Rethinking Your Firm into Revit®: The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software

Jon Anunson – URS Corporation

CM322-2U

BIM as a technology and process is radically different from traditional design practice. Are you going to try to press your traditional practice into the BIM mold? If we're going to reorganize design to utilize BIM, then let's rethink the way we approach and manage design. When does engineering work start on a facility? Why do your staff sit where they do? How do you evaluate computer hardware purchases? What has worked and not worked in your practice to leverage the tools that BIM provides in order to produce better and/or more profitable projects? How do you train your users? How do you measure their abilities? Do you continue to use drawings? How and Why? What radical change can you imagine to the design process that will make use of the technology and tools now available to us as designers? Speak out and learn from others!

About the Speaker:
Jon Anunson, AIA, NCARB, BIM Coordinator, URS Corporation. A registered architect and database programmer/software engineer, Jon has 30 years of experience in computer graphics, 3D Modeling and programming and 20 years of experience in architectural design and production. He's worked with enriching 3D design models and documents with client, design, and construction data for over 15 years, and has been an active Autodesk Revit® user since version 1.0. Jon has coordinated BIM implementations of complex architectural and engineering projects such as hospitals, airports, and secure and federal projects ranging in size up to 1.5 Million Square Feet. He consults on projects with a variety of special needs including 3D construction coordination, complex delivery methods, the utilization of IPD Protocols and model collaboration, and the integration of specialty data and computational needs. He has presented BIM concepts and techniques to various trade & industry groups, Local and Regional AIA meetings, University and Community college lectures and symposiums. Jon_Anunson@URSCorp.com

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Rethinking Your Firm into Revit ®
The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software

Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3

Discussion Plan: ........................................................................................................................ 3
Outline ....................................................................................................................................................... 3

Introductions .............................................................................................................................. 4
Enrollment ................................................................................................................................................. 4 Attendee Background Survey ................................................................................................................... 4 Discussion Jump-Start Survey .................................................................................................................. 5

Orientation Material .................................................................................................................... 7
Definition: BIM .......................................................................................................................................... 7 Concepts that require change ................................................................................................................. 11 Barriers to Change .................................................................................................................................. 13 Tools that Enable the ЯE Think .............................................................................................................. 14

Discussion Topics .....................................................................................................................23
Contracts ................................................................................................................................................. 23 Workflow / Process.................................................................................................................................. 23 Hardware ................................................................................................................................................. 23 Collaboration & Roles ............................................................................................................................. 23 Training Strategies .................................................................................................................................. 23 Model-Based Estimation ......................................................................................................................... 23 BIM Deliverables ..................................................................................................................................... 24 Bidding .................................................................................................................................................... 24 Contractors .............................................................................................................................................. 24 Scope, Model Management .................................................................................................................... 24 Other ....................................................................................................................................................... 24

Reference Material ....................................................................................................................25
Research Links:....................................................................................................................................... 25

Group Messages.......................................................................................................................26
Message 1: Message 2: Message 3: Message 4: Thank you for Signing Up! 2010.11.15 ............................................................................... 26 A Head-Start on the discussion 2010.11.17 ....................................................................... 27 Last Minute Information, See you in Vegas! 2010.11.23 ................................................... 27 Thank you for attending. 2010.12.13 .................................................................................. 27

Jon Anunson URS Corporation 2

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Introduction
Rethinking your firm into Revit: The process of designing and documenting buildings has remained relatively unchanged for hundreds of years. Now, we’re beginning to see tools that can improve our creative and technical delivery process, but how can we take advantage of these tools. The most difficult part of implementing BIM is not the software selection. BIM is more than just a technology; It’s a process. In this unconference, we’ll discuss how we can create a process / culture / environment in existing practices that enable us to fully leverage the benefits of BIM.

Discussion Plan:
In order to make the most of the discussion time, let’s plan on minimum "Orientation" Time, I will lead us in a survey of our base assumptions. We'll go as fast as the group can, so we can maximize our time learning from each other's experience and expertise. Section Introductions Orientation Discussion Conclusions End Start 11:00 AM 11:05 AM 11:15 AM 11:50 AM 12:00 PM Length 0:05:00 0:10:00 0:35:00 0:10:00 End 0:05:00 0:15:00 0:50:00 1:00:00

Outline
Introductions A brief review of our names, and the group's statistics… Orientation A presentation of the information for the basis of our conversation…

who we are
basis of discussion

Discussion What we’ve done, what we know, think, wonder Group investigation of the issues, sharing experiences, advice… Conclusions Common conclusions (document post-conference) End Follow-up & Contact info will be provided after AU. what we agree on Let’s Keep in Touch!

3

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Introductions
Several web surveys were used prior to the Unconference to help inform our discussion. Questions and results will be documented here for your reference.

