female cats which I named Vasiti and
Tema. We spent two weeks in Ha'apai.
BACK IN VAVA'U
We finall y returned to Vava'u on that same boat. After seeing the movies at Tongatapu I
wanted to learn how to walk on wire. So r hung a wire between two orange trees and would practice
walking on it day after day. I finally learned how to do it well and people would come and watch me
perform. They enjoyed this skill I had developed by perseverance.
I learned how to wrestle. I organized a B o y ' ~ Club and taught them boxing. I taught myself
to ride horses, to round up cattle, and rope them. I accomplished anything I set my mind to because
I didn't mind spending my time learning about those things I was interested in.
26
At this same time I became interested in training horses to count with their hoofs. I trained
them to sit, stand, walk forward and backwards at my command, to talk or neigh as horses do. 1
worked with roosters and hens. They would lay down and get up, and as I beat two coconut shells
together, they would run up to me when called for them.
HOUSEKEEPER
I was very lucky to have my parents train me in every way. They taught me how to care for
our home and the importance of using my time wisely. They had a time schedule: At 7:00 A.M. our
mother Salome always had our breakfast ready. Family prayer was held, and after this, the children
cleaned their bedrooms, made their beds, after which the dishes were washed and put away. School
was at 8:00 a.m.. It would close at 1:00 p.m. and between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. we were free to do
as we wished, perhaps swim, visit a friend, or play. We were home at 5:30 p,m. ready for baths, with
dinner at 6:00 p.m. Homework started at 7:00 p.m. with bedtime and prayers at 8:30 p.m. This was
the schedule each school day.
On Saturday everyone would work outdoors. The leaves were raked, windows washed, the
trash bumed and weeds pulled. Inside the house everything was polished and cleaned, the windows,
furniture, mirrors, woodwork, and doors. Everyone took his tum working in the garden.
EMPLOYMENT
1927: Whenltumed 16 years old, 1 payed the Government 21 shillings for my property tax
and after that I was able to work for the Tongan Government. It is a law for every 16-year old male
to pay their debts first. I was hired by the govemment to be the chief right-hand man to the captain
at the wharf of Vava'u. This was the well known Pu'utalefusi wharf. My responsibility was to fire
a huge gun when a large ship arrived at the harbor. I also took care of all the govemment property
at the wharf. 1 would raise the Tongan flag at Utulei to alert the people in the village about the ship
in the harbor. Day and night I was held responsible for the bombs and bullets that were stored in
Vava'u by the govemment.
I went with the Captain and the pilot to bring the big ships safely into the harbor. Another of
my tasks was to see that there were lights for the incoming ships and to extinguish them as the ships
left the harbor in the evening. I enjoyed my work but the pay was very small—only six shillings a
month. I decided to look around for another job. I applied at the government to work for the street
department.
1928 I worked for the Street Department for eight shillings a month. The work was hard and
the days were long in the hot sun. Mother encouraged me to come back home and work again as a
carpenter. I quit my work in Neiafu and decided to help build a govemment school building. I helped
with the construction of school houses, hospitals, churches, stores and private homes all over Vava'u.
At this time my father accidentally hit his leg severely on the comer of the table. The
accident broke one of the main veins in his leg. I was then asked to leave my employment and return
home to stay and help out with the family. I was not very happy, for my desire was to work and earn
money to help support the family.
26
At this same time I became interested in training horses to count with their hoofs. I trained
them to si t, stand, walk forward and backwards at my command, to talk or neigh as horses do. I
worked with roosters and hens. They would lay down and get up, and as I beat two coconut shells
together, they would run up to me when cal led for them.
HOUSEKEEPER
I was very lucky to have my parents train me in every way. They taught me how to care for
our home and the importance of using my time wisely. They had a time schedul e: At 7:00 A.M. our
mother Salome always had our breakfast ready. Family prayer was held, and after thi s, the children
cleaned their bedrooms, made their beds, after which the dishes were washed and put away. School
was at 8:00 a.m .. It would close at 1:00 p.m. and between 1:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. we were free to do
as we wished, perhaps swim, visi t a fri end, or play. We were home at 5:30 p,m. ready for baths, with
dinner at 6:00 p.m. Homework staJ1ed at 7:00 p.m. with bedtime and prayers at 8:30 p.m. Thi s was
the schedule each school day.
On Saturday everyone would work outdoors. The leaves were raked, windows washed, the
trash burned and weeds pulled. Inside the house everything was polished and cleaned, the windows,
furniture, mirrors, woodwork, and doors. Everyone took hi s turn working in the garden.
EMPLOYMENT
1927: When I turned 16 years old, I payed the Government 2 1 shillings for my property tax
and after that I was able to work for the Tongan Government. It is a law for every 16-year old male
to pay thei r debts first. I was hired by the government to be the chief right-hand man to the captai n
at the wharf of Vava'u. Thi s was the well known Pu' utalefusi wharf. My responsibility was to fi re
a huge gun when a large ship arrived at the harbor. I also took care of all the government property
at the wharf. I would raise the Tongan flag at Utulei to alert the people in the village about the ship
in the harbor. Day and ni ght I was held responsible for the bombs and bullets that were stored in
Vava'u by the government.
I went with the Captain and the pilot to bring the bi g ships safely into the harbor. Another of
my tasks was to see that there were li ghts for the incoming ships and to extinguish them as the shi ps
left the harbor in the evening. I enjoyed my work but the pay was very small--only six shillings a
month. I decided to look around for another job. I applied at the government to work for the street
department.
1928 I worked for the Street Department for eight shillings a month. The work was hard and
the days were long in the hot sun. Mother encouraged me to come back home and work again as a
carpenter. I quit my work in Neiafu and decided to help build a government school building. I helped
with the construction of school houses, hospitals, churches, stores and private homes all over Vava' u.
At thi s time my father accidentally hit hi s leg severely on the corner of the table. The
accident broke one of the main veins in hi s leg. I was then asked to leave my employment and return
home to stay and help out with the family. I was not very happy, for my desire was to work and earn
money to help support the famil y.
27
There was an American ship in the Vava'u harbor. Tongan sailors were needed to do repair
work. I applied for, was interviewed, and accepted for the job. I was very happy for this meant I
would go to Vancouver, Canada and the U.S.A. I hurried home that evening and told my father I was
going to Canada and the U.S.A.. My father was as happy as I for this opportunity . All the family
got together and had a big farewell feast for me at Mata'ika. I was expecting to leave the next day.
A Mission Conference was held the next day. The Mission President James Cutler heard the
news concerning me. He became worried. The family and loved ones and friends were at the wharf
to bid me goodbye. My father and I went up to see the captain. As we approached the captain's
quarters, we were surprised to hear President Cutler ask me what I was doing on deck. I excitedly
answered, "Don't you know I'm leaving for the U.S. today?"
President Cutler said, "Is that right, Brother Wolfgramm?" At the same time he reached out
for lohani's hands to hold and then said," 1 feel very strongly, that this is not yet the right time for you
to leave for the U.S.A.. You shouldn't leave this beautiful island for a strange place. It is a very
difficult time now in the United States. If I were you, I would stay back here in Tonga, at least for
now."
President Cutler discouraged me about going. I felt within myself that this was the right
decision. My father and I shook hands with the President, then went over and shook the Captain's
hand and informed him of my change in plans.
The family went back to Ha'alaufuli that aftemoon and rejoiced because of my decision to stay
in Tonga. All through my life I was very obedient to those in authority, even though it was a sacrifice
and disappointment to me in many instances. I was always cheerful in following the advice I was
offered. I have been blessed with developing great strength in spirit and to be a noble example for
others.
HA'ALAUFULI HOME USED AS A MOVIE HOUSE
1948: While raising my family in Vava'u I was unable to send them to a movie theater
because there were too many children and I didn't have the 6 pence each to pay their fare, and they
wanted to attend so badly. My cousin Otto Sanft in Neiafu owned the theater.
I made arrangements with Otto allowing us to see the movie free of charge. In exchange Otto
brought his film to our house and the public could use our Ha'alaufuli home as a theater. Ours was
the largest house in the village. This way I worked things out so my children could see the movies.
The children enjoyed the next moming finding all kinds of coins on the floor and they didn't mind
sweeping up the peanut shells and papers.
A SPECIAL GIFT FOR CHOKING VICTIMS
r
hen I was about four or five years old, a special patriarchal healing power was given to
me by my great grandfather, Tu'inahoki, from Mata'ika, Vava'u. This is one ofthe very
dear and special gifts that the Polynesians hand down from generation to generation, just like their
genealogy; similar to the special gifts given the Israelites in Jerusalem. I was a member, but not old
enough to be baptized into the L.D.S. church at that time.
" T r
27
There was an American ship in the Vava' u harbor. Tongan sai lors were needed to do repair
work. I applied for, was interviewed, and accepted for the job. I was very happy for this meant I
would go to Vancouver, Canada and the U.S.A. I hurried home that evening and told my father I was
going to Canada and the U.S.A .. My father was as happy as I for this opportunity. All the family
got together and had a big farewell feast for me at Mata' ika. I was expecting to leave the next day.
A Mission Conference was held the next day. The Mission President James Cutler heard the
news concerning me. He became worried. The family and loved ones and friends were at the wharf
to bid me goodbye. My father and I went up to see the captain. As we approached the captain's
quarters, we were to hear President Cutl er ask me what r was doing on deck. I excited ly
answered, "Don't you know I'm leaving for the U.S. today?"
President Cutler said, "Is that right, Brother Wolfgramm?" At the same time he reached out
for Iohani's hands to hold and then said, " I feel very strongly, that this is not yet the right time for you
to leave for the U.S.A .. You shouldn't leave thi s beautiful island for a strange place. It is a very
difficult time now in the United States. If I were you. I would stay back here in Tonga, at least for
now, It
President Cutler discouraged me about going. I felt within myself that this was the ri ght
decision. My father and I shook hands wit h the President, then went over and shook the Captain's
hand and informed him of my change in plans.
The fami Iy went back to Ha'alaufuli that afternoon and rejoiced because of my deci sion to stay
in Tonga. All through my life I was very obedient to those in authority, even though it was a sacrifice
and di sappointment to me in many instances. I was always cheerful in following the advice I was
offered. I have been blessed with developing great strength in spirit and to be a nobl e example for
others.
HA'ALAUFULI HOME USED AS A MOVIE HOUSE
1948: While raising my family in Vava ' u I was unable to send them to a movie theater
because there were too many children and I didn ' t have the 6 pence each to pay their fare, and they
wanted to attend so badly. My cousin Otto Sanft in Neiafu owned the theater.
I made arrangements with Otto allowing US to see the movie free of charge. In exchange Otto
brought hi s film to our house and the public could use our Ha' alaufuli home as a theater. Ours was
the largest house in the village. This way I worked things out so my children could see the movies.
The children enjoyed the next morning finding all kinds of coins on the floor and they didn ' t mind
sweeping up the peanut shell s and papers.
A SPECIAL GIFT FOR CHOKING VICTIMS
W
hen I was about four or five years old, a special patriarchal healing power was given to
me by my great grandfather, Tu'inahoki, from Mata' ika. Vava'u. Thi s is one of the very
dear and special gifts that the Polynesians hand down from generation to generation, just like their
genealogy; simil ar to the special gifts given the Israelites in Jerusalem. I was a member, bur not old
enough to be baptized into the L.D.S. church at that time.
2S
Crushed, green leaves of the uhi were mixed with a little warm water and oil then rubbed
together in the patriarch's hands. The great grandfather took the two hands, usually ofthe eldest son
or grandson and offered a prayer, asking the Lord to bestow His healing power to that descendant.
This power was especially used for people who choked from fish bones and such.
The grandson, or chosen one, would have to repeat after his grandfather words something like
this: "I, Tu'inahoki, the patriarch of this family am giving you, my grandson, lohani, the power and
the authority of healing which I have; that you will be able to carry on this responsibility to administer
and help those who choke or suffocate. And when you do this they will be able to get well. At the
same time you gently touch their neck and work the fish bone out, repeating these words: Go in or
out, Go in or out, Go in or out, Go in or out. Say this as long as you need to, and pretty soon
whatever they have been choking on will either go all the way down to their stomach, or come out
through their mouth. This way it will never fail you." I did just as I was told, sometimes taking a
piece of bread for fish bones.
When I was still a child, about six or seven years of age, my grandfather Pita Afu ate some
fish for his lunch and got a bone stuck in his throat. He did all he could to get the fish bone out but
was unable to retrieve it. He sent for me. My grandfather Pita Afu sent one of my younger brothers
to our home after me, to come and see if I could help his throat. He had faith in my great grandfather
Tu'inahoki, but he was so far away, and was very old, so he sent for me. I was kind of scared, but
I felt very responsible, or obliged to do the duty of my great grandfather, so I came. I went up to his
little Tongan hut at Tu'akolo. My mother had sent a hot teapot of cocoa and some bread with me for
Pita. 1 took it in and went up to him, gave him a big hug or squeeze, and then I did just as I was told
by my great grandfather Tu'inahoki. As I was repeating, "Go in or out. Go in or out," about 25 times,
while gently rubbing on his neck, my grandfather started to cough and cough. Pretty soon he was able
to spit it out. I couldn't believe it, but it helped the fish bone come out.
Many people from different villages near and far came to me for help. Most of them had fish
bones stuck in their throat or windpipe. Some would be near suffocation.
At one time, Naeata's grandmother Fusi Malapo and the mother of Vika Palemo, ate some
seafood, including some porcupine fish called soki soki. Some of it's bones are shaped like a T pin,
and that's what Fusi Malapo accidentally swallowed, and stuck in her throat. I gently worked and
worked with my fingers around her neck and repeated what I was told to say. Pretty soon, that big
fish bone came slowly up. Fusi coughed it out, and kept saying, "Oh, thank you, now I can swallow
my saliva once more."
At one time, an older man named Sione Nuku went fishing at Otualea beach. Tongans have
this habit of killing the fish by biting their heads before bringing them home for the family. At this
time Sione was a little slow with this fish in his mouth, and it went half-way down inside his throat
and got stuck there. It couldn't go in or out any father. Sione tried and tried to get the fish out, but
his scales, bones and fins were cutting Sions's throat. He almost died there, trying to get the fish out,
but he couldn't move it. He remembered me at his time of difficulty, so he ran all the way to our
home in Havelu, and fortunately I was home. I helped him, and about twenty-five minutes later the
whole fish came out. His saliva continued to run from his mouth.
28
Crushed, green leaves of the uhi were mixed with a little warm water and oil then rubbed
together in the patriarch's hands. The great grandfather took the two hands, usuall y of the eldest son
or grandson and offered a prayer, asking the Lord to bestow His healing power to that descendant.
This power was especiall y used fo r people who choked from f ish bones and such.
The grandson, or chosen one, would have to repeat after his grandfather words something like
this: "1, Tu'inahoki, the patri arch of thi s family am giving you, my grandson, lohani , the power and
the aut hority of healing whi ch 1 have; that you will be able to carryon this responsibility to admini ster
and hel p those who choke or suffocate. And when you do this they will be able to get well. At the
same time you gently touch their neck and work the fish bone out, repeating these words: Go in or
oul , Go in or OUI. Go ill or out, Go ill or oul. Say this as long as you need to, and pretty soon
whatever they have been choking on will either go all the way down to their stomach, or come out
through their mouth. Thi s way it will never fai l you." 1 did just as 1 was told, sometimes taking a
piece of bread for fi sh bones.
When 1 was still a child, about six or seven years of age, my grandfather Pita Afu ate some
fish for hi s lunch and got a bone stuck in hi s throat. He did all he could to get the fish bone out but
was unable to retrieve it. He sent for me. My grandfather Pita Afu sent one of my younger brothers
to our home after me, to come and see if 1 could help hi s throat. He had faith in my great grandfather
Tu ' inahoki , but he was so far away, and was very old, so he sent for me. 1 was kind of scared, but
I felt very responsible, or obl iged to do the duty of my great grandfather, so I came. I went up to hi s
little Tongan hut at Tu'akolo. My mother had sent a hot teapot of cocoa and some bread with me for
Pita. I took it in and went up to him, gave him a big hug or squeeze, and then I did just as I was told
by my great grandfather Tu'inahoki. As I was repeating, "Go in or out, Go in or out," about 25 times,
whil e gently rubbing on his neck, my grandfat her started to cough and cough. Pretty soon he was able
to spit it out. I couldn't believe it, but it helped the fish bone come out.
Many people from different vill ages near and far came to me for help. Most of them had fi sh
bones st uck in their throat or windpipe. Some would be near suffocation.
At one time, Naeata's grandmother Fusi Malapo and the mother of Vika Palemo, ate some
seafood, including some porcupine fis h call ed saki saki. Some of it's bones are shaped like a T pi n,
and that's what Fusi Malapo accidentall y swallowed, and st uck in her throat. I gently worked and
worked with my fingers around her neck and repeated what I was told to say. Pretty soon, that bi g
fi sh bone came slowly up. Fusi coughed it out, and kept saying, "Oh, thank you, now I can swallow
my saliva once more."
At one time, an older man named Sione Nuku went fishing at Otualea beach. Tongans have
this habit of killing the fish by biting their heads before bringing them home for the family. At this
time Sione was a little slow with this fish in hi s mouth, and it went half-way down inside hi s throat
and got st uck there. It couldn't go in or out any father. Sione tried and tried to get the fish out, but
hi s scales, bones and fins were cutting Sions's throat. He almost died there, trying to get the fi sh out,
but he couldn't move it. He remembered me at hi s time of difficulty, so he ran all the way to our
home in Havelu, and fortunately I was home. 1 helped him, and about twenty-five minutes later the
whole fish came out. His saliva continued to run from hi s mouth.
29
Sometimes it wasn't only people who came to my home for help. A man from Holonga owned
the number one race horse in town. His horse broke loose from his restraint and went over to his
neighbor's plantation and ate up all his neighbor's tapioca leaves and whatever else he could find. 1
guess the horse was trying to eat fast before someone would come looking for him from the
plantation. In doing so he dug up some tapioca roots and started to eat them too. As the horse was
eating a piece of hard, white tapioca, it stuck in his throat. A few minutes later, the owner came and
found the horse and saw what had happened. He hurriedly brought the horse over to our home. I still
remember when I saw that horse for the first time. Oh, I truly felt so bad, his mouth was full of foam,
he could hardly breathe and was in so much pain. I had never seen an animal suffer like that before.
I didn't give up but worked and worked with that horse and slowly a big piece of tapioca worked loose
and the horse spit it out. My, what a relief. We all cheered and were thankful in our hearts for this
horse. The owner was so happy he brought us a hundred pounds of yams the next day for the
recovery of his horse.
Another time, a little pig was brought from Ta'anea village. She accidentally ate some hard,
green, premature bread fruit, and a piece stuck inside her throat and almost killed her. The older pigs
know the difference between the ripe breadfruit and green breadfruit. The ripe ones are mostly sweet
and soft and easy to swallow, but the green ones are just the opposite. When Ana brought this pig in,
his mouth was full of foam and saliva, and a little bloody. I worked and worked with this pig until
he was free from what he had eaten. We were all thrilled to see him happy again.
A cousin, Mafileo Lagi choked on some fish bones and was brought over for treatment. A few
minutes later he went home a happy teenager again.
Once I worked and worked with a cat which was choking from something; finally it was
alright.
Note by Tisina: 1997: A few weeks before his death, lohani passed on this gift to his son
Walter, lohani felt he was his most spiritual son and worthy of it. Walter is currently living near
Oakland, Califomia.
T
l
F
INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC AT VAVA'U
ihe influenza came to Tonga in 1918. Many people all over the Islands got influenza.
Even as far as the Samoan Islands and I'm pretty sure throughout the islands in the South
Pacific that received visitors from ships. They called that the flu bug.
In November 1918, that trial came upon the Saints at Vava'u. There was a mission conference
held at Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu during that month. A boat had arrived to take the members to attend
this conference. My mother Salome and her baby Ela were among them. Uncle Rudy's mother
Martha Wolfgramm was there with baby Rudy and a lot of members went on that ship, without
knowing that there was an influenza epidemic brought with the ship. Even the ship's crew didn't
know. Our small school band was among the passengers to Tongatapu. We left Ha'laufuli to go to
Neiafu, but after we got to Neiafu one ofthe missionaries, Elder Jacob, decided not to leave with us
for the conference, but to remain at Vava'u. At that lime he was the district missionary leader at
Vava'u.
29
Sometimes it wasn't only people who came to my home for help. A man from Holonga owned
the number one race horse in town. His horse broke loose from hi s restraint and went over to his
neighbor's plantation and ate up all hi s neighbor' s tapioca leaves and whatever else he could find. I
guess the horse was trying to eat fast before someone would come looking for him from the
plantation. In doing so he dug up some tapioca roots and Sliuted to eat them too. As the horse was
eating a piece of hard, white tapioca, it stuck in hi s throat. A few minutes later, the owner came and
found the horse and saw what had happened. He hurri edly brought the horse over to our home. I still
remember when I saw that horse for the first time. Oh, I truly felt so bad, hi s mouth was full of foam,
he could hardl y breathe and was in so much pain. I had never seen an animal suffer like that before.
I didn't give up but worked and worked with that horse and slowly a big piece of tapioca worked loose
and the horse spit it out. My, what a reli ef. We all cheered and were thankful in our hearts for this
horse. The owner was so happy he brought us a hundred pounds of yams the next day for the
recovery of hi s horse.
Another time, a littl e pig was brought from Ta'anea vi ll age. She accidentally ate some hard,
green, premature bread fruit , and a piece stuck inside her throat and almost killed her. The older pigs
know the difference between the ripe breadfruit and green breadfruit. The ripe ones are mostly sweet
and soft and easy to swal low, but the green ones are just the opposite. When Ana brought this pig in,
his mouth was full of foam and saliva, and a littl e bloody. I worked and worked with this pig until
he was free from what he had eaten. We were all thrilled to see him happy again.
A cousin, Mafil eo Lagi choked on some fish bones and was brought over for treatment. A few
minutes later he went home a harpy teenager again.
Once I worked and worked with a cat which was choking from something; finally it was
alright.
Note by Ti sina: 1997: A few weeks before hi s death, Iohani passed on thi s gift to hi s SOl]
Walter. lohani felt he was hi s most spiritual son and wOIlhy of it. Walter is currently living near
Oakland, California.
INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC AT V A V A 'U
T
he influenza came to Tonga in 1918. Many people all over the Islands got influenza.
Even as far as the Samoan Islands and I' m pretty sure throughout the islands in the South
Pacific that received visitors from ships. They called that the flu bug.
In November 1918, thattrial came upon the Saints at Vava'u. There was a mission conference
held at Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu during that month. A boat had arrived to take the members to attend
this conference. My mother Salome and her baby Ela were alllong them. Uncle Rudy's mother
Martha Wolfgramm was there with baby Rudy and a lot of members went on that ship, without
knowing that there was an influenza epidemic brought with the ship. Even the ship's crew didn ' t
know. Our small school band was among the passengers to Tongatapu. We left Ha'iaufuli to go to
Neiafu but after we "ot to Neiafu one of the missionaries, Elder Jacob, decided not to leave wit h us
, '"
for the conference, but to remain at Vava' u. At that time he was the district mi ssionary leader at
Vava' u.
30
The members didn't know what made him change his mind, but I'm sure he wanted to go also,
but he heard and obeyed the still small voice. The Lord had another mission for Elder Jacob back in
Vava'u. It didn't take very long after we got inside the boat, many people started to get sick. Their
bodies felt so weak all the way to Tongatapu. Many of the members couldn't attend the conference
because they were so sick. The same thing happened to many ofthe missionaries. Some just couldn't
get up. One ofthe missionaries, Elder Langston, was ill before with influenza and passed away at that
time.
Elder May was a very fine director, very musically talented. We played throughout the islands
of Vava'u, and at the wharf welcomed the arrival ofthe big ships. Tourists used to throw coins at us.
We played for the Royal family and big cultural events held for the natives and people enjoyed the
school band. Some ofthe members in the band at Ha'laufuli besides me were Onesi, Osika, Koloti,
all Wolfgramms and Ana Tu'ifeleunga Langi, Netane, Fusiloa, Tevita Makihele, Pita Pauni, Viliami
Naeata, Afa Wolfgramm, Ana Vanila and many others.
It was so strange when we finally got to Tongatapu to play, one by one, some of the band
members would be playing and pretty soon would fall down and couldn't stand up any more, Many
of them got very sick.
When conference was over, Martha Wolfgramm was so sick with the flu she was unable to
nurse baby Rudy, so my mother took baby Rudy and fed Ela on one breast and Rudy on the other.
Salome was very blessed. She was spared so she could feed the two babies. Martha Wolfgramm was
Relief Society president in Neiafu at that time and was a greatly respected, hard worker and she loved
the people in caring and feeding the missionaries, including cooking and serving the Royal families.
This was the very first mission conference held in Tongatapu in 1918 and Pres. Smith presided over
the brand new chapel built on solid Tongatapu ground at Matavaimoui which was completed in
December 1923.
During this conference there were not enough doctors or nurses to care for the sick. Each
family had to care for their own by digging holes and burying their dead. Sometimes they would bury
three or four bodies together in the same hole because they were all infected with the influenza.
Between 4,000 and 5,000 died during that time. Finally a four-masted American ship arrived
at Vava'u harbor and also at Tongatapu and the govemment leaders asked if they could hire some of
their sailors to help bury their dead. Even though their sailors were drunk, they were still willing to
help out.
In some ofthe missionary journals they told about what they heard and witnessed with their
own eyes. The home where the missionaries reside was not very far from the graveyard. They saw
hundreds of families and friends carry their dead up for burial, so weak they almost couldn't make
it up the hill, and some dropped dead before they arrived to bury three and now four to bury. The
missionaries were saddened by what happened at Vava'u and other Islands. They continued to pray
and thank God for preserving their lives at this difficult time while they were out on their mission.
After conference, people who left Vava'u and Ha'apai retumed home and were shocked to
find half of their families and loved ones had died also.
30
The members didn't know what made him change hi s mind, but I'm sure he wanted to go also,
but he heard and obeyed the still small voice. The Lord had another mission for Elder Jacob back in
Vava ' u. It didn 't take very long after we got inside the boat, many people started to get sick. Their
bodies felt so weak all the way to Tongatapu. Many of the members couldn't attend the conference
because they were so sick. The same thing happened to many of the mi ssionari es. Some just couldn ' t
gel up. Oneof the mi ssionaries, Elder Langston, was ill before with influenza and passed away at that
time.
Elder May was a very fine director, very musicall y tal ented. We played throughout the islands
of Vava'u, and at the wharf welcomed the arrival of the big ships. Tourists used to throw coins at us.
We played for the Royal famil y and big cultural events held for the nati ves and people enj oyed the
school band. Some of the members inlhe band at Ha' laufuli besides me were Onesi , Osika, Koloti ,
all Wolfgramms and Ana Tu' ifeleunga Langi, Netane, Fusiloa, Tevita Makihele, Pita Pauni, Viliami
Naeata, Afa Wolfgramm, Ana Vanil a and many others.
It was so strange when we finall y got to Tongatapu to play, one by one, some of the band
members woul d be pl aying and pretty soon would fall down and couldn 't stand up any more, Many
of them got very sick.
When conference was over, Manha Wolfgramm was so sick with the flu she was unable to
nurse baby Rudy, so my mother took baby Rudy and fed Ela on one breast and Rudy on the other.
Salome was very blessed. She was spared so she could feed the two babies. Martha Wolfgramm was
Rei ief Society president in Neiafu at that time and was a greatly respected, hard worker and she loved
the people in caring and feeding the mi ssionaries, including cooking and serving the Royal families.
This was the very first mi ssion conference held in Tongatapu in 1918 and Pres. Smith presided over
the brand new chapel built on solid Tongatapu ground at Matavaimoui which was completed in
December 1923.
During this conference there were not enough doctors or nurses to care for the sick. Each
family had to care for their own by digging holes and burying their dead. Someti mes they would bury
three or four bodies together in the same hole because they were all infected with the influenza.
Between 4,000 and 5,000 died during that time. Finall y a four-masted American ship arrived
at Vava ' u harbor and also at Tongatapu and the government leaders asked if they could hire some of
lheir sail ors to help bury their dead. Even though their sailors were drunk, they were still wi lling to
help out.
In some of the mi ssionary journal s they told about what they heard and witnessed with their
own eyes. The home where the missionaries reside was not very far from the graveyard. They saw
hundreds of famil ies and friends carry their dead up for burial, so weak they almost couldn 't make
il up the hill , and some dropped dead before they aITived to bury three and now four to bury. The
missionaries were saddened by what happened at Vava' u and other Islands. They continued to pray
and thank God for preserving their lives at this difficult time whil e they were out on their mi ssion.
After conference, peopl e who left Vava' u and Ha'apai returned home and were shocked to
find half of their famil ies and loved ones had died also.
31
Elder Jacob, who had decided to remain in Vava'u with the saints, was the only one in Vava'u
who held the Melchizedek Priesthood. During this period Elder Jacob was called from house to
house, and town to town, to come and administer to loved ones who were so ill. Elder Jacob said
when he arrived at a family house, almost everyone was sick. He laid his hands and gave them a
priesthood blessing, many people recovered and later joined the Church. Those he administered to
became very close and loving friends ofthe missionary through his kindness to them and the Lord
helped them recover from their sickness.
Elder Jacob said it was from God that made him stay back to help out these people in time of
their need. It was amazing during this time they had 65 students attending Makeke College in
Tongatapu and not one single student was affected, for they had the Priesthood to protect them.
Students from other schools died.
I too, want to thank God for the love, service, testimonies, and language of these pioneer
Elders who gave their all to come and bring us the light and teach us the gospel so we can enjoy our
blessing in the Church of Jesus Christ. During this time many homes in Tonga had asked the mission
priesthood holders to come and chase evil spirits from their homes. Some received food that had been
poisoned, so they had a real rough time after World War I in 1918.
EARTHQUAKE AT OTUALEA BEACH AT HA'LAUFULI 1918
"very Wednesday night at Ha'alaufuli the missionaries preached on the street corner.
'Salome, went out with some neighbors to hear them. My father, being very weary
decided to put the children to bed early, and then retire himself. Soon after, there was a great
earthquake. This was 1918. I remember being thrown from my bed. We children were tossed about
the floor, as the earth beneath us shook violently. Hurrying to our feet, we all ran outside to see what
was happening. The missionaries were still preaching. Suddenly we heard a veiy loud noise coming
from Otualea, our favorite beach. We discovered it to be a very big tidal wave, climbing nearly half
way up the cliff. This was my first experience, witnessing a tidal wave, which was so devastating.
It took with it, eveiy single beach house. The sand was thrown to the deep part of the ocean; only
rocks were left behind. Fish, sharks, and sea life of all kinds were thrown on the tree tops. Coconut
trees, and toa trees, were pulled out from their roots; wild flowers and vines were crushed against the
rocks. All the sand had been washed away, and there were holes everywhere upon the seashore. All
the people rushed to the beach, to see what had occurred. Children immediately envisioned using the
holes for their individual swimming holes; they thought it amusing to see fish and shark hanging upon
the trees.
The Vava'u group of islands was of volcanic origin and the village was on the top of these
high rocks. Fortunately, no lives were lost on the beach that night.
31
Elder Jacob, who bad decided to remain in Vava'u with the saints, was the only one in Vava'u
who held the Melchizedek Priesthood. During this period Elder Jacob was called from house to
house, and town to town, to come and administer to loved ones who were so ill. Elder Jacob said
when he arrived at a family house, almost everyone was sick. He laid hi s hands and gave them a
priesthood blessing, many people recovered and later joined the Church. Those he administered to
became very close and loving friends of the mi ssionary through his kindness to them and the Lord
helped them recover from their sickness.
Elder Jacob said it was from God that made him stay back to help out these people in time of
their need. It was amazing during thi s time they had 65 students attending Makeke College in
Tongatapu and not one single student was affected, for they had the Priesthood to protect them.
Students from other school s died.
I too, want to thank God for the love, service, testimonies, and language of these pioneer
Elders who gave their all to come and bring us the li ght and teach us the gospel so we can enjoy our
blessing in the Church of Jesus Christ. During thi s time many homes in Tonga had asked the mi ssion
priesthood holders to come and chase evil spirits from their homes. Some received food that had been
poisoned, so they had a real rough time after World War I in 1918.
EARTHQUAKE AT OTUALEA BEACH AT HA'LAUFULI 1918
E
very Wednesday night at Ha'alaufuli the mi ssionaries preached on the street corner.
Salome, went out with some neighbors to hear them. My father, heing very weary
decided to put the children to bed early, and then retire himself. Soon after, there was a great
earthquake. This was 1918. I remember being thrown from my bed. We chi ldren were tossed Jbout
the floor, as the ealth beneath us shook violently. Hurrying to our feet, we all ran outside to see what
was happening. The mi ssionaries were still preaching. Suddenly we heard a very loud noise coming
from Otualea, our favorite beach. We discovered it to be a very big tidal wave, climbing nearl y half
way up the cliff. This was my first experience, witnessing a tidal wave, which was so devastating.
It took with it, every single beach house. The sand was thrown to the deep part of the ocean; only
rocks were left behind. Fi sh, sharks, and sea life of all kinds were thrown on the tree tops. Coconut
trees, and loa trees, were pulled out from their roots; wi ld flowers and vines were crushed against the
rocks. All the sand had been washed away, and there were holes everywhere upon the seashore. All
the people rushed to the beach, to see what had occulTed. Chi ldren immediately envisioned using the
holes for their individual swimming holes; they thought it amusing to see fish and shark hanging upon
the trees.
The Vava'u group of islands was of volcanic origin and the village was on the top of these
high rocks. Fortunately, no li ves were lost on the beach that night.
T;
32
IOHANI WAS 10 YEARS OLD
ihis was the most fun time of my life when I was about 10 years old (1921). We used to
have so much fun with my little brothers and sisters and all my cousins. On the week
ends we would go out to Mata'ika and ride the buggy and the horses. Some of Grandfather's
(Frederick Gustav Ludwig Wolfgramm) employees would come and put all the cousins inside the
cart and race through the village with them—that was so much fun. There would be Oscar, Claude,
Arthur, and Ernest. One Saturday they were getting on the cart and Arthur whipped the horse and the
horse took off with all of them. Grandfather and all the people in the house came out to see where the
horse would take them. I was the first one to fall from the cart. I landed by a Koka tree and injured
my back, but thank goodness it didn't hurt my head. I didn't tell a soul what happened.
During that time one of my favorite friends was Tevita Makihele who told me he could fix
my back. I came and stood by Tevita. He took both of my hands and put them behind my back. He
twisted my arms and started to shake me. I heard something crack in my back and fell to the ground
and that's when blood started to come from my nose and ears. I felt very sick and went and lay down.
My fever rose to 105 degrees. My friend felt very bad about what he had done.
My father kept on asking if I remembered anything that had happened that week that might
have caused this condition. I had been afraid to tell about my fall, but finally admitted, yes, the horse
took off with the cart and 1 was thrown against the Koka tree and hurt my back.
There was a little man named Vea in Ta'anea, the next town, well known for fixing fractures.
He was sent for and was brought back to our home. As I lay on my bed Vea took his medicine made
from certain green leaves and bark of the trees, put it inside a kava bowl, and mixed it with warm
water. It was strained with coconut fibers. He told me to drink the whole cup. After I drank that, a
few minutes later 1 regurgitated everything in my insides. Day by day I regained my health back to
normal again.
APOSTLE DAVID O. McKAY
This was one ofthe stops on the around-the-world trip of David 0. McKay in 1921,
and which lohani attended as a ten vear old child.
A'
/It
11 the people from Vava'u came to Ha'alaufuli to see the apostle, David O. McKay He
talked to them about a vision. He spoke ofthe lovely sunset glowing in the beautiful red
sky. As he gazed upward, he saw Jesus Christ and the 12 Apostles. They were standing together in
a cloud. At this point in David O. McKay's talk, the interpreter, Lui Wolfgramm, a cousin of lohani's
was unable to continue. Lui understood what the apostle was saying, but, as the tears fell upon his
cheeks, he sat down, and one ofthe missionaries from Zion, Elder May, continued on. After a few
moments Lui again took his place and finished translating Apostle McKay's talk. President Heber
J. Grant was the prophet at the time.
Apostle McKay also told the people this short experience. He was once called to attend a
meeting for all the apostles. Before the time to leave he rested in a chair and fell asleep. At this time
he had a dream: it concemed the meeting. He arrived at the designated place, but was sent home
32
IOHANI WAS 10 YEARS OLD
T
his was the most fun time of my life when I was about 10 years old (1921). We used to
have so much fun with my little brothers and sisters and all my cousins. On the week
ends we would go out to Mata'ika and ride the buggy and the horses. Some of Grandfather's
(Frederick Gustav Ludwig Wolfgramm) employees woul d come and put all the cousins inside the
cart and race through the village with them--that was so much fun. There wou ld be Oscar, Claude,
Arthur, and Ernest. One Saturday they were getting on the cart and Arthur whipped the horse and the
horse took off with all of them. Grandfather and all the people in the house came out to see where the
horse would take them. I was the first one to fall from the can. I landed by a Koka tree and injured
my back, but thank goodness it didn't hurt my head. I didn't tell a soul what happened.
During that time one of my favorite friends was Tevita Makihele who told me he could fix
my back. I came and stood by Tevita. He took both of my hands and put them behind my back. He
twisted my anns and started to shake me. r heard something crack in my back and fell to the ground
and that's when blood started to come from my nose and ears. r felt very sick and went and lay down.
My fever rose to 105 degrees. My friend felt very bad about what he had done.
My father kept on asking if I remembered anything that had happened that week that might
have caused thi s condition. I had been afraid to tell about my fall, but finally admitted, yes, the horse
took off with the cart and I was thrown against the Koka tree and hurt my back.
There was a little man named Yea in Ta'anea, the next town, well known for fi xing fractures.
He was sent for and was brought back to our home. As I lay on my bed Yea took hi s medicine made
from certain green leaves and bark of the trees, put it inside a kava howl , and mixed iT wiTh warm
water. It was strained with coconut fibers. He told me to drink the whole cup. After I drank that, a
few minutes later I regurgitated everything in my insides. Day by day I regained my health back to
nonnal again.
APOSTLE DAVID O. McKAY
This \1 'as Olle a/the stops ol/tll e around-the-world !rip of David O. McKay in 1921,
and \1'lIlch fahani oflended as a fell year old child.
A
ll the people from Yava'u came to Ha'alaufuli to see the apostle, David O. McKay He
talked to them about a vision. He spoke of the lovely sunset glowing in the beautiful red
sky. As he gazed upward, he saw Jesus Christ and the 12 Apostles. They were standing together in
a cloud. At this point in David O. McKay's talk, the interpreter, Lui Wolfgramm, a cousin of lohani's
was unable to continue. Lui understood what the apostle was saying, but, as the tears fell upon his
cheeks, he sat down, and one of the missionaries from Zion, Elder May, continued on. After a few
moments Lui again took his place and finished translating Apostle McKay's talk. President Heber
J. Grant was the prophet at the time.
Apostle McKay al so told the people this short experience. He was once called to attend a
meeting for all the apost les. Before the time to leave he rested in a chair and fell asleep. At this ti me
he had a dream: it concerned the meeting. He arrived at the designated place, but was sent home
33
before the meeting started. Within a few minutes, the apostle awakened and hurried to make his
appointment, giving no further thought to his dream. While driving along in his car, he was brought
to an abrupt stop. A rope had been tied across the road. It hit the windshield causing the glass to
break and the splinters flew into the apostle's face. The skin was pealed off in some areas. He missed
his meeting, and was taken directly to the hospital.
The saints in Ha'alaufuli examined his face, but could see no evidence ofthe accident. During
this same talk, he asked for a glass of water. He likened the clear, pure water to a virtuous person.
He put one drop of ink from his fountain pen into the same glass. The discoloration was an example
of what sin could do.
He picked a lovely red rose from an arrangement on the pulpit. As he examined it, he drew
the audience's attention to the beauty and fragrance of the flower. He said the thoms acted as a
protection to the rose, therefore they should not be removed. There is good and bad in all people.
Try to always look for the good qualities. We always find fault with our neighbor, but do not see our
own weaknesses.
The Apostle was reminded of the lily-very fragile to look upon, but many times they are
found in muddy water. The lovely flower finds strength to rise above the murky waters and lift it's
head upward to the sky. We too, can rise above our environment if it is an undesirable one.
I leamed three good lessons from the apostle's talk that day. I have used them as guides
throughout my life, and am grateful for the examples of our leaders. At the age of 66,1 am still very
appreciative of my many blessings.
i:
HUNTING WILD GOATS
'had a cousin, called Netane Lea'aevai, and a friend named Hale Makehele. One day they
-decided to take me hunting at one of the big cliffs by Hangai Tokelau. The rock covered
cliff is several hundred feet high. Beneath it is the beautiful blue ocean. In these waters, the
whales and sharks come to feast on any goats that happen to fall off the pinnacles of the cliff into
the deep ocean below. These goats love to roam during the daytime. They make their home
inside small caves.
I really didn't want to go with them but they insisted I go just this once. At seventeen
years of age I knew it was a very dangerous sport. The cliff was so steep it was very difficult to
hike around it. I finally found a very narrow space about two and a half feet wide. I was trying to
hang on to a small tree branch so I wouldn't fall into the ocean.
While reaching out for more branches to hang on to, my friend Hale Makihele saw a great
big goat standing about 50 feet right above where I was standing. I knew for sure that if Hale
decided to shoot this goat, that would be the end of my life, plus the life of the goat.
Hale, in his excitement, immediately took a shot at the goat, which killed it. I looked up
and saw the goat fall straight at me and it landed right on my back. What an experience in nearly
losing my life! I was holding some branches with one hand and the other grasping some rocks.
As the goat hit my back, it slid down and his neck and head were stuck between the small tree I
was hanging on to. Two of his legs were stuck inside small rock holes, and the rest of his body
was hanging in space. 1 was very fortunate to get home safely that aftemoon.
33
before the meeting started. Within a few minutes, the apost le awakened and hurried to make hi s
appointment, giving no further thought to his dream. Whi le driving along in hi s car, he was brought
to an abrupt stop. A rope had been tied across the road. It hit the windshield causing the glass 10
break and the splinters fl ew into the apost le's face . The skin was pealed off in some areas. He missed
hi s meeting, and was taken directl y to the hospital.
The sai nts in Ha'alaufuli examined hi s face, but could see no evidence of the accident. During
this same talk, he asked for a glass of water. He likened the clear, pure water to a virtuous person.
He put one drop of ink from his fountain pen into the same glass. The discoloration was an example
of what sin could do.
He picked a lovely red rose from an arrangement on the pulpit. As he examined it, he drew
the audience's attention to the beauty and fragrance of the flower. He said the thorns acted as a
protection to the rose, therefore they should not be removed. There is good and bad in all people.
Try to always look for the good qualities. We always find fault with our nei ghbor. but do not see our
own weaknesses.
The Apostle was reminded of the lily--very fragile to look upon, but many times they are
found in muddy water. The lovely flower finds strength to rise above the murky waters and li ft it's
head upward to the sky. We too, can ri se dbove our environment if it is an undesirable one.
r learned three good lessons from the apostle's talk that day. I have used them as guides
throughout my I ife, and am grateful for the examples of our leaders. At the age of 66, I am sti II very
appreciati ve of my many blessings.
HUNTING WILD GOATS
I
had a cousin, called Netane Lea'aevai , and a friend named Hale Makehele. One ddy they
decided to take me hunting at one of the big cliffs by Hangai Tokelau. The rock covered
cliff is several hundred feet hi gh. Beneath it is the beautiful blue ocean. [n these waters, the
whales and sharks come to feast on any goats that happen to fall off the pinnacles of the cliff inlo
the deep ocean below. These goats love to roam during the daytime. They make their home
inside small caves.
r reall y didn't want to go with them but they insisted r go just this once. At seventeen
years of age r knew it was a very dangerous sport. The cli ff was so steep it was very difficult to
hike around it. I final ly found a very narrow space about two and a half feet wide. r was trying to
hang on to a small tree branch so I wouldn't fall into the ocean.
While reaching out for more branches to hang on to, my friend Hale Maki hele saw a great
big goat standing about 50 feet right above where r was standing. r knew for sure that if Hale
decided to shoot this goat, that would be the end of my life, plus the life of the goat.
Hale, in hi s excitement, immediately took a shot at the goal, which killed it. r looked up
and saw the gOal fall straight at me and it landed right on my back. What an experience in nearly
lOSing my life! I was holding some branches with one hand and the other grasping some rocks.
As the goat hit my back, it slid down and hi s neck and head were stuck between the smalllree r
was hangi ng on to. Two of his legs were stuck inside small rock holes, and the rest of his body
was hanging in space. r was very fortunate to get home safely that afternoon.
i;
34
WHILE IOHANI WAS SINGLE (at Hangai)
't was about 5:00 p.m. this certain aftemoon. 1 needed some kerosene for my lamp, also
-some spending money. I jumped on my horse and headed to the bush at Hangai to make
some copra. First thing I did was to collect about 350 coconuts. I could take copra into any store and
exchange it for money. That amount of copra would be worth about 20/- (shillings) or one pound in
English money.
I went straight to the big cliff at Hangai, collected my cocoanuts, and started to cut them open
with an ax. I cleaned out the meat from each coconut shell as I sat with my back facing the top ofthe
200 foot cliff. Finally, the sun went down at 6:00 p.m. I had worked hard to make this copra because
I didn't have a light, and had forgotten to bring any matches.
Darkness fell. I could barely see the coconut meat. The crickets began to sing. A huge tree
grew behind where I sat, and after removing the meat from the coconut shell, I would throw the husk
over my shoulder behind this tree.
As I was hurrying to finish this task, I heard a new born baby crying. The sound came directly
behind the large tree. I tumed around to see if anyone was there. Seeing no one, I continued with my
copra, so I might finish and retum to town. I continued to throw the husks behind the tree, the baby
crying all the while. Finally finished, I threw my sack of copra on the horse's back, and headed for
town. I was frightened because I knew Satan was trying to scare me that night.
i;
WHILE IOHANI WAS SINGLE (at Vaomaile)
'went out to the bush one day to plant sweet potatoes, but before I worked on my plantation,
-I decided to build myself a small Tongan hut. It would be six feet long and six feet wide,
and three feet high. After that was completed I built a chicken coop; then I went out and found a
mother hen and one rooster which I put in the chicken coop, and cared for them. In the days to come
it wasn't long until I had eggs and more chickens.
The day after building my hut, I started planting sweet potatoes. First I hoed and pulled the
weeds, clearing the area for the kumala (sweet potatoes). Soon the kumala began to grow. I worked
hard on my plantation. One day the sun was very hot. I had a severe headache. I decided to go back
to my hut and rest until sundown. 1 would then return to my garden when it became cooler.
As I lay down to rest, I closed my eyes but did not sleep. As I lay resting, a feeling of great
weariness overcame me. I felt as if I was inside a deep hole, and had difficulty breathing. My body
became very weak. As I opened my eyes, they fell upon two women who had entered my little hut.
The first woman had beautiful long, black hair. She was very attractive and wore very little clothing.
Around the lower part of her body she wore a small tapa cloth that covered her hips and upper thighs.
Her legs were bare and her hair was so long and thick it became a covering for the upper part of her
beautiful body. She looked like a Samoan beauty. Her spotless skin, with a blush in her cheeks, and
a beautiful smile, made a great impression on lohani. She walked towards him and sat down near
where my head lay.
34
WHILE IOHANI WAS SINGLE (at Hangai)
I
t was about 5:00 p.m. thi s certain afternoon. I needed some kerosene for my lamp, also
some spending money. I jumped on my horse and headed to the bush at Hangai to make
some copra. First thing I did was to collect about 350 coconuts. I could take copra into any store and
exchange it for money. That amount of copra would be worth about 20/- (shillings) or one pound in
English money.
I went straight to the big cliff at Hangai, collected my cocoanuts, and started to cut them open
with an ax. I cleaned out the meat from each coconut shell as I sat with my back facing the top of the
200 foot cliff. Finally, the sun went down at 6:00 p.m. I had worked hard to make thi s copra because
[didn't have a li ght , and had forgotten to bring any matches.
Darkness fell. I could barely see the coconut meat. The crickets began to sing. A huge tree
grew behind where I sat, and after removing the meat from the coconut shell , I would throw the husk
over my shoulder behind thi s tree.
As J was hurrying to finish this task, J heard a new born baby crying. The sound came directly
behind the large tree. I turned around to see if anyone was there. Seeing no one, I continued with my
copra, so I might finish and return to town. I continued to throw the husks behind the tree, the baby
cryi ng all the while. Finally finished, I threw my sack of copra on the horse's back, and headed for
town. I was frightened because J knew Satan was trying to scare me that night.
WHILE IOHANr WAS SINGLE (at Vaomaile)
I
went out to the bush one day to plant sweet potatoes, but before I worked on my plantation,
I decided to build myself a small Tongan hut. It would be six feet long and six feet wide,
and three feet hi gh. After that was completed I built a chicken coop; then I went out and found a
mother hen and one rooster which I put in the chicken coop, and cared for them. In the days to come
it wasn't long until I had eggs and more chickens.
The day after building my hut, I started planting sweet potatoes. First I hoed and pulled the
weeds, clearing the area for the kuma/a (sweet potatoes) . Soon the kuma/a began to grow. I worked
hard on my plantation. One day the sun was very hot. 1 had a severe headache. I decided to go back
to my hut and res t until sundown. J would then return to my garden when it became cooler.
As I lay down to rest, I closed my eyes but did not sleep. As I lay resting, a feeling of great
weari ness overcame me. I felt as if I was inside a deep hole, and had difficulty breathing. My body
became very weak. As I opened my eyes, they fell upon two women who had entered my little hut.
The first woman had beautiful long, black hair. She was very attractive and wore very little clothing.
Around the lower part of her body she wore a small tapa cloth that covered her hips and upper thi ghs.
Her legs were bare and her hair was so long and thick it became a covering for the upper pan of her
beautiful body. She looked like a Samoan beauty. Her spotless ski n, with a blush in her cheeks, and
a beautifu l smi le, made a great impression on lohani. She walked towards him and sat down near
where my head lay.
35
The second woman entered the hut behind her. She also was beautiful. Her skin was as dark
as a Fijian, her hair, short and curly, made a lovely frame for her beautiful face. She sat at my feet.
Neither woman spoke but continued to smile at me.
I experienced this between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. I became so weak, I could
hardly breathe. Some power seemed to enfold me. As 1 lay there, I looked up at these two women,
who were now laughing at me, but still not uttering a sound. I realized that these two must be Satan
of Fehuluni, a female devil that Tongans see at the bush quite often.
I finally said, "If that is you Satan, by the power of the Melchizedek Priesthood which I hold,
and in the name of Jesus Christ, I command you to get out of here and stay out. Just then, I sat up
and my little hut was full of smoke vapors. The two women both disappeared. I then knew that they
were Satan tempting me again.
A
1
CHURCHES IN HA'ALAUFULI
t the time I was growing up in Ha'alaufuli there were only three churches in our village:
-one was the Methodist Church, one the Church of Tonga, and the other was a small
branch of the Mormon Church. Sunday was always a holy sabbath that we kept while attending
Church. Primary was after school on Tuesdays. Wednesday was for Relief Society in the morning
and M.I.A. was in the evening. Friday a social or dance was held. Sometimes we had genealogy on
Thursday night. We also found time for choir practice on M.I.A. night. This was the regular schedule
for our branch.
The other two churches would hold meetings on Sunday. For a special month each year,
every day, Monday through Friday, their members would go to church at 5:00 p.m. and read their
Bible. In a short time, one by one would get up and "pour out his heart". Before long, 75 to 80 people
would be overcome with a certain kind of spirit, and they would talk and scream and yell "Hallelujah!,
Hallelujah". Pretty soon they would work themselves up, and fill their souls with love for the Savior.
Soon they would fall upon the chapel floor and pass out. They called this , "the Spirit of Love" for
the Savior that fell upon them, but I wonder sometimes if that's what it really was.
When these people passed out, especially the women, the L.D.S. members would be ready to
help them. We would carry them outside the chapel into the fresh air, and then pour cold water on
them. The only way for them to be able to stop this emotional meeting was for someone to run
quickly or on horseback to another village to find the president of their church. He would be the only
one who could come out to that chapel and call the meeting to an end. Each village had their own
steward or missionary to lead them in their church meeting.
One day, I remember there were people who had come from the nearby villages of
Tu'anikivale, Ta'ane, Holonga, and Mangia to our town for this special month. They worshiped every
day of that month, and pretty soon this "Spirit of Love" as they called it, fell upon these people. We
asked around for extra men to assist us that day, but there were too many visitors who had come to
attend church at Ha'alaufuli. We started carrying these people out, one by one. As I carried this little
old lady, Finau Fale Vai, out the door, I was surprised to find out she had just pretended to faint. She
35
The second woman entered the hut behind her. She also was beautiful. Her skin was as dark
as a FUian, her hair, short and curl y, made a lovely frame for her beautif ul face. She sat at my feet.
Neither woman spoke but continued to smile at me.
I experienced thi s between the hours of II :00 a.m. and 12:00 noon. I became so weak, I could
hardly breathe. Some power seemed to enfold me. As I lay there, I looked up at these two women,
who were now laughing at me, but still not uttering a sound. I realized that these two must be Satan
of Fehuluni , a femal e devil that Tongans see at the bush quite often.
I finally said, "If that is you Satan, by the power of the Melchi zedek Priesthood which I hold,
and in the name of Jesus Christ, I command you to get out of here and stay out. Just then, 1 sat up
and my littl e hut was full of smoke vapors. The two women both di sappeared. I then knew that they
were Satan tempting me again.
CHURCHES IN HA' ALAUFULl
A
t the time I was growing up in Ha'alaufuli there were only three churches in our vill age:
one was the Methodi st Church. one the Church of Tonga, and the other was a small
branch of the Mormon Church. Sunday was always a holy sabbath that we kept whil e attending
Church. Primary was after school on Tuesdays. Wednesday was for Relief Society in the moming
and M.I.A. was in the evening. Friday a social or dance was held. Sometimes we had genealogy on
Thursday ni ght. We also found time for choi r practice on M.I.A. night. This was the regularschedul e
for our branch.
The other two churches woul d hold meetings on Sunday. For a special month each year,
every day, Monday through Friday, their members would go to church at 5:00 p.m. and read their
Bible. In a short time, one by one would get up and "pour out hi s heart". Before long, 75 [0 80 people
would be overcome with a certain kind of spirit, and they would talk and scream and yell "Hallelujah! ,
Hal lelujah". Pretty soon they would work themselves up, and fill their soul s with love for the Savior.
Soon they would fall upon the chapel floor and pass out. They call ed this , "the Spirit of Love" for
the Savior that fe ll upon them, but I wonder sometimes if that's what it real ly was.
When these people passed out, especially the women, the L.D.S. members would be ready to
help them. We would carry them outside the chapel into the fresh air, and then pour cold water on
them. The only way for them to be able to stop this emotional meet ing was for someone to run
qui ckly or on horseback to another vill age to find the president of their church. He would be the only
one who could come out to that chapel and call the meeting to an end. Each village had their own
steward or missionary to lead them in their church meeting.
One day, I remember there were people who had come from the nearby villages of
Tu'anikivale, Ta'ane, Holonga, and Mangia to our town for thi s special month. They worshi ped every
day of that month, and pretty soon this "Spir it of Love" as they call ed it, fell upon these people. We
asked around for ext ra men to ass ist us that day, but there were too many visitors who had come to
attend church at Ha'alaufuli. We started carryi ng these people out, one by one. As I carried this little
old lady, Finau Fale Vai , out the door, [was surpri sed to fi nd out she had just pretended to faint. She
36
opened her eyes, and whispered to me, "lohani, before you pour any water on my face, be very careful
with my hat. It's brand new, and I don't want to get water on it, OK!" She closed her eyes again, and
pretended that the "Spirit of Love" had fallen upon her too. Instead of feeling sorry for her, I just
smiled at her and told her to get up and run home quickly before the men poured water on her.
My friends and I became tired of carrying this crowd out. Instead of these L.D.S. young men
carrying each person out to the lawn and lying them gracefully down, then pouring cold water over
their faces, they tried something else. They just marched these people up to the front door of the
Mormon chapel and just dropped them down, or just let them roll down the steps. The more people
they let go at the top of the stairs, the more awoke at the bottom as others fell on them. A few hours
later someone finally found their president. He came and closed the meeting.
lOHANI' S BODY ARISES FROM THE DEAD
'here was a conference held in May 1931 at Koloa and Elder James Cutler was the mission
president at that time. Elder Martin was called to start his missionary work at Ha'alaufuli.
Sione Ulufonua and Mele gave my mother Salome some shark's liver for dinner and I ate
quite a bit of it.
There was a cricket game at Ta'anea. I left for the game but felt very dizzy and left for home.
I decided to stop at a small sweet water lagoon called Pu'ipuaka for an aftemoon bath hoping to make
me feel better, but as I looked up at the sun, everything looked yellow or greenish.
I couldn't figure out what was wrong with me. I began to walk back home at Havelu to rest
but felt very sick to my stomach.
All I remember was trying to walk back to the missionary housing at Tapuhia (means sacred
place) to see if the new Elder Martin was back from Neiafu to give me a blessing.
On my way there, I remember feeling dizzy and losing my balance. I fell down three times,
but finally made it back to Tapuhia. That's where the Ha'alaufuli chapel, missionary home, three
cement cisterns, a kitchen and a dance or social hall and the church bell were.
When I first arrived, older church members were engaged in a kava party to honor their newly
arrived missionary at Ha'alaufuli, including Siosefa Naeata, Fusiloa Unga, Netane Laevai, Pita Pauni,
Fifita Motua, Sione Ulufonua, Saia Lange, Viliami Naeata Fehoko, and Elder Martin's new Tongan
missionary companion Elder Sione Filipe of Ha'apai who was married to Ane Brown.
As soon as Siosefa Naeata saw me on the front step of the missionary home, he wanted to
know if I was sick? I said, "Please get me a missionary, I'm awfully sick."
Sione Felipe got up quietly to go and check on Elder Martin,but he was taking a short nap
from his long boat trip to Vava'u.
I started to enter from the porch to the living room, but fell and died on the floor. At that time
they called for Elder Martin. He came and checked on me, but I was dead.
The Elder again went back into his room and brought with him the consecrated oil and asked
his companion to assist.
36
opened her eyes, and whispered to me, "Iohani , before you pour any water on my face, be very careful
wi th my hat. It' s brand new, and I don't want to get water on it, OK!" She closed her eyes again, and
pretended that the "Spirit of Love" had fallen upon her too. Instead of feeling sorry for her, I just
smiled at her and told her to get up and run home qui ckly before the men poured water on her.
My friends and I became tired of carrying this crowd out. Instead of these L.D.S. young men
carrying each person out to the lawn and lying them gracefull y down, then pouring cold water over
their faces, they tried something else. They just marched these people up to the front door of the
MonTIon chapel and just dropped them down, or just let them roll down the steps. The more people
they let go at the top of the stairs, the more awoke at the bottom as others fell on them. A few hours
later someone finall y found their president. He came and closed the meeting.
IOHANI'S BODY ARISES FROM THE DEAD
T
here was a conference held in May 1931 at Koloa and Elder J ames Cutler was the mi ssion
president at that time. Elder Marti n was called to start hi s mi ssionary work at Ha'alaufuli.
Sione Ulufonua and Mele gave my mother Salome some shark's liver for dinner and I ate
quile a bit of it.
There was a cricket game at Ta'anea. I left for the game but felt very dizzy and left for home.
I decided to stop at a small sweet water lagoon call ed Pu' ipuaka for an afternoon bath hoping to make
me feel better, but as [ looked up at the sun, everything looked yellow or greenish.
I couldn't figure out what was wrong wit h me. I began to walk back home at Havelu to rest
but felt very sick to my stomach.
All I remember was trying to walk back to the missionary housing at Tapuhia (means sacred
place) to see if the new Elder Martin was back from Neiafu to give me a blessing.
On my way there, I remember feeling dizzy and losing my balance. I fell down three times,
but finally made it back to Tapuhia. That's where the Ha'alaufuli chapel, missionary home, three
cement cisterns, a kitchen and a dance or social hall and the church bell were.
When I first arrived, older church members were engaged in a kava party to honor their newly
arrived missionary at Ha' alaufuli, including SiosefaNaeata, Fusiloa Unga, NetaneLaevai, Pita Pauni,
Fifita Motua, Sione Ulufonua, Saia Lange, Viliami Naeata Fehoko, and Elder Martin's new Tongan
mi ssionary companion Elder Sione Filipe of Ha'apai who was married to Ane Brown.
As soon as Siosefa Naeata saw me on the front step of the missionary home, he wanted to
know if I was sick? I said, "Please get me a mi ssionary, I'm awfully sick. "
Sione Felipe got up quietly to go and check on Elder Martin,but he was taking a short nap
from hi s long boat trip to Vava ' u.
I started to enter from the porch to the li ving room, but fell and died on the floor. At that time
they called for Elder Martin. He came and checked on me, but I was dead.
The Elder again went back into his room and brought with him the consecrated oi l and asked
his companion to assist.
37
At this time my mortal body was laying on the floor and my spirit was taken above and I could
see what was going on down below.
I saw Elder Martin open up the consecrated oil and begin a priesthood blessing for me. It
seems that my spirit was taken farther and farther away from this earth. In a veiy humble and sweet
voice, Elder Martin called for my spirit and said, "lohani Otto Wolfgramm, by the holy power ofthe
Melchezidek priesthood which I bear, and in the name of Jesus Christ I command your spirit to return
and for you to arise from the dead."
It seemed to me that I was far away from this world when I heard my name called and that was
the last thing I heard. My spirit immediately retumed and entered my mortal body and life returned.
My heart began to pump normally and 1 began to breathe again.
I stood up and quickly left the building and went behind the house and vomited out all the
poisonous food that caused my problem and what a relief. Salome and I expressed our love for the
missionary and his companion. Priesthood leaders were eye witness to the power of God that is given
to men to raise someone from the dead.
We left to go home. By the time we got home we were on our knees thanking God for his
blessing and for sending Elder Martin to Tonga.
The next day Elder Martin came over to our home with his companion and said to us, "Today
I would like to bear you my testimony as a witness to what took place yesterday. Just before I came
on my mission I was given a patriarchal blessing that told me that through God's power given me,
I will help raise someone from the dead."
With Everything going on yesterday Elder Martin didn't remember about his blessing, but the
next day he remembered and came and shared that with Salome and me.
Through this blessing I gained much love for missionary work and it gave me much faith and
willingness to serve wherever the church needs me.
THE DAY MY FATHER DIED
| arly Wednesday morning, May 20,1929, we just barely got up from our sleep, I heard my
/father, Chares Frederick Ludwig Wolfgramm, call me to come to his bedroom and say,
"lohani, today I feel like I'm going to die, and by 4:00 o'clock I will be gone. I would like to prepare
you, lohani, to be a father to raise the rest of your brothers and sisters. If your mother, Salome Fo'ou
Afu, decides to marry again, there will be no problem, but will have her wish. Let her make up her
own mind, whatever she would like to do. Go out to the back room and there is a large book there
about 10 inches thick that contains the accounts of everyone in Tonga, New Zealand, and Australia,
that owe money to the store. Many of their names you will find inside this book. Some of them have
taken loans out for food; some of them have taken loans for building new homes, loans for their
funeral, and some for their copra and some for spending money. I want you to look through this book
at the names of the different companies that owe us money, and make a promise to me that after I die
you will not go after them, not even a penny. Those that we have helped out, whatever need and
services that we have rendered them, the Lord has blessed us and it is not for you to worry about it
any more. It was a blessing for us to be of help to them."
37
At this time my mortal body was laying on the floor and my spirit was taken above and I could
see what was going on down below.
I saw Elder Martin open up the consecrated oi I and begin a priesthood blessing for me. It
seems that my spirit was taken farther and farther away from thi s earth. In a very humble and sweet
voice, Elder Martin called for my spirit and said, "Iohani Otto Wolfgramm, by the holy power of the
Meichezidek priesthood which I bear, and in the name of Jesus Chri st I command your spirit to return
and for you to arise from the dead."
It seemed to me that I was far away from this world when I heard my name called and that was
the last thing I heard. My spirit immediately returned and entered my mortal body and life returned.
My heart began to purnp normall y and I began to breathe again.
I stood up and quickly left the building and went behind the house and vomited out all the
poisonous food that caused my problem and what a relief. Salome and I expressed our love for the
missionary and hi s companion. Priesthood leaders were eye witness to the power of God that is given
to men to raise someone from the dead.
We left to go home. By the time we got home we were on our knees thanking God for hi s
blessing and for sending Elder Martin to Tonga.
The next day Elder Martin came over to our home with hi s companion and said to us, "Today
I would like to bear you my testimony as a witness to what took place yesterday. Just before I came
on my mission I was given a patriarchal blessing that told me that through God's power given me,
I will help raise someone from the dead."
With Everything going on yesterday Elder Martin didn ' t remember about hi s blessing, but the
next day he remembered and came and shared that with Salome and me.
Through this blessing I gained much love for missionary work and it gave me much faith and
willingness to serve wherever the church needs me.
THE DAY MY FATHER DIED
E
arly Wednesday morning, May 20, 1929, we just barely got up from our sleep, I heard my
father, Chares Frederick Ludwig Wolfgramm, call me to come to hi s bedroom and say,
"lohani , today I feel like I'm going to die, and by 4:00 o' clock I will be gone. I would like to prepare
you,Iohani , to be a father to raise the rest of your brothers and sisters. If your mother, Salome Fo' ou
Afu, decides to marry again, there will be no problem, but will have her wish. Let her make up her
own mind, whatever she would like to do. Go out to the back room and there is a large book there
about 10 inches thick that contains the accounts of everyone in Tonga, New Zealand, and Australia,
that owe money to the store. Many of their names you wi II find inside this book. Some of them have
taken loans out for food; some of them have taken loans for building new homes, loans for their
funeral , and some for their copra and some for spending money. I want you to look through thi s book
at the names of the different companies that owe us money, and make a promi se to me that after I di e
you wi ll not go after them, not even a penny. Those that we have helped out, whatever need and
services that we have rendered them, the Lord has blessed us and it is not for you to worry about it
any more. It was a blessing for us to be of help to them. "
38
My father Charles was living at Ha'alaufuli and ran a little store. At the store there was sharp
corner on a table on which he constantly bumped his leg in walking back and forth in his work. This
caused a large lump on his leg that began to grow larger and larger. It may have been a tumor or
cancer and became very painful, but there was no medication to help him. One day the pain was so
severe he grabbed the lump and tried to pull it out, hoping to stop the pain. He reached down and
ruptured a blood vessel. At this time it began to bleed profusely. Salome brought a bucket so the
blood could drain into it. Osika was sent to Neiafu to find a doctor. A few hours later they arrived
in a horse and buggy. When the doctor arrived the bucket was almost full of Sale's blood. He turned
around and said, "I'm very sorry to tell you this, almost all of Sale's blood has drained out and I do
not have anything to get it back inside. He will soon die."
"lohani, come stand by my side, because tomorrow after I die you will have to look after all
the children. Make sure they are cared for and maybe you must leave your schooling and look for a
new job so you will be able to raise them. I would like you to fix me my last meal." I turned around
and went into the kitchen and made father some porridge and toast in the kerosene oven and some
hot chocolate. That was father's favorite breakfast. I brought it over to him and he ate it. The rest
of the kids were not there at that time except Osika. I was about 18 years old, Oscar 17, Kaloti 16,
Caroline 15, Ana 14, Ella 11, Christian 10, Walter 9, and Makanese 6, and Martha 4, Heinrich 3, and
Simione was 2. My mother had had 5 miscarriages. About 4:00 o'clock that aftemoon Sale passed
away. All the family from Neiafu, Mata'ika, and Ha'alaufuli, Koloa, and Otea and some from
Tu'anekivale and the little island of Falevai where Sulunga came from, came for the funeral. Some
came from Leimatua and some from Ta'anea, and others.
The evening after the funeral I couldn't rest. My heart was aching and I couldn't stop the tears
and couldn't understand why this happened to father while the children were so very young. So I
came to my bedroom and layed there and cried and cried That evening I saw the beautiful full moon
showing over the graveyard where father had been buried. It was almost like daylight, I could see
clearly from my bedroom to father's grave. I got up on my knees and started to pray fervently and
asked the Lord to help and comfort my heart and help me find a way that I could become a good
father to the rest of my brothers and sisters.
While sitting on my bed and praying and looking at the grave, I saw a man walk in. His feet
didn't touch the ground and he said to me, "I've come to take you, lohani,"
I immediately said, "Where are you going to take me?"
"I have come to take you to the spirit world."
"Good, because I was wondering in my heart where to go next? I've been thinking of my
father and the deep love I have for him and I could not relax and get it off my mind, because I don't
know how I'm going to care for all of these children."
The angel told me, " You have to get up and follow me."
When I got off the bed to follow the man, I could hardly breathe and came to a stop and felt
like I was passing out. My body fell back on the bed and I could see my spirit leave my body. The
angel said, "Come with me.". At that moment I saw my body on the bed and my spirit follow the
angel. We left this earth to go to another place.
38
My father Charles was living at Ha'alaufuli and ran a little store. At the store there was sharp
corner on a table on which he constantly bumped hi s leg in walking back and forth in his work. Thi s
caused a large lump on hi s leg that began to grow larger and larger. It may have been a tumor or
cancer and became very painful, but there was no medication to help him. One day the pain was so
severe he grabbed the lump and tried to pull it out, hoping to stop the pain. He reached down and
ruptured a blood vessel. At thi s time it began to bleed profusely. Salome brought a bucket so the
blood could drain into it. Osika was sent to Neiafu to f ind a doctor. A few hours later they arrived
in a horse and buggy. When the doctor arrived the bucket was almost full of Sale' s blood. He turned
around and said, "I'm very sorry to tell you this, almost all of Sale's blood has drained out and I do
not have anything to get it back ins ide. He will soon die."
"Iohani , come stand by my side, because tomorrow after I die you will have to look after all
the children. Make sure they are cared for and maybe you must leave your schooling and look for a
new job so you will be able to raise them. I would like you to fix me my last meal. " I turned around
and went into the kitchen and made father some porridge and toast in the kerosene oven and some
hot chocolate. That was father's favorite breakfast. I brought it over to him and he ate it. The rest
of the kids were not there at that time except Osika. I was about 18 years old, Oscar 17, Kaloti 16,
Caroli ne IS, Ana J 4, Ella II, Christian 10, Walter 9, and Makanese 6, and Mal1ha 4, Heinrich 3, and
Simione was 2. My mother had had 5 miscarriages. About 4:00 o'clock that afternoon Sale passed
away. All the family from Neiafu, Mata'ika, and Ha'alaufuli, Koloa, and Otea and some from
Tu ' anekivale and the li ttle island of Falevai where Sulunga came from, came for the funeral. Some
came from Leimatua and some from Ta'anea, and others.
The evening after the funeral Icouldn ' t rest. My heart was aching and I couldn 't stop the tears
and couldn ' t understand why thi s happened to father wh ile the children were so very young. So I
came to my bedroom and layed there and cried and cried That evening I saw the beautiful full moon
showing over the graveyard where father had been buried. It was almost like daylight, I coul d see
clearl y from my bedroom to father ' s grave. I got up on my knees and started to pray fervently and
asked the Lord to help and comfort my heart and help me find a way that I could become a good
father to the rest of my brothers and sisters.
While sitting on my bed and praying and looking at the grave, I saw a man walk in. His feet
didn't touch the ground and he said to me, "I've come to take you, Iohani ,"
I immediately said, "Where are you going to take me?"
"I have come to take you to the spirit world."
"Good, because I was wondering in my heart where to go next? I've been thinking of my
father and the deep love I have for him and I could not relax and get it off my mind, because I don' t
know how I'm going to care for all of these children."
The angel told me, " You have to get up and follow me."
When I got off the bed to follow the man, I could hardl y breathe and came to a stop and relt
like I was passing out. My body fell back on the bed and I could see my spi rit leave my body. The
angel said, "Come with me.". At that moment I saw my body on the bed and my spirit follow the
angel. We left thi s earth to go to another place.
39
The angel said, "lohani, do you know where we are standing now?"
I answered ," No".
I saw an open area and many, many spirits were there, even from the time of Adam. Some
of them ran up to me touching part of my clothing and some of them had clothing on and some didn't.
Some of them had faces that were sad holding their chin in their hands. There were no houses around.
