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<td width="100%"><!--webbot bot="Include" U-Include="indexinc0302.htm" TAG="BODY" startspan --> <!-- Template slot begins here --> <h3> <font color="Blue">SEARCH RESULTS</font></h3> <p><i>Total number of records found for this search criteria = 10</i> </p> <hr noshade="noshade" size="1"> <b>AAS 334/SOC 334<br> </font>Educating a New Majority<br> <b>Professor(s):</b> Richard O. Hope <br> <hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="1"> <b>POL 343/AAS 343<br> </font>African American Politics<br> <b>Professor(s):</b> Melissa V. Harris-Lacewell <br> <hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="1">

<b>HIS 486/AAS 355/WOM 486 <br> <font color="Red"> </font> African American Women's History<br> (HA)</b> <i>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;na, npdf</i>

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<b>Professor(s):</b> Tera W. Hunter <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>This course focuses on African American women's history from the era of slavery to the present. It will address broad themes such as labor, family, community, sexuality, politics, and religion. It will examine the social, political, and economic diversity of the experiences of black women within the broader context of U.S. history. Students will read a range of secondary and primary texts and will enhance skills such as: critical thinking, writing, and oral communication.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Nell Painter , <u>Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol</u><br> Evelyn Higginbotham , <u>Righteous Discontent</u><br>

Marilyn Richardson, ed. , <u>Maria Stewart: America's First Black Woman Political Writer</u><br> Farah Jasmine Griffin , <u>If You Can't Be Free, Be a Mystery</u><br> Barbara Ransby , <u>Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement</u><br> Stephanie Shaw , <u>What a Woman Ought to Be and To Do</u><br>

<br><b>Reading/Writing Assignments:</b> 3 papers<br>

<br><b>Requirements/Grading:</b><br>

Papers:

75%<br>

Other (See Instructor):

25%<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">23347 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar :</b> S01

1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T &nbsp;&nbsp; Dickinson Hall 210 &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/53.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=DICKH&amp;ROOM_NUM=210"> Photo</a>

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<b>HIS 386/AAS 366 <br> <font color="Red"> </font> African-American History to 1863<br> (HA)</b>

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<b>Professor(s):</b> T.K. Hunter <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>The history of Africans in the Americas is integral to the history of the New World. This course presents an introduction to the life and times of the members of the African Diaspora in the Americas from early 17th-century to the U.S. Civil War and familiarizes students with an expanded understanding of the presence of Africans in America. The focus is on the history of Africans in the New World largely in relation to Britain and the English-speaking colonies, but will include places such as Saint Domingue � a French colony that becomes Haiti.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Thomas C. Holt &amp; Elsa Barkley Brown, eds. , <u>Major Problems in African-American History (Vol. 1)</u><br> Adam Potkay &amp; Sandra Burr, eds. , <u>Black Atlantic Writers of the 18th Century</u><br>

<u>Course Packet</u><br> <u>Additional Readings</u><br>

<br><b>Reading/Writing Assignments:</b> 2 short papers and final paper<br>

<br><b>Requirements/Grading:</b><br>

Paper in lieu of Final Exam:

40%<br>

Papers:

35%<br> 25%<br>

Precept Participation:

<br><b>Prerequisites and Restrictions:</b> P/D/F option is not available for History concentrators.<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">22633 </font>- </b> <b> Lecture :</b> L01

11:00 am - 12:20 pm M W &nbsp;&nbsp; Chancellor Green 105 &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/14.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=CHANC&amp;ROOM_NUM=105"> Photo</a>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">22634 </font>- </b> <b> Precept P01 :</b><b><font color="red">CANCELLED </font></b> TBA &nbsp;&nbsp;

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<b>ENG 370/AAS 370 <br>

<font color="Red"> </font> History of Criticism<br> (LA)</b> <i>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;na, npdf</i>

<br> <b>Enrollment by application or interview.<br></b> <b>Departmental permission required.<br></b> Maximum Enrollment: <br> <b>Professor(s):</b> Daphne A. Brooks <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>A survey of literary works in the field of popular music cultural criticism. We will examine a variety of critical and popular music texts from diverse genres ("classic aor" rock, hip hop, R&amp;B, country, techno, indie rock, jazz). Readings include journalistic essays, as well as musician interviews, album liner notes and scholarly articles. The course traces the evolution of rock music criticism from the late 1960s to the present day. It explores the aesthetics of popular music writing, as well as the ways in which racial, gender, class and sexual identity politics radically shape and influence the form as well as the content of the genre.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Greil Marcus , <u>Mystery Train</u><br> 16