Enrollment

What we Do
Research / Education 7%

Where We're From
AU 3%

CA 11%
Production 29% Technical Managem ent 46%

Managem ent 18%

US 86%

US

CA

AU

Other

Attendee Background Survey
1. How big is your organization? 2. How experienced is your staff with BIM? 3. How Much experience does your organization have with BIM? 4. How often to you use Revit in your organization: What % of your projects are completed with Revit? 5. How often to you use Revit in your organization: What % of your projects are completed with 100% of deliverables done in Revit? 6. How big are your projects? 7. Where are you now? (Check the one that matches you status the closest.)  Considering the use of Revit/BIM for production (no test cases) Evaluating the use of Revit/BIM for production? (One or several test projects)  Planning a transition  Struggling with the transition (recovering from some missteps)  In the middle of a transition (so far so good!)  100% BIM in Part of the organization, making it global.  Have Transitioned, Looking to move to the “next level.” 8. Are any of the following true about your organization Culture? (Check All that Apply.) 

4

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

All projects are required to be done in Revit.  You see the necessity and/or benefits of IDP (Integrated Design Processes) in your firm.  You see the necessity and/or benefits of IPD (Integrated Project Delivery) in your firm. 9. Are any of the following true about your organizations Standards?  You use or have you used the AIA Contract exhibit AIA E202-2008.  You require BIM Deliverables from your consultants.  You have a BIM Execution Plan.  You have a library of custom Revit Content.  You deploy the plugins for Revit.  You have created custom Revit plugins of your own. 10. Are any of the following true about your organizations project delivery? (Check All that Apply.)  Your CAD standards reflect the use of Revit.

 

   

You have integrated specifications through Revit via an application like eSpecs or Speclink. You have integrated cost estimation through Revit via internal schedules or application extensions You deliver contract documents in locked/signed 2D digital format (DWFX, PDF,). You deliver contract documents in locked/signed 3D digital format (DWFX, PDF, and NWD). You deliver contract documents in editable/Functional digital format (DWG, RVT, NWC, and IFC). You issue your model as a construction document. You deliver contract documents via a website/SharePoint/Buzzsaw/Project portal. You offer clash detection as a deliverable. You offer the BM model for sale as an FM tool. You charge extra for renderings. You charge extra for animations.

Discussion Jump-Start Survey
1. What most interests you about this Unconference?  Listening: Learning about BIM Workflows and changes to the design and documentation process that result from using BIM  Talking: Discussing solutions with others who are working on similar problems  Research: Finding out how far along others in the marketplace are in using BIM 2. What would you like to see the most time spent on in the Orientation segment? What do you know the least about, want the most information presented to focus on?  Contracts  Model-Based Estimation  Workflow  BIM Deliverables  Hardware  Bidding  Collaboration & Roles  Contractors  Training Strategies  Scope, Model Management 5

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

3. Do you agree with the definition of BIM supplied in the course material? 4. What do you think are the most DIFFICULT and IMPORTANT hurdles to overcome when Re-Orienting your practical production for the use of BIM? 5. How do you think your organization fares in implementing BIM compared to the competition in your market? 6. Would you be willing to share your BIM Execution Plan documents with others at this session?

6

Orientation Material
Definition: BIM
BIM is more than Software. BIM IS: a technology, a process, and a potential service/ deliverable. Overall BIM influences nearly all of the design and construction process. BIM is the collaborative and holistic process of designing and documenting a building in a Datacentric, relational information model about the facility. BIM is a Technology. As a documentation technique, BIM augments the design team’s ability to create coordinated, accurate design documentation, respond to changes more rapidly, and predict and avoid construction conflicts. The BIM model is a 3D representation of the building and the equipment and furnishings within. Each object in the BIM Model represents an actual object, and contains information about itself, such as its relationship to other objects, its utility requirements, clearances; Even warranty and specification information can be embedded in each item so that users of the model can navigate to equipment in specific locations within the building and review a full complement of information about the object. The design then, becomes a database of objects, relationships and specifications. This database of multiple forms of information captures more design intent than traditional drawings, and creates a platform for managing work, schedule, and change during design and construction. By documenting a design in a BIM model, we create a more intelligent, and nimble facility plan that enhances the construction process, predicts conflicts before they occur, and can adapt to changes with less effort. As a technology BIM forms a relational database of facility information that can create the backbone of a facilities management and operations process for the lifecycle of the building.   The ‘I’ is the most important part of BIM. BIM is an INFORMATION model about a building, not a building model that has extra information attached. True BIM comes from a Relational Database. The advantage of working in BIM stems primarily from our ability to leverage the relationships between, and the cascading reference to, tables or lists of information BIM isn’t necessarily 3D, but as it’s an Information Model about a building, It most likely contains information that is at least partly geometric. In practice, BIM is not, nor is it very similar to, CAD.