The spirits were sitting in this hot area with nothing over their heads, crying for help, and
p!eading,"Iohani, I hope you remember us. They have shown us to you so that when you retum to
earth you will take our names to the temple so we can be redeemed. Please, we beg of you to do that.
Promise us to do that when you return, lohani."
The angel spoke to me, " That's why you are here so you can see and be an eye witness that
their work is waiting to be done on the other side." 1 promised them that if 1 had the opportunity 1
would.
The crowd ofthe people seeking lohani's help were calling, "Please, anyone, take our names
to the temple or any member ofthe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to do baptism for us
so we can leave this horrible place and go on to paradise and continue work there."
I answered them, "Yes, if I ever have a chance to go to America, I will take your names and
have your temple work done."
"In a short time we will go through this gate and I will let you see some of your family
members here," the angel declared.
The angel said, "lohani, we must leave this place now, we don't have enough time left." As
we were leaving this area these people began to rush out to be close to us and even touch our clothing,
but were unable to do so because in front of us we were facing a huge white gate, and a long
white cloud or fog stood between us and these people; therefore wc were separated by this force of
energy. They would be shocked if they came any closer or touched us. They tried to enter this gate
but were unsuccessful.
The angel asked me, "lohani, do you know where we have come from?"
I said, "No."
He said, "That was the spirit prison. These people need to be baptized before they can enter
the gate. The reason you were brought to them is so you can see how they suffer and wait for
someone to do baptisms for them from the other side. That is your mission."
A big force of energy from the cloud pushed us inside the gate and those who were coming
from the first place couldn't get in. This area was so much cleaner, homes were painted and very
clean, flowers were in bloom. The angel said to me, "Now you will meet some of you family here."
They were only ten feet away from us. They received me well, and one by one they came and hugged
and kissed me in a long line. Some said, "Please, lohani, when you go back, take our family names
to the temple and continue their work."
Shortly after that the angel said," Come with me."
We saw a building and inside was a waiting room like at the temple and the first lady I met
was Martha Sanft Wolfgramm, my step-grandmother who lives in Neiafu. She was the one that was
waiting at the door and let us in. There 1 met everyone of my family that had passed away and they
were very happy to see me. But I couldn't find my father. As we looked up to our left out the window
there was another building on the top of a hill capped by the statue of a woman. She had a crown
on her head with 12 stars on her crown and the moon under her feet.
The angel said, "Ioilani , do you know where we are standing now?"
I answered ," No".
39
I saw an open area and many, many spirits were there, even from the lime of Adam. Some
ofrhem ran up to me touching part of my clothing and some oflhem had clothing on and some didn't.
Some of them had faces that were sad holding their chin in their hands. There were no houses around.
The spirits were sitting in thi s hot area with nothing over their heads, crying for he lp, and
pleading,"]ohani, I hope you remember us. They have shown us to you so that when you return to
earth you will take our names to the temple so we can be redeemed. Please, we beg of you to do that.
Promi se us to do that when you return, Iohani."
The angel spoke to me, " That's why you are here so you can see and be an eye witness that
thei r work is waiting to be done on the other side." ] promised them that if I had the opportunity I
would.
The crowd of the people seeking lohani 's help were calling, "Please, anyone, take our names
to the temple or any member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to do baptism for us
so we can leave this horrible place and go on to paradise and continue work there. "
I answered them, "Yes, if I ever have a chance to go to America, I wi ll take your names and
have your temple work done."
"In a short time we wil l go through this gate and I will let you see some of your famil y
members here," the angel declared.
The angel said, "lohani , we must leave this place now, we don ' t have enough time left. " As
we were leaving thi s area these people began to rush out to be close to us and even touch our clothing,
but were unable to do so because in front of us we were facing a huge white gate, and a long
white cloud or fog stood between us and these people; therefore wc were separated by this force of
energy. They would be shocked if they came any closer or touched us. They tri ed to enter thi s gate
but were unsuccessful.
The angel asked me, "lohani , do you know where we have come from?"
I said, "No."
He said, ·'That was the spirit pri son. These people need to be baptized before they can enter
the gate. The reason you were brought to them is so you can see how they suffer and wait fo r
someone to do baptisms for them from the other side. That is your mission."
A big force of energy from the cloud pushed us inside the gate and those who were coming
from the first place couldn't get in. This area was so much cleaner, homes were painted and very
clean, flowers were in bloom. The angel said to me, "Now you will meet some of you family here."
They were only ten feet away from us. They recei ved me well, and one by one they came and hugged
and ki ssed me in a long line. Some said, "Please, lohani , when you go back, take our family names
to the temple and continue their work. "
Shortly after that the angel said," Come with me."
We saw a building and inside was a waiting room like al the temple and the first lady I met
was Martha Sanft Wolfgramm, my step-grandmother who lives in Neiafu. She was the one that was
waiting at the door and let us in. There I met everyone of my family that had passed away and they
were very happy to see me. But I couldn't find my father. As we looked up to our left out the window
there was another building on the top of a hill capped by the statue of a woman. She had a crown
on her head with 12 stars on her crown and the moon under her feet.
40
The angel asked if I understood the meaning of the woman?
I said, "No."
He said, "It represents the twelve tribes of Israel or the 12 apostles ofthe true Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints, until everyone will repent and some will join the Church."
That's what I couldn't quite understand in my heart because I was 18 at that time.
The angel said, "You must understand about the true Church of God and have faith in the
Prophet Joseph Smith and even to the time when you will study and learn about the life of Brigham
Young also and their mission to organize the Church in these last days. You must be able to see and
understand and witness all of this and things that will take place before the second coming of the
Savior. That's why you were brought here to witness what will take place a few years before Christ's
second coming. " And the angel spoke to me again, "Would you like to see what is going to take
place in the last days?"
I said, "Yes, I would like to see that very much, but I would like to see my father." The angel
told me to wait and he would send for him. As we were looking around the waiting room, I saw
David O. McKay and Uncle Rudy Wolfgramm who were still living at the time. I saw a lot of
missionaries that were in Tonga at the time, and then my family, but still couldn't find my father.
The Angel took me outside behind the building where we found my father standing. He
couldn't enter that building and he begged me to forgive him, because when he died he hadn't quite
repented of all his sins. Then he asked me to take his name to the Temple. We hugged each other
and he told me how much he loved me. The Angel said, "Hurry, we don't have much time left." So
he took me over to a little hill facing the setting sun and said, "Listen," and we heard the thunder and
the lightening hitting and the rain starting to come and then a big roaring of the thunder and the
lightening come again, and I heard the people from the other side crying and screaming-they needed
help. My heart felt for them. I was very sad to hear their cries. I wanted so much to help them, but
at that time I couldn't. The angel was showing me a panorama of what was to take place in Old
Jerusalem, in the United States, and in the New Jerusalem.
After I witnessed and heard everything that would take place the angel told me, "You must
come with me to the room where the Savior will come". As I came to the door I saw my
grandmother, Ma'ata. They were preparing the room where the Savior would come. The angel went
inside the room and as I put my right foot forward my spirit retumed to my body. I sat up on the bed
and I knew the reason why I was taken that evening so I could see my whole life's mission to work
for the dead and leam and have a strong testimony of these holy men of God, Joseph Smith and
Brigham Young.
40
The angel asked if I understood the meaning of the woman?
I said, "No."
He said, "It represents the twelve tribes ofIsrael or the 12 apostles of the true Church of Jesus
Chri st of Latter-day Saints, until everyone will repent and some will join the Church."
That ' s what I couldn 't quite understand in my heart because I was 18 at that time.
The angel said, "You must understand about the true Church of God and have fa ith in the
Prophet Joseph Smith and even to the time when you will study and learn about the life of Brigham
Young also and their mi ssion to organi ze the Church in these last days. You must be able to see and
understand and wi tness all of this and things that will take place before the second coming of the
Savior. That ' s why you were brought here to witness what will take place a few years before Cht; st 's
second coming. " And the angel spoke to me again, "Would you like to see what is going to take
place in the last days?"
I said, "Yes, I woul d like to see that very much, but I would li ke to see my father." The angel
told me to wait and he would send for him. As we were looking around the waiting room, I saw
David O. McKay and Uncle Rudy Wolfgramm who were sti ll li ving at the time. I saw a lot of
missionaries that were in Tonga at the ti me, and then my family, but sti ll couldn' r find my father.
The Angel took me outside behind the building where we found my father standing. He
couldn't enter that building and he begged me to forgive him, because when he died he hadn't quite
repented of all hi s si ns. Then he asked me to take hi s name to the Temple. We hugged each other
and he told me how much he loved me. The Angel said, "Hurry, we don't have much time left." So
he took me over to a little hill facing the setting SUIl and said, "Listen," and we heard the thunder and
the lightening hitting and the rain starting to come and then a big roaring of the thunder and the
li ghtening come again, and I heard the people from the other side crying and screaming- they needed
help. My heart felt for them. I was very sad to hear their cries. I wanted so much to help them, but
at that time I couldn' r. The angel was showing me a panorama of what was to take place in Old
Jerusalem, in the United States, and in the New Jerusalem.
After I witnessed and heard everything that would take place the angel told me, "You must
come with me to the room where the Savior will come". As I came to the door 1 saw my
grandmother, Ma'ata. They were preparing the room where the Savior would come. The angel went
inside the room and as I put my right fOOl forward my spirit returned to my body.l sat up on the bed
and I knew the reason why I was taken that evening so I could see my whole life' s mi ssion to work
for the dead and learn and have a strong testimQny of these holy men of God, Joseph Smith and
Brigham Young.
CHAPTER III
lOHANI'S
YOUNG MARRIED LIFE
CHAPTER III
IOHANI'S
YOUNG MARRIED LIFE
i:
43
lOHANI'S ENGAGEMENT
'n 1929 Elder Stone, a young elder, (who later returned to preside over the mission) was
-called to come to Ha'alaufuli. He encouraged me to go to the United States with him. He
would help train me in the field of carpentry when we reached Elder Stone's home in Oakland,
California. I asked my father's permission, and father agreed to let me go to the United States. Once
more a change of plans had to be made. Father hurt his leg when he bumped it on a table. He broke
a vein and lost a lot of blood. This accident was the cause of his death as the leg never healed
properly. The responsibility of caring for my mother and brothers and sisters was now mine. 1 quit
school while in the sixth grade so I could help my mother. Our family was very poor after father died.
As the time drew near for Elder Stone to retum to the United States, he once more approached
me. I told him of my financial problems, and the load I carried while trying to care for my brothers
and sisters. 1 was busy raising cows, chickens, and pigs and the plantation needed care. Elder Stone
was disappointed, but understood. Some ofthe children went to school at Makeke on Tongatapu.
In 1930 a mission conference was held at Ha'apai celebrating a century ofthe organization of
the Church and honoring Joseph Smith. During the same year, Umupuaka, a nobleman, and a
relative, planned to come to the Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had saved enough money and
had prepared themselves and were taking me with them. During 1930, death came to Umupuaka,.so
once more the dream of receiving my endowment was still, "just a dream".
I continued to play with the church school band from Ha'alaufuli. One Thursday, we arrived
at Ha'apai from Vava'u. Luise Brown, whose great great grandfather was a King, asked her friend Me
Mataele to give me a message. She wished to meet me after the band finished playing. Our first date
was that night walking on the beach with Me Mataele between us. We once visited a Catholic Church
and on that day Luisa and I became engaged. I gave her my father's ring. Our plans included school
for both of us as I retumed to Vava'u.
Ana, my younger sister, became good friends with Luisa at school. Luisa was very attractive
and everyone liked her. She was a good actress, and was in a concert Children of Israel. Luisa also
performed as a dancer. It wasn't long until Luisa became interested in other boys, even though she
was engaged to me. Ana wrote me informing me of Luisa's activities.
The first time I met Salote whom I later married, I leamed that she was Luisa'a best friend.
After receiving word of Luisa's attraction to other boys, I broke our engagement and began to date
Salote, who was a very beautiful girl too.
EARLY MARRIED LIFE AT VAUFISI
ight after Salote and I were married at Ha'alaufuli in 1933,1 was still building us a large
-lumber house in the main town at Lalo. While waiting for the completion of our home
I decided that it would be a lot of fun to build us a small Tongan Fale or house at Vaofisi (in the
bush). It was to be used as our honeymoon hideout hut just for the two of us.
R;
43
IOHANI'S ENGAGEMENT
I
n 1929 Elder Stone, a young elder, (who later returned to preside over the mi ssion) was
called to come to Ha'alaufuli . He encouraged me to go to the United States with him. He
would help train me in the field of carpentry when we reached Elder Stone's home in Oakland,
California. I asked my father' s pennission, and father agreed to let me go to the United States. Once
more a change of plans had to be made. Father hurt hi s leg when he bumped it on a table. He broke
a vein and lost a lot of blood. This accident was the cause of hi s death as the leg never heal ed
properly. The responsibility of caring for my mother and brothers and sisters was now mine. I quit
school while in the sixth grade so I could help my mother. OUl'fami ly was very poor afterfatherdied.
As the time drew near for Elder Stone to return to the United States, he once more approached
me. I told him of my financial problems, and the load I carried while trying to care for my brothers
and sisters. I was busy rai sing cows, chickens, and pigs and the plantation needed care. Elder Stone
was disappointed, but understood. Some of the chi ldren went to school at Makeke on Tongatapu.
In 1930 a mission conference was held at Ha'apai celebrati ng a century of the organization of
the Church and honoring Joseph Smith. During the same year, Umupuaka, a nobleman, and a
relative, planned to come to the Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had saved enough money and
had prepared themselves and were taking me with them. During 1930, death came to Umupuaka, so
once more the dream of receiving my endowment was still, "just a dream".
I continued to play with the church school band from Ha'alaufuli. One Thursday, we arrived
at Ha'apai from Vava'u. Lui se Brown, whose great great grandfather was a King, asked her friend Me
Mataele to give me a message. She wished to meet me after the band finished playing. Our first date
was that night walking on the beach with Me Mataele between us. We once visited a Catholi c Church
and on that day Luisa and I became engaged. I gave her my father's ring. Our plans included school
for both of us as I returned to Vava'u.
Ana, my younger sister, became good fri ends with Luisa at school. Luisa was very attractive
and everyone liked her. She was a good actress, and was in a concert Children of Israel. Lui sa also
pelformed as a dancer. It wasn't long until Luisa became interested in other boys, even though she
was engaged to me. Ana wrote me informing me of Lui sa's activities.
The first time I met Salote whom I later married, I learned that she was Luisa'a best friend.
After receiving word of Luisa's attraction to other boys, I broke our engagement and began to date
Salote, who was a very beautiful girl too.
EARLY MARRIED LIFE AT V AUFISI
R
ight after Salote and I were married at Ha'alaufuli in 1933, I was still building us a large
lumber house in the main town at Lalo. WhIl e waltlll g for the completI on of our home
I decided that it would be a lot of fun to build us a small Tongan Fale or house at Vaofi si (in the
bllsh). It was to be used as our honeymoon hideout hut just for the two of us.
44
One day we were out looking for that right spot, when we came upon a small hill. It could
be compared to a small jungle-many coconut trees, fekika trees were in bloom, tuitui trees, orange
and lime trees. Beautiful wild birds and lovely flowers surrounded the area. I said, "See that hill,
that's going to be our new home." Salote agreed, mainly because when it rained, at least our home
would not be flooded.
The next day we pulled all the weeds, saved the big trees to give us plenty of shade, besides
adding beauty to the land. While digging the foundation for our new home, I came upon many skulls
and some skeletons. I carefully wrapped the human bones in a tapa cloth, and put them aside as we
worked hard and long to finish our hut. The roof was on, walls up, and even the floor was completed
the same day. I built some shelves where I layed the skeletons and skulls. I made us a bed from the
trees. This was put on one side of our small home. The other side of the room we used for cooking
and eating. Salote and I received much joy working together on our first home. Tongan curtains
were put around the doors to keep out the mosquitoes.
When evening came, we were tired, but happy, and went to bed. I dreamed of a Tongan
woman who came to visit us in our new home. The woman was weeping. I spoke to her, "Oh dear,
who are you and what can I do for you?"
The Tongan woman replied, "You do not know me, but I'll tell you now who I am. My name
is Luisa and you have built your house on top of my grave. I would like to know what you are going
to do with my skull and bones?" After that she left.
I awakened and called to my wife, "Salote, wake up I'm sorry about this, but I didn't know."
I then told her of my dream.
Salote was sorry too. As we sat there, I spoke saying, "Luisa, I apologize for our mistake, but
in the moming, we promise you we will put the rest of your bones together and return them where we
found them."
The next moming Salote and I were up early, and the first thing we did was to get some tapa
cloth and wrap the human bones and skull inside it. Then we dug the sand out from the area from
which we had taken the bones and replaced them. I spoke again, saying, "Luisa, don't be angry with
us. Everything is alright now. We won't move away from here. We have decided to stay." The
bones were buried deep in the middle of our living room floor, covered with dirt, and hulu, tapakau,
and mats. Although Salote and I spent our honeymoon there in our little hut, Luisa seemed content,
for she no longer bothered us
One Tuesday, mutual night or MIA, Salote and I walked from the bush to the main town about
a mile away after dinner to attend this meeting from which we received so much joy. The moon
lighted our path. After MIA we retumed home in the rain. We started running, so we would not be
soaked. As we approached our house we saw a great light, much like a kerosene lamp, which seemed
to be in the middle of our living room floor.
1 tumed to Salote saying, "I wonder who is inside our home?"
Salote replied, "We better hurry and see who is there; maybe its Uncle Taulata or perhaps its
your cousin Kalama, or one of our relatives." As they came closer, I noticed the light was not shining
from the middle ofthe living room, but outside the house.
44
One day we were out looking for that right spot, when we came upon a small hill. It could
be compared to a small jungl e--many coconut trees,fekika trees were in bloom, llIirui trees, orange
and lime trees. Beautifu l wi ld birds and lovely flowers surrounded the area. I said, "See that hill .
that's going to be our new home." Salote agreed, mainly because when it rained, at least our home
would not be flooded.
The next day we pull ed all the weeds, saved the big trees to give us plenty of shade, besides
adding beauty to the land. While digging the foundation for our new home, I came upon many skulls
and some skeletons. 1 carefull y wrapped the human bones in a tapa cloth, and put them aside as we
worked hard and long to fin ish our hut. The roof was on, walls up, and even the floor was completed
the same day. I built some shelves where I layed the skeletons and skull s. I made us a bed from the
trees. This was put on one side of our small home. The other side of the room we used for cooking
and eat ing. Salote and I received much joy working together on our first home. Tongan curtains
were put around the doors to keep out the mosqui toes.
When evening came, we were tired, but happy, and went to bed. I dreamed of a Tongan
woman who came to visit us in our new home. The woman was weeping. I spoke to her, "Oh dear,
who are you and what can I do for you?"
The Tongan woman replied, "You do not know me, but I'll tell you now who I am. My name
is Luisa and you have built your house on top of my grave. I would like to know what you are going
to do with my skull and bones?" After that she left.
I awakened and called to my wife, "Salote, wake up I'm sorry about this, but I didn't know."
J then told her of my dream.
Sainte was sorry too. As we sat there, I spoke saying, "Luisa, I apologize for our mistake, but
in the morning, we promise you we will put the rest of your bones together and return them where we
found them."
The next morning Sal ate and I were up early, and the first thing we did was to get some tapa
cloth and wrap the human bones and skull inside it. Then we dug the sand out from the area from
which we had taken the bones and replaced them. I spoke again, saying, "Luisa, don't be angry with
us. Everything is alright now. We won't move away from here. We have decided to stay. " The
bones were buried deep in the middle of our living room floor, covered wi th dirt, and hulu, tapakall ,
and mats. Although Salote and I spent our honeymoon there in our little hut, Luisa seemed content.
for she no longer bothered us
One Tuesday, mutual night or MIA, S a l o t ~ and I walked from the bush to the main town about
a mile away after dinner to attend this meeting from which we received so much joy. The moon
li ghted our path. After MIA we returned home in the rain. We started running, so we would not be
soaked. As we approached our house we saw a great light, much like a kerosene lamp, whi ch seemed
to be in the middle of our li ving room floor.
I turned to Salote sayi ng, "I wonder who is inside our home?"
Sal ate replied, "We better hUITY and see who is there; maybe its Uncle Taul ata or perhaps its
your cousin Kalama, or one of our relatives." As they came closer, I noticed the light was not shinj ng
from the middle of the living room, but outside the house.
45
I said to Salote, "You stay here in the dark while I go and see who's out there for sure." Salote
agreed. I sneaked up behind the house and saw a light that looked like a torch burning out from the
ground. It was about six inches around and about two or three feet high. It seemed to stand between
a tuitui tree and our front door about three feet on each side of the light. I approached the light very
slowly, then quickly jumped out, and tried to grab it. The light moved from its original source and
seemed to disappear into the earth.
I realized this light was not an earthly thing, but perhaps an evil spirit. Salote started
screaming from the other side of the road, "What is it?"
I answered, "I don't know. I tried to catch it with my hands, but it disappeared down into the
ground." Salote was frightened the remainder of the night, even though I did my best to help her
forget the incident, she had nightmares all night long. This occurred during our honeymoon.
i;
EARLY TRANASLATION OF THE BOOK OF MORMON
't was 1937 when Elder Ermel J. Morton arrived at Ha'alaufuli on a Friday moming, the
-mission president met him, then brought him straight to priesthood meeting. He asked
Elder Morton to take a few minutes to speak to the people. The Tongans were shocked as they heard
Elder Morton speak in the Tongan language for two minutes. I went up after the meeting to shake
hands with the new elder, thanking him and also remarking how I could hardly believe that he was
able to speak our language so well.
Elder Morton asked Salote and me to help him with Tongan words while he translated the
Book of Mormon. This was the second time it had been translated into the Tongan language. Half
was translated by Elder May about 1920, but never completed. Elder May's manuscript was never
consulted nor known to later missionaries. It would be several years later before the translation was
completed and the Book of Mormon printed in Tongan. Elder Morton lived at the missionary home,
which was the headquarters for the church in Tonga. Salote and I just lived across the street from the
Church, so we were able to help him often. Each day Elder Morton would run back and forth across
the street to ask for a meaning or spelling of a Tongan word.
In 1947 the first copies ofthe newly published Tohi a Molomona (Book of Mormon) were
taken to Tonga by President Evon W. Huntsman.
FISHING AT THE SEA SHORE
A:
t times in our life when money was scarce and so many children to care for, I would
^always be the first one to ask if any would like to go to the sea fishing for mussels, jelly
fish, clams, or sea weed. All the children and many women in the neighborhood always joined us for
a fishing trip by foot at Havelu, Tuku Tonga, and sometime at Fatai for clams, land crabs or big
hukilau (in Hawaii) with other men, women and children. They used green coconut leaves to form
a big long curved line from the deep water and would chase the fish to the sea shore, and when the
45
I said to Salote, "You stay here in the dark while I go and see who's out there for sure. " Salote
agreed. I sneaked up behind the house and saw a li ght that looked like a torch burning Ollt from the
ground. It was about six inches around and about two or three feet hi gh. It seemed to stand between
a lUifui tree and our front door about three feet on each side of the light. I approached the li ght very
slowly, then quickly jumped out, and tried to grab it. The li ght moved from its ori ginal source and
seemed to di sappear into the earth.
I reali zed thi s li ght was not an earthly thing, but perhaps an evil spirit. Salote started
screaming from the other side of the road, "What is it?"
I answered, "1 don't know. I tri ed to catch it with my hands, but it disappeared down into the
ground." Salote was frightened the remainder of the ni ght, even though I did my best to help her
forget the incident, she had ni ghtmares all ni ght long. Thi s occurred during our honeymoon.
EARLY TRANASLATION OF THE BOOK OF MORMON
I
t was 1937 when Elder Elmel J. M0I10n arrived at Ha'alaufu li on a Friday morning, the
mission president met him, then brought him straight to priesthood meeting. He asked
Elder Morton to take a few minutes to speak to the people. The Tongans were shocked as they heard
Elder Morton speak in the Tongan language for two minutes. I went up after the meeting to shake
hands wi th the new elder, thanking him and also remarking how I could hardly believe that he was
able to speak our language so well .
Elder Morton asked Salote and me to help him with Tongan words whil e he translated the
Book of Mormon. Thi s was the second time it had been translated into the Tongan language. Half
was translated by Elder May about 1920, but never completed. Elder May's manuscript was never
consulted nor known to later mi ssionari es. It would be several years later before the trans lation was
completed and the Book of Mormon printed in Tongan. Elder Morton lived at the missionary home,
which was the headquarters for the church in Tonga. Salate and Ijust li ved across the street from the
Church, so we were able to help him often. Each day Elder Morton would run back and fort h across
the street to ask for a meaning or spelling of a Tongan word.
In 1947 the first copies of the newly published Tohi a Molomolla (Book of Mormon) were
taken to Tonga by President Evon W. Huntsman.
FISHING AT THE SEA SHORE
A
t times in our life when money was scarce and so many chi ldren to care for, I wou ld
always be the first one to ask if any would like to go to the sea fish ing for mussels, jelly
fish, clams, or sea weed. All the children and many women in the neighborhood always joined us for
a fishing trip by foot at Havelu, Tuku Tonga, ana sometime at Fatai for clams, land crabs or big
hukilau (in Hawaii) with other men, women and children. They used green coconut leaves to form
a big long curved line from the deep water and would chase the fish to the sea shore, and when the
46
tide was low, fish could be caught by the hundreds. We used to come home with big baskets or sacks
full of different kind offish. All day Saturday or Friday after school was always our favorite time for
fishing.
Mother and the younger children would always remain at home with a big cooked pot of
tapioka, taro, or bananas waiting anxiously for our retum for some special sea food or fish, for a raw
fish salad or whatever. What a special blessing for our family to be able to received those blessings
from above.
THE TRUTH MUST BE TOLD
This story is hy Salote Fakatou Wolfgramm as related to
her daughter Tisina Wolfgramm Gerber
T:
"ihis was a very difficult time for lohani trying to be a father to all ten of his brothers and
sisters, and be a husband to Salote and their four young children. He felt very bad
sometimes when he had to leave Ha'alaufuli each Monday moming and wouldn't return until Friday
evening
At this time lohani often trained his brothers and cousins how to do carpentry work. He
sometimes took his younger brother Walter with him to do a job but Haini was still too young. Haini
loved to hunt and work at the plantation. Koloti loved to weave fish nets and go out fishing. Koloti 's
talents were composing music and poetry and playing the guitar and singing. Osika worked for the
Vava'u copra board, had a small store that he enjoyed operating and they all helped out with the
plantation and copra for extra money. At that time Makanesi was living with Uncle Vuna and Aunty
Bertha; Ela and Ana and the girl cousins were at Makeke for school; Ma'ata was with Aunty Helene
and Uncle Samuela Fakatou.
Around Dec 1939 lohani was asked by Arthur Schulke to come and do some remodeling for
him and build a cistern at his home at Vaimalo. lohani and his family were living at Ha'alaufuli
village about five miles from Neiafu, and it was another four miles to Vaimalo from Neiafu.
Makanesi, Vuna and Arthur Schulke and his son Harold had a lot of experience in running his
motor boat around the different islands of Vava'u but as for lohani, he had to use his bike or go
horseback for transportation. He took his bike to Neiafu and a motor boat to Vaimalo that same
week. He had no choice on this matter because he was the only contractor that did carpentry work
around Vava'u after some of the Germans went to New Zealand. When lohani had a chance to do
a job anywhere close to Vava'u, he was very happy so he could support his own family at school plus
his wife and his young children.
During this time there was a married man who was attracted to Salote. He used to stalk her
everywhere. He lived at Tu'anekivale, a village adjacent to Ha'alaufuli where his wife was from.
Salote had no idea that this man was so crazy about her. This couple had adopted a few children but
as far as I knew they had one child and she later died.
Neither lohani nor Salote had any idea what was going on inside this man's mind until Salote
gave birth to my older sister Taiana on 14 Decemberl938. This man went around spreading the
rumor that Taiana was his baby. When Salote and lohani heard this news they thought this man must
46
tide was low, fish could be caught by the hundreds. We used to come home with big baskets or sacks
full of different kind offish. All day Saturday or Friday after school was always oUI' favorite time for
fishing.
Mother and the younger children would always remain at home with a big cooked pot of
tapioka, taro, or bananas waiting anxiously for our return for some special sea food or fish, for a raw
fish salad or whatever. What a special blessing for our family to be able to received those blessings
from above.
THE TRUTH MUST BE TOLD
This story is by Sa/ate Fakatoll Wolfgramm as related to
her daughter Tisilla Wolfgramm Gerber
T
hi s was a very difficult time for Iohani trying to be a father to all ten of his brothers and
sisters, and be a husband to Salote and their four young chIldren. He felt very bad
sometimes when he had to leave Ha'alaufuli each Monday morning and wouldn't return until Friday
evenmg
At this time lohani often trained his brothers and cousins how to do carpentry work. He
somet imes took hi s younger brother Walter with him to do ajob but Haini was still too young. Haini
loved to hunt and work at the plantation. Koloti loved to weave fish nets and go out fishing. Koloti ' s
talents were composing music and poetry and playing the guitar and singing. Osika worked for the
Vava' u copra board, had a small store that he enjoyed operating and they all helped out with the
plantation and copra for extra money. At that time Makanesi was li ving with Uncle Vuna and Aunty
Bertha; Ela and Ana and the girl cousins were at Makeke for school; Ma' ata was with Aunty Helene
and Uncle Samuela Fakatou.
Around Dec 1939 Iohani was asked by Althur Schulke to come and do some remodeling for
him and build a cistern at his home at Vaimalo. Iohani and hi s family were living at Ha' alaufuli
village about five miles from Neiafu, and it was another four miles to Vaimalo from Neiafu.
Makanesi , Vuna and Arthur Schulke and his son Harold had a lot of experience in running his
motor boat around the different islands of Vava'u but as for Iohani , he had to use his bike or go
horseback for transportation. He took his bike to Neiafu and a motor boat to Vaimalo that same
week. He had no choice on this matter because he was the only contractor that did carpentry work
around Vava ' u after some of the Germans went to New Zealand. When Iohani had a chance to do
a job anywhere close to Vava ' u, he was very happy so he could support hi s own family at school pl us
hi s wife and hi s young children.
During this time there was a married man who was attracted to Salote. He used to stalk her
everywhere. He lived at Tu 'anekivale, a village adjacent to Ha'alaufuli where his wife was from.
Salote had no idea that this man was so crazy about her. This couple had adopted a few children but
as far as I knew they had one child and she later died.
Neither lohani nor Salote had any idea what was going on inside this man's mind until Salote
gave birth to my older sister Taiana on 14 Decemberl938. This man went around spreading the
rumor that Taiana was hi s baby. When Salote and Iohani heard thi s news they thought this man must
47
be out of his mind. They just ignored him. You couldn't believe the gossip that went around the
village. It was outrageous. It didn't bother my parents much any more because they knew that story
was not true.
About Dec. 1939 Arthur Schulke came to Ha'alaufuli and asked lohani to come back to
Vaimalo again for another job. lohani didn't like to leave Salote and the young children home alone,
so he asked his younger brother Haini and a cousin Kalama if they could help Salote get food from
their plantation at Uta and make sure that the family would be safe until he returned on the weekend.
At this time Malina was five years old, Ana was four, the third child Chalres Fritz was two and baby
Taiana was a year old.
Salote remembered that ugly dark black night. Salote and their four small children went to
sleep early at their home in Ha'aluafuli. Their kerosene lamp was empty. Haini and Kalama were
out fishing. This man who had been stalking my mother for almost a year somehow sneaked inside
the home while everyone was fast asleep and the whole house was in darkness. He felt his way
around and found where mother was asleep, tied a cloth over her mouth to keep her from screaming,
and tied Salote's hands above her head, and raped her.
Salote tried to scream and fought him with all her power, she bit him and scratched his face,
but it was too late. This ugly dark, evil minded man had tortured Salote. She felt so dirty and
frightened and cried all night. During her struggle that night the children didn't hear her because
Salote's mouth was covered and her hands were tied. The intruder left her home quickly. Salote felt
so helpless. Through her struggle her hands became untied and she recognized his voice
immediately. She hurried and untied her mouth. Salote was shocked and unable to sleep for the rest
ofthe night. When daylight came she sent for lohani to come home right away. When lohani came
Salote told him what had happened. He was especially upset because Salote was at that time three
months pregnant and he feared for the unborn child. She would have another child around June 1940.
They had been delighted with the announcement and had told some of their close family and even
Arthur Schulke about the good news prior to this time.
He was so incensed at what this man had done to Salote, he wanted to go and find him. Talk
about a German temper, yes, at this time lohani was so irate he went inside our house and looked for
his shot gun. then went out in the village looking for the man. When lohani found him he told him
he had better run as fast as he could run because he was going to use his gun. What a terrible mess
you have caused in the life of my wife. lohani took one shot in the air as a warning to him. The man
was really frightened and began to run like a mad dog. lohani ran right behind him.
This man kept saying to lohani, "So sorry lohani, I didn't mean to hurt your wife. I swear I
will not do it any more. Please, lohani, I swear to God I will never do this again."
lohani said, "You had better keep on running man, or I'll shoot you." lohani opened fire
again, not to the sky, but shot down some coconuts off a coconut tree. The man was so scared he
thought he was going to be next.
lohani kept on chasing this man all the way down to the beach and said, "I'm going to put a
stop to you today. I better not see your face again in this village. Do you understand me? You are
not allowed in this village as long as I live here. Now you can swim to Tu'anekivale where you
belong and if you don't hurry, I might open up my gun and start shooting again."
47
be out of hi s mind. They just ignored him. You couldn' t believe the gossip that went around the
vi ll age. It was outrageous. It didn't bother my parents much any more because they knew that story
was not true.
About Dec. 1939 Arthur Schulke came to Ha'alaufuli and asked lohani to come back to
Vaimalo again for another job. lohani didn ' t like to leave Salote and the youno children home alone
b ,
so he asked hi s younger brother Haini and a cousin Kalama if they could help SalOle get food from
their plantation at Uta and make sure that the family would be safe until he returned on the weekend.
At thi s time Malina was five years old, Ana was four, the third child Chaires Fritz was two and baby
Taiana was a year old.
Salote remembered that ugl y dark black night. Salote and their four small chi ldren went to
sleep early at their home in Ha'aluafuli. Their kerosene lamp was empty. Haini and Kalama were
out fis hing. This man who had been stalking my mother for almost a year somehow sneaked inside
the home whi le everyone was fast asleep and the whole house was in darkness. He felt hi s way
around and found where mother was as leep, tied a cloth over her mouth to keep her from screaming,
and tied Salote' s hands above her head, and raped her.
Salote tried to scream and fought him with all her power, she bit him and scratched hi s face ,
but it was too late. Thi s ugl y dark, evi l minded man had tortured Salote. She felt so dirty and
frightened and cri ed all ni ght. During her struggle that ni ght the children didn ' t hear her because
Salote's mouth was covered and her hands were tied. The intruder left her home quickly. Salote felt
so helpless. Through her struggle her hands became untied and she recognized hi s vOice
immediately. She hun'ied and untied her mouth. Salote was shocked and unabl e to sleep for the rest
of the night. When dayli ght came she sent for lohani to come home right away. When lohani came
Salote told him what had happened. He was especiall y upset because Salote was at that time three
months pregnant and he feared for the unbom child. She would have another chi ld around June 1940.
They had been deli ghted with the announcement and had told some of thei r close family and even
Art hur Schulke about the good news prior to this time.
He was so incensed at what thi s man had done to Salote, he wanted to go and find him. Talk
about a German temper, yes, at thi s time Iohani was so irate he went inside our house and looked for
hi s shot gun. then went out in the village looking for the man. When lohani found him he told him
he had better run as fast as he could run because he was going to use his gun. What a terrible mess
you have caused in the life of my wife. Iohani took one shot in the ai r as a warning to him. The man
was reall y frightened and began to run li ke a mad dog. Iohani ran right behind him.
This man kept saying to lohani, "So sorry lohani, I didn't mean to hurt your wife. I swear I
will not do it any more. Please, lohani , I swear to God I wil l never do thi s again. "
Iohani said, "You had better keep on running man, or I' ll shoot you." Iohani opened fire
again, not to the sky, but shot down some coconuts off a coconut tree. The man was so scared he
thought he was goi ng to be next.
Iohani kept on chasing thi s man all the way down to the beach and said, "I' m going to put a
stop to you today. I better not see your face again in this village. Do you understand me? You are
not allowed in this village as long as I live here. Now you can swi m to Tu'anekivale where you
belong and if you don ' t hurry, I might open up my gun and start shooti ng again. "
48
It didn't take long before this man swam out to sea back to his own village again. lohani
wanted to teach him a lesson. He wasn't going to hurt him, but in Tonga families have to watch ou
for their own security. Sometimes when law officers come to a village to check out a complaint, the
young men of that village disagree with what he says and beat up the police officer.
After lohani chased that man out of Ha'alaufuli, Salote wanted to go over to their branch
president and tell him what had happened to her during that night. That was in the aftemoon, but
before they got there, this man that had raped her, who was a member ofthe Tu'anekivale Branch,
had gone to the branch president and told a completely different story about what had happened. He
said my mother was in love with him and had agreed to sleep with him, which was a big lie. This
man was so upset with Salote that he stalked her even after that.
By the time lohani and Salote went over to report this, the branch preisdent believed the story
from this rapist, and he decided to disfellowship them both. My mother was disfellowshipped for a
whole month for telling the truth. It almost killed both my mom and dad. My mother couldn't stop
crying. She was broken hearted. Word went out real fast about this problem. There was much
contemptible gossip about my mother.
But after this my parents went to the Lord and asked Him to please forgive the man and all
those who had been scattering the lies and rumors. Most of their friends and close family wanted
lohani and Salote to take this man to court, but lohani decided to forgive him for what he had done
and Salote agreed also. If you want the Lord to forgive you, you must forgive those who trespass
against you.
A month later Salote was accepted back into their branch. So sad for this man. He reneged
on his promise. A missionary couple came from Ha'apai to serve at Ha'laufuli and he did the same
thing to that wife. It caused them to return to Ha'apai, an unwanted birth, and later a cause for their
divorce.
GEORGE ALBERT SMITH VISITS TONGA
lohani was living in Vava'u at this time and comments
on the travels of the Authorities
ihis was a very exciting time for the members ofthe Church in Tonga when President Emil
Dunn received word that they were to be visited by George Albert Smith, a member ofthe
Quorum ofthe Twelve. He would arrive on May 9
th
1939 in Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu.
Many district leaders received telegrams about Elder Smith's visit to prepare the saints in
other islands for their conferences. Elder Smith was accompanied to Tonga by Elder Alex Wishart.
Elder Rufus K. Hardy of the Quorum of the Seventy had come from America, but had remained in
New Zealand because he was ill.
They finally arrived at Vuna's wharf in Nuku'alofa and were welcomed by Elder Preston
Wilding, Mosese Muti and all the students of Makeke who belonged to the Boy Scouts and Girls
Guides. They lined up in their clean uniforms to shake hands and said, We want to Welcome you to
Tonga.
48
It didn'l take long before this man swam out to sea back to hi s own vi llage again. lohani
wallled to teach him a lesson. He wasn't going to hurt him, but in Tonga families have to watch ou
for the ir own security. Sometimes when law officers come to a village to check out a complaint, the
young men of that village disagree with what he says and beat up the police officer.
After lohani chased that man out of Ha' alaufuli. Salote wallled to go over to their branch
president and tell him what had happened to her during that night. That was in the afternoon, but
before they gO[ there, thi s man that had raped her, who was a member of the Tu'anekivale Branch,
had gone to the branch president and told a completely different story about what had happened. He
said my mother was in love with him and had agreed to sleep with him, which was a big lie. This
man was so upset with Salote that he stalked her even after that.
By the time lohani and Salote went over to report this, the branch preisdent believed the story
from thi s rapi st, and he decided to disfellowship them both. My mother was di sfellowshipped for a
whole month for telling the truth. It almost killed both my mom and dad. My mother couldn't stop
crying. She was broken hearted. Word wenl out real fast about this problem. There was much
contemptible gossip about my mother.
But after this my parents went to the Lord and asked Him to please forgive the man and all
those who had been scattering the lies and rumors. Most of their friends and close family wanted
Iohani and Salote to take thi s man to court, but lohani decided to forgive him for what he had done
and SalOle agreed also. If you want the Lord to forgive you, you must forgive those who trespass
against you.
A month later Salote was accepted back into their branch. So sad for thi s man. He reneged
on hi s promi se. A mi ssionary couple came from Ha' apai to serve at Ha' iaufuli and he did the same
thing to that wife. It caused them to return to Ha ' apai , an unwanted birth, and later a cause for their
divorce.
GEORGE ALBERT SMITH VISITS TONGA
l ollOlli H'05 living ill Vavo'il ar this time alld commellfs
ol11he travels of the Authorities
T
hi s was a very exciting time for the members of the Church in Tonga when President Emil
Dunn received word that they were to be vIsited by George Albert Smith, a member of the
Quorum of the Twelve. He would arrive on May 9'" 1939 in Nuku'alofa, Tongatapu.
Many distlict leaders received tel egrams about Elder Smith's visit to prepare the saints in
other islands for their conferences. Elder Smith was accompanied to Tonga by Elder Alex Wi shart.
Elder Rufus K. Hardy of the Quorum of the Seventy had come from America, but had remained in
New Zealand because he was ill.
They finall y arrived at Vuna 's wharf in Nuku'alofa and were welcomed by Elder Preston
Wilding, Mosese Muti and all the students of Makeke who belonged to the Boy Scouts and Girls
Guides. They lined up in their clean uniforms to shake hands and said, We want 10 Welcome YOLI to
TOl/ga.
49
Around noon time at Matavaimo'ui (mission headquarters) there were about 1,000 members
gathered for a big feast honoring this general authority and to hear what he had to say.
When Elder Smith was assigned to speak, he said, "In a very short time there will be a big
war. There will be famine and we will experience very difficult times. It won't be much longer, the
Lord will gather His people. At this time the Lord's saints should be united together as members of
His church in peace and harmony.
Five days later on May 15
,h
, Elder Smith arrived for another conference at Vava'u. He called
on the people of Vava'u to let their light shine before the world, so when others see this light, they
will accept the light of the gospel and join them.
Elder Smith spoke also about the Book of Mormon, and told the Polynesians that they are
descendants of the people of the Book of Mormon. He encouraged the saints to pay a full tithing and
promised them blessings for doing so. He reminded the saints at Vava'u and also Tongatapu to be
temple worthy, and the importance of preparing themselves and their families to be worthy to enter
the House of the Lord when that blessing comes to them in the future.
He expressed his love for the Scout program in Tonga and those who came to welcome him
at the wharf. How he loved Scouting. It is important for them to continue with the Scout program
and those who would like to join should do so.
A few days later they left Vava'u for Ha'apai and another conference. He told them the
importance of keeping records. It came to us from the Lord himself and is our sacred obligation to
keep our records and write them down and do it now.
He bore witness and his testimony for the restoration of the gospel of God and his Church.
He taught that Joseph Smith the prophet was given all the keys and powers to organize his Church
upon the earth that you and I are part of today.
In Ha'apai there was no car or truck available (none were on the island because it was so
small) for Brother Smith's transportation so President Dunn went to the Morris Hedstrom store and
bought a bicycle for Brother Smith so ride. That way he could visit the different towns, and branches
and meet members who lived a distance from Pangai. The rest had to walk. The last town they were
to visit Brother Smith told the group of priesthood leaders to go ahead as he would like a quiet time
alone to pray to God by the sea shore at Koulo for the safety of the saints in Ha'apai.
Retuming from the Ha'apai conference, Elder Smith and a few church leaders finally arrived
back at Nuku'alofa. A meeting was arranged with the Premier, Prince Tungi and Queen Salote
Tupou. Elder Smith taught them about the Church and the Book of Mormon
About the 8
th
of June Elder Hardy finally arrived from New Zealand. They wanted to visit all the
Govemment offices and work places in Tongatapu. They also wanted to visit every town and village
where there was an L.D.S. Chapel.
There was a final conference held for the missionaries from Zion who had come to Tonga.
After that meeting a Tongan saint named Atonio Amasio and his wife Sela, brought their new little
baby girl and requested that she be blessed by Elder Smith. The name given was Ana Lilio Amasio.
The visiting guests left that afternoon on the Matua.
49
Around noon time at Matavaimo'ui (mission headquarters) there were about 1,000 members
gathered for a big feast honoring this general authority and to hear what he had to say.
When Elder Smith was assigned to speak, he said, "In a very short time there wi ll be a big
war. There will be famine and we wi ll experience very diftlcult times. It won't be much longer, the
Lord will gather Hi s people. At this time the Lord's saints should be united toget her as members of
His church in peace and harmony.
Five days later on May 15,h, Elder Smith arrived for another conference at Yava' u. He called
on the people of Yava ' u to let their light shine before the world, so when others see this li ght, they
will accept the light of the gospel and join them.
Elder Smith spoke also about the Book of Mormoll , and told the Polynesians that they are
descendants of the peopl e of the Book olMormon. He encouraged the saints to pay a full tithing and
promised them blessings for doing so. He reminded the saints at Yava'u and also Tongatapu to be
temple worthy, and the importance of preparing themselves and their families to be worthy to enter
the House of the Lord when that blessing comes to them in the future.
He expressed his love for the Scout program in Tonga and those who came to welcome him
at the whalf . How he loved Scouting. It is impOltant for them to continue with the Scout program
and those who woul d like to join should do so.
A few days later they left Yava ' u for Ha'apai and another conference. He told them the
impOltance of keeping records. It came to us from the Lord himself and is our sacred obligation to
keep our records and write them down and do it now.
He bore wi tness and h·i s testimony for the restoration of the gospel of God and his Church.
He taught that Joseph Smith the prophet was given all the keys and powers to organize hi s Church
upon the earth that you and I are part of today.
In Ha' apai there was no car or truck available (none were on the island because it WaS so
small ) for Brother Smi th's transportation so President Dunn went to the Morris Hedstrom store and
bought a bicycle for Brother Smith so ride. That way he could visit the different towns, and branches
and meet members who lived a distance from Pangai. The rest had to walk. The last town they were
to visit Brother Smith told the group of priesthood leaders to go ahead as he would like a quiet time
alone to pray to God by the sea shore at Koulo for the safety of the saints in Ha' apai.
Returning from the Ha'apai conference, Elder Smith and a few church leaders finally arrived
back at Nuku'alofa. A meeting was arranged with the Premier, Prince Tungi and Queen Salote
Tupou. Elder Smith taught them about the Church and the Book of Mormon
About the 8'" of J une Elder Hardy finally arrived from New Zealand. They wanted to visit all the
Government offices and work places in Tongatapu. They also wanteo to visi t every town and village
where there was an L.D.S. Chapel.
There was a final conference held for the missionaries from Zion who had come to Tonga.
After that meeting a Tongan saint named Atonia Amasia and his wife Sela, brought their new little
baby girl and requested that she be blessed by Elder Smith. The name given was Ana Lilio Amasio.
The visiting guests left that afternoon on tile MalLIa.
MP
50
SPEAKING ASSIGNMENT AT TU'ANUKU
r
y family was living at Ha'alaufuli about 1938. I was assigned to go to the island of
-Tu'anuku to speak at their sacrament meeting the following Sunday. We got up early
and had our family prayer, I said goodbye to my family, and walked to Ta'ane, then to Mata'ika down
by Tufutele to the beach.
I had a lot of water to cross to Tefisi, so I took off all my clothing except my shorts and
wrapped my scriptures and hymn book in my clothing, then placed them on top of my head and began
to swim from Mata'ika to Tefisi. There was no boat or canoe in that area on Sunday moming and I
wanted to keep them dry.
I swam quite a ways in this deep blue water unti I got to Tefisi. From Tefisi I had to swim to
the island of Taoa. After arriving at Taoa I had to get to the island of Tu'anuku and finally made it
there. The saints were so grateful to have me come. 1 preached and taught them a lot. We enjoyed
a good dinner, then at 4:00 p.m. I said goodbye to all my friends and retumed the same way.
By the time I was at sea swimming between Taoa and Tefisi, it was very difficult because the
tide was high, which means I had deeper water in which to swim back to Mata'ika. When I was half
way between Tefisi and Taoa, I noticed the sun disappearing into the sea, and only for half an hour
could I see any more light. I tried to quicken my strokes, but darkness came too fast.
At that time I heard a big fish of some kind coming straight at me. The fish was flipping up
in the air, then kept heading straight at me. In my mind I thought it could be either a whale or a shark
so the spirit told me that I should try to swim to the closest beach as soon as I could. I obeyed and
began to swim towards Mata'ika beach. I soon arrived and got out ofthe water. I saw a beam of light
coming straight at me aiming to hit me on my head from the highest point of Taoa village. I quickly
turned my head and missed that target. I again thought I might be wrong. Maybe someone was trying
to get back to Taoa or Tefisi. More beams of light kept coming at me trying to hit me on the head,
but couldn't. 1 again thought it might be some fisherman out late at sea trying to retum home. Then
I remembered that couldn't be, it was Sunday so no one would be out fishing at that time, so maybe
it's something else.
I started to walk toward Mata'ika and more light changed position. Now they all tumed
around facing me and kept on coming straight at me, but it didn't scare me at all. I kept on walking
right straight at these lights.
The closer they got to my face, they quickly went over my head and landed on top of the
highest elevation at Taoa village. I couldn't believe what I saw when I tumed back to watch these
lights.
1 again turned my head forward. There were a hundred more lights out at sea where I had been
swimming, and from the westem part of Mata'ika there was the villages of Feletoa and Leimatu'a.
To my surprise, as I looked over their graveyards, every tombstone had lights shining on me. To me
they looked like Christmas time in America.
1 knew there must be hundreds of evil spirits trying to get me to swim back into the deep water
in the dark so a shark or whale could destroy me or prevent me from doing my assignment for the
Lord.
50
SPEAKING ASSIGNMENT AT TU' ANUKU
M
y family was li ving at Ha'alaufuli about 1938. I was assigned to go to the island of
Tu 'anuku 10 speak at theIr sacrament meetmg the followlllg Sunday. We got up early
and had OUI' fami ly prayer, I said goodbye to my fami ly, and walked to Ta'ane, then to Mata'ika down
by Tufutele 10 the beach.
I had a lot of water 10 cross to Tefisi, so I lOok off all my clothing except my shorts and
wrapped my scriptures and hymn book in my clothing, then placed them on top of my head and began
to swim from Mata ' ika to Tefisi . There was no boat or canoe in that area on Sunday morning and I
wanted to keep them dry.
I swam quite a ways in this deep blue water unti I got 10 Tefisi. From Tefisi I had to swim to
the island of Taoa. After arriving at Taoa 1 had to get to the island ofTu'anuku and finally made it
there. The saints were so grateful 10 have me come. I preached and taught them a lot. We enjoyed
a good dinner, then at 4:00 p.m. I said goodbye to all my friends and returned the same way.
By the time I was at sea swimming between Taoa and Tefi si, it was very difficult because the
tide was high, which means I had deeper water in which to swim back to Mata'ika. When I was half
way between Tefisi and Taoa, I noticed the sun disappearing into the sea, and only for half an hour
could I see any more light. I tried to quicken my strokes, but darkness came too fast.
At that time I heard a big fish of some kind coming straight at me. The fi sh was flipping up
in the air, then kept heading straight at me. In my mind I thought it could be either a whale or a shark
so the spirit IOld me that I should try to swim to the closest beach as soon as I could. I obeyed and
began to swim towards Mata' ika beach. I soon arrived and got out of the water. I saw a beam of li ght
coming straight at me aiming to hit me on my head from the highest point of Taoa village. I quickly
turned my head and mi ssed that target. I again thought I might be wrong. Maybe someone was trying
to get back to Taoa or Tefisi. More beams of light kept coming at me trying to hit me on the head,
but couldn't. I again thought it might be some fisherman out late at sea trying to return home. Then
I remembered that couldn't be, it was Sunday so no one would be out fishing at that time, so maybe
it 's something else.
I started to walk toward Mata'ika and more light changed position. Now they all turned
around facing me and kept on coming straight at me, but it didn't scare me at all. I kept on walki ng
right straight at these lights.
The closer they got to my face, they quickly went over my head and landed on lOp of the
hi ghest elevation at Taoa village. I couldn' t believe what I saw when I turned back to watch these
li ghts .
I again turned my head forward. There were a hundred more lights out at sea where I had been
swi mming, and from the western part of Mata'ika there was the villages of Feletoa and Leimatu 'a.
To my surpri se, as I looked over their graveyards, every tombstone had lights shining on me. To me
they looked like Christmas time in Amelica.
I knew there must be hundreds of evil spirits trying to get me to swim back into the deep water
in the dark so a shark or whale could destroy me or prevent me from doing my assignment for the
Lord.
51
I again looked out to the beach. At this time the whole beach was covered with lights. 1 was
not afraid so I kept on walking toward these lights. As I came close to them, the lights began to move
away quickly from me.
I finally arrived at my grandfather Tu'inahoki's' sweet water cave and lagoon at Mata'ika
called Tufutele and washed off al the salt water, rinsed my shorts, put on my dry clothing and left to
see my Uncle Herman Wolfgramm and Aunt Maele at their home at Mata'ika. I visited and rested
for a little while then I was back on the road walking back to Ta'anea and Ha'alaufuli. Before I got
to Ta'anea there is the home of Fifita Motu'a called Toloke, and as I passed Toloke to Ta'anea road
there's a big hill on the road,and from there I looked ahead and could almost see Hangai Tokelau, my
home api at Vao at night with the moon above me to direct me home. As I looked up, hundreds more
lights were shining at me from Hangai Tokelau.
It didn't frighten me at all. I decided to keep on walking to Hangai Tokelau and ignored the
lights and spent the night out there. This I did. I know what the devil had in mind. By shining these
lights at Hangai Tokelau, he might lead me about 300 yards to a cliff to fall off and be destroyed so
I couldn't continue my duty for the Lord.
The next moming I returned to Salote and the children. They were very happy and grateful
that the Lord had protected me while I was away in my calling.
A
1
ATTACKED BY A 75 FOOT WHALE AT OTEA BRANCH
bout 1948 I was assigned at our monthly Priesthood meeting to be a guest speaker at the
^Otea Branch for at least one month. I loved to do this, but transportation was a problem.
Otea is one of the small beautiful islands in the Vava'u group, with a population of only 285 people.
I would have to walk five miles from Ha'alaufuli after Sunday School, find a boat or a canoe to sail
from Neiafu, five miles more by sea to Otea to be there at 2:00 p.m. for their Sacrament meeting.
When I arrived at Neiafu, I couldn't find a ride on one of the big boats, so I asked around to
see if anyone in Neiafu had a canoe that I might borrow for half a day. I ran into a good friend and
cousin, Sione Tuita Vehikite, who lived on a nearby island called Vaimalo. He was happy to see me.
He had an extra canoe right on the beach and offered it to me. He said he would like to come along
with me to visit some of his family in Otea.
Sione Tuita and I each took our own small canoe and paddle and started out. In two hours we
arrived at Otea to be greeted by the Saints. After the meeting they invited us to stay and visit with
them. We talked about the gospel until 10:00 p.m. when we said goodbye and left for Neiafu,
lighted by the moon. It was so beautiful that evening.
As we rowed our canoes back between the islands of Utugake and Ngaunoho I heard this great
big fish coming towards my small, one-man canoe, and tumed around to look. There was only three
feet between my canoe and this huge whale. He looked 75 feet long. As he lifted his body out ofthe
water, I could see how very small my canoe was compared with it. Sione Tuita shouted, "lohani, don't
move, it's a whale." Just then the whale rose up right against my canoe. His head and tail were so
long, that as he started to come up from the water, he caught my canoe and lifted it upon his back.
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I again looked out to the beach. At this time the whole beach was covered with li ghts. I was
not afraid so I kept on walking toward these li ghts. As I came close to them, the li ght s began to move
away quickly from me.
I finally arrived at my grandfather Tu'inahoki's' sweet water cave and lagoon at Mata'ika
called Tufutele and washed off al the salt water, rinsed my shorts, put on my dry clothing and left to
see my Uncl e Herman Wolfgramm and Aunt Maele at their home at Mata'ika. r visiLed and res Led
for a litt le while then I was back on the road walking back to Ta'anea and Ha'alaufuli. Before I got
to Ta'anea there is the home of Fifita Motu'a called Toloke, and as I passed Toloke to Ta'anea road
there's a big hill on the road,and from there 1 looked ahead and could almost see Hangai Tokelau, my
home api at Vao at ni ght with the moon above me to direct me home. As 1 looked up, hundreds more
li ghts were shining aL me from Hangai Tokelau.
It didn ' t fri"ohten me at all. I decided to keep on walkino to Hanoai Tokelau and ionored Lhe
b" "
lights and spent the ni ght out there. This I did. I know what the devil had in mind. By shining these
lights at Hangai Tokelau, he might lead me about 300 yards to a cliff to fall off and be destroyed so
I couldn' t continue my duty for the Lord.
The next morning I returned to Salote and the chi ldren. They were very happy and grateful
that the Lord had protected me while I was away in my calling.
ATTACKED BY A 75 FOOT WHALE AT OTEA BRANCH
A
bout 1948 I was assigned at our monthly Priesthood meeting to be a guest speaker at the
Otea Branch for at least one month. 1 loved to do this, but transportation was a problem.
Otea is one of the small beautiful islands in the Vava'u group, with a population of only 285 peuple.
I would have to walk five miles from Ha'alaufuli after Sunday School, find a boat or a canoe to sail
from Neiafu, five miles more by sea to Otea to be there at 2:00 p.m. for their Sacrament meeting.
When r arrived at Neiafu, I couldn't find a ride on one of the big boats, so I asked around to
see if anyone in Neiafu had a canoe that I might borrow for half a day. I ran into a good friend and
cousin, Sione Tuita Vehikite, who lived on a nearby island called Vaimalo. He was happy to see me.
He had an extra canoe right on the beach and offered it to me. He said he would like to come along
with me to visit some of his family in Otea.
Sione Tuita and I each took our own small canoe and paddle and started out. In two hours we
arrived at Otea to be greeted by the Saints. After the meeting they invited us to stay and visit with
them. We talked about the gospel until 10:00 p.m. when we said goodbye and left for Neiafu,
lighted by the moon. It was so beautiful that evening.
As we rowed our canoes back between the islands ofUtugakeand Ngaunoho 1 heard this great
big fish coming towards my small. one-man canoe, and turned around to look. There was only three
feet between my canoe and thi s huge whale. He looked 75 feet long. As he lifted his body out of the
water, 1 could see how very small my canoe was corn pared with it. Sione Tuita shouted, "Iohani. don't
move, it's a whale." Just then the whale rose up right against my canoe. His head and tail were so
long, that as he started to come up from the water, he caught my canoe and lifted it upon his back.
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Up he went and down he came. As we fell together, my canoe filled with water. Sione was about
10 feet in front of me. He kept calling, "Hurry and get away from the whale before he kills both of
us. Hurry."
I tried to hurry, baling the water out ofthe canoe as I saw the whale disappear below. I tried
to paddle my canoe once more but again the same whale attacked me from behind. He pushed the
back part of my canoe and lifted it up, then dropped me again, filling my canoe with water. As
quickly as I could, I baled it out. In my heart, I was saying to myself, "Tonight I guess Satan is here
to test my faith. Deep down in my heart I do know that my Redeemer lives, and through the power
of the Melchizedek priesthood, which I hold, I know the Lord will protect me. Nothing will happen
to me tonight. If this whale has plans for my body tonight, he is wrong. The Lord will not let
anything like that happen to Sione or me. I have faith that He will protect us and take us home
safely." After having filled my assignment to go and speak to the Saints at Otea, I knew all would
be well.
Sione called out to me to try and catch up with him, as there was an island close by. We
paddled up to the beach of Teleki where the waters are shallow. Maybe the whale wouldn't bother
us there. We didn't see the whale for awhile, then for a third time he attacked. He tried to tip my
canoe over again. He was so huge that he became stuck between the coral and reefs and was unable
to swim up anymore. I then followed Sione Tuita in his canoe back to his home at Vaimalo where
he lived with his family. I spent the night there. I felt the Spirit of our Heavenly Father very near
to us during that night.
I retumed safely to Ha'alaufuli the next day. My family were very happy to see me. They
were worried because I had not retumed. They couldn't understand where I could have been all that
time. I told them of my experience, and that evening in our prayers we thanked our Father in Heaven
for my safe return to them and left my testimony with them.
i:
MOVING FROM VAVA'U TO MAPELU
Told by Salote, translated by Tisina
'n the year 1935 we received a letter from my Uncle Samuela and Aunt Helene Fakatou,
-asking us to move to Tongatapu to begin our family plan to come to America. My sister
Malina was the oldest and next was my sister Ana. We started a plan and we all worked together to
save every penny that we eamed toward our future trip. This was a real tough time. The price of
copra was so bad, and that's the only way we could get a little money was by selling our copra for
export.
By the time we arrived in Tongatapu we didn't know that a new disease had come to the
Islands by a foreign ship. It was called the measles and we had never heard of it before. In a short
time our two daughters were very sick with the measles and I was afraid to get too close to them, but
lohani was not afraid. He cared for them night and day until one day he came down with the measles.
The girls didn't get it too bad but lohani got it the worst of all. lohani had a real high fever, almost
ready to die. His skin tumed purple. His fever caused his mouth and lips to dry out. He couldn't eat
anything. He was dehydrated. When I saw lohani suffering almost to die, I put my vaia on real fast
52
Up he went and down he came. As we fell together, my canoe filled with water. Sione was about
10 feet in front of me. He kept calling, "Hurry and get away from the whale before he kills both of
us. Hurry. "
I tried to hurry, baling the water alit of the canoe as I saw the whale di sappear below. I tri ed
to paddle my canoe once more but again the same whale attacked me from behind. He pushed the
back pan of my canoe and lifted it up, then dropped me again, filling my canoe with water. As
quickly as [ could, I baled it out. In my heart, I was saying to myself, "Tonight I guess Satan is here
to test my faith. Deep down in my heart I do know that my Redeemer lives, and through the power
of the Meichizedek priesthood, which I hold, I know the Lord will protect me. Nothing wi ll happen
to me toni ght. If this whale has plans for my body tonight, he is wrong. The Lord will not let
anything like that happen to Sione or me. I have faith that He will protect us and take us home
safely." After having filled my assignment to go and speak to the Saints at Otea, I knew all would
be well.
Sione called out to me to try and catch up with him, as there was an island close by. We
paddled up to the beach of Teleki where the waters are shallow. Maybe the whale wouldn't bother
us there. We didn't see the whale for awhile, then for a third time he attacked. He tried to tip my
canoe over again. He was so huge that he became stuck between the coral and reefs and was unable
to swim up anymore. I then followed Sione Tuita in his canoe back to his home at Vaimalo where
he lived with his family. I spent the night there. I felt the Spirit of our Heavenly Father very near
to LIS during that night.
I returned safely to Ha'alaufuli the next day. My family were very happy to see me. They
were worried because I had not returned. They couldn't understand where I could have been all that
time. I told them of my experience, and that evening in our prayers we thanked our Father in Heaven
for my safe return to them and left my testimony with them.
MOVING FROM V A V A'U TO MAPELU
Told by Sa/ore , translated by Tisina
I
n the year 1935 we received a letter from my Uncle Samuela and Aunt Helene Fakatou,
asking us to move to Tongatapu to begin our family plan to come to America. My sister
Malina was the oldest and next was my sister Ana. We started a plan and we all worked together to
save every penny that we earned toward our future trip. This was a real tough time. The price of
copra was so bad, and that's the only way we could get a little money was by selling our copra for
export.
By the time we arrived in Tongatapu we didn't know that a new disease had come to the
Islands by a foreign ship. It was called the measles and we had never heard of it before. In a short
time our two daughters were very sick with the measles and I was afraid to get too close to them, but
lohani was not afraid. He cared for them night and day until one day he came down with the measles.
The girls didn't get it too bad but lohani got it the worst of all. lohani had a real high fever, almost
ready to die. His skin turned purple. His fever caused hi s mouth and lips to dry out. He couldn't eat
anything. He was dehydrated. When I saw Iohani suffering almost to die, I put my vala on real fast
53
and started to run to Ha'akame, the next town about two and a half or three miles away from our
home. I needed some transportation for lohani to get to the hospital at Nuku'alofa about 7 miles from
our home.
I met our friend Itaehau and asked if his horse and buggy was available for me to take lohani
to see the Doctor Itaehau said, "By all means, Salote, take it for as long as you need it, because we
won't need it until next week."
Itaehau got the horse and buggy ready, then I drove it back to Mapelu moe Lau. 1 put lohani,
Malina, and all of our stuff in and drove them as fast as I could to Nukualofa. It takes about two
hours to drive there. When we got to Nuku'alofa we drove by another friend's house, Tuliakiono and
Sela's home and to our surprise we ran into lohani's mother Salome and step-father Siosefa Naeata
out there. They had just come from Makeke College where they serve as dorm parents for the
students and were visiting Tuliakiono and Sela.
lohani asked if Siosefa Naeata and Tuliakiono could lay their hands on his head and give him
and the two girls a priesthood blessing. He said, "I have a strong faith. If you give me a blessing I
won't have Salote drive us to the hospital or see any doctor. We will be just fine. After the blessing
they were all healed according to their faith and their priesthood blessing. They went back to Mapelu
and gathered all their belongings and moved to Houma looking for a piece of land out there for
lohani's younger brother Walter, and later retumed Itaehau's horse and buggy. Everyone was well
and happy again. This Josefa Naeata was the very first member in Tonga to receive the Melchizedek
priesthood after he married lohani's mother Salome Afu.
53
and started to run to [-[a' akame, the next town about two and a half or three mi les away from our
home. I needed some transportation for [ohani to get to the hospital at Nuku'alofa about 7 miles from
our home.
[ met our friend Itaehau and asked if his horse and buggy was available for me to take lohani
to see the Doctor Itaehau said, "By al l means, SalOle, take it for as long as you need it, because we
won' t need it until next week."
Itaehau got the horse and buggy ready, then J drove it back to Mapelu moe Lau. 1 put lohani ,
Mal ina, and all of our stuff in and drove them as fast as I could to Nukua' lofa. It takes about two
hours to drive there. When we got to Nuku'alofa we drove by another friend 's house, Tuliaki ono and
Sela' s home and to our surpri se we ran into Iohani ' s mother Salome and step-father Siosefa Naeata
out there. They had just come from Makeke College where they serve as dorm parent s for the
students and were visiting Tuliakiono and Sela.
Iohani asked if Siosefa Naeata and Tuli akiono could lay thei r hands on hi s head and give him
and the two girls a priesthood blessing. He said, "I have a strong faith. If you give me a blessing I
won' t have Salote dri ve us to the hospital or see any doctor. We wi ll be just fine. After the blessing
they were all healed according to their faith and their priesthood blessing. They went back to Mapelu
and gathered all their belongings and moved to Houma looking for a pi ece of land out there for
lohani 's younger brother Walter, and later returned Itaehau' s horse and buggy. Everyone was well
and happy again. This 10sefa Naeata was the very first member in Tonga to receive the Melchizedek
priesthood after he marri ed Iohani 's mother Salome Afu.
54
lohani - Salote dancing
lohani as a young man
Abt 1940
r
: " ~ " "
^ M
7 ' \ -
y .
j
V
. *
Salote preparing a A:ai
54
Iohani as a young man
Abt 1940
Iohani - Salote dancing
Salote preparing a kai
55
Seaside village, Vava'u
55
Seaside village, Vava'u
56 56
CHAPTER IV
SALOTE
SUPPORTIVE WIFE
CHAPTER IV
SALOTE
SUPPORTIVE WIFE
I
59
SALOTE'S BEGINNINGS
This story is in Salote's own words
'would like to tell you a short story of my mother Selu Vaia Mafi. She was bom
-19 April 1898 at Kolonga, Tongatapu, Tonga. She wasjust a young adult when she met my
father during her school year. She attended the all-girl Queen Salote College and Benisoni Kaufusi
Fakatou was attending the all-boy Tonga College. They fell in love and were married July 1914 in
Tonga. She was a very beautiful young lady and Benisoni Kaufusi was a handsome young man. After
the wedding my mother decided to quit school so she could stay home and be a home maker, while
my father could still attend school. At that time newly weds could still attend school.
It didn't take them very long for my mother and father to expect their first child, so they made
their home at Kolonga. Nine months later my mother gave birth to a beautiful Tongan baby girl with
lots of black hair and named her Salote Lasini Fakatou (that's me) named for a great aunt of mine from
Felemea, Ha'apai. My father asked his father-in-law, Isileli Mafi, if he would go and register their
baby at the government office at Nuku'alofa.
Everything went fine for me until my mother's health began to fail when I was about four or
five months old, so my father left school and accompanied my mother back to her home at Felemea.
My mother felt like she was going to have another baby. Father knew that by going to Felemea there
would be plenty of fish, seafood, and fresh air and would be perfect for his newly wed wife. They left
on a small boat to Felemea with their new baby.
One day my mother was talking to her mother-in-law Ateleita Fifita Fakatou and said, "1 don't
feel at all well, and have a feeling that I might die soon; but I need to tell you something, if 1 should
die, promise me that you will take good care of our daughter because I would like her to be raised by
her father's family. I know if I let my family care for her they would spoil her and let her do anything
that she ever wanted to do without disciplining her. {Ofa vale) but they would love her so much that
she could get away with anything."
When I was almost six months old, my mother Selu Vaea died at Felemea on 11 December
1916. There were no baby bottles, no milk, no spoons, so my aunt Ofa Vaitai became my mother. Ofa
would chew the food in her mouth and I would eat from her mouth (just like a mother bird would feed
her little baby birds). This continued until Ofa was expecting another baby and she couldn't stand the
smell of food, so her younger sister Mele Tonga took over my feeding, and then she started mashing
my food and I thrived.
In the Islands in those days they didn't bathe their babies often for fear that they might get
pneumonia or other diseases. I used to have a lot of sores on top of my head. One day my aunt gave
me a bath. She took my hat off and washed the sores and to her surprise, she found one big scab
covered all my head. Everything else was healed.
I'm so grateful for my Fakatou grandparents and Teleita, all my aunts and uncles, where I grew
up. I was close to them and I knew them all my life. My father went back to school and I didn't know
him much. My uncle Samuela Fakatou, Jr. was in my real father's image. He introduced me to school,
taught me the gospel and what I am today in the Church is the love and the caring from my father's
family. I'm sure my mother's side would love me just the same, but later on in my life I found them
and so happy that the Lord has really given me a huge healthy family to love and to have.
SALOTE'S BEGINNINGS
This slory is in SalOle's own words
59
I
would like to tell you a short story of my mother Selu Vaia Mafi. She was born
19 April 1898 at Kolonga, Tongatapu, Tonga. She was just a young adult when she met my
father during her school year. She attended the all-girl Queen Salote Coll ege and Benisoni Kaufusi
Fakatou was attending the all-boy Tonga College. They fell in love and were married July 19 14 in
Tonga. She was a very beautiful young lady and Beni soni Kaufus i was a handsome young man. After
the wedding my mother decided to quit school so she could stay home and be a home maker, whi le
my father could still attend school. At that time newlyweds could still attend school.
It didn't take them very long for my mother and father to expect their first child, so they made
their home at Kolonga. Nine months later my mother gave birth to a beautiful Tongan baby girl with
lots of black hair and named her Salote Lasini Fakatou (that's me) named for a great aunt of mine from
Felemea, Ha'apai. My father asked hi s father-in-law, lsi leli Mari , if he would go and register their
baby at the government office at Nuku' alofa.
Everything went fine for me until my mother's health began to fail when 1 was about four or
five months old, so my father left school 3nd accompanied my mother back to her home at Felemea.
My mother felt like she was going to have another baby. Father knew that by goi ng to Felemea there
wou ld be plenty offish, seafood, and fresh air and would be peliect for his newly wed wife. They left
on a small boat to Felemea with their new baby.
One day my mother w a ~ talking to her mother-in-law Ateleita Fifita Fakatou and said, "I don't
feel at all well, and have a feeli ng that I might die soon; but 1 need to tell you something, if I shoul d
die, promise me that you wil l takc good care of our daughter because I would like her to be raised by
her father's famil y. I know if I let my family care for her they wou ld spoil her and let her do anyth ing
that she ever wanted to do without disciplining her. (Ora vale) but they would love her so much that
she could get away with anything."