Robert Christgau , <u>Any Old Way You Choose It</u><br> Ellen Willis , <u>Beginning to See the Light</u><br> Nelson George , <u>The Death of Rhythm and Blues</u><br> Evelyn McDonell and Ann Powers , <u>Rock She Wrote</u><br>

Ego Trip , <u>Big Book of Racism</u><br>

<br><b>Reading/Writing Assignments:</b> Weekly discussions, weekly writing exercises, one feature writing project 15-20 pages.<br>

<br><b>Requirements/Grading:</b><br>

Paper in lieu of Final Exam:

40%<br>

Papers: 30%<br> Oral Presentation(s): Precept Participation:

15%<br> 15%<br>

<br><b>Other Information:</b> For an application form, write to Professor Brooks (brooksd@princeton.ed) and return your completed application to the same address. The deadline for applications is Monday, April 30th, 2007.<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">22026 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar :</b> S01

1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T &nbsp;&nbsp; McCosh Hall 34 &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/54.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=MCCOH&amp;ROOM_NUM=34"> Photo</a>

<hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="1"> <b>ENG 386/AAS 386 <br> <font color="Red"> </font> Topics in Black Literature: Black Women Artist-Intellectuals<br> (LA)</b>

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<b>Professor(s):</b> Mendi L. Obadike

<br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>This course explores work produced in what are presumably two contexts--the creative and the intellectual. Some works might be perceived as objects of creative fields (ie: the poetry book, the performed script, the documented conceptual artwork) and others of intellectual fields (ie: the scholarly book or essay). We will ask whether the "creative" works might be read as part of each artist's intellectual project, and whether the "scholarly" works might be read as part of her artistic project. Our work will require us to explore the ways in which notions of "intellectual", "artist", and "black woman" inform each artist's work and career.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Toni Morrison , <u>Playing in the Dark; Paradise</u><br> Elizabeth Alexander , <u>The Black Interior; American Sublime</u><br> Harryette Mullen , <u>Recyclopedia</u><br> Coco Fusco , <u>these bodies that were not ours</u><br>

Adrian Piper , <u>"Kant's Intelligible Standpoint on Action"</u><br>

<br><b>Reading/Writing Assignments:</b> 1-2 books (or works in other media) per week.<br>

<br><b>Requirements/Grading:</b><br> Midterm Exam: 15%<br> Final Exam: 25%<br>

Oral Presentation(s): Precept Participation:

50%<br> 10%<br>

<br><b>Other Requirements:</b><br> Course Not Open to Freshmen<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">21606 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar :</b> S01

1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T &nbsp;&nbsp; McCosh Hall 26 &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/54.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=MCCOH&amp;ROOM_NUM=26"> Photo</a>

<hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="1"> <b>AAS 392/ENG 392 <br> <font color="Red"> </font> Topics in African American Literature: Gender, Sexuality, and the African American Novel<br> (LA)</b>

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<b>Professor(s):</b> Miriam J. Petty <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>This course pairs readings of post-New Negro Movement works by African American authors with key readings in black feminist theory. To the extent that issues of gender and sexuality often play an uneasy second to issues of race when considering works of African American literature, this course offers students an explicit and extensive opportunity to consider the complex interplay between race, sexuality, and gender in modern political and cultural formations. Many of the course's novels share a concern with issues of family, especially gender-based dynamics between parents and children.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Anne Petry , <u>The Street</u><br> James Baldwin , <u>Go Tell It on the Mountain</u><br> Richard Wright , <u>Native Son</u><br> Ernest Gaines , <u>A Lesson Before Dying</u><br>

Alice Walker , <u>The Third Life of Grange Copeland</u><br> Audre Lorde , <u>Zami: A New Spelling of My Name</u><br>

<br><b>Reading/Writing Assignments:</b> Approximately 150 pp. of reading weekly. Attendance and class participation are mandatory. Three papers: two short essays (5 pages) and one longer essay (8-10 pages).<br>

<br><b>Requirements/Grading:</b><br>

Paper in lieu of Final Exam:

40%<br>

Papers:

40%<br> 20%<br>

Precept Participation:

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">21441 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar :</b> S01

1:30 pm - 4:20 pm W &nbsp;&nbsp; Stanhope 201 &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/11.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=STANH&amp;ROOM_NUM=201"> Photo</a>