 

BIM is a Process. Creating a BIM model in the early design phases of a project creates a rich collection of information about project requirements, design intent, and building performance. BIM design places enhanced design and coordination effort for all design disciplines earlier in the design process where greater change can be affected with less cost and schedule impact. This allows

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

designers to make more informed decisions, and test more concepts for greater benefit to the finished design. Scenarios for building layout, building performance, and construction strategy can be simulated and quantified. The construction can be more easily quantified to understand the cost impact of design options. Alternate energy, air, and lighting strategies can be tested for performance and cost. Quality and Quantity can be better understood, Summed, and evaluated by all parties involved. Better designs come from informed decisions, and the ability to more fully investigate and evaluate design concepts during the early design process.  A BIM Process is Collaborative. The more input that can be combined into the process earlier, the more opportunities we have to improve the design, construction, and operation of a facility. BIM Based design wants to be Holistic. It’s difficult to separate specific tasks from the overall goals in BIM, which is a good thing, even though it introduces difficulties with traditional staffing models. BIM models are designed in Iterative refinements. Guess early, alter, evaluate, and refine. Draw it wrong before you draw it right. The preceding 3 bullets mean that your design budget must be Front-Loaded. It takes more effort to get to the traditional SD, and DD deliverables at the same level of detail. Not because it’s harder, or because it’s less efficient, it’s because it requires more consideration and coordination as part of the process. Once a team is good at BIM, it becomes more comfortable and profitable to allow front-loaded budgets on BIM Projects. BIM is not IPD (Integrated Project Delivery). BIM works very well in an IPD environment, and enhances the IPD process. IPD also helps with the Collaborative, Holistic, and Iterative needs of a BIM Process. They’re complementary, but either one can exist without the other.

 

BIM is a Game Changer for Design, Construction and Operations BIM is the basis of a modern method for unifying and coordinating information, providing opportunities to improve efficiency, responsiveness, and quality. Design Advantages with BIM During the design of the project BIM -base processes allow for more detailed collaboration between the designer and the owner, and between the design partners. Because the facility is created and shared in 3D, the coordination between disciplines is enhanced and because conversations about design can address spaces and functions in comprehensive 3D views, facility owners can have detailed feedback on the qualities of space, and design issues and tradeoffs being considered. In addition, a BIM Database provides a much larger reservoir of design and construction information earlier in the design process. This data can be leveraged for analysis and simulation, to provide the design team very early feedback on building construction and operation costs, sustainable design goals and the building efficiency, and to predict the performance of systems, thermally, acoustically, visually, and otherwise. 8

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

At the end of the design phase, by using collaborative processes based on a shared BIM database, the design team can have a better-coordinated set of documents that illustrate a more thoroughly considered, tested, and approved design. They can know in great detail what the building will look like, cost, perform like, and how long it will likely take to build. They can also understand the specific impact of the selection of each design alternative had on this performance.     Clarity of Communication, Interaction Coordination, Synergy Documentation Analysis (LEED?)

Construction Advantages with BIM When the design is being documented in a BIM database, there are further opportunities to leverage the BIM model for construction. With a collaborative environment based on shared BIM Data, design partners can provide a platform for construction partners to find further efficiency in the building process. The model can be analyzed for constructability, and construction objects like scaffolding, cranes and delivery times/methods can be added to the database. Issues like sequence and staging can be visualized and planned in detail. Time (4D) and Cost (5D) data can be added to the BIM Database to analyze the cost and sequence/speed of construction. This analysis will allow the constructor to reduce field costs such as on-site storage, enable just-in-time delivery of construction materials, and provide for a safer, better planned work site, all of which allow for significant savings. The 4D (time analyzed 3D) model also becomes a tool to track project process, identify schedule issues very early, and address them to keep construction on pace. The 5D (Cost analyzed 4D) model provides the same tracking / oversight ability for material costs. Fabrication drawings can be added to the model in 3D, reducing the possibility of conflicts during installation in the field. 3D shop-drawing procedures further reduce waste and errors, and reduce owner liability for in-field change orders due to conflicts in installation or clearance issues. As a change management engine, the BIM Model remains useful throughout the construction process, ensuring accurate assembly and installation, coordinated construction, and compliance to design documents. At the end of the construction process the well-maintained construction model is a digital document that represents the construction as-built, including the steps in construction that created the facility.      Coordination Just -In-Time Schedule Tracking Verification Overall Efficiency 9

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Operational Advantages with BIM With an as-Built BIM model, owners now have a facility management tool that is far more detailed and useful than 2D drawings. Because a BIM is a database, direct data about individual elements in the building is much more accessible. The BIM Database can be accessed directly, or converted into an FM (Facility Management) database platform, where work orders and office assignments can be managed based on accurate 3D information on the facility. Through the lifecycle of the building, the accurate As-Built BIM model is a tool that can be used for maintenance and alterations to the facility, as well as to test and manage operational alternatives, even to validate systems commissioning. Throughout facility design and construction, the use of BIM technology encourages collaboration, enhances coordination, and provides better tools to predict performance and manage change.      Data-Centric Approach Inventory Moves, Occupancy, Scheduling Maintenance, Tracking, fulfillment Organization, Filing, paperwork, Warranties