When I was almost six months old, my mother Selu Vaea died at Felemea on I I December
1916. There were no baby bottles, no milk, no spoons, so my aunt Ofa Vaitai became my mother. Ora
would chew the food in her mouth and I would eat from her mouth Gust like a mother bird would feed
her little baby birds). Thi s continued until Ofa was expecting another baby and she couldn 't stand the
smell of food, so her younger sister Mele Tonga took over my feeding, and then she started mashing
my food and I thrived.
In the Islands in those days they didn 't bathe their babies often for fear that they mi ght get
pneumonia or other di seases. I used to have a lot of sores on top of my head. One day my aunt gave
me a bath. She took my hat off and washed the sores and to her surprise, she found one big scab
covered all my head. Everything else was healed.
I'm so grateful for my Fakatou grandparents and Teleita, all my aunts and uncles, where I grew
up. I was close to them and I knew them all my life. My father went back to school and I didn't know
him much. My uncle Samuela Fakatou, Jr. was in my real father's image. He introduced me to school ,
taught me the gospel and what I am today in the Church is the love and the caring from my father's
family. I'm sure my mother's side would love me just the same, but later on in my life I found them
and so happy that the Lord has really given me a huge healthy family to love and to have.
60
I'm sure one of my missions was to find my grandparents on my mother and father's side and
have their temple work done. After retuming from our last and 7
th
mission from Tonga in 1981 I was
able to find many names on my mother's side of my family. Even though we haven't grown up as one
family, I'm closer to them by doing their temple work.
A:
FAITH AND A PRAYER WERE ANSWERED
fter our last mission to Tonga in 1976,1 retumed to Ha'apai with some burial clothing and
-a casket for my father, Benisoni Kaufisi Fakatou. My father only lived a week after my
retum. My daughter Ana was in Tonga at this time so she accompanied me to Felemea. All the family
came to his funeral and he looked very well and had a beautiful service.
After the funeral my niece, Kalo came and gave her a six-month old baby boy for me to raise
and bring to America to be educated. Hopefully he could find a wife and make a life for himself. In
the Tongan way, this is how they show their love and respect for the oldest sister of their father, to let
her raise their children.
At this time, after the tension ofthe funeral died down, I had nothing else left, I was all drained
out. I had given away everything, all my clothing except what I was wearing, except for my plane
ticket and $20.00 for pocket money, and now a new baby to bring back with me to the States. The
baby had diarrhea and was fussy, and 1 began feeling sick with the flu symptoms.
I made arrangements for the baby's passport and went to Pago Pago, American Samoa, hoping
that the baby's papers could be filed there to come to America. By the time we arrived in Samoa, I had
no more diapers for the baby. I took my old muumuu and made five diapers for him, but luckily, a
relative who was living at Pago Pago gave me another muumuu.
The baby had diarrhea because he was homesick and missed his mother. The baby drank only
well water mixed with sugar and a little bit of mother's milk. His mother was skin and bones with
worry and not enough money to care for her other two children. She was working at that time as a
single mom, but the little she eamed only paid for the girls' schooling, a place to stay, and very few
groceries. While the baby and I were waiting two weeks for passage in Samoa and for our papers to
be filed, I called lohani saying that I didn't think I could make it back to Utah. I was weak with the
flu and the baby had severe diarrhea and I had no more money.
lohani told me not to worry that everything would be just fine. He would send some money
right away and take the matter to the Lord in fasting and prayer. After I hung up lohani began to fast
and went to the temple every day.
He fasted for seven days. The seventh day came on Sunday. As lohani broke his fast in a long
prayer, he expressed his love to the Lord. He told him about my situation and the baby stranded in
Samoa. He asked the Lord to see that the baby and I would be blessed with good health and to give
me the strength I needed and let my mind be at ease and to bless me to be with someone whom I could
trust, or send someone to help fix the baby's papers with the immigration office. And please let the
door be opened so this baby can come to America, if it is the Lords' will, to save his soul because his
family are not members of the Church. In America he will grow up in a Church home, and seeds of
the gospel will be given him and he will know God and Jesus Christ and will serve God in
righteousness and later go on a mission. He will be a light for the rest of his family and others.
60
I'm sure one of my mi ssions was to find my grandparents on my mother and father's side and
have their temple work done. After retuming from our last and 7th mission from Tonga in 1981 I was
able LO find many names on my mother's side of my family. Even though we haven't grown up as one
family, I'm closer to them by doing their temple work.
FAITH AND A PRA YER WERE ANSWERED
A
fter our last mi ssion to Tonga in 1976, I returned to Ha'apai with some burial clothing and
a casket for my father, Benlsonl Kauflsl Fakatou. My father only lived a week after my
return. My daughter Ana was in Tonga at thi s time so she accompanied me to Felemea. All the famil y
came to hi s funeral and he looked very well and had a beautiful service.
After the funeral my niece, Kalo came and gave her a six-month old baby boy for me to raise
and bring to America to be educated. Hopefully he could find a wife and make a life for himself. In
the Tongan way, thi s is how they show their love and respect for the oldest sister of their father, to let
her rai se their children.
At this time, after the tension of the funeral died down, I had nothing else left, I was all drained
out. I had given away everything, all my clothing except what I was wearing, except for my pl ane
ticket and $20.00 for pocket money, and now a new baby to bring back with me to the States. The
baby had diarrhea and was fussy, and I began feeling sick with the flu symptoms.
I made an·angements for the baby's passport and went LO Pago Pago, American Samoa, hoping
that the baby's papers could be filed there to come to America. By the time we arrived in Samoa, I had
no more diapers for the baby. I LOok myoId muumuu and made five diapers for him, but luckil y, a
relative who was li ving at Pago Pago gave me another muumuu.
The baby had di3IThea because he was homesick and mi ssed hi s mother. The baby drank only
well water mixed with sugar and a little bit of mother' s milk. His mother was skin and bones wi th
worry and not enough money to care for her other two children. She was worki ng at that time as a
single mom, but the little she earned only paid for the girls ' schooling, a place to stay, and very few
groceries. While the baby and I were waiting two weeks for passage in Samoa and for our papers to
be fi led, I call ed lohani saying that I didn 't think I could make it back to Utah. I was weak with the
flu and the baby had severe diarrhea and I had no more money.
lohani told me not to worry that everything would be just fine. He would send some money
right away and take the matter to the Lord in fasting and prayer. After I hung up lohani began to fast
and went to the temple every day.
He fasted for seven days. The seventh day came on Sunday. As lohani broke hi s fast in a long
prayer, he expressed hi s love to the Lord. He told him about my situation and the baby stranded in
Samoa. He asked the Lord to see that the baby and I would be blessed with good health and to give
me the strength I needed and let my mind be at ease and to bless me to be with someone whom I could
trust, or send someone to help fix the baby' s papers with the immigration office. And please let the
door be opened so thi s baby can come to America, if it is the Lords' will, to save hi s soul because his
fami ly are not members of the Church. In America he wi ll grow up in a Church home, and seeds of
the gospel will be given him and he will know God and Jesus Christ and will serve God in
ri ghteousness and later go on a mi ssion. He will be a light for the rest of his family and others.
61
lohani had not eaten for seven days. In faith he poured out his heart and soul to the Lord in
searching for an answer to the problems of his wife and the baby in Samoa. At this time the holy ghost
bore witness to lohani that the Lord knew this and doors would be opened, and the baby and his wife
would soon be on their way back to Utah and he need worry no more. Right after lohani received this
answer, he was very relieved and grateful. As he got up he heard the telephone ringing upstairs. He
hurried to answer the call and I was on the line from Samoa.
I told lohani a Samoan woman came and asked for the baby's birth certificate and for a $10.00
fee for a doctor appointment for the baby and a passport picture. She also made a little dress for the
baby because she only had little girls, but had no pattem for a boy's outfit.
I was so blessed because of my husband's faith and prayers. This Samoan woman took care
of all the needs ofthe baby and me. I told my husband that we would be arriving in Utah in three days.
lohani knew that everything would be taken care of by our Heavenly Father. I soon arrived in
Hawaii. We traveled together with Mele Fonua of Houma. The officer came around to check our
passport and visas. The minute I stepped up to the officer, the baby began to cry loud and louder. He
had never seen a white man before. The officer immediately told me to take that crying child away
from there. He couldn't stand that cry. So I immediately handed the baby to Mele Fonua while I
fumbled through my bag. The officer said to me, "Go ahead, you're OK." So the baby and I didn't
have any papers checked out after all.
Soon we arrived. All the children were home to welcome the new baby and me back home.
All those who wanted to raise another child before this came by, and after meeting the baby, they
changed their mind, saying the baby didn't smile at all and looked so sad.
Tisina went in and saw the baby. She knew immediately he would be their second son. I knew
why he didn't smile. He missed his mother and changing to can milk had given him diarrhea. At that
time lohani and I already had Semisi with us. We agreed that the baby should go to Roy and Tisina.
He was taken home with the Gerbers. Now their son David had a younger brother. Adoption
papers were filed and he was named initially after both of his grandfathers Benisoni Ikavuka
Toutaiolepo Tu'ipulotu Fakatou. In school his friends had a hard time with his name so he chose the
name he wanted to be called. When he was very young he loved the story of Daniel in the Lion's
Den; so when he was ready to be baptized the name he picked was Daniel. From then on he has been
known as Daniel Leimoana Gerber. Both Gerber boys filled missions and David is now married. Dan
is finishing up his schooling at B.Y.U. and serving in the Elder's quorum presidency and a member
of Living Legends (an entertainment group) at B.Y.U. He has been a blessing for the Gerbers (as they
had only daughters) but now belongs to them for time and all eternity.
61
lohani had not eaten for seven days. In fa ith he poured out hi s heart and soul to the Lord in
searchi ng for an answer to the problems of his wife and the baby in Samoa. At th is time the holy ghost
bore witness to Iohani that the Lord knew th is and doors wou ld be opened, and the baby and hi s wife
wou ld soon be on their way back to Utah and he need worry no more. Right after lohani received this
answer, he was very reli eved and grateful. As he got up he heard the telephone ringing upstairs. He
hurried to answer the call and I was on the line from Samoa.
I told Iohani a Samoan woman came and asked for the baby's birth ceI1ificate and for a $ 1 0.00
fee for a doctor appointment for the baby and a passport picture. She also made a little dress for the
baby because she onl y had litt le girls, but had no pattern for a boy's outfit.
I was so blessed because of my husband' s faith and prayers. Thi s Samoan woman took care
of all the needs of the baby and me. I told my husband that we would be arriving in Utah in three days.
Iohani knew that everything would be taken care of by our Heavenly Father. I soon arrived in
Hawai i. We traveled together with Mele Fonua of Houma. The officer came around to check our
passport and visas. The minute I stepped up to the officer, the baby began to cry loud and louder. He
had never seen a white man before. The officer immediately told me to take that crying chi ld away
from there. He coul dn't stand that cry. So I immediately handed the baby to Mele Fonua while I
fumbled through my bag. The officer said to me, "Go ahead, you're OK. " So the baby and I didn ' t
have any papers checked out after all.
Soon we arrived. All the children were home to welcome the new baby and me back home.
All those who wanted to rai se another child before this came by, and after meeting the baby, they
changed their mind, sayi ng the baby didn ' t smil e at all and looked so sad.
Tisina went in and saw the baby. She knew immediately he would be their second son. I knew
why he didn' t smil e. He missed hi s mother and changing to can milk had given him diarrhea. At that
time lohani and I already had Semisi with us. We agreed that the baby should go to Roy and Tisina.
He was taken home with the Gerbers. Now their son David had a younger brother. Adoption
papers were fil ed and he was named initi all y after both of hi s grandfathers Beni soni Ikavuka
Toutaiolepo Tu ' ipul otu Fakatou. In school his friends had a hard time with hi s name so he chose the
name he wanted to be call ed. When he was very young he loved the story of Danie! in the Lion's
Den; so when he was ready to be baptized the name he picked was Daniel. From then on he has been
known as Daniel Leimoana Gerber. Both Gerber boys filled missions and David is now marri ed. Dan
is fi nishing up his schooling at B.Y.U. and serving in the Elder's quorum presidency and a member
of Living Legends (an entertainment group) at B.Y.U. He has been a blessing for the Gerbers (as they
had only daughters) but now belongs to them for time and all eternity.
Wl
62
CARE FOR A NEW MOTHER AND HER BABY
Tisina relates Salote's observations
of new-baby care
r
hen I (Tisina) was growing up in Ha'alaufuli, I remember watching my Aunt Selu AIo
Fa, a non-member, who had given birth to her new baby girl named Malahina. I could
immediately tell a difference between how my mother was taught in the church how to care for her
newbom than my other non-member relatives.
Selu really struggled with her first child, where they still stuck to the old Tongan way of how
a new mother handles her newborn baby. They weren't allowed to have a complete bath for at least
a month, and often kept the mother in bed for at least a month for fear they might die.
The mother was well cared for by her family to make sure she would have plenty of milk to
nourish her child. Sometimes the new baby would have a quick warm bath and sometimes not. The
grandmothers usually stayed close in tending and wrapping the newbom in tapa cloth without a shirt
or diaper. The father was usually at sea looking for sea food for the mother and the grandparents for
their daily feedings and also at his plantation for vegetables and fruits. When the baby and mother feel
much better, at least a month, then they are finally allowed a complete bath and are also ready for the
baby to be taken to church for christening.
A lot of time when the mother remained in bed she would loose a lot of blood and the after
pains were very painful also. The mother and baby were certainly not spotlessly clean. On top of their
little baby heads you'll often find sores and sometimes on their hands and feet between their toes. And
small white flees sometimes got into their body and started to make their home in parts of their heads,
hands, and feet. My heart goes out to these new mothers and their babies. When the baby was about
12 to 18 months old, mothers usually quit breast feeding and would then chew the food and sometimes
mix it with coconut juice (not the milk) and let the infant be fed through the mother's mouth, same as
drinking juices. When I first saw that I thought, Oh, my gosh, is this for real, as I asked my mother,
she said, "Yes, that's the old Tongan way before the Relief Society sisters were taught how to use a
diaper and bottle feed their babies." We leamed it was so much cleaner and babies were much
healthier and happier when well taken care of in the modem manner.
ANA
From Journal of lohani and Salote
WI
r
hen Ana was but a baby, she suffered much pain from an infected boil on the small of
her back just above her little bottom. After some time the boil seemed to heal on the
outside, but inside a deep hole was located, from which some infection drained. For three years the
drainage continued. Each day, Salote took her to the Catholic nun for medication, but nothing seemed
to help. She took her back to the doctor and still there was no change. The sore continued to drain.
One day a Tongan medical doctor named AIo told me he had just retumed from the New
Heberdies. He had seen a lot of this type of infection. He said it was almost like a cancer, and there
was no medication that he knew of that would help, with the exception of one that his mother used on
62
CARE FOR A NEW MOTHER AND HER BABY
Tisino relales SalOle' 5 obserwlfiol1s
of new-baby care
W
hen I (Tisina) was growing up in Ha' alaufuli, I remember watching my Aunt Selu Alo
Fa, a non-member, who had given birth to her new baby girl named Malahina. I could
immediately tell a difference between how my mother was taught in the church how to care for her
newborn than my other non-member relati ves.
Selu reall y struggled with her first child, where they still stuck to the old Tongan way of how
a new mother handles her newborn baby. They weren' t allowed to have a complete bath for at least
a month, and often kept the mother in bed for at least a month for fear they mi ght di e.
The mother was well cared for by her family to make sure she would have plenty of mil k to
nourish her child. Sometimes the new baby would have a quick warm bath and sometimes not. The
grandmothers usuall y stayed close in tending and wrapping the newborn in tapa cloth without a shirt
or di aper. The father was usuall y at sea looking for sea food for the mother and the grandparents for
their daily feedings and also at hi s plantation for vegetables and fruits. When the baby and mother feel
much better, at least a month, then they are finall y allowed a complete bath and are al so ready for the
baby to be taken to church for chri stening.
A lot of time when the mother remained in bed she would loose a lot of blood and the after
pains were very painful also. The mother and baby were certainly not spotlessly clean. On top of their
littl e baby heads you ' ll often find sores and sometimes on their hands and feet between their toes. And
small whi te flees sometimes got into their body and started to make their home in parts of their heads.
hands, and feet. My heart goes out to these new mothers and their babies. When the baby was about
12 to 18 mont hs old, mothers usuall y quit breast feeding and would then chew the food and someti mes
mi x it with coconut juice (not the milk) and let the infant be fed through the mother 's mouth, same as
drinking j ui ces. When I first saw that I thought, Oh, my gosh, is this for real , as I asked my mother,
she said, "Yes, that's the old Tongan way before the Relief Society sisters were taught how to use a
diaper and bottle feed their babies. " We learned it was so much cleaner and babies were much
healthier and happier when well taken care of in the modern manner.
ANA
From Journa/ ofl ohani and Sa/Ole
W
hen Ana was but a baby, she suffered much pain from an infected boil on the small of
her back just above her little bottom. After some time the boil seemed to heal on the
outside, but inside a deep hole was located, from whi ch some infection drained. For three years the
drai nage continued. Each day, Salote took her to the Catholic nun for medication, but nothing seemed
to help. She took her back to the doctor and sti ll there was no change. The sore continued to drain.
One day a Tongan medical doctor named Alo told me he had just returned from the New
Heberdies. He had seen a lot of thi s type of infection. He said it was almost like a cancer, and there
was no medication that he knew of that wou ld help, with the exception of one that his mother used on
63
many of his cancer patients. This did seem to have some effect. He said to me, "Salote, go and pick
the baby leaves from the hehea tree and grind them real good, and give them to Ana. Let her drink that
juice, then go out and dig some yellow roote (they looked like ginger roots). Peel and grate three or
four of these. Let them sit overnight, and in the moming take the left over hehea juice and mix it with
the starchy part of the yellow root after dumping out the top water from the yellow root). And anoint
this on Ana's sore. In a few day's time you'll see a big difference." So I did as the doctor had said.
It took only three or four applications of this mixture and Ana's infection was gone.
T:
RELIEF SOCIETY AT HA'APAI ABOUT 1938
lohani's daughter Taiana Brown related this story
^his story is about rny husband's mother Sokopeti Brown from Ha'apai and also her
daughter Leola and Makeleta that happened about 1938.
One day Sokopeti and her two Relief Society sisters left on foot from Pangai to Faleloa to visit
their branch members. When they finally reached the end ofthe island there was about a mile stretch
of ocean reef to cross. If the tide was low and the ocean was calm, you could remove your shoes, part
of your clothing, bag and books and try to carry them across the water to reach the other side.
Visiting time was very important for their safe retum the same day. There were no radios or
T.V. at that time so they used the sun as their clock. When the sun is just above the palm trees it's
about 8:00 a.m. When the sun,is high in the sky and you don't see your shadow, it is noon.. When
it is about half way down the palm trees, it is 6:00 p.m.
One night their meeting at Faleloa went overtime and a few sisters needed help in appointing
new teachers and visiting teachers. While at Faleloa they had forgotten that they had to cross v/hen
the tide would be higher on their return. It is almost impossible for them to cross unless they had a
horse who wasn't afraid to cross that water at night. Because of the current, you could get carried
away and dropped into some unknown place like Pulotu.
When Sokopeti and her two sisters came to cross the area, the tide was too high for them to
even try to cross. They didn't have any horses, so they decided to go back and kneel down by a
hibiscus tree at the beach and plead with the Lord to please help them cross that deep rough area so
they could get back safely to their branch and family, and continue his work among their people. They
thanked the Lord for receiving the gospel and many blessings that they had by living the gospel.
After they closed their prayers, they came back and stood at the side ofthe open water hoping
that they might somehow be able to swim across with their scriptures and books from Faleloa to
Pangai. As the ocean was very rough, they felt the big waves spray their clothing and got soaking wet.
A few minutes later they noticed a light. It was not a very big light but like a flashing light or a falling
star. It came from above and stood right where they were standing. The light began to move in front
of them, almost as if saying to them to come and follow me. These sisters quickly began to line up,
one after another and followed this guiding light. Sokopeti related to us, as they started out into the
water, the waves began to divide the water as they were crossing all the way from Faleloa beach to the
next beach where they were to cross to Koulo and to Pangai. Only the bottom part of their feet were
wet. They couldn't believe what took place. They felt very humbled by the experience.
63
many of hi s cancer patients. This did seem to have some effect. He said to me, "Salote, go and pick
the baby leaves from the hehea tree and grind them real good, and give them to Ana. Let her drink that
juice, then go out and dig some yell ow roote (they looked like ginger roots). Peel and grate three or
four of these. Let them sit overnight, and in the morning take the left over hehea jui ce and mix it with
the starchy part of the yellow root after dumping out the top water from the yell ow root). And anoint
thi s on Ana' s sore. In a few day' s time you' ll see a big difference." So I did as the doctor had said.
It took onl y three or four applicati ons of this mixt ure and Ana's infection was gone.
RELIEF SOCIETY AT HA'APAI ABOUT 1938
l ohani' s daughter Taiana Brown related this story
T
hi s story is about my husband's mother Sokopeti Brown from Ha 'apai and also her
daughter Leola and Makeleta that happened about 1938.
One day Sokopeti and her two Relief Society sisters left on foot from Pangai to Faleloa to visit
their branch members. When they finall y reached the end of the island there was about a mil e stretch
of ocean reef to cross. If the tide was low and the ocean was calm, you could remove your shoes, part
of your clothing, bag and books and try to carry them across the water to reach the ot her side.
Visiting time was very important for their safe return the same day. There were no radios or
T.V. at that time so they used the sun as their clock. When the sun is just above the palm trees it' s
about 8:00 a. m. When the sun. is high in the sky and you don't see your shadow, it is noon .. When
it is about half way down the palm trees, it is 6:00 p.m.
One ni ght their meeting at Faleloa went overtime and a few sisters needed help in appointing
new teachers and visiting teachers. While at Faleloa they had forgot ten that they had to cross when
the tide would be hi gher on their return. It is almost impossible for them to cross unless they had a
horse who wasn't afraid to cross that water at ni ght. Because of the current, you could get carri ed
away and dropped into some unknown place like Pulotu.
When Sokopeti and her two sisters came to cross the area, the tide was too hi gh for them to
even try to cross. They didn ' t have any horses, so they decided to go back and kneel down by a
hibi scus tree at the beach and pl ead with the Lord to please help them cross that deep rough area so
they could get back safel y to their branch and famil y, and continue hi s work among their people. They
thanked the Lord for recei ving the gospel and many blessings that they had by li ving the gospel.
After they closed their prayers, they came back and stood at the side of the open water hoping
that they might somehow be able to swim across with their scriptures and books from Faleloa to
Pangai. As the ocean was very rough, they felt the big waves spray their clothing and got soaki ng wet.
A few minutes later they noticed a li ght. It was not a very big light but like a flashing li ght or a falling
star. It came from above and stood right where they were standing. The li ght began to move in front
of them, almost as if saying to them to come and follow me. These sisters quickly began to line up,
one after another and followed thi s guiding light. Sokopeti related to us, as they started out into the
water, the waves began to divide the water as they were crossing all the way from Faleloa beach to the
next beach where they were to cross to Koul o and to Pangai . Only the bottom part of their feet were
wet. They couldn' t beli eve what took place. They felt very humbled by the experience.
64
The high light disappeared as it had come to guide them. As they got to the other side and
looked back, the ocean began to rush back to its normal place but the light disappeared.
Again, just as they were across from the opposite side of these islands, they were on their knees
to give thanks to the Lord for their safe retum to their family and that their prayers were heard and
answered to bless their lives.
Just then they heard someone come on horseback riding with a hurricane lamp. He asked if
they had seen Sokopeti and the Relief Society sisters, and to their surprise it was Sokopeti's husband
Siaosi Brown. He was very concemed for them being so late. He borrowed a horse to come and look
for them. They were grateful that he had brought the hurricane lamp because there was only a quarter
moon for their light that evening. The Lord will continue to bless his children here on earth when we
serve him wherever we may be.
The Brown's had the first bakery at Pangai, Ha'apai and the best receipe for sweet rolls. They
fed and cared for a lot of missionaries out there.
Earliest Missionary Work in Ha'apai:
Notes by Tisina: I was told by my father about the time when they established new branches
in different towns, islands and villages at the Tongan Group. It was at Nomuka, Ha'apai Group in
June 1894 and at Pangai it was January 1895. Missionary work began at the Ha'apai group in 1917.
There was also a Chief (matapule) had asked if they could send more missionaries out to Ha'apai.
Elder Butler, Elder Rallison, and Elder Lalesoni opened up the Ha'apai Group.
The missionary work at Ha'apai was improved. There was a matapule that lived at Ha'apai.
He heard about the gospel, studied their beliefs, and had faith on these missionaries and asked if they
would come and give him a priesthood blessing. He had a very bad infection on his foot. It never got
any better, so he secretly studied the scriptures and prayed. He invited the missionaries to come and
bless him. They came and right after the blessing his wound was healed and in retum he began to bear
his testimony about the church and its doctrines. His name was Siaki Lolohea.
The King of Tonga, Tupou Uluaki was very sick at Tongatapu. He invited all his men and
chiefs and nobles to come. So Siaki Lolohea from Ha'apai also came to the palace because he was
a matapule. He rose up at this meeting and expressed his love and concem to the King and bore
witness that if he would allow the new Mormon missionaries to come and lay their hands on his head
and give him a blessing, the Lord would bless him and his good health would retum, as they would
pronounce that in the prayer on his head.
Siaki Lolohea told the king, "Just look at me, I'm a living testimony of that work. I almost
died, but through reading the Bible and having faith, the missionaries blessed me and now I'm better."
The king was very delighted and agreed.
He invited the missionaries in. Pres. Smith was the mission president at that time in Tonga,
and with Elder Butler came in and met with the king. The missionaries asked if the rest of the royal
family could join them in fasting, have faith in the work they were about to do in behalf of the king.
Missionaries again retumed on Sunday evening. The king had never had a bite to eat or water
to drink that day. So the missionaries laid their hands on his head and gave him a blessing. Part of
the blessing follows:
64
The hi gh li ght disappeared as it had come to guide them. As they got to the other side and
looked back, the ocean began to rush back to its normal place but the li ght disappeared.
Again, just as they were across from the opposite side of these islands, they were on their knees
to give thanks to the Lord for thei.r safe return to their family and that their prayers were heard and
answered to bless their lives.
Just then they heard someone come on horseback riding with a hurricane lamp. He asked if
they had seen Sokopeli and the Relief Society sisters, and to their surpri se it was Sokopeti's husband
Siaos i Brown. He was very concerned for them being so late. He borrowed a horse to come and look
for them. They were grateful that he had brought the hurricane lamp because there was only a quarter
moon for their li ght that evening. The Lord will continue to bless hi s children here on earth when we
serve him wherever we may be.
The Brown's had the first bakery at Pangai, Ha' apai and the best receipe for sweet rolls. They
fed and cared for a lot of missionaries out there.
Earli est Missionary Work in Ha ' apai:
Notes by Tisina: I was told by my father about the time when they established new branches
in different towns, islands and villages at the Tongan Group. It was at Nomuka, Ha'apai Group in
June 1894 and at Pangai it was January 1895. Missionary work began at the Ha'apai group in 1917.
There was also a Chief (matapule) had asked if they could send more mi ssionaries out to Ha 'apai .
Elder Butler, Elder Rallison, and Elder Lalesoni opened up the Ha' apai Group.
The missionary work at Ha'apai was improved. There was a matapule that lived at Ha'apai.
He heard about the gospel, studi ed thei r beliefs, and had faith on these missionaries and asked if they
would come and give him a priesthood blessing. He had a very had infect ion on his foot. It never got
any better, so he secretly studied the scriptures and prayed. He invited the missionaries to come and
bless him. They came and ri ght after the blessing his wound was healed and in return he began to bear
his testimony about the church and its doctrines. His name was Siaki Lolohea.
The King of Tonga, Tupou Uluaki was very sick at Tongatapu. He invited all his men and
chi efs and nobles to come. So Siaki Lolohea from Ha'apai also came to the palace because he was
a matapule. He rose up at this meeting and expressed his love and concern to the King and bore
witness that if he would allow the new Mormon missionaries to come and lay their hands on hi s head
and give him a blessing, the Lord would bless him and hi s good health would return, as they woul d
pronounce that in the prayer on his head.
Siaki Lolohea told the king, "Just look at ~ e , I'm a living testi mony of that work. r almost
died, but through reading the Bible and having faith, the missionaries blessed me and now I'm better."
The king was very deli ghted and agreed.
He invited the missionaries in. Pres. Smith was the mission president at that time in Tonga,
and with Elder Butler came in and met with the king. The missionaries asked if the rest of the royal
family could join them in fasting, have faith in the work they were about to do in behalf of the ki ng.
Mi ssionari es again returned on Sunday evening. The king had never had a bite to eat or water
to drink that day. So the mi ssionaries laid their hands on hi s head and gave him a blessing. Part of
the blessing follows:
65
King Siaosi Tupou Uluaki I, if you are kind enough to give your support and help with the
Lord's work among these people, the Lord will continue to bless you, and you will recover from your
sick bed; not only return to good health, but your youthful looks, your bones, muscles, nerves, blood
condition will retum to function as the body of a young man would function.
When the king got up the next day he was better, and also recovered from his sickness. He
immediately went to the office of the Church to express to them his love and thanks for their kindness.
He told them how the Lord helped heal him and all the blessings pronounced upon him by Elder Smith
and Elder Butler came true.
September 15, 1917. During this time Pres. Smith needed to finish new schools for the
children, and chapels for the saints to meet in. They needed more teachers and missionaries to teach
school in their own area. President Willard Smith wrote to church headquarters, but war broke out and
Tonga was under English protection, and refused any more missionaries to be sent to all countries that
were under English protection including New Zealand, Australia, and Samoa as well as Tonga. So that
thought was gone. President Smith wondered what next?
After receiving the letters the year before in 1916 from headquarters, Pres. Willard L. Smith
had two things in mind. First was the priesthood power, second genealogy work, Around 1916 Pres.
Smith received a letter from the First Presidency stating that they should stop giving the power of the
priesthood to these people, but to make sure that you know that they are worthy to receive it and able
to show their worthiness to receive it.
Second was on genealogy: Many other missions are now doing it, but the Tongans hadn't done
any temple work among their loved ones or families who had gone before. So they were encouraged
to start recording and searching genealogy in Tonga in 1916. That's when lohani and his mother
Salome became very interested in doing research and genealogy work.
They were encouraged to send their genealogy to the St. George, Hawaii, or Salt Lake City
Temples. Soon family group sheets were sent to Tonga and it is still continuing in the Tonga Temple
today.
I
AFTER THE DEATH OF MY SON NAPOLE
Salote tells her experience
had a very difficult time after losing a wonderful son like Napole. He was 23 years old at
-the time of his passing in 1969.. I felt so bad. 1 didn't enjoy eating food anymore, I missed
Napole so much. He was the first of my children to die. A daughter Ofa Moana was a still-bom baby.
I used to cry a lot when downstairs in our home. I would even cry in my sleep. I continued on with
this for about three weeks. lohani finally had a nice long talk with me one day, and tried to comfort
me somehow. After we talked I fell asleep on the couch in our front room, while lohani went down
stairs to sleep.
65
King Siaos i Tupou Uluaki J, if you are kind enough to give your support and help with the
Lord's work among these people, the Lord will continue to bless you, and you will recover from your
sick bed; not only return to good health, but your youthful looks, your bones, muscles, nerves, blood
condition will return to function as the body of a young man would function.
When the king got up the next day he was better, and also recovered from hi s sickness. He
immediately went to the office of the Church to express to them hi s love and thanks for their kindness.
He told them how the Lord helped heal him and all the blessings pronounced upon him by Elder Smith
and Elder Butler came true.
September 15, 19 17. During thi s time Pres. Smith needed to fini sh new schools for the
children, and chapels for the saints to meet in. They needed more teachers and mi ssionaries to teach
school in their own area. President Willard Smith wrote to church headquarters, but war broke out and
Tonga was under English protection, and refused any more missionaries to be sent to all countries that
were under English protection including New Zealand, Australia. and Samoa as well as Tonga. So that
thought was gone. President Smith wondered what next?
After receiving the letters the year before in 191 6 from headquarters, Pres. Willard L. Smith
had two things in mind. First was the priesthood power, second genealogy work, Around 1916 Pres.
Smith received a letter from the First Presidency stating that they should stop giving the power of the
priesthood to these people, but to make sure that you know that they are worthy to receive it and able
to show their worthiness to receive it.
Second was on genealogy: Many other mi ssions are now doing it, but the Tongans hadn' t done
any temple work among their loved ones or fami li es who had gone before. So they were encouraged
to start recording and searching genealogy in Tonga in 1916. That 's when lohani and his mother
Salome became very interested in doing research and genealogy work.
They were encouraged to send their genealogy to the St. George, Hawaii , or Salt Lake City
Temples. Soon fami ly group sheets were sent to Tonga and it is still continuing in the Tonga Temple
today.
AFTER THE DEATH OF MY SON NAPOLE
Sa/Ofe fells her experience
I
had a very difficult time after losing a wonderfu l. s o ~ like Napole. He was 23 years old at
the time of hi s passing in 1969 .. I felt so bad. I dldn t enJoy eatmg food anymore, I mI ssed
Napole so much. He was the first of my chi ldren to die. A daughter Ofa Moana was a still-born baby.
I used to cry a lot when downstairs in our home. I would even cry in my sleep. [continued on with
this for about three weeks. lohani finally had a nice long talk with me one day, and tried to comfort
me somehow. After we talked I fell asleep on the couch in our front room, whil e lohani went down
stairs to sleep.
66
As I closed my eyes in sleep, I saw Napole in a dream. He came into the room and was smiling
at me. I said, "Napole, where have you been? I missed you so much and want you to come home."
Napole said to me, "You don't have to worry about me mother. See, right here in my right hand
I've got a Bible, and a Book of Mormon. Here in my left, I have the sword of Laban. I'm so happy and
am teaching the gospel to the Polynesian people here, so don't worry about me any more."
As Napole left the room, I started to walk and call for our son. After I woke up, I knew it was
a dream. Finally that peaceful feeling came upon me. Now that I understand what our son is doing,
I am ashamed of how I felt before about his death. I am sure that Napole is teaching the Gospel to
those who have died, and performing many other good works too.
c;
COCONUT PALMS
Salote could never say enough ahout coconut palms
(oconut trees are the most important tree throughout the South Pacific for Polynesian
'families. The roots are used for weaving ropes, shoes for fishing, trunk is used for house
building, poles, boats or tiki carving or water container for animals, birds and fish. Coconut fibers are
used for brooms and basket weaving, leaves for making hats and mat weaving, coconut husks are used
for making ropes, bath scrubber, brushes, toilets and used to start a fire.
Coconut shells are used as cups for kava drinking, entertainment implements, necklaces,
bracelets. Small burning coconut shells are put in flatirons to heat the irons for ironing clothes, and
also used for bonfires.
The coconut liquid is the number one safest water on earth to drink. The coconut milk is
used for daily cooking, for oil, soap, including feeding humans and animals alike.
For a young family it is very important to plant coconut trees so the new family can enjoy every
part of this tree to maintain trees for future generations as Tongans continue to grow also.
NAPOLEONE AND HIS SON NAPOLEONE JR.
lohani tells ahout his grandson
'y seventh child was a boy named Napoleone Finau. He was bom while we were on our
-mission at Kolonga, Tongatapu, Tonga Islands. He was a short, well-built young man,
and a very kind and loving son. He filled a mission in Tonga and had been married about nine months
and two weeks when he had his fatal accident. He was working at Kennecott Copper Company. A
few loose train cars got loose and hit the car Napole was on, knocking him onto the tracks where he
was run over by the train killing him instantly. I felt very deeply that he was the only one of my
children who at this time was ready to go to the other side.
M;
66
As I closed my eyes in sleep, I saw Napole in a dream. He came into the room and was smil ing
at me. I said, "Napol e, where have you been? I mi ssed you so much and want you to come home."
Napole said to me, "You don't have to worry about me mother. See, right here in my right hand
I've got a Bible, and a Book of Mormon. Here in my left, I have the sword of Laban. I'm so happy and
am teaching the gospel to the Polynesian people here, so don't WOITY about me any more."
As Napole left the room, I started to walk and call for our son. After I woke up, I knew it was
a dream. Finall y that peaceful feeling came upon me. Now that I understand what our son is doing,
I am ashamed of how I felt before about hi s death. I am sure that Napole is teaching the Gospel to
those who have died, and perfonning many other good works too.
COCONUT PALMS
Salote could never say enough about coconut palms
C
oconut trees are the most important tree throughout the South Pacifi c for Pol ynesian
fami li es. The roots are used for weaving ropes, shoes for fishi ng, trunk is used for house
building, poles, boats or tiki carving or water container for animals, birds and fish. Coconut fibers are
used for brooms and basket weaving, leaves for making hats and mat weaving, coconut husks are used
for making ropes, bath scrubber, brushes, toi lets and used to start a fire.
Coconut shell s are used as cups for kava drinking, entel1ainment implements, neckl aces,
bracelets. Small burning coconut shell s are put in flatirons to heat the irons for ironing clothes, and
also used for bonfires.
The coconut liquid is the number one safest water on earth to drink. The coconut milk is
used for daily cooking, for oil , soap, including feeding humans and animals alike.
For a young family it is very importantto plant coconut trees so the new family can enj oy every
part of thi s tree to maintain trees for future generations as Tongans continue to grow also.
NAPOLEONE AND HIS SON NAPOLEONE JR.
l ohani tells about his grandson
M
y seventh child was a boy named Napaleone Finau. He was born whi le we were on our
mission at Kolonga, Tongatapu, Tonga Islands. He was a shalt, well -built young man,
and a very kind and lovi ng son. He filled a mission in Tonga and had been married about nine months
and two weeks when he had his fatal accident. He was working at Kennecott Copper Company. A
few loose u'ain cars got loose and hit the car Napole was on, knocking him onto the tracks where he
was run over by the train ki lling him instantly. I felt very deeply that he was the only one of my
chi ldren who at thi s time was ready to go to the other side.
67
I didn't know about Napole's death until the bishop and his father-in-law came to my home and
told me about Napole. I said, "Where is his body?" They said that he had been taken to the L.D.S.
hospital morgue. All I remember I said was, "Alright," and I ran downstairs to grab the oil so I could
administer to my son. I heard my wife Salote's voice crying so very loudly.
As I was running downstairs to get the consecrated oil, a voice came to me so clearly, saying,
"Don't go after the oil, lohani. This is the right time for Napole to go. He has another mission to
fulfill, so don't worry about him now." Then peace came upon me and I felt it so strongly. Instead of
bringing up the oil, I left the bottle there in my suit coat pocket, and came upstairs again. I told them
I wanted to see my son in the hospital anyway. When we arrived, I saw a lot of policemen around by
the room. They had sealed off that whole area so no one else could come there, or try to see Napole's
body. I felt that same peaceful feeling come over me again that relayed this message to me, "Peace
be with you, my peace I leave with you." I knew deep down in my heart that Napole indeed had
another mission to fulfill, so I told the doctor 1 just wanted to say goodbye to my son before I left to
go home. The doctor pulled a big icebox drawer out and Napole's body was covered with some see-
through material over his body. I knew his spirit had gone back to our Heavenly Father once more.
I also felt that Napole had prepared for this day. He must have had a feeling he was going to die.
Two weeks before the accident he called up his uncle Samuela V. Fakatou who was selling
burial lots. He put a little money down on a burial lot for himself and his little family. That same
evening before he died, my daughter Tisina and her husband Roy had just retumed from a trip to San
Diego and Tiajuana, Mexico. They had promised Napole and his wife Penny some green coconuts
and beautiful, ripe mangoes from Mexico.
As Tisina came into the house and gave the fruit to Napole. He grabbed her and gave her a
big hug and kiss. Tisina sort of pushed him away and said, "What's going on with you Napole?" The
Tongan way is that we very seldom show our affection to our brothers and sisters by hugging or
kissing them in public, but I could see by Napole's eyes that he really meant it.
He tumed around and said to her, "I love you Tisina." This was the first time that one of her
own brothers had said this to her. It surprised her very much. Napole took the coconuts and mangoes
and said, "Dl save these for Penny and me to eat after work tonight." But the accident came too fast
and Napole never got to eat those beautiful mangoes. Penny was expecting a baby in two weeks, and
subsequently delivered a big baby boy. She named him Napoleone Jr. after his father. I'm sure that
this little child must have spent time with his father before he came here.
Before Napoleone Jr. was bom, my daughter Ana had a dream. She saw her younger brother
Napole come riding on a beautiful white horse holding his son. As they came closer to where she was
standing, she saw Napole Jr. fall off the horse and land on his head. She immediately ran over and
picked up the baby, but it seemed to her that Napole's baby might have a problem with his mind after
seeing the baby fall off the horse.
As the baby grew, we didn't know that he had any problem, but I remember he used to hit his
little head against his crib. He would do this from one side of his bed around to the other side, and it
worried me a lot, but I didn't want to interfere. By the time Napole Jr. reached the age of six he was
a hyper-active child, and Penny had to take him to a special school. They told her he was autistic.
67
Ididn't know about Napole's death until the bi shop and hi s father-in-law came to my home and
told me about Napole. I said, "Where is hi s body?" They said that he had been taken to the L.D.S.
hospital morgue. AliI remember I said was, "Alright ," and I ran downstairs to grab the oi l so I could
admini ster to my son. I heard my wife Salote's voice crying so very loudly.
As ] was running downstairs to get the consecrated oil, a voice came to me so clearl y, saying,
"Don't go after the oi l, rohani . Thi s is the ri ght time for Napole to go. He has another mi ssion to
fu lfill, so don't worry about him now." Then peace came upon me and I felt it so strongly. Instead of
bringing up the oil , ] left the bottle there in my suit coat pocket, and came upstairs agai n. I told them
I wanted to see my son in the hospital anyway. When we alTived, I saw a lot of policemen around by
the room. They had sealed off that whole area so no one else could come there, or tly to see Napole's
body. I fe lt that same peaceful feeling come over me again that relayed thi s message to me, "Peace
be with you, my peace] leave with you." [knew deep down in my heart that NapoJe indeed had
another mi ssion to fulfill , so I told the doctor [just wanted to say goodbye to my son before I left to
go home. The doctor pul led a bi g icebox drawer out and Napole's body was covered with some see-
through material over hi s body. I knew hi s spirit had gone back to our Heavenly Father once more.
I also felt that Napole had prepared for ths day. He must have had a feeling he was going to die.
Two weeks before the accident he call ed up hi s uncle Samuela V. Fakatou who was selling
burial lots. He put a little money down on a burial lot for himself and hi s little famil y. That same
evening before he died, my daughter Ti sina and her husband Roy had just returned from a trip to San
Diego and Tiajuana, Mexico. They had promi sed Napole and hi s wife Penny some green coconuts
and beautiful , ripe mangoes from Mexico.
As Ti sina came into the house and gave the frui t to Napole. He grabbed her and gave her a
big hug and kiss. Ti sina sort of pushed him away and said, "What' s going on with you Napole?" The
Tongan way is that we very seldom show our affect ion to our brothers and sisters by hugging or
kissing them in public, but ] could see by Napole's eyes that he really meant it.
He turned around and said to her, "I love you Tisina." This was the first time that one of her
own brothers had said thi s to her. It surprised her very much. Napole took the coconuts and mangoes
and said, "TIl save these for Penny and me to eat after work tonight." But the accident came too fast
and Napole never got to eat those beautiful mangoes. Penny was expecting a baby in two weeks, and
subsequent ly delivered a big baby boy. She named him Napoleone 1r. after hi s father. I'm sure that
thi s little child must have spent time with hi s father before he came here.
Before Napoleone 1r. was born, my daughter Ana had a dream. She saw her younger brother
Napole come riding on a beautiful white horse holding his son. As they came closer to where she was
standing, she saw Napole 1r. fall off the horse and land on his head. She immediately ran over and
picked up the baby, but it seemed to her that Napole's baby might have a problem with hi s mind after
seeing the baby fall off the horse.
As the baby grew, we didn't know that he had any problem, but I remember he used to hit hi s
little head against hi s crib. He would do thi s from one side of hi s bed around to the other side, and it
wOlTied me a lot, but] didn't want to interfere. By the time Napole 1r. reached the age of six he was
a hyper-active child, and Penny had to take him to a special school. They told her he was aut istic.
68
After leaming for sure that my grandson Napole was autistic, I called and asked all my family,
including all of Penny's family, if we could hold a special fast and prayer for little Napoleone. This
we did, and that same evening we all went into Napole and Penny's home to break our fast and I gave
the child a special blessing.
I love Napole Jr. very much. For six years he didn't say a word you could understand. He
would look up at you, but you couldn't see his eyes. He would be looking at something else. He used
to be very frightened of lights, but loved to swim and play in the water. He used to hurt other children,
without realizing it. He would love and bite them at the same time. When I saw my grandson that
way, I decided maybe I could ask my Father in Heaven on behalf of little Napole for a special blessing
for him. 1 knew that with the faith I have and through the power of the Melchizedek priesthood, that
the Lord would be kind to Napole and give him knowledge. I prayed that Napole's mouth would be
opened, that someday he could go to school and be would be able to learn and study his lessons at
school, and that he would to able to read and write. That some day he would have a chance to go on
a mission and preach the gospel of Jesus Christ, and the Lord would open his mouth so he could speak
to all kinds of people.
I sat Napole down on a chair and anointed the oil on his head assisted by one of my sons and
his other grandfather. We gave Napole that special blessing and we did this by the power ofthe holy
Melchizedek priesthood and in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.
As we finished our prayer Napole's mouth was opened up and the first word that came out from
his mouth was A-men. Napole gave me a big hug and a kiss, and I felt that the Lords' blessings would
be with Napole from then on.
Napole is now 8 years old. He can write, read, do sums in adding, subtracting and spelling.
He reads and writes both Tongan and English. Napole is a special boy in our family too. He now
loves other children and I hope and pray that the Lord will continue to bless him and that he will be
an instrument in the work of the Lord.
P.S. It has been a long time since I recorded this story. I will add a few notes (1995)to update
and add to the story. Napole is living with other roommates. He works with computers and does name
extraction for the dead and is still single. He also graduated from High School.
Mi
STORY OF GARY FRANDSEN
Tisina tells the story from lohani's Journal
'y sister Leilani had been going with Gary Frandsen but broke up. Gary was a very close
rfriend of my husband Roy and I and we used to go deer hunting together. Leilani was
called on a mission to Tonga and Gary left on a mission to the Philippines when we lived at 130
Wilson Avenue in Salt Lake City in the Arbor Ward of Temple View Stake. Our three young
daughters used to play with Gary and Leilani at our home. Gary met a pretty Philippino girl on his
mission whose name was Cora. She used to play the piano for their branch. Leilani also had her eyes
on another retum missionary, but it tumed out to be a distant relative and Salote had her break up that
relationship.
68
After learning for sure that my grandson Napole was autistic, I called and asked all my famil y,
including all of Penny's family, if we could hold a special fast and prayer for little Napoleone. Thi s
we did, and that same evening we all went into Napole and Penny's home to break our fast and I gave
the chil d a special blessing.
I love Napole 1r. very much. For six years he didn't say a word you could understand. He
would look up at you, but you couldn't see hi s eyes. He would be looking at something else. He used
to be very frightened of li ghts, but loved to swim and play in the water. He used to hurt other chi ldren,
without realizing it. He wouJd love and bite them at the same time. When I saw my grandson that
way, I decided maybe I could ask my Father in Heaven on behalf of little Napole for a special blessing
for him. J knew that with the faith I have and through the power of the Melchizedek priesthood, that
the Lord would be kind to Napole and give him knowledge. I prayed that Napole's mouth would be
opened, that someday he could go to school and be would be able to learn and study hi s lessons at
school , and that he would to able to read and write. That some day he would have a chance to go on
a mi ssion and preach the gospel of Jesus Chri st, and the Lord would open hi s mouth so he could speak
to all kinds of people.
1 sat Napole down on a chair and anointed the oil on his head assisted by one of my sons and
hi s other grandfather. We gave Napole that special blessing and we did this by the power of the holy
Melchi zedek priesthood and in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.
As we fini shed our prayer Napole's mouth was opened up and the fi rst word that came out from
hi s mouth was A-men. Napole gave me a big hug and a kiss, and I felt that the Lords' blessings would
be wit h Napole from then on.
Napole is now 8 years old. He can write, read, do sums in adding, subtracting and spelling.
He reads and writes both Tongan and English. Napole is a special boy in our family too. He now
loves other children and I hope and pray that the Lord will continue to bless him and that he will be
an instrument in the work of the Lord.
P.S. It has been a long time since I recorded this story. I will add a few notes ( 1995)to update
and add to the story. Napole is living with other roommates. He works with computers and does name
extraction for the dead and is still single. He also graduated from High School.
STORY OF GARY FRANDSEN
Tisilla tells tile story }i'O/11/oilal1i' s Journal
M
y sister Leilani had been going with Gary Frandsen but broke up. Gary was a very close
fnend of my husband Roy and I and we used to go deer hunting together. Leilani was
called on a mission to Tonga and Gary left on a mi ssion to the Philippines when we lived at 130
Wil son Avenue in Salt Lake City in the Arbor Ward of Temple View Stake. Our three young
daughters used to play with Gary and Leilani at our home. Gary met a pretty Philippino girl on his
mi ssion whose name was Cora. She used to play the piano for their branch. Lei lani also had her eyes
on another return mi ssionary, but it turned out to be a distant relative and Salote had her break up thai
relationship.
69
Gary married Cora shortly after she came to the United States. They were very happy and were
living in our same ward and stake. It was a shock for us to hear from Gary's family that he was dying
with cancer. They only lived together for about three months when Gary died. We all felt so bad for
Cora. We just couldn't believe it. Cora was living alone at their apartment for only a short time when
we heard the sad news that someone had found a young woman's body in our ward parking lot with
little clothing on. Police needed some LD. as she had been raped and tortured. Everyone could hardly
believe what had happened to this newly widowed woman. We cried and were saddened by this news.
As Roy gathered our small daughters and we all knelt for our family prayer that evening, he prayed for
both Gary and Cora and the Frandsen family that evening. I remember our three young daughters got
so emotional and their little eyes were full of tears. In their hearts they asked our Heaveny Father to
be with Gary and Cora and the Frandsen family.
At that time I was the Primary President at our Arbor Ward. When I went to bed, in a dream
I saw myself walking across the street between 3900 south on 2300 East across from a gas station at
the comer by Arby's. I saw myself still crying wondering who in the world had killed Gary's wife
Cora. At that moment I heard a familiar voice that called me by name. 1 immediately tumed my head
back and there I saw a man. I soon recognized it was Gary Frandsen's voice. He grabbed me by my
hands and said, "You want to know who killed my wife?"
I said, "Oh yes?"
"Let me tell you, Tisina, Cora was killed by an Oriental person." He grabbed me and gave me
a big hug and a kiss. I immediately woke up from my dream, and could still feel the warmth of his
hands on my hand and could still feel the warm hug and kiss he gave me.
I woke Roy up and began to explain my dream and what Gary had told me about his wife's
killer. At that time they used to live in the Terrace apartment. If they ever find out who did it, I would
be very interested.
(Story of Robert Frandsen, 1972, is included in The Day of Reckoning)
M >
FOOD STORAGE IN HA'APAI
Family Story by Salote
'y grandfather's name was Samuela Fakatou, Sr. He grew up on the small island of
jlemea, Ha'apai, Tonga. His wife was Ateleita Fifita from Ha'ano, Ha'apai. After their
marriage they lived at Felemea. Ateleita was very blessed with the gift of healing in her hands and
she was well known as a little medicine lady in Ha'apai. She would travel from island to island and
she had a good knowledge of different kind of leaves, part ofthe trees, and roots. She would take them
and mash them together and anoint many sick people and they would recover from their sicknesses,
especially little children. She worked as a midwife most of her life.
Samuela's talent was to work in his plantation as a farmer and he was a very good farmer
throughout his whole life. They lived their life as good Christian people. You would find them daily
kneeling down in prayer regardless of the time of day. They didn't belong to our church at this time
and the Royal family wanted Samuela to continue on with his eiki name Fakatou'ia, and continue
69
Gary married Cora shortly after she came to the United States. They were very happy and were
living in our same ward and stake. It was a shock for us to hear from Gary's famil y that he was dying
with cancer. They only lived together for about three months when Gary died. We all felt so bad for
Cora. We just couldn ' t believe it. Cora was li ving alone at their apartment for only a short time when
we heard the sad news that someone had found a young woman's body in our ward parking lot with
li ttle clothing on. Police needed some LD. as she had been raped and tortured. Everyone could hardly
beli eve what had happened to thi s newl y widowed woman. We cried and were saddened by thi s news.
As Roy gathered our small daughters and we all knelt for our fami ly prayerthat evening, he prayed for
both Gary and Cora and the Frandsen fami ly that evening. I remember our three young daughters got
so emotional and their little eyes were full of tears. In their hearts they asked our Heaveny Father to
be with Gary and Cora and the Frandsen famil y.
At that time I was the Primary President at our Arbor Ward. When I went to bed, in a dream
I saw myself walki ng across the street between 3900 south on 2300 East across from a gas station at
the comer by Arby's. I saw myself still crying wondering who in the world had killed Gary's wife
Cora. At that moment I heard a familiar voice that called me by name. I immediately turned my head
back and there I saw a man. I soon recognized it was Gary Frandsen's voice. He grabbed me by my
hands and said, "You want to know who killed my wife?"
I said, "Oh yes?"
"Let me tell you, Tisina, Cora was killed by an Oriental person." He grabbed me and gave me
a big hug and a kiss. I immedifltely woke up from my dream, and could still feel the WaIlll th of hi s
hands on my hand and could still feel the warm hug and kiss he gave me.
1 woke Roy up and began to explain my dream and what Gary had told me about hi s wife's
kill er. At that time they used to live in the Terrace apartment. If they ever find out who did it, I would
be very interested.
(Story of Robert Frandsen, 1972. is included in The Day of Reckonillg)
FOOD STORAGE IN HA'APAI
Family Stary by Salore
M
y grandfather 's name was Samuela Fakatou, Sr. He grew up on the small island of
lemea, Ha ' apai, Tonga. His wife was Ateleita Fifita from Ha' ano, Ha' apai. After their
man'iage they lived at Felemea. Ateleita was very blessed with the gift of healing in her hands and
she was well known as a little medicine lady in Ha'apai. She would travel from island to island and
she had a good knowledge of different kind of leaves, part of the trees, and roots. She would take them
and mash them together and anoint many sick people and they would recover from their sicknesses,
especially little children. She worked as a midwife most of her li fe.
Samuela's talent was to work in his plantation as a farmer and he was a very good famler
throughout hi s whole life. They li ved their life as good Christian people. You would find them dai ly
kneeling down in prayer regardless of the time of day. They didn ' t belong to our church at this time
and the Royal fami ly wanted Samuela to continue on with his eiki name Fakatou'ia, and continue
70
caring for all the people at Felemea. He didn't want that, he just wanted to be a farmer and have his
cousin cany the title for him, which he did. Samuela was free from the responsibility and spent most
of his time at his plantation, and named his api Mapelu moe Lau which means abundant fruit on the
trees. Throughout his whole plantation bananas, hopa, sweet potatoes, papaya and especially the
manioke (tapioca) thrived.
During 1924 Grandfather Samuela passed away. Ateleita didn't go back to the plantation but
spent most of her time in town. They had just had a huge hurricane at Ha'apai. Most of their homes,
plantations, and vessels were destroyed. A few months later there was draught throughout Ha'apai.
Their daily diet was usually the old roots of the ti leaf plant. They would pick the root, clean it well,
and bake it inside an umu. Then they would take it out shred it and bake it with coconut cream. That
was their daily meal.
During this time at Felemea, people kept coming over to Fakatou's looking for food, but
couldn't find any. All the ti leaves were gone and Ateleita decided to pray about it. Di a dream she
saw her husband. He called her and said, "Ateleita, have you forgotten about the storage umu at our
plantation?"
Ateleita said, "What umuT
Samuela continued saying, "You must send Benesoni Kaufusi out to our plantation and by
the old breadfruit tree you will find the storage umu buried there. Ateleita didn't remember that
because it had been ten years since the storage umus had been made. Right after that he turned around
and left.
Ateleita got up, called for her son to come, and said, "Take your hoe and go back to the old
plantation and start looking for the storage umu" He started to dig around there and as he cleared the
top dirt away there he found a big storage umu. When he uncovered it, to his surprise he found the
area was full of white flour from the manioke. He was amazed and filled a kumete (a large wooden
bowl) full of flour and took it back to Ateleita. Word went out that they had found Samuela's food
storage. Most everyone came over and asked for some flour. Before the first umu was finished they
found the next one and before that was finished they found a third one. They were so grateful for
Samuela Fakatou's food storage. All the people of Felemea were preserved through this.
Ten years before this when Samuela harvested his plantation, he called all the people of
Felemea to come and help him. They brought their horses and carts and loaded them with manioke
and went out to the beach. There they would sit and clean them, peal them, and leave them in the sea
so the salt water could preserve them. Later they were hauled back to his plantation where he dug a
big square hole. Inside, the hole was covered it with burlap, then they collected green banana leaves
and covered the whole area with that, and inside that hole he would put layer upon layer oi manioke
until it was full. The top he layered with more banana leaves, burlap, and a large piece of tin then
covered it all with dirt. There it was left for ten years.
After ten years the manioke had tumed into flour. To prepare the flour for eating, coconut
cream and the liquid from a green cocoanut was mixed with the flour. Ti leaves were squeezed for
syrup and mixed into the small loaves. Sometimes they would put it inside a coconut husk and again
baked it inside a real umu. That's how they made the Tongan bread. Many of them would not dare
to taste the flour because of some unpleasant odors similar to a rotten coconut, after its long storage.
70
caring for all the people at Felemea. He didn't want that, he just wanted to be a fanner and have hi s
cousin carry the title for him, which he did. Samuela was free from the responsibility and spent most
of his time at hi s plantation, and named hi s api Mapelu moe Lau which means abundant fruit on the
trees. Throughout his whole plantation bananas, hopa, sweet potatoes, papaya and especially the
manioke (tapioca) thrived.
During 1924 Grandfather Samuela passed away. Ateleita didn' t go back to the plantation but
spent most of her time in town. They had just had a huge hurricane at Ha 'apai. Most of their homes,
plantations, and vessels were destroyed. A few months later there was draught throughout Ha'apai.
Their daily diet was usually the old roots of the Ii leaf plant. They would pick the root, clean it well ,
and bake it inside an umu. Then they would take it out shred it and bake it with coconut cream. That
was their daily meal.
During this time at Felemea, people kept coming over to Fakatou's looking for food, but
couldn't find any. All the Ii leaves were gone and Ateleita decided to pray about it. In a dream she
saw her husband. He called her and said, "Ateleita, have you forgotten about the storage umu at our
plantation?"
Ateleita said, "What umu?"
Samuela continued saying, "You must send Benesoni Kaufusi out to our plantation and by
the old breadfruit tree you will find the storage umu buried there. Ateleita didn't remember that
because it had been ten years si nce the storage umus had been made. Right after that he turned around
and left.
Ateleita got up, called for her son to come, and said, "Take your hoe and go back to the old
plantation and start looking for the storage /lmu" He started to dig around there and as he cleared the
top dirt away there he found a big storage umu. When he uncovered it, to his surprise he found the
area was full of white flour from the maniake. He was amazed and filled a kumete (a large wooden
bowl) full of flour and took it back to Ateleita. Word went out that they had found Samuela's food
storage. Most everyone came over and asked for some flour. Before the first umu was finished they
found the next one and before that was finished they found a third one. They were so grateful for
Samuela Fakatou's food storage. All the people of Felemea were preserved through this.
Ten years before this when Samuela harvested his plantation, he called all the peopl e of
Felemea to come and help him. They brought their horses and carts and loaded them with manioke
and went out to the beach. There they would sit and clean them, peal them, and leave them in the sea
so the salt water could preserve them. Later they were hauled back to hi s plantation where he dug a
big square hole. Inside, the hole was covered it with burlap, then they collected green banana leaves
and covered the whole area with that, and inside that hole he would put layer upon layer of manioke
unti I it was full. The top he layered with more banana leaves, burlap, and a large piece of tin then
covered it all with dirt. There it was left for ten years.
After ten years the manioke had turned into flour. To prepare the flour for eating, coconut
cream and the liquid from a green cocoanut was mixed with the flour. Ti leaves were squeezed for
syrup and mixed into the small loaves. Sometimes they would put it inside a coconut husk and agai n
baked it inside a reallimu. That's how they made the Tongan bread. Many of them would not dare
to taste the flour because of some unpleasant odors similar to a rotten coconut, after its long storage.
71
The addition of coconut cream, etc. made it taste delicious. After that people came from the village
to thank Ateleita for sharing their food storage with them and grateful to Samuela Fakatou for coming
in the dream to let her know how to get food in time of need. During the drought they were able to
feed the whole island of Felemea with the food storage.
About the same time this story was told by an L.D.S. mother at Pangai, Ha'apai named Louisa
Brown Kongika. She had to feed some young L.D.S. missionaries. They went out to their plantation
and couldn't find anything with which to feed them so they took the matter to the Lord in prayer and
asked for special help. When they retumed there were two sacks of taro beside their home. They
asked their neighbor who had brought the taro to them. The neighbor said a man came on horseback
and asked where the Kongika's home was and left the sacks for them. Louise asked what the
gentleman looked like, but the neighbor told them that he had never seen that man before. They looked
but found no trace of him anywhere. They came to the conclusion that the Lord had given answer to
their prayers that morning.
THE DAY PRESIDENT SPENCER W. KIMBALL DIED
Incident from Tisina's Journal
November!, 1985
i;
'was home baby sitting for my granddaughter Vanessa as we turned on the TV to watch the
-midday news. We heard the sad news about the death of our prophet.
I immediately felt tears rolling down my face as we continued to listen in. I felt very humble
when I thought back in my mind of the great leaders in our church both before and after him. Again
the echo of his voice was ringing in my ears as though he were speaking to me, expressing his love and
concern for everyone in that deep tone of voice when he spoke to us in conference. Sweet memories
of what he taught us came very clear to my mind. The important words were given us to write down
our thoughts, testimony, words ofthe chief leaders, and their testimony, our works and goals in our
joumal.
The importance of genealogy work, loving your families, and going on missions and
Do it Now, read the Book of Mormon, and all scriptures and live it, go to the temple, redeem the dead,
have family home evening, read the Miracle of Forgiveness.
Again in my mind 1 could hear his voice speaking to us from the tabernacle, he stopped for a
moment and said, "If only you could see what I have seen, many problems are ahead of you, according
to my understanding." The veil must be quite thin that the prophet of the Lord must foresee our day
and what was coming in our time. The news broadcast ended.
A thought came to my mind: I wonder if we can send some flowers for the viewing. I wanted
to send the best tropical flowers and leis, so it would represent our love and appreciation for the
prophet and all he has done for the Polynesians.
71
The addition of coconut cream, etc. made it taste delicious. After that people came from the vill age
to thank Ateleita for sharing their food storage with them and grateful to Samuela Fakatou for coming
in the dream to let her know how to get food in time of need. During the drought they were able to
feed the whole island of Felemea with the food storage.
About the same time thi s story was told by an L.D.s. mother at Pangai, Ha'apai named Loui sa
Brown Kongika. She had to feed some young L.D.s. mi ssionari es. They went out to their plantati on
and couldn' t find anything with which to feed them so they took the matter to the Lord in prayer and
asked for special help. When they returned there were two sacks of lara beside their home. They
asked their neighbor who had brought the taro La them. The neighbor said a man came on horseback
and asked where the Kongika 's home was and left the sacks for them. Loui se asked what the
gent leman looked like, but the neighbor told them that he had never seen that man before. They looked
but found no trace of him anywhere. They came to the conclusion that the Lord had given answer to
their prayers that morning.
THE DAY PRESIDENT SPENCER W. KIMBALL DIED
Incidenl./i"om Tisina's Journal
NOl'emher 2, 1985
I
was home baby sitting for my granddaughter Vanessa as we turned on the TV to watch the
midday news. We heard the sad news about the death of our prophct.
I immediately felt tears rolling down my face as we continued to li sten in. I felt very humble
when I thought back in my mind of the great leaders in our church both before and after him. Again
the echo of hi s voice was ringing in my ears as though he were speaking to me, expressing his iove and
concern for everyone in that deep tone of voice when he spoke to us in conference. Sweet memori es
of what he taught us came very clear to my mind. The important words were given us to write down
our thoughts, testimony, words of the chi ef leaders, and their testimony, our works and goals in our
journal.
The importance of genealogy work, loving your fami lies, and goi ng on mi ssions and
Do il Now, read the Book of Mormon, and all scriptures and li ve it, go to the temple, redeem the dead,
have fami ly home evening, read the Miracle of Forgiveness.
Again in my mind I could hear hi s voice speaking to us from the tabernacle, he stopped for a
moment and said, "If only you could see what I have seen, many problems are ahead of you. according
to my understanding." The veil must be quite thin that the prophet of the Lord must foresee our day
and what was coming in our time. The news broadcast ended.
A thought came to my mind: I wonder if we can send some flowers for the viewi ng. I wanted
to send the best tropical fl owers and leis, so it would represent our love and appreciati on for the
prophet and all he has done for the Pol ynesians.
72
I immediately grabbed my purse and looked inside my wallet to see what I had for the flowers.
1 counted all my change and it only came to about $20.00. That's all we had left until payday.
1 told Vanessa about my plan for the flowers. We must take this matter to the Lord and ask
for His help. This we both agreed to. I took Vanessa by her little hands and went to our back bedroom
and there we both knelt down and I offered this prayer. We asked the Lord, as he knows we only had
$20.00 for this emergency, if he could help us get the flowers this aftemoon and thanked him very
much for our blessing and for the prophet.
We later got into our car, drove down and found some beautiful fresh tropical ti leaves,
anthriums, bird of paradise, orchids, baby breath and red, white, lavender, and tangerine colored
double carnations. Our flowers only came to about $60.00 so we paid the $20.00 and promised to pay
the rest the following week. We were so happy. We came home and called up my parents including
my sister Ana, brother Sale, his wife Fononga, if they would help me fix up the leis and flowers. Oh
yes indeed they would.
They came over right away. We made two big tropical stands with two long flower leis hung
at the bottom draping around the stands and they were beautiful.
We later called the church office building to see if we could bring them in. They told us to be
there at 4:00 a.m. at the old church building. We put the flowers in Sale's van. lohani and Salote rode
with me. Ana, Fononga and Sale rode down with the flowers.
There were many beautiful arrangements that had arrived earlier. Soon we left to come home
for we had stayed up until that time. The viewing was held on November 8
th
at the church office
building. We all wanted to join the crowd of people who came to stand in a long line beginning at the
old church office building all around the block to the new church office building.
We had been standing there for about half an hour. We felt a mild breeze blowing where we
stood. Everyone was busy talking and visiting and many people kept on coming to join us. Again I
felt that mild breeze that seemed to be blowing right at me. I suddenly felt something touching my
foot or my leg. I looked around but didn't notice a thing, but in a small sweet tone it said to me, tum
your head and look down at your feet. As I looked down I saw a plain piece of paper, but didn't try
to open it. The same sweet small voice said, open it up see and what's inside. As I unfolded the paper
I saw something was folded inside. To my surprise I found a 20 dollar bill and then another 20 dollar
bill-just the amount I owed for all the flowers.
I asked, Has anyone lost any change. Everyone that stood by us shook they heads and said no.
I again heard the same voice saying, '"Blessings you give, more blessings you will receive." You
cannot imagine the joy and happiness that filled my soul that evening, knowing that the Lord had given
us an answer to our prayer with my little granddaughter Vanessa. I cried for the gladness in my heart
for the miracle he blessed our life with on the day our prophet died.
By the time we got to see the prophet at the viewing, my mother Salote saw both our flowers
and leis standing side by side by the prophet's casket with these words written on the ribbons: We
Thank you for our Tongan Temple from the Tongan saints and family, the other one said Ofa Lahi Atu
from the Wolfgramm family.
72
I immediately grabbed my purse and looked inside my wallet to see what J had for the flowers.
T counted all my change and it only came to about $20.00. That's all we had left until payday.
T told Vanessa about my plan for the flowers. We must take this matter to the Lord and ask
for His help. This we both agreed to. I took Vanessa by her little hands and went to our back bedroom
and there we both knelt down and I offered this prayer. We asked the Lord, as he knows we only had
$20.00 for thi s emergency, if he could help us get the tlowers this afternoon and thanked him very
much for our blessing and for the prophet.
We later got into our car, drove down and found some beautiful fresh tropical Ii leaves,
onlhriums, bird of paradise, orchids, baby breath and red, white, lavender, and tangerine colored
double carnations. Our flowers only came to about $60.00 so we paid the $20.00 and promised to pay
the rest the following week. We were so happy. We came home and called up my parents including
my sister Ana, brother Sale, his wife Fononga, if they would help me fix up the leis and flowers. Oh
yes indeed they would.
They came over right away. We made two big tropical stands with two long flower lei s hung
at the bottom draping around the stands and they were beautiful.
We later called the church office building to see if we could bring them in. They told us to be
there at 4:00 a.m. at the old church building. We put the flowers in Sale' s van. Iohani and Salote rode
with me. Ana, Fononga and Sale rode down with the flowers.
There were many beautiful arrangements that had anived earlier. Soon we left to come home
for we had stayed up until that time. The viewing was held on November 8
th
at the church offi ce
building. We all wanted to join the crowd of people who came to stand in a long line beginning at the
old church office building all around the block to the new church office building.
We had been standing there for about half an hour. We felt a mi ld breeze blowing where we
stood. Everyone was busy talking and visiting and many people kept on coming to join us. Agai n I
felt that mild breeze that seemed to be blowing right at me. I suddenly felt something touching my
foot or my leg. I looked around but didn't notice a thing, but in a small sweet tone it said to me, turn
your head and look down at your feet. As I looked down I saw a plain piece of paper, but didn ' t try
to open it. The same sweet small voice said, open it up see and what 's inside. As I unfolded the paper
I saw something was folded inside. To my surprise I found a 20 dollar bill and then another 20 doll ar
bill- just the amount lowed for all the flowers.
I asked, Has anyone lost any change. Everyone that stood by us shook they heads and said no.
r again heard the same voice saying, '''Blessings you give, more blessings you will receive." You
cannot imagine the joy and happiness that fi lled my soul that evening, knowing that the Lord had gi ven
us an answer to our prayer with my little granddaughter Vanessa. I cried for the gladness in rny heart
for the miracle he blessed our life with on the day our prophet died.
By the time we got to see the prophet at the viewing, my mother Salote saw both our flowers
and leis standing side by side by the prophet's casket with these words written on the ribbons: We
Thank you f or our Tongan Temple from the Tongan saints and family, the other one said Ofa Loki AtLI
from the Wolfgramm family.
73
My mother and father couldn't believe their eyes. My sister Norma, Ana, Fononga and I were
all shocked to think what an honor for us to have our simple and humble flower stands and leis stand
that close to the prophet of God. Salote began to cry out loud. We all began to cry for the warm,
loving spirit we all felt and were touched when we came close to his casket. He looked so peaceful,
clean and pure. We will always remember his loving face. I often wish that he could be a Polynesian
prophet, as David O. McKay, President Gordon B. Hinckley, Thomas S. Monson, Apostle Matthew
Cowley, John H. Groberg, Eric Shumway and others. They are holy men of God who love us so much
and serve the Lord faithfully.
This story is true. I express my love to him for all that he has done for me.
T:
A ONE DOLLAR BILL
By Salote, November 1997
ihis happened a few weeks after lohani died September 16,1997.
I went to the temple in November 1997 and it was a very cold morning. I went out to catch
my bus home, not realizing I had forgotten my wallet. I began to panic. I looked around hoping to
see a Tongan or a relative to loan me the 50 cents until I got home, but could find no one.
I began to look inside my purse. I then dumped everything out, but not enough change. I began
to empty my two coat pockets, hoping for a few more pennies, but found none In a humble prayer
I said, "Father in heaven, I have spent almost all day going through the temple for the dead, and a
promise was given to us that if we do such service, we will be assisted with our problems, and if not,
please let lohani come and bring me bus fare so I can get home."
When I ended my prayer, I saw our bus arrive. Again I reached down into my coat pocket, and
with a smile on my face and a grateful heart, I found a one dollar bill inside. Just enough to pay my
bus fare.
I later called and told Tisina how excited I was that the Lord maybe sent lohani with the one
dollar bill for my fare that day.