<hr align="center" noshade="noshade" size="1"> <b>AAS 477/HIS 477 <br> <font color="Red"> </font> The Civil Rights Movement<br> (HA)</b>

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<b>Professor(s):</b> Joshua B. Guild <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>This course examines the evolution of African American political mobilization

from 1945 to 1975. It explores the various ways that African Americans articulated their political demands and affirmed their citizenship, using worker' rights, the church, feminism, education, war, grassroots organizations, the federal bureaucracy, and the law as tools for political action. The readings for this course draw heavily from personal narratives, oral testimonies, and historical scholarship. One three-hour seminar.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Charles Payne , <u>I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition.</u><br> Mary Dudziak , <u>Cold War Civil rights: Race and the Image of American</u><br> Martin Luther King , <u>Why We Can't Wait</u><br> Peniel Joseph , <u>Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black</u><br>

Chana Kai Lee , <u>For Freedom's Sake:

The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer</u><br>

Kimberly Springer , <u>Living for The Revolution: Black Feminist Organizations</u><br>

<br><b>Reading/Writing Assignments:</b> An average of 150-200 pages of reading per week. One short paper (5-8 pages.), one brief class presntation, take home midterm and final paper.<br>

<br><b>Requirements/Grading:</b><br>

Paper in lieu of Final Exam: Take Home Midterm Exam:

30%<br>

20%<br>

Papers:

15%<br> 15%<br>

Oral Presentation(s):

Precept Participation:

20%<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">20454 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar :</b> S01

1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T &nbsp;&nbsp; Stanhope 201 &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/11.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=STANH&amp;ROOM_NUM=201"> Photo</a>

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<b>ENG 556/AAS 556 <br> <font color="Red"> </font> African-American Literature: Black Women Writers of the 1940s and 1950s<br> </b> <i>No P/D/F</i>

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<b>Professor(s):</b> Valerie A. Smith <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>Jacqueline Goldsby has referred to the post-World War II/pre-Civil Rights Movement era as the second "woman's era" in African American literature. Although Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Ann Petry and Lorraine Hansberry achieved unprecedented critical and popular acclaim during the period of the 1940s and 1950s, they have received little attention as a group who circulated in personal and literary networks. We will read works by these writers in relation to each other in order to consider such issues as the formal and thematic appeal of their work and their place in contemporary literary, political and public intellectual life.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Gwendolyn Brooks , <u>A Street in Bronzeville</u><br> Gwendolyn Brooks , <u>Maud Martha</u><br> Ann Petry , <u>The Street</u><br> Ann Petry , <u>The Narrows</u><br>

Lorraine Hansberry

, <u>A Raisin in the Sun</u><br> Margaret Walker , <u>For My People</u><br>

<br><b>Other Requirements:</b><br> Course Not Open to Freshmen<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">22446 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar :</b> S01

1:30 pm - 4:20 pm T &nbsp;&nbsp; Firestone Library B02J &nbsp;

<a href="http://www.princeton.edu/%7Epumap/buildings/20.html">Location</a>&nbsp; <a href="../../../classroom/Picture.cfm?BLD_CODE=FIRES&amp;ROOM_NUM=B02J"> Photo</a>

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<b>POL 581/AAS 581 <br> <font color="Red"> <b>CANCELLED</b><br></font> African American Political Thought<br> </b>

<b>Professor(s):</b> Melissa V. Harris-Lacewell <br> <br> <b>Description/Objectives:</b> <br>Politics has played a key role in the African American experience in the United States. This course offers and intensive introduction to black political thought. This course focuses on the various ideologies and strategies, which have informed the African American quest for human fulfillment, self-actualization, and

equity in the United States of America. The readings will focus on thinkers and activists from the twentieth century.<br> <br><b>Sample Reading List:</b><br> Dawson, Michael/Black Visions: the Roots of Contempora <br> Faryna, S; Stedson, B., and Conti J./Black and Right: <br> Guy-Shefthall, F. (ed),. Words of Fire: <br> An

Harris-Lacewell, M./Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: <br> Kelley, R., D.G. Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical <br> Lubiano, W. (e) The House hat Race Built <br>

<br><b>Other Requirements:</b><br> Course Open to Graduate Students Only.<br>

<br><b>Schedule/Classroom Assignment:</b>

<br> <b>Class Number: <font color="blue">22610 </font>- </b> <b> Seminar S01 :</b><b><font color="red">CANCELLED </font></b> 7:00 pm - 9:50 pm T &nbsp;&nbsp;

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