10

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Concepts that require change
Holistic Addressing big-picture decisions and filtering down to specifics gradually. Do designers stop designing? When does engineering start? How can we ask our engineers to design an incorrect solution based on early information and still be profitable? Front Loaded Consider that it’s likely some traditional fee schedule has been shown to your client as early as the RFP response. Most were already expecting something similar before requesting a proposal. What will they expect for what percent of the fee? Are they sophisticated enough to care about the level of detail in early deliverables? If so, are they also sophisticated enough to recognize the benefits of BIM deliverables relative to their increased up-front investment, or a front-loaded fee schedule? Collaborative How will you share model information with the contractor? How will you gather program and goal information from the client? Is the client prepared for the information demands they will need to meet to populate a BIM database? BIM Is Not CAD. People working on a BIM model no longer work on representational images; they create virtual representations of actual objects. In order to be effective, they need to understand the construction and assembly of materials, the function of systems, and the purpose of elements in the design. How will you use drafters in the BIM process? How will your engineers impart sufficient information to modelers about system function and intent? BIM is not IPD But one of the reasons for the IPD framework is the need to protect professionals who collaborate on a BIM solution from the liability issues that arise from a shared information database that extends beyond the traditional level of detail in an “Instrument of Service” document. So, how can we benefit from this collaborative environment without assuming more risk than we’re prepared for? How do we ensure others work with us toward our common best interest? How do we assimilate data from design and construction partners who have no direct contractual relationship with us? Engineering can/must be efficient before Design is complete Building Structure and system design are integral parts of the machines for enclosure that we call buildings. In a holistic, iterative approach we need to ask engineers (in-house, or consultants) to buy into the front-loaded schedule, to model before a final design is possible, and to change the model as decisions progress. This tends to be a difficult sell for a discipline that is trained to provide accurate answers to specific questions. Can you ask your consultant to skip the one-line diagram and narrative and instead design a hypothetical partial system? Can you ask your structural engineer to provide 3D schematic structural design? As engineers, 11

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

can we maintain a budget while modeling inaccurate systems and revising? There’s plenty of evidence available that these techniques work, but it may take a leap of faith and some timid testing to get everyone on board.

12

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Barriers to Change
While we can identify some major points where the conceptual of BIM deviates from tradition, there are still some very sticky barriers within our industry and our own offices that will also have to be overcome. Office Culture How do you break old habits? Take away old tools? Provide education, rewards? Staffing What roles do you define as part of your salary structure? Do they apply in a holistic modeling environment? Do you have enough of the right kind of knowledge available? How will you get those with the design knowledge to efficiently embed it in the model? Industry Culture Are your design consultants and construction partners ready to work with you in BIM? Legal /Insurance requirements/precedent Does your liability insurance cover BIM deliverables? Would they if they understood what they are? Does your contract protect you? Existing Contract language Is the contract your organization uses obligating project teams to work in a way that’s less BIMFriendly? Traditional Workflow Complete the design, get sign-off, engineer the structure, layout ceilings and ductwork, review, coordinate, detail, deliver. Sure, you still can do this, but if you wanted to get the most value from the technology you’re using, perhaps there’s a better process. Delivery Requirements Do the delivery standards of your clients require you to produce documents in a less efficient manner? A specific file format? There are workarounds.

13

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Tools that Enable the ЯE Think
Targeted Change Your firm is a firm for a reason. BIM can’t be a complete wipe of the slate, but it affects so many areas of practice that targeting all of the elements that need change can look like a full restart. This won’t win over your staff, or allow you to maintain the properties of the organization that have led to its success. What are the most important triggers that will allow for success without damaging the best parts of the existing structure and culture? Empowered Staff Give staff who must cope with the procedural changes of a BIM workflow the authority to question standards, suggest changes, and identify inefficiencies in the way they need to work with the BIM model. The model authors will be able to quickly identify practices that hurt the bottom line, slow down BIM development, and introduce the opportunity for error. Don’t ask transitioning staff to shift platforms without giving them the ability to tune their process accordingly. BIM-Friendly Contracts Can you create contracts that allow you to work in a more BIM-friendly sequence and still provide clients with the deliverables and controls they’re expecting? What needs to change? Below is a set of billing schedule graphics. It includes 3 tracks: Traditional, a BIM-recognizing schedule that has been published and used by a number of standards, and an Ideal schedule that reflects the best-case use of money where it matters by all parties. How can contracts and pre-project planning help move a project closer to the ideal? What internal changes will also need to be made to enable this distribution?