THE MISSING WALLET
Salote's story, September 1997
i;
'had been at the Salt Lake City Temple for almost half a day. Upon leaving, I came to the
-Kennecott Building to use the pay phone to call Tisina. After we talked Salote said, "I'll
be coming home to eat and have a short nap, and will you please bring me back for our sealing session
around 6:00 p.m. tonight, I would appreciate it?"
Tisina answered, "Sure, I'll even come with you to the temple."
I said, "That sounds real good because you have to tend my grandson Tevita on Monday and
Tuesday each week."
73
My mother and fat her coul dn' t believe their eyes. My sister Norma, Ana, Fononga and r were
al l shocked to think what an honor for us to have our si mple and humble fl ower stands and lei s stand
that close to the prophet of God. Salote began to cry out loud. We all began to cry for the warm,
loving spirit we all felt and were touched when we came close to hi s casket. He looked so peaceful,
clean and pure. We will always remember hi s loving face. I often wish that he coul d be a Polynesian
prophet, as David O. McKay, President Gordon B. Hinckley, Thomas S. Monson, Apost le Matthew
Cowley, John H. Groberg, Eri c Shumway and others. They are holy men of God who love us so much
and serve the Lord faithfully.
This story is true. r express my love to him for all that he has done for me.
A ONE DOLLAR BILL
By SalOle, November 1997
T
hi s happened a few weeks after Iohan i died September 16, 1997.
I went to the temple in 1997 and it was a very cold morning. r went out to catch
my bus home, not realizing r had forgotten my wall et. I began to panic. [ looked around hoping to
see a Tongan or a relative to loan me the 50 cents until r got home, but could find no one.
r began to look inside my purse. r then dumped everyt hing out, but not enough change. 1 began
to empty my two coat pockets,.hoping for a few more pennies, but found none In a humble prayer
[ said, "Father in heaven, I have spent almost all day going through the temple for the dead, and a
promi se was given to us that if we do such service, we will be assisted wit h our problems, and if not,
please let lohani come and bring me bus fare so [ can get home."
When r ended my prayer, I saw our bus arrive. Again 1 reached down into my coat pocket, and
with a smile on my face and a grateful heart, r found a one dollar bill inside. Just enough to pay my
bus fare.
r later called and told Tisina how excited r was that the Lord maybe sent Iohan i with the one
doll ar bill for my fare that day.
THE MISSING WALLET
SaloTe's slOry, SepTember 1997
I
had been at the Salt Lake City Templ e for almost half a day. Upon leaving, r came
Kennecott Building to use the pay phone to call Tlsll1a. After we talked Salote saId, r II
be coming home to eat and have a short nap, and will you please bring me back for our seal ing session
around 6:00 p.m. tonight, I would appreciate it?"
Tisi na answered, "Sure, I'll even come with you to the temple."
I said, "That sounds real good because you have to tend my grandson Tevita on Monday and
Tuesday each week."
74
Next thing I remembered, I hung up the phone and ran out to get my bus. After being on the
bus I began to look for my wallet and again felt panic. I couldn't find my wallet inside my purse. At
this time the bus driver had gone about six blocks south and two blocks east, or eight blocks altogether.
I asked the bus driver to please stop and let me out. I couldn't find my bus fare. I wanted to walk back
to the Kennecott building phone booth and look for my wallet. So the bus driver let me off.
All the way back to the building, I prayed and asked the Lord to please let lohani go back to
Kennecott Building and care for my wallet and hide it so no one might take off with it.
My temple recommend was also inside my wallet, and I didn't want it to get lost.
Fifteen or 20 minutes later I finally arrived back at the Kennecott Building. I looked on top
ofthe pay phone. 1 couldn't find anything there. I finally heard a small still voice saying, "Walk over
by the flowers. In there you will find your wallet"
I said to the spirit, "Thank you." I walked inside where some flowers were planted and found
my wallet under some fresh flower leaves. "I know that God lives. He heard my prayer and came to
my rescue. I remember I left my wallet on top of the phone, and while I was running to catch the bus,
someone removed my wallet and hid it for me inside the flower garden till I came and was told where
to look for it."
74
Next thing I remembered, I hung up the phone and ran out to get my bus. After being on the
bus I began to look for my wallet and again felt panic. I couldn' t find my wall et inside my purse. At
this time the bus driver had gone about six blocks south and two blocks east, or eight blocks altogether.
I asked the bus driver to please stop and let me out. I couldn't find my bus fare. I wanted to walk back
to the Kennecott building phone booth and look for my wallet. So the bus driver let me off.
All the way back to the building, I prayed and asked the Lord to please let lohani go back LO
Kennecott Building and care for my wallet and hide it so no one might take off with it.
My temple recommend was also inside my wallet, and I didn' t want it to get lost.
Fifteen or 20 minutes later I finally arrived back at the Kennecott Building. I looked on top
of the pay phone. I couldn 't find anything there. I finally heard a small still voice saying, "Walk over
by the flowers . In there you will find your wallet"
I said to the spirit, "Thank you." I walked inside where some flowers were planted and found
my wallet under some fresh flower leaves. "I know that God lives. He heard my prayer and came to
my rescue. I remember I left my wallet on top of the phone, and while I was running to catch the bus,
someone removed my wallet and hid it for me inside the flower garden till I came and was told where
to look for it."
CHAPTER V
lOHANI'S
MISSIONARY YEARS
CHAPTER V
IOHANI'S
MISSIONARY YEARS
A
c
77
MISSIONARY LIFE IN TONGA 1941 -1943
ITEM I: Beginning in Houma
conference was held for the Tongan mission. President Dunn came to interview Salote
and me. The first question asked was if we owed any money to anybody or had any
unpaid debts that we needed to take care of. Our answer was no, so during that conference we were
called to leave on a mission to Tongatapu. It was the year 1941. It is about 3,000 miles from
Nukualofa to Sydney, Australia and 430 miles from Suva, Fiji, and 1,100 miles to New Zealand. From
Vava'u to Tongatapu is only about 160 miles, with the Ha'apai Group halfway between.
The only source of money at that time was through our copra. We could only get 12 pence for
one pound of dried cocoanut or copra. When I worked building a house I only got two shillings (24
pence) a day. I spent almost every day working and building and saving for our boat fare to leave on
our first mission.
Salote and a few of the older children would spend every day going out to the bush to collect
cocoanuts for copra. By March 1941 we had saved enough money for our boat fare. There were five
children to take with us. After paying our boat fare, we only had 7/-(shillings) left. I purchased a new
Bible for 6/- (shillings) so all we had left was 1 /- (shilling) or 12
d
(pence) for our pocket money. Each
of us had only one best change of clothing for Sunday and one change for every day. We also took two
blankets and two tapa cloths.
We sailed on a little boat called the Taufale. During our sailing time on the Taufale or other
times, we usually had everyone at sea singing hymns. We prayed together early in the morning and
late at night to give thanks to God and ask for our safety at sea. We were so sea sick and hungry. We
sailed two whole days and nights. It was so crowded and the smell of the boat engine was
overwhelming. The sea was so rough I used a bucket for the sick ones to throw up in. I would tie a
rope on the bucket then use that for them to throw up in, then I would empty it every half hour during
our trip all the way from Vava'u to Ha'apai, then from Ha'apai to Tongatapu. I was very good at sea,
caring for all the family, as I never get seasick. I kept my eyes on my family at all times. When the
sea got rough or a storm came up, I would tie a rope from a post or port of the vessel so if hard times
hit, we could always hang on to that rope. I was always at the head of the rope as an anchor for the
family's safety and I had the power ofthe priesthood as we traveled.
After we arrived at Houma, President Emil Dunn took us to the home of an old widow named
Popua. She was blind and unable to care for herself. There were holes on top of the roof so we could
see the stars and moon at night. When it rained we had to move our bedding from the wet area to a
dry place. The pigs and chickens lived underneath her house for protection. The house was ready to
collapse to the ground, but yet we were to care for Popua in exchange for using her home for our living
and also as headquarters for Church meetings.
There were about seven or eight member families living at Houma at this time and there was
only one room on Popua's house. So we took our tapa cloth, cut it in half for a draw curtain and
divided the room into three. The east side would be for Popua, the west side would be ours, and the
middle area would be the area in which to hold the Church meetings.
77
MISSIONARY LIFE IN TONGA 1941 - 1943
ITEM I: Beginning in Houma
A conference was held for the Ton,gan mi ssion. President Dunn came to interview Salote
and me. The fll st quest Ion asked was I f we owed any money to anybody or had any
unpaid debts that we needed to take care of. Our answer was no, so during that conference we were
call ed to leave on a mi ssion to Tongatapu. It was the year 1941. It is about 3,000 miles from
Nukualofa to Sydney, Australia and 430 miles from Suva, Fiji, and I, I 00 miles to New Zealand. From
Vava'u to Tongatapu is only about 160 miles, with the Ha'apai Group halfway between.
The only source of money at that time was through our copra. We could only get 12 pence for
one pound of dli ed cocoanut or copra. When I worked building a house I only got two shillings (24
pence) a day. I spent almost every day working and building and saving for our boat fare to leave on
our first mi ssion.
Salote and a few of the older children would spend every day going out to the bush to collect
cocoanuts for copra. By March 1941 we had saved enough money for our boat fare. There were five
children to take with us. After paying our boat fare, we only had 7/- (shillings) left. 1 purchased a new
Bible for 6/- (shillings) so all we had left was 1/- (shilling) or 12' (pence) for our pocket money. Each
of us had only one best change of clothing for Sunday and one change for every day. We also took two
blankets and two tapa cloths.
We sailed on a littl e bo.at called the Taujaie. During our sailing time on the TaL/jale or other
times, we usually had everyone at sea singing hymns. We prayed together early in the morning and
late at night to give thanks to God and ask for our safety at sea. We were so sea sick and hungry. We
sailed two whole days and nights. It was so crowded and the smell of the boat engine was
overwhelming. The sea was so rough I used a bucket for the sick ones to throw up in. I would tie a
rope on the bucket then use that for them to throw up in, then I would empty it every half hour during
our trip al l the way from Vava'u to Ha'apai, then from Ha'apai to Tongatapu. I was very good at sea,
caring for all the fami ly, as I never get seasick. I kept my eyes on my family at all times. When the
sea got rough or a storm came up, I would tie a rope from a post or port of the vessel so if hard times
hit, we could always hang on to that rope. I was always at the head of the rope as an anchor for the
fami ly's safety and I had the power of the priesthood as we traveled.
After we arrived at Houma, President Emil Dunn took us to the home of an old widow named
Papua. She was bl ind and unabl e to care for herself. There were holes on top of the roof so we could
see the stars and moon at night. When it rained we had to move our bedding from the wet area to a
dry place. The pigs and chi ckens lived underneath her house for protection. The house was ready to
collapse to the ground, but yet we were to care for Papua in exchange for using her home for our living
and also as headquarters for Church meetings.
There were about seven or eight member famil ies living at Houma at this time and there was
only one room on Papua's house. So we took our tapa cloth, cut it in half for a draw curtain and
divi ded the room into three. The east side would be for Papua, the west side would be ours, and the
middle area would be the area in which to hold the Church meetings.
78
The day we first arrived the children were crying for some food. Salote started to weep as the
children started to cry and she began to complain to me. She said, "If only we had remained in Vava'u,
our children would not be crying for food right now. lohani, can't you see?"
I smiled at Salote and said, "Come with me. Lets go outside and take a good look at the
beautiful creation that God has given us. Look at the trees and flowers outside." As they began to hold
hands outside, they began to hear tropical birds singing beautiful songs. It was a sweet lullaby to their
ears. By the house was a creeping flower known as Kaloni Kakala that was in full bloom. Gardenias
and roses were there too. The atmosphere was heady with perfume of the plumeria trees and tropical
flowers of all colors. Thousands of blossoms had fallen and covered the beautiful lawn with plumeria
and green and red ti leaves. I said to Salote, "Can't you see who is here to welcome us in this beautiful
spring moming? They are here singing their little hearts out, not only that but can you hear their
beautiful musical song? Just listen."
Salote took a look at those beautiful tropical flowers. Can't you smell their different tropical
scents. It's so heavenly and beautiful. As silence came at this time they heard the wind as it hit the
iron wood leaves. There was a different sound (some high tones) of music coming from it. We also
listened to the different sounds that came out as the wind hit the banana leaves. It was a different low
sound and as the wind hit the taro and kape plants it made a tenor sound.
So I began to question Salote again, "Can I ask you who helped feed those birds this
morning?"
Salote said, "I know that God has fed them."
Then I said, "All right, our children and our family will be cared for and will be fed by God also
as he loves and cares for these birds. We won't need to worry any more. The Lord has called us to
serve him, and he will be here to take care of whatever we need at different times."
Again as we roamed around the garden outside, Salote agreed with me that they must trust and
have faith in the Lord. As they looked around the beautiful breadfruit trees, to our surprise we spotted
not one breadfruit, but three breadfruit on top ofthe breadfruit tree. I said, "See Salote, what did I tell
you! We will be cared for as the Lord cared for his birds in the air." So Salote was pacified. We
picked those three breadfruit and came in the house. Salote started to cook them for the family, but
I went and thanked the Lord, took my new Bible and started to go from door to door introducing
myself to the people ofthe village as the new missionary family in Houma.
I spent the rest ofthe day talking and preaching to those who were willing to listen to me until
the sun went down. I came to the last house in the village and in there I met a widow named
Kalolaine. Her family was German-Tongan, just like my family. I taught her the gospel. Kalolaini
was so grateful and before I knew it, she took a box and inside she put rice, canned milk, bread, flour,
sugar, soap, corned beef and kerosene for our lamps. Kalolaini said, "lohani, I know this is not much,
but give these to your family, and anything that your family needs at any time, send them over to my
little store. It will be open for you and your family at any time at no cost because you are here to serve
the Lord."
I was so grateful and thanked her for her generosity and later brought the box home to Salote
and the children. Oh, it was like Christmas eve. We knelt in prayer to thank the Lord for our blessing.
The Lord kept his promise that he would provide for us as we served him faithfully.
78
The day we first arrived the chi ldren were crying for some food. Salote started to weep as the
children started to cry and she began to complain to me. She said, "If only we had remained in Vava'u,
our children would not be crying for food right now. Iohani , can't you see?"
I smiled at Salote and said, "Come with me. Lets go outside and take a good look at the
beautiful creation that God has given us. Look at the trees and flowers outside." As they began to hold
hands outside, they began to hew' tropical birds singing beautiful songs. It was a sweet lull aby to their
ears. By the house was a creeping flower known as Kaloni Kakala that was in full bloom. Gardenias
and roses were there too. The atmosphere was heady with peliume of the plumeria trees and tropi cal
flowers of all colors. Thousands of blossoms had fall en and covered the beautiful lawn with plumeria
and green and red [i leaves. I said to Salote, "Can't you see who is here to welcome us in this beautifu l
spring morning? They are here singing their little hearts out, not only that but can you hear their
beautiful musical song? Just li sten. "
Salote took a look at those beautiful tropical flowers. Can't you smell their different tropi cal
scents. It's so heavenly and beautiful. As silence came at this time they heard the wind as it hit the
iron wood leaves. There was a different sound (some high tones) of music coming from it. We also
listened to the different sounds that came out as the wind hit the banana leaves. It was a different low
sound and as the wind hit the [oro and kape pl ants it made a tenor sound.
So I began to question Salote again, "Can I ask you who helped feed those birds this
morning'?"
Salote said, "I know that God has fed them."
Then I said, "All ri ght, our children and our family will be cared for and will be fed byGod al so
as he loves and cares for these birds. We won't need to worry any more. The Lord has called us to
serve him, and he will be here to take care of whatever we need at different times."
Again as we roamed around the garden outside, Salote agreed with me that they must trust and
have fa ith in the Lord. As they looked around the beautiful breadfruit trees, to our surpri se we spotted
not one breadfruit, but three breadfruit on top of the breadfruit tree. I said, "See Salote, what did I tell
you! We wi ll be cared for as the Lord cared for his birds in the air." So Salote was pacified. We
picked those three breadfruit and came in the house. Salote started to cook them for the family, but
I went and thanked the Lord, took my new Bible and started to go from door to door introducing
myself to the people of the village as the new missionary fami ly in Houma.
I spent the rest of the day talking and preaching to those who were will ing to li sten to me until
the sun went down. I came to the last house in the village and in there I met a widow named
Kalolaine. Her family was German-Tongan, just like my family. I taught her the gospel. Kalol aini
was so grateful and before I knew it, she took a box and inside she put rice, canned milk, bread, fl our,
sugar, soap, corned beef and kerosene for our lamps. Kalolaini said, "Iohani, I know this is not much,
but give these to your family, and anything that your family needs at any time, send them over to my
little store. It wi ll be open for you and your family at any time at no cost because you are here to serve
the Lord. "
I was so grateful and thanked her for her generosity and later brought the box home to Salote
and the chi ldren. Oh, it was like Christmas eve. We knelt in prayer to thank the Lord for our blessi ng.
The Lord kept his promi se that he would provide for us as we served him fait hfull y.
70
Each morning at 5:00 A.M. I would take my hoe and machete to clean my new plantation in
the bush for our food and vegetables. I cultivated the area planting a new crop consisting of taro,
tapioka, sweet potatoes, banana trees and vegetables. Some ofthe branch members came out to help,
especially the Fonua and Tonga families. They were so kind and helped out the newly adopted
missionary family at Houma. As to Vaea, the Chief of Houma, he was courteous and respectful to our
family.
Houma has a rocky, terraced coast line. It features one ofthe South Pacific's most impressive
spectacles. Huge waves crash into the coral rock, sending water spouts hissing 60 feet and more into
the air, called blow-holes. Houma is well known for its dwarf red and yellow pan dan trees along the
sea coast which make beautiful garlands of green huni lei along with their white blossoms and red
striped stems.
It usually takes six months before a plantation is ready for harvest. Before we moved to
Houma, Namosi and Fifita Loa, a missionary couple from Vava'u had just been released before we
arrived. They gave their plantation to someone else instead ofthe next missionary, so Salote and some
of the children were out most of their free time after school weeding and cultivating our plantation.
As early as 5:00 a.m. to7:30 a.m. I would be there on my free time, then we had family prayer,
scripture study, and then at 8:00 a.m. the children went to School. Salote would be home getting her
lesson ready for Relief Society, Primary, and M.I.A., and I along with my missionary companion,
would be out tracting until 6:00 p.m. when 1 would come in, eat, and go out to the bush to work for
a couple of hours. Then I would retum home and get ready and would leave with a missionary
companion along with Salote, so she could read the scriptures, for a street meeting until 10:00 p.m.
Then we would retum home. This was our routine most of the time.
Six months had passed and our plantation was ready. We were looking forward to the harvest.
We had been enjoying the papaya, pineapple, the lupulu, and a few bananas and sugar cane from it,
but we hadn't touched the rest. To our surprise, the mission president arrived at our home and asked
me how the plantation was. I said, "Wonderful, it's ready to be harvested at any time now."
"Good." replied President Dunn." How about your family?" I said they were all well and very
happy. Pres. Dunn said, "Fine, if it would be all right with you and Salote, we need to have you move
to Fo'ui. It's a few miles from here and we would ask you to leave your plantation for our next
missionary couple to have when they move out here. I'll wait for a little while so you can get all your
belongings together and give you a ride to Fo'ui." We were sad to leave our church members and
friends behind, but were excited to know how happy the new missionary couple would be to come and
take our place and enjoy our plantation for their family. Soon all our clothing and belongings were
together. We all hopped inside Pres. Dunn's car and went with him to the village of Fo'ui. There we
were met with caring and loving church members, the Mataele, Sekona, Poto, and Matelau families.
We leamed during the time we were out serving at Houma that the little breadfruit tree was like
a manna tree. It produced breadfruit and served us from the day we arrived until the last day we left
Houma. It continued every day for six months. How blessed we were to receive this blessing. It
tasted like a heavenly bread each time we prepared it for our meals. Salote and I only ate once a day,
and it would fill up our stomachs until we got home late at night.
79
Each morning at 5:00 A.M. I would take my hoe and machete to clean my new plantation in
the bush for our food and vegetables. I cultivated the area planting a new crop consisting of taro,
tapioka, sweet potatoes, banana trees and vegetables. Some of the branch members came out to help,
especially the Fonua and Tonga families. They were so kind and helped out the newly adopted
missionary family at Houma. As to Vaea, the Chief of Houma, he was courteous and respectful to our
fami ly.
Houma has a rocky, terraced coastline. It features one of the South Pacific's most impressive
spectacles. Huge waves crash into the coral rock, sending water spouts hi ssing 60 feet and more into
the air, call ed blow-holes. Houma is well known for its dwarf red and yell ow pancian trees along the
sea coast which make beautiful garlands of green huni lei along with their white blossoms and red
striped stems.
It usually takes six months before a plantation is ready for harvest. Before we moved to
Houma, Namosi and Fifita Loa, a missionary couple from Vava'u had just been released before we
arrived. They gave their plantation to someone else instead of the next mi ssionary, so Salote and some
of the children were out most of their free time after school weeding and cultivating our plantation.
As early as 5:00 a.m. to7:30 a.m. I would be there on my free time, then we had family prayer,
scripture study, and then at 8:00 a.m. the children went to School. Salote would be home getting her
lesson ready for Reli ef Society, Primary, and M.I.A. , and I along with my mi ssionary companion,
would be out tracting until 6:00 p.m. when I would come in, eat, and go out to the bush to work for
a couple of hours. Then I wquld return home and get ready and would leave with a mi ssionary
companion along with Salote, so she could read the scriptures, for a street meeting until 10:00 p.m.
Then we would return home. This was our routine most of the time.
Six months had passed and our plantation was ready. We were looking forward to the harvest.
We had been enjoying the papaya, pineapple, the lupulu, and a few bananas and sugar cane from it,
but we hadn't touched the rest. To our surpri se, the mission president arrived at our home and asked
me how the plantation was. I said, "Wonderful , it's ready to be harvested at any time now."
"Good." replied President Dunn. " How about your family?" I said they were all well and very
happy. Pres. Dunn said, "Fine, if it would be all right wi th you and Salote, we need to have you move
to Fo' ui. It's a few miles from here and we would ask you to leave your plantation for our next
mi ssionary couple to have when they move out here. I'll wait for a littl e whil e so you can gel all your
belongings together and give you a ride to Fo'ui." We were sad to leave our church members and
friends behind, but were excited to know how happy the new mi ssionary couple would be to come and
take our place and enjoy our plantation for their family. Soon all our clothing and belongings were
toget her. We all hopped inside Pres. Dunn's car and went with him to the vill age of Fo'ui. There we
were met with caring and loving church members, the Mataele, Sekona, Poto, and Matelau families .
We learned during the time we were out serving at Houma that the little breadfruit tree was like
a manna tree. It produced breadfruit and served us from the day we arrived until the last day we left
Houma. It continued every day for six months. Hnw blessed we were to receive thi s blessing. It
tasted like a heavenly bread each time we prepared it for our meal s. Salote and I onl y ate once a day,
and it would fill up our stomachs until we got home late at night.
80
I received my very first missionary companion Samuela Loholoho Vehikite (a cousin) from
Otea Island and his wife was Elisapesi Pasikala. Before we left for Fo'ui we just barely celebrated our
baby Tisina's first birthday at Houma.
After my family and I left Fo'ui we went to Kolovai for our missionary work. I remember how
those people there hated us when they found out we were an L.D.S. missionary family who had come
there to teach them about the church. On our very first night at Kolovai, we slept in a community hall.
We could see the moon and the stars through the holes in the rooftop, and through the large holes in
the walls. The floor was made of hard gravel. We shared one big long mat. All of the girls had only
one sheet to cover them; all the boys shared one blanket between them. To make matters worse,
someone came in and stole our covers while we were asleep that night. In the moming we got up, sang
our favorite hymn and opened with a prayer of gratitude for our safety that night.
ITEM fl: Our First Area - Ha'utu And Fahefa -1942
While our family was still living at Fo'ui, my companion Samuela Vehikite and I traveled from
village to village doing missionary work. One aftemoon we came to Ha'utu and Fahefa. Some men
were having a fai kava (a kava ceremony). A young woman would mix some kava root for 16 or 20
men in the village. As they drank this juice, they would visit one another. The younger men would
serenade the young lady with songs. This was a form of dating in Tonga. Sometimes they had a fai
kava to invite visitors or newcomers to their village.
We asked if we could join the fai kava. This way we could talk about the Gospel of Jesus
Christ. A man from the village invited us into his house. Everyone was sitting in a circle, with the
young lady seated at the front. My companion and I sat by thc door, facing each other. I started lo
explain our reason for being there, and how we wished to tell them about the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
At that time missionaries were allowed to fai kava.
A very large man, weighing about 250 pounds and 6 foot 4 inches tall, sat on my right. While
I was giving the discussion the man continued to talk, making a disturbance. He tumed to me and
asked, "Why don't you shut up and get lost?" I had been given permission by the head of the house
to speak, so I regained the group's attention and continued teaching.
The man, enraged at being ignored, started to grab me and shake me. He then grasped my throat
in his huge hands and tried to choke me. I had some experience in self defense that served me well.
I pulled the man's thumbs down and twisted them in the wrong direction, almost breaking them. The
extreme pain made the man let go of my neck and he cried out, "Oh no, oh no, you've broken my
arms." He sat upon the floor and held his hands down, dripping saliva from his mouth. My quick
thinking had saved me.
Samuela became frightened, but deep in his heart he knew that the Lord would protect us from
our enemies. I tumed to the attacker and asked, "What happened to you? I thought you were trying
to kill me and stop the work of the Lord here in Fahefa. You forgot that we are here to do the work
of the Lord. I'm very sorry for what happened."
We finished our final discussions, shook hands with those present, and continued on our way
that night.
80
I received my very first missionary companion Samuela Loholoho Vehikite (a cousin) from
Otea Island and hi s wife was Elisapesi Pasikala. Before we left for Fo'ui we just barely celebrated Our
baby Tisina's first birthday at Houma.
After my family and I left Fo'ui we went to Kolovai for our mi ssionary work. I remember how
those people there hated US when they found out we were an L.D.S. missionary family who had come
there to teach them about the church. On our very first ni ght at Kolovai , we slept in a community hal l.
We could see the moon and the stars through the holes in the rooftop, and through the large holes in
the wal ls. The floor was made of hard gravel. We shared one big long mat. All of the gi rl s had only '
one sheet to cover them; all the boys shared one blanket between them. To make matters worse,
someone came in and stole our covers while we were asleep that night. In the morning we got up, sang
our favorite hymn and opened with a prayer of gratitude for our safety that night.
ITEM II: Our First Area - Ha ' utu And Fahefa - 1942
Whil e our family was still living at Fo'ui , my companion Samuela Vehikite and I travel ed from
village to village doing missionary work. One afternoon we came to Ha' utu and Fahefa. Some men
were havi ng afai kava (a kava ceremony). A young woman would mi x some kava root for J 6 or 20
men in the village. As they drank thi s juice, they would visit one another. The younger men would
serenade the young lady with songs. This was a form of dating in Tonga. Sometimes they had afai
kava to invite visitors or newcomers to their village.
We asked if we could join the fai kava. This way we could talk about the Gospel of Jesus
Chri st. A man from the village invited us into hi s house. Everyone was sitting in a circle, with the
young lady seated at the fronl. My companion and I sat by the door, facing each other. I staned to
explain our reason for being there, and how we wished to tell them about the Gospel of Jes us Chri sl.
At that time mi ssionaries were allowed tofai kava.
A very large man, weighing about 250 pounds and 6 foot 4 inches tall , sat on my right. While
J was giving the discussion the man continued to talk, making a di sturbance. He turned to me and
asked, "Why don't you shut up and get lost?" I had been given permission by the head of the house
to speak, so I regained the group's attention and continued teaching.
The man, enraged at being ignored, started to grab me and shake me. He then grasped my throat
in hi s huge hands and tried to choke me. I had some experience in self defense that served me well.
I pulled the man's thumbs down and twisted them in the wrong direction, almost breaking them. The
extreme pain made the man let go of my neck and he cried out, "Oh no, oh no, you've broken my
arms." He sal upon the floor and held his hands down, dripping saliva from hi s mouth. My quick
thinking had saved me.
Samuela became frightened, but deep in his heart he knew that the Lord would protect us from
our enemies. I turned to the attacker and asked, "What happened to you? I thought you were trying
to kill me and stop the work of the Lord here in Fahefa. You forgot that we are here to do the work
of the Lord. I'm very sorry for what happened."
We finished our final di scussions, shook hands with those present, and continued on our way
that nighl.
81
ITEM III: At Kolovai. Tongatapu. Tonga
After my family and I left Fo'ui we went to Kolovai for our missionary work. I remember how
those people there hated us when they found out we were an L.D.S. missionary family who had come
there to teach them about the church. On our veiy first night at Kolovai, we slept in a community hall.
We could see the moon and the stars through the holes in the rooftop, and through the large holes in
the walls. The floor was made of hard gravel. We shared one big long mat. All of the girls had only
one sheet to cover them; all the boys shared one blanket between them. To make matters worse,
someone came in and stole our covers while we were asleep that night. In the moming we got up, sang
our favorite hymn and opened with a prayer of gratitude for our safety that night.
ITEM IV: A Special Blessing:
When our family arrived at Fo'ui there were two special families who lived there. The family
of Sister Me Mata'ele was one, the other was the family of her elder sister Makeleta Fine. Every day
before those two families would eat their daily meals, they would send a plate of food for us to eat.
There were no funds, money, or food provided for any missionary family. We had planted a plantation
for our food, but it would take about six months for it to be ready to harvest. We ate only breadfruit
out of Sione Finau's breadfruit trees.
One day we didn't know where the next meal would come from. A non-member, Tevita Pau'u
from Fo'ui came by and gave us 10/-(shillings). That was a lot of money for us. He said that it might
be of some help for the children.
Another day our kerosene lamp was empty, the soap was gone, and there was no food. I was
so tired of eating breadfruit every day, though I didn't complain. That afternoon, a man that we had
never seen nor met before came with a big horse-drawn buggy and asked, "Is lohani home?"
Salote answered, "No, lohani had to go and do his missionary trading."
He then said, "Here is some food for your family."
I thanked him and said, "Can you please unload them at our kitchen area?" To my surprise I
looked over and saw these long and beautiful ufi called kahokaho, the kind given to the royal family,
and they were brought for us to eat. There were hopa bananas and even live chickens. He never told
us who he was. After unloading the buggy, he smiled and left.
The day came that we ran out of our laundry soap. Salote and our daughters went out by the
beach and hunted for a special kind of tree from which they scraped the bark. They made home-made
suds for our laundry. They also used it to bathe with and shampoo their hair. Dishes were washed
with it also.
Three months passed and all our food was gone. That evening a United States army jeep drove
over to our home and asked, "Is this the missionary home?"
Salote answered, "Yes." The two men smiled at us and they started to empty out their little
jeep. They had brought 100 pounds of flour, 50 pounds of sugar, 100 pounds of rice, and 25 bottles
of oil; they also gave us soap. An African American soldier brought in peanut butter, jam and candies.
We were so happy. Again we were blessed with food and supplies. We never knew where these U.S.
men in uniform had come from, nor did we know how they found out about our shortage of food.
81
ITEM ill: At Kolovai. Tongatapu. Tonga
After my family and I left Fo'ui we went to Kolovai for our miss ionary work. I remember how
those people there hated us when they fou nd out we were an LD.S. missionary famil y who had come
there to teach them about the church. On our very first ni ght at Kolovai, we slept in a community hal l.
We could see the moon and the stars through the hol es in the rooftop, and through the large holes in
the wall s. The floor was made of hard gravel. We shared one big long mat. All of the girl s had onl y
one sheet to cover them; all the boys shared one blanket between them. To make matters worse,
someone came in and stole our covers whil e we were asleep that niollt In the mornino we oot up sana
b . 0 b , b
our favorite hymn and opened wit h a prayer of gratitude for our safety that night.
ITEM IV: A Special Blessing:
When our family arrived at Fo'ui there were two special families who li ved there. The family
of Si ster Me Mata'ele was one, the other was the family of her elder sister Makeleta Fine. Every day
before those two fami li es would eat their daily meals, they would send a plate of food for us to eat.
There were no funds, money, or food provided for any missionary fami ly. We had planted a plantation
for our food, but it would take about six :nonths for it to be ready to harvest. We ate only breadfruit
out of Sione Finau 's breadfruit trees.
One day we didn't know where the next meal would come from. A non-member, Tevita Pau'u
from Fo'ui came by and gave us 10/-(shillings). That was a lot of money for us. He said that it might
be of some help for the chi ldreJ1.
Another day our kerosene lamp was empty, the soap was gone, and there was no food. I was
so tired of eating breadfruit every day, though I didn't complain. That afternoon, a man that we had
never seen nor met before came with a big horse-drawn buggy and asked, "Is Iohani home?"
Salote answered, "No, Iohani had to go and do hi s missionary tracting."
He then said, "Here is some food for your family."
I thanked him and said, "Can you please unload them at our kitchen area?" To my surprise I
looked over and saw these long and beautiful uli called kahokaho, the kind given to the royal fami ly,
and they were brought for us to eat. There were hopa bananas and even live chickens. He never told
us who he was. After unl oading the buggy, he smil ed and left.
The day came that we ran out of our laundry soap. Salote and our daughters went out by the
beach and hunted for a special kind of tree from which they scraped the bark. They made home-made
suds for our laundry. They also used it to bathe with and shampoo their hair. Dishes were washed
with it al so.
Three months passed and all our food was gone. That evening a United States army jeep drove
over to our home and asked, "Is thi s the missionary home?"
Salote answered, "Yes." The two men smiled at us and they started to empty out their little
jeep. They had brought 100 pounds of flour, 50 pounds of sugar, 100 pounds of rice, and 25 bottles
of oil ; they also gave us soap. An African American soldier brought in peanut butter,jam and candies.
We were so happy. Again we were blessed with food and supplies. We never knew where these U.S.
men in unifornl had come from, nor did we know how they found out about our shortage of food.
82
I'm sure through the difficult time we experienced on our mission, the accident with Tisina, the
sickness and hardships, we leamed many things. These difficulties helped us to grow and develop, and
were good for us. I'm sure the Lord must have touched the hearts of these people in our time of need.
1 hope and pray that someday we may be able to retum this love and appreciation to someone else in
need of these blessings.
Sometimes we would grow hungry for some ripe bananas or taro and sugar cane. Along would
come Uncle Samuela and Aunty Helene Fakatou with all these fruits and food. How we were blessed
to be missionaries.
ITEM V: Trading at Ha'atafu - 1942
Our family was residing in the Fo'ui Branch. I was acting as branch president as well as a
proselyting missionary. One day I was delivering church tracts to many people in the village of
Ha'atafu in Hihifo district. My teachings were unheeded by those I contacted. During the afternoon,
as I traveled alone, I became hungry and tired, having been out all day without nourishment of any
kind. I arrived at the end of this particular village very discouraged. I noticed a husky 275 pound man,
of middle age, cutting his grass in the front yard. I asked him if I might visit with him, and tell him
about the Church. The man laid down his large, sharp, machete and sat down.
The man's first question related to why the Mormon Church baptized only the adults and those
over eight years of age and not the babies? I answered, "We follow the teachings that are in the Bible.
If they repent from their sins and are baptized in the name of Jesus Christ, their sins are forgiven, and
they become members of His church. Babies and small children have no need for baptism because of
their innocence. Their minds are clean and pure." At thc same time I continued, "I'll find you the
scripture in the Bible, to prove our point of view."
Just then the man got up and said, "You're wrong, I don't believe a word you are saying. I'm
a preacher for the Methodist church and I've studied the Bible more than you have." He got up and
grabbed his machete and said, "Right now I'm going to kill you." He swung the knife from behind my
back and it came down towards my head. I knew the man was serious. Fortunately, in my youth I was
taught self protection. I quickly grabbed the man's hand and twisted very hard. This caused enough
pain to the man that I was able to take the knife from him.
I looked into the man's eyes and asked, "What makes you so upset at our discussion? You
asked me a question and while I was trying to find the scripture to prove my point, you almost killed
me?"
The man felt so guilty, and replied, saying, "I lost my head. Now we can sit down and talk
some more." I finished the discussion, shook the man's hand, and went on my way.
ITEM VI: A Tomado at Fo'ui
Motulalo Tonga with his wife Lea were missionaries like Samuela Vehikite. He was my
companion and we had a lot of appointments at Hihifo district. One day we went to visit some
families at Nukunuku, some at Masilamea, some at Te'ekiu, and our last appointment was at Fahefa.
In our missionary work we also visited the villages of Utulau, Ha'akame and Ha'alalo. We walked
and went to every town and village without shoes, food or drink. There was no tar on the road, just
82
I'm sure through the difficult time we experienced on our mission, the accident with Tisina, the
sickness and hardsh ips, we learned many things. These diffi culties helped us to grow and develop, and
were good for li S. I'm sure the Lord must have touched the hearts of these people in our time of need.
I hope and pray that someday we may be able to return thi s love and appreciation to someone else in
need of these blessings.
Sometimes we would grow hungry for some ripe bananas or taro and sugar cane. Along would
come Uncle Samuela and Aunty Helene Fakatou with all these fruits and food. How we were blessed
to be missionaries.
ITEM V: Tracti ng at Ha' atafu - 1942
Our famil y was residing in the Fo' ui Branch. I was acting as branch president as well as a
proselyting mi ssionary. One day I was delivering church tracts to many people in the village of
Ha'atafu in Hihifo di strict. My teachings were unheeded by those I contacted. During the afternoon,
as I traveled alone, I became hungry and tired, having been out all day wi thout nourishment of any
kind. I arrived at the end of thi s particular village very di scouraged. I noticed a husky 275 pound man,
of middle age, cutti ng hi s grass in the front yard. I asked him if I might visit with him, and tell him
about the Church. The man laid down hi s large, sharp, machete and sat down.
The man's first question related to why the Mormon Church baptized onl y the adults and those
over eight years of age and not the babies? I answered, "We foll ow the teachings that are in the Bib/e.
If they repent from their sins and are baptized in the name of Jesus Christ, their sins are forgiven, and
they become members of His church. Babies and small children have no need for bapti sm because of
their innocence. Their minds are clean and pure. " At the same time I continued, "I'll fi nd you the
scripture in the Bib/e, to prove our point of view."
Just then the man got up and said, "You're wrong, I don't believe a word you are saying. I'm
a preacher for the Methodist church and I've studi ed the Bible more than you have." He got up and
grabbed hi s machete and said, "Right now I'm going to ki ll you." He swung the knife from behind my
back and it came down towards my head. I knew the man was serious. Fortunately, in my youth I was
taught self protection. I qui ckly grabbed the man's hand and twi sted very hard. This caused enough
pai n to the man that I was able to take the knife from him.
I looked into the man's eyes and asked, "What makes you so upset at our discussion? You
asked me a question and while I was trying to find the scripture to prove my point, you almost ki lled
me?"
The man felt so guil ty, and replied, saying, "1 lost my head. Now we can sit down and talk
some more," I fini shed the discussion, shook the man's hand, and went on my way.
ITEM VI: A Tornado at Fo' ui
Motulalo Tonga with hi s wife Lea were missionari es li ke Samuela Vehikite. He was my
companion and we had a lot of appointments at Hihifo di strict. One day we went to visit some
families at Nukunuku, some at Masil amea, some at Te'ekiu, and our last appointment was at Fahefa.
III our missionary work we also vi sited the villages of Utulau, Ha' akame and Ha'alalo. We wal ked
and went to every town and vi llage without shoes, food or drink. There was no tar on the road, just
83
hard coral and more rocks. After our appointment we started trading from house to house and wanted
to arrange for a street meeting the following night. We finally held one at Te'ekiu. We didn't find too
many men around. Some of them were out to sea fishing, some of them were busy with copra.
Women were busy making tapa cloth and weaving mats. Children were at school.
Retuming through Matahau we were tired and looked up Inoke Mataele, our friend who had
been partially blind since birth, with very restricted eyesight in only one eye. He was a very active
member of the church. I asked Inoke's wife Lavinia if they had a little extra food for us to eat and
drink before walking back to Fo'ui. Inoke was happy that the missionaries had stopped by. He sent
Lavinia to get us two plates of food and some green coconuts to drink. Inoke's second wife Lavinia
is a cousin to my wife. That's why we stopped at their home, as missionaries often do in Tonga.
We thanked them for the meal and rest, but before leaving we went to moke's plantation to
replant a few taro plants in exchange for the food we had received. We took two hoes and started to
plant the crop. As I came to the fourth row of taro, I put my hoe down. I could see something in front
of me that looked like a TV screen. 1 could see my children laying on the floor in our house at Fo'ui.
It looked like they were asleep but I could see cuts, and blood, and in a few seconds the image was
gone from my sight. I thanked Motulalo Tonga for going with me that day, and said I would get back
with him later, but that I'd just seen something happening to my children at Fo'ui.
I ran from Matahau through Nukunuku, Te'ekiu, Masilamea clear back to Fo'ui as fast as I
could go. The first thing I wanted to see was where the children were at this time. There was no
problem. They were all asleep jnside our house on the floor. No one was hurt or anything like that,
no broken bones nor was anyone bleeding. I said to myself, "Strange thing that I saw at Matahau, and
now our children seem to be just fine."
At this time I heard a still small voice saying, "lohani, remove the children outside at once."
Salote was looking over from the kitchen fixing the breadfruit dinner for the family. She couldn't
believe what she was seeing. She saw me grab the children one by one and toss them out the door.
I called for Salote to hurry and grab the children. She didn't know why I was getting the children out.
At this time rain started to fall and Salote said, "Are you out of your mind putting the children
outside. Can't you see it's raining now?"
All Salote got from me was, "We do not have enough time." As the last one was tossed out,
I remembered our big home-made trunk that carried everything that we owned-clothing, Bible,
missionary books, histories and genealogy. That was the last thing to come out.
It didn't take more than two minutes to get us to this point. There was no wind, but we saw
a great big round whirlwind dive down right on top of our house. It broke the house in half, twisted
and twisted round and round and broke the main poles that held up the house. Half of the house was
carried away with the whirlwind. The rest, including 300 single heavy coconut poles being stored
inside our living room area, all fell down and landed where the children had been asleep only seconds
before. These poles were being prepared by the local members to use for a new chapel.
If I had ignored the warning that came to me everyone of us might be dead by now. We are
so grateful for the seventh article of faith that says we believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy,
revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, etc.
83
hard coral and more rocks. After our appointment we started tracti ng from house to house and wanted
to arrange for a street meeti ng the foll owing ni ght. We final ly held one at Te 'ekiu. We didn't find too
many men around. Some of them were out to sea fishing, some of them were busy with copra.
Women were busy making tapa cloth and weaving mats. Chi ldren were at school.
Returning through Matahau we were tired and looked up Inoke Mataele, our friend who had
been partiall y blind since birth, wi th very restricted eyesight in only one eye. He was a very active
member of the church. I asked Inoke' s wife Lavinia if they had a little extra food for us to eat and
dri nk before walking back to Fo' ui . Inoke was happy that the missionaries had stopped by. He sent
Lavi nia to get us two plates of food and some green coconuts to drink. Inoke's second wife Lavinia
is a cousi n to my wife. That 's why we stopped at their home, as mi ssionaries often do in Tonga.
We thanked them for the meal and rest, but before leaving we went to Inoke's plantation to
replant a few taro plants in exchange for the food we had received. We took two hoes and started to
plant the crop. As I came to the fourth row of laro, I put my hoe down.l could see something in front
of me that looked li ke a TV screen. I could see my children laying on the floor in our house at Fo'ui.
It looked like they were as leep but I could see cuts, and blood, and in a few seconds the image was
gone from my sight. I thanked MOllllalo ;onga for going with me that day, and said I would get back
with him later, but that I'd j ust seen something happening to my children at Fo'ui.
I ran from Matahau through Nukunuku, Te'ekiu, Masilamea clear back to Fo'ui as fast as I
could go. The first thing I wanted to see was where the children were at thi s time. There was no
problem. They were all asleep ,inside our house on the floor. No one was hurt or anyt hing like that,
no broken bones nor was anyone bleeding. I said to myself, "Strange thing that I saw at Matahau, and
now our chil dren seem to be j ust fine."
At thi s time I heard a still small voice saying, "Iohani, remove the children outside at once."
Salote was looking over from the kitchen fixing the breadfruit dinner for the family. She couldn't
believe what she was seeing. She saw me grab the children one by one and toss them out the door.
I call ed for Salote to hurry and grab the children. She didn't know why I was getting the chi ldren out.
At this time rain started to fall and Salote said, "Are you out of your mind putting the children
outside. Can' t you see it's raining now?"
All Salote got from me was, "We do not have enough time." As the last one was tossed out,
I remembered our big home-made trunk that carried everything that we owned---dothing, Bible,
missionary books, hi stories and genealogy. That was the last thing to come out.
It didn't take more than two minutes to get us to this point. There was no wind, but we saw
a great big round whirlwind dive down right on top of our house. It broke the house in half, twi sted
and twisted round and round and broke the main poles that held up the house. Hal f of the house was
carried away with the whirlwind. The rest, including 300 si ngle heavy coconut poles being stored
inside our li ving room area, all fell down and landed where the children had been as leep only seconds
before. These poles were being prepared by the local members to use for a new chapel.
If! had ionored the warnino that came to me. everyone of us might be dead by now. We are
<> <>
so grateful for the seventh article of faith that says we believe in the gift of tongues, prophecy,
revelation, visions, healing, interpretation of tongues, etc.
84
ITEM VB: Assisting the War Effort - 1942
At this time I remember they had over 7,000 American servicemen come to protect us from the
Japanese (our enemies at the time). Most of the stores weren't allowed to be opened any more.
Salote's uncle Samuela Fakatou had a pig farm near his home at Mapelu moe Lau. There were
a lot of different camps for the U.S. servicemen surrounding his home. All the trucks were painted
green so the enemy couldn't see them. The people were told to stay indoors and not have any light on
at night. They also must dig a foxhole in the ground for a bomb shelter (in case the enemy dropped
a bomb on the island, they were to run and hide inside their fox hole).
Uncle Samuela asked the American servicemen if he could have any leftover or waste food for
his pigs to eat. They said they would bring it to him the next afternoon. To our surprise, when the
truck came, they brought a few cases of jam, peanut butter, butter, dehydrated potatoes, rice, flour, and
sugar. Most ofthe food wasn't even opened yet and still in safe boxes. The pigs finally got their meal.
There were lots of loose knives, spoons, and forks. Salote saw something very special-some white
rags that the American soldiers used to clean their guns with. Some were used for wiping tables.
Some cloths were used to wrap their beef, mutton, and pork with. There were flour sacks, rice sacks,
sugar sacks. It was like a gold mine for my mother. She started to collect them, boil them, put blueing
liquid on them, then she began to iron them, cut the material up and made the children a lot of
beautiful white clothing-pants, shirts, dresses, underwear, and petticoats. We were on cloud nine.
What a joy that was. My mother was one of the best seamstresses in town. Aunty Helene Fakatou,
Uncle Charles Sanft and Uncle Rudy Wolfgramm also did excellent sewing.
Our little baby Samuela Fakatou Wolfgramm now had a lot of nice clothes to wear. My mother
used to take four to six pieces of rice or flour sacks, take them apart, then make us a big sheet for our
bed. Not only sheets, but we were able to have enough material for new pillow cases as well. She
took the heavy white rags and cut them up for pants for the children, and the white stretch fabric she
used for baby t-shirts. Salote was able to make new diapers for the baby too. Mother also shared the
clothes with other families who needed them. We do love and appreciate the American soldiers. They
had big hearts. They loved us and we loved them. They always brought treats for the children and
were willing to help us at any time.
At the time of the arrival of the American soldiers in Tonga, I had a very special calling from
the mission president Emil Dunn. I was asked to help the Army build a new hospital at Houma for the
Red Cross. Then I was asked to build another hospital in Fua'amotu. I was asked to help them build
at their different camps. I built stores to store all their food, and so on. I was asked to build a machine
at each barrack that could change different coins for the U.S. men. I did the best job I knew how and
gave my all. This was while serving our mission at Fo'ui, but I donated all my time to help the
Americans who were kind enough to come and protect Tonga at that time. That was my part time
missionary work for the Lord. Without money in the mission field, I could easily have asked for a pay
job, but it never crossed my mind. I saw that the money brought to the island was for the servicemen's
paycheck. The one in charge had me care for the money until the money machine was completed. I
never thought of helping myself to it. In fact if I had a little extra money from making copra, I would
walk barefooted from Fo'ui to Fua'amotu, a distance of 18 miles to pay the mission president my
tithing. If even 1/- (shilling) or 10/- (shillings) I never missed our tithing.
84
ITEM VI1: Assist ing the War Effort - 1942
At thi s time I remember they had over 7,000 American servicemen come to protect us from the
Japanese (our enemies at the time). Most of the stores weren ' t allowed to be opened any more.
Salote' s uncle Samuela Fakatou had a pig faIm near his home at Mapelu moe Lau. There were
a lot of different camps for the U.S. servicemen surroundi ng his home. All the trucks were painted
green so the enemy couldn't see them. The people were told to stay indoors and not have any li ght on
at ni ght. They al so must dig a fox hole in the ground for a bomb shelter (in case the enemy dropped
a bomb on the island, they were to run and hide inside their fox hole).
Uncle Samuela asked the American servicemen if he coul d have any leftover or waste food for
hi s pigs to eat. They said they woul d bring it to him the next afternoon. To our surpri se, when the
truck came, they brought a few cases of jam, peanut butter, butter, dehydrated potatoes, rice, flour, and
sugar. Most orthe food wasn' t even opened yet and sti ll in safe boxes. The pigs finall y got their meal.
There were lots of loose knives, spoons, and forks. Salote saw something very special- some whi te
rags that the Ameri can soldiers used to clean their guns with. Some were used for wiping tables.
Some cloths were used to wrap their beef, mutton, and pork with. There were flour sacks, rice sacks,
sugar sacks. It was li ke a gold mine for my mother. She started to collect them. boi l them, put blueing
liquid on them. then she began to iron them, cut the material up and made the chil dren a lot of
beautiful white clothing- pants, shirts, dresses, underwear, and petticoats. We were on cloud ni ne.
What a joy that was. My mother was one of the best seamstresses in town. Aunty Helene Fakatou,
Uncle Charl es Sanft and Uncle Rudy Wolfgramm also did excellent sewing.
Our little baby Samuela Fakatou Wolfgramm now had a lot ofnice clothes to wear. My mother
used to take four to six pieces of rice or flour sacks, take them apart, then make us a big sheet for our
bed. Not only sheets, but we were able to have enough material for new pi ll ow cases as well. She
took the heavy white rags and cut them up for pants for the children, and the white stretch fabri c she
used for baby t-shirts. Salote was able to make new diapers for the baby too. Mother also shared the
clothes with other families who needed them. We do love and appreciate the American soldiers. They
had bi g hearts. They loved us and we loved them. They al ways brought treats for the children and
were willing to help us at any time.
At the time of the 3ITival of the American soldiers in Tonga, I had a very special calling from
the mi ssion president Emil Dunn. I was asked to help the Army build a new hospital at Houma for the
Red Cross. Then I was asked to build another hospital in Fua' amolU. I was asked to help them buil d
at their different camps. I buil t stores to store all theirfood, and so on. I was asked to build a machine
at each barrack that could change different coins for the U.S. men. I did the best job I knew how and
gave my all. Thi s was while serving our mi ssion at Fo' ui , but I donated all my time to help the
Ameri cans who were kind enough to come and protect Tonga at that time. That was my part time
mi ssionary work for the Lord. Without money in the mi ssion field, I could easi Iy have asked for a pay
j ob, but it never crossed my mind. I saw that the money brought to the island was for the servicemen's
paycheck. The one in charge had me care for the money until the money machine was completed. I
never thought of helping myself to it. In fact if! had a little extra money from making copra, I would
walk barefooted from Fo'ui to Fua'amotu, a di stance of 18 miles to pay the mission president my
tithing. If even 1/- (shilling) or 10/- (shillings) I never mi ssed our tithing.
85
We always knew when we did the right thing, many blessings would be given us. Every
needful thing that our family ever needed surprisingly came in our hour of need. The Lord gave us
special laws that we must follow and it's up to us to decide if we follow Him and receive the blessing
or not. I know our family has been blessed and protected from fire, hurricanes, earthquakes and
tornadoes. It's amazing, and I'm sure when the Lord destroys the wicked with water as in the time of
Noah, those that are tithed will be protected.
He also gave Noah the rainbow in the heavens as a sign or a covenant that the earth will not
be destroyed with water again, but with fire. Those who listen to the voice ofthe prophets, who lead
and direct us, have been wamed to give our tenth to the Lord so we can have the Lord's insurance with
his chosen children. That's not much after he gives us our lives, his sunshine, rain, flowers, food,
animals, children, and everything that we have on this earth. All he wants back from us is only one
penny out of every ten pennies. We have 9 pennies to ourselves and only 1 cent to the Lord. That's
all. That's not much.
ITEM VIB: War Years at Fo'ui - 1942
In the town of Fo'ui, a surveyor boat belonging to the United States of America arrived in 1942.
Vaka was the boat that brought an L.D.S. general to Tonga. Upon arrival, he inquired as to where he
might contact leaders of the Church there on the Island of Tonga, in the town of Fo'ui. First he met
the mission president in Nuku'alofa. In Fo'ui he was referred to Maile Mataele, a church member, who
took the general to some ofthe church meetings. He explained to the church members that the reason
for his attendance was to let them know what would occur within the next few days on their island.
The Japanese would attack the island the next Tuesday, in six days. The United States had 7,000
troops who would land in a couple of days to protect the people and defend their island. New Zealand,
Australia, and Fiji troops would also come to help. They would be under the command of United
States generals. Four carriers would land these men and also all of their supplies, trucks, jeeps, food,
etc. on Friday night in boats. Among the personnel there would be doctors and nurses to care for the
wounded. The ammunition would stay on board, as the armed forces would go out in the ocean
Sunday to meet the Japanese for battle half way between New Zealand and Fiji. The general had come
early to familiarize himself with the entire island. He needed to be aware of the depth of the water
surrounding the beaches, and the depth ofthe wharfs.
The Tongan government had given permission for the U.S. troops to land while the battle was
in progress out in the ocean. Three thousand Marines were to land later on. For two days troops
roamed over the complete Island of Tonga, making themselves familiar with every part of it. They
walked, rode horses, used buses, cars and taxis. At this time I was the branch president at Fo'ui. I
obtained a pass which enabled me and my companion Samuela Vehikite to watch the unloading of
the supplies on Sunday. I had never seen so many sailors throughout the Island of Tonga. The
troops would be on the island two days to protect it, then most of them would go out on the warships
to fight the enemy, leaving the island on Sunday. The Japanese did not know of the United States'
plan to arrive at the Island early and be ready for them. The general told the people they must prepare
to protect themselves by digging places in the bush to live. Every beach must be protected. The troops
helped families dig trenches and holes any place where they could not be spotted from the air or by
land by the enemy. Their lives were in great danger.
85
We always knew when we did the right thing, many blessings woul d be given us. Every
needful thing that our famil y ever needed surpri si ngly came in our hour of need. The Lord gave us
special laws that we must follow and it's up to us to decide if we follow Him and receive the blessing
or not. I know our fami ly has been blessed and protected from fire, hurricanes, earthquakes and
tomadoes. It 's amazing, and I'm sure when the Lord destroys the wicked with water as in the time of
Noah, those that are tithed will be protected.
He al so gave Noah the rainbow in the heavens as a sign or a covenant that the earth wi ll not
be destroyed with water again, but with fire. Those who li sten to the voice of the prophets, who lead
and direct us, have been warned to give our tenth to the Lord so we can have the Lord's insurance with
hi s chosen children. That' s not much after he gives us our lives, hi s sunshine, rain, flowers, food,
animals, children, and everything that we have on thi s earth. All he wants back from us is only one
penny out of every ten pennies. We have 9 pennies to ourselves and only I cent to the Lord. That's
all. That's not much.
ITEM Vill: War Years at Fo'ui - 1942
In the town ofFo' ui , a surveyor boat belonging to the United States of America anived in 1942.
Vaka was the boat that brought an L.D.S. general to Tonga. Upon arri val, he inquired as to where he
mi ght contact leaders of the Church there on the Island of Tonga, in the town of Fo'ui. Fi rst he met
the mi ssion president in Nuku'alofa. In Fo'ui he was referred to Maile Mataele, a church member. who
took the general to some of the church meetings. He explained to the church members that the reason
for his attendance was to let them know what would occur within the next few days on their island.
The Japanese would attack the island the next Tuesday, in six days. The United States had 7,000
troops who would land in a couple of days to protect the people and defend their island. New Zealand,
Australia, and Fiji troops woul d also come to help. They would be under the command of United
States general s. Four carri ers would land these men and also all of their suppl ies, trucks, jeeps, food,
etc. on Friday ni ght in boats. Among the personnel there would be doctors and nurses to care for the
wounded. The ammunition would stay on board, as the armed forces would go out in the ocean
Sunday to meet the Japanese for battle halfway between New Zealand and Fiji. The general had come
early to familiarize himself with the entire island. He needed to be aware of the depth of the water
surrounding the beaches, and the depth of the whmfs.
The Tongan government had given permission for the U.S. troops to land while the battle was
in progress out in the ocean. Three thousand Marines were to land later on. For two days troops
roamed over the complete Island of Tonga, making themselves familiar wit h every part of it. They
walked, rode horses, used buses, cars and taxis. At this time I was the branch president at Fo'ui. I
obtained a pass wh ich enabled me and my companion Samuela Vehikite to watch the unloading of
the supplies on Sunday. I had never seen so many sailors throughout the Island of Tonga. The
troops would be on the island two days to protect it, then most of them would go out on the warships
to fight the enemy, leaving the island on Sunday. The Japanese did not know of the United States'
plan to arrive at the Isl and early and be ready for then I. The general told the people they must prepare
to protect themselves by digging places in the bush to live. Every beach must be protected. The troops
helped families di g trenches and holes any place where they could not be spotted from the air or by
land by the enemy. Their li ves were in great danger.
86
Camps for the troops were scattered throughout different areas in Tongatapu. Royalty and
govemment were advised to leave the palace to find hiding places with the other inhabitants of the
island. At this time the queen was a widow. The queen moved to a cave, named Aho Nonou in
Fua'amotu behind the beach. Royalty had lived in this area for about two years. Samuela and I
witnessed the disembarkation ofthe troops. They arrived on the beaches, with guns in position to fire
upon the enemy, if any were nearby.
At the appointed time, sailors went ahead to fight the enemy. One of the pilots spotted a
Japanese oil boat. A bomb was dropped and as it hit it's target, the oil caught fire. The flame lighted
the whole island and ocean where the Japanese navy was hiding. Between Fiji and New Zealand eight
of the enemy boats were destroyed but seven managed to escape. Had not those defending the island
been prepared, these ships would have used Tongatapu as the center from which to fight, thus enabling
the Japanese to gain control of the battle. They were two days late, not knowing the plans of the
United States and other countries. New Zealand and Fiji were informed to keep an outlook for the
seven Japanese ships that escaped.
The general called mission president Emil Dunn to bring the best carpenter on the Island to
him. President Dunn asked me to bring five men with me from Fo'ui and to come to Nuku'alofa. I was
asked to construct a large building which would have offices for a Catholic Bishop, and an area large
enough for the United States Headquarters. There were to be offices for taking care of supplies,
payrolls for the troops, and a canteen, which would have a coin machine to enable the men to change
their dollars into smaller denominations. I had to build all these items.
I saw for the first time the currency and coins which made up the United States payroll. I had
never seen a silver dollar, half-dollar, nickel or dime or penny. Shelves, tables, benches, chairs, etc.
had to be built as quickly as possible. The generals, colonels, and other officers were seated for a
quick lunch when suddenly the wailing of the siren was heard. This was the signal of the enemy
approaching. Everyone ran for their lives. Business men grabbed their moneybags, leaving the doors
of their business houses open. Four of the colonels left their food, ran to their different headquarters
to issue orders for combat. One wealthy store owner jumped into the hiding place of a family to whom
he had previously been unkind, not feeling them quite as high in station as he, because of their lack
of materia] things of this life.
An airplane was circling in the air. People were asked to go and find a hiding place. Everyone
left Nuku'alofa for the bush. The United States colonel asked the Tongans to get off the road, not to
use it and to stand where they couldn't be seen by the enemy, and if possible, to run to their hiding
places and jump in and be very quiet. The U.S. army was kept busy firing at the plane in the air. They
received communication from the plane informing them that he was a New Zealand pilot who had
become confused and entered enemy lines and was trying to find his way back. The pilot's name was
Makai. During this time of confusion I came in where the food had been prepared for the general. I
looked over the table. Everything was so appetizing that I decided to help myself to the food they had
left behind. I was not concemed with any danger. After accepting the pilot's plea to be allowed to
land, the army personnel came back to finish their lunch. I was still eating. The colonel made me feel
welcome, and they continued their lunch, enjoying with good humor the mistake ofthe New Zealand
pilot.
86
Camps for the troops were scattered throughout different areas in Tongatapu. Royalty and
government were advised to leave the palace to find hiding places with the other inhabitants of the
island. At thi s time the queen was a widow. The queen moved to a cave, named Aho Nol'/ou in
Fua 'amotu behind the beach. Royalty had li ved in this area for about two years. Samuela and I
witnessed the di sembarkation of the troops. They arrived on the beaches, with guns in position to fire
upon the enemy, if any were nearby.
At the appointed time, sailors went ahead to fight the enemy. One of the pi lots spotted a
Japanese oil boat. A bomb was dropped and as it hit it's target, the oil caught fire. The flame li ghted
the whole island and ocean where the Japanese navy was hiding. Between Fiji and New Zealand eight
of the enemy boats were destroyed but seven managed to escape. Had not those defending the island
been prepared, these ships would have used Tongatapu as the center from which to fight, thus enabling
the Japanese to gain control of the battle. They were two days late, not knowing the plans of the
Uni ted States and other countries. New Zealand and Fiji were informed to keep an outlook for the
seven Japanese ships that escaped.
The general called mission president Emil Dunn to bring the best carpenter on the Island to
him. President Dunn asked me to bring five men with me from Fo'ui and to come to Nuku'alofa. I was
asked to construct a large building which would have offices for a Catholic Bishop, and an area large
enough for the United States Headquarters. There were to be offices for taking care of supplies,
payroll s for the troops, and a canteen, which would have a coi n machine to enable the men to change
their dollars into smaller denominations. I had to build all these items.
I saw for the first time the currency and coins which made up the United States payroll. I had
nevcr sccn a sil ver dollar, half-doll ar, nickel or dime or penny. Shelves, tables, benches, chairs, etc.
had to be built as quickly as possible. The generals, colonels, and other officers were seated for a
quick lunch when suddenly the wailing of the siren was heard. Thi s was the signal of the enemy
approaching. Everyone ran for their li ves. Business men grabbed thei.r moneybags, leaving the doors
of their business houses open. Four of the colonels left their food, ran to their different headquarters
to issue orders for combat. One wealthy store owner jumped into the hiding place of a fami ly to whom
he had previously been unkind, not feeling them quite as high in station as he, because of their lack
of material things of thi s life.
An airplane was circl ing in the air. People were asked to go and find a hiding place. Everyone
left Nuku'alofa for the bush. The United States colonel asked the Tongans to get off the road, not to
use it and to stand where they couldn' t be seen by the enemy, and if possible, to run to their hiding
places and jump in and be very quiet. The U.S. aImy was kept busy firing at the plane in the air. They
received communi cation from the plane informing them that he was a New Zealand pi lot who had
become confused and entered enemy lines and was trying to find hi s way back. The pilot's name was
Makai . During thi s time of confusion I came in where the food had been prepared for the general. I
looked over the table. Everything was so appetizing that I decided to help myself to the food they had
left behind. I was not concerned wi th any danger. After accepting the pilot's plea to be allowed to
land, the army personnel came back to finish their lunch. I was still eating. The colonel made me feel
welcome, and they continued their lunch, enjoying with good humor the mi stake of the New Zeal and
pil ot.
S7
The general asked me to go to another camp in Ma'ufaga for the Navy, for there was more work
to be done. President Dunn and I left for Ma'ufaga. Sometimes there were five or six men, and maybe
10 or 12 men in each tent. The camp contained 3,000 men. Pres. Dunn asked where the captain's
headquarters was located. While standing there, they observed the navy carrying their laundry towards
a little well. They tied a rope around their helmets and used them as buckets for well water. They
heated the water with fire made from left-over wood and leaves. Some were walking around in the
nude. They washed their clothing on wash boards. I was shocked and tumed to President Dunn and
asked, "President Dunn, is that what they do in the U.S., run around nude in the middle of towns and
villages?"
President Dunn answered, saying, "Don't worry, those people don't know any better." They
finally located the captain. He said they needed five men to help. I went out and returned with a
cousin Misitana Vea, a brother-in-law Saia Hola, and his brother-in-law Salesi. The other two were
Tali and Samuela Vehikite. They constructed seven huge U.S. buildings, taking only two weeks to
finish. These were the first to be built for the U.S. navy for their supplies and storage of all kinds of
food: rice, flour, sugar, meat, etc.
I made friends with a U.S. navy pilot. We enjoyed each other's friendship, and later, the pilot
took me for a plane ride and showed me how the plane maneuvered; how to tum the plane to the left
or right, and also how they released the bombs.
The captain told me to find 500 more men to build fifty hospitals for the U.S. army. I informed
him that I might find a few men, but certainly not 500. The captain wanted all different types of
buildings; some made like the figure "H", some like a "T". The dimensions were to be between 200
and 600 feet. After finishing all of these, President Dunn told me that I had helped the U.S. army
enough, and it was time for me to retum to my missionary labors. I retumed to Fo'ui and asked
Vaha'i's son, Solo, to take my place. At this time, the Tongans were paid by the U.S. army. When
I was working such long hours I received nothing. But I was grateful that was part of my missionary
work. Later many blessings came to us from the Americans in time of need.
Just about that time the firing of ammunition was heard at the beach at Kolonga. Everyone
said it was just a practice. I disagreed and said, "No, it is the enemy." In a short time the ships were
heard returning fire. Some people had been having a fai kava at the beach house. They all ran out.
A Japanese submarine had destroyed three ships at the Island of Eua, about 20 miles southeast ofthe
island of Tongatapu. The captain on one of these ships realized there was no way to save his ship,
hi order to save the lives of his men, many of whom were badly hurt, he decided to ram the boat into
the main wharf so it would be close enough to the beach to receive help in getting his men to shore.
Because of this decision, over half of his men were saved from drowning. A friend and I helped repair
the damage to the wharf the next day.
The next Sunday, I was asked to come and speak at Fua'amotu. Two U.S. navy sailors attended
the meeting. George was a military police officer who was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints; the other man had been hurt in battle and was not a member, but enjoyed helping
the missionaries, and at this time gave me 12 dollars as a gift.
87
The general asked me to go to another camp in Ma'ufaga forthe Navy, forth ere was more work
to be done. President Dunn and I left for Ma'ufaga. Sometimes there were five or six men, and maybe
10 or 12 men in each tent. The camp contained 3,000 men. Pres. Dunn asked where the captain's
headquarters was located. Whil e standing there, they observed the navy carrying their laundry towards
a little well. They tied a rope around their helmets and used them as buckets for well water. They
heated the water with fire made from left-over wood and leaves. Some were walking around in the
nude. They washed their clothing on wash boards. I was shocked and turned to President Dunn and
asked, "President Dunn, is that what they do in the U.S., run around nude in the middle of towns and
vill ages?"
President Dunn answered, saying, "Don't won'y, those people don't know any better." They
finall y located the captain. He said they needed tive men to help. I went out and returned with a
cousin Misitana Yea, a brother-in-law Saia Hola, and hi s brother-in-law Salesi. The other two were
Tali and Samuela Yehi kite. They constructed seven huge U.S. buildings, taking only two weeks to
fi nish. These were the fi rst to be bui lt for the U.S. navy for their supplies and storage of all kinds of
food: ri ce, fl our, sugar, meat, etc.
I made fri ends with a U.S. navy pilot. We enjoyed each other's friendship, and later, the pilot
took me for a plane ride and showed me how the plane maneuvered; how to turn the plane to the left
or right, and also how they released the bombs.
The captain told me to find 500 more men to build fifty hospitals for the U.S. army. I informed
him that I might find a few myn, but certainly not 500. The captain wanted all different types of
buildings; some made like the figure "H", some like a "T". The dimensions were to be between 200
and 600 feet. After fini shing all of these, President Dunn told me that I had helped the U.S. army
enough, and it was time for me to return to my missionary labors. I returned to Fo'ui and asked
Yaha'i's son, Solo, to take my place. At thi s time, the Tongans were paid by the U.S. army. When
I was working such long hours I received nothing. But I was grateful that was part of my missionary
work. Later many blessings came to us from the Americans in time of need.
Just about that time the firing of ammuniti on was heard at the beach at Kolonga. Everyone
said it was j ust a practice. I disagreed and said, "No, it is the enemy." In a short time the ships were
heard returning fire. Some peopl e had been having afai kava at the beach house. They all ran out.
A Japanese submari ne had destroyed three ships at the Island of Eua, about 20 miles southeast of the
island of Tongatapu. The captain on one of these ships realized there was no way to save his shi p.
In order to save the I ives of hi s men, many of whom were badly hurt, he decided to ram the boat into
the main wharf so it would be close enough to the beach to receive help in getting hi s men to shore.
Because of this decision, over half of hi s men were saved from drowning. A friend and I helped repair
the damage to the whmf the next day.
The next Sunday, I was asked to come and speak at Fua'amotu. Two U.S. navy sai lors attended
the meeting. George was a military police officer who was a member of the Church of Jesus Chri st
of Latter-day Saints; the other man had been hurt in battle and was not a member, but enjoyed helping
the missionari es, and at this time gave me 12 dollars as a gift.
H.S
I went back a good many miles to take the money to President Dunn, even though the wounded
man had expected me to use it for my own use. President Dunn accepted the cash from me, and made
out a receipt for tithing to the Lord; he asked me to please find George at Fua'amotu and give him his
tithing receipt. So back again I hurried to the airport, looking for George. I was not allowed to enter
the gate, so I went to Sione Nau's house (a church member).
The camp had a door open at the back; most ofthe black navy men would gather there. I asked
them if I could see an American stationed there, as I needed to deliver something to him. They
answered, "Why not!". They opened the gate.
There were two guards, a Tongan and a New Zealander. They said to me, "It's past 6:00 p.m.
You are without a permit. You not only came at the wrong time, but at the wrong gate. You are a spy
and your punishment is death." I was told to hold my hands above my head, and they approached me
with rifles at firing positions.
I said, "I didn't come to see you, I came to see your officer in charge; take me to the head man,
he is the one I wish to see." Still distrustful of me, one guard walked behind me until we reached the
officer. He wanted an explanation. I informed him of me receiving money from George and my desire
to see him. The officer was understanding, and asked a New Zealand military policeman to take me
to the U.S. military police. I was very surprised and happy to be greeted by the same U.S. MP who
had attended Church when I had spoken on Sunday. He reached out with a smile and shook my hand
and said, "Brother Wolfgramm, come in." I was taken to George, and I told him that his money had
been paid as a tithing to the Lord, and President Dunn had written a receipt for the 12 dollars and had
asked me to deliver it to him. George was very thankful for the effort I had made to reach him.
On my way out of the gate, I recognized a friend, Ukumea, who was on guard at the time.
Ukumea ordered me to halt, but I didn't stop. Whenever a soldier commands you to halt, and again
repeats it the second and third time, he means business, and you should stop immediately. Ukumea
had not realized it was I and quickly came with his gun aimed at my heart. I grabbed him on his
stomach and said, "Are you really going to kill me?"
Ukumea in surprise answered, "lohani, what are you doing here?" We both had a laugh as we
were very good friends.
I said, "I saw you and was just kidding around."
ITEM IX: Missionary Life at Fo'ui. March - 1943
During our mission at the village of Fo'ui during World War B, all Tongans had left their
homes in the main town and were out hiding in the bush. We weren't allowed to light any fire or use
any lamp in the evening, but local missionaries were still allowed to leave on missions for other towns
or villages and check to see if any families were in need of help or assistance.
During this time our family was serving our mission at the village of Fo'ui in the westem
district of Tongatapu. We had six children at that time, Malina the oldest, Ana, Salesi, Taiana, Tisina
and baby Samuel. My missionary companion was Motulalo Tonga of Ha'apai Islands, and his wife
was Lea. They were laboring at the village of Fahefa in the westem district. Early one moming I got
up and walked over to the village of Fahefa, about four and a half miles away, and asked Motulalo
to go tracting with me. We left after our moming prayer, without any breakfast. We went from one
town to the next without any problems People were very happy to see us come, and it was a comfort
for them to see the missionaries come to their town.
88
I went back a good many miles to take the money to President Dunn, even though the wounded
man had expected me to use it for my own use. President Dunn accepted the cash from me, and made
out a receipt for tithing to the Lord; he asked me to please find George at Fua'amotu and give him hi s
tithing receipt. So back again I hUITied to the airport, looking for George. I was not all owed to enter
the gate, so I went to Sione Nau's house (a church member).
The camp had a door open at the back; most of the black navy men would gather there. I asked
them if I could see an Ameri can stationed there, as I needed to deliver something to him. They
answered, "Why not! ". They opened the gate.
There were two guards, a Tongan and a New Zealander. They said to me, "It's past 6:00 p.m.
You are without a permit. You not only came at the wrong time, but at the wrong gate. You are a spy
and your punishment is death." I was told to hold my hands above my head, and they approached me
with rifles at firing positions.
I said, "I didn't come to see you, I came to see your officer in charge; take me to the head man,
he is the one I wish to see." Still distrustful of me, one guard walked behind me until we reached the
officer. He wanted an explanation. I infOImed him of me receiving money from George and my desire
to see him. The officer was understanding, and asked a New Zealand military policeman to take me
to the U.S. military poli ce. I was very surprised and happy to be greeted by the same U.S. MP who
had attended Church when I had spoken on Sunday. He reached out with a smile and shook my hand
and said, "Brother Wolfgramm, come in. " I was taken to George, and I told him that hi s money had
been paid as a tithing to the Lord, and President Dunn had written a receipt for the 12 doll ars and had
asked me to deliver it to him. George was very thankful for the effort I had made to reach him.
On my way out of the gate, I recognized a friend, Ukumea, who was on guard at the time.
Uk umea ordered me to halt, but I didn't stop. Whenever a soldier commands you to halt, and again
repeats it the second and third time, he means business, and you should stop immediately. Ukumea
had not realized it was I and quickly came with hi s gun aimed at my heart. I grabbed him on hi s
stomach and said, "Are you really going to kill me?"
Ukumea in surpri se answered, "Iohani, what are you doing here?" We both had a laugh as we
were very good friends.
I said, "I saw you and was just kidding around."
ITEM IX: Missionary Life at Fo' ui . March - 1943
During our mi ssion at the village of Fo'ui during World War n, all Tongans had left their
homes in the main town and were out hiding in the bush. We weren't allowed to light any fire or use
any lamp in the evening, but local mi ssionaries were sti ll allowed to leave on missions for other towns
or villages and check to see if any fami lies were in need of help or assistance.
During thi s time our family was serving our mission at the village of Fo'ui in the western
district ofTongatapu. We had six children at that time, Malina the oldest, Ana, Salesi, Taiana, Ti sina
and baby Samuel. My missionary companion was Motulalo Tonga of Ha ' apai Islands, and hi s wife
was Lea. They were laboring at the vi llage of Fahefa in the western district. Early one morning I got
up and walked over to the vill age of Fahefa, about four and a half miles away, and asked Motulal o
to go tracting with me. We left after our morning prayer, without any breakfast. We went from one
town to the next without any problems People were very happy to see us come, and it was a comfort
for them to see the mi ssionaries come to their town.
89
At that time, we found a lot of men were out working on their plantations. Mothers were busy
weaving mats, children were busy collecting coconuts and gathering fruit and playing.
The Tongans were told if ever they heard sounds of an airplane to immediately leave their
home, gather their families, and hide in the dugout holes (fox holes) closest to them. Seeing the
American, New Zealand, and Australian soldiers who had come to protect all of us in Tonga, we were
very grateful. The children used to make up a song for the soldiers. The Tongan children didn't quite
understand the English language, but when they met or saw service men around that had white or dark
skin, they got so frightened. They would usually run behind their house to hide.
Most of the time the children's bodies would be infected with sores or boils and their heads
had lice. Unboiled water or water that had been contaminated by mice falling inside their cisterns, or
disease caused by mosquitoes made very unsanitary conditions under which they lived. So when
members met or saw the Elders Motulalo Tonga and I, they knew we were sent from our Heavenly
Father to assist them in their time of need or difficulties, so we were welcomed by them, but not
welcomed by the non-members.
Blessings were offered to some ofthe women who were about to give birth at that time, some
were given to some very ill families who were afraid to go to Nuku'alofa to the hospital to see a
doctor. Some non-members were taught the gospel. Some didn't welcome us and we were chased out
to the main street. But the missionaries had a way to calm and make peace with them. A few minutes
later those who chased us out were sorry, and we were again invited inside their home for more
discussions and later they were baptized and confirmed as members of the Church. This was how
missionary work was carried on in Tonga during World War D. All other missionaries were sent back
to New Zealand, including their wives and children, but Pres. Emil Dunn was still carrying on his
duties. Some of these Tongan missionaries continued to help at Tongatapu, including Epalahame
Tua'one and wife, Lilevai, Samuela Vehikite and Elisapesi, Motulalo Tonga and Lea and others at
Tongatapu as I remember. We have been so blessed in the Gospel and it was a blessing to help others
in their time of need.
ITEM X: Tisina Retumed to Life
By lohani Wolfgramm
I was finishing up the monthly reports for the Fo'ui Branch when the spirit told me to stop
and look out the window, but I was too busy. The second time the spirit spoke to me he said,
"lohani, stop now and look out the window." Still I went on working. The third time I felt like
someone was pushing me off the chair and told me to stop and look out the window. 1 was
surprised to see a group of people hovering over something in the road and rushed out to find my
family in trouble.
Many people, all at once, were trying to tell me what had happened, I could only see the
body of my little girl Tisina with her head crushed and lifeless body laying in the street.
My wife Salote had crossed the street to go to the home of Lolo and Mataele about 2:30 in
the aftemoon after sacrament meeting. Malina, Ana, Sale, and Tisina were told to wait until the
road was clear to cross. They couldn't figure out how Tisina came loose from Malina's hand and
tried to run after her mother, but she ran into the road and was hit by a car. The driver was
89
At that time, we found a lot of men were out working on their plantations. Mothers were busy
weaving mats, chil dren were busy coll ecting coconuts and gathering fru it and playi ng.
The Tongans were told if ever they heard sounds of an airplane to immediately leave their
home, gather their famili es, and hide in the dugout holes (fox holes) closest to them. Seeing the
Ameri can, New Zealand, and Australian soldiers who had come to protect all of us in Tonoa we were
'"
very grateful. The children used to make up a song for the soldiers. The Tongan children didn ' t qu ite
understand the Engli sh language, but when they met or saw service men around that had white or dark
ski n, they got so fri ghtened. They would usually run behind thei r house to hide.
Most of the time the chil dren' s bodies would be infected with sores or boil s and their heads
had lice. Unboil ed water or water that had been contaminated by mice fall ing inside their cisterns, or
disease caused by mosqui toes made very unsanitary conditions under which they lived. So when
members met or saw the Elders Motul alo Tonga and I, they knew we were sent from our Heavenly
Father to ass ist them in their time of need or difficulties, so we were welcomed by them, but not
welcomed by the non-members.
Blessings were offered to some of the women who were about to give birth at that time, some
were given to some very ill famili es wh;) were afraid to go to Nuku 'alofa to the hospital to see a
doctor. Some non-members were taught the gospel. Some didn ' t welcome US and we were chased out
to the main street. But the missionaries had a way to calm and make peace with them. A few minutes
later those who chased us out were sorry, and we were again invited inside their home for more
discussions and later they w e r ~ baptized and confirmed as members of the Church. This was how
mi ssionary work was carri ed on in Tonga during World War II. All other mi ssionaries were sent back
to New Zealand, including their wives and chi ldren, but Pres. Emil Dunn was stil l carrying on his
dut ies. Some of these Tongan mi ssionaries continued to help at Tongatapu, including Epalahame
Tua'one and wife, Lil evai, Samuela Vehikite and Eli sapesi , Motulalo Tonga and Lea and others at
Tongatapu as I remember. We have been so blessed in the Gospel and it was a blessing to help others
in their time of need.
ITEM X: Tisina Returned to Life
By / ohalli Wolfgramll1
I was fi nishing up the monthl y reports for the Fo'ui Branch when the spirit told me to stop
and look out the window, but I was too busy. The second time the spirit spoke to me he said,
"Iohani, stop now and look out the window." Still I went on working. The third time J felt like
someone was pushing me off the chair and told me to stop and look out the window. I was
surprised to see a group of people hovering over something in the road and rushed out to find my
fami ly in troubl e.
Many people, all at once, were trying to tell me what had happened, J could only see the
body of my little girl Tisina with her head crushed and lifeless body laying in the street.
My wife Salote had crossed the street to go to the home of Lolo and Mataele about 2:30 in
the afternoon after sacrament meeting. Malina, Ana, Sale, and Tisina were told to wait unti l the
road was clear to cross. They couldn't figure out how Tisina came loose from Malina's hand and
tried to run after her mother, but she ran into the road and was hit by a car. The driver was
90
unaware that he had hit Tisina and that her lifeless body was laying in the road. The next car was
full of American soldiers who had just retumed from a sight seeing tour of the village of Ha'atafu
and stopped immediately to help. Malina was the first one to try to pick Tisina's body off the
street. Sale ran to hold her little head up but was too scared. Ana ran over and started to lift
Tisina's body and saw the blood coming out through her mouth, nose, ears, and eyes. She was so
frightened she dropped her and ran off. Salote came running and saw the blood on her face. She
fainted by the roadway. Friends and neighbors came with a bucket of cold water to pour over
Salote's face, then she finally came out of it.
My missionary companion Samuela Vehikite brought a mat to carry Tisina's body inside
their house. A van arrived with American soldiers and offered to take Tisina back to the army
hospital at Houma where an American doctor could see what could be done for the child. I agreed,
so they put Tisina inside their truck and started for Houma about a mile away.
Though shocked, I finally got my composure and ran after the truck and said, "Please stop,
please. I just changed my mind. I forgot something very important to do for my daughter right
now." In my mind, I had forgotten to give Tisina a priesthood blessing. I asked the soldiers if they
would please back up their truck and bring Tisina into the home right away.
At this time, other churches had just barely let their members out from church. Sekona, a
Samoan, call out and said, "lohani, don't try to act like God, but send your daughter to the hospital
and see if a doctor can help her." Many were afraid and some were very upset with me, but I
understood something that non-members did not. I called Samuela Vehikite to assist me by
anointing the consecrated oil on Tisina's head, and as I began to utter the prayer, I couldn't say a
word. My mouth was locked. My mind was blank. No words would come, but in a few minutes
the spirit spoke to me in my mind that there were so many unbelievers in and out ofthe house that
had no faith that Tisina would ever recover from her accident, that I should send the people home.
I immediately opened my eyes and asked the people if they wanted Tisina to came back to
life to please leave my home now so we can pray for her. Oh my! Non-members were furious and
started to spit at me. Some picked up rocks and started throwing them at the house as they were
leaving, calling me names. I knew the American doctor might help Tisina walk again, but how
about her brain? I knew that only God who created her, who gave her life, would be the only who
that could help Tisina completely recover and bring her memory back to normal again.
I asked Salote to go ahead and fix supper for the family, but I would go and pray for Tisina.
I prayed and prayed and thanked the Lord for all his blessings to us, for sending us on the mission,
but how I wouldn't like to part with any of my children yet because we have no white material for
her burial nor funeral cloth in Tongatapu, but in Vava'u we did. I reminded the Lord of how he
saved the Israelites by parting the waters of the Red Sea, how Christ raised people from the dead,
and of the simple faith of a missionary who just had his daughter run over by a car and had been
killed, you can understand of my love for her. 1 reviewed how Lazarus was raised after being in
the tomb for four days, through faith and the power of the priesthood. I prayed and thanked the
Lord for those great prophets of old and their faith and special callings in the church from Adam
down to the prophet Joseph Smith. I said, "I don't want a funeral away from all my family, and if
this little girl has a special mission on the earth to do, please spare her life so she can fulfil that
blessing and her mission." I was on my knees over four hours that evening. Finally the Lord heard
my prayer and said to me, "Tisina won't be with you tonight, but tomorrow."
90
unaware that he had hit Tisina and that her lifeless body was laying in the road. The next car was
full of American soldi ers who had just returned from a sight seeing tour of the village of Ha' atafu
and stopped immediately to help. Malina was the first one to try to pick Tisina' s body off the
street. Sal e ran to hold her littl e head up but was too scared. Ana ran over and started to lift
Tisina's body and saw the blood coming out through her mouth, nose, ears, and eyes. She was so
fri ghtened she dropped her and ran off. Salote came running and saw the blood on her face. She
fainted by the roadway. Fri ends and neighbors came with a bucket of cold water to pour over
Salote's face, then she finally came out of it.
My mi ssionary companion Samuela Vehikite brought a mat to carry Ti sina 's body inside
their house. A van arrived with American soldiers and offered to take Tisina back to the army
hospital at Houma where an American doctor could see what could be done for the child. I agreed,
so they put Tisina insi de their truck and stalled for Houma about a mile away.
Though shocked, I finally got my composure and ran after the truck and said, "Please stop,
please. I just changed my mind. I forgot something very important to do for my daughter right
now." In my mind, I had forgotten to give Tisina a priesthood blessing. I asked the soldiers if they
would please back up their truck and bring Tisina into the home light away.
At thi s time, other churches had just barely let their members out from church. Sekona, a
Samoan, call out and said, "Iohani , don' t try to act like God, but send your daughter to the hospital
and see if a doctor can help her. " Many were afraid and some were very upset with me, but I
understood something that non-members did not. I called Samuel a Vehikite to assist me by
anointing the consecrated oil on Ti si na' s head, and as I began to utter the prayer, I couldn ' t say a
word. My mouth was locked. My mind was blank. No words would come, but in a few minutes
the spirit spoke to me in my mind that there werc so many unbelievers in and out or the house that
had no faith that Tisina would ever recover from her accident, that I should send the people home.
I immediately opened my eyes and asked the people if they wanted Ti sina to came back to
life to please leave my home now so we can pray for her. Oh my! Non-members were fUlious and
started to spit at me. Some picked up rocks and started throwing them at the house as they were
leaving, calling me names. I knew the American doctor mi ght help Ti sina walk again, but how
about her brain? I knew that only God who created her, who gave her life, would be the only who
that could help Tisina completely recover and bring her memory back to normal again.
I asked Salote to go ahead and fix supper for the family, but I would go and pray for Ti sina.
I prayed and prayed and thanked the Lord for all his blessings to us, for sendi ng us on the mi ssion,
but how I wouldn 't like to part with any of my children yet because we have no white material for
her burial nor funeral cloth in Tongatapu, but in Vava ' u we did. I reminded the Lord of how he
saved the Israeli tes by parting the waters of the Red Sea, how Christ raised people from the dead,
and of the simple faith of a missionary who just had hi s daughter run over by a car and had been
ki li ed, you can understand of my love for her. I reviewed how Lazarus was raised after being in
the tomb for four days, through fait h and the power of the pri esthood. I prayed and thanked the
Lord for those great prophets of old and their faith and special cal lings in the church from Adam
down to the prophet Joseph Smith. I said, "I don' t want a funeral away from all my family, and if
thi s li tt le girl has a special mi ssion on the earth to do, please spare her life so she can fulfil that
blessi ng and her mi ssion. " I was on my knees over fou r hours that evening. Finally the Lord heard
my prayer and said to me, "Ti sina won't be with you tonight, but tomorrow."
91
A humble and very sweet warm feeling came over my heart and a great worry and fear was
lifted from my shoulders that evening. I thanked God for the answer that I received. I opened my
eyes slowly, filled with deep gratitude and tears of joy. I went over to Salote and said, "Not
tonight, but tomorrow." Salote and the children didn't touch any food that evening. Everyone was
shocked and felt so bad about Tisina.
Samuela Vehikite and I waited and waited all night long, and about 3:00 a.m. we felt the
spirit fill our souls and knew that this was finally the right time for us to give Tisina her priesthood
blessing. Samuela Vehikite anointed her and I sealed the blessing. I thanked the Lord and
expressed his love to me in answering my prayers and said, "Tisina, by the power of the
Melchizedek Priesthood which we hold, we ask Thee, our Heavenly Father, to bless Tisina from
the top of her head all the way down to her toes, that every bone, muscle, nerve, blood vessel, skin,
nails, hair or any part of her body that has been broken, lost or damaged, through the power of the
priesthood which we hold we command it to retum to its normal place and start to function and to
do their work, that she will be able to stand and her body will be retumed and renewed with all its
parts and start to function as they were before. We promise you through the holy power of the
priesthood that when the sun rises in the morning, you will be raised up together with the sun. And
when other witnesses hear this testimony of Tisina, they will also testify that Jesus is the Christ and
through him the Lord healed Tisina. Not tonight, but tomorrow Tisina will walk with the rest of
the family as the spirit whispers."
After the blessing everyone knelt down before they went to bed and in a circle offered a
prayer, then we retired. I came in the room where Tisina still had her face covered with a cloth.
She was still dead. I picked her up and laid her little broken head on my arm and kept her body
close to me. Hours seemed to pass. I finally dozed off and on for about two more hours and about
6:00 a.m. I felt someone playing around my face and touching my hair. I slowly opened my eyes
and to my surprise saw Tisina standing up playing with my face and hair, with a big smile on her
face.
I slowly reached out to feel Tisina's head. It was normal. I started to feel her hands, legs,
face-everything that had been promised had come true. Samuela Vehikite remembered that in her
priesthood blessing that when the sun rose up in the moming she would be raised up together with
the sun. So he opened the window shades and sure enough, the sun had just barely risen in the sky.
How excited we were to have our little daughter back with us again. We sang a special
hymn to thank God for her retum, and said a long prayer of thanksgiving by me. A few minutes
later a knock came to our door. Our Aunt Marie and Uncle Maile Niu brought us Tisina's burial
clothing and her burial box and asked where the dead child was. I said she was the one that
answered the door. They were shocked and so relieved to know that the Lord had again blessed
our family during our mission at Fo'ui. Maile Niu asked me what would be a special wish Tisina
would like today? Tisina said, "Let's go for a picnic at the beach." So the family went to celebrate
at Hahake beach. I want to testify to any of you who might read this story that it is true.
There were a few people who joined the church in Tonga because of seeing how the hand
of the Lord caused miracles to be given to his children on this earth. When we exercise our trust
and faith in the Lord, our lives and family are blessed by him.
91
A humbl e and very sweet warm feel ing came over my heart and a great worry and fear was
lifted from my shoulders that evening. I thanked God for the answer that I received. I opened my
eyes slowly, filled with deep gratitude and tears of j oy. I went over to Salote and said, "Not
ton ight, but tomorrow. " Salote and the chil dren didn ' t touch any food that evening. Everyone was
shocked and felt so bad about Tisina.
Samuela Vehikite and I waited and waited all night long, and about 3:00 a.m. we felt the
spirit fill our soul s and knew that this was finally the right time for us to give Tisina her priesthood
blessing. Samuela Vehikite anointed her and I sealed the blessing. [ thanked the Lord and
expressed hi s love to me in answering my prayers and said, ' Ti sina, by the power of the
Melchizedek Priesthood which we hold, we ask Thee, our Heavenly Father, to bless Tisina from
the top of her head all the way down to her toes, that every bone, muscle, nerve, blood vessel, skin,
nails, hair or any part of her body that has been broken, lost or damaged, through the power of the
priesthood whi ch we hold we command it to return to its normal place and start to functi on and to
do their work, that she will be able to stand and her body will be returned and renewed wit h all its
parts and start to function as they were before. We promise you through the holy power of the
priesthood that when the sun ri ses in the ;naming, you wil l be raised up toget her with the sun. And
when other witnesses hear thi s testimony of Ti sina, they will also testify that Jesus is the Christ and
through him the Lord healed Tisina. Not tonight, but tomorrow Tisina will walk with the rest of
the famil y as the spirit whi spers."
After the blessing every'one knelt down before they went to bed and in a circle offered a
prayer, then we retired. I came in the room where Tisina st ill had her face covered with a cloth.
She was still dead. I picked her up and laid her little broken head on my arm and kept her body
close to me. Hours seemed to pass. I fin all y dozed off and on for about two more hours and about
6:00 a.m. I felt someone playing around my face and touching my hair. I slowl y opened my eyes
and to my surpri se saw Tisina standing up playing with my face and hair, with a big smile on her
face.
I slowly reached out to feel Tisina' s head. It was normal. I started to feel her hands, legs,
face--everything that had been promi sed had come true. Samuela Vehikite remembered that in her
priesthood blessing that when the sun rose up in the morning she would be raised up together with
the sun. So he opened the window shades and sure enough, the sun had just barely ri sen in the sky.
How excited we were to have our little daughter back with us agai n. We sang a special
hymn to thank God for her retulll, and said a long prayer of thanksgiving by me. A few minutes
later a knock came to our door. Our Aunt Marie and Uncle Mail e Ni u brought us Tisina's buri al
clothino and her buri al box and asked where the dead child was. I said she was the one that
b
answered the door. They were shocked and so relieved to know that the Lord had again blessed
our famil y during our mi ssion at Fo' ui. Maile Niu asked me what would be a special wish Tisina
would like today? Ti sina said, "Let 's go for a picnic at the beach." So the famil y went to celebrate
at Hahake beach. I want to testify to any of you whl' might read thi s story that it is true.
There were a few peopl e who joined the church in Tonga because of seeing how the hand
of the Lord caused miracles to be given to his children on this earth. When we exercise our trust
and faith in the Lord, our li ves and family are blessed by him.
92
ITEM XI: Transfer to Halaloto Branch - 1943
In July 1943 our plantation was ready to be harvested and again came a knock at our door. It
was mission President Emil C. Dunn saying, "Brother and sister Wolfgramm, how is the plantation
going?" 1 told him it was great and would be ready for harvest this weekend or so. President Dunn
said, "Good, I have good news for your family." We were anxious to hear what he would tell us next.
He said, "I would like you to leave your plantation for the next missionary couple to eat from when
they get here this weekend. I've just called your wife's Uncle Samuela and Aunt Helene, your sister
Ma'ata and a niece Mele Fakatou to leave the Halaloto branch for you and Salote and family to
preside over, and they will be leaving to serve a mission at Niuafo'ou (the Tin Can Island) as soon as
they can make it.
We thanked him respectfully and accepted our new calling. We were so excited. Mapelu moe
Lau was like our second home away from home. But the mission president still wanted us to go out
tracting and holding street meetings as proselyting missionaries at night and serve as branch president
at the Halaloto Branch that had been organized March 5,1939.
We found ourselves going door to door to say goodbye and thanking all our branch family at
Fo'ui for their love and caring for us, especially the two sisters, Me who married Lolo Mataele and
their family, her sister Makeleta who married Fine Sekona and their family . Our thanks to Sione
Finau and family for offering their home for our stay at Fo' ui. Tevita Pau'u family, Tuione and Hepi
Matelau and family and many others were so kind to us.
When the Fakatou's were getting things ready to leave on their mission to the Tin Can Island,
Pres. Dunn wanted them to know a little bit about what the Island would be like. He told them that
this tropica] islands is still an active volcano; that it had just erupted and all the livestock and
plantations had been destroyed. There had been no rain for almost three years, and a long drought
was what they were about to face.The mail would only come to them every six to twelve months, if
there was any ship available to bring it to them, plus their food and other supplies. Before leaving he
urged them to take enough food and other supplies to last them six to 12 months. He layed his hands
on their heads and gave them each a wonderful blessing before they left.
After my father passed away, my younger brother Walter, a younger sister Martha, and a niece
Mary were kind of adopted by Samuela and Helene Fakatou. So Walter left for school at Makeke and
Martha and Mary left with the couple to the Tin Can Island on their mission. After the Fakatou's got
all their goods and other supplies ready for the trip, Pres. Dunn left his blessing with them and said
good bye at Vuna' s wharf at Nukualofa. He had also moved us back to Halaloto Branch.
What a wonderful blessing for us to move back to Mapelu, our second home. This is where
my mother Salote was raised by her grandmother Teleita Fifita and Samuela Fakatou and Ofa Vaitai.
After grandfather Samuela Sr. died at Felemea, Samuela Jr. met Helene Sanft and they were married
in their later years and had no children of their own, but later adopted two of Helene's grandchildren
from her first marriage and her niece Mary, a daughter of lohani' s older sister Ela.
When we came back to Mapelu moe Lau. We were so happy. It was like returning to paradise
again. We could smell the laukaupouli blossoms-the midnight flower that only gives it's scent at
night time. We could also smell the tropical scents ofthe gardenias,the kaloni kakala, the sweet scent
of the yellow ginger, the roses all in blossom fragrance was all in the air. We knew we were at the
Halaloto Branch, the sweet smell of hopa, pineapple, oranges, tangerines and the vi fruits, mangoes,
papayas and bananas were just ripening and falling to the ground. It reminds one ofthe place called
Bountiful in the Book of Mormon.
92
ITEM XI: Transfer to Halaloto Branch - 1943
In July 1943 our plantation was ready to be harvested and again came a knock at our door. [t
was mi ssion President Emi I C. Dunn saying, "Brother and sister Wolfgramm, how is the plantation
going?" [told him it was great and would be ready for harvest this weekend or so. President Dunn
said, "Good, I have good news for your famil y." We were anx ious to hear what he wou ld tell us next.
He said, "I would like you to leave your plantation for the next missionary coupl e to eat from when
they get here this weekend. I've just call ed your wife's Uncle Samuela and Aunt Helene, your sister
Ma' ata and a niece Mele Fakatou to leave the Halaloto branch for you and Salote and family to
preside over, and they will be leaving to serve a mission at Niuafo'ou (the Tin Can Island) as soon as
they can make it.
We thanked him respectfully and accepted our new calling. We were so excited. Mapelu moe
Lau was like our second home away fTom home. But the mission president sti ll wanted us to go out
tracting and holding street meetings as proselyting missionaries at night and serve as branch president
at the Halaloto Branch that had been organized March 5, 1939.
We found ourselves going door to door to say goodbye and thanking all our branch family at
Fo' ui for their love and caring for us, especially the two sisters, Me who married Lolo Mataele and
their family, her sister Makeleta who married Fine Sekona and their family. Our thanks to Sione
Finau and fami ly for offering their home for our stay at Fo'ui. Tevita Pau'u family, Tuione and Hepi
Matelau and family and many others were so kind to us.
When the Fakatou's were getting things ready to leave on their mission to the Tin Can Island,
Pres. Dunn wanted them to know a little bit about what the Island would be like. He told them that
this tropical islands is still an active volcano; that it had just erupted and all the livestock and
plantations had been destroyed. There had been no rain for almost three years, and a long drought
was what they were about to face.Themail would only come to them every six to twelve months, if
there was any ship avai lable to bring it to them, plus their food and other supplies. Before leaving he
urged them to take enough food and other supplies to last them six to 12 months. He layed his hands
on thei r heads and gave them each a wonderful blessing before they left.
After my father passed away, my younger brother Walter, a younger sister Martha, and a ni ece
Mary were kind of adopted by Samuela and Helene Fakatou. So Walter left for school at Makeke and
Martha and Mary left with the coupl e to the Tin Can Island on their mission. After the Fakatou's got
all their goods and other suppli es ready for the trip, Pres. Dunn left hi s blessing with them and said
good bye at Yuna 's wharf at Nukualofa. He had also moved us back to Halaloto Branch.
What a wonderful blessing for us to move back to Mapelu, our second home. This is where
my mother Salote was raised by her grandmother Teleita Fifita and Samuela Fakatou and Ofa Yaitai .
After grandfather Samuela Sr. died at Felemea, Samuela Jr. met Helene Sanft and they were marri ed
in their later years and had no children of their own, but later adopted two of Helene' s grandchil dren
from her first marriage and her niece Mary, a daughter of Iohani's older sister Ela.
When we came back to Mapelu moe Lau. We were so happy. It was like returning to paradise
again. We could smell the laukaLipaLili blossoms-the midnight flower that only gives it 's scent at
night time. We could also smell the tropical scents of the gardenias,the ka/ani kakala, the sweet scent
of the yellow ginger, the roses all in blossom fragrance was all in the air. We knew we were at the
Halaloto Branch, the sweet smell of hopa, pineapple, oranges, tangerines and the vi fruits, mangoes,
papayas and bananas were just ripening and falling to the ground. It reminds one of the place called
Bountiful in the Book of Mormon.
93
It seems that the windows of heaven were opened up for us after having gone through the
trials at Fo'ui and the Lord rewarded us a hundred fold. The spirit of missionary work filled our
hearts with gratitude and love for our Heavenly Father for his goodness to us and for His spiritual
influence on behalf of our family.
After arriving at Mapelu moe Lau there were quite a few local members who had decided to
make their home in the nearby bush during World War II. Between the villages of Ha'akame, Houma,
Halaloto and Tokomololo there were over 14 families plus their extended families.
This was a wonderful time to be a missionary out in the field. We witnessed how the Lord
helped heal the sick, control the waves and the elements so a baptism could be performed, and bring
joy, happiness and light of truth into the lives of thousands at home and abroad. We felt his power
and strength throughout our mission. His hands rested upon our head for our safety in sailing to other
islands. It is an honor to be a member of His church today and enjoy the Melchizedek priesthood
power and the privilege to bless others in their affliction as we knew without a doubt in our minds
that the Lord would continue to strengthen and preserve us as we served him faithfully. What a
blessing for our family after giving up two plantations to the next missionary couple. We moved
back to Mapelu moe Lau and we cannot compare our small plantation to the one of Uncle Samuel
Fakatou. He was educated in New Zealand at the L.D.S. Maori Agriculture College, along with
Mateaki, Misitana Vea, Sosaia Mataele, Pi Falati Pikula, Sovea Kioa, and Sione Tuita Vehikite.
After they completed their schooling they came back to help teach the students at Makeke and at
Liahona college.
It was like retuming to paradise, at Mapelu moe Lau Samuela and Helene had planted
orange trees in 24 rows; they planted tangerine trees in 24 rows, pineapple, banana trees, taro, ufi
(yams) sweet potatoes, hopas, a vi tree, a tava tree, mango trees all over and five different varieties
of bananas. Papaya would just ripen and fall to the ground.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of ufi and 1 row for his tithing.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of bananas and 1 row for his tithing.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of sweet potatoes and 1 row for his tithing.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of kape and 1 row for his tithing.
With every kind of fruit and vegetable at his plantation, there always a row there for the
Lord. With all his animals he did the same. The best looking one was for the Lord, and nine, his
to be butchered. His pigs and chickens were the same. Our family used to come over to Mapelu
moe Lau a lot to help them with their plantation and make copra. That's what we used to do on
our plantation at Vava'u and we leamed the law of tithing early in life before we came to
Tongatapu.
All his plantation seemed to be overgrown sometimes. Bananas used to just ripen and fall
to the ground. The papaya was the same and the yams and sweet potatoes grew bigger than
normal. Instead of his animals giving birth to one, they gave birth to twin calves. Pigs would
have ten to 15 at one time. Eggs and chickens were double. We witnessed that when we lived at
their home. Helene loved flowers. She used to plant all kind of roses, lillies, gardenias, plumeria,
hibiscus, yellow ginger, honey suckle and most af all the kaloni kakala with other flowers. She
used to cut them early in the moming and we had to take them to all the missionary homes for
It seems that the windows of heaven were opened up for us after having gone through the
trials at Fo'ui and the Lord rewarded us a hundred fold. The spirit of missionary work fill ed our
hearts with gratitude and love for our Heavenl y Father for hi s goodness to us and for Hi s spiritual
innuence on behalf of our famil y.
93
After arriving at Mapelu moe Lau there were quite a few local members who had decided to
make their home in the nearby bush during World War 11. Between the villages of Ha'akame, Houma,
Halaloto and Tokomololo there were over 14 families plus their extended famili es.
This was a wonderful time to be a missionary out in the field. We witnessed how the Lord
helped heal the sick, control the waves and the elemenLs so a baptism could be perfomled, and bring
joy, happiness and li ght of truth into the lives of thousands at home and abroad. We felt hi s power
and strength throughout our mission. His hands rested upon our head for our safety in sailing to other
islands. It is an honor to be a member of Hi s church today and enjoy the Melchizedek priesthood
power and the privilege to bless others in their affl iction as we knew without a doubt in our minds
that the Lord would continue to strengthen and preserve us as we served him faithfully. What a
blessing for our family after giving up two plantations to the next mi ssionary coupl e. We moved
back to Mapelu moe Lau and we cannot compare our small plantation to the one of Uncle Samuel
Fakatou. He was educated in New Zealand at the L.D.S. Maori Agriculture College, along with
Mateaki , Misitana Yea, Sosaia Mataele, Pi Falati Pikula, Sovea Kioa, and Sione Tuita Yehikite.
After they completed their schooling they came back to help teach the students at Makeke and at
Liahona coll ege.
It was li ke returning to paradi se, at Mapelu moe Lau Samuela and Helene had planted
orange trees in 24 rows; they planted tangerine trees in 24 rows. pineapple, banana trees, laro, IIti
(yams) sweet potatoes, hopas, a vi tree, a lava tree, mango trees all over and five different varieti es
of bananas. Papaya would just ripen and fall to the ground.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of IIji and I row for hi s tithing.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of bananas and I row for hi s tithi ng.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of sweet potatoes and I row for his tithing.
Samuela used to plant 9 rows of kape and I row for hi s tithing.
With every kind of fruit and vegetable at his plantation, there always a row there for the
Lord. With all hi s animals he did the same. The best looking one was for the Lord, and nine, hi s
to be butchered. His pigs and chickens were the same. Our family used to come over to Mapelu
moe Lall a lot to help them with their plantation and make copra. That's what we used to do on
ollr plantation at Yava'u and we learned the law of tithing earl y in life before we came to
Tongatapu.
All hi s plantation seemed to be overgrown sometimes. Bananas used to j ust ripen and fa ll
to the ground. The papaya was the same and the yams and sweet potatoes grew bigger than
normal. Instead of hi s animals giving birth to one, they gave birth to twi n calves. Pigs woul d
have ten to 15 at one time. Eggs and chickens were double. We witnessed that when we lived at
their home. Helene loved flowers. She used to plant all kind of roses, lillies, gardenias, plumeria,
hibiscus, yellow ginger, honey suckl e and most af all the kaloni kakala with other nowers. She
used to cut them early in the moming and we had to take them to all the missionary homes for
94
them to enjoy and fresh cut flowers for the L.D.S. branches and Sunday meeting and conference
time. Every Saturday evening her flowers seemed to blossom much more. When you travel by
Mapelu moe Lau you couldn enjoy the tranquil, sweet scent ofthe flowers and sometimes you
could almost tell where a stock of ripe bananas could be found in the middle of the plantation by its
sweet smell.
Most of the time we had to keep our eyes open when missionaries needed some bananas.
We had to find the best bunch of bananas to take to them and let them hang at their place so they
would always have plenty. Same for their pineapple and avacados and mangoes. The best looking
one would always go to the Mission President, then the missionaries, then to us and to the needy
last.
During World War D Samuela and Helene became parents to lots of young American
service men. When they became homesick or lonely, they would come over just to visit or talk.
Most of all Helene used to be the best cook in town, so often they came and paid for a plate of food
from her. Sometimes Helene used to do their laundry for them and get paid for it. Samuela and
Helene were the only ones in the area who could speak English, besides a few others. Helene used
to have a safe inside their house. The money she made from cooking and working for the service
men she put in the safe to start saving for their trip to America to come to the temple. That was our
family plan since 1934 when Salote and I, Samuela and Helene, Uncle Charles Sanft, Fritz
Wolfgramm, Walter Wolfgramm, and Rudy Wolfgramm met in council to plan the future ofthe
family. There goal was that they might be sealed for all time and eternity in the holy temple, and
be able to do temple ordinances for our loved ones who had passed away.
SAM AND HELENE'S MISSION AT NIUAFO'OU
Written by Helene Sanft Fakatou
These stories of Sam and Helene Fakatou are given here because of their close association with lohani
and Salote. Sam Fakatou was one ofthe relatives that raised Salote and when in Tongatapu made their home
with the Fakatou's, as you can tell by some ofthe stories by lohani. They are family treasures.
ITEM I: Mission to Niuafo'ou in 1944-1945
P
resident Emil Dunn called my husband Samuela V. Fakatou and I to serve a mission at
Tonga Mama'o, Niuafo'ou, (Tongan Mission). We took lohani's young sister Ma'ata and
a younger niece Mele Tu'i Tonga with us on our mission.
When President Dunn called my husband and I on a mission to Niuafo'ou, we were asked to
make sure that we took the following items: a case of corned beef, a sack of flour, sugar, a can of
biscuits, and soap for our laundry. This island had just been destroyed by another volcanic eruption.
Three months before that it was hit by a hurricane. Most ofthe crops were gone, and when we arrived,
children were out digging old roots of the trees, and hunting for ofato, (big white worms) to eat. The
old people were also digging for roots, or anything they might use for food. It was difficult to find
drinking water. Most of the animals had died during the disaster.
94
them to enjoy and fresh cut flowers for the L.D.S. branches and Sunday meeting and conference
time. Every Saturday evening her flowers seemed to blossom much more. When you travel by
Mapelu moe Lau you couldn enjoy the tranquil , sweet scent of the flowers and sometimes you
could almost tell where a stock of ripe bananas could be found in the middle of the plantation by its
sweet smell.
Most of the time we had to keep our eyes open when missionaries needed some bananas.
We had to find the best bunch of bananas to take to them and let them hang at their place so they
would always have plenty. Same for their pineapple and avacados and mangoes. The best looking
one would always go to the Mission President, then the missionaries, then to us and to the needy
last.
During World War II Samuela and Helene became parents to lots of young American
service men. When they became homesick or lonely, they would come over just to visit or talk.
Most of all Helene used to be the best cook in town, so often they came and paid for a plate of food
from her. Sometimes Helene used to do their laundry for them and get paid for it. Samuela and
Helene were the only ones in the area who could speak English, besides a few others. Helene used
to have a safe inside their house. The money she made from cooking and working for the servi ce
men she put III the safe to start saving for their trip to America to come to the temple. That was our
family plan since 1934 when Salote and 1, Samuela and Helene, Uncle Charles Sanft, Fritz
Wolfgramm, Walter Wolfgramm, and Rudy Wolfgrammmet in council to plan the future of the
family. There goal was that they might be sealed for all time and eternity in the holy temple, and
be able to do temple ordinances for our loved ones who had passed away.
SAM AND HELENE'S MISSION AT NIUAFO'OU
Wrillell by Helelle Sallfi FakalOlI
These slories of Sam alld Helelle Fakatoll are given here becallse oflheir close associalion wilh l ohani
alld Salore. Salll FakalOlI was one of Ihe relarives Ihal raised SalOle and when in TongataplI made Iheir hallie
"'ilh rhe Fakaloll's. as YOll call1elf by some of Ihe slories by lohani. They are family IreaSllres.
ITEM I: Mission to Niuafo'ou in 1944-1945
P
resident Emil Dunn call ed my husband Samuela V. Fakatou and I to serve a mi ssion at
Tonga Mama'o, Niuafo'ou, (Tongan Mission). We took Iohani 's young sister Ma'ata and
a younger niece Mele Tu'i Tonga with us on our mission.
When President Dunn called my husband and Ion a mission to Niuafo'ou, we were asked to
make sure that we took the following items: a case of corned beef, a sack of flour, sugar, a can of
biscuits, and soap for our laundry. This island had just been destroyed by another volcani c eruption.
Three months before that it was hit by a hurricane. Most ofthe crops were gone, and when we arrived,
children were out digging old roots of the trees, and hunting for of oro, (big white worms) to eat. The
old people were also digging for roots, or anything they might use for food. It was difficult to find
drinking water. Most of the animals had died during the disaster.
95
My husband would go out to teach these people the Gospel of Jesus Christ, and in the evening
he would invite them to come over and have dumplings and a white sauce with sugar. As they ate, he
would continue teaching the gospel.
The work was really hard for us to do, but the Lord was with us. The boat, carrying food
supplies would only come to Niuafo'ou once eveiy three to six months. The more we shared our food
with these people, the more often they came back to enjoy a spiritual feast too. How clearly I
remember-it was two weeks before the boat would bring us more food. My last sack of flour was
getting really low. Finally I spoke to my husband, "What are we going to feed those people with when
they come?"
He answered, "The Lord will take care of that too." I had examined the sack of flour two
nights before, it was empty. The next moming I again reached down into the sack, which lay under
a wooden table. As I withdrew my cup, it was filled with flour; it was a miracle. Each time I reached
under that table, I had a cup of flour with which to feed those hungry people. Finally two days passed.
1 took the sack from under the small table and shook it. I emptied this into my little bowl, and again
fed the company. As we finished our dinner, my husband presented another gospel discussion. During
this time we heard the loud siren-a signal to us from the boat, letting us know that it had arrived. Our
food was coming from President Dunn in Tongatapu. We were so blessed and felt the helping hands
of our Father in Heaven, and wanted to share all we had with the poor.
ITEM B: Blessing Patisepa
It was a wonderful experience for all of us. When they first arrived at Niuafo'ou we found the
people there weren't as friendly as the people who lived at Tongatapu or on the other islands. It was
very difficult to teach them the gospel because they only had heard a little about the church. Maybe
only one or two members of the village of twenty-five to forty people were Latter-day Saints.
One day I told Ma'ata, "People have given us too many chickens, how about going with me
to the bush to get a few sticks and chop down a few trees to make a chicken coop. We will be able to
raise some for eating and have a few more eggs?" We left around 10:00 a.m.
While looking around the bush for suitable material, we suddenly heard a woman's voice
calling for me. We immediately recognized the voice of Likivai, the nobleman's daughter. She said,
"Helene, please hurry up and come back to town with me, my younger sister Patisepa is very ill."
I said, "All right, I'll come right now, but I want you to go down farther and call for my
husband, Samuela Fakatou. Tell him to hurry up and come quickly with you and give Patisepa a
blessing." While Likivai was looking and calling for Samuela at the bush, I arrived at the home.
First thing I heard was the voice of Malu a Maka, the father. The nobleman was crying at the
top of his lungs. He cried and cried, and kept on saying, "My Patisepa is dead, oh no, she's dead."
The people from the village heard the news; they started to come and joined in crying with the rest of
the family. Right at the front door, I met the doctor. He said, "There is nothing more anyone can do
as Patisepa has expired."
I opened the door and walked into the room and went straight up to Malu a Maka and patted
him on the shoulder and said, "Why are you crying and carrying on like this, Malu? What has
happened to your faith? Don't you know that Samuela will be here in a few minutes to help?"
95
My husband would go out to teach these people the Gospel of Jesus Christ. and in the evening
he woul d invite them to come over and have dumplings and a white sauce with sugar. As they ate, he
woul d continue teaching the gospel.
The work was reall y hard for us to do, but the Lord was with us. The boat, carrying food
suppli es would only come to Niuafo'ou once every three to six months. The more we shared our food
with these people, the more often they came back to enjoy a spiritual feas t too. How clearl y I
remember-it was two weeks before the boat wou ld bring us more food. My last sack of flour was
getting really low. Finally I spoke to my husband, "What are we going to feed those people with when
they come?"
He answered, "The Lord wi ll take care of that too. " I had examined the sack of flour two
nights before, it was empty. The next morning I again reached down into the sack, which lay under
a wooden table. As I withdrew my cup, it was filled with flour; it was a miracle. Each time I reached
under that table, I had a cup of flour with which to feed those hungry people. Finally two days passed.
I took the sack from under the smal l table and shook it. I emptied this into my little bowl , and again
fed the company. As we fi nished our dinner, my husband presented another gospel discussion. During
thi s time we heard the loud siren-a signal to us from the boat, letting us know that it had arrived. Our
food was coming from President Dunn in Tongatapu. We were so blessed and felt the helping hands
of our Father in Heaven, and wanted to share all we had with the poor.
ITEM II: Blessing Patisepa
It was a wondelful experience for all of us. When they first arrived at Niuafo' ou we found the
people there weren't as friendly as the people who lived at Tongatapu or on the other islands. It was
very difficult to teach them the gospel because they only had heard a littl e about the church. Maybe
only one or two members of the village of twenty-five to forty people were Latter-day Saints.
One day I told Ma ' ata, "People have given us too many chi ckens. how about going with me
to the bush to get a few sticks and chop down a few trees to make a chicken coop. We will be able to
raise some for eating and have a few more eggs?" We left around 10:00 a.m.
Whil e looking around the bush for suitable material , we suddenl y heard a woman's voice
calling for me. We immediately recognized the voice of Likivai. the nobleman's daughter. She said,
"Helene, please hurry up and come back to town wit h me, my younger sister Patisepa is very ill. "
I said "All liaht I'll come riallt now. but I want you to gO down farther and call for my
, b , 0::0 . '-'
husband, Samuela Fakatou. Tell him to hurry up and come quickly with you and give Patisepa a
blessing. " While Likivai was looking and calling for Samuela at the bush, I arri ved at the home.
First thing I heard was the voice of Malu a Maka, the father. The nobleman was crying at the
top of hi s lungs. He cried and cried. and kept on saying, "My Patisepa is dead, oh no, she's dead."
The people from the village heard the news; they stalted to come and joined in crying with the rest of
the famil y. Right at the front door, I met the doctor. He said, "There is nothing more anyone can do
as Patisepa has expired."
I opened the door and walked into the room and went straight up to Malu a Maka and patted
him on the shoulder and said, "Why are you crying and carrying on like this, Malu? What has
happened to your fait h? Don't you know that Samuela wi ll be here in a few minutes to help?"
96
While I was trying to comfort Malu a Maka and the family, the doctor was walking down the
main street telling the people that there was going to be a funeral; the nobleman's daughter Papisepa
had just expired. People started coming, one by one, wearing their tad vaia (the mats they wrap
around their waistline to show their respect for their dead.) 1 finally finished talking with Malu a Maka
and went up to see the young girl's body. Patisepa's grandmother Milika was massaging the girl's
arms and legs, so they would be supple while they put on her burial clothes.
People from the village came and filled the house. Malu stopped crying as my husband walked
in. When he came in the house and saw all the people he spoke to them and said, "Would you please
leave this house immediately. I would like only my wife Helene, and Patisepa's immediate family
here-her father Malu a Maka, her mother Pua, the grandmother Milika and myself." The people were
angered by the idea, but left the house.
A half-hour or so went by, then Samuela annointed the oil on Patisepa's head and gave her a
beautiful blessing. When he was almost at the end of the blessing the grandmother Melika said, "I
can't help this, but I already feel the warmth coming back to Patisepa's toes and hands". Right after
Samuela's prayer, the little girl started to scream very loudly. She started to breathe again. Her whole
body felt warm and the blood started to circulate once again. She lived.
Samuela said, "You had better get some warm food and give her something to eat as she is
hungry." So the family did just that.
Patisepa is still living. She is married and has a family too. A few people in Niuafo'ou
witnessed this experience and later became members.
ITEM BI: Harvest
When our family first arrived in Niuafo'ou there was a drought and nothing was left for the
people to eat. Samuela started a little manioke plantation that usually takes six months to harvest.
He found out that most of the people in Niuafo'ou would go out to the bush and find the roots of an
Aka tree. They usually got the roots, pulled them out, and then ate them. Sometimes they hunted for
the older ti leaf plants and dug them out, cleaned them up and put them in an umu and baked it, then
chewed them like they would chew sugar cane, and the juice tasted like brown sugar. That's how the
people survived.
Rarely they would find a green coconut and would drink the liquid and eat the meat from the
young coconut. Most of the people here were not the least interested in the missionary message, and
didn't even want to hear it. Samuela and Vaha'i Tonga, a school teacher for the Tongan Government
were one ofthe few church members there. They were invited for a special meeting by the Methodist
Church they called ako lotu. After the meeting they served some food and the next night they decided
that the Latter-day Saint missionaries were to feed them. Samuela and Vaha'i Tonga were at a loss
as to what food to take for the next night, because they were not members ofthe community but only
visitors. One Methodist member offered them a little pig. They were grateful for the pig and baked
it in an umu. They decided to go to the Lord in prayer.
They gave their all in their faith in the Lord that somehow he would supply the manioke for
them. When the pig was ready, there was still no manioke so Vaha'i and Samuela went to the
plantation. It had only been there three months and was still immature. Vaha'i stood there and looked
96
Whil e I was trying to comfort Malu a Maka and the family, the doctor was wal king down the
mai n street telling the people that there was goi ng to be a funeral; the nobl eman's daughter Papi sepa
had just expired. Peopl e started coming, one by one, wearing their rao'vala (the mats they wrap
around their waistline to show their respect for their dead. ) I finall y fini shed talking with Malu a Maka
and went up to see the young girl 's body. Pati sepa' s grandmother Milika was massaging the girl's
arms and legs, so they would be suppl e while they put on her buri al clothes.
People from the village came and fill ed the house. Malu stopped crying as my husband walked
in. When he came in the house and saw all the people he spoke to them and said, " Would you please
leave thi s house immediatel y. I would like onl y my wife Helene, and Pati sepa's immediate famil y
here- her father Malu a Maka, her mother Pua, the grandmother Milika and myself. " The people were
angered by the idea. but left the house.
A half-hour or so went by, then Samuela annointed the oil on Pati sepa's head and gave her a
beauti ful blessing. When he was almost at the end of the blessing the grandmother Melika said, "I
can' t help thi s, but I already feel the wannth coming back to Pati sepa's toes and hands". Ri ght after
Samuela's prayer, the little girl started to scream very loudl y. She started to breathe again. Her whole
body felt warm and the bl ood staJ1ed to circul ate once again. She li ved.
Samuela said, "You had better get some wmm food and give her something to eat as she is
hungry." So the famil y did just that.
Pati sepa is still living. She is marri ed and has a famil y too. A few peopl e in Niuafo'ou
witnessed thi s experi ence and later became members.
ITEM m: Il arvest
When our famil y first arri ved in Niuafo' ou there was a drought and nothing was left for the
people to eat. Samuela started a little manioke plantati on that usuall y takes six months to harvest.
He found out that most of the people in Niuafo' ou woul d go out to the bush and find the roots of an
Aka tree. They usuall y got the roots, pulled them out, and then ate them. Sometimes they hunted for
the older Ii leaf plants and dug them out , cleaned them up and put them in an um!! and baked it, then
chewed them like they woul d chew sugar cane, and the juice tasted like brown sugar. That' s how the
people survived.
Rarely they woul d find a green coconut and woul d drink the liquid and eat the meat from the
young coconut. Most of the people here were not the least interested in the mi ssionary message, and
didn' t even want to hear it. Samuela and Vaha' i Tonga, a school teacher for the Tongan Government
were one of the few church members there. They were invi ted for a special meeting by the Methodi st
Church they called ako lolU. After the meeting they served some food and the next night they decided
that the Latter-day Sai nt missionaries were to feed them. Samuela and Vaha' i Tonga were at a loss
as to what food to take for the next ni ght, because they were not members of the community but only
visitors. One Methodi st member offered them a little pig. They were grateful for the pi g and baked
it in an //m//. They decided to go to the Lord in prayer.
They gave their all in thei r faith in the Lord that somehow he would supply the manioke for
them. When the pig was ready, there was still no mall ioke so Vaha' i and Samuela went to the
plantation. It had onl y been there three months and was still immature. Vaha' i stood there and looked
97
at the manioke and said, "When are you going to be ready for harvest, and why are you waiting so
long? We need some manioke right away tonight. You should be providing us with full-grown
manioke. It is tonight Samuela and 1 need your help" As he started to uproot the manioke he couldn't
believe it. He saw large manioke come out of the ground and more and more. Tears rolled down
Vaha'i's face and also Samuela's. They knew that the Lord had helped them. They filled the first
basket full of manioke, then the second basket full. They took it to town, peeled and baked them in
the umu. When the Methodist Church heard about it, they all came and asked for a little manioke.
They divided to each family enough manioke to supply the whole village. Then the Methodist
members decided to go out to the same plantation to see if they could get more. When they pulled out
the manioke there was nothing, it was only a baby manioke, but not matured. They came back and
asked them where they could get some and they told them that they must have faith and pray and ask
God for help and he would supply them with whatever they need.
That was the testimony of Samuela and Vaha'i while they were on a mission. It was like
manna for the people of Niuafo'ou to see what the Lord had done for them.
ITEM TV: The Ulu'ave Familv
While living at Niuafo'ou, Sam and I went out to Mu'a to see how much damage the erupted
volcano had done. The destruction was found to be almost complete. While there we came across
a mother with four children, Salome Ulu'ave. She was on her death bed and the children were
mourning and were getting ready for her burial. While she was dying she asked for Elder Vaha'i Tonga
to please come and administer to her. Her family and in-laws were very much against the Mormon
church. They didn't want lo have anything to do with the church or any of its members, but at
Salome's urging they sent for Elder Vaha'i Tonga. He came and gave her a beautiful blessing and she
slowly but surely recovered.
She was the only member of her family who had joined the Church. When she was better the
family treated her with hate and bittemess, but worst of all her own husband, Solo Ulu'ave treated her
badly. He was very bitter about the Mormon church. Every Sunday he would go around from village
to village with the book of a Dr. Wood and preach against the Mormons and the prophet Joseph Smith
and the doctrines. When I saw how they treated Salome, my heart felt for her and her littie children.
1 wanted us to help her out.
There was a famine and everyone was practically starving, yet Solo would say he was going
to hunt for food and not come home for days. The mother and kids would survive only on coconuts,
because she was very weak from her illness she was barely able to move around.
One day Solo decided to came over and meet this so-called Mormon missionary Samuela
Fakatou. Solo was invited in and talked. I was happy because I would have a chance to ask Solo if
he would let us take care of his wife and children while she recuperated from her illness. To our
surprise he readily accepted the offer. He said that he could not stand the sight of her ever since she
joined the Mormon faith, but I asked him to please come up every once in a while and see them
because she might even die from a broken heart. He agreed, and Samuela and I took the mother and
the four children with us to our home in the other village.
97
at the manioke and said, "When are you going to be ready for harvest, and why are you wait ing so
long? We need some manioke ri ght away tonight. You should be providing us with fu ll -grown
manioke. It is toni ght Samuela and I need your help" As he started to uproot the manioke he couldn't
believe it. He saw large manioke come out of the ground and more and more. Tears rolled down
Vaha'i 's face and also Samuela's. They knew that the Lord had helped them. They filled the first
basket full of manioke, then the second basket fu ll. They took it to town, peeled and baked them in
the umu. When the Methodi st Church heard about it, they all came and asked for a little manioke.
They divided to each famil y enough manioke to suppl y the whole vill age. Then the Methodist
members decided to go out to the same plantation to see if they could gel more. When they pulled out
the manioke there was nothing, it was only a baby manioke, but not matured. They came back and
asked them where they could get some and they told them that they must have faith and pray and ask
God for help and he would suppl y them with whatever they need.
That was the testimony of Samuela and Vaha' i whil e they were on a mi ssion. It was like
manna for the people of Niuafo'ou to see what the Lord had done for them.
ITEM IV: The Ulu'ave Famil y
While li ving at Ni uafo' ou, Sam and I went out to Mu'a to see how much damage the erupted
volcano had done. The destruction was found to be almost complete. Whi le there we came across
a mother with four children, Salome Ul u' ave. She was on her death bed and the children were
mourning and were getting ready for her buri al. While she was dying she asked for Elder Vaha'i Tonga
to please come and admini ster to her. Her fami ly and in-l aws were very much against the Mormon
church. They didn't want to have anything to do wit h the church or any of its members, but at
Salome's urging they sent for Elder Vaha' i Tonga. He came and gave her a beautiful blessing and she
slowly but surel y recovered.
She was the only member of her family who had joined the Church. When she was better the
famil y treated her with hate and bitterness, but worst of all her own husband , Solo Ulu'ave treated her
badly. He was very bitter about the Mormon church. Every Sunday he would go around from vi ll age
to village with the book of a Dr. Wood and preach against the Monnons and the prophet Joseph Smith
and the doctrines. When I saw how they treated Salome, my heart felt for her and her li tt le children.
I wanted us to help her out.
There was a famine and everyone was practically starving, yet Solo would say he was going
to hunt for food and not come home for days. The mother and kids would survive only on coconuts,
because she was very weak from her illness she was barely able to move around.
One day Solo decided to came over and meet this so-called Mormon mi ssionary Samuela
Fakatou. Solo was invited in and talked. I was happy because I would have a chance to ask Solo if
he would let us take care of hi s wife and children while she recuperated from her illness. To our
surprise he readily accepted the offer. He said that he could not stand the sight of her ever since she
joined the Mormon faith, but I asked him to pleas" come up every once in a whil e and see them
because she mi ght even die from a broken heart. He agreed, and Samuela and I took the mother and
the four children with us to our home in the other village.
98
Solo kept his promise. He found out that his family really meant a lot to him. He missed them
and he would come up about every week to see them. But things went sour again. He became very
confused and joined with priests from the Methodist belief named Tevita Langi and his wife Eseta.
The were all against the L.D.S. Church, and convinced him that he had been tricked by this missionary
couple to take his loved ones away from him. That's how they trap other members of the same family
into their belief, so they told him. He quickly came over to our house to argue with us about how
tricky and evil of us to try to force him into joining the church.
Samuela talked with him and said, "Solo, I am here to do the work ofthe Lord. I am not here
to force anyone to believe or belong to the church. Helping the needy and the sick is part of my
mission and I am prepared for any ridicule and accusations made of me." Solo immediately called
them a liar and all kinds of vicious words.
When Sam found out that it was Tevita Langi and Eseta behind all of his confusion, he
immediately told Solo to go right then and tell Tevita how soon they had forgotten the efforts and
energy the relief society and the priesthood members of the Mormon church in helping Eseta's
grandmother when she needed help. She was fed, clothed, and cared for. They gave everything to
build her a decent home to live in. I still do not know what kind of heart Eseta has, because she has
still stood against the church, yet her grandmother Eli had a better life because of the help from the
church members. Solo informed them what the Monnon missionaries had said. I felt a little guilty
for not having a little more patience, but I was not about to put up with the lies and ridicule these
people inflicted upon us all the time.
The following Saturday Samuela was to hold an outdoor crusade (street meeting) in Mu'a. For
a long time Solo, had made the missionary work extra hard and difficult. For seven years Solo had
studied to be a great preacher for another faith and later on got hold of this book written by a Dr.
Wood. It was false information about the L.D.S. doctrines, and the prophet Brigham Young. He
taught and preached just as hard as the Mormon missionaries did. This particular night, I asked Solo
to please come and feel welcome to hear another side of what Sam is preaching because he was going
to hold an outdoor crusade, and would be talking about plural marriage. Plural marriage-that really
got his attention, and he was willing to come and listen for the very first time.
Samuela reserved the topic for last and brought forth prophets and priests from the Bible as
reasons why Brigham Young practiced plural marriage. Abraham, Solomon, and a few others were
told by God to have many wives in order to produce righteous children of God. Solo was amazed and
he had never thought of those verses in the Bible. He was very humbled and sincere and full of
apologies for his behavior. He asked if could come over and spend the night with his family.
Nothing much was said that night, but he was in deep thought. Early the next moming Solo
woke up early, rolled up the door that was made of leaves, and started sobbing. His wife awoke and
wondered what had happened to him. He then told her that he had made up his mind. He had finally
found the light for which he had been searching for the past seven years. It seemed like everything
made sense from what he had heard that night. They both broke down and cried, and then he blurted
out that he would like to be baptized into the church because he knew deep down in his heart that this
was the true gospel.
98
Solo kept hi s promi se. He found out that hi s family really meant a lot to him. He missed them
and he would come up about every week to see them. But things went sour again. He became very
confused and joined wi th priests from the Methodist belief named Tevita Langi and hi s wife Eseta.
The were all against the L.D.S. Church, and convinced him that he had been tricked by thi s mi ssionary
coupl e to take hi s loved ones away from him. That ' s how they trap other members of the same family
into their belief, so they told him. He quickly came over to our house to argue with us about how
tricky and evi l of us to try to force him into joining the church.
Samuela talked with him and said, "Solo, I am here to do t.he work of the Lord. I am not here
to force anyone to believe or belong to the church. Helping the needy and the sick is part of my
mission and I am prepared for any ridicule and accusations made of me." Solo immediately called
them a liar and all kinds of vicious words.
When Sam found out that it was Tevita Langi and Eseta behind all of his confusion, he
immediately told Solo to go right then and tell Tevita how soon they had forgotten the efforts and
energy the relief society and the priesthood members of the Mornlon church in helping Eseta's
grandmother when she needed help. She was fed, clothed, and cared for. They gave everything to
build her a decent home to live in. I still do not know what kind of heart Eseta has, because she has
st ill stood against the church, yet her grandmother Eli had a better life because of the help from the
church members. Solo infornled them what the Mormon missionaries had said. I felt a little guilty
for not having a littl e more patience, but I was not about to put up with the lies and ridicule these
people inflicted upon us all the time.
The following Saturday Samuela was to hold an outdoor crusade (st reet meeting) in Mu'a. For
a long time Solo, had made thc missionary work extra hard and difficult. For seven years Solo had
studied to be a great preacher for another faith and later on got hold of this book written by a Dr.
Wood. It was false information about the L.D.S. doctrines, and the prophet Brigham Young. He
taught and preached just as hard as the MOImon missionaries did. This particular night, I asked Solo
to please come and feel welcome to hear another side of what Sam is preaching because he was going
to hold an outdoor crusade, and would be talking about plural marriage. Plural marriage--that reall y
got his attention, and he was willing to come and listen for the very first time.
Samuela reserved the topic for last and brought forth prophets and priests from the Bibl e as
reasons why Brigham Young practiced plural marriage. Abraham, Solomon, and a few others were
told by God to have many wives in order to produce righteous children of God. Solo was amazed and
he had never thought of those verses in the Bible. He was very humbled and sincere and full of
apologies for his behavior. He asked if could come over and spend the night with his family.
Nothing much was said that night, but he was in deep thought. Early the next morning Solo
woke up early, rolled up the door that was made of leaves, and started sobbing. His wife awoke and
wondered what had happened to him. He then told her that he had made up his mind. He had finally
found the light for wh ich he had been searching for the past seven years. It seemed like everythi ng
made sense from what he had heard that night. They both broke down and cried, and then he blurted
out that he would like to be baptized into the church because he knew deep down in hi s heart that this
was the true gospel.
99
They continued crying in happiness together. They sent for Elder Vaha'i Tonga to come and
baptize him, although he was afraid and felt sad that his relatives would disown him. He was more
than happy to be together with his loving little family once again and in this wonderful new faith that
was strongly budding within him. They decided to reside close to our home. They had come across
some very bad times. They often ran out of food, and sometimes a kind neighbor would share their
food with them, and sometimes we would go without so the mother and the children would have
something to eat.
It was a very dry season. The drought was so bad, that for six months we would share only
about a gallon of water a day for food, bath and necessary things. We finally went to the adjoining
village to get water from the public cistern. But when the town officer found out that the Mormon
missionaries were getting water from the tank, he was full of hate for them and he would lock up the
tank at night because that was when we could go. But somehow the good Lord always provided us
with another way and means of survival.
When we heard that the apostle George Albert Smith was to visit Tonga, we asked President
Dunn if we could return to Tongatapu to be at the conference. That is when we left Niuafo'ou and after
the conference were reassigned elsewhere.
o;
BLESSING OF MISSIONARY WORK
me day my missionary companion, Samuela Vehekite was very sick with the flu. I couldn't
find anyone to go trading with me that day, so I walked from Fo'ui to Fahefa looking for
Samuela to see if he would go tracting. To my surprise 1 found that Samuela's wife Disapesi had just
given birth to twin girls, and Samuela could hardly walk.
I said, "I need your help and I need a missionary companion. How about coming with me?
We need to go tracting. The Lord will take care of you." So Samuela slowly got up. His legs were
still shaking, but he put on his shirt, then picked up his scriptures. We walked to Ha'akame, then to
Ha'alalo and then to Utulau. We preached from door to door. When nightfall came we retumed home
and Samuela was completely healed.
O
W i
IOHANI AND MOTULALO TONGA AT NUKUNUKU
me day I went out with a missionary companion named Motulalo Tonga to visit at
Nukunuku village. We found a well known person named Fisi'ihoi and asked if we could
spend a little time with him and his family about the church.
Fisi'ihoi didn't like the missionaries at all. He kicked us out. I spoke to Fisi'ihoi to please
listen what the Savior told us in the Book of Matthew 10:11-16: Verily I say unto you, it shall be more
tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city. Behold, I sent
you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves, be ye therefore wise as serpents and harmless as doves.
99
They continued crying in happiness together. They sent for Elder Vaha' i Tonga to come and
baptize him, although he was afraid and felt sad that hi s relatives would di sown him. He was more
than happy to be together with hi s loving littl e famil y once again and in thi s wonderful new fai th that
was st rongly budding within him. They decided to reside close to our home. They had come across
some very bad times. They often ran out of food, and sometimes a kind nei ghbor wou ld share their
food with them, and sometimes we would go without so the mother and the chil dren would have
something to eat.
It was a very dry season. The drought was so bad, that for six months we would share onl y
about a gallon of water a day for food, bat h and necessary things. We finall y went to the adjoining
vi llage to get water from the public ci stern. But when the town officer found out that the Mormon
mi ssionaries were getti ng water from the tank, he was full of hate for them and he would lock up the
tank at night because that was when we could go. But somehow the good Lord always provided us
wi th anot her way and means of survival.
When we heard that the apostle George Albert Smith was to visit Tonga, we asked President
Dunn if we coul d return to Tongatapu to be at the conference. That is when we left Niuafo'ou and after
the conference were reassigned el sewhere..
BLESSING OF MISSIONARY WORK
O
ne day my mi ssionary companion, Samuela Vehekite was velY sick with the flu. I couldn't
find anyone to go tracting with me that day, so I walked from Fo'ui to Fahefa looki ng for
Samuela to see if he would go tracting. To my surpri se I found that Samuela's wife ni sapesi had Just
given birth to twin girls, and Samuela could hardl y walk.
T said, "I need your help and I need a mi ssionary companion. How about coming wit h me?
We need to go tracting. The Lord will take care of you." So Samuela slowly got up. His legs were
still shaking, but he put on hi s shirt, then picked up hi s scriptures. We walked to Ha'akame, then to
Ha'alalo and then to Ut ul au. We preached from door to door. When nightfall came we returned home
and Samuela was completely healed.
IOHANI AND MOTULALO TONGA AT NUKUNUKU
O
ne day I went out with a mi ssionary compani on named Motulalo Tonga to visit at
Nukunuku vi ll age. We found a well known person named Fisi ' ihoi and asked if we could
spend a littl e time with him and hi s famil y about the church.
Fi si' ihoi didn't li ke the missionaries at all. He kicked us out. I spoke to Fisi'ihoi to please
li sten what the Savior told us in the Baal: of Matthew 10:11-16: Verily I say unto you, it shall be more
tolerable for the land of Sodom and Gomorrah in the day of judgment than for that city. Behold, [ sent
you fort h as sheep in the midst of wolves, be ye therefore wise as serpents and harmless as doves.
100
In less than the twinkle of an eye after Motulalo Tonga read those verses Fisi'ihoi said, "Go
on in and visit my wife, I have changed my mind." The missionaries went inside.
The minute I opened my mouth, this lady didn't give me a chance to speak. She was very rude,
took her Tongan broom, and hit us in our faces and chased us out of her home. We left. There are
many times missionaries have to put up with some experiences like this. The more the people hated
the church, the more the missionaries wanted them to know of its truthfulness and become a part of
it.
w
• • c
lOHANI'S CARPENTRY SKILL
r
hen I had a littie time from my family and church activities, I was always out in the
community helping build up schools, churches, private homes, businesses, cisterns, and
other projects at Neiafu, Vava'u. I wanted the three oldest children to leam to speak English. The
Catholic School was the only one that taught English at Vava'u at this time. Malina, Ana and their
brother Sale were sent to school at Neiafu. They would walk five miles each direction every day to
school along with me as a protector and their Sanft cousins. I would work while the children were at
school. I worked for the Catholic school, built housing for the nuns and priests, repaired the statue
of Jesus, Mary, and others, helped design their sheds, trays and bread tins, and enlarged their kitchen
area and their cistern in exchange for his children's school tuition.
Epikopo Tifinio from Ma'ofanga became my good friend. The nuns and priests from the
Catholic Church loved and respected me because they found me a very honest and trustworthy
Mormon. Even the priests and the nuns from Houma, Tongatapu came and asked I if he would help
out with their school, which 1 did.
A Catholic member from Pangaimotu heard and saw my work for the Catholic Church and
asked me if I could build him a house, a kitchen, and a cistern. This I did and the Hausia family was
very grateful. In exchange they brought us mats, tapa cloths, a ton of ufi and yams at Vava'u.
The Govemment representative asked me if I could build the Post Office, plus an enlargement
to the courthouse and a new copra board house at the wharf, and I did that too.
My cousins Rudolph and Taupea Tupou Sanft were living at Neiafu and wanted me to build
them a two story house, a kitchen and a cistern. I worked really hard and finally finished that home.
Church families from Neiafu, Fifialoa and Namosi Topou and Tonga and Ana Poteki came and asked
me to build their homes too. I completed those homes also.
The manager of the Burns Phillips Co. needed a copra house to bake and store all their copra
on the Island of Fofoa, a four hour sail by sea. I built and completed that. The Morris Hedstrom
Company had me build another building for the storage of their copra at Neiafu. I built a home for
a cousin, Sueni Guttenbeil. I was asked by the govemment if I would build a primary school and also
housing for workers and their families.
My uncle Otto Gustav Sanft had me design and build the first bus to transport the people
around Vava'u. He also asked if I would design and build the very first theater for the people of
Vava'u. So my family was moved from Ha'alaufuli to Neiafu so they could be closer to my work.
100
In less than the twinkle of an eye after Motulalo Tonga read those verses Fisi ' ihoi said, "Go
on in and visit my wife, I have changed my mind." The missionaries went inside.
The minute I opened my mouth, this lady didn't give me a chance to speak. She was very rude,
took her Tongan broom, and hi t us in our faces and chased us out of her home. We left. There are
many times missionaries have to put up with some experiences Like this. The more the people hated
the church, the more the missionaries wanted them to know of its truthfulness and become a part of
it.
IOHANI'S CARPENTRY SKILL
W
hen I had a little time from my family and church activities, I was always out in the
community helping build up school s, churches, private homes, businesses, cisterns, and
other projects at Neiafu, Vava' u. I wanted the three oldest children to learn to speak Engli sh. The
Catholic School was the only one that taught Engli sh at Vava'u at this time. Malina, Ana and their
brother Sale were sent to school at Neiafu. They would walk five miles each direction every day to
school along with me as a protector and their Sanft cousins. I would work whi le the children were at
school. I worked for the Catholic school , built housing for the nuns and priests, repaired the statue
of Jesus, Mary, and others, helped design their sheds, trays and bread tins, and enlarged their kitchen
area and their cistern in exchange for his children's school tuition.
Epikopo Tifinio from Ma'ofanga became my good friend. The nuns and priests from the
Catholi c Church loved and respected me because they found me a very honest and trustworthy
Mormon. Even the priests and the nuns from Houma, Tongatapu came and asked I if he would help
out with their school, which I did.
A Catholic member from Pangaimotu heard and saw my work for the Catholic Church and
asked me if J could build him a house, a kitchen, and a cistern. This I did and the Hausia famil y was
very grateful. In exchange they brought us mats, tapa cloths, a ton of 41 and yams at Vava' u.
The Government representative asked me if I could build the Post Office, plus an enlargement
to the courthouse and a new copra board house at the whaIf, and I did that too.
My cousins Rudolph and Taupea Tupou Sanft were living at Neiafu and wanted me to build
them a two story house, a kitchen and a cistern. I worked really hard and finall y fin ished that home.
Church families from Neiafu, Fifialoa and Namos i Topou and Tonga and Ana Poteki came and asked
me to bui Id their homes too. I completed those homes al so.
The manager of the Burns Phillips Co. needed a copra house to bake and store all their copra
on the Island of Fofoa, a four hour sai l by sea. I built and completed that. The Morris Hedstrom
Company had me build another building for the storage of their copra at Neiafu. I buiit a home for
a cousin, Sueni Guttenbeil. I was asked by the government if! would build a primary school and also
housing for workers and their families.
My uncle Otto Gustav Sanft had me design and build the first bus to transport the people
around Vava' u. He also asked if I would design and build the very first theater for the people of
Vava' u. So my fami ly was moved from Ha ' alaufuli to Neiafu so they could be closer to my work.