Traditional

5%

15%

15%

40%

7%

18% PD SD

BIM

5%

20%

25%

20%

7%

23%

DD CD Bids CA, Closeout

Ideal

5%

25%

40%

15%

2% 8%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

14

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Model Planning Know what questions to ask before starting. Educate the client. Address the deliverables, and Work/Model to the Deliverable. Plan the model files with file size, team size, and all final deliverables in mind. Plan the clash-detection and/or coordination procedures, for all phases. Once you start to model, Utilize the Model Data well; Feed your Database! Training Structure Transitioning to new design and documentation software and techniques is a significant effort. In order to be successful in such a transition, training will be required. The transition to a BIM environment from traditional CAD is especially difficult. Most groups underestimate the scope of change involved; the technological change from CAD to BIM involves a paradigm shift in project planning, execution and management, as well as a change in software and technique, and computer hardware requirements. This is a list of potential training strategies, and how and when to best implement them in a transition from CADD to BIM. All of these techniques can be used together, or individually as needed. Provide a structure, ROLES to access help. Name an office BIM leader, Try to find a Managing BIM leader, and announce these people's roles and responsibilities to the office. Office and or Studio/Discipline/Practice/Project BIM Leaders A good communicator and software leader who has organization and presentation skills to represent the office in sales presentations, Office BIM leaders lead training and monthly BIM informational Lunches, and provide direction, training, and consistency in the execution of BIM Projects. This person will coordinate with Project model managers to address concerns or needs for hardware, software, content, and templates. An Office BIM leader probably needs some dedicated overhead hours to spend maintaining the offices processes and scheduling meetings and/or training in coordination with the Regional BIM Coordinator; 5%-20% depending on the needs of the office. An office BIM Leader may also be the CADD Manager, however BIM leadership can be thought of as a different process than CAD Management; BIM leaders would be more concerned with project processes, and overseeing and maintaining the BIM Database consistency and integrity. They advise on modeling and documentation techniques, but not necessarily CADD Standards like titles, sheet names, numbers, layers, etc. Office IT Manager The same person you're already accustomed to calling for computer and software needs. A Managing BIM Coordinator This should be someone within the organization who can maintain consistency, Train, and Create standards for the whole organization. They would maintain Shared parameters, templates and other items that require consistency throughout all 15

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

practices/offices/studios. This person should also work with IT to Coordinate deployment of software, service packs and updates, and provide training curriculum in the form of short training sessions as well as guided hands-on training. They should be available to work with project teams to plan complex or difficult projects, and promote the use of standard procedures and templates throughout the region. Other services the Managing BIM Coordinator would be in the position to provide include:     Assess training needs Periodically review logs in coordination with IT to determine licensing needs. Maintain and edit a store of data on standards and best practices. Advise Project managers on the planning and execution of BIM implementation and contracts. Present on BIM Services and Capabilities in a marketing and PR capacity. Guide clients interested in implementing BIM or integrated project delivery on the techniques and services that will best meet their needs. Make sure people know who, and how, to ask for software and technical support. Include a list of resources for help: Tech support, Tutorials, content locations, public forums and content sources such as AUGI (Autodesk Users' Group International, http://www.augi.com), Templates, and organizational documents.

Project Model manager  One of the Discipline Model Managers. On small, or single-model projects, One person fills both roles.  Single point of contact for all modeloriented questions.  The person who will maintain the NavisWorks file and run clash detections.  The person who will maintain uploads and downloads and otherwise manages the flow of information between modeling entities.  Keeper of project-specific standards, graphic standards, Title Blocks and maintainer of communication about style and standards conflicts between consultants.  Maintainer of Title blocks, including issues/revisions, Project Revisions, Client -directed title block information  Implement any client-specific project/shared parameters and schedules.  Preserve / Record previous versions of the models (or ensure that backups or SharePoint versions are being maintained. Discipline Model Manager  On Multi-Discipline projects 1 person should be named Model manager for each Discipline-Specific model file to be maintained.  Ensure that modeling requirements and LOD Matrix guidelines are being met.  Maintains Export Views and produces NavisWorks caches from the model.  Export or ensure that exports are made of NavisWorks Geometry Cache files (NWC) from Revit.

16

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

    

Ensure that clash report items are addressed in the model. Maintain and verify workset integrity Periodic Audits and Compression of the Central file. Periodic consistency checks, purges and cleanup. The person who will maintain all exports and imports.

Clash/ Coordination Manager  This team member will work for the CM / GC / internally and maintain the coordination model and host clash review sessions.  Manage collaborative Clash review sessions  Collect and combine Clash detection models from all participants.  Document and distribute clash reports.

Define a SWAT team of your best users to approach the transition This should be a group that works well together and is proficient using computers and technology, and a team whose members are eager to learn and achieve. Provide recognition to the team as trail-blazers in the office. Note that the project manager must be included in the SWAT team. While the PM may not be involved in the same training, and may not even use the BIM model directly, their role will be significantly affected by the use of BIM technology, and they will need some training to prepare for the shifts. The SWAT team should plan the approach for the first BIM Project together, and then maintain their group through at least 3 projects. SWAT Team Roles  Project Manager  Computer Tech(s)  Designer(s)  Communicator/ Facilitator  Engineer(s)  Model Manager(s)  Detailer(s) Provide Intro Training to the SWAT team Provide extra training focus and/or consulting time to support the team in their first effort. Training very eager and adaptable users with no BIM experience to use a BIM application should require up to three (3) training sessions. Each session will be up to three (3) days long, and they should be spaced out to coincide with the beginning of the SD, DD and CD phases of a project. Project Managers should receive training as well, but with a different focus. PM training should be done very early in the project (pre-proposal, if possible) and should amount to about two (2) days of instruction. Keep the SWAT team communicating about their progress Weekly Project Reviews with BIM Leader(s)    Identify upcoming tasks and questions regarding process. Discuss current needs and questions Follow SCRUM model for quick standing meetings and brief overviews. 17

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Monthly Project Reviews with Managing BIM Leader  Review model contents, Budget and scope compliance, BIM Execution plan and LOD matrix, Update and verify the team's information. Address major organization and modeling concerns, schedule training resources.

Monthly or Phase-completion Reports back to their Discipline  Brief overview from SWAT team members to the others in their discipline - Project Progress, Issues and Solutions, Lessons Learned.