101
Uncle Otto let us build a small house on top of a wharf owned by the Wolfgramm family who used
to transport their copra from smaller rafts to a big ship that came from Hamburg, Germany or
Australia for the copra exporting.
1 remember one time a large ship arrived at Neiafu, Vava'u carrying equipment and supplies
for builders at Vava'u but unable to unload it because the wharf and sea was too shallow for the ship
to come in any closer for unloading. They sought me out to see if I could help them, or find a way
to get their heavy equipment and lumber off the ship.
Sure enough, I was guided to tie some empty barrels together with heavy ropes, and made a
raft. All this was done by man power. I also built a hoist to move and lift tons of heavy equipment
and timber to the wharf because there was no way to lift it by hand.
I used the shore line to level off more than 40,000 square feet of building from start to finish.
No one knew how I did it without using a level or transit. I relied on the Lord to solve problems that
men could not do, so I was able to help the Govemment out that day. The ship had been ready to leave
Neiafu harbor without unloading their equipment and timber. Thanks to the guidance and help from
above for giving me the opportunity to help out.
1947:1 did the same. When Queen Salote found out what had happened to her people when
the volcano erupted on the Island of Niuafo'ou, she sent a ship to bring them back to Tongatapu. One
of the chiefs asked me to go with them so I could help them load up these people. There is no wharf
in Niuafo'ou where a ship could come close to pick up the passengers. Again I used the knowledge
that the Lord had given me at Vava'u. I was able to apply it the same way with the empty barrels for
the people of Niuafo'ou and they finally got to the boat and to Tongatapu safely.
HOME MADE CAR
By lohani Wolfgramm
A
bout 1942 during World War II we were transferred to work as missionaries in the Halaloto
branch. There were quite a few members there who lived nearby. Some came from
Ha'akame, some from Tokomololo. Some Fijians came from another village also named Halaloto of
the Fijian. It was a beautiful and lovely place to come home to because my wife Salote, and her
grandmother Ateleita Fakatou used to live there with her Uncle Samuela and Helene Fakatou at
Halaloto also called Mapelu. My younger brother Walter Phillip and a younger sister Martha, also
were raised by these two kind and loving people, my wife's aunt and uncle.
My family didn't own any horse or buggy. Everywhere we went we would walk. One day we
were invited to go out to another village called Nukunuku for my cousin Marie Wolfgramm's
wedding. I tried to find a horse or buggy for our transportation that day. My wife and I had eight
children at this time, plus one missionary companion named Samuela Vehikite. With my wife and I
there were eleven of us all together. It was almost ten minutes before one o'clock that aftemoon, and
the wedding was at six o'clock that evening.
101
Uncle Otto let us build a small house on top of a wharf owned by the Wolfgramm family who used
to transport their copra from smaller rafts to a big ship that came from Hamburg, Germany or
Australi a for the copra exporting.
I remember one time a large ship arrived at Neiafu, Vava'u carrying equipmelll and supplies
for builders at Vava'u but unable to unload it because the wharf and sea was too shallow for the ship
to come in any closer for unl oading. They sought me out to see if I could help them, or find a way
to get their heavy equipment and lumber off the ship.
Sure enough, I was guided to tie some empty barrel s together with heavy ropes, and made a
raft. All thi s was done by man power. I also bui lt a hoi st to move and lift tons of heavy equipment
and timber to the wharf because there was no way to li ft it by hand.
I used the shore line to level off more than 40,000 square feet of building from start to finish.
No one knew how I did it without using a level or transit. I relied on the Lord to solve problems that
men could not do, so I was able to help the Government out that day. The ship had been ready to leave
Neiafu harbor without unloading their equipment and timber. Thanks to the guidance and help from
above for giving me the opportunity to help out.
1947: I did the same. When Queen Salote found out what had happened to her people when
the volcano erupted on the Island ofNiuafo'ou, she sent a ship to bring them back to Tongatapu. One
of the chiefs asked me to go with them so I could help them load up these people. There is no wharf
in Niuafo'ou where a ship could come close to pick up the passengers. Again I used the knowledge
that the Lord had given me at V.ava' u. I was able to apply it the same way with the empty barrels for
the people of Niuafo'ou and they finally got to the boat and to Tongatapu safely.
HOME MADE CAR
By Iohani Wolfgramm
A
bout 1942 during World War II we were transferred to work as missionaries in the H a l ~ l o t o
branch. There were quite a few members there who lived nearby. Some came from
Ha'akame, some from Tokomololo. Some Fijians came from another village also named Halaloto of
the Fijian. It was a beautiful and lovely place to come home to because my wife Salote, and her
grandmother Ateleita Fakatou used to live there with her Uncle Samuela and Helene Fakatou at
Halaloto also called Mapelu. My younger brother Walter Phillip and a younger sister Martha, also
were raised by these two kind and loving people, my wife's aunt and uncle.
My family didn ' t own any horse or buggy. Everywhere we went we would walk. One day we
were invited to go out to another village call ed Nukunuku for my cousin Marie Wolfgramm's
wedd ing. I tried to find a horse or buggy for our transportation that day. My wife and I had eight
children at this time, plus one missionary companion named Samuela Vehikite. With my wife and I
there were eleven of us all together. It was almost ten minutes before one o'clock that afternoon, and
the weddi ng was at six o'clock that evening.
102
As I was searching for some way to travel, I saw this U.S. Navy garbage truck drive up to dump
their garbage each day in an area near the Fakatou home at Halaloto. A thought came to my mind right
then, why not try to build a home-made car? I hurriedly ran over to the dump yard and was surprised
to find all these pieces of rods, irons, tin cans, and barrel lids. I started to gather all I could find and
took them home. I gathered lots of coconut husks and coconut shells. I bumed all the wires, irons,
steel, tin cans together. When they tumed red hot I started to form my motor. While very hot, I shaped
parts of my car from this by twisting them around until finally I had the body of my car formed. I
added a steering-wheel and took a red hot piece of pipe and twisted it into a piece that would control
the steering-wheel. I cut the bottom part of a barrel, and created four wheels for my car. I built the
top like a Tongan Fale. Cloths were hung around it to look like a curtain. I had started at 1:00 p.m.
and at 5:00 p.m. that evening my home-made car was ready to go.
I took the car out to the middle of the road to try it out. It was beautiful. I came home and told
everyone they need not worry anymore. We now owned the first home-made car in Tonga, and it
would run without gasoline. I only used my feet back and forth with a foot pedal and pulleys to move
the wheels and a rope to control the steering when we went up or down a hill. By seven o'clock that
evening we arrived at Nukunuku and the next moming we came back to Halaloto.
A few weeks later we attended a conference at Makeke College; It's about 8 miles from
Halaloto. Our small car would take the whole family. My missionary companion and I had a lot of
use out of our car; we traveled all over Tongatapu.
One day Samuela and I had need to travel to Nukualofa. As we arrived in our little car, we
were seen by some U.S. Marines, who had just arrived on their leave from fighting on some of the
Islands of the South Pacific. They wanted to see what kind of car we were riding on. They asked if
we would share with them. We let them take our car out for rides, and seemed to have a lot of fun,
riding in a car that ran without gasoline. A business man named Vilikoka, saw the marines driving
around, and was amazed to see how it ran. After they retumed our car to us, we to drove down by the
beach at Ma'ofanga to attend the wedding of one of our relatives. Hola Mataele was going to marry
a European. We drove straight to Tifonio's home. He was a Catholic priest. He also came out and
asked us how we built that car. After explaining to him, we decided to go back to Halaloto because
we didn't have any lights for the car. That small car took us to all of our church meetings, the
conferences, missionary work, etc. We used it for loading food from the bush, took the family for
picnics at the beach, also to watch American movies at the soldier's headquarters.
Finally our mission came to an end, and I gave my younger brother Walter that home-made car.
We left for the North Island Group called Vava'u. When we retumed in 1947 the little car was still
there, but the wheel was broken. We appreciated the U.S. Army letting us use some of it's irons, rods,
steel, etc. with which we built our home-made car. Without these materials to provide us with our
transportation, we might have had a much more difficult time the last few months of our mission.
102
As I was searching for some way to travel, Isaw this U.S. Navy garbage truck dri ve up to dump
thei r oarbaoe each day in an area near the Fakatou home at Halaloto. A thought came to my mind ri ght
'" '"
then, why not try to buil d a home-made car? I hurriedly ran over to the dump yard and was surprised
to find all these pieces of rods, irons, tin cans, and barrel lids. I started to gather all I could find and
took them home. I gathered lots of coconut husks and coconut shell s. I burned all the wi res, irons,
steel, tin cans together. When they turned red hot I started to fornl my motor. While very hot, I shaped
parts of my car from thi s by twisting them around until finally I had the body of my car fOlmed. I
added a steering-wheel and took a red hot piece of pipe and twisted it into a pi ece that would control
the steering-wheel. 1 cut the bottom part of a banel , and created fou r wheels for my car. I built the
top li ke a Tongan Fale. Cloths were hung around it to look like a curtain. I had started at 1 :00 p.m.
and at 5:00 p.m. that eveni ng my home-made car was ready to go.
I took the car out to the middle of the road to try it out. It was beautiful. I came home and told
everyone they need not wony anymore. We now owned the first home-made car in Tonga, and it
would run without gasoline. I only used my feet back and forth with a foot pedal and pulleys to move
the wheels and a rope to control the steering when we went up or down a hill. By seven o'clock that
evening we arrived at Nukunuku and the next morning we came back to Halaloto.
A few weeks later we attended a conference at Makeke College; It 's about 8 miles from
Halaloto. Our small car would take the whole famil y. My missionary companion and I had a lot of
use out of our car; we traveled all over Tongatapu.
One day Samuela and I had need to travel to Nukualofa. As we alTived in our little car, we
were seen by some U.S. Marines, who had just arri ved on their leave from fighting on some of the
Islands of the South Pacific. They wanted to see what kind of car we were riding on. They asked if
we would share with them. We let them take our car out for rides, and seemed to have a lot of fun,
riding in a car that ran without gasoline. A business man named Vilikoka, saw the marines dri ving
around, and was amazed to see how it ran. After they returned our car to us, we to drove down by the
beach at Ma'ofanga to attend the weddi ng of one of our relatives. Hola Mataele was going to marry
a European. We drove straight to Tifonio's home. He was a Catholic priest. He also came out and
asked us how we built that car. After explaining to him, we decided to go back to Halaloto because
we didn ' t have any lights for the car. That small car took us to all of our church meetings. the
conferences, mi ssionary work, etc. We used it for loading food from the bush, took the famil y for
picnics at the beach, also to watch American movies at the soldier 's headquarters.
Finally our mi ssion came to an end, and I gave·my younger brother Walter that home-made car.
We left for the Nort h Island Group called Vava' u. When we returned in 1947 the little car was sti ll
there, but the wheel was broken. We appreciated the U.S. Anny letting us use some of it 's irons, rods,
steel, etc. wit h which we built our home-made car. Without these materials to provide us with our
transportation, we mi ght have had a much more difficult time the last few months of our mission.
103
CARL WEISS, LABOR MISSIONARY
lohani recorded these stories of Elder Weiss and we feel that they are interesting enough to
be put with lohani's writings inasmuch as they touched him deeply. Elder Weiss was a labor
missionary sent to work on Liahona in the construction stage. He had a grown family at home.
A
1
ITEM 1: Carl Weiss tells of his father 1950-1951
turning point for my family to turn the hearts to their fathers was when Elder Carl Weiss
-came to Tonga as a labor missionary from Zion. At a special genealogy class he was our
guest speaker. He related several miracles that happened to him or his family during his life in
Germany.
He started by telling us that his father was Henry Weiss. He heard the gospel in Nuremberg,
Germany in 1909 and accepted it with all his heart. As he studied both before and after his baptism,
he leamed the principle of salvation for the dead, but was not actively interested in it. He felt that he
had plenty of time for the work to be done in the years ahead after he reached Zion.
In the World War: When the World War I came, Elder Henry Weiss was among the first
German recruits drafted. As he left for the front, his son Carl handed him a little pocket Bible, asking
him to always carry it with him. From it he frequently explained to his comrades the principles of the
gospel as restored through the prophet Joseph Smith. Some few listened to the message but others
jeered at it or ignored it.
A Miraculous Escape: Qnce as he entered a battle in Germany, he felt a sudden impression to
take the Bible out of the lower right hand pocket of his uniform where he always carried it, and put it
in the upper left hand pocket of his coat. No sooner had he done so than shrapnel exploded in the
midst of his group of soldiers and tore through their ranks, killing many of them around him. One
jagged piece of shrapnel, red hot and with razor sharp edges, about four inches long, pierced the tunic
at his breast with terrific impact and hurled him a considerable distance.
Unconscious, he was carried to a field hospital. When his tum came to be examined, they
found that his arm was shattered, and protruding from his breast was the jagged piece of shrapnel.
When he regained consciousness his superior officer showed him the piece of shrapnel and the Bible,
and told him that except for the Bible he would have been instantly killed.
A Message from Malachi: In the hospital he underwent eleven operations on his left arm. It
was paralyzed and the attending physician told him that he would be helpless as long as he lived.
Imagine his anguish of mind and body as he lay there contemplating the future. He thought of his
family at home, his wife and a number of small children whose fate and happiness depended upon his
own life or death. For eight months he lay there too ill for speech or motion.
One day he remembered his Bible and called for it. Painfully turning the leaves, he was curious
as to how far the point of the shrapnel had actually penetrated. To his amazement he saw that it
stopped exactly on chapter 4 of Malachi and the words Behold I will send you Elijah the prophet
before the coming ofthe great and dreadful day ofthe Lord. And he shall turn the heart of the fathers
to their children, and the heart ofthe children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a
curse jumped out at him.
103
CARL WEISS, LABOR MISSIONARY
lohani recorded /hese s/ories of Elder Weiss and we feel that they are il1leresting enough to
be put with l ohan;' s writings inasmuch as /hey lOuched him deeply. Elder Weiss was a labor
missionary sent 10 work on Liahona in the calls/ruction stage. He had a grown fami ly atllOme.
ITEM I: Carl Weiss tell s of hi s father
1950-1951
A
turnin
g
point for my fami ly to turn the hearts to their fat hers was when Elder Carl Wei ss
came to Tonga as a labor missIOnary from ZIOn. At a speci al genealogy class he was our
guest speaker. He related several miracles that happened to him or hi s famil y during hi s life in
Gernlany.
He started by telling us that hi s father was Hemy Wei ss. He heard the gospel in Nuremberg,
Germany in 1909 and accepted it with all hi s heart. As he studied both before and after hi s bapti sm,
he learned the principle of salvation for the dead, but was not actively interested in it. He felt that he
had plenty of time for the work to be done in the years ahead after he reached Zion.
In the World War: When the World War I came, Elder Henry Weiss was among the first
German recruits drafted. As he left for th" front, his son Carl handed him a li ttle pocket Bible, asking
him to always carry it with him. From it he frequently explained to his comrades the principles of the
gospel as restored through the prophet Joseph Smith. Some few li stened to the message but others
jeered at it or ignored it.
A Miraculous Escape: Once as he entered a battle in Germany, he felt a sudden impression to
take the Bible out of the lower light hand pocket of hi s uniform where he always can-i ed it, and put it
in the upper left hand pocket of his coat. No sooner had he done so than shrapnel exploded in the
midst of hi s group of soldiers and tore through their ranks, killing many of them around him. One
jagged piece of shrapnel , red hot and with razor sharp edges, about four inches long, pierced the tunic
at hi s breast with terrific impact and hurled hi m a considerable distance.
Unconscious, he was carried to a field hospital. When hi s tum came to be examined, they
found that hi s arm was shattered, and protruding from his breast was the jagged piece of shrapnel.
When he regained consciousness his superior officer showed him the piece of shrapnel and the Bible,
and told him that except for the Bible he would have been instantly killed.
A Message from Malachi: In the hospital he underwent eleven operations on hi s left arm. It
was paralyzed and the attending physician told him that he would be helpless as long as he lived.
Imagine hi s angui sh of mind and body as he lay there contemplating the future. He thought of hi s
family at home, his wife and a number of small chil dren whose fate and happiness depended upon hi s
own life or death. For eight months he lay there too i II for 'speech or motion.
One day he remembered hi s Bible and called for it. Painfully tuming the leaves, he was curi ous
as to how far the point of the shrapnel had actuall y penetrated. To hi s amazement he saw that it
stopped exactly on chapter 4 of Malachi and the words Behold I will send you Elijah Ihe prophet
before Ihe coming of the greal and dreadful day of the Lord. And he shall turn Ihe heart otlhefalhers
to /heir children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest {come and smite the earth with a
curse jumped out at him.
104
A sudden conviction entered his soul to its very depths. Now he knew the meaning of the
passage. He realized why his life had been spared by the slightest margin, and he had been kept from
the world of spirits where his father and mother and loved ones were gathered, where they were no
doubt pleading for him to understand and take up a labor in their behalf to bring them more complete
happiness, which could only be done in the temple in Zion.
He lifted up his voice in covenant with his maker promising that if his life should be spared
and his health restored and his paralysis removed, he would devote a major portion of his life to the
work of salvation and redemption of his dead kindred. As he made this covenant, the spirit of peace
entered his soul.
Healed by the Priesthood: He pleaded with his nurse and the hospital authorities that a Latter-
day Saint elder might be sent to bless him by the power ofthe priesthood. He begged to have President
Angus J. Cannon, who was presiding over the German Mission, notified by telegraph of his condition
and request that he come and administer to him. President Cannon received the telegram and came
immediately. By the laying on of hands, by authority ofthe priesthood, Elder Weiss was immediately
healed and in a short time in a most wonderful way regained his old-time health and vigor. After he
retumed home, he spent every spare moment from his trade among the parish registers and in
govemment record offices searching out his kindred dead, in order to discharge his obligation to them.
Because he was a soldier, every facility was opened to him in his search. Tirelessly and
faithfully he labored between the years 1918 and 1923. By this time he had gathered the names of
3,000 ancestors of his own kindred and had carefully arranged them in pedigree and family group
form. Di addition he had gathered out 30,000 names for poor German saints of his neighborhood and
acquaintances.
Labor in the Temple: After emigrating to Zion, Elder Henry Weiss utilized every opportunity
to attend the Temple and assist in bringing salvation within the reach of his departed kindred. As the
ordinances were completed, they were recorded with exactness in his voluminous record book. He
labored through the day and then in the evening with his own family. His married children and their
spouses went regularly to the House of the Lord.
An Unusual Dream: So grateful was he to the Lord for life, health, and happiness that he
volunteered for a short-term mission to the northwestem States. The day before he was to retum home
from his mission, his wife in Salt Lake City had an unusual dream. She saw a wide valley and in the
valley a great concourse of people gathered and were in eamest and animated conversation. At their
head, evidently their leader, was a person dressed in the costume of an old-time schoolmaster. A little
farther away she saw her father-in-law Henry Weiss. He had died just after hearing the gospel from
an elder of the Church. The school master approached him and said, "We have heard that upon earth
some labor has been performed in our behalf which will bring us great happiness. Can you tell us about
it"
The father-in-law answered "I'm sorry, but I cannot. I only heard of the gospel once before I
died. You should have my son, Henry Weiss, here as a missionary. He could tell you all about that."
It was decided among the group to get up a petition asking for Henry Weiss to be called to the spirit
world on a mission to preach to his numerous kindred.
104
A sudden conviction entered hi s soul to its very depths. Now he knew the meaning of the
passage. He reali zed why hi s li fe had been spared by the sli ghtest margin, and he had been kept from
the world of spiri ts where his father and mother and loved ones were gathered, where they were no
doubt pleading for him to understand and take up a labor in their behalf to bring them more complete
happiness, whi ch could onl y be done in the temple in Zion.
He lifted up hi s voice in covenant with his maker promising that if hi s li fe should be spared
and hi s health restored and his paralysis removed, he would devote a major portion of hi s li fe to the
work of salvation and redemption of hi s dead kindred. As he made thi s covenant, the spirit of peace
entered his soul.
Healed bv the Pri esthood: He pleaded with hi s nurse and the hospital authorities that a Latter-
day Saint elder might be sent to bless him by the power of the priesthood. He begged to have President
Angus J. Cannon, who was presiding over the German Mission, notified by telegraph of hi s condition
and request that he come and administer to him. President Cannon received the telegram and came
immediately. By the laying on of hands, by authority of the priesthood, Elder Weiss was immediately
healed and in a short time in a most wonderful way regained hi s old-time health and vigor. After he
returned home, he spent every spare moment from hi s trade among the pari sh registers and in
government record offices searching out hi s kindred dead, in order to discharge hi s obli gation to them.
Because he was a soldier, every facility was opened to him in hi s search. Tirelessly and
fait hfull y he labored between the years 19 18 and 1923. By thi s time he had gathered the names of
3,000 ancestors of hi s own kindred and had carefull y arranged them in pedigree and family group
foml. In additi on he had gathered out 30,000 names for poor German saints of hi s neighborhood and
acquai ntances.
Labor in the Temple: After emi grati ng to Zion, Elder Henry Weiss utili zed every opportunity
to attend the Temple and assist in bringing salvati on withi n the reach of his departed kindred. As the
ordinances were compl eted, they were recorded with exactness in hi s voluminous record book. He
labored through the day and then in the evening with his own fami ly. His married chi ldren and their
spouses went regularly to the House of the Lord.
An Unusual Dream: So grateful was he to the Lord for life, health, and happiness that he
vol unteered for a short-term mission to the northwestern States. The day before he was to return home
from hi s mi ssion, hi s wife in Salt Lake City had an unusual dream. She saw a wide valley and in the
vall ey a great concourse of people gathered and were in earnest and animated conversation. At their
head, evidently their leader, was a person dressed in the costume of an old-time schoolmaster. A li ttle
Farther away she saw her father-in-law Henry Wei ss. He had died just after hearing the gospel from
an elder of the Church. The school master approached him and said, "We have heard that upon earth
some labor has been performed in our behalf which wil l bring us great happiness. Can you tell us about
it"
The father-in-law answered ''I'm sorry, but I cannot. I onl y heard of the gospel once before I
died. You should have my son, Henry Wei ss, here as a mi ssionary. He could tell you all about that."
It was decided among the group to get up a petition asking for Henry Weiss to be called to the spirit
world on a mi ssion to preach to hi s numerous kindred.
105
Completing his Record: When she awoke the next morning she was deeply concemed as to the
meaning of her dream. He husband retumed. He seemed in good health and two days after his arrival
resumed his regular business and church duties. At the first opportunity, she related her dream to him.
He said, "It seems to refer to me, and I suppose it means that I should redouble my efforts to gather
more of my relatives."
The family noticed that as the weeks went by he spent a great deal of time checking over all
his records, seeing if any names had been omitted and if all baptisms, endowments, and sealings had
been completed. He prepared a Book of Remembrance record of his life that was most creditable
containing among other faith promoting experiences, the war time incident related above.
Called Home: About six months after his retum, his health was impaired and he suffered much
pain. When he consulted a doctor, and X-ray showed that he had cancer. An immediate operation was
advised. When the operation was performed, the examination showed the cancer had already pervaded
his stomach and reached his spine. But Henry Weiss, not knowing his serious condition, had high
hopes of a speedy recovery. Only a few mornings later, on Februaiy 1,1932, as a nurse adjusted his
bed, he tumed over on his side and in an instant he was gone.
The Interpretation ofthe Dream: Flis wife, Marie W. Weiss, wrote these words after his death.
"The interpretation ofthe dream is very clear to me now. My husband's father was the last one who
died in his family without having accepted the gospel. The oldest man, dressed like a schoolmaster,
was the earliest ancestor on our pedigree chart who immigrated in 1620 from Silesia into Bavaria as
a soldier and school teacher. The gospel had to be preached to them and so they looked for someone
in mortal life to be called on a mission over to the spirit world to instruct them. My husband was the
only one out of a family of 15 children to hear the gospel message and accept it, and was ready to go
over as a missionary to his father's household and preach to his own kindred in the spirit world the
glad tidings ofthe gospel. This is my testimony, that sometimes when my heart aches in longing for
my husband, the dream is a solace and comfort to me, a source of faith and hope from which I get
renewed strength to go forward. I can see clearly that he was the only one that was able to go and do
this great and glorious work for his people."
After all the members heard Brother Carl Weiss tell us of his father's experiences, Elder Ermel
J. Morton was the translator, there was no one in that whole building that could hold back the tears.
Their heart had been touched. Again the spirit bore witness to all of us that the things Elder Carl
Weiss related to us were true.
ITEM B: Carl Weiss heals Walter 1950
When my son Walter was about three years old a German labor missionary named Carl Weiss
came to help build Liahona High School. He was a very spiritual man. We often found him going
inside an unfinished building, on his knees, offering a long prayer to our Heavenly Father.
At one time Walter was suffering from a big boil between his legs, causing him much pain.
I decided to call on Brother Weiss to come and administer to young Walter.
Brother Weiss asked all the small children to form a little circle around Walter and for the older
children and adults to stand just behind Walter. I annointed the oil and Brother Weiss offered the
prayer and blessing and promised Walter, through the faith of his family and all the children united
105
Completing his Record: When she awoke the next morning she was deeply concerned as to the
meaning of her dream. He husband returned. He seemed in good health and two days after hi s arri val
resumed hi s regular business and church duti es. At the first opport unity, she related her dream to him.
He said, " It seems to refer to me, and I suppose it means that I should redoubl e my efforts to gather
more of my relatives."
The family noticed that as the weeks went by he spent a great deal of time checking over all
hi s records, seeing if any names had been omitted and if all bapti sms, endowments, and sealings had
been completed. He prepared a Book of Rememhrance record of hi s life that was most creditabl e
contai ning among other fa ith promoting experiences, the war time incident rel ated above.
Call ed Home: About six months after hi s return, his health was impaired and he suffered much
pain. When he consulted a doctor, and X-ray showed that he had cancer. An immedi ate operation was
advised. When the operation was perfonned, the examination showed the cancer had already pervaded
hi s stomach and reached hi s spine. But Henry Weiss, not knowing hi s serious condition, had hi gh
hopes of a speedy recovery. Only a few mornings later, on February I , 1932, as a nurse adjusted hi s
bed, he turned over on hi s side and in an instant he was gone.
The Interpretation of the Dream: Eis wife, Marie W. Weiss, wrote these words after hi s death.
"The interpretation of the dream is very clear to me now. My husband's fat her was the last one who
di ed in hi s famil y without havi ng accepted the gospel. The oldest man, dressed li ke a schoolmaster,
was the earliest ancestor on our pedigree chm1 who immigrated in 1620 from Silesia into Bavaria as
a soldier and school teacher. The gospel had to be preached to them and so they looked for someone
in mortal life to be called on a mi ssion over to the spi ri t world to instruct them. My husband was the
only one out of a family of 15 children to hear the gospel message and accept it, and was ready to go
over as a mi ssionary to hi s father 's household and preach to hi s own kindred in the spirit world the
glad tidings of the gospel. Thi s is my testimony, that sometimes when my heart aches in longing for
my husband, the dream is a solace and comfort to me. a source of faith and hope from whi ch I get
renewed st rength to go forwm·d. I can see clearly that he was the only one that was able to go and do
this great and glori ous work for hi s people."
After all the members heard Brother Carl Weiss tell us of his father's experi ences, Elder Ennel
J. Morton was the translator, there was no one in that whole building that could hold back the tears.
Their heart had been touched. Again the spirit bore witness to all of us that the things Elder Carl
Weiss related to us were true.
ITEM II: Carl Wei ss heal s Walter 1950
When my son Walter was about three years old a Gennan labor missionary named Carl Wei ss
came to help build Liahona Hi gh School. He was a very spiri tual man. We often found him goi ng
inside an unfini shed building, on hi s knees, offering a long prayer to our Heavenly Father.
At one time Walter was suffering from a big boil between his legs, causi ng him much pain.
I decided to call on Brother Wei ss to come and admifJi ster to young Walter.
Brother Weiss asked all the small children to form a littl e circle around Walter and for the older
chi ldren and adults to stand just behind Walter. I annointed the oil and Brother Wei ss offered the
prayer and blessing and promised Walter, through the fait h of his family and all the chi ldren united
106
together, including his faith, that our Heavenly Father would bless Walter. He asked that the very
next moming that all the infection and pus that caused his suffering would be loosed and would cause
his boil to open up and drain away all the infection. By the power ofthe priesthood, Walter would be
able to use his legs to be well and continue to walk and play with his brothers and sisters very soon.
Many blessings were given to Walter at that time. The prayer came to an end. Brother Weiss
told us the reason why he had all the small children circle around Walter was because through their
faith, Heavenly Father can hear their prayers. He usually gives them answers to their prayers.
The very next moming Walter tried to crawl over to Salote. He took one step forward and the
boil broke. All the infection came out like he was promised. Walter started to walk and play with us
as the blessing had promised.
A
1
LABOR MISSIONARIES AND LIAHONA COLLEGE
mission conference was held in 1947. Elder Mathew Cowley asked for a few skilled
-carpenters to measure and lay the comer stone for the newly approved Liahona church
college. I along with Simote, Fusitu'a and Efalame Wolfgramm were called with a few others.
Salote and I and our eleven children came to Tongatapu. We didn't have any money saved, but
knew the Lord would provide for our needs. Soon after our arrival we built a Tongan Fale (house).
We enjoyed our life there. We didn't receive any pay for our work, but the Church allowed a cup
of flour for each member of the family, a bar of soap, a little sugar, and a good piece of meat to
make some soup or use some other way for the family meal. The older children were able to
attend the college; and the younger ones had to walk to the Fatal village for Primary school. It was
very hard not having any money to buy a loaf of bread for the younger children or for school
lunches, or perhaps a piece of material for their school clothes.
The college operated a plantation where we could go and cut copra. For this work we
would receive six pence for each box ful of coconut meat (about 100 to 150 pounds of copra).
Salote and I would sneak out quietly at 3:00 a.m. while the children were fast asleep and walk one
and a half miles to Loto'api, an area where they could cut copra to make a little money for the
family. They would usually fill 10 boxes then walk the mile and a half miles back home, arriving
there around 7:30 a.m. I would then get ready for my regular job at the college.
The children would awaken early and fix a big pot of topai (mixed dough, coconut milk and
sugar) or Tonga cake and have it prepared for the family. We would have our family prayers and
then go our separate ways to work, school, etc.
All the labor missionaries would gather together at the sound ofthe big bell at 8:00 a.m.,
then the school bell would ring at 8:30 a.m.. The labor missionaries would go inside and have a
spiritual talk, song and prayer before they started to work on the building. This was the daily
routine. We also constructed a large dorm for the single labor missionaries, and a separate kitchen
with a man and wife to do the cooking for them. Their clothing was sent over to the school to be
washed and ironed by female students. These single men were good L.D.S. members and would
abide with the rules set up for them. They had high moral standards.
106
lOgether, including hi s faith, that our Heavenly Father would bless Walter. He asked that the very
next morning that all the infection and pus that caused his suffering would be loosed and would cause
hi s boil to open up and drain away all the infection . By the power of the pliesthood, Walter would be
able to use hi s legs to be wel l and continue lO walk and play with his brothers and sisters very Soon.
Many blessings were given lO Walter at that time. The prayer came to an end. Brother Weiss
lOld us the reason why he had all the small chi ldren circle around Walter was because through their
faith, Heavenly Father can hear their prayers. He usually gives them answers lO their prayers.
The very next morning Walter tried to crawl over to Salote. He took one step forward and the
boil broke. All the infection came out like he was promised. Walter started to walk and play with us
as the blessing had promised.
LABOR MISSIONARIES AND LIAHONA COLLEGE
A
mi ssion conference was held in 1947. Elder Mathew Cowley asked for a few skilled
carpenters lO measure and lay the comer SlOne for the newl y approved Liahona church
college. I along wi th Simote, Fusitu'a and Efalame Wolfgramm were called with a few others.
Salote and I and our eleven children came lO Tongatapu. We didn't have any money saved, but
knew the Lord would provide for our needs. Soon after our arrival we built a Tongan Fale (house).
We enj oyed our life there. We didn't receive any pay for our work, but the Church allowed a cup
of flour for each member of the family, a bar of soap, a little sugar, and a good piece of meat lO
make some soup or use some other way for the family meal. The older children were able lO
attend the coll ege; and the younger ones had to walk to the Fatai village for Primary school. It was
very hard not having any money to buy a loaf of bread for the younger children or for school
lunches, or perhaps a piece of material for their school clothes.
The coll ege operated a plantation where we could go and cut copra. For thi s work we
would receive six pence for each box ful of coconut meat (about 100 to 150 pounds of copra).
Salote and I woul d sneak out quietly at 3:00 a.m. while the children were fast asleep and walk one
and a half mil es to Loto'api, an area where they could cut copra to make a little money for the
family. They would usually fill 10 boxes then walk the mile and a half miles back home, arriving
there around 7:30 a.m. I would then get ready for my regul ar job at the coll ege.
The chi ldren would awaken early and fix a big pot of lOpai (mixed dough, coconut milk and
sugar) or Tonga cake and have it prepared for the family. We would have our fami ly prayers and
then go our separate ways to work, school, etc.
All the labor missionaries would gather together at the sound of the big bell at 8:00 a.m. ,
then the school bell would ring at 8:30 a.m .. The labor missionaries would go inside and have a
spiritual talk, song and prayer before they started to work on the bui lding. This was the daily
routine. We also constructed a large dOlm for the single labor missionaries, and a separate kitchen
with a man and wife lO do the cooking for them. Their clothing was sent over to the school lO be
washed and ironed by fema le students. These single men were good L.D.S. members and would
abide with the rules set up for them. They had high moral standards.
107
A lovely couple from the United States who were working in New Zealand, were
transferred to work in Tonga by Matthew Cowley. Brother Lionel and Sister Norma Going served
as a labor missionary leader and Norma, his wife, taught school at Liahona college. He had been a
successful farmer. He was taught early in his youth. When he arrived in Tonga he brought
vegetable seeds and eggs ready to hatch and started raising chickens. He planted a lot of
vegetables and potatoes in his garden. He was in charge ofthe missionary food for each family
daily. He would go and milk cows and share this milk with the families who needed it for their
babies. He did all this while working as a labor missionary.
M:
MATTHEW COWLEY'S HELP
ITEM I Matthew Cowley's First Visit 1947/1948
'issionary work in Tonga was very hard, especially with what the mission president had
-to put up with. Many missionaries from Zion were willing to come and serve, but the
Tongan Govemment refused to grant an entry visa for them. In fact, President Huntsman requested
the leaders in Zion that Elder John Laycock be transferred to another mission while Elder
Rudolph Wolfgramm and his wife Edna remain in Tonga. His request was granted. The Govemment
would only let a new missionary in when one was being released.
The day President Huntsman came to see President Emil Dunn off at Fua'amotu airport, he was
coming back by Makeke College and drove in to check out how the students were doing there. After
seeing what little food {ufi, taro) some of the students were eating, he decided to write church
headquarters for more money to see about building a new and better school for the Tongan students.
While waiting for a reply, he began to search, pray, and check out new areas.
Around February that year President Evon W. Huntsman, Elder Lidell Roberts and Elder
Rudolph Wolfgramm had been around looking for a piece of land for the new school. They had
offered many prayers with all their might, mind and all that they had, asking the Lord for his help in
finding a new land where he would like the students of Tonga to live and receive an education and be
taught the gospel. They were about to buy a land close to Makeke owned by the Seventh Day
Adventist Church, but after meeting with Samuela Fakatou who was teaching at Makeke College at
the time, he told the committee that if they would come with him back to Halaloto he would show
them another piece of land.
Samuela Fakatou told them that there was a very special and beautiful piece of land with rich
soil, about 276 acres in area belonging to Frank Cowley. 150 acres are in coconut palms, about 70
acres are tropical forest, including 70 head of cattle, 9 horses, and 3 buggies, and it is up for lease right
now, the price $10,000. I'm sure after they saw that land, they all felt that this was going to be the new
land that they had been looking for.
On April 14 Pres. Huntsman received a telegram from the church leaders from Salt Lake City,
Utah approving their request, saying, We welcome your request for the church to buy or lease
Cowley's land and everything therein.
107
A lovely couple from the United States who were working in New Zealand, were
transferred to work in Tonga by Matthew Cowley. Brother Lionel and Sister Norma Going served
as a labor missionary leader and Norma, hi s wife, taught school at Liahona col lege. He had been a
successful farmer. He was taught early in hi s youth. When he arrived in Tonoa he brouolll
b '"
vegetable seeds and eggs ready to hatch and started raising ch ickens. He planted a lot of
vegetables and potatoes in his garden. He was in charge of the mi ssionary food for each family
daily. He would go and milk cows and share this milk with the families who needed it for their
babies. He did all this whi le working as a labor missionary.
MATTHEW COWLEY'S HELP
ITEM I Matt hew Cowley's First Visit
1947/1948
M
issionary work in Tonga ~ a s very hard, especially wit h what the mi ssion president had
to put up With. Many miSSionaries from ZIOn were Willing to come and serve, but the
Tongan Government refused to grant an t'ntry visa for them. In fact , President Huntsman requested
the leaders in Zion that Elder John Laycock be transferred to another mission while Elder
Rudolph Wolfgramm and his wife Edna remain in Tonga. Hi s request was granted. The Government
would only let a new missionary in when one was being released.
The day President H u n t s ~ a n came to see President Emil Dunn offatFua 'amotu airport, he was
coming back by Makeke College and drove in to check out how the students were doing there. After
seeing what li ttle food (uji, rara) some of the students were eating, he decided to write church
headquarters for more money to see about building a new and better school for the Tongan students.
While waiting for a reply, he began to search, pray, and check out new areas.
Around February that year President Evon W. Huntsman, Elder Lidell Roberts and Elder
Rudolph Wolfgramm had been around looking for a piece of land for the new school. They had
offered many prayers with all their might, mind and all that they had, asking the Lord for hi s help in
find ing a new land where he would like the students of Tonga to live and receive an education and be
taught the gospel. They were about to buy a land close to Makeke owned by the Seventh Day
Adventist Church, but after meeting with Samuela Fakatou who was teaching at Makeke College at
the time, he told the committee that if they wou ld come with him back to Halaloto he would show
them another piece of land.
Samuela Fakatou told them that there was a very special and beautiful piece of land with rich
soil , about 276 acres in area belonging to Frank Cowley. 150 acres are in coconut palms, about 70
acres are tropical forest, including 70 head of cattle, 9 horses, and 3 buggies, and it is up for lease right
now, the price $10,000. I'm sure after they saw that land, they all felt that this was going to be the new
land that they had been looking for.
On April 14 Pres . Huntsman received a telegram from the church leaders from Salt Lake City,
Utah approving their request, saying, We welcome your request for the church to buy or lease
Cowley's land and everything therein.
108
With humble hearts and gratitude to the Lord, the request for the land lease was accepted.
President Huntsman went to Havea Tu'iha'ateiho, the minister of land and bought the lease. The
papers were signed and Cowley's land belonged to the church-at least the remaining 20 years left on
the lease.
At that same time Elder Matthew Cowley, a member of the Twelve apostles, was assigned to
preside over all the missions in the South Pacific. About June 15,1947, Matthew Cowley visited with
Havea Tu'iha'ateiho to make sure the land that the church was about to lease could be renewed after
the 1961 expiration date.
After visiting with the students of Makeke they prepared a welcome for the apostle along with
other missionaries and the mission president,. Elder Cowley wanted to see the new area and check it
out for himself. He felt right about the decision, and went back to Nuku'alofa and sent a telegram to
Church headquarters to send the money to Frank Cowley's bank in New Zealand.
There was a conference held from May 22
nd
to May 29
th
, 1947 at which Elder Matthew
Cowley expressed his love for the Tongan people and brought a message of greeting and love from
the First Presidency ofthe church to each and everyone there.
He told the people to continue to pray and fast that the Tongan Government might open the
doors for missionaries to come and bless their lives. He encouraged them to pay their tithing, and let
them know that the leaders in Zion love them. The gift that the Lord had given them was a gift from
those who had given their tithing to the Lord, allowing the church to lease the land for the saints in
Tonga and for non-members also.
He also spoke of how happy he was to look down upon our faces and let us know that we are
descendants of NEPHI in the Book of Mormon. We were so surprised. All this time, we were told
that we were lazy Lamanites by Semisi Taumoepeau, a teacher assigned to work closely with Tonga
Toutai. After that conference we were very, very happy.
At this conference, Elder Matthew Cowley asked Pres. Huntsman for the best carpenter in
Tonga. Pres. Huntsman told him that lohani Otto Wolfgramm of Ha'alaufuli, Efalame Carl
Wolfgramm of Koloa, and Simote Fusitu'a from Taia, also Sosaia Napai Hola for the lotoapi (place
where copra is made), and Samuela Fakatou for the agriculture at the new school, were the best.
After this conference I told Elder Cowley that I would be more than happy to serve this
mission, but my eyes had cataracts. Elder Cowley said, "There is no problem lohani. After the
meeting come to Matavaimo'ui (mission home) and I'll give you a blessing." I continued saying that
there were other problems. I told him that some of my cousins had been taken to Makonga, Fiji along
with people from Tefisi, thinking they had leprosy. Elder Matthew Cowley said, "Don't worry, just
gather all your family or any that have afflictions and come to Matavaimo'ui and your request will be
granted."
Elder Matthew Cowley made us feel at ease. The family was gathered together and walked
about a mile to Matavaimo'ui. After we gathered there he raised up his hands and offered a holy
prayer of faith and asked the Lord to open lohani's eyes that he could cany on this new calling. He
blessed lohani that he would never have need for glasses for the rest of his life and it happened as he
said. He also asked the Lord to bring an end to this disease that had afflicted the family and that they
would suffer from it no more. During his prayer, he said that if we lived the gospel and paid a full
108
With humble hearts and gratitude to the Lord, the request for the land lease was accepted.
Pres ident Huntsman went to Havea Tu' iha'atei ho, the minister of land and bought the lease. The
papers were signed and Cowley's land belonged to the church-at least the remaining 20 years left on
the lease.
At that same time Elder Matthew Cowley, a member of the Twelve apostles, was assigned to
preside over all the mi ssions in the South Pacific. About June 15,1947, Matthew Cowley visited with
Havea Tu' iha'ateiho to make sure the land that the church was about to lease could be renewed after
the 1961 expiration date.
After visiting with the students ofMakeke they prepared a welcome for the apostle along with
other mi ssionaries and the mission president,. Elder Cowley wanted to see the new area and check it
out for himself. He felt right about the decision, and went back to Nuku'alofa and sent a telegram to
Church headquarters to send the money to Frank Cowley's bank in New Zealand.
There was a conference held from May 22"d to May 29'h, 1947 at which Elder Matthew
Cowley expressed his love for the Tongan people and brought a message of greeting and love from
the First Presidency of the church to each and everyone there.
He told the people to continue to pray and fast that the Tongan Government might open the
doors for missionaries to come and bless their li ves. He encouraged them to pay their tithing, and let
them know that the leaders in Zion love them. The gift that the Lord had given them was a gift from
those who had given their tithing to the Lord, allowing the church to lease the land fo r the saints in
Tonga and for non-members also.
He also spoke of how happy he was to look down upon our faces and let us know that we are
descendants o/NEPHI in the Book of Mormon. We were so surprised. All this time, we were told
that we were lazy Lamanites by Semisi Taumoepeau, a teacher assigned to work closely with Tonga
Toutai. After that conference we were very, very happy.
At this conference, Elder Matthew Cowley asked Pres. Huntsman for the best carpenter in
Tonga. Pres. Huntsman told him that lohani Otto Wolfgramm of Ha'alaufuli, Efalame Carl
Wolfgramm of Koloa, and Simote Fusitu 'a from Taia, also Sosaia Napai Hola for the lotoapi (place
where copra is made), and Samuela Fakatou for the agriculture at the new school , were the best.
After thi s conference I told Elder Cowley that I would be more than happy to serve this
mi ssion, but my eyes had cataracts. Elder Cowley said, "There is no problem lohani. After the
meeting come to Matavaimo' ui (mission home) and I'll give you a blessing." I continued saying that
there were other problems. I told him that some of my cousins had been taken to Makonga, Fiji along
with people from Tefisi, thinking they had leprosy. Elder Matthew Cowley said, "Don ' t worry, just
gather all your family or any that have afflictions and come to Matavaimo'ui and your request will be
granted."
Elder Matthew Cowley made us feel at ease. The famil y was gathered together and wal ked
about a mile to Matavaimo' ui. After we gathered there he rai sed up hi s hands and offered a holy
prayer of faith and asked the Lord to open lohani 's eyes that he could carryon this new calling. He
blessed Iohani that he would never have need for glasses for the rest of his life and it happened as he
said. He also asked the Lord to bring an end to thi s disease that had affl icted the family and that they
would suffer from it no more. During hi s prayer, he said that if we lived the gospel and paid a fu ll
109
tithing, the Lord would bless us, but if we failed to do those things, the blessings would not come to
us. Here the Lord has blessed you with these beautiful islands of Tonga for you to dwell on. Even this
new piece of land has been given to you. Be grateful and obedient and keep all the gospel and laws
of God to your best ability. Live it, now and in the future that the Govemment of Tonga will be able
to find good honest leadership among you to help them. This was done by the power of the
Melchizedek priesthood which he held and in the name of Jesus Christ. We felt the spirit so strong
there. The room was full of family members,
I started helping the new mission president in surveying for the new college.
Later, 27
Ih
June 1947, Elder Matthew Cowley said farewell to Queen Salote Tupou, to the
Crown Prince Tungi, and left for the airport at Fua'amotu. There were waiting about 600 members
to sing farewell songs and say good bye to Elder Matthew Cowley. We went with other members of
the Church. The spirit was very strong. Our testimonies of the truthfulness of the gospel was
strengthened. We witnessed the healing given to us by God at the hands of his apostle and his
priesthood power. Jesus Christ lives and the Father also. We know that the Holy Ghost helps us and
guides us throughout our lives. Joseph Smith was a prophet of God, as well as our prophet today.
We know that the Book of Mormon and the Bible and other writings of the church are
true. We love Elder Matthew Cowley. He was a man of God. He had a lot of faith. He helped bless
and heal the sick. Many lives were restored. We received many blessings from God through him. We
express our love for the great church leaders from Zion, for sending us missionaries, presidents, even
apostle Matthew Cowley to love and teach us. We all said farewell and continued singing until his
plane left for Samoa.
ITEM B: More of Matthew Cowley's Visit
President Evon W. Huntsman had just arrived in 1946 to preside over the Tongan Mission.
In 1947 Elder Matthew Cowley came to Tonga to visit. They brought him over on a little boat named
Lupe. He retumed in 1948 for another official visit.
I was once again called to go back to Tongatapu. I was needed to help survey the land, and to
mark the boundaries for a new school to be built on the plantation that would be known as Liahona
High School. My cousin Efalame and my younger brother Walter were called to help also. President
Dunn later returned from America to help with construction.
The first thing they wanted me to build was a heavy truck bed about eight feet long, another
fourteen feet long. They wanted to use them for delivery of their cement, pipes, nails and materials
for these new buildings. The Tongan Govemment made a big fuss over the length of the truck, but
later agreed to permit them to build it for Liahona.
I had already signed a contract with a cousin Otto Vai Sanft to finish his theater and a large bus
for his son Ralph to run. I discussed this work with the mission president, while waiting for the
materials to arrive from the United States. The President suggested I go back to Vava'u and finish the
work I had contracted for there. This I did.
I later retumed to Liahona to continue with my call to serve. A well known business man from
Fo'ui named Huni heard about Otto Vai Sanft's passenger bus that I had built at Vava'u. He sent a
109
tithing, the Lord would bless us, but if we fail ed to do those things, the blessings would not come to
us. Here the Lord has blessed you wi th these beautiful islands of Tonga for you to dwell on. Even this
new piece of land has been given to you. Be grateful and obedient and keep all the gospel and laws
of God to your best abi lity. Live it, now and in the future that the Government of Tonoa wi ll be able
'"
to find good honest leadership among you to help them. Thi s was done by the power of the
Melchizedek priest hood whi ch he held and in the name of Jesus Chri st. We felt the spirit so strong
there. The room was full of family members,
I started helping the new mission president in surveying for the new coll ege.
Later, 27'" June 1947, Elder Matthew Cowley said farewell to Queen Salote Tupou, to the
Crown Prince Tungi, and left for the airport at Fua'amot u. There were wait ing about 600 members
to sing farewell songs and say good bye to Elder Matt hew Cowley. We went with other members of
the Church. The spirit was very strong. Our testimonies of the truthfulness of the gospel was
strengthened. We witnessed the healing given to us by God at the hands of his apostle and his
priesthood power. Jesus Chri st lives and the Father also. We know that the Holy Ghost helps us and
gu ides us throughout our li ves. Joseph Smith was a prophet of God, as well as our prophet today.
We know that the Book of Mormon and the Bible and other writings of the church are
true. We love Elder Matthew Cowley. He was a man of God. He had a lot of faith. He helped bless
and heal the sick. Many li ves were restored. We received many blessings from God through him. We
express our love for the great church leaders from Zion, for sending us missionaries, presidents, even
apostl e Matthew Cowley to lovv and teach us. We all said farewell and cont inued singing until hi s
plane left for Samoa.
ITEM II: More of Matthew Cowley's Visit
President Evon W. Huntsman had just arrived in 1946 to preside over the Tongan Mission.
In 1947 Elder Matthew Cowley came to Tonga to visit. They brought him over on a little boat named
LlIpe. He ret urned in 1948 for another official visit.
I was once again call ed to go back to Tongatapu. I was needed to help survey the land, and to
mark the boundaries for a new school to be built on the plantation that would be known as Liahona
High School. My cousin Efalame and my younger brother Walter were called to help also. President
Dunn later returned from America to help with construction.
The first thing they wanted me to buil d was a heavy truck bed about eight feet long, another
fourteen feet long. They wanted to use them for deli very of their cement, pipes, nail s and materials
for these new buildings. The Tongan Government made a big fuss over the length of the truck, but
later agreed to permit them to build it for Liahona.
I had already signed a contract with a cousin Otto Vai Sanft to finish his theater and a large bus
for his son Ralph to run. I discussed thi s work with the mission president, while waiting for the
material s to arrive from the United States. The President suggested I go back to Vava'u and finish the
work I had cont racted for there. This I did.
I later returned to Liahona to continue with my call to serve. A well known business man from
Fo'ui named Huni heard about OttO Vai Sanft's passenger bus that I had built at Vava'u. He sent a
110
message to see if I could come and build him a passenger bus at Fo'ui. So when I had a few hours or
Saturday off, I would ride down on my bike and build Huni's passenger bus to operate in Tongatapu.
At Fua'amotu: There was a couple, Ukamea and Eseta Latu, who had been married for quite
some time and had waited a long time for a child, but had been unable to conceive. They heard about
Matthew Cowley coming to Tonga between a visit to New Zealand in 1946-1947. They came in a
horse and buggy to Makeke, but he had just barely left for Matavaimo'ui at Nuku'alofa, 15 miles away.
They again left Makeke to see President Cowley. When they arrived, they asked if he could lay his
hands on them so they could have some children. With the simple faith that they had, Matthew
Cowley gave them a blessing and told them the Lord would bless them with children as long as they
continued to serve and keep the Lord's commandments. There will be a little girl given to you and her
hands will be a blessing for her to work and serve in the house of the Lord when she grows up. After
the blessing they thanked Brother Cowley and they left for Fua'amotu.
Nine months later Eseta had her first baby and it was a little girl, so they named her Kalotini.
She grew until Brother Cowley came back to Tonga on another conference and visited Kalotini. As
a Primary child she got up and payed her tribute in a poem expressing their love for Brother Cowley
for the blessing her parents had received. At the conference the Latu's expressed their love again to
Brother Cowley, a servant of God. Brother Cowley met the Latu's after the meeting. As Kalotini grew
up, her mother made sure that she was responsible for getting the tables, linens, and fresh flowers for
the small Tongan hut that served their branch. Her mother thought that was her call, never dreaming
of a temple yet.
Kalotini attended Liahona high school. There she gained a testimony, and while there became
one ofthe best seamstresses. After she graduated, she met a returned labor missionaiy, Sifa Fatani of
Kolonga and they later married. They were one of the first couples who were called to work in the
Tonga Temple. They later immigrated to the United States. She worked in a Los Anglees hospital and
wanted to become a nurse, but a friend of theirs named Ana Tautala Langi Dca brought good news and
told her that at the Los Angeles Temple they needed some help in about six month's time, so she could
apply for it now.
Kalotini did that the very next day. The Los Angeles Temple called and wanted to hire her.
Kalotini asked Sifa about taking the job, and he said, "If the Lord needs you to work at His house
now, that's the thing to do." Kalotini worked there for some time, but a few years later they transferred
to Salt Lake City, There they sent her to the Beehive Clothing Factory. Kalotini was disappointed for
not being given a job in the temple. She called her supervisor and he told her to go to the Bountiful
Temple. When she got there, they didn't need her either. Then she later called her supervisor again
and was hired to work at the Bountiful Temple for two and a half years.
Later arrangements were made for her to come and work at the Salt Lake Temple. Her
supervisor came and told Kalotini, "I just want to express to you our love and let you know how many
people in the temple have been blessed by your hands, Kalotini. I was watching how well your hands
help fold, mend holes, and replace buttons on the temple clothing."
At that time her mind flashed back to the blessing Matthew Cowley had given her parents.
She said, "Now I can see, this was my mission in life, to work in the House of the Lord, and now the
supervisor is grateful for my call."
110
message to see if I could come and build him a passenger bus at Fo'ui. So when I had a few hours or
Saturday off, I would ride down on my bike and build Huni 's passenger bus to operate in Tongatapu.
At Fua' amotu: There was a couple, Ukamea and Eseta Latu, who had been married for quite
some lime and had waited a long time for a child, but had been unable to conceive. They heard about
Matt hew Cowley coming to Tonga between a visit to New Zealand in 1946- 1947. They came in a
horse and buggy to Makeke, but he had just barely left for Matavaimo'ui atNuku 'alofa, 15 miles away.
They again left Makeke to see President Cowley. When they arri ved, they asked if he could lay hi s
hands on them so they could have some children. With the simpl e faith that they had, Matthew
Cowley gave them a blessing and told them the Lord would bless them with children as long as they
continued to serve and keep the Lord's commandments. There will be a little gi rl given to you and her
hands will be a blessi ng for her to work and serve in the house of the Lord when she grows up. After
the blessing they thanked Brother Cowley and they left for Fua 'amotu.
Nine months later Eseta had her first baby and it was a little girl, so they named her Kalotini .
She grew until Brother Cowley came back to Tonga on another conference and visited Kalotini. As
a Primary child she got up and payed her tribute in a poem expressing their love for Brother Cowl ey
for the blessing her parents had received. At the conference the Latu's expressed their love again to
Brother Cowley, a servant of God. BrotherCowley met the Latu's after the meeting. As Kalotini grew
up, her mother made sure that she was responsible for getting the tables, linens, and fresh flowers for
the small Tongan hut that served their branch. Her mother thought that was her call, never dreaming
of a temple yet.
Kalotini attended Liahona hi gh school. There she gained a testimony, and while there became
one of the best seamstresses. After she graduated, she met a returned labor missionmy, Sifa Fatani of
Kolonga and they later married. They were one of the first couples who were call ed to work in the
Tonga Temple. They later immi grated to the United States. She worked in a Los Anglees hospital and
wanted to become a nurse, but a friend of theirs named Ana Tautala Langi Ika brought good news and
told her that at the Los Angeles Temple they needed some help in about six month's time, so she coul d
apply for it now.
Kalotini did that the very next day. The Los Angeles Temple called and wanted to hire her.
Kalotini asked Sifa about taking the job, and he said, "If the Lord needs you to work at Hi s house
now, that 's the thing to do." Kalotini worked there for some time, but a few years later they transferred
to Salt Lake City, There they sent her to the Beehive Clothing Factory. Kalotini was di sappointed for
not being given a job in the temple. She called her supervisor and he told her to go to the Bountiful
Temple. When she got there, they didn' t need her either. Then she later called her supervisor agai n
and was hired to work at the Bountiful Temple for two and a half years.
Later arrangements were made for her to come and work at the Salt Lake Temple. Her
supervisor came and told Kalotini , "I just want to express to you our love and let you know how many
people in the temple have been blessed by your hands, Kalotini . I was watching how well your hands
help fo ld, mend holes, and replace buttons on the temple clothing."
At that time her mind flashed back to the blessing Matthew Cowley had given her parents.
She said, "Now I can see, this was my mi ssion in life, to work in the House of the Lord, and now the
supervisor is grateful for my cal l. "
I l l
ITEM IB: Unseen Presence 1970 in Salt Lake City
I was at the Salt Lake Temple with Salote for almost half a day in 1970. As soon as I went
in I felt someone was with me. All the way through my temple session I felt that someone was by my
side. It seemed to me that this person was someone that I had met before. He spoke to me and told
me how happy he was to see me, how many people I had blessed by laying my hands on their head,
and through the power of the priesthood of God made them whole again. He continued on saying the
Lord was very pleased with all my work on this earth, also at the temple, and he will continue to bless
me with faith to accomplish my mission on this earth. At the end he reached up to my back and patted
me and told me how much he loved and appreciated me. As I looked up, for a very short time, I saw
Elder Matthew Cowley by my side, smiling at me.
ITEM TV: Story of Makongai. Fiji, the Leper Colony
A few years later, one cousin died at Makongai, Fiji, three cousins were retumed to Vava'u,
the second doctor came in to check on the children and found out that those who were sent to
Makongai, Fiji from Vava'u were misdiagnosed with the disease. A few more were sent back to Tefesi
from Makongai, Fiji who were also misdiagnosed. It was not leprosy, but some kind of muscular
problem where they didn't have any feelings in their hands and feet. Too bad for these children and
young adults, their lives and family reputation had been ruined by so many people in Tonga. The name
calling was outrageous. No one wanted to sit by them for fear that the family still had the disease,
without finding out the truth. People accused us by name calling of some disease that our family never
had, from the beginning. I was so grateful to the Lord for sending his apostle to Tonga so others may
read this and have some tender loving hearts not to judge others, but call it a blessing from above, that
through our faith, and prayers, the Lord will take care of our needs, if we choose to ignore those who
mocked and gossiped at those that were sent away.
AN ILO KAVA CIRCLE AT TE'EKIU
This story was told by Salote Fakatou Wolfgramm on their last mission to Tonga in 1980.
w;
r
hen we first arrived at the village of Te'ekiu we found the Tongan people there very
warm and made us feel welcome. One evening a young man came to our door and said,
"I am sent here by Motuapuaka, Chief of Te'ekiu, to invite you to join him with other invited guests
at a kava circle to celebrate his birthday tonight." We accepted and thereafter arrived at the home of
Chief Motuapuaka. The house was packed with invited guests, friends, nobles, and chiefs. We looked
for a place to sit, but could not find one. A beautiful Tongan musical number was being sung at that
time and the kava circle was going on too.
As we looked around, every place was taken except the one that should be occupied by the
special invited high chief. When lohani saw that empty seat, he excused himself and quietly walked
up and sat down on that spot. I decided to sit down next to the girl mixing the kava. In the middle of
the floor sat all those who were singing Tongan musical numbers together with Chief Motuapuaka.
III
ITEM ill: Unseen Presence 1970 in Salt Lake City
1 was at the Salt Lake Temple with Salote for almost half a day in 1970. As soon as I went
in I felt someone was with me. All the way through my temple session I felt that someone was by my
side. It seemed to me that thi s person was someone that I had met before. He spoke to me and told
me how happy he was to see me, how many people 1 had blessed by laying my hands on their head,
and t1lrough the power of the priesthood of God made them whole again. He continued on saying the
Lord was very pleased with all my work on this earth, also at the temple, and he will continue to bless
me with faith to accomplish my mission on thi s earth. At the end he reached up to my back and patted
me and told me how much he loved and appreciated me. As I looked up, for a very short time, 1 saw
Elder Matthew Cowley by my side, smiling at me.
ITEM IV: Story of Makongai. Fiji . the Leper Colony
A few years later, one cousin died at Makongai, Fiji , three cousins were reLUmed to Vava'u,
the second doctor came in to check on the chi ldren and found out that those who were sent to
Makongai, Fiji from Vava' u were mi sdiagnosed with the disease. A few more were sent back to Tefesi
from Makongai, Fiji who were also mi sdiagnosed. It was not leprosy, but some kind of muscular
problem where they didn ' t have any feelings in their hands and feet. Too bad for these chi ldren and
young adults, their li ves and family reputation had been ruined by so many people in Tonga. The name
calling was outrageous. No one wanted to sit by them for fear that the family still had the disease,
without finding out the truth. Pepple accused us by name calling of some disease that our family never
had, from the beginning. I was so grateful to the Lord for sending his apost le to Tonga so others may
read this and have some tender loving hearts not to judge others, but call it a blessing from above, that
through our faith, and prayers, the Lord wi ll take care of our needs, if we choose to ignore those who
mocked and gossiped at those that were sent away.
AN ILO KA VA CIRCLE AT TE'EKIU
Thi s s/Ory was laid by Salole Fakololl Wollgramm onlheir lasl missiol1lo TOllga ill 1980.
W
hen we first arrived at the village of Te'ekiu we found the Tongan people there very
warnl and made us feel welcome. One evenmg a young man came to our door and said,
"I am sent here by Motuapuaka, Chief of Te'ekiu, to invite you to join him with other invited guests
at a kava circle to celebrate his birthday toni ght. " We accepted and thereafter arrived at the home of
ChiefMotuapuaka. The house was packed with invited guests, friends, nobles, and chiefs. We looked
for a place to sit, but could not find one. A beautiful Tongan musical number was being sung at that
time and the kava circle was going on too.
As we looked around, every place was taken except the one that should be occupied by the
special invited high chief. When Iohani saw that empty seat, he excused himself and quietly walked
up and sat down on that spot. I decided to sit down next to the girl mixing the kava. In the middle of
the floor sat all those who were singing Tongan musical numbers together with Chief MOLUapuaka.
112
A few minutes later one ofthe chiefs spoke up and said, "To all of you who are engaged at the
party, just make sure that the seat you now occupy is the right seat for you. If you are not in your
rightful seat, I wish that you would move and let the rightful heir have his seat."
No one moved. No one spoke up, just ignoring what they had just heard. Again this matapule
spoke up and told them the same thing and said, "We need to serve the kava soon, but we need some
of you to make a few changes in your sitting positions, especially the one who is sitting at the head of
our kava circle."
When I heard that, I motioned to lohani and said, "lohani, please get off that seat because
everyone is waiting for you to leave so the chief from Mu'a can sit as head of the circle tonight."
lohani spoke up and said to the matapule, "Oh, are you speaking directly to me to get off this
seat?"
The chief said, "Yes indeed. We need Ta'ito to sit where you are sitting right now so we can
serve the kava as he is the chief of Mu'a."
lohani answered and spoke out to the chief and said, "I am Afu Kaipouli, and am seated in my
rightful seat as head of Mutuapuaka's birthday kava party. Please allow me to express this to you all
so you will know where you stand or sit at this kava party next time. Listen as I tell you this story."
The first ruling King of the Ha'a Tui Kanokupolu was named Ngata. The Tui Tonga used to
live at Mu'a, but no more. Now the Tu'i Kanokupolu lived here in the hihifo (western district) and
they had their own chiefs and nobles. You almost forgot that when you come to Hihifo each district
and area has their own chief and nobles. Listen carefully so I can explain why I am sitting in my
rightful space tonight."
The first king of hihifo was Ngata, the Tuikanokupolu. His son was Atamata'ila. His son was
Mataele Tu'apiko, and next to him was Vakafuhu. They took Vakafuhu to be a chief of Ha'alaufuli
as they had no chief. The son of Vakafuhu was Afu Kaipouli and that's me speaking to you. Any of
you chiefs want to force me off my seat as the rightful heir, speak out now.
One chief said, "Excuse me, Afu Kaipouli, but I think Motuapuaka should be there."
lohani answered, "Excuse me, don't you understand, when Motuapuaka's grandfather (Kui)
is present, Motuapuaka won't have the kava, but only his grandfather will have the kava, not the
grandson."
Again the chiefs were furious about what they had heard and thought they should remove Afu
Kaipouli from where he was sitting. lohani looked out at one named Ta'ito and said to him. "Ta'ito,
do you really know where you should be during an Uo Kaval If you don't know, I'll tell you. It is out
there at the kitchen door by the fire." The people began to laugh.
One man spoke out to lohani and said, "Please lohani, explain why Ta'ito should leave the Uo
Kava and stay out by the fire."
"All right," lohani said, "If you seriously want me to tell you the true story, here it is:"
Not too long ago there were three Samoan men who built a medium vessel to sail from Samoa
to Tonga. They heard a rumor that after a huge feast at the royal Tongan palace, no one is ever allowed
to eat any food left over from the king's dinner, m due time they arrived at Mu'a.
News went out to the king about them. He invited them to his palace at Mu'a and asked why they had
come to Tonga. They told the king that they heard in Samoa about how much food was wasted after
112
A few minutes later one of the chi efs spoke up and said, "To all of you who are engaged at the
party, just make sure that the seat you now occupy is the ri ght seat for you. If you are not in your
rightful seat, I wish that you woul d move and let the ri ghtful heir have hi s seat. "
No one moved. No one spoke up, just ignoring what they had just heard. Again thi s malapu/e
spoke up and told them the same thing and said, "We need to serve the kava soon, but we need some
of you to make a few changes in your sitting positions, especially the one who is sitting at the head of
our kava ci rcl e."
When I heard that, I moti oned to Iohani and said, "Iohani , please get off that seat because
everyone is waiti ng for you to leave so the chi ef from Mu 'a can sit as head of the circle toni ght. "
lohani spoke up and said to the matapule, "Oh, are you speaking directl y to me to get off this
seat?"
The chief said, "Yes indeed. We need Ta' ito to sit where you are sitting ri ght now so we can
serve the kava as he is the chief ofMu' a."
Iohani answered and spoke out to the chief and said, "I am Afu Kaipouli , and am seated in my
rightfu l seat as head of Mutuapuaka's birthday kava party. Please all ow me to express thi s to you all
so you wi II know where you stand or sit at this kava party next time. Listen as I tel1 you thi s story."
The first ru ling King of the Ha'a Tui Kanokupolu was named Ngata. The Tui Tonga used to
live at Mu'a, but no more. Now the Tu'i Kanokupolu li ved here in the hihifo (western di stri ct) and
they had thei r own chiefs and nobles. You almost forgot that when you come to Hi hifo each di strict
and area has their own chi ef and nobles. Listen carefull y so 1 can explain why I am sitting in my
rightful space tonight."
The first king ofhihi fo was Ngata, the Tui kanokupolu. His son was Atamata'i la. His son was
Mataele Tu'apiko, and next to him was Vakafuhu. They took Vakafuhu to be a chi ef of Ha'alaufuli
as they had no chi ef. The son of Vakafuh u was Afu Kaipouli and that ' s me speaking to you. Any of
you chiefs want to force me off my seat as the rightful heir, speak out now.
One chief said, "Excuse me, Afu Kaipouli, but 1 think Motuapuaka should be there."
[ohani answered, "Excuse me, don ' t you understand, when Motuapuaka' s grandfather (Kui)
is present, Motuapuaka won' t have the kava, but only hi s grandfather will have the kava, not the
grandson."
Again the chiefs were furious about what they had heard and thought they should remove Afu
Kaipou li from where he was sitting. [ohani looked out at one named Ta ' ito and said to him. "Ta'ito,
do you reall y know where you should be during an flo Kava? If you don't know, I'll tell you. It is out
there at the kitchen door by the fire ." The people began to laugh.
One man spoke out to Iohani and said, "Please Iohani , explain why Ta ' ito should leave the Ilo
Kava and stay out by the fire. "
"All ri ght," lohani said, "If you seriously want me to tell you the true story, here it is:"
Not too long ago there were three Samoan men who buil t a medium vessel to sail from Samoa
to Tonga. They heard a rumor that after a huge feast at the royal Tongan palace, no one is ever all owed
to eat any food left over from the king's dinner. In due time they arrived at Mu ' a.
News went out to the king about them. He invited them to his palace at Mu'a and asked why they had
come to Tonga. They told the king that they heard in Samoa about how much food was wasted after
113
the king's feasts, and decided to ask the king if it were true and if he would share that food with them.
The king wanted to visit with them. We will have a kava and I'll give you new names, and later your
place will be in the area by the fire and ashes where the food has been cooked.
The King spoke to the first man, "Please tell me what your responsibility was on the ship on
your way from Samoa to Tonga."
He answered the King and said he was standing and steering the boat all the way to Tonga.
The King said, "Good we will call you Leha'uli."
The King asked the second man the same question.
He answered, "Since we left Samoa, I took containers and baled the water so our boat wouldn't
sink"
Then the King answered, "Your new name by which you will be known in Tonga is Tui vai."
To the third man he asked the same question.
He told the king his story, "Since we left Samoa I was in the front of the boat constantly
watching for the Ta'ito as the sun set in the evening time."
The King continued, "Your name will be Ta'ito. Now you all have your new names, now you
may go and stay by the fire. I'll make sure that you will have something to eat.
Right after lohani told them this story, Chief Latu Mailangi spoke up and said, "All of you men,
I urge you that if you don't know who you are and your place at the kava, go now and find your pen
and paper. Write down what Afu Kaipouli told us tonight. Study your line, copy it down, so you will
know who you are in our future kava circles.
Afu Kaipouli (lohani) continued talking and visiting and the others were very happy. The other
chiefs from Mu'a almost forgot where they should be until lohani taught them that evening.
T
l
f
lOHANI' S TAPE FROM THE MISSIONFIELD
December 1980
mis is lohani speaking on the tape. First I would like to express my love to my heavenly
father for all my many blessings. We are in good health and want to send you all our love.
Thank you for the letters, tapes, money, etc. that you share with us.
It worries me to hear from your letters and tapes of the problems that some of you are going
through right now. The family has missed us, but we want to let you know that everything is fine and
we are doing great and from your letters it sounds like everyone is worrying about me for I have been
sick lately. The Lord has blessed me according to my faith and many prayers. And through those
prayers and faith the Lord has given me good health, especially the fasting that some of you have done
for me and the Lord was very pleased that you have given your time to pray and fast in my behalf.
Salote and I received a missionaiy call from the prophet Spencer W. Kimball in June 1980 to
go on a mission to Old Mexico City. We went to our stake president for an interview and he had lined
up someone who could help us leam the Spanish language. The first thing he asked us was, "Can you
say OlaT and we said "Ola" fast. The next word we could not pronounce. Then the telephone rang.
11 3
the king's feasts, and decided to ask the king if it were true and if he would share that food with them.
The king wanted to vi sit with them. We will have a kava and I'll give you new names, and later your
place will be in the area by the fire and ashes where the food has been cooked.
The King spoke to the first man, "Please tell me what your responsibility was on the ship on
your way from Samoa to Tonga."
sink"
He answered the King and said he was standing and steeri ng the boat all the way to Tonga.
The King said, "Good we wi ll call you Leha' uli ."
The King asked the second man the same question.
He answered, "Since we left Samoa, I took containers and baled the water so our boat wouldn't
Then the King answered, "Your new name by which you will be known in Tonga is Tuivai.'·
To the third man he asked the same question.
He told the king hi s story, "Since we left Samoa I was in the front of the boat constantly
watching for the Ta' ito as the sun set in the evening time."
The King continued, "Your name wi ll be Ta' ito. Now you all have your new names, now you
may go and stay by the fire . I'll make sure that you wi ll have something to eat.
Right after Iohani told them this story, ChiefLatu Mailangi spoke up and said, "All of you men,
I urge you that if you don't know who you are and your place at the kava, go now and find your pen
and paper. Write down what Afu Kaipouli told us tonight. Study your line, copy it down. so you will
know who you are in our future .kava circles.
Afu Kaipouli (Iohani ) continued talki ng and visiting and the others were very happy. The other
chi efs from Mu'a almost forgot where they should be until Iohani taught them that evening.
IOHANI'S TAPE FROM THE MISSIONFlELD
December J 980
T
hi s is Iohani speaking on the tape. First I would like to express my love to my heavenly
father for all my many blessings. We are in good health and want to send you all our love.
Thank you for the letters, tapes, money, etc. that you share with us.
It worries me to hear from your letters and tapes of the problems that some of you are going
through ri ght now. The family has missed us, but we want to let you know that everything is fi ne and
we are doing great and from your letters it sounds like everyone is worrying about me for I have been
sick latel y. The Lord has blessed me according to my faith and many prayers. And through those
prayers and faith the Lord has given me good health, especially the fasting that some of you have done
for me and the Lord was very pleased that you have given your time to pray and fast in my behalf.
Salote and I received a mi ssionary call from the prophet Spencer W. Kimball in June 1980 to
go on a mi ssion to Old Mexico City. We went to our stake president for an interview and he had lined
up someone who could help us learn the Spanish language. The First thing he asked us was, "Can you
say Ola?" and we said "Ola" fast. The next word we could not pronounce. Then the Ielephone rang.
114
President White of the Wilford Stake, answered the phone and it was President Kimball. He
asked if the Wolfgramm's were there to let them know that their mission had been changed and they
were to serve in the Tongan mission.. They were so excited and thanked the president, were set apart,
and then came home. The next moming Salote had a beautiful crocheted bed cover she had made and
wanted to give it to the prophet. So they contacted Rose Calder, a sister of Sister Camilla Kimball,
to know how to reach the prophet to deliver the gift. She made arrangements for us to go to the
prophet's home. They called security and we got cleared to go in. As we came closer to his home it
was a big surprise to find the Prophet outside with his arms open to welcome us. He had tears in his
eyes and gave me a big hug and told me how he loved me, and then Salote, then Tisina and Leilani
who accompanied us. And again he told us, do you know how much we love you? We went inside
and met his wife. He said he really loved the Polynesian people. You know our Father in Heaven
loves you too and saying to his wife, "I want you to meet my good friends from Tonga.".
Pres. Kimball went on to say that I should take with me my genealogy to Tonga and teach even
the Royal family, and bring the Scale of Time to show them how short the time is for them to go to
the temple and redeem their dead. Before we left the prophet told us that two days after arriving in
Tonga I would be visited by Christ and he would let me know of my mission to the Tongan people.
We went to Provo for missionary training and eventually arrived in Tonga. Di the training
center we were very popular and every time there was a break missionaries came into our room and
wanted to hear more and more of what 1 had to say.
But today I want to let all my family know what happened to me. From here I will explain to
you why I was sick, but in reality I was not sick. Rather it was the vision that I saw with my eyes that
caused me to feel like that. It was during the night that I saw the vision before I retired to bed.
There were two personages that stood inside our living room. Their feet didn't touch the
ground and I didn't know where they came from. They said to me, " Stand up, we have come to take
you with us and would like you to see the dwelling place of the Lord". I took a deep breath and we
were on our way. We went on a very speedy trip. I was frightened and thought they were going to
destroy my life. As we traveled we passed many planets and other celestial bodies. I asked them
where they were taking me, and they told me to where the Lord resides.
I was taken to a place unknown to me. I didn't understand where we were. In a short time I
heard the thunder and saw lightening and rain. It looked like we were facing the west as the sun went
down-then it was all dark. At that time it seemed to me like 8:00 p.m. but it was after midnight when
I was getting ready to retire. We saw a light, though it was raining and saw the lightening hit and then
saw another lightening hit, and one ofthe men said, "See, in a few moments you will see a vision from
the heavens and the appearance of Christ in his glory." Everything was so light and beautiful and
shining. While 1 was standing there I felt the rain, the lightening hit me and the darkness disappeared
and everything was light. That light never disappeared. Then I saw the rainbow and the rainbow
encircled the light and there was no end of the brightness-brighter than noonday sun.
Then the voice spoke to me and asked if I understood about the rainbow. I said, "Yes, that was
the covenant that was made between Noah and Father in Heaven that he would never again destroy
the earth by water."
114
President White of the Wilford Stake, answered the phone and it was President Kimball. He
asked if the Wolfgramm's were there to let them know that their mi ssion had been changed and they
were to serve in the Tongan mission .. They were so excited and thanked the president, were set apan,
and then came home. The next morning Salote had a beautiful crocheted bed cover she had made and
wanted to give it to the prophet. So they contacted Rose Calder, a sister of Sister Cami lla Kimball ,
to know how to reach the prophet to deliver the gift. She made arrangements for us to go to the
prophet 's home. They called security and we got cleared to go in. As we came closer to hi s home it
was a big surpri se to find the Prophet outside with hi s a11l1S open to welcome us. He had tears in hi s
eyes and gave me a big hug and told me how he loved me, and then Salote, then Tisina and Leil ani
who accompanied us. And again he told us, do you know how much we love you? We went inside
and met hi s wife. He said he reall y loved the Polynesian people. You know our Father in Heaven
loves you too and saying to hi s wife, "I want you to meet my good friends from Tonga.".
Pres. Kimball went on to say that I should take with me my genealogy to Tonga and teach even
the Royal family, and bring the Scale of Time to show them how short the time is for them to go to
the temple and redeem their dead. Before we left the prophet told us that two days after arriving in
Tonga I would be visited by Christ and he would let me know of my mission to the Tongan people.
We went to Provo for missionary training and eventually alTived in Tonga. In the training
center we were very popular and every time there was a break mi ssionaries came into our room and
wanted to hear more and more of what T had to say.
But today I want to let all my family know what happened to me. From here I will explai n to
you why I was sick, but in reality T was not sick. Rather it was the vision that I saw with my eyes that
caused me to feel like that. It was during the ni ght that I saw the vision before I retired to bed.
There were two personages that stood inside our living room. Their feet didn't touch the
ground and I didn't know where they came from. They said to me, " Stand up, we have come to take
you with us and would like you to see the dwelling place of the Lord". I took a deep breath and we
were on our way. We went on a very speedy trip. I was frightened and thought they were going to
destroy my li fe. As we traveled we passed many planets and other celestial bodies. I asked them
where they were taking me, and they told me to where the Lord resides.
I was taken to a place unknown to me. I didn't understand where we were. In a short ti me I
heard the thunder and saw li ghtening and rain. It looked like we were facing the west as the sun went
down--then it was all dark. At that time it seemed to me like 8:00 p.m. but it was after midnight when
I was getting ready to retire. We saw a light, though it was raining and saw the lightening hit and then
saw another li ghtening hit, and one of the men said, "See, in a few moments you will see a vision from
the heavens and the appearance of Christ in his glory." Everything was so light and beautiful and
shining. While I was standing there I felt the rain, the lightening hit me and the darkness disappeared
and evelyt hing was li ght. That li ght never disappeared. Then I saw the rainbow and the rainbow
encircled the li ght and there was no end of the brightness--brighter than noonday sun.
Then the voice spoke to me and asked if I understood about the rainbow. I said, "Yes, that was
the covenant that was made between Noah and Father in Heaven that he woul d never again destroy
the earth by water. "
115
Then the voice said, "lohani, have you repented enough?" Then the voice spoke of this world,
"Have all mankind repented enough? Indeed it is true, I will not destroy this earth again by water, but
I will destroy it with fire if they will not come unto me." Then I saw the light circle around the
rainbow. He told me to look and see what was written. What I saw was:
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
written in gold. Again the voice spoke to me, " See". The writing was full of lights and very brilliant.
I heard a voice speaking from that light saying, "lohani, go and call repentance unto your people. Call
them to repent and to repent and to repent. Go and call everyone that lives on these islands to repent
and repent and repent. The time is so short that they must repent and repent and repent. Let the people
that you will meet in this life know that the time is so short that they must repent and come unto Christ.
You must go and call repentance unto your people in Tonga, including the royal house of Taufa'ahau
Tupou IV, Mata'aho and the Crown Prince Tupou To'a. The Lord told me that a few months after
Salote and I touch the American soil, a destruction will come to Tonga-not to destroy them
completely, but as a warning to let them know that he, Jesus Christ, rules on earth and in the heavens.
1 was sent to Tonga by God so I could be an instrument or a mouthpiece for him so I could cry
repentance unto my people and if they hardened their hearts to the words of God, and repented not
from their iniquities, a tidal wave would come to their beaches and it would cause damage to their
crops and plantations. Some of their homes, power lines, and trees, would be uprooted. Floods would
come to some places. Rocks and coral would be tossed like feathers in the air. But this problem will
only come if they fail to harken to voice of his servants and repent not. I was filled with the Spirit of
the Lord and I started my mission where Christ told me to begin at Ha'atafu in the westem district,
then all the way up to Niutoua in the eastem district. "In my anger I will send destruction to them
because they have not listened to my servants nor repented or their iniquities. Because they will not
listen to my voice, they will be destroyed and no one will be left." In his loud voice Christ spoke and
said to me that I must go and teach them, to speak to them with kindness but not hurt them and for
them to repent. No one will live when I send my destruction upon the islands of the sea, even those
who are not members of the Church that have not listened to my servants will be destroyed. Christ
spoke to me and used the word repentance 16 times.
This was shown to me at the very first part of our mission. After He spoke to me the light
disappeared, and I stood there alone. I was confused, not knowing what was going on, and again
wondering where this light came from. From where He was speaking to me it was about 30 or 40 feet
away. Again the light came back only about 2 minutes after it disappeared, and again 1 heard the voice
speaking to me. This second time it was louder. Christ stood behind me cupping my ear and spoke
to me, "Go and speak to the people and tell them I am Jesus Christ-and have sent you to those who
live on this island and those you meet in your daily work. Call them quickly to repent because I am
coming soon to destroy this world and no one will be left behind-they will all be destroyed." Also,
for the third time he again spoke the same thing to me. "Go to them and call them to repentance. I
am coming to this world to destroy it if they do not repent and repent and repent and wait no more, for
I will come to punish them-those that will not keep my word nor abide by the scriptures."
115
Then the voice said, "Iohani, have you repented enough?" Then the voice spoke of thi s world,
"Have all mankind repented enough? Indeed it is true, I will not destroy this earth again by water, but
I will destroy it with fire if they will not come unto me." Then I saw the light circle around the
rainbow. He told me to look and see what was written. What I saw was:
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LA TTER-DA Y SAINTS
wri tten in gold. Again the voice spoke to me , "See". The writing was full of li ghts and very brilliant.
I heard a voice speaking from that li ght saying, "Iohani, go and call repentance unto your people. Call
them to repent and to repent and to repent. Go and call everyone that lives on these islands to repent
and repent and repent. The time is so short that they must repent and repent and repent. Let the people
that you will meet in this life know that the time is so short that they must repent and come unto Christ.
You must go and call repentance unto your people in Tonga, including the royal house ofTaufa'ahau
Tupou IV, Mata'aho and the Crown Prince Tupou To'a. The Lord told me that a few months after
Salote and I touch the American soil , a destruction will come to Tonga-not to destroy them
completely, but as a warni ng to let them know that he, Jesus Christ, rules on earth and in the heavens.
I was sent to Tonga by God so I could be an instrument or a mouthpiece for him so I could cry
repentance unto my people and if they hardened their hearts to the words of God, and repented not
from their iniquities, a tidal wave would come to their beaches and it would cause damage to their
crops and plantations. Some of their homes, power lines, and trees, would be uprooted. Floods would
come to some places. Rocks and coral would be tossed like feathers in the ai r. But this problem will
only come if they fail to harken fO voice of hi s servants and repent not. I was filled with the Spirit of
the Lord and I started my mission where Christ told me to begin at Ha' atafu in the western district,
then all the way up to Niutoua in the eastern district. "In my anger I will send destruction to them
because they have not li stened to my servants nor repented or their iniquities. Because they will not
listen to my voice, they will be destroyed and no one will be left." In his loud voice Christ spoke and
said to me that I must go and teach them, to speak to them with kindness but not hurt them and for
them to repent. No one will live when I send my destruction upon the islands of the sea, even those
who are not members of the Church that have not listened to my servants will be destroyed. Chri st
spoke to me and used the word repentance 16 times.
This was shown to me at the very first part of our mission. After He spoke to me the light
disappeared, and I stood there alone. I was confused, not knowing what was going on, and again
wondering where this li ght came from. From where He was speaking to me it was about 30 or 40 feet
away. Again the light came back only about 2 minutes after it disappeared, and again I heard the voice
speaking to me. This second time it was louder. Christ stood behind me cupping my ear and spoke
to me, "Go and speak to the people and tell them I am Jesus Christ--and have sent you to those who
li ve on this island and those you meet in your daily work. Call them quickly to repent because I am
coming soon to destroy this world and no one will be left behind--they will all be destroyed." Also,
for the third time he again spoke the same thing to me. "Go to them and call them to repentance. I
am coming to this world to destroy it if they do not repent and repent and repent and wait no more, for
I will come to punish them--those that will not keep my word nor abide by the scriptures."
116
"You must speak even to those missionaries you are serving with-that are working daily with
you-call them to repentance also. I am Jesus Christ, who called for you to call them to repentance.
Command the missionaries not to be ashamed or fear but to preach repentance also. Most of them will
hate you and won't believe what you say to them, but you must let them know that they must repent
or they will be destroyed."
He urged me to go and speak to the missionaries, not tomorrow, but right now. Then the light
disappeared again. At that moment I still stood there. Then the lightening came again and hit me right
under my feet and started to work its way up through all my body like a ball of fire starting from my
feet. I could see myself standing and the power that came from that light was like an electric shock.
It first affected my flesh and entered my bones. I immediately felt the pain in my whole body with
that power inside. I looked at my hands and my whole body was illuminated. I felt that I was going
to faint—with the heat and the strong power. Even my eyes. I was like the sun standing there. My
body was changed.
1 almost fell to the ground, but the angels held me up and said, "lohani, you have the same
power with which the Lord created the whole earth with and same power will stand firm for you when
you meet the Savior. The Lord called me from the side, "lohani.". I tumed and Christ put him arms
around me and hugged me and kissed me and told me how much He really loved me and wanted to
introduce me to his father Eloheim. Then He took me and introduced me to Eloheim in the place
where they dwell. It was more beautiful. The place was full of light and was clear like crystal and
pure and holy. It was a beauty that I cannot explain, but I felt a warmth and spirit of love in that place.
He kissed me and hugged me and told me, "I wish that all my children on the earth would do the same
as you have been doing in giving your time, your talent, your faith and sharing your love with others."
And again embraced me, hugged and kissed me, and Jesus did the same to me. Jesus Christ and
Eloheim laid their hands on my head and ordained me to my calling. After that they hugged me again.
Immediately I heard someone speak behind me with his mouth to my ear. "I tell you right now,
go and speak to your people. You don't have much time to call your people to repentance. Those who
haven't received the gospel must come unto Christ and be baptized. There will be many diseases and
people will die from them and destruction will come to them. Don't hesitate, but straight way talk to
the missionaries, they must call the people to repentance also."
Christ spoke again in my ear and said, "lohani, look behind you and see what's going on". I
slowly tumed my head to see what was behind me. I looked at my own hands and body and it was full
of electric power and I saw thousands and thousands of people behind me. The understanding that I
had was that they were not members ofthe Church and they were full of evil-all kinds of evil, and had
not yet repented. Again the voice spoke into my ear. "lohani, tum around and continue to preach to
these people. Go to these people behind you and call them to repentance. Speak to them like right
now."
When I was told to do that I obeyed the voice. I tumed around, walked straight at them, and
as I started to speak to them, it was like my whole body was in a flame of light. I didn't know where
I was standing, but like it was day time. As soon as I started to speak, the people started to fall to the
ground. Some started to cover their faces. They couldn't withstand the power that came from me.
Some fell on their back on the floor, some didn't want to look at the light and tumed their heads away.
j j 6
"You must speak even to those missionaries you are serving with--that are working daily with
youncall them to repentance also. I am Jesus Christ, who called for you to call them to repentance.
Command the missionaries not to be ashamed or fear but to preach repentance also. Most of them wi II
hate you and won't believe what you say to them, but you must let them know that they must repent
or they will be destroyed. "
He urged me to go and speak to the missionaries, not tomorrow, but ri ght now. Then the li ght
disappeared again. At that moment I still stood there. Then the lightening came again and hit me ri ght
under my feet and started to work its way up through all my body like a ball of fire starting from my
feet. I could see myself standing and the power that came from that light was like an electric shock.
It first affected my flesh and entered my bones. I immediately felt the pain in my whole body with
that power inside. I looked at my hands and my whole body was illuminated. I felt that I was going
to faint--with the heat and the strong power. Even my eyes. I was like the sun standing there. My
body was changed.
I almost fell to the ground, but the angels held me up and said, "Iohani, you have the same
power wit h which the Lord created the whole earth with and same power will stand firm for you when
you meet the Savior. The Lord call ed me from the side, "Iohani. ". I turned and Christ put him arms
around me and hugged me and kissed me and told me how much He really loved me and wanted to
introduce me to his father Eloheim. Then He took me and introduced me to Eloheim in the pl ace
where they dwell. It was more beautiful. The place was full of light and was clear like crystal and
pure and holy. It was a beauty that 1 cannot explain, but 1 felt a warmth and spirit of love in that place.
He ki ssed me and hugged me and told me, "1 wi sh that all my children on the earth would do the same
as you have been doing in giving your time, your talent, your faith and sharing your love with others."
And again embraced me, hugged and kissed me, and Jesus did the same to me. Jesus Christ and
Eloheim laid their hands on my head and ordained me to my calling. After that they hugged me again.
Immediately I heard someone speak behind me with hi s mouth to my ear. "I tell you right now,
go and speak to your people. You don't have much time to call your people to repentance. Those who
haven't received the gospel must come unto Christ and be baptized. There will be many diseases and
people will di e from them and destruction will come to them. Don ' t hesitate, but strai ght way tal k to
the missionaries, they must call the people to repentance al so."
Christ spoke again in my ear and said, "lohani, look behind you and see what's going on". I
slowly turned my head to see what was behind me. I looked at my own hands and body and it was full
of electric power and I saw thousands and thousands of people behind me. The understanding that I
had was that they were not members of the Church and they were full of evil--all kinds of evil , and had
not yet repented. Agai n the voice spoke into my ear. "Iohani , turn around and continue to preach to
these people. Go to these people behind you and call them to repentance. Speak to them like ri ght
now."
When I was told to do that I obeyed the voice. I turned around, walked straight at them, and
as J started to speak to them, it was like my whol e body was in a flame oflight. 1 didn't know where
J was standing, but like it was day time. As soon as 1 started to speak, the people started to fall to the
ground. Some st3lted to cover their faces. They couldn't withstand the power that came from me.
Some fell on their back on the floor , some didn't want to look at the light and turned their heads away.
117
When I spoke to them, it looked like the people were wilting. Some were sitting against some boards
and when I spoke, they fell to the floor. Some of them fell from the wall they had been sitting on.
That's how powerful the spirit was. Again they tried to hide their faces or fall on their stomach.
They were even falling from the houses. Some on their knees. The people were beginning to get
frightened-you could tell by their eyes. As I was talking I told them to repent-then Christ told me
to speak out louder-three times. Repent, be baptized, and come to the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints so you can have eternal life. I did as I was told. Christ said, "lohani, speak up
louder." Again for the second time I began to speak to them very loudly with all my strength. The
third time Chirst spoke again to me and said, "LOUDER". Be obedient to the Lord or your life will
be taken. Some didn't have clothes, some had torn clothes, and were very frightened. I don't know
how many people were there, but many thousands.
When I was told by Christ to tell them to repent-I raised my hand and brought it down firmly
and told them to repent. "Say it louder and louder," I was instructed. I called them to repentance with
all my power and the Lord was very pleased with me.
When 1 was returned back to my home I wanted to wake up Salote to tell her, but the spirit said
it was not the right time. I wanted her to massage my back because the pain was still in my body, my
bones, my flesh, my muscles and I needed a massage. But she slept on and didn't hear me call for help.
1 crawled to the bathroom and buried myself in the cool water to get some relief, but it was no
comfort. My body was on fire, especially my bones and my flesh was in pain. Again I ran the shower
over my head, but nothing helped. I said a prayer and asked if it would be alright to relate the story
to my wife, but the sprit told me not now. I suffered that day and throughout the next night until
moming. I couldn't even move my hands.
Salote woke up and thought 1 had the flu so went after some aspirin. While Salote was out two
sister missionaries walked into our missionary home to see if they could have breakfast with us. I
crawled to the kitchen, cooked them a pot of rice. While they were eating Salote arrived with two
Elders to administer to me. After the blessing I felt a little relief, but not much. I still had that pain
and my body was so hot, and especially all the joints. I never experienced sharp pain like that my
whole life. It began with my toes, all the way to the top of my head. There was no part of my body
that was not in pain. I felt like I was inside a furnace of fire-the pain in my body was tremendous.
I started to get up and try to sit down, but couldn't discover a way to relieve the pain and heat
from my body. Salote went after some more aspirin. I took it but no relief. Again she went after the
same Elders to administer to me again. While they were blessing me I was taken away somewhere and
don't know how long I was gone, but during that time the Savior again saw me. After I retumed I was
able to explain to my wife and the two sister missionaries what had happened to me.
The same day, the Lord spoke to me and said, "Why are you waiting? You need to go now
because I have ordained you as my mouthpiece. Get up and go now." Though I had almost no strength
in my legs and they were very shaky, I was determined to go to Ha'atafu where I was directed to go
first and take Salote with me. "You are not to turn away from what you are to say to the people. When
they do not what I say, there will be tidal waves, there will be bad storms, and the water from the ocean
will destroy their plantation, and will come over the beaches. It will be a testimony to them that I am
Jesus Christ who have sent you, and you will be my mouthpiece to your people. I am the one who
created this earth and everything therein."
117
When I spoke to them, it looked like the people were wil ti ng. Some were sitti ng against some boards
and when I spoke, they fe ll to the tloor. Some of them fel l from the wall they had been sitting on.
That's how powerfu l the spirit was. Again they tri ed to hide thei r faces or fall on their stomach.
They were even falling from the houses. Some on their knees. The people were beginni ng to get
frightened--you could tell by their eyes. As I was talking I told them to repent--then Christ told me
to speak out loudern three times. Repent, be baptized, and come to the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints so you can have etemall ife. ldid as I was told. Christ said, " Iohani , speak up
louder. " Again for the second time I began to speak to them very loudly with all my strength. The
third time Chirst spoke again to me and said, "LOUDER". Be obedient to the Lord or your life wi ll
be taken. Some didn't have cl othes, some had torn clothes, and were very frightened. I don't know
how many people were there, but many thousands.
When I was told by Christ to tell them to repent-I raised my hand and brought it down firmly
and told them to repent. "Say it louder and louder," I was instructed. I called them to repentance with
all my power and the Lord was very pleased with me.
When I was returned back to my home I wanted to wake up Salote to tell her, but the spirit said
it was not the ri ght time. I wanted her to massage my back because the pain was sti ll in my body, my
bones, my fl esh, my muscles and I needed a massage. But she slept on and didn't hear me call for help.
I crawled to the bathroom and buried myself in the cool water to get some rei ief, but it was .no
comfort. My body was on fire, especially my bones and my flesh was in pain. Again I ran the shower
over my head, but noth ing helped. I said a prayer and asked if it would be alright to relate the story
to my wife, but the split told me not now. I suffered that day and throughout the next ni ght until
moming. I coul dn't even move my hands.
Salote woke up and thought I had the flu so went after some aspirin. While Salote was out two
sister mi ssionaries walked into our mi ssionary home to see if they could have breakfast with us. I
crawled to the kitchen, cooked them a pot of ri ce. While they were eating Salote arrived with two
Elders to admini ster to me. After the blessing I felt a littl e relief, but not much. I still had that pain
and my body was so hot, and especially all the joints. I never experienced sharp pain like that my
whole life. It began wi th my toes, all the way to the top of my head. There was no part of my body
that was not in pain. I felt like I was inside a furnace of fire--the pain in my body was tremendous.
I started to get up and try to sit down, but couldn't di scover a way to relieve the pain and heat
from my body. Salote went after some more aspirin. I took it but no relief. Again she went after the
same Elders to admini ster to me again. While they were blessing me I was taken away somewhere and
don' t know how long I was gone, but during that time the Savior again saw me. After I returned I was
able to explain to my wife and the two sister missionaries what had happened to me.
The same day, the Lord spoke to me and said, "Why are you waiting? You need to go now
because I have ordained you as my mouthpiece. Get up and go now." Though I had almost no st rength
in my legs and they were very shaky, I was determined to go to Ha'atafu where T was directed to go
first and take Sal ote with me. "You are not to turn away from what you are to say to the people. When
they do not what I say, there will be tidal waves, there .vi II be bad stolmS, and the water from the ocean
will destroy their plantati on, and will come over the beaches. It will be a testimony to them that I am
Jesus Chri st who have sent you, and you wi ll be my mouthpiece to your people. I am the one who
created thi s earth and everything therein."
118
I was filled with the spirit of our Father in Heaven and no one could stop me. I could speak
to the people with power and ask them to come unto Christ and repent and be baptized. I spoke to the
people at Ha'atafu and as I spoke to the people I was full of the spirit and started to prophesy many
things that would come to their life if they didn't change and come unto Christ. The spirit of Christ
was within me that day. I felt a great love for the Savior. And the love in my heart for my Tongan
people caused my heart to ache because they hardened their hearts and I bore testimony and prophesied
many things that some ofthe old prophets had told them in the scriptures. I preached to them about
Joseph Smith and authority was given to him and all the keys in the last dispensation of time. He was
truly a prophet of God. They must listen to the missionaries and repent and be baptized and come unto
Christ and join his church, if they really want to have eternal life. If they don't they will be destroyed.
And I did the same from Ha'atafu all the way to the next town and the next village Kanokupolu.
As I retumed home in the evening a van from mission headquarters arrived to take us to a
missionary meeting. When we arrived at the meeting I was very ill and they took me anyway and as
1 got there I fainted. They rushed me to the doctor at Vaiola Hospital thinking I had a heart attack.
The severe heat had never left my body and my whole body was like a fumace of fire. The doctor
couldn't find anything wrong with me except my body was heated and they couldn't get rid ofthe heat.
1 was told I must go back to Te'ekiu and run a cold shower on my head and body. Again the Savior
came and spoke to me. I must go again on to the next town and was told not to fear for my life for I
would be protected. Many people will hate you and many will call you names, but angels will protect
you. At this time also, he reminded me that angels have heard the prayers of your forefathers and want
their work done in the temple. For I was to include calling those people to bring their names to the
temple and get their work done. Those forefathers had died before the gospel was brought to the
islands. Lastly, when you preach to them Lhey will swear at you, they will call you all kinds of names
and hate you for telling them the truth, but don't give up but continue on preaching.
The next day 1 almost died again. We went out again and continued on to the next village. My
body was full of the spirit of our Father in Heaven. I couldn't imagine all the words that filled my
mind and my spirit-words to be used when I spoke to these people. And when I said those, I heard
voices back from them saying, "You are a liar, you stop spreading lies." I expressed to them my love
and the love of our Savior to them and bore them my testimony. I felt like I was going to die again.
Especially my joints and my bones were killing me.
Again the missionaries arrived in their van to check up on me. They had a welfare meeting we
needed to attend in Nuku'alofa. Again I fell down and passed out. They took me again to Vaiola
Hospital. I couldn't get rid of the pain. I asked my mission President Hopoate and another Elder to
give me a blessing. After that they thought I had the flu, which was prevalent in Tonga at that time.
I stayed in the shower all night, but didn't get any relief. I got up very early and went to Kanokupolu
and started to preach to the people. The people were mean to me again over there. We walked to
Kolovai. The same treatment.
Not my words, but from the Lord that spoke in my ear. Repent. Also He says that He will
punish those in His house first before He punishes others. If the destruction comes to the house ofthe
Lord, what about your house? Are you ready to receive the Lord when he comes? Have you repented
enough? What He has told me is that He will completely destroy this whole world by fire and not to
be slow about repenting because it will come to your house before it goes to others. Especially to my
own family at home.
118
I was filled with the spiIit of our Father in Heaven and no one could stop me. I could speak
to the people with power and ask them to come unto Christ and repent and be baptized. I spoke to the
people at Ha'atafu and as I spoke to the people I was full of the spirit and started to prophesy many
things that would come to their life if they didn ' t change and come unto Christ. The spirit of Christ
was within me that day. I felt a great love for the Savior. And the love in my heart for my Tongan
people caused my heart to ache because they hardened their hearts and I bore testimony and prophesied
many things that some of the old prophets had told them in the scriptures. I preached to them about
Joseph Smith and authori ty was given to him and all the keys in the last dispensation of time. He was
trul y a prophet ofOod. They must li sten to the missionaries and repent and be baptized and come unto
Christ and join his church, if they really want to have eternal life. If they don't they wi ll be destroyed.
And I did the same from Ha'atafu all the way to the next town and the next vi ll age Kanokupolu.
As I ret urned home in the evening a van from mission headquarters anived to take us to a
missionary meeting. When we arrived at the meeting I was very ill and they took me anyway and as
I got there I fainted . They rushed me to the doctor at Vaiola Hospital thinking r had a heart attack.
The severe heat had never left my body and my whole body was I ike a furnace of fi re. The doctor
coul dn't find anything wrong with me except my body was heated and they couldn't get rid of the heat.
I was told I must go back to Te'ekiu and run a cold shower on my head and body. Again the Savior
came and spoke to me. I must go again on to the next town and was told not to fear for my life for I
would be protected. Many people will hate you and many wi ll call you names. but angels wi ll protect
you. At this time also, he reminded me that angels have heard the prayers of your forefathers and want
their work done in the temple. For I was to include calling those people to bring their names to the
temple and get their work done. Those forefathers had died before the gospel was brought to the
islands. Lastly, when you preach to them they will swear at you, they wi ll call you all kinds of names
and hate you for telling them the truth, but don't give up but continue on preaching.
The next day I almost died again. We went out again and continued on to the next village. My
body was full of the spirit of our Father in Heaven. I couldn't imagine all the words that filled my
mind and my spirit--words to be used when I spoke to these people. And when r said those, I heard
voices back from them saying, "You are a liar, you stop spreading lies." I expressed to them my love
and the love of our Savior to them and bore them my testimony. I felt like I was going to die again.
Especiall y my joints and my bones were killing me.
Again the mi ssionaries arrived in their van to check up on me. They had a welfare meeting we
needed to attend in Nuku'alofa. Again I fell down and passed out. They took me again to Vaiol a
Hospital. I couldn't get lid of the pain. I asked my mission President Hopoate and another Elder to
give me a blessing. After that they thought r had the flu, which was prevalent in Tonga at that ti me.
r stayed in the shower all night, but didn't get any relief. I got up very early and went to Kanokupol u
and started to preach to the people. The people were mean to me agai n over there. We walked to
Kolovai. The same treatment.
Not my words, but from the Lord that spoke in my ear. Repent. Also He says that He will
punish those in His house fiJ-st before He punishes others. If the destruction comes to the house of the
Lord, what about your house? Are you ready to receive the Lord when he comes? Have you repented
enough? What He has told me is that He will completely destroy thi s whol e world by fire and not to
be slow about repenting because it wi ll come to your house before it goes to others. Especially to my
own family at home.
119
I am your father speaking to you. You can come unto Christ. I am very concemed about you.
Are you ready to change your life? Don't wait any longer. The Lord won't speak any lies to me. It
is the truth. We must change our lives for the better. I'm doing this because of my love and concem
for you because I want to make sure that you will be protected and hope that you'll be obedient. The
voice of warning is from Christ.
I want to thank you for all you have done for your mother and me, and share all my love with
you. The only thing I worry about is if you are not prepared. I don't want to see you die. Forgive me
if I am too harsh with you, but I won't be able to stand between you and the punishment that the Lord
will mete out to those that don't repent. You must be humble before the Lord and the Lord will put
his arm around you and he will protect each and every one of you. All of you are members of the
Church. I humbly ask of you to please give up the smoking, your alcohol, and attend your church
meetings. Most of you are not attending your sacrament meetings. Take your families when you
attend your meetings.
I fear for your life if the World War BI comes. It will go on until the Savior comes. There will
be no more peace upon this earth until the Savior comes. That is the Lord's word and he said read
Doctrine & C ovenants 103:4 This is not my word, but came from the Lord. As a father I know that
you are not living up to the great knowledge that we have and being obedient to the commandments.
When we do not obey and live unrighteously, this is what will happen to you: I Peter 4.16-18.
This is not my work, it is the Lord's work. The Lord again warns us who have been baptized in the
Church, that we must keep the commandments.
The Lord can pour out the destroying angel on you—it's up to you. None of you know the time
the United States will be destroyed by an atom bomb. None of us will know about the great
earthquake that is to come. Some of you will be buried under the ground with it and many tidal waves,
hurricanes, lots and lots of rain. There will be many disasters yet to come. The cup of the Savior will
overflow with the evils of this world and he will not withhold his judgments. Compare it to the ripe
grape, that is taken down and trampled under foot and good for nothing after that. In the future there
will be many people fighting each other.
To the grandchildren: Why are you still living in unrighteousness, Doctrine& Covenants 41:1 -
7. This is the Lord speaking, if we don't change our lives, those that have been baptized in the church
and have taken Christ's name, if we do not live as we should, your name will be taken away from the
records ofthe church if you are not abiding. We should treat the gospel with love and understanding
and respect, but here in the scriptures it says we should not share the gospel with dogs and pigs.
I'm humbly asking you girls that have left your husbands. Work your problems out. Go back
to your husbands and make peace with your families. Have family home evening, study the scriptures,
pray, and repent. The time comes soon that you waste your time running around, looking for safety,
but you won't find it. But those that have repented, the Lord will protect your lives.
For those that have hardened their hearts, they will be destroyed. It comes to me in my mind
because for I am your father. Out here in Tonga I preach repentance to the Tongans, but imagine my
children living in sin and not changing and repenting in America. My heart cries out for you. I'm here
to help non-members and they listen to the voice of waming, but my own children reject the teachings
ofthe Savior including your parents' teachings.
J 19
I am your father speaking to you. You can come unto Chri st. I am very concerned about you.
Me you ready to change your life? Don't wait any longer. The Lord won't speak any li es to me. It
is the truth. We must change our li ves for the better. I'm doing thi s because of my love and concern
for you because I want to make sure that you will be protected and hope that you' ll be obedient. The
voice of warning is from Christ.
I want to thank you for all you have done for your mother and me, and share all my love with
you. The only thing I worry about is if you are not prepared. I don't want to see you di e. Forgive me
if I am too harsh with you, but I won't be able to stand between you and the puni shment that the Lord
will mete out to those that don't repent. You must be humble before the Lord and the Lord will put
his arm around you and he will protect each and everyone of you. All of you are members of the
Church. I humbl y ask of you to please give up the smoking, your alcohol , and attend your church
meetings. Most of you are not attending your sacrament meetings. Take your families when you
attend your meetings.
I fear for your life if the World War III comes. It wi ll go on until the Savior comes. There wil l
be no more peace upon thi s earth until the Savior comes. That is the Lord's word and he said read
Doctrine & Covenants 103:4 This is not my word. but came from the Lord. As a father I know that
you are not li ving up to the great knowledge that we have and being obedient to the commandments.
When we do not obey and live unri ghteously, thi s is what will happen to you: I Peter4:16-1 8.
Thi s is not my work, it is the Lord's work. The Lord again warns us who have been baptized in the
Church, that we must keep the 90mmandments.
The Lord can pour out the destroying angel on you--it's up to you. None of you know the time
the United States wi ll be destroyed by an atom bomb. None of us will know about the great
earthquake that is to come. Some of you will be buried under the ground with it and many tidal waves,
hurricanes, lots and lots of rain. There will be many disasters yet to come. The cup of the Savior will
overflow with the evils of this world and he will not withhold hi s judgments. Compare it to the ripe
grape, that is taken down and trampl ed under foot and good for nothing after that. In the future there
wi ll be many people fighting each other.
To the grandchil dren: Why are you still living in unrighteousness, Doctrine& Covenants 4 / :i-
7. This is the Lord speaking, if we don't change our li ves, those that have been baptized in the church
and have taken Christ's name, if we do not li ve as we should, your name will be taken away from the
records of the church if you are not abiding. We should treat the gospel with love and understanding
and respect, but here in the scriptures it says we shoul d not share the gospel with dogs and pigs.
I'm humbl y asking you girls that have left your husbands. Work your problems out. Go back
to your husbands and make peace with YOUI· families. Have famil y home evening, study the scriptures,
pray, and repent. The time comes soon that you waste your time running around, looking for safet y,
but you won't find it. But those that have repented, the Lord wi ll protect your lives.
For those that have hardened thei r hearts, they will be destroyed. It comes to me in my mind
because for I am your father. Out here in Tonga I preach repentance to the Tongans, but imagine my
children li ving in sin and not changing and repenting in Ameri ca. My heart cri es out for you. I'm here
to help non-members and they listen to the voice of warn ing, but my own children reject the teachings
of the Savior including your parents' teachings.
120
In the book of Ezekiel it tells you there that when you see the wrong in your family, you should
speak to them. Why am I wasting my time teaching others and neglecting my own family.
Dear children, forgive me and listen to me. With all my heart and with love I beg of you that God lives
and God will remove you from this earth if you do not keep all his commandments. And I ask you to
all stay away from temptation and be active in the Church. Spend your time in the Church so we can
have eternal life. If you don't abide by this, you may end up in hell. Ezekiel 33:7. My children, I wish
you could listen to my voice, with love, come unto Christ. Together I speak with Christ and especially
those that have hardened your hearts and closed your ears. It's not to frighten you but to help you and
council you. I am the doorkeeper in the house of Israel and am here to speak to you. All of you living
in sin must repent. I am not preaching to you thinking I am better than you. Come back to the Church.
I wish you could read all the scriptures that I have mentioned to you.
Salote, read Ezekiel 18:21-22 and Doctrine & Covenants 43:17-27. Listen what the Savior
says to us. How many times has the Savior given us the information and asked the missionaries and
families to help them get back to the Church. Watch out and be prepared, for the Lord's punishment.
A few years from now it will begin. The Lord will pour out his wrath and you won't be able to stand
the fire. You won't be able to stand still because he will shake the whole earth with an earthquake. It
will cause the ground to open and many towns will be swallowed up in the earth. Those that live by
the ocean won't be able to stop the tidal wave. It will fill the whole area. Where in the world can you
be safe.
I'm telling you, my children, don't harden your heart against the Lord's work. Be humble and
become active in the Church. I am very frightened what the Lord's going to pour out upon the world.
It is unbelievable what is to come, especially the fire will be like hell. The only thing that will stop
you from the fear is lo repent and come unto Christ. I beg of you to come and change your ways and
do not fear but to be happy and live in harmony with the Lord and his teachings.
Sad days are ahead of you. Many worry. But if you are on the right hand of God you find
happiness, but if you chose to be on the side of Satan, he is happy when he is able to drag you down
to hell. Most of all, I urge you to pay your full tithing and fast offerings. Attend your meetings and
make it a full tithing and not a part-tithing so you will be safe from the destroying fire that is to come.
In observing the law of tithing you will be safe from that fire. The line of fire will be in front of you
and from the back and there is no way for you to run away. Only one way is to repent. That's what
I'm trying to explain to you from the beginning. Isaiah 33:13-16. Where are you going to be safe?
Where are you going to tum? It will come to Zion, to people in Utah, and people in America. You
will hear the voice of those that do not repent, screaming, Where can we be safe. It will come to those
that do not repent. They will bum them up and take their life away. That's what the everlasting fire
is about.
When you choose Satan and his ways, then you can see the difference between the ways of
Satan and Christ. There is no peace in sin and there is confusion in your life and you don't know where
you are headed. Most of you, when the war comes, where will you get your water from. The Lord has
told us we must have our food storage. He has promised us that those that live and prepare themselves
have no need to worry. If ye are prepared, ye need not fear. Those who come to the Rocky Mountains
of Utah, the Lord has prepared also for them bread and water and the teaching of the prophet that we
must prepare.
120
In the book of Ezekiel it tell s you there that when you see the wrong in your fami ly, you shoul d
speak to them. Why am I wasting my time teaching others and neglecting my own famil y.
Dear children, forgive me and listen to me. With all my heart and with love I beg of you that God li ves
and God will remove you from thi s earth if you do not keep all hi s commandments. And I ask you to
all stay away from temptation and be active in the Church. Spend your time in the Church so we can
have eternal li fe. If you don't abide by this, you may end up in hell. Ezekiel 33: 7. My children, I wish
you could li sten to my voice, with love, come unto Chri st. Together I speak with Christ and especially
those that have hardened your hearts and closed your ears. It's not to frighten you but to help you and
council you. I am the doorkeeper in the house ofIsraei and am here to speak to you. All of you li ving
in sin must repent. I am not preaching to you thinking I am better than you. Come back to the Church.
I wish you could read all the scriptures that I have mentioned to you.
Salote, read Ezekiel 18:21-22 and Doc/rine & Covenants 43:]7-27. Listen what the Savior
says to us. How many times has the Savior given us the infOImation and asked the mi ssionaries and
famili es to help them get back to the Church. Watch out and be prepared, for the Lord's puni shment.
A few years from now it will begin. The Lord will pour out hi s wrath and you won't be able to stand
the fire. You won't be able to stand still because he wi ll shake the whole earth with an earthquake. It
will cause the ground to open and many towns wi ll be swallowed up in the earth. Those that live by
the ocean won't be able to stop the tidal wave. It will fill the whole area. Where in the world can you
be safe.
I'm telling you, my children, don't harden your heart against the Lord's work. Be humbl e and
become acti ve in the Church. I am very frightened what the Lord's going to pour out upon the world.
It is unbel ievable what is to come, especially the fire will be like hell. The only thing that will stop
you frOI11 the fear is LO repent and come unto Chri st. I beg of you to come and change your ways and
do not fear but to be happy and li ve in harmony with the Lord and hi s teachings.
Sad days are ahead of you. Many worry. But if you are on the ri ght hand of God you find
happiness, but if you chose to be on the side of Satan, he is happy when he is able to drag you down
to hell. Most of all , I urge you to pay your full tithing and fast offerings. Attend your meetings and
make it a full tithing and not a part-tithing so you wi ll be safe from the destroyi ng fire that is to come.
In observing the law of tithing you will be safe from that fire. The line of fire wi ll be in front of you
and from the back and there is no way for you to run away. Only one way is to repent. That' s what
I'm trying to explain to you frol11 the beginning. Isaiah 33:13-J6. Where are you going to be safe?
Where are you going to turn? It wi ll come to Zion, to people in Utah, and peopl e in America. You
wi II hear the voice of those that do not repent, screaming, Where can we be safe . It will come to those
that do not repent. They wi ll burn them up and take their life away. That's what the everlasting fire
is about.
When you choose Satan and his ways, then you can see the difference between the ways of
Satan and Christ. There is no peace in sin and there is confusion in your life and you don't know where
you are headed. Most of you, when the war comes, where will you get your water from. The Lord has
told us we must have our food storage. He has promi sed us that those that I ive and prepare themselves
have no need to worry. lfye are prepared, ye need not fear. Those who come to the Rocky Mountains
of Utah, the Lord has prepared also for them bread and water and the teaching of the prophet that we
must prepare.
121
This is what the lord told us he is going to do. He will destroy from one end to another end.
All the people. If they forsake the Lord's work, you will end up with the rest of them.
Ezekiel 39:17-29. Jeremiah 25:27-34. Remember we have come to the promised land to get our
blessings. Choose the way you should go-the Lord's way or the other way. And again, I call all of
you to repent. With all my love, lohani Wolfgramm.
Given at a later time:
As our mission time was drawing to a close, there were only two towns in all of Tongatapu
that hadn't been visited, Mu'a and Ha'akame. During this time we dedicated the rest of our time
knocking at the doors, proselyting. There was not one night that we didn't call repentance to some
village. After the problems some towns hardened their hearts, there were others that were ready to
receive the gospel. We arranged a day meeting, a mid-day meeting, an aftemoon meeting, and at night
we did genealogy. Most ofthe time we were out teaching, there were many requests for us to explain
to them about the last days, genealogy and how to do it, how the many lines are connected, how the
gospel was sent to the earth and then taken away again. Most of them couldn't believe all the
information that I was able to expound to them. It made them anxious to learn more about the Book
of Mormon. They want to know what would happen to them if they failed to repent. They were asking
me about the second coming and what they should do to be saved.
M:
DAVIDIC LINE IN AMERICA
r
ore than 400 years after King Zedekiah's death, this people came in contact with the
-descendants of Lehi who left Jerusalem 600 BC or in the first year of King Zedekiah's
reign. Lehi's colony evidently were landsmen. If they had been seafarers along the westem coast of
Palestine they would have wished to go that way rather than hy the borders ofthe Red Sea and out
upon the broad expanse ofthe South Pacific Ocean.
When the children of Lehi discovered the descendants of Mulek they were under a leader
named Zarahemla who was a direct descendant of Mulek, according to the tradition {Book of Mormon,
Omni 1:18) (Mosiah 25:2) and therefore ofthe royal line of David (Helaman 8:21)
This branch of the royal line did not however, receive kingly recognition in the new world, which is
the land promised to Joseph (Genesis 49:26) and not to Abraham (Genesis 15:18).
At the end of the 70 years of Babylonian captivity the Jews were restored to Palestine-a
kingdom without a king of Davidic line. If Daniel and his associates were of that line, they made no
claim to the throne. Publicly in Judea the royal line of David disappeared and seemingly has been lost,
as they said, to latter days.
To the Polynesians (the Tongans) the royal line of David did not disappear. The Lord took his
direct royal line from Palestine with King Zedekiah's children along with their grandfather the Prophet
Jeremiah, Princess Tamar and her younger sister left with the prophet to the British Isles, and their
brother, the King's son Mulek, was brought to America on a ship that landed near the Florida coast,
walked and traveled across the land, found pieces of gold and records of the people of Ether. The
121
Thi s is what the lord told us he is going to do. He wi Il destroy from one end to another end.
All the peopl e. If they forsake the Lord's work, you wi ll end up wit h the rest of them.
Ezekiel 39:17-29. Jeremiah 25:27-34. Remember we have come to the promised land to get our
blessi ngs. Choose the way you should go--the Lord's way or the other way. And again, [call al l of
you to repent. Wit h all my love, [ohani Wolfgramm.
Given al a later lime:
As our mi ssion time was drawing to a close, there were only two towns in all of Tongatapu
that hadn't been visited, Mu'a and Ha'akame. During thi s time we dedicated the rest of our time
knocking at the doors , proselyting. There was not one ni ght that we didn't call repentance to some
vill age. After the problems some towns hardened their hearts, there were others that were ready to
receive the gospel. We arranged a day meeting, a mid-day meeting, an afternoon meeting, and at night
we did genealogy. Most of the time we were out teaching, there were many requests for us to explain
to them about the last days, genealogy and how to do it, how the many lines are connected, how the
gospel was sent to the earth and then taken away again. Most of them couldn't believe all the
informati on that [ was able to expound to them. It made them anxious to learn more about the Book
a/Mormon. They want to know what would happen to them if they failed to repent. They were asking
me about the second coming and what they should do to be saved.
DA VIOIC LINE IN AMERICA
M
ore than 400 years after King Zedekiah's death, this people came ir. contact with the
descendants of Lehi who left Jerusalem 600 BC or in the first year of King Zedekiah 's
reIgn. Lehi 's colony evidently were landsmen. If they had been seafarers along the western coast of
Palest ine they woul d have wished to go that way rather than hy Ihe horders o/ Ihe Red Sea and out
upon the broad expanse of the South Pacific Ocean.
When the chi ldren of Lehi discovered the descendants of Mulek they were under a leader
named Zaraheml a who was a direct descendant of Mulek, according to the tradition (Book a/Mormon.
Omni I: 18) (Mosiah 25:2) and therefore of the royal line of David (Helaman 8:21)
Thi s branch of the royal line did not however. receive kingly recognition in the new world, which is
the land promised to Joseph (Genesis 49:26) and not to Abraham (Genesis 15: 18).
At the end of the 70 years of Babylonian captivity the Jews were restored to Palestine- a
kingdom without a king of Davidic line. [f Daniel and his associates were of that line, they made no
clai m to the throne. Publicly in Judea the royal line of David disappeared and seemi ngly has been lost,
as they said, to latter days.
To the Polynesians (the Tongans) the royal line of David did not disappear. The Lord took hi s
direct royal line from Palest ine with King Zedekiah's c; hildren along with their grandfatherthe Prophet
Jeremiah, Princess Tamar and her younger s ister left with the prophet to the Briti sh Isles, and their
brother, the King's son Mulek, was brought to America on a ship that landed near the Florida coast,
walked and traveled across the land, found pieces of gold and records of the people of Ether. The
122
descendants of Mulek and his company were under a leader named Zarahemla who was a direct
descendant, met the people of Mosiah from Central America and were mixed. King Mosiah taught
them of their genealogy and language. From that direct royal line of David was bom a man named
Hagoth who built ships. He needed a captain for his ship. He found one of his royal cousins named
Hawaiiloa from David's royal line to help find these Nephite people a new home. Another way our
Heavenly Father wanted to scatter the House of Israel around the world and later would gather them
through the gospel. It was God's plan from the beginning. Hawaiiloa including men, women, and
children, Prophet Spencer W. Kimball told us, it took 400 years to scatter these people out to the South
Seas, and they were Nephite people.
From Central America, Hawaiiloa left 88 BC, his wife' name was Hualalai, his oldest son Maui
ai Alu was bom 65 BC, second a daughter named Oahu was born 63 BC and another son Kanai was
bom at 61 BC, and they named the islands of Hawaii after him.
Later his royal descendants were Tangaloa, Monuka, Tangarkoa Rangi, Tangaloa Motua, and
Hawaiiloa's younger brother was named Kei. Kei wanted to sail and find him new islands. He
discovered Tahiti. After being there he found out that some Tahitians were cannibals and he joined
with them. He was so surprised when he got there, the people who lived in Tahiti spoke the same
language as he.
There was a Nephite man named Opuka Honua who married a Lamanite named Lana in the
year 263 A.D.and used to live in Central America. He left with his family because he didn't like wars.
So they sailed out to sea and found the Easter Island. They populated that Island and war again began
in the East Island and the land was getting too small for their population, so some decided to head out
to sea and look for new land, and that's when they found Tahiti. Later they found New Zealand, the
land with the long white cloud, Rarotonga, and other islands. Tangaroa Monuka found Fiji, but when
they first arrived they found some dark skinned people were already living in Fiji, up by the mountain.
But Tongaroa people lived by the sea. They had a ship wreck at sea with a big storm and hurricane,
and drifted out to sea and when they landed at Fiji, they came from the Solomon Islands.
Tangaroa Langi said he needed to head out to sea also and to look for a new island for himself.
When they sighted the tall mountain off Samoa it reminded him of Hawaii, so they called the island
Savaii, so he wanted to remain in Samoa.
Tangaroa Motua the oldest, decided to look for a new land for him and his people so they left
Samoa and headed out to sea like the other two, and it didn't take him long before they sighted the two
Niua Islands and Tafahi, and the third one was Toku Island. That's where the first royal line of King
David resided. It is a beautiful small islands with beautiful white sand, and lots of different colored
fish around so Tangaloa Motua wanted to stay at Toku. To this day the descendants of Tangaloa still
own that island.
Later the king found out that big foreign ships would come and trick these islanders to come
inside their ship to trade their wares. They traded penny nails for a pig or food or tapa cloth, mats or
whatever the Tongans had, as they didn't know any better. As 75 to 100 people were inside their ship,
they closed and locked the doors. They used the people in the hold as slaves to clean their boats, even
sold the children for 50 cents, women for 50 cents and men for one dollar. They did this throughout
the south seas.
122
descendants of Mulek and hi s company were under a leader named Zarahemla who was a direcl
descendant, met the people of Mosiah from Central America and were mi xed. King Mosiah taught
them of lheir oenealooy and lanouaoe From that direct royal line of David was born a man named
o b b /:I .
Hagoth who built shi ps. He needed a captain for hi s ship. He found one of hi s royal cousins named
Hawaii loa from David' s royal line to help find these Nephite people a new home. Another way our
Heavenly Father wanted to scatter the House of Israel around the world and laler would gather them
through the gospel. It was God's plan from the beginning. Hawaiiloa including men, women, and
chi ldren, Prophet Spencer W. Kimball told us, it took 400 years to scatter these people out to the South
Seas, and lhey were Nephite people.
From Central Ameri ca, Hawaiiloa left 88 BC, hi s wife' name was Hualalai , hi s oldest son Maui
ai Alu was born 65 BC, second a daughler named Oahu was born 63 BC and another son Kanai was
born at 6 1 BC, and they named the islands of Hawaii after him.
Later hi s royal descendants were Tangaloa, Monuka, Tangarkoa Rangi , Tangaloa Motua, and
Hawaii loa's younger brother was named Kei. Kei wanted to sail and find him new islands. He
di scovered Tahiti. After being there he found out that some Tahitians were cannibal s and he joined
with them. He was so surpri sed when he got there, the people who li ved in Tahi ti spoke the same
language as he.
There was a Nephite man named Opuka Honua who manied a Lamanite named Lana in the
year 263 A.D.and used to live in Central Ameri ca. He left wi th hi s famil y because he didn' t like wars.
So they sail ed out to sea and found the Easter Island. They populated that Island and war again began
in the East Island and the land was getting too small for their popul ation, so some decided to head OUl
to sea and look for new land, and that ' s when they found Tahiti. Later they found New Zealand, the
land with the long white cloud, Rarotonga, and other islands. Tangaroa Monuka found Fiji, but when
they first arrived they found some dark skinned people were already li vi ng in Fiji , up by the mountai n.
BUl Tongaroa people lived by the sea. They had a ship wreck at sea with a big storm and hurri cane.
and drifted out to sea and when they landed at Fij i, they came from the Solomon Islands.
Tangaroa Langi said he needed to head out to sea also and to look for a new island for hi mself.
When they sighted the tall mountain off Samoa it reminded him of Hawaii , so they called the island
Savaii , so he wanted to remain in Samoa.
Tangaroa Motua the oldest, decided to look for a new land for him and hi s people so they left
Samoa and headed out to sea like the other two, and it didn ' t take him long before they sighted the two
Niua Islands and Tafahi, and the third one was Toku Island. That 's where the first royal line of King
David resided. It is a beautiful small islands with beautiful white sand, and lots of different colored
fish around so Tangaloa Motua wanted to stay at Toku. To thi s day the descendants of Tangaloa sti ll
own that island.
Later the king found out that big foreign ships would come and trick these islanders to come
inside their ship to trade their wares. They traded penny nail s for a pig or food or tapa cloth, mats or
whatever the Tongans had, as they didn't know any better. As 75 to 100 people were inside their ship,
they closed and locked the doors. They used the people in the hold as slaves to clean their boats, even
sold the children for 50 cents, women for 50 cents and men for one dollar. They did thi s throughout
the south seas.
123
It was so sad, but it is a true story. To this day you see the Hawaiians used to have a king but
they lost their king. Same as Tahiti, New Zealand, Rarotonga, Fiji and Samoa, have lost their royal
king and queen. To this day, only the Royal King Taufa Ahau Tupou IV and Queen Halauvalu
Mata'aho of Tonga still rule their own people and countiy. Do you know why?
In 1989 lohani and Salote finally completed the Royal line. The genealogy of the King and
Queen of Tonga had been traced, researched, and checked over and over, and finally their line
connected with the Royal line of Queen Elizabeth of England. The Tongan Royal line came from
Mulek, Queen Elizabeth's line from Mulek's sister Temar Tephi, and the royal line of Spain from the
younger sister (all of David's royal line).
So now we leam that the Lord took the royal line of David (the male heir to the royal line)
because it came from Mulek and hid him upon this tiny island of Tonga. He can remain there without
fear and be protected in Tonga. And he will not go to war. He is from the Royal House of Judah,
Levi, Ephraim, and Manassah-four blood lines that flow in the veins ofthe Royal couple.
A
1
THE BAY OF RECKONING
This was written by Salote Fakatou Wolfgramm.
t the urging of my daughter Tisina, I would like to explain to those of our family and
rfriends about some very personal and serious reports that came to Church Headquarters
from our ward and Stake and others regarding some activities of lohani and myself. We are recording
this on August 20thl999, though the event took place in the summer of 1995.
A woman was sent to our home to ask lohani and I if we would come for a special meeting
or interview at the Church Office Building. lohani and I were not afraid. We told her, "Sure, we
would love to come," but before we leave, lohani asked to have time to go and gather all information
and evidences that he might need to take with us.
lohani went to our bedroom and in there he gathered all his books, charts, genealogy and
scriptures. Later we left for the Church Office Building with two brief cases packed full of material.
We were conducted into an interview room when we arrived at the office.
QUESTION I:
He began the interview by saying: "lohani, we have received many, many reports that you have
broken some church rules by going outside of your ward and Stake boundries to bless and administer
to the sick, and you were told that you were not go perform these duties outside of your ward or Stake.
Is that true. Brother Wolfgramm?"
With no hesitation lohani replied, "That's true. I did that. But I've got a question for you to
explain to me. Why was I ever given the Melchizedek Priesthood as an officer of the high priesthood?
Isn't that our duty to do work for the dead, do service for our loved ones and families in the temples,
record our family histories, but most of all the Lord has given me, including yourself, services and
duties on this earth to perform. Please open up your scriptures to the book of Matthew 10:1,6,7,8."
123
It was so sad, but it is a true story. To thi s day you see the Hawaii ans used to have a king but
they lost their king. Same as Tahiti, New Zealand, Rarotonga, Fiji and Samoa, have lost their royal
king and queen. To thi s day, only the Royal King Taufa Ahau Tupou rv and Queen Halauvalu
Mata'aho of Tonga still rule their own peopl e and country. Do you know why?
In 1989 lohani and Salote finally completed the Royal line. The genealogy of the King and
Queen of Tonga had been traced, researched, and checked over and over, and finally their line
connected with the Royal line of Queen Eli zabeth of England. The Tongan Royal line came from
Mulek, Queen Elizabeth's line from Mulek' s sister Temar Tephi , and the royal line of Spain from the
younger sister (all of David' s royal line) .
So now we learn that the Lord took the royal line of David (the male hei r to the royal line)
because it came from Mulek and hid him upon thi s tiny island of Tonga. He can remain there wit hout
fear and be protected in Tonga. And he will not go to war. He is from the Royal House of Judah,
Levi, Ephraim, and Manassah-four blood lines that flow in the veins of the Royal couple.
THE DA Y OF RECKONING
This was wrillen by Sa/ole Fakalou Woljgramm.
A
t the urging of my daughter Tisina, I would like to explain to those of our famil y and
friends about some yery personal and seri ous reports that came to Church Headquarters
from our ward and Stake and others regarding some act ivities ofIohani and myself. We are recording
this on August 20th 1999, though the event took place in the summer of 1995.
A woman was sent to our home to ask Iohani and I if we would come for a special meeting
or interview at the Church Office Building. Iohani and I were not afraid. We told her, "Sure, we
would love to come," but before we leave, Iohani asked to have time to go and gather all infOImation
and evidences that he mi ght need to take with us.
Iohani went to our bedroom and in there he gathered all hi s books, charts, genealogy and
scriptures. Later we left for the Church Office Building with two brief cases packed full of materi al.
We were conducted into an interview room when we arrived at the office.
QUESTION I:
He began the interview by saying: "Iohani, we have received many, many reports that you have
broken some church rul es by going outside of your ward and Stake boundries to bless and admini ster
to the sick, and you were told that you were not go pelform these duti es outside of your ward or Stake.
Is that true, Brother Wolfgramm?"
With no hesitation Iohani replied, "That ' s true. I did that. But I've got a question for you to
explain to me. Why was I ever given the Melchi zedek Priesthood as an officer of the hi gh priesthood?
Isn't that our duty to do work for the dead, do service for our loved ones and families in the temples,
record our family hi stories, but most of all the Lord has given me, including yourself, services and
dut ies on this earth to perform. Please open up your scriptures to the book of Matthew 10:1,6.7,8."
124
(J) And when he had called unto him his twelve disciples he gave them power against
unclean spirits to cast them out, and to heal all manner of sickness and all manner of
disease.
(6) But go rather to the lost sheep of Isreal.
(7) And as you go, preach, saying, the kingdom of heaven is at hand.
(8) Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, cast out devils; freely ye have
received, freely give.
After the scripture was read, lohani continued on, "It is my duty and responsibility that was
given me, if anyone calls for me to give him or her a blessing, I must help them and I should help
them. Another thing that you must understand, I didn't ask them to call me or invite them to come to
our home."
"Day after day people keep coming over to our home asking me for a blessing from the Lord
to heal the sick, bless and help the lame to walk, to restore the sight ofthe blind, to raise the dead, cast
out devils through their fasting, prayers and faith in the Lord. Most were healed by the Lord and only
a few weren't as I was an instrument in the Lord's hands."
"I was ordained to the office of the Melchizedek priesthood as an Elder in Zion and now have
been ordained as a High Priest. The same instruction was given by Jesus Christ who instructs,
empowers, and send his Twelve apostles forth to preach, minister, and heal the sick. Those who
receive them receive the Lord."
"I didn't want to tum my back when people came or traveled many, many miles to receive a
blessing. That's your calling and mine as a Melchizedek priesthood holder to give answers when they
call for our help, so we may give it to them freely as the Lord gave them to us freely. And I will never
chase anyone away from our home if they come with the intent in their heart for a blessing from the
Lord in their behalf-to be healed or not, it's up to the Lord, but I may be an instrument in his holy
power and priesthood to perform my duty on this earth."
After lohani explained his feelings to them, one ofthe interviewers said to lohani, "Indeed, you
are right Brother Wolfgramm. We have finally heard the truth. We had heard that you went and
invited people to come so you could bless them, and that was not true. They came by themselves to
your home, right? Indeed, lohani, that's your duty and mine to go forth and perform our duties as we
are asked to do."
QUESTION II:
Again the interviewer said, "lohani, I don't see any violence at all here, but I want to know,
lohani, do you have a patriarchal blessing?"
lohani said, "Of course, let me give it to you." He reached into his briefcase and opened up
his patriarchal blessing. It states there, " / bless you that the priesthood which you bear will he a
source of strength and power in your hands in righteousness that you may administer to the sick that
they may receive a blessing thereby; that you may have the spirit and the power of healing through
the priesthood you hear that you may, through your faith and your prayers, see the hand of the
Lord manifest in behalf of those with whom you associate, particularly with those to whom you
administer the ordinance for healing. Can you understand what my blessing was all about?"
124
(i ) And when he had called unto him his Melve disciples he gave them power against
IIne/ean spirits to cast them out, and to heal all manner of sickness and all manner of
disease.
(6) But go rather to the lost sheep of isreal.
(7) A lid as you go, preach, saying, the kingdom of heaven is at hand.
(8) Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers. raise the dead, cast out devils; free ly ye have
received,freely give.
After the scripture was read, lohani continued on, "It is my duty and responsibility that was
given me, if anyone call s for me to give him or her a blessing, I must help them and 1 should help
them. Another thing that you must understand, I didn' t as k them to call me or invite them to come to
our home."
"Day after day people keep coming over to our home asking me for a blessing from the Lord
to heal the sick, bless and help the lame to walk, to restore the sight ofthe blind, to rai se the dead, cast
out devi ls through their fasting, prayers and faith in the Lord. Most were healed by the Lord and only
a few weren' t as I was an instrument in the Lord's hands."
"I was ordained to the office of the Melchizedek priesthood as an Elder in Zion and now have
been ordained as a High Priest. The same instruction was given by Jesus Chri st who instructs,
empowers. and send his Twelve apostles forth to preach, mini ster, and heal the sick. Those who
receive them receive the Lord."
"I didn ' t want to turn my back when people carne or traveled many, many mil es to receive a
blessing. That ' s your calling and mine as a Melchizedek priesthood holder to give answers when they
call for our help, so we may give it to them freely as the Lord gave them to us freely. And 1 will never
chase anyone away from our home if they come with the intent in their heart for a blessing from the
Lord in their behalf-to be healed or not, it's up to the Lord, but I may be an instrument in hi s holy
power and priesthood to perfonn my duty on thi s earth. "
After lohani explained hi s feeli ngs to them, one of the interviewers said to lohani , "Indeed, you
are ri ght Brother Wolfgramm. We have finall y heard the truth. We had heard that you went and
invited people to come so you could bless them, and that was not true. They came by themselves to
your home, right? Indeed, Iohani , that's your duty and mine to go forth and perfolm our duti es as we
are asked to do."
QUESTION II:
Again the interviewer said, "lohani , 1 don't see any violence at all here, but 1 want to know,
lohani. do you have a patriarchal blessing?"
lohani said, "Of course, let me give it to you." He reached into hi s briefcase and opened up
his patriarchal blessing. It states there, .. .. .... I bless you that the priesthood which you bear will be a
source of strength and power in your hands in righteousness that you may administer to the sick tilat
they may receive a blessing thereby; that you may have the spirit and the power of healing through
the priesthood you bear ....... that you may, through yourfaith and your prayers, see the hand of the
Lord mallilest in behalf of those with whom you associate, particularly with those to whom yOll
administer the ordinance for healing. Can you understand what my blessing was all about?"
125
The interviewer said, "Brother Wolfgramm, I commend you for your great service to the
faithful members ofthe Church. Now I can really see what you are doing now wasjust fine, the prayer
of faith will help people to restore their lives and your patriarchal blessing is a great opportunity for
those who may call you for their blessing, to heal the sick as a test of their faith."
QESTION III:
Our next question is: "The story that we have heard went something like this: If a person called
from a great distance or a very far place on the telephone, you have agreed to bless them through the
telephone. We haven't heard such a thing in our Church previous to this. Is that true?" asked the
interviewer.
lohani replied again, "That is also true. Circumstances vary, but when there is an emergency
where I am unable to be there in person to perform my duty in matters of life and death, I had no other
choice but to leave it in the hand of God to guide me through his spirit what I should do at that
moment."
"Yes, to me it doesn't matter, if a person is unable to come forme and asks if I could give him
or her that blessing, even though we are miles and miles apart, yes, indeed, I'll try with all my heart
to give that person the blessing that his or her heart desires in righteousness if that is what the Holy
Ghost moves me to do at that time. I must wait and listen for an answer, and continued to serve and
perform my duties as I am guided from above."
The interviewer said, "All right, Brother Wolfgramm, can you tell us any experiences that have
happened to anyone who needed your help and you were unable to be there in person, and with the aid
of a telephone, you were able to ask the Lord for his help, and he or she recovered?"
"Yes, indeed, I can't begin to tell or count how many people the Lord has reached out to heal
and have recovered from whatever problem or disease that they were dying with that were healed,"
lohani answered.
The interviewer continued, "Alright Brother Wolfgramm, can you relate to us any true story
of someone that this happened to and has recovered?"
lohani replied, "Certainly. Listen while I tell you this true story. Our son Mike and his wife
Vake and his family (known as The Jets) had invited us to join them on a trip to do shows and concerts
around Alberta, Canada and British Columbia about 1981."
"About 6:00 a.m. one moming while we were staying at Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada that
weekend, we received a telephone call from Tila, one of our twin daughters, calling us from St. Mark's
hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. Tila said, Dad, I really need some help. I don't know what has
happened to me, but I keep on fainting at home, so I came to see our doctor and he said that I'm about
3 months pregnant. The reason why I keep passing out is that my little baby is inside the tube. 1 was
told that if the baby remains inside this tube, the tube will rupture and the baby will die and perhaps
me also. I was told the only choice left for me was to let the doctor operate and dissolve or vacuum
out my baby so I might live."
lohani replied, "What would you like me to do, Tila?"
Tila cried and said, "Dad, please only one thing I need to ask of you. Would it be possible for
you to ask our Heavenly Father what we should do at this time, because I don't want them to kill our
baby. I want you to ask our Heavenly Father to please take our baby from the tube and place him
inside my womb where he will remain until he is ready to be bom."
125
The interviewer said, "Brother Wolfgramm, I commend you for your great service to the
faithful members of the Church. Now I can really see what you are doing now was just fine, the prayer
of faith wi ll help people to restore their li ves and your patriarchal blessing is a great opportunity for
those who may call you for thei r bl essi ng, to heal the sick as a test of their faith."
QESTION 1II:
Our next question is: "The story that we have heard went something like this: If a person call ed
from a great distance or a very far place on the telephone, you have agreed to bless them through the
telephone. We haven ' t heard such a thing in our Church previous to thi s. Is that true?" as ked the
interviewer.
lohani replied again, "That is also true. Circumstances vary, but when there is an emergency
where I am unabl e to be there in person to perform my duty in matters of life and death, I had no other
choice but to leave it in the hand of God to guide me through his spirit what I should do at that
moment."
"Yes, to me it doesn' t matter, if a person is unable to come for me and asks if! could give him
or her that bl essing, even though we are mil es and miles apart, yes, indeed, I'll try wit h all my hean
to give that person the blessing that hi s or her heart desires in ri ghteousness if that is what the Holy
Ghost moves me to do at that time. I must wait and li sten for an answer, and conti nued to serve and
perform my duti es as I am guided from above."
The interviewer said, "All right, Brother Wolfgramm, can you tell us any experiences that have
happened to anyone who needed your help and you were unabl e to be there in person. and with the aid
of a telephone, you were able to ask the Lord for hi s help, and he or she recovered?"
"Yes, indeed, I can' t begin to tell or count how many people the Lord has reached out to heal
and have recovered from whatever problem or disease that they were dying with that were heal ed,"
lohani answered.
The interv iewer continued, "Alright Brother Wolfgramm, can you relate to us any true story
of someone that thi s happened to and has recovered?"
lohani repli ed, "Certainly. Li sten while I tell you this true story. Our son Mike and his wife
Vake and hi s fami ly (known as The .leIS) had invited us to join them on a trip to do shows and concerts
around Alberta, Canada and Briti sh Columbia about 1981."
"About 6:00 a.m. one morning whil e we were staying at Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada that
weekend, we received a telephone call from Tila, one of our twin daughters, calling us from St. Mark 's
hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. Tila said, Dad, I really need some help. I don't know what has
happened to me, but I keep on fainting at home, so I came to see our doctor and he sai d that I'm about
3 months pregnant. The reason why I keep passing out is that my little baby is inside the tube. I was
told that if the baby remains inside thi s tube, the tube will rupture and the baby will die and perhaps
me also. I was told the only choice left for me was to let the doctor operate and dissolve or vacuum
out my baby so I mi ght li ve."
Iohani repli ed, "What would you like me to do, Tila?"
Ti la cried and said, "Dad, please only one thing I need to ask of you. Would it be possibl e for
you to ask our Heavenl y Father what we should do at this time, because I don ' t want them to kill our
baby. I want you to ask our Heavenl y Father to please take our baby from the tube and place him
inside my womb where he wi ll remain unti l he is ready to be born. "
126
lohani replied, "Tila, do you have enough faith if I pray to our Heavenly Father to help save
you and your baby from this serious tubal pregnancy so you both will recover?"
"Yes Dad, I know God will hear your prayers and our lives will be spared. That's why I
called."
Again lohani continued, "You do this Tila, seal your faith and mine to our Father in Heaven
right now, and let him allow me to bless you with the aid ofthe telephone because of our long distance
apart."
lohani began to pray to our Father in Heaven in humble prayer, "Tila, by the holy power ofthe
Melchizedek priesthood that is vested in me and in the name of Jesus Christ, I, lohani, your father
unite our faith and prayers and seal this up to God the Father and in the name of his begotton Son Jesus
Christ, we humbly ask thee at this time to look down upon our daughter Tila and the baby this moming
who has called to tell us what has happened to her at the St. Mark's hospital. This baby was given you
by God to you who was also a co-creator of this baby. But somehow this baby was conceived inside
the tube, and we ourselves know that no one else can remove that baby from the tube without killing
either the baby or Tila. Heavenly Father, you are the only one who would be able to accomplish that.
You have the wisdom the knowledge to do that, so please, Heavenly Father, we humbly ask thee, if
it is possible for us topray for these two, may we ask thee for that blessing. What her doctor can do
here in mortality is just a small and limited knowledge of what is possible, but remember that our
daughter Tila doesn't want to have them kill her baby."
lohani began to feel the spirit and began to thank the Lord for this great opportunity to express
his love and gratitude for all our blessings and in this blessing he said, "Father, thank you so much for
this little boy that you have blessed our family with." At that time no one knew that she was carrying
a boy. "When this littie boy is grown up he will be useful in thy hand to serving thee in righteousness
and in preparing the way for thy Son's second coming. Please, Heavenly Father, let thy will be done,
as we hope and pray that this boy will grow in knowledge and understanding and faith in the gospel.
We ask thee Lord, to bless Tila also with what her heart's desire at this difficult time, in the name of
thy son Jesus Christ, amen."