Maintain the team Keep the same team together (all disciplines) through 3-4 projects so that they can continue to support each other in learning and developing skills in regards to maintaining the model, collaborating through it, and planning project execution Spread the Knowledge As the SWAT team grows in proficiency and attacks larger projects, gradually bring new employees into the project team. When project opportunities are available, divide the SWAT team over 2 projects, and continue to add employees and build proficiency across the organization. Ask SWAT staff to produce “Lunch & learn” sessions where they report new discoveries, Progress on single-issue topics, lessons learned, or show off new successes. Train on Demand  WebEx training,  Hired training on specific topics  Identify topics via team updates on upcoming tasks Oversee Progress Schedule OTS (over the Shoulder) time to check on the project weekly with the Discipline BIM Leader. Keep Local BIM leader involved in weekly Scrums. One-Deliverable at a Time An alternate, or accompaniment to the SWAT Team approach, this is a more gradual transition. It’s easier to manage budgets as only small portions of each project use new techniques. It also takes longer to make the transition and reach a point where projects can benefit from the synergy of an integrated model across all deliverables. Assign team members single-issue topics to resolve and report back: 1 function at a time. Identify a leader for 1 deliverable, and select a project to use the new technique. The leader will find out how to get the work done, attempt to follow the procedure, while watching project budgets and communicating openly with the PM about the costs and potential downstream benefits of the new process. Once a deliverable has been successfully provided, the leader will hold a lunch-and learn session with 18

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

the rest of the discipline group and communicate the technique, identify caveats and benefits, and provide documentation of the procedural steps. From that point forward, all projects are required to use the new technique for that 1 deliverable. Over time, through several projects, Train the trainer Invest in training for discipline leaders - bring them all to a training location and provide in-depth training. Up to Three (3) 3-day sessions are needed to cover a single application. Classroom training is still the best way to introduce a whole new software/process to a design team. Typical Classroom training -style intro sessions involve relocating a group of 6-10 people into a single room for 3 days of instructor-led, lecture, discussion, and exercises. Project Management: SCRUM For a more complete definition of SCRUM, See the SCRUM In under 10 Minutes video on YouTube or 5min.com. The video does a nice job of quickly explaining the SCRUM concept. SCRUM can apply well to the concept of developing a set of architectural documents and is also good for managing a more iterative development process as required by a BIM workflow. Scrum is a rugby term, and is used to describe this process as an analogy to a rugby scrum where players all bundle together and attempt to push the ball forward as a group The following are my idea of translating the terms used in Scrum to an architectural project. Product Backlog: A well designed Product Backlog would be equivalent to an excellent set of best practices, where each item that could potentially be included in a perfect document set is outlined; What a finished product would look like, what tools to use, how to use the tools, and when it should be done, by whom. The Product Owner The product owner roll equates to the project principal and/or project manager, selecting items from the backlog that reflect our contract and the needs of the design. Scrum Master This is the Project manager, working to the plan, sometimes with the aid of a facilitator/ communicator. Release Backlog The PM/Scrum Master places the desired project components into a plan by phase, each phase of the project equates to a 'release'. There would generally 19

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

be 4 releases in an architectural project, each divided into 4 Sprints, the last Sprint in each release being Quality Control Review. 01 Programming      Sprint 1 - First Sketches, Initial Pass Sprint 2 - Coordinated refinement Sprint 3 - Redevelopment, Client Approval Sprint 4 - Re-Coordination, Defect Log Sprint 5 - Quality Control, Client Approval     Sprint 2 - Coordinated refinement Sprint 3 - Redevelopment, Client Approval Sprint 4 - Re-Coordination, Defect Log Sprint 5 - Quality Control, Client Approval

04 Construction Documents      Sprint 1 - New Information Sprint 2 - Coordinated refinement Sprint 3 - Redevelopment, Client Approval Sprint 4 - Re-Coordination, Defect Log Sprint 5 - Quality Control, Client Approval

02 Schematic Design      Sprint 1 - First Sketches, Initial Pass Sprint 2 - Coordinated refinement Sprint 3 - Redevelopment, Client Approval Sprint 4 - Re-Coordination, Defect Log Sprint 5 - Quality Control, Client Approval

05 Construction  etc....

03 Design Development  Sprint 1 - New Information

06 Occupancy  etc....

20

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Sprints Here things diverge a bit. To be successful, a facility design must be iterated through multiple times as information and coordination is refined. When he says that each sprint results in a 100% ready product, we would have to diverge and say that each sprint results in the documentation of all the information available at the time. I would think that many backlog items would be revisited several times in the project, perhaps even in different sprints of the same phase. Burndown Chart Similar to how we currently watch project progress. The information-gathering technique he describes at about 5:40 for collecting the data for the burndown chart is what I was describing as built into the sheet schedule for the Revit file: As users re-define their time estimates per sheet, the burndown rate can be projected and compared to the original estimate. Defect Backlog Code Issues, Client approval/input, etc. By keeping these items separate, we also have a tool to show the owner what their actions do to impact project progress. SCRUM is a management model that can help with projects that have common properties for building design: One-of-a-kind solutions, created by many authors, collaborating on many integrated tasks with difficult to measure progress.