After we said goodbye on the phone, we asked Mike and the rest ofthe family if we could fast
all day for Tila and her baby. We did so and at 5:00 p.m. we broke our fast in Canada and asked the
Lord that his will be done, as we continued to pray that their lives might be spared.
lohani again called St. Mark's hospital to check up on Tila's condition and the baby. Her
husband Kim answered the phone and laughed. He said they had taken Tila for another X-ray and after
comparing the 1
st
and 2
nd
X-rays they were identical. The baby was still inside the mother's tube so
they decided to take her up for surgery. They operated on Tila that same evening and unexpectedly
found that the baby had moved from her tube and had been placed in his mother's womb.
The doctor who did the surgery was shocked and immediately called seven other doctors to
come and see this great change that had happened to his patient. They couldn't believe what they just
saw on the X-ray film-nothing like before the operation. The baby was back to his normal area. They
closed her up.
126
lohani replied, ''Til a, do you have enough faith if I pray to our Heavenl y Father to help save
you and your baby from this seri ous tubal pregnancy so you both wi ll recover?"
"Yes Dad, I know God will hear your prayers and our lives will be spared. That 's why I
call ed. "
Agai n Iohani continued, "You do thi s Tila, seal your faith and mine to our Father in Heaven
right now, and let him allow me to bl ess you with the aid of the telephone because of our long di stance
apart. "
Iohani began to pray to our Father in Heaven in humble prayer, "Tila, by the holy power of the
Me1chi zedek priesthood that is vested in me and in the name of Jes us Chri st, I, Iohani , your father
unite our faith and prayers and seal thi s up to God the Father and in the name of hi s begotton Son Jesus
Chri st, we humbly ask thee at thi s time to look down upon our daughter Tila and the baby this morning
who has call ed to tell us what has happened to her at the St. Mark's hospital. This baby was given you
by God to you who was also a co-creator of thi s baby. But somehow thi s baby was conceived inside
the tube, and we ourselves know that no one else can remove that baby from the tube without kill ing
either the baby or Ti la. Heavenl y Father, you are the only one who would be able to accompli sh that.
You have the wisdom the knowledge to do that, so please, Heavenly Father, we humbl y ask thee, if
it is possible for us topray for these two, may we ask thee for that bl essing. What her doctor can do
here in mortality is just a small and limited knowledge of what is possibl e, but remember that our
daughter Tila doesn' t want to have them kill her baby."
Iohani began to feel the spiri t and began to thank the Lord for thi s great opportunity to express
his love and gratitude for al l our blessings and in this blessing he said, "Father, thank you so much for
thi s little boy that you have blessed our family with." At that time no one knew that she was carryi ng
a boy. "When thi s littl e boy is grown up he will be useful in thy hand to serving thee in ri ghteousness
and in preparing the way for thy Son' s second coming. Please, Heavenly Father, let thy will be done,
as we hope and pray that thi s boy will grow in knowledge and understanding and faith in the gospel.
We ask thee Lord, to bless Ti la also with what her heart 's desire at this difficult time, in the name of
thy son Jesus Christ, amen. "
After we said goodbye on the phone, we asked Mike and the rest of the family if we could fast
all day for Tila and her baby. We did so and at 5:00 p.m. we broke our fast in Canada and asked the
Lord that hi s wil l be done, as we continued to pray that their lives might be spared.
Iohani again called St. Mark' s hospital to check up on Til a's condition and the baby. Her
husband Kim answered the phone and laughed. He said they had taken Tila for another X-ray and after
comparing the J" and 2"d X-rays they were identical. The baby was still inside the mother 's tube so
they decided to take her up for surgery. They operated on Ti la that same evening and unexpectedly
found that the baby had moved from her tube and had been placed in his mother's womb.
The doctor who did the surgery was shocked and immediately called seven other doctors to
come and see this great change that had happened to his patient. They couldn't believe what they j ust
saw on the X-ray fi lm-nothing like before the operation. The baby was back to hi s normal area. They
closed her up.
127
We all thanked the Lord for this miracle. We came back to Utah. Five months later we were
at the temple and received another phone call. It was Tila stating that her doctor had called and asked
if she would come to the hospital. They thought it would be wise to deliver the baby by C-sedion that
day, but she insisted on another blessing from lohani.
We immediately left the temple and went in a taxi to give Tila another blessing. In lohani's
prayer to our Heavenly Father, he asked the Lord: "If Tila's baby is not quite ready to be born, through
the power ofthe holy Melchizedek priesthood and in the name of Jesus Christ, I promise you, Tila, that
the Lord's hands will be around and about you to protect you and your baby. If your baby is not quite
ready to come, I bless you that the surgeon's knife will never come close until the appointed time for
him to be bom and the Lord's hands will be there to protect you both."
Tila was ready and taken up for her last operation. Her doctor arrived. He came in to check
her out, Tila explained. "I don't know what happened, when the doctor came in the room he had a
doubtful look on his face. He whistled around the room and finally came to her bed and said, 'Tila,
I am very sorry, I have changed my mind. I will not operate on you now, but will wait for your baby's
new arrival date.'"
Tila cried and said, "Thank you, and thank Heavenly Father, that that's what the Lord wanted
us to do. Tila was released from the hospital the very same day. A month later she gave birth to a
perfect little baby and he was named after our prophet Spencer Kimball-Spencer Johnson and with
his grandmother's family name too. Our Lord had blessed our family and all honor and glory to him.
The interviewer said, "lohani, were there any other instances in which you have blessed people
on the phone?"
lohani replied, "Yes indeed, I can hardly count them. There were many of them."
About 1972:
The interviewer said, "Can you relate another story for us so we may hear it?"
"Yes indeed," lohani replied.
"There was a young man, Robert Frandsen, who had recently retumed from Thailand after
serving with the United States Air Force. While attending a party in Price, Utah, he was accidentally
shot by one of his friends while on his stomach on the floor watching a television show. Seventeen
bullets were scattered throughout his whole insides, penetrating his stomach, lungs, and liver, but
somehow missed his heart. They took him to the hospital. He had a lot of pain and suffered from the
loss of a great amount of blood. Within six months he had six different operations. The doctors had
done all they could for him. His uncle and aunt had heard me bear my testimony in a Sacrament
meeting about how the Lord had restored one of my daughters back to life after she had passed away
17 hours earlier. Robert's father called lohani if he could drive up with some of our family to give his
son a priesthood blessing at the hospital.
"We invited my sons-in-law, Weldon Sillito and Roy Gerber with their wives to go and assist
in Robert's blessing. One was an Elder and the other a Seventy."
"When we arrived there were doctors and a few nurses around. Robert's father asked if we
could come in so we could administer to his son."
127
We all thanked the Lord for thi s miracle. We came back to Utah. Five months later we were
at the temple and received another phone call. It was Tila stating that her doctor had call ed and asked
if she would come to the hospital. They thought it woul d be wise to deliver the baby by C-section that
day, but she insisted on another blessing from Iohani .
We immediately left the templ e and went in a taxi to give Tila anot her bl essing. In Iohani 's
prayer to our Heavenly Father, he asked the Lord: "lfTil a's baby is not quite ready to be born, through
the power of the holy Melchi zedek priesthood and in the nameof"Jesus Chri st, I promise you, Til a, that
the Lord's hands will be around and about you to protect you and your baby. If your baby is not quite
ready to come, I bless you that the surgeon's knife will never come close until the appointed time for
him to be born and the Lord's hands wi ll be there to protect you both."
Tila was ready and taken up for her last operation. Her doctor an·ived. He came in to check
her out, Tila explained. "I don't know what happened, when the doctor came in the room he had a
doubtful look on hi s face . He whistl ed around the room and finall y came to her bed and said, 'Tila,
I am very sorry, [have changed my mind. I will not operate on you now, but will wait for your baby' s
new arrival date. ",
Tila cried and said, "Thank you, ar.d thank Heavenly Father, that that 's what the Lord wanted
us to do. Tila was released from the hospital the very same day. A month later she gave bi rth to a
pelfect littl e baby and he was named after our prophet Spencer Kimball-Spencer Johnson and with
his grandmother's family name too. Our Lord had blessed our fami ly and all honor and glory to him.
The intervi ewer said, "lojlani , were there any other instances in which you have blessed people
on the phone?"
lohani repli ed, "Yes indeed, I can hardly count them. There were many of them."
About 1972:
The intervi ewer said, "Can you relate another story for us so we may hear it?"
"Yes indeed," Iohani replied.
"There was a young man, Roben Frandsen, who had recently returned from Thailand after
serving with the United States Air Force. While attending a party in Price, Utah, he was accidentall y
shot by one of hi s friends while on hi s stomach on the floor watching a television show. Seventeen
bull ets were scattered throughout hi s whole insides, penetrating his stomach, lungs, and liver, but
somehow mi ssed hi s heart. They took him to the hospital. He had a lot of pain and suffered from the
loss of a great amount of blood. Within six months he had six different operations. The doctors had
done all they could for him. Hi s uncle and aunt had heard me bear my testimony in a Sacrament
meeting about how the Lord had restored one of my daughters back to I ife after she had passed away
17 hours earli er. Robert 's father call ed [ohani if he could drive up with some of our family to give hi s
son a priesthood blessing at the hospital.
"We invited my sons-in-law, Weldon Sillito and Roy Gerber with their wives to go and ass ist
in Robert 's blessing. One was an Elder and the other a Seventy."
" When we arrived there were doctors and a few nurses around. Robert's father asked if we
could come in so we coul d admini ster to hi s son. "
128
Bob had been lying flat on his back ever since he was shot. He was unable to move by himself.
He hardly noticed anyone because he was in so much pain and very weak. They were so happy to see
us. Bob's father had tears in his eyes. They feared they might lose him that night. Bob was very
uncomfortable, being in much pain. His father asked the doctor to make sure it would be alright to
give his son a blessing. "By all means, yes," said the doctor.
In lohani's prayer he said: Holy Father, as you know by now, that Bob's body has been shot
at and almost every part of his body has been injured, including his stomach, legs, kidneys and other
parts. The doctor won't be able to heal all his injured parts right away. Holy Father, you were the one
who was responsible for creating his stomach and every part of his body, and we pray and ask thee,
in the name of Jesus Christ, if thy will be done on his behalf, and we can understand the suffering
caused by this gun shot. We know that he has lost a lot of blood already. His nerves and muscles have
been damaged, including parts of his flesh. Some small bones have been shattered and damaged by
some of the bullets. At this moment, Holy Father, we humble ourselves in deep humility asking thee
in the name of thy son Jesus Christ to see to it that every little part and piece that had been shattered
and broken or had been damaged-to gather them and mend them carefully and place them back in their
own place like it was before, so Bob will be able to raise up his own two feet and be healed. We ask
that he will return to his normal health again. We ask that Bob's healing will stand as a testimony to
the world that you are the living God who made it possible for Bob to recover from his wounds.
"By the time lohani and his two sons-in-law said amen, doctors and nurses were shocked. Bob
instantly got up from his hospital bed and thanked all of us and shook our hands. Then he excused
himself and walked over to the bath room, washed his face and hands and retumed and sat on his bed.
Bob began to talk and talked to us without stopping.
After we visited for about 20 more minutes, lohani shook his hand and asked, " How do you
feel."
Bob said, "I can't feel any hurts at all."
lohani said, "Yes, the Lord's hands have protected and have blessed you, Bob, and through
God's priesthood power has made you well tonight. Through your faith, the Lord has healed your
wounds and what a blessing for us to be a part of his gospel to share God's blessing like faith, healing,
and the power of the priesthood."
Three days later Bob was released from the hospital.
Around 1979 we received another call from Bob Frandsen asking urgently for lohani. He said,
"While I was working as a window cleaner, the safety equipment failed and I fell from the fourth floor
of a building in Arizona this year. I landed on my back and my right side and part of my back was
injured severely. In fact the doctor told me my right side was paralyzed and will remain like that until
I die. I know without a doubt in my mind, lohani, if you can bless me tonight, the Lord will hear our
prayers and will help me heal and be able to make my right side move normally, so I can continued
to work and support my family. Can you help me again, lohani?"
lohani replied, "Bob, I sealed up your faith unto the Lord and I'm sorry I'm so far away from
you, but with the aid ofthe telephone, I know that God will understand my situation and allow me to
use the telephone for your blessing. I received a peaceful feeling and knew it would be alright. Put
your ear close to the phone and listen quietly while I ask our Heavenly Father to please seal up our
faith, prayers and your faith together with mine."
128
Bob had been lying fl at on hi s back ever since he was shot. He was unable to move by himself.
He hardl y noticed anyone because he was in so much pain and very weak. They were so happy to see
us. Bob's father had tears in hi s eyes. They feared they mi ght lose him that ni ght. Bob was very
uncomfortable, being in much pain. His father asked the doctor to make sure it would be alri ght to
give his son a bl essing. "By all means, yes," said the doctor.
In Iohani's prayer he said: Holy Father, as you know by now, that Bob' s body has been shot
at and almost every part of hi s body has been injured, incl uding his stomach, legs, kidneys and other
parts. The doctor won' t be able to heal all hi s injured parts ri ght away. Hol y Father, you were the one
who was responsible for creating hi s stomach and every part of hi s body, and we pray and as k thee,
in the name of Jesus Christ. if thy will be done on hi s behal f, and we can understand the suffering
caused by th is gun shot. We know that he has lost a lot of bl ood already. Hi s nerves and muscles have
been damaged, incl uding parts of his fl esh. Some small bones have been shattered and damaged by
some of the bull ets. At thi s moment, Holy Father, we humble ourselves in deep humility aski ng thee
in the name of thy son Jesus Christ to see to it that every li tt le part and piece that had been shattered
and broken or had been damaged- to gather them and mend them carefull y and place them back in their
own place like it was before, so Bob will be able to raise up hi s own two feet and be heal ed. We ask
that he will ret urn to hi s nOl111al healt h again. We ask that Bob' s healing will stand as a testimony to
the world that you are the living God who made it possible for Bob to recover from hi s wounds.
"By the time Iohani and hi s two sons-i n-law said amen, doctors and nurses were shocked. Bob
instantl y got up from hi s hospital bed and thanked all of us and shook our hands. Then he excused
hi mself and walked over to the bath room, washed his face and hands and returned and sat on hi s bed.
Bob began to talk and talked to us without stopping.
After we visited for about 20 more minutes, Iohani shook hi s hand and asked, " How do you
feel. "
Bob said, "I can' t feel any hurt s at all. "
Iohani said, "Yes, the Lord's hands have protected and have blessed you, Bob, and through
God's priesthood power has made you well tonight. Through your faith, the Lord has healed your
wounds and what a blessing for us to be a part of hi s gospel to share God's bl essing like faith, healing,
and the power of the priesthood."
Three days later Bob was released from the hospital.
Around 1979 we received another call from Bob Frandsen asking urgentl y for Iohani . He said,
"While I was working as a window cleaner, the safety equipment fail ed and I fell from the fourt h fl oor
of a building in Ari zona thi s year. I landed on my back and my right side and part of my back was
injured severely. In fact the doctor told me my right side was paralyzed and will remain like that unti l
I di e. I know without a doubt in my mind, Iohani, if you can bless me toni ght, the Lord will hear our
prayers and will help me heal and be able to make my ri ght side move normall y, so I can conti nued
to work and support my family. Can you help me again, Iohan i?"
Iohan i repli ed, "Bob, I sealed up your faith unto the Lord and I' m sorry I' m so far away from
you, but with the aid of the telephone, I know that God will understand my situation and all ow me to
use t he telephone for your blessing. I received a peaceful feeling and knew it would be alri ght. Put
your ear close to the phone and li sten qui etly whi le I ask our Heavenl y Father to please seal up our
fait h, prayers and your fa ith together with mine."
129
Bob thanked lohani as he listened reverently.
lohani began to offer the blessing: "Oh God the All Mighty, hear me, oh God of Heaven and
give ears oh earth and rejoice ye inhabitants thereof, for the Lord is God, great is his wisdom,
marvelous are his ways, from eternity to eternity he is the same.
"Almighty God, this is the second time Bob has had a very serious injury, and you showed him
your power before. Combining his faith with ours, he has asked for thy blessing. As you know, has
has fallen and injured his back, and one side has become paralyzed. Without a doubt in our mind, if
we pray and ask thee, Oh Lord, to look down upon Bob's problems, thou wilt be mindful of him. He
refuses to stay in bed for the rest of his life. He asks that you may heal all his broken and injured parts,
his side, his body, and make it whole again. He has asked if I could bless him and seal our faith with
thee, so he will completely recover and will soon be back to normal."
lohani again asked the Lord to heal all his broken bones, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels
and the let blood flow freely. After this blessing. Bob thanked lohani and he went to sleep.
Bob's parents were extremely troubled and so were some of his friends. At the moment I
pronounced the blessings all doubts were swept away. Bob said, "When you put your trust in the Lord
he can open many doors and bless you through sincere prayer and faith in Him." The next moming
when Bob woke up he had forgotten all about his problems. He just didn't lie there as he used to do,
but got up, stretched his legs and began to move his hands, feet, and neck as they were before. He got
up and began to run. He sat down. What a change. He began to roll on the floor. He started to laugh
and again rolled over. He was so excited that every part of his body was back to normal. The dead
blood vessels, weakened muscles, arteries, veins began to function normally and Bob was so exited
and grateful.
He immediately called his doctor to witness what the Lord had done for him. The doctor was
surprised and thanked him for his trust and faith in God.
I was called for the blessing three months after the accident.
Notes from actual letter: " Doctors said I would never walk or go to the bathroom normally
again nor be able to give my wife any children. The X-rays showed that spinal nerves had been
completely severed. I was taken to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and they did extensive
surgery on my back, but I was paralyzed from the waist down. I should be in a wheelchair the rest of
my life. "
Just before Christmas 1979 we were surprise and excited to have Bob arrive at our home and
he was able to run, walk and even drive his car back to Utah. He had great joy and was very happy
for his recovery.
After lohani told the interviewer these three stories, he was amazed and said, "I had never heard
of such a story like this before. It is inconceivable. We can't believe it. Anyone who has used the
telephone in behalf of the sick and injured patients before have not recovered."
lohani continued, "Christ told us in the scripture, if we pray to him in faith, all our sick will
be made well. In the Book of James 5:14,15.
(14) If any sick among you? Let him califor the elders ofthe church, and let them pray
over him, anointing him with oil in the name ofthe Lord.
129
Bob thanked lohani as he li stened reverentl y.
Iohani began to offer the blessing: "Oh God the All Mighty, hear me, oh God of Heaven and
give ears oh earth and rejoice ye inhabitants thereof, ror the Lord is God, great is his wisdom.
marvelous are hi s ways, from eternity to eternity he is the same.
" Almighty God, thi s is the second time Bob has had a very serious injury, and you showed him
your power before. Combining hi s faith with ours, he has asked for thy blessing. As you know, has
has fallen and injured hi s back, and one side has become paralyzed. Without a doubt in our mind, if
we pray and ask thee, Oh Lord, to look down upon Bob's problems, thou wilt be mindful of him. He
refuses to stay in bed for the rest of hi s life. He asks that you may heal all hi s broken and injured parts,
hi s side, hi s body, and make it whole again. He has asked ifl could bless him and seal oUl'fai th with
thee, so he will completely recover and will soon be back to nonnal."
lohani agai n asked the Lord to heal all hi s broken bones, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels
and the let blood flow freely. After this blessing. Bob thanked lohani and he went to sleep.
Bob's parents were extremely troubled and so were some of hi s friends. At the moment I
pronounced the blessings all doubts were swept away. Bob said, "When you put your trust in the Lord
he can open many doors and bless you through sincere prayer and faith in Him." The next morning
when Bob woke up he had forgotten all about his problems. He just didn't lie there as he used to do,
but got up, stretched his legs and began to move hi s hands, feet, and neck as they were before. He got
up and began to run. He sat down. What a change. He began to roll on the floor. He started to laugh
and again rolled over. He was ~ o excited that every part of his body was back to normal. The dead
blood vessels, weakened muscles, arteries, veins began to function nonnall y and Bob was so exited
and grater ul.
He immediately called his doctor to witness what the Lord had done for him. The doctor was
surpri sed and thanked him for hi s trust and faith in God.
I was called for the blessing three months after the accident.
Notes from actual letter: " Doctors said I would never walk or go to the bathroom nOlmall y
again nor be able to give my wife any chi ldren. The X-rays showed that spinal nerves had been
completely severed. J was taken to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and they did extensive
surgery on my back, but I was paralyzed from the waist down. 1 should be in a wheelchair the rest of
my life. "
Just before Christmas 1979 we were surprise and excited to have Bob alTive at our home and
he was able to run, walk and even drive hi s car back to Utah. He had great joy and was very happy
for hi s recovery.
After lohani told the interviewerthese three stories, he was amazed and said, "I had never heard
of such a story like this before. It is inconceivable. We can't believe it. Anyone who has used the
telephone in behalf of the sick and injured patients before have not recovered."
lohani continued, "Chri st told us in the scripture, if we pray to him in faith, all our sick will
be made well. In the Book of James 5:14,15.
(14) If any sick among you? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray
oller him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord.
130
(75) And the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up, and if he
has committed sins, they shall be forgiven him.
"See, this is what the Lord taught us that we must do.
"When I'm called to perform my duties among those who have called up me, I do it in the
name of Jesus Christ and I also pray to God in faith, that's why the keys and authority can be ours, and
he will reveal all mysteries, and God will honor those who serve him in righteousness and great shall
be their reward and eternal shall be their glory.
QUESTION IV:
"Reports have come to us saying that you have gone and held different firesides without the
permission of your bishop or your Stake President, but you go of your own free will. Will you
explain?"
lohani said, "The bishop of that ward and Stake President are responsible for whomever they
would feel or be inspired to ask to come and share their testimony, their genealogy, or talk about any
doctrine ofthe church. I have been called and invited to come and share those things in the church that
are sacred and dear to me. Never once did I ever invite or ask for any special group or church members
to come so my wife and 1 could be their host or their main speaker for their fireside or sacrament
meeting, never.
"To my understanding, firesides, sacrament meeting, programs for youth, or Relief Society and
others, bishops, Stake Presidents or Relief Society Presidents or High Priest Group Leaders can invite
those that have special gifts of the spirit, or retum missionary couples who involve their lives in
genealogy, family history, temple activities, or those whom they feel are good couples who dedicate
their lives for missionaiy service in building up the Kingdom of God on this earth, can be called to
come and share their testimonies and their work, faith, and experiences, to help others to build up their
own faith and testimony.
"There are no rules that we cannot speak at other wards or stakes, especially if the bishop of
that ward along with their Stake President calls and asks if we can come and share our sacred
testimony of the Prophet Joseph Smith, the dream of King Nebuchadnessar, the 12 tribes of Isreal,
blessing given to Joseph Smith of Ephraim and Manasseh, the Book of Monnon, baptism for the dead,
temple marriage, faith, repentance, baptism, receiving the Holy Ghost, healing ofthe sick, the House
of Israel, the lost ten tribes, genealogy ofthe Polynesian people, covenant people, Christ's teaching,
true church of God, Jesus (the Rock), second coming, house ofthe Lord, terrible destruction in the last
days, missionary work, teaching of the prophets, family experiences, patriarchal blessings, temple
marriage, priesthood, repentance, pioneer stories, Holy Ghost, prophets ofthe old testament and their
testimonies, Adam and Eve and all his family and posterity and their stories and testimonies, faith,
trials,and sacrifices, miracles. Moses and the ten commandments, Abraham and Isaac, Jacob, Noah,
Enoch, Jesus Christ, Jared, Lehi, Nephi, Mormon, Moroni, New Jerusalem, Jews in old Jerusalem,
Zion, Urim and Thummin, Salvation, promises, three degrees of glory, satan, scriptures, word of
wisdom, the ten virgins. Sources are Matthew Cowley speaks, LeGrand Richards hook, Spencer W.
Kimball, Priesthood manuals, Ensign, Conference talks, B.Y.U. devotionals, Return ofthe City of
Enoch, Isreal in the Pacific, the Royal lines of Tonga are connected to the Royal line of Queen
Elizabeth, genealogy, King David, charts, maps, and different lines.
130
(15) Alld the prayer o.tfailh shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up, and ilhe
has commilled SillS, Ihey shall be forgiven him.
"See. thi s is what the Lord taught us that we must do.
"When I'm call ed to perform my duties among those who have call ed up me. 1 do it in the
name of Jesus Chri st and 1 also pray to God in faith, that 's why the keys and authority can be ours, and
he will reveal all mysteries, and God wi ll honor those who serve him in righteousness and great shall
be their reward and eternal shall be thei r glory.
QUESTION IV:
"Reports have come to us saying that you have gone and held different firesides without the
permi ss ion of your bishop or your Stake President, but you go of your own free will. Will you
ex plain?"
Iohani said, "The bi shop of that ward and Stake President are responsible for whomever they
would feel or be inspired to ask to come and share their testimony, their genealogy, or talk about any
doctrine of the church. I have been call ed and invited to come and share those things in the church that
are sacred and dear to me. Never once did 1 ever invite or ask for any special group or church members
to come so my wife and I could be their host or their main speaker for their fireside or sacrament

"To my understanding, firesides, sacrament meeting, programs for youth, or Relief Society and
others, bishops, Stake Presidents or Reli ef Society Presidents or High Priest Group Leaders can invite
those that have special gifts of the spirit, or return missionary couples who involve their li ves in
genealogy, famil y hi story, temple activities, or those whom they feel are good couples who dedicate
their li ves for mi ssionary servi ce in building up the Ki ngdom of God on this earth, can be call ed to
come and share their testimoni es and their work, faith, and experi ences, to help others to build up their
own faith and testimony.
"There are no rules that we cannot speak at other wards or stakes, especially if the bishop of
that ward along wit h their Stake President calls and asks if we can come and share our sacred
testimony of the Prophet Joseph Smith, the dream of King Nebuchadnessar, the 12 tribes of Isreal,
blessi ng given to Joseph Smith of Ephraim and Manasseh, the Book of Mormon, bapti sm for the dead,
temple marriage, faith, repentance, baptism, receiving the Holy Ghost, healing of the sick, the House
of Israel, the lost ten tri bes, genealogy of the Polynesian people, covenant people, Christ's teachi ng,
true church of God, Jesus (the Rock), second coming, house of the Lord, terrible destruction in the last
days, mi ssionary work, teaching of the prophets, fami ly experiences, patriarchal blessings, temple
marri age, priesthood, repentance, pioneer stories, Holy Ghost, prophets of the old testament and their
testimonies, Adam and Eve and all his fami ly and posterity and their stories and testimonies, faith,
trials,and sacrifices. miracles. Moses and the ten commandments, Abraham and Isaac, Jacob, Noah,
Enoch, Jesus Chri st, Jared, Lehi, Nephi , Mormon, Moroni, New Jerusalem, Jews in old Jerusalem,
Zion, Urim and Thummin, Salvation, promises, three degrees of glory, satan, scriptures, word of
wisdom, the ten virgins. Sources are Mallhew Cowley speaks, LeGrand Richards book, Spencer W.
Kimball, Priesthood manuals, Ensign, Conference talks, B.Y.U. devotionals, Return of the Ci ty of
Enoch, Isreal in Ihe Pacific, the Royal lines of Tonga are connected to the Royal line of Queen
Elizabeth, genealogy. King David, charts, maps, and different lines.
131
"When we teach there are only a few ofthe topics we use when we preach or speak at firesides,
using all scriptures and other church books and manuals. Many people haven't heard some common
things that the Church taught by early missionaries and their testimonies when they first came to the
Islands. To them, the same doctrines are different or new, but the Church is just the same throughout
the whole world. The only difference is that widely scattered people within the Church have widely
diverse cultural background, their clothing is different, their language is different, and they do things
in their native way, and their food is different, but the blessing that we are so grateful for in the Church
is that of knowing that we all belong to our Father and Mother in Heaven and they love each and
everyone of us. He doesn't judge us from the outside, but what we are really like inside, and the intent
of our hearts." (The interviewer was shaking his head in disbelief.)
QUESTION V:
The interviewer again said, "Here's another consideration. Brother Wolfgramm, the story that
reached us said that you told others, including Tongans that they are descendants of Nephi? But
Tongans believe that they are descendants of Laman because their skin is brown. Can you explain that
to us, Brother Wolfgramm?"
"Oh yes. I will be more than happy if you care to listen. It's a long, long story."
The interviewer said, "We want to listen, Brother Wolfgramm."
lohani sat up straight and began to recite the story of Lehi from Jerusalem to America, 600 B.C.
with his wife Sariah and his four sons Laman, Lemuel, Sam, and Nephi. The Lord wanted Lehi to
depart out of Jerusalem, because he prophesied to the people concerning their iniquity and they sought
to destroy his life.
After journeying into the wildemess, the sons retumed to Jerusalem after the record of the
Jews, and a second time for Ishmael and his family, and took the daughters of Ishmael to wife. They
came to a large body of water, and with the Lord's help, Nephi built a ship to cross the water to the
promised land (America). Posterity of Lehi and Ishmael are descendants of Manasseh and Ephraim
the sons of Joseph who was sold into Egypt. The Book of Mormon is their history.
At the time the Jews were conquered by the Babylonians and taken into captivity, Zedekiah was
the King of Judah. They slew the king's sons before his eyes, and put out King Zedekiah's eyes. They
bound him with fetters of brass and carried him to Babylon (Jeremiah 52:10,11).
When David was anointed King of Israel, the prophet Nathan said, "Thine house and kingdom
and throne will he established forever." David was of the tribe of Judah. After King Zedekiah was
taken captive, it appeared that the blessing given to David was not to be fulfilled and his throne would
not endure forever. However, such was not the case.
The mother of King Zedekiah was Hamutal, daughter of Jeremiah of Tibnah (the prophet)
{Jeremiah 52:1). The children of King Zedekiah were great grandchildren of Jeremiah. He took two
of Zedekiah's daughters for safety into Egypt for hiding, and later lead a colony of people to Spain
where the younger daughter married into the royal family of Spain. Jeremiah then went to Ireland
where the older one married the chief king of Deland. These unions eventually caused the blood of
Judah to mix with all the royal families of Europe.
131
"When we teach there are only a few of the topi cs we use when we preach or speak at firesides,
using all scriptures and other church books and manuals. Many people haven' t heard some common
things that the Church taught by early mi ssionaries and their testimoni es when they first came to the
Islands. To them, the same doctrines are different or new, but the Church is just the same throughout
the whole world. The onl y difference is that widely scattered people within the Church have widely
diverse cultural background, their c1othin
b
o
is different, their lanouaoe is different and they do thinos
b b , b
in their native way, and their food is different, but the blessing that we are so grateful for in the Church
is that of knowing that we all belong to our Father and Mother in Heaven and they love each and
everyone of us. He doesn ' tj udge us from the outside, but what we are reall y like inside, and the intent
of our hearts. " (The interviewer was shaking hi s head in di sbeli ef. )
QUESTION V:
The interviewer again said, "Here's another considerati on. Brother Wolfgramm, the story that
reached us said that you told others, including Tongans that they are descendants of Nephi ? But
Tongans believe that they are descendants of Laman because their skin is brown. Can you explain that
to us, Brother Wolfgramm?"
"Oh yes. I will be more than happy if you care to li sten. It's a long, long story."
The interviewer said, "We want to li sten, Brother Wolfgramm."
lohani sat up straight and began to recite the story of Lehi from Jerusalem to Ameri ca, 600 B.C.
with his wife Sariah and his fOIJr sons Laman, Lemuel, Sam, and Nephi. The Lord wanted Lehi to
depart out of Jerusalem, because he prophesied to the peopl e concerning thei r iniquity and they sought
to destroy hi s li fe.
After j ourneying into the wilderness, the sons returned to Jerusalem after the record of the
Jews, and a second time for Ishmael and hi s famil y, and took the daughters of Ishmael to wife. They
came to a large body of water, and with the Lord 's help, Nephi bui lt a shi p to cross the water to the
promised land (America). Posterity of Lehi and Ishmael are descendants of Manasseil and Ephraim
the sons of Joseph who was sold into Egypt. The Book of Mormon is their hi story.
At the time the Jews were conquered by the Babylonians and taken into captivity, Zedekiah was
the King of Judah. They slew the king's sons before hi s eyes, and put out King Zedekiah' s eyes. They
bound him with fetters of brass and carried him to Babylon (Jeremiah 52:JO,J J).
When David was anointed King ofIsrael, the prophet Nathan said, "Thine hOl/se and kingdom
and throne will he estahlished forever." David was of the tribe of Judah. After Ki ng Zedeki ah was
taken captive, it appeared that the blessing given to David was not to be ful filled and hi s throne woul d
not endure forever. However, such was not the case.
The mother of King Zedeki ah was Hamutal, daughter of Jeremiah of Tibnah (the prophet)
(Jeremiah 52:1). The chil dren of King Zedekiah were great grandchildren of Jeremi ah. He took two
of Zedekiah's daughters for safety into Egypt for hi ding, and later lead a colony of people to Spain
where the younger daughter married into the royal family of Spai n. Jeremiah then went to Ireland
where the older one married the chi ef king of Ireland. These uni ons eventuall y caused the blood of
Judah to mix with all the royal famili es of Europe.
132
At the time the sons of King Zedekiah were put to death, he had one son that escaped the
destruction of his brothers. This son was Mulek, and through his father Zedekiah, was a descendant
of Levi through his grandmother Hemutal, and Judah through his father Zedekiah. Mulek went with
a colony ofpeople to America {Bookof Mormon,Helaman6:10) From the Mediterannean Sea
they crossed the great waters and landed in the area of Florida, and then traveled about North America.
They found a record on gold plates, later translated as the record written by Ether, of a people that left
at the time of the Tower of Babel (the Jaredites) who were scattered by the Lord at the time of the
confounding of the language of the people who were building a tower to reach to heaven. They had
preceded the Mulekites and the last Jaredite survivor lived to tell the story of his people. He was
Coriantumr and he dwelt with the people of Zarahemla for the space of 9 moons {Book of Mormon,
Omni 1:21) before he died.
A completely opposite route was taken by Lehi in 600 B.C. They crossed the great Pacific
ocean and landed in the area of Central America {Book of Mormon, Helaman 6:10) Amaleki, the son
of Abinadom tells about a Nephite who was named Mosiah. He discovered the land of Zarahemla after
warned by the Lord to flee out of the land of Nephi and go into the wildemess. There he found the
colony of Mulekites and their city Zarahemla and was greeted warmly by them, and became their king.
Thus were the Nephites and the Mulekites united in peace and harmony.
They had many wars and serious contentions with the Lamanites and fell by the sword from
time to time. The language ofthe Mulekites had become corrupted as they had brought no record with
them; they denied the being of their creator and Mosiah nor his people could understand them. Mosiah
caused that they should be taught in his language. Zarahemla gave a genealogy of his fathers according
to his memory, and they were written, but not in these plates.
The two nations united to become one nation and intermarrige took place between the two
people (That's the Polynesian royal line). Book of Mormon Alma 63:4-10.
(4) And it came to pass in the 37'
1
' year of the reign of the judges, there was a large
company of men, even to the amount of 5,400 men, their wives and their children,
departed out ofthe land of Zarahemla into the land which was northward.
(5) And it came to pass that Hagoth, he being an exceedingly curious man, therefore he
went forth and built him an exceedingly large ship, on the border ofthe land Bountiful,
by the land Desolation, and launched it forth into the west sea hy the narrow neck,
which led into the land northward.
(6) And behold, there were many ofthe Nephites who did enter therein and did sail away
with mucjh provisions, and also many women and children; and they took their course
northward. And thus ended the 37"' year.
(7) In the 38
th
year this man build other ships. And the first ship did also return, and
many more people did enter into it; and they also took much provisions, and set out
again to the land northward.
132
At the time the sons of King Zedekiah were put to death, he had one son that escaped the
destruction of his brothers. Thi s son was Mulek, and through hi s father Zedekiah, was a descendant
of Levi through his grandmother Hemutal, and Judah through hi s father Zedekiah. Mulek went with
acolonyofpeopletoAmerica (Book of Mormon , Helaman 6:10) From the Mediterannean Sea
they crossed the great waters and landed in the area of Florida, and then traveled about North America.
They found a record on gold plates, later translated as the record written by Ether, of a people that left
at the time of the Tower of Babel (t he Jaredites) who were scattered by the Lord at the time of the
confounding of the language of the people who were building a tower to reach to heaven. They had
preceded the Mulekites and the last Jaredite survivor lived to tell the story of his people. He was
Cor iantumr and he dwelt with the people of Zarahemla for the space of 9 moons (Book of Mormon,
Omni 1 :21) before he died.
A completely opposite route was taken by Lehi in 600 B.C. They crossed the great Pacific
ocean and landed in the area of Central Amelica (Book of Mormon, Helaman 6:10) Amaleki , the son
of Abinadom tells about a Nephite who was named Mosiah. He discovered the land ofZarahemla after
warned by the Lord to flee out of the land of Nephi and go into the wilderness. There he found the
colony of Mulekites and their city Zarahemla and was greeted wannly by them, and became their king.
Thus were the Nephites and the Mulekites united in peace and hannony.
They had many wars and serious contentions with the Lamanites and fell by the sword from
time to time. The language of the Mulekites had become con up ted as they had brought no record with
them; they denied the being of their creator and Mosiah nor his people could understand them. Mosiah
caused that they should be taught in hi s language. Zarahemla gave a genealogy of his fathers according
to hi s memory, and they were written, but not in these plates.
The two nations united to become one nation and intennarlige took place between the two
people (That 's the Polynesian royal line). Book of Mormon Alma 63:4-10.
(4) And it came to pass in the 37'" year of the reign of the judges, Ihere was a large
company of men, even 10 Ihe amounr of' 5,400 men, Iheir wives and their children,
depaned oul of lhe land ofZarahemla into Ihe land which was northward.
(5) And il came 10 pass Ihal Hagoth, he being an exceedingly curious man, Iherefore he
wenr forlh and buill him an exceedingly large ship, on the border of the land Bountijitl,
by the land Desolalion, and launched it forth into the west sea by the narrow neck,
which led inro Ihe land northward.
(6) And behold, there were many of lhe Nephi tes who did enter Iherein and did sail away
with mucjh provisions, and also many women and children; and they took Iheir course
norrhward. And thus ended Ihe 37'" year.
(7) In Ihe 38'" year Ihis man build other ships. And Ihe firsl ship did also return, and
man)' more people did enter inro il; and they also lOok much provisions, and set oUl
again 10 the land norlhward.
133
Hagoth asked his cousin Hawaiiloa to be captain of his ship. Hawaiiloa was an astronomer.
He studied about the sun, moon, and stars. He knew about the weather, the currents, earth rotation,
and was a great fisherman. Hawaiiloa was bora 88 B.C. He discovered the Hawaiian Islands. At that
time they were uninhabited. He retumed to bring his family back to these beautiful islands and named
them after himself and his children. The first island was named Oahu after his first daughter. The
second island was named after his second child, a son named Maui. The big island of Hawaii was
named after himself, Hawaii. The fourth island was named Kauai, his other son. The remainder of
the islands he named after his steermen. Hawaiiloa was a descendant of Anianikalani (Nephite).
There was another Nephite named Opukahonua bom about 263 B.C. (His birth is determined
from the birth date of King Kamehameha of Hawaii bom 1797, figuring 25 years for a generation).
Opukahonua didn't like war so he sailed from America and came to Easter Island. They lived
there because it was the island closest to the American coast and was first inhabited around 200 B.C.
This is evidenced by the stone carvings of the early Menehune. Both Nephites and Lamanites were
in the island. I believe the "long ears" were the first to arrive in Easter Island, coming by ship. Later
the "short ears" arrived in Easter Island. They lived side by side until the time arrived that "short ears"
rebelled and slew the "long ears".
At that time Opukahonua had already left with his people to find a new home. Opukahonua
found Tahiti first and they settled there for a while. Tane and Atea were descendants of Opukahonua
(Nephites) who settled the Marquesas Islands and another descendant of Lolokona who may have been
a Lamanite descendant, was bom about 238 B.C. as son of Nu'u (Noah) and intermarried with the
descendants of Hawaiiloa and became the ancestor of the royal family of Hawaii.
The interrogator was satisfied with lohani's answers and shook our hands warmly as we
departed.
THE SEINI KIVALU'S STORY
lohani's daughter Tisina Gerber relates this stoiy
S
eini Kivalu was a student of Liahona High School when my husband Roy Gerber and I were
serving a family history mission in Tonga between the years 1992 and 1995. A thought
came to Roy, that if he could train a few students from Liahona College how to run a computer they
could help with the family history research in Tonga when our mission is over and we leave for the
United States.
At church we asked for some volunteers for computer training for family history. We had
prayed about it for almost three weeks. It was kind of hard because in Tonga only women of chief or
noble descent knew about their different lines, except a few genealogists in the Church. The
knowledgeable people had either left the islands or had passed away.
The following week after Roy spoke at Matagiake Ward and at Liahona Ward, there came ten
young girls. A sixteen year old whose name of Lupi Ngaue from Matahau, Toa Fakatou, Ofa Fakatou
from Mapelu moe Lau, Sister Ve'etutu, Sister Kaumavae, Sister Mateaki, Sister longi from Ha'akame,
Sister Ana Moli of Matangiake Ward, and 15 year old Seini Kivalu from Kahoua Ward. Her parents
were Manu and Kelikupa Kivalu of Fualu, her grandfather's land is where the Tonga temple is now
located, and was given for that purpose.
133
Hagoth asked hi s cousin Hawaii loa to be captain of his ship. Hawaiiloa was an astronomer.
He studied about the sun, moon, and stars. He knew about the weat her the currents earth rotation
, , ,
and was a great fi shel1llan. Hawaiiloa was born 88 B.C. He discovered the Hawaiian Islands. At that
time they were uninhabited. He returned to bring his fami ly back to these beautiful islands and named
them after himself and hi s children. The first island was named Oahu after his firs! daughter. The
second island was named after hi s second child. a son named Maui. The big island of Hawaii was
named after himself, Hawaii . The fourth island was named Kauai , his other son. The remainder of
the islands he named after hi s steel1llen. Hawaiiloa was a descendant of Anianikalani (Nephite).
There was another Nephite named Opukahonua born about 263 B.C. (His birth is determined
from the birth date of King Kamehameha of Hawaii born 1797, figuring 25 years for a generati on).
Opukahonua didn't like war so he sail ed from America and came to Easter Island. They lived
there because it was the island closest to the American coast and was first inhabited around 200 B.C.
This is evidenced by the stone carvings of the early Menehune. Both Nephites and Lamanites were
in the island. I believe the "long ears" were the first to arrive in Easter Island, coming by ship. Later
the "short ears" arrived in Easter Island. They lived side by side unti I the time arrived that "short ears"
rebelled and slew the "long ears".
At that time Opukahonua had alreddy left with hi s people to find a new home. Opukahonua
found Tahiti first and they settled there for a while. Tane and Atea were descendants of Opukahonua
(Nephites) who settled the Marquesas Islands and another descendant of Lolokona who may have been
a Lamanite descendant, was born about 238 B.C. as son of Nu'u (Noah) and intermarried with the
descendants of Hawaiiloa and b$!came the ancestor of the royal family of Hawaii.
The interrogator was satisfied with Iohani' s answers and shook our hands warmly as we
departed.
THE SEINI KJV ALU'S STORY
lohani's daughter Tisina Gerher relates this stOI)'
S
eini Kivalu was a student ofLiahona High School when my husband Roy Gerber and I were
servll1g a famIly hI story mIsSIon 111 Tonga between the years 1992 and 1995. A thought
came to Roy, that if he could train a few students from Liahona College how to run a computer they
coul d help with the fami ly hi story research in Tonga when our mi ssion is over and we leave for the
United States.
At church we asked for some volunteers for computer training for family hi story. We had
prayed about it for almost three weeks. It was kind of hard because in Tonga only women of chief or
noble descent knew about their different lines, except a few genealogi sts in the Church. The
knowledgeable people had either left the islands or had passed away.
The foll owing week after Roy spoke at Matagiake Ward and at Liahona Ward, there came ten
young girls. A sixteen year old whose name ofLupi Ngaue from Matahau, Toa Fakalou, Ofa Fakatou
from Mapelu moe Lau, Sister Ve' etutu, Sister Kaumavae, Si ster Mateaki, Sister Iongi from Ha' akame,
Si ster Ana Moli of Matangiake Ward, and 15 year old Seini Kivalu from Kahoua Ward. Her parents
were Manu and Kelikupa Kivalu of Fualu, her grandfather's land is where the Tonga temple is now
located, and was given for that purpose.
134
Roy found out it is much easier to teach the youth computer work because of their young
minds. They are so much easier than an older person to be trained. Sure enough, they were great and
learned very quickly how to run a computer and we want to express our love and gratitude for them.
They were able to type out all our Tongan death records, Tongan census, the Tamaha Amelia record
and did submit most of those who were related to them for Temple work.
Some who were working at the office mocked us and wanted to know why we trained these
youth (babies) as they referred to these young women, to help us with the work. But with fasting and
prayers these young women's hearts were touched by the spirit in time of our need and became
excellent in typing and searching for their families.
One day I asked Seini why she was interested so much in computer and genealogy research.
She said, "Brother and Sister Gerber I'm only 14 years old, almost 15 (unusual for a 14 year old
Tongan) but as I was reading my patriarchal blessing, I couldn't help but know that a part of my
blessing was to search out and help do genealogy for my family who had gone before me, and want
so much to leam all I can about genealogy work." She agreed to give us her time and we in tum will
give her training in all that we know about family search and genealogy.
Most of these young women that helped us out in our family history library, after they turned
21. left on a mission afterward and one served in New Zealand, one in the Philippines, one in Australia
and one in America and two in Tonga. Two couples got married in the temple and one outside the
temple. As for Seini and her family, they were called to serve a five-year mission in New Zealand and
what a joy for the whole family. Late one aftemoon we just barely finished typing all the Tongan
Death Records and Seini began to share with me what happened to her at the age of six years old or
so.
Her family lived right next door to the property on which the Tongan temple was to be built.
The land had belonged to her grandfather Tevita Folau Mahuinga of Pea. One day she came out to
play and had a skipping rope. She began to skip and play with her rope. All of a sudden she looked
over to the area next to her house and saw many people out there. They looked like they were working
and clearing this area. Some were singing, some were praying, and some were performing some
cultural lakelaka and ma'ulu'ulu (Tongan Dances). When she saw them, she dropped her skipping
rope on the ground and ran inside the house to tell her mother. Manu came and saw no people out
there working. She thought Seini was just kidding around, so went back inside the house.
Seini decided to come out again to play. Again Seini saw the same people out there working,
celebrating, eating, singing, and performing their cultural dances, and still cleaning that area. She
again went back to tell her mother. Manu came out the second time but she couldn't see anything and
told Seini to stay in the house because it was getting late and dark already.
Manu's sister and part of her family were living at Nuku'alofa and at the village of Pea and
decided to drive over to Houma one evening. As they drove by close to Seini's house, there they saw
everything that Seini had been trying to tell her mother. They couldn't believe it, so on their way back
from Houma they stopped over at Seini's house. Manu's sister asked her who the people were
working, cleaning out the temple site, and singing and dancing out there earlier.
134
Roy found out it is much easier to teach the youth computer work because of their young
minds. They are so much easier than an older person to be trained. Sure enough, they were great and
learned very quickly how to run a computer and we want to express our love and gratitude for them.
They were able to type out all our Tongan death records, Tongan census, the Tamaha Amel ia record
and did submit most of those who were related to them for Temple work.
Some who were working at the office mocked US and wanted to know why we trained these
youth (babies) as they referred to these young women, to help us with the work. But with fasting and
prayers these young women 's hearts were touched by the spirit in time of our need and became
excel lent in typing and searching for their families .
One day I asked Seini why she was interested so much in computer and genealogy research.
She said, "Brother and Sister Gerber I'm only 14 years old, almost 15 (unusual for a 14 year old
Tongan) but as I was reading my patriarchal blessing, I couldn't help but know that a part of my
blessing was to search out and help do genealogy for my family who had gone before me, and want
so much to learn aliI can about genealogy work." She agreed to give us her time and we in turn will
give her training in all that we know about family search and genealogy.
Most of these young women that helped us out in our family hi story library, after they turned
21. left on a mission afterward and one served in New Zealand, one in the Philippines, one in Australia
and one in Ameri ca and two in Tonga. Two couples got married in the temple and one outside the
temple. As for Seini and her family, they were called to serve a five-year mission in New Zealand and
what a joy for the whole family. Late one aftemoon we just barely finished typing all the Tongan
Death Records and Seini began to share with me what happened to her at the age of six years old or
so.
Her family li ved right next door to the property on which the Tongan temple was to be built.
The land had belonged to her grandfat her Tevita Folau Mahuinga of Pea. One day she came out to
play and had a skipping rope. She began to skip and play with her rope. All of a sudden she looked
over to the area next to her house and saw many people out there. They looked like they were working
and clearing this area. Some were singing, some were praying, and some were performing some
cult urallakelaka and rna' uilt' ulu (Tongan Dances). When she saw them, she dropped her skipping
rope on the ground and ran inside the house to tell her mother. Manu came and saw no people out
there working. She thought Seini was just kidding around, so went back inside the house.
Seini decided to come out again to play. Again Seini saw the same people out there worki ng,
celebrating, eating, singing, and perfOlming their cultural dances, and still cleaning that area. She
again went back to tell her mother. Manu came out the second time but she couldn't see anything and
told Seini to stay in the house because it was getting late and dark already.
Manu 's si ster and part of her family were living at Nuku'alofa and at the village of Pea and
decided to drive over to Houma one evening. As they drove by close to Seini 's house, there they saw
everything that Seini had been trying to tell her mother. They couldn' t believe it, so on their way back
from Houma they stopped over at Seini ' s house. Manu ' s sister asked her who the people were
working, cleani ng out the temple site, and singing and dancing out there earlier.
135
Manu said there was no one there and Seini spoke up and told them that it was the same thing
she had seen before and tried to tell her mother, but she couldn't see it. After that she told her father
also and now they all believed what Seini had been telling them was true. The family thought maybe
these people were some Tongans who had passed beyond, who came to show them how happy they
were that Tonga would finally build a Temple there on that ground so they could all be redeemed from
the dead.
Right after they built the Tonga temple Seini had a dream one night in which she saw the
heavens open and Jesus Christ descending from above with heavenly angels surrounding him, and lots
of lights and brightness encircling them. Seini's eyes kept looking up and saw them coming closer to
where she was standing along the sidewalk by the Temple along with all her Primary children friends
all dressed in white, but they were playing outside by the temple walls.
Finally Jesus and his heavenly angels came closer and closer to the top of the Tonga temple
where the statue of Angel Moroni stands, and they surrounded him in a circle for a little while and
right after that she looked out and felt a huge force of air. It came very quickly like a huge wave and
swept all the Primary children inside the temple. As she looked out all those Tongan adult members
were standing outside the temple. Only the children could get inside.
Jesus immediately came inside the temple. He picked these Primary children up one by one,
held them close to his heart, and told them how much he loved each and every one of them. He took
these children up to the celestial room and told them many beautiful stories. As Jesus was almost
finished visiting with the children, Seini spoke out and said, "Jesus, can you please come with me to
my home. My father Kelikupa Kivalu is dead, and I heard how you helped heal the sick and raise
people from the dead. Please come and bless my father, so he may be raised from his death bed,
please."
Jesus took Seini's hand and they walked over to her home and inside Seini's home, there is
a very special room. It was a very, very clean room painted white, that they had prepared for special
guests like general authorities. Pictures were on the wall, with white lace curtains and table cloths,
with a vase of freshly picked tropical flowers every day decorated the room. In this room is where
Seini's father Kelikupa was lying dead on top of a table. Seini lead Christ inside this room and when
Jesus saw Kelikupa, he walked up closer to him and put his hand on top of his head and gave him a
blessing and raised him from the dead. Right after that special blessing, Kelikupa got up from the top
of the table and thanked Jesus and shook his hand. Seini ran up quickly, stood by her father, hugged
and kissed him and also thanked Jesus for restoring her father's life again.
They called for Seini's mother to come along with some of the family and they all came
together and walked back into the temple. The Savior again started to hug and kiss them one by one
including the Primary children. He spoke to the people outside as he was about to leave the temple.
He said to them that they must change and have clean hands and pure hearts like these Primary
children or they cannot enter into his Holy House. As he left the Temple, again his holy heavenly
angels were there, surrounding him and they heard the voice of the Savior inside the Temple saying,
"I will see you very, very soon." They heard the same thing three times. The children were filled with
joy and gratitude in their hearts. Some were in tears waving and saying farewells to Jesus and felt of
his love for them. They were amazed and thankful.
135
Manu said there was no one there and Seini spoke up and told them that it was the same thing
she had seen before and tried to tell her mother, but she couldn't see it. After that she told her fat her
also and now they all beli eved what Seini had been tel ling them was true. The family thought maybe
these people were some Tongans who had passed beyond, who came to show them how happy they
were that Tonga wou ld finall y build a Temple there on that ground so they could all be redeemed from
the dead.
Ri ght after they built the Tonga temple Seini had a dream one ni ght in wh ich she saw the
heavens open and Jesus Christ descending from above with heavenl y angels surrounding him, and lots
of li ghts and bri ghtness encircling them. Sein i 's eyes kept looki ng up and saw them coming closer to
where she was standing along the sidewalk by the Temple along with all her Primary chil dren friends
all dressed in white, but they were pl ayi ng outside by the temple walls.
Finally Jesus and hi s heavenly angels came closer and closer to the top of the Tonga temple
where the statue of Angel Moroni stands, and they surrounded him in a circle for a littl e whi le and
right after that she looked out and felt a huge force of air. It came very quickl y li ke a huge wave and
swept al l the Primary chi ldren inside the temple. As she looked out all those Tongan adult members
were standing outside the temple. Only the chil dren could get inside.
Jesll s immediately came inside the temple. He picked these Primary children up one by one.
held them close to hi s heart, and told them how much he loved each and everyone of them. He took
these children up to the celestial room and told them many beautiful stories. As Jes us was almost
fin ished vi siting with the childn;n, Seini spoke out and said, "Jesus, can you please come wit h me to
my home. My father Kelikupa Kivalu is dead, and I heard how you helped heal the sick and rai se
people from the dead. Please come and bless my father, so he may be raised from hi s death bed,
please."
Jesus took Seini 's hand and they walked over to her home and inside Seini 's home, there is
a very special room. It was a very, very clean room painted white, that they had prepared for special
guests like general authoriti es. Pictures were on the wall , with white lace curtains and table cloths,
wi th a vase of fresh ly picked tropi cal flowers every day decorated the room. In this room is where
Seini 's father Kel ikupa was lying dead on top of a table. Seini lead Christ inside this room and when
Jesus saw Kelikupa, he walked up closer to hi m and put his hand on top of his head and gave him a
blessing and rai sed him from the dead. Right after that special blessing. Kelikupa got up from the top
of the table and thanked Jesus and shook hi s hand. Seini ran up quickly, stood by her fat her, hugged
and ki ssed him and also thanked Jesus for restoring her father's life again.
They called for Seini 's mother to come along with some of the family and they all came
together and walked back into the temple. The Savior again started to hug and kiss them one by one
incl uding the Primary children. He spoke to the people outside as he was about to leave the temple.
He said to them that they must change and have clean hands and pure hearts like these Primary
children or they cannot enter into hi s Holy House. As he left the Temple, again his holy heavenly
angels were there, surrounding him and they heard the voice of the Savior inside the Temple saying,
"I will see you very, very soon. " They heard the same thing three times. The children were filled with
joy and grat itude in their hearts. Some were in tears waving and saying farewe!l s to Jesus and felt of
his love for them. They were amazed and thankful.
136
Again Seini waved and saw them surround the statue of angel Moroni on top ofthe temple for
a little while and later disappeared. Seini quickly woke up. She ran to check up on her father and
hugged and kissed him and told her parents what she had seen in her dream. He father believed her,
got up and began to write Seini's story down.
But this was interesting too. While we were in Tonga doing our family history mission, Seini's
father had a very serious accident at Liahona. He worked in the school supply room. One day the
shelves caved in and crushed him. Kelikupa passed out or died there for a while. They rushed him
to Nuku'alofa to the hospital and no one knew if he would be able to retum home.
After he was administered to, Kelikupa's life retumed and he was able to retum to his job and
later was called on a mission to New Zealand along with his wife and Seini for five years. Just
recently I heard that the family had been at the missionaiy training center at Provo, Utah, with a new
calling to be the new mission president for the Tongan Mission. Seini is now attending BYU Hawaii
University at this time. She was such a joy to have around us, she had a very warm, happy and
wholesome attitude about life, country, and church, and a beautiful Tongan tauolunga dancer.
Seini also had an older brother named Peni He Kivalu. He is now playing rugby in Japan.
Before that he played on a college team at Liahona in Tonga. He met a lot of boy friends at college.
His family, including Peni, taught his whole team the gospel. I believe there were between 15 to 18
young men who joined the church through the example and love and sharing the gospel with these
young men, they were baptized into the Church.
When their families found out, they were so upset with their sons' decision they were kicked
out of their homes, including one nephew of Salote from Felemea, so the Kivalu family invited the
whole rugby team back into their home. They built large temporary living quarters for these young
men, fed them, clothed them, and cared for them as their own. In the meantime, most of these young
men were about the right age to be called on a mission.
So the Book of Mormon and scriptures were read, taught to them daily, and a choice was given
them. Did they want to prepare themselves to go on a mission? Sure enough, the whole rugby team
left and served missions throughout the islands of Tonga.
I know this story was true because I've met one nephew of my mother, Elder Fakatou at the
village of Malapo who was out there on a mission when we came out to have a fireside one day.
Many, many times we were invited out for a lovely dinner at the Kivalu home. Missionaries and new
visitors were always invited over for a big dinner at their home.
I remember two months before we left Tonga we heard of the American parents of an Elder
Adams from Arizona, I believe they had just barely arrived in Tonga, hoping to bring their son back
from his mission. They discovered Elder Adams' last missionary companion was Elder Peni He
Kivalu, and they had been sent out to one ofthe hardest islands for missionaiy work, Niuafo'ou, where
Elder John Groberg served his mission. This is where they had sent him.
It is one ofthe poorest islands. They continued having drought and volcanic eruptions on this
island. People there are not too friendly with the missionaries. The boats only come there once every
six months. When missionaries mn out of food, they have to boil some water to drink without sugar
or hard cabin biscuits, and if you are lucky you'll find some boiled green bananas to eat.
136
Aaain Seini waved and saw them surround the statue of angel Moroni on top of the temple for
'"
a little while and later di sappeared. Seini quickly woke up. She ran to check up on her father and
hugged and ki ssed him and told her parents what she had seen in her dream. He father believed her,
got up and began to write Seini 's story down.
But thi s was interesting too. Whil e we were in Tonga doing ourfamily history mission, Seini 's
father had a very serious accident at Liahona. He worked in the school supply room. One day the
shelves caved in and crushed him. Kelikupa passed out or died there for a while. They rushed him
to Nuku ' alofa to the hospital and no one knew if he would be able to return home.
After he was administered to, Kelikupa's life returned and he was able to return to hi s job and
later was call ed on a mi ssion to New Zealand along with his wife and Seini for five years. Just
recentl y I heard that the family had been at the missionary training center at Provo, Utah, with a new
calling to be the new mission president for the Tongan Mission. Seini is now attending BYU Hawaii
University at thi s time. She was such a joy to have around us, she had a very warnl , happy and
wholesome attitude about life, country, and church, and a beautiful Tongan tauolunga dancer.
Seini also had an older brother named Peni He Kivalu. He is now playing rugby in Japan.
Before that he played on a college team at Liahona in Tonga. He met a lot of boy friends at college.
His family, including Peni , taught hi s whole team the gospel. I believe there were between 15 to 18
young men who joined the church through the example and love and sharing the gospel with these
young men, they were bapti zed into the Church.
When their families found out, they were so upset with their sons ' deci sion they were ki cked
out of their homes, including one nephew of Salote from Felemea, so the Kivalu famil y invited the
whole rugby team hack into their home. They built large temporary living quartcrs for these young
men, fed them, clothed them, and cared for them as their own. In the meantime, most of these young
men were about the ri ght age to be called on a mi ssion.
So the Book of Mormon and scriptures were read, taught to them daily, and a choice was given
them. Did they want to prepare themsel ves to go on a mi ssion? Sure enough, the whole rugby team
left and served mi ssions throughout the islands of Tonga.
I know thi s story was true because I' ve met one nephew of my mother, Elder Fakatou at the
vill age of Malapo who was out there on a mi ssion when we came out to have a fireside one day.
Many, many times we were invited out for a lovel y dinner at the Kivalu home. Mi ssionari es and new
visitors were always invited over for a bi g dinner at their home.
I remember two months before we left Tonga. we heard of the American parents of an El der
Adams from Ari zona, I beli eve they had just barel y arrived in Tonga, hoping to bring their son back
from hi s mission. They discovered Elder Adams' last mi ssionary compani on was Elder Peni He
Kivalu, and they had been sent out to one of the hardest islands for missionary work, Ni uafo'ou, where
Elder John Groberg served his mission. Thi s is where they had sent him.
It is one of the poorest islands. They continued having drought and volcanic eruptions on this
is land. People there are not too fri endly with the mi ssionaries. The boats only come there once every
six months. When mi ssionari es run out of food, they have to boil some water to drink without sugar
or hard cabin biscui ts, and if you are lucky you' ll find some boiled green bananas to eat.
137
When Elder Kivalu and Elder Adams returned from Nuiafo'ou to meet his parents at
Tongatapu, these two elders were very thin and had lost quite a bit of weight. When they ran out of
food they would go out to the bush and hunt for big fat worms that made their home inside old tree
branches. They put them overnight inside a full bowl of coconut cream so they would be fed all night
long. In the moming they would be filled with the coconut cream and ready to be fried or boiled for
their meal.
When they told us that, I was so scared, and asked myself if we were sent there what would
happen to Roy? My husband, as apapalangi (white man) would have a real hard time. At one time
we did ask Pres. Uasila'a if we could go to Niuafo'ou for two weeks, but he discouraged us because
of Roy's health. He said it it might not be two weeks in Niuafo'ou, but might be six of twelve months
out there without transportation back to Tongatapu.
So after seeing these two elders, I remember the first thing Beni He Kivalu's mother said to
me the day they retumed. Le's go over to Utulau and take some warm food, clothing and bedding for
our missionaries who just barely got back from Niuafo'ou. They are both tired, sick and need help.
We did and they were so happy.
Though they struggled and went through a very hard mission, the missionaries said they would
never quit or give up that special opportunity because the island was where the spirit of the Lord was
upon them constantly and taught them many spiritual testimonies to the truthfulness of the gospel of
Jesus Christ. This is where they gained a great love for the Savior Jesus Christ. It humbled them and
taught them to love and share what they had with others.
I'm grateful for Manu's sister which I've grown to love and know. Sa'ane and Taiana, Siesia,
Fale'etau Fineanganofo, their mother Onita Kaufusi and father Tevita Mahuinga, they are very special
friends of my family. We are grateful for their love ofthe gospel, and Peni He's influence on his rugby
team. Seini's sweet spirit, and Manu and Kelikupa's love for missionaries including their sister and
husband the Fineaganofo will stay with us always. Sione and Fale'etau Fineanganofo are now serving
as the new Tonga Temple president. They have done a great work with the students at Liahona and
great leadership among the Tongan saints. May God continue to bless the family throughout the
islands, I pray in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.
o;
EVIL SPIRIT BETWEEN MATA'IKA AND FELETOA
By lohani
,ur family was back in Vava'u from Tongatapu for a short stay after our first mission. The
Branch President Saia Langi from Ha'alaufuli assigned me to go to the village of Feletoa
and visit that branch and speak at sacrament meeting. All the family attended our own meeting at
Ha'alaufuli. I decided to ride on my horse that day. I took my scriptures, we had our family prayer
then I was on my way. I passed by a lot of people on their way to Church that moming. I came through
the town of Ta'anea, then Mata'ika, the town of my grandmother Kisaea Sisifa Tu'inahoki. The family
was very happy to greet me end asked where I was going? "To Feletoa" I said. They invited me to
drop in and have a Sunday meal with them after taking care of my assignment at Feletoa, as is the
custom in Tonga. I thanked them and accepted the invitation.
137
When Elder Kivalu and Elder Adams returned from Nuiafo'ou to meet hi s parents at
Tongatapu, these two elders were very thin and had lost quite a bit of weight. When they ran out of
food they would go out to the bus h and hunt for big fat WOI111S that made their home inside old tree
branches. They put them overnight inside a full bowl of coconut cream so they would be fed all night
long. In the morning they would be filled with the coconut cream and ready to be fri ed or boi led for
their meal.
When they told us that, I was so scared, and asked myself if we were sent there what would
happen to Roy? My husband, as a papalangi (white man) would have a real hard time. At one time
we did ask Pres. Uasi la'a if we could go to Niuafo' ou for two weeks, but he discouraged us because
of Roy's health. He said it it might not be two weeks in Niuafo'ou, but might be six of twelve months
out there without transportation back to Tongatapu.
So after seeing these two elders, I remember the first thing Beni He Kivalu 's mother said to
me the day they returned. Le's go over to Utulau and take some wanll food, clothing and bedding for
our mi ssionari es who just barely got back from Niuafo'ou. They are both tired, sick and need help.
We did and they were so happy.
Though they struggled and went through a velY hard mission, the mi ssionaries said they woul d
never quit or give up that speci al opportur,ity because the island was where the spirit of the Lord was
upon them constantl y and taught them many spiritual testimonies to the truthfulness of the gospel of
Jesus Christ. This is where they gained a great love for the Savior Jesus Christ. It humbled them and
taught them to love and share what they had with others.
I'm grateful for Manu's ~ i s t e r which I've grown to love and know. Sa'ane and Taiana, Siesia,
Fale'etau Fineanganofo, their mother Onita Kaufusi and father Tevita Mahuinga, they are velY special
friends of my family. We are grateful for their love of the gospel , and Peni He's influence on his rugby
team. Seini 's sweet spirit, and Manu and Kel ikupa's love for missionaries including their sister and
husband the Fineaganofo will stay with us always. Sione and Fale'etau Fineanganofo are now serving
as the new Tonga Temple president. They have done a great work with the students at Liahona and
great leadership among the Tongan saints. May God continue to bless the family throughout the
islands, I pray in the name of Jesus Christ, Amen.
EVIL SPIRIT BETWEEN MATA'IKA AND FELETOA
By f ollan;
O
ur famil y was back in Vava'u from Tongatapu for a short stay after our first mission. The
Branch President Saia Langi from Ha' alaufuli assigned me to go to the village of Feletoa
and visit that branch and speak at sacrament meeting. All the family attended our own meeting at
Ha'alaufu li . I decided to ride on my horse that day. I took my scriptures, we had our family prayer
then I was on my way. I passed by a lot of people on their way to Church that morning. Icame through
the town ofTa 'anea, then Mata ' ika, the town of my grandmother Kisaea Si sifa Tu ' inahoki . The family
was very happy to greet me end asked where I was going? "To Feletoa" I said. They invited me to
drop in and have a Sunday meal with them after taking care of my assignment at Feletoa, as is the
custom in Tonga. I thanked them and accepted the invitation.
138
I had hardly passed the village of Mata'ika when my horse started to jump up in the air as if
he was trying to avoid something on the road. I said to the horse, "Oh! Is there anything wrong? Why
are you jumping like that?" The horse started to neigh louder and louder again and lifted both front
legs up in the air and kept on kicking and kicking and going backward instead of forward. I looked
down and in front of the horse and saw a huge dog that stood from one side of the road all across to
the opposite side. 1 had never seen a dog that huge before. I said to myself, "No wonder the horse is
acting so strange." I immediately felt that it was not a real dog but an evil spirit who came to stop me
from visiting the saints at Feletoa.
I got off the horse, grabbed the extra rope I was carrying, and made it into four long ropes and
began to whip the dog. The minute I whipped the dog, I felt that the rope didn't touch the dog at all.
The dog disappeared from where he was standing and changed direction to the opposite side of the
road. I got angry and again took my rope to whip the dog, to clear the road so my horse and I could
move forward. The same thing happened, again the dog moved to the opposite side of the road. I
came to the realization that by only one thing can I get rid of the dog and that was to use the power of
the priesthood of God. I did just that. When I finished I saw the dog had shrunk from this huge size
to a very small dog. The dog finally ran across the street to an old graveyard and disappeared in some
kind of a smoke or mist.
I was on my knees thanking God for using his priesthood power to get rid of this evil spirit and
protect my horse. I finally got to Feletoa. As I walked in the small Tongan chapel, Pres. Kauvaka
welcomed me and said I could use the rest ofthe Sacrament Meeting time to speak to them. I was so
grateful and gave a talk on an assigned subject, expressed my testimony, and also shared the
experience that I had on my way to Feletoa with the rest of Felctoa's branch members. They were
touched and humbled by that experience.
138
I had hardly passed the village of Mata'ika when my horse started to jump up in the air as if
he was trying to avoid somet hing on the road. I said to the horse, "Oh! Is there anything wrong? Why
are you jumping like that?" The horse started to neigh louder and louder again and lifted both front
legs up in the air and kept on kicking and kicking and going backward instead offOIward. I looked
down and in front of the horse and saw a huge dog that stood from one side of the road all across to
the opposite s ide. I had never seen a dog that huge before. I said to myself, "No wonder the horse is
act ing so strange. " 1 immediately felt that it was not a real dog but an evil spirit who came to stop me
from vis iting the saints at Feletoa.
I got off the horse, grabbed the extra rope I was carrying, and made it into four long ropes and
began to whip the dog. The minute I whipped the dog, I felt that the rope didn ' t touch the dog at al l.
The dog di sappeared from where he was standing and changed direction to the opposite side of the
road. I got angry and again took my rope to whi p the dog, to clear the road so my horse and I could
move forward. The same thing happened, again the dog moved to the opposite side of the road. I
came to the real ization that by onl y one thing can I get rid of the dog and that was to use the power of
the priesthood of God. 1 did just that. When I fini shed I saw the dog had shrunk from thi s huge size
to a very small dog. The dog fi nall y ran across the street to an old graveyard and disappeared in some
kind of a smoke or mist.
I was on my knees thanking God for using hi s priesthood power to get rid of this evil spirit and
protect my horse. I f inall y got to Feletoa. As I walked in the small Tongan chapel , Pres. Kauvaka
welcomed me and said I could use the rest of the Sacrament Meeting time to speak to them. I was so
grateful and gave a talk on an assigned subject , expressed my testimony, and also shared the
experience that I had on my way to Feletoa with the rest of Fclctoa's branch members. They were
touched and humbled by that experi ence.
\
139
Guests in President Kimball's home
lohani - Tisina
lahoni with favorite hat and
Grandchildren
Moroni, Gabriel, Selu Vaia
lohani - Salote
lahoni with favorite hat and
Grandchildren
Moroni, Gabriel, Selu Vaia
Guests in President Kimball's home
lohani - Tisina
Iohani - Salote
139
4-
O
lahoni - Solate
Return from Tonga Mission 1982
Family meets them at the Salt Lake Airport
lahoni • Solate
Return from Tonga Mission 1982
Family meets them at the Salt Lake Airport
141
Tonga Temple 1995
(See the seini Kivalu Story)
A Tongan-style Beach House
at Koulo, Ha'apai
Rented to the missionaries 1995
Tonga Temple 1995
(See the seini Kivalu Story)
~ ~
A Tongan-style Beach House
at Koulo, Ha' apai
Rented to the missionaries 1995
141
142
142
CHAPTER VI
IMIGRATION TO U.S.A
CHAPTER VI
IMIGRATION TO U.S.A.
i;
145
PREPARATION FOR AMERICA
Saturday. Sept. 6. 1965.
'was over at the Liahona High School, finishing some roofing, remodeling some ofthe broken
-windows when I was greeted by the Mission President Pat Dalton. He said that he heard a
rumor that Salote and me, with our family, were leaving for the States?
President. Dalton was very concerned about our plan and said, "lohani, you must be out of your
mind." (Tangata faka sesele aupito). "How are you going to go to America without any money?
How are you going to feed those little mouths? What about the language? Jobs? I'm so afraid you
might live on soup every day when you get there?"
I smiled and said, "Pres. Dalton, nothing is too hard for the Lord. All you do is to serve him
with all your might, mind and strength. He wants us to open our minds and mouth and ask in faith for
the things that we need and he will bless our lives. To have our family sealed to us in the Salt Lake
Temple has always been our goal so we can be a forever family. It's up to the Lord to bless us when
we serve him well. I know he will continue to bless our family."
I told President Dalton, "I've been able to support all our children here in the islands, and I'm
willing to take any job offered me in the States when we get there so I'll be able to care for my wife
and the rest of my family." President Dalton just shook his hea