21

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Work Pairing Like SCRUM, Work Pairing is another process borrowed from software development practices. With work pairing, you can attempt to address the knowledge gap that occurs when bringing BIM software into a traditionally CAD-oriented workflow. In Work pairing, an experienced designer or engineer shares a single modeling computer with experienced BIM Operator. Studies have shown that work pairing can produce the same amount of work, with fewer errors than two people working separately. There are many procedures and rules available on Work Pairing; http://www.extremeprogramming.org/index.html is one of the most well-known. In addition to the proven productivity advantages of pairing, you also create a situation where your designers and engineers learn more about creating, maintaining and benefiting from the model, and your modelers learn more about designing good systems and details rather than just picking up redlines. Project Hoteling Provide project-based workspaces that users occupy for specific projects. Include in the project hotel space the computers, and interactive equipment to best facilitate design and construction conversations that include all disciplines, and consultants and contractors as well. This is an excellent way to build up a SWAT team, and supports the interaction and collaboration needed to succeed in BIM and/or Integrated delivery. IPD? The following are defined in the AIA's IPD Case Studies document as characteristics of an IPD project Required:  Early involvement of key participants  Shared Risk and reward  Multi-Party Contract  Collaborative Decision making and control  Liability waivers among key participants  Jointly developed and validated project goals. Desirable:  Mutual trust and respect among participants  Collaborative innovation  Intensified early planning  Open communication within the project team  Building Information Modeling (BIM)  Lean Principles of design, construction and operations  Co-Location of teams  Transparent financials

Is your firm able to partake in IPD-style contracts? Join a project LLC? What about your clients?

22

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Discussion Topics
Contracts
What tools are available to allow you to collaborate with clients and constructors in BIM?

Workflow / Process
What if we weren't architects/Engineers? What would we do to guide the construction of a building? Why? What tool or tools can we use to create this process? How do we engage our teams with these tools, remove obstacles, encourage innovation? How do we create this process and turn it into a culture? How do we make change part of the process? This is a big project that will take time. How do we make this a process that involves everyone and leverages the experience and insight of all of the company, not just an edict to be issued? People need to buy in, be involved and benefit during the process, not just after the design is completed. We need to start change as part of the design.

Hardware
How do you maintain hardware capable of running Revit and other applications? Are your CAD workstations enough?

Collaboration & Roles
How can you encourage the collaborative teaming that makes BIM modeling efficient? Project team seating? Design Partner Co-location? What new tasks must be managed in a BIM project and who will do them? Do you need a Model Manager? What do they do?

Training Strategies
Have you tried any of the strategies listed for Training staff? What works the best? How do you get training provided Just In Time, so that the knowledge is available to the team when needed, but not provided with too much time to forget before it’s needed.

Model-Based Estimation
Budgeting: Can you build a burn down report within Revit? Would it help? Cost Estimation: How might you integrate cost into the BIM process to everyone’s advantage? Is it possible to put meaningful costs directly into the database? What else is required? Are you liable for errors or omissions in quantity if you share takeoff values?

23

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

BIM Deliverables
What new deliverables are possible when leveraging a BIM database? Will clients pay for them? Which ones do you give away?          Renderings & Animations Solar Studies CFD analysis, Airflow and ambient temperature simulations Daylight analysis Artificial and emergency lighting studies Code Compliance Analysis, Reports Carbon Footprint calculations Lifecycle Cost Analysis Equipment and asset management planning         Departmental and Facility function planning and schedules Occupancy and move plans and schedules Acoustical analysis LEED compliance schedules Construction change management Model-Based QTO Solar and wind advantage analysis Clash Detection, 3D Shop drawings, 3D construction coordination drawings

Bidding
BID documents are generally the last remaining 2D, paper, information bottleneck in the building process. What tools would bidders need to take advantage of the BIM database for more accurate bids and planning? How can you provide access to this richer data without extra liability? Can you write specification language to protect designers? Can you

Contractors
Would a GC or CM be willing to collaborate on a model in the SD, DD or CD phases? What could you gain by having them in the room as major design decisions are made? Who benefits most from that value? Will they pay for it?

Scope, Model Management
How do you define the scope of the model? This question is central to your ability to define limits in liability, documentation delivery, and simply manage production budgets. What Options are available? Does the AIA E202 & Model Progression Matrix provide sufficient definition? What questions are left over?

Other
We can all offer experiences relative to existing processes, change, and technology that may interest the group. What new techniques could you share? What accomplishments in reorganization or training would you like to brag on? What questions would you like to ask the others in the unconference?

24

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Reference Material
This Presentation includes multiple images from the web and from URS Corporation.

Research Links:
The Discussion flow (zoom-effect) is generated by pptPlex, a free plug-in from Microsoft for PowerPoint 2007 and 2010. It was a proof of concept project for Plex technology, or the adaptive zoom effect now used in many handheld and portable devices like windows mobile and the iphone. You can get your own pptPlex plug-in for free from http://www.officelabs.com/pptplex Process SCRUM In Under 10 Minutes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5k7a9YEoUI http://www.5min.com/Video/Scrum-in-under-10-minutes-244235609 Pair Programming: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pair_programming http://www.extremeprogramming.org/rules/pair.html IPD Case Studies: http://info.aia.org/aia/ipdcasestudies.cfm http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab082051.pdf Industry BIM Standards National BIM Standard http://www.facilityinformationcouncil.org/bim/ http://www.facilityinformationcouncil.org/bim/pdfs/NBIMSv1_p1.pdf National CAD Standard http://www.buildingsmartalliance.org http://www.cfm.va.gov/til/bim/BIMGuide/downloads/VA-BIM-Guide.pdf AIA CIS/2 COBIE IFC http://www.aia.org/ipdg http://cic.nist.gov/vrml/cis2.html http://www.wbdg.org/resources/cobie.php http://www.iai-tech.org/

Municipal State of Wisconsin Wisconsin DSF BIM Guidelines and Standards http://www.doa.state.wi.us/dsf/masterspec_view_new.asp?catid=61&locid=4 State of Texas Press Release and Contact http://www.tfc.state.tx.us/communities/facilities/prog/construct/ Army Corps of Engineers https://cadbim.usace.army.mil/default.aspx http://www.gsa.gov/Portal/gsa/ep/channelView.do?pageTypeId=17109&channelId=-24291 GSA 3D-4D Building Information Modeling 25

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

Veterans Administration http://www.cfm.va.gov/til/bim/BIMGuide/lifecycle.htm http://www.cfm.va.gov/til/bim/BIMGuide/downloads/VA-BIM-Guide.pdf State of Ohio Framework Document http://das.ohio.gov/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=VD8N3VDCjno%3d&tabid=305 Higher Ed Indiana University Penn State university

http://www.indiana.edu/~uao/iubim.html http://www.engr.psu.edu/ae/cic/bimex/procedure.aspx

San Diego CCD SD Community College District BIM Standards 1.0 http://public.sdccdprops-n.com/Design/SDCCD_BIM_Standards.pdf Los Angeles CCD LA Community College District BIM Standards http://standards.build-laccd.org/projects/dcs/pub/BIM%20Standards/released/BIM-001.html Other Resources SeaRUG NIBS: Whole Building Design Guide: Performative Design: My BIM Blog Roll: BIM Delicious Feed: http://www.searug.org/ (Active Revit Users’ Group) http://www.nibs.org/ http://www.wbdg.org/index.php http://www.andrewmarsh.com/ http://bit.ly/aqs4RE http://feeds.delicious.com/v2/rss/janunson/BIM?count=60

Group Messages
The following is an archive of class messages sent out prior to AU soliciting feedback, suggestions and direction on the presentation.

Message 1: Thank you for Signing Up! 2010.11.15
Thanks for signing up for CM322-2U: ЯE:THINKing your firm into Revit. I’m looking forward to an interesting discussion and I hope we can all learn from each other a little bit about the changed landscape of building design and construction relative to technologies like BIM / Revit. I’m posting some class materials on the AU site today, but I’d like to invite you to provide some information for me that will help me guide our conversation toward the most appropriate topics for our group. This is just a little background information on your current experience in implementing BIM technologies and workflows. Take the getting-to-know-you survey here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/97P5R7Q

26

CM322-2U: ЯE Thinking Your Firm into Revit

®

The Transition to BIM Takes More than Software!

All feedback will be anonymous; I’m just looking to make sure I target the best parts of this conversation for our hour in Vegas.

Message 2: A Head-Start on the discussion 2010.11.17
Hi again. The course materials are available on the AU site. Thanks for still being signed up for CM322-2U: ЯE:THINKing your firm into Revit, even after reviewing the posted materials. I’m really looking forward to this unconference, and I hope we will all find it interesting. I’ve spent the last few years having conversations with people on this topic, and I’ve not found that any subject related to BIM workflow could be completely wrestled to the ground in less than 60 minutes. I know you’re busy with holidays and preparations for travel on top of your already busy schedules, but if you have a few minutes, I think we can help ensure productive discussion at AU by sharing our interests in this topic of discussion. There’s a lot of background information and conversation topics in the packet. I think lots of material is good in a class handout, but our one-hour conversation will need more focus. I’ve issued a second survey to help us jump right into the discussion and focus on the parts that matter most. Please offer your opinions to help guide the discussion once you’ve had a chance to review the Class Information. http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DTJ9X6H I will update the information packet one more time before the conference, with results from the survey questions included. (The first survey was: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/97P5R7Q) Thanks, and see you soon!

Message 3: Last Minute Information, See you in Vegas! 2010.11.23
Wishing everyone safe travels; See you in Las Vegas. If you can, please take a minute to fill in the surveys prior to leaving. It will help make this session better! What is our group’s background? http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/97P5R7Q) What do you most want to discuss? http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DTJ9X6H

Message 4: Thank you for attending. 2011.03.04
Wow, Time flies after AU. I realize I’d promised everyone copies of the slides, and haven’t delivered yet. It’s been on my list all this time! Really! Anyway, I’ve posted the rest of the class materials for your use here. Thanks again for your time and input. I hope to see some of you again in 2011.

27