Enriching

Animals’ Lives
Coming Soon…
THS Spay/Neuter
Service
Teaching Kids
About Animals
Happy Tails
One at a Time
SPR & SUM 2011
AnimalTalk
Animal Word Search
The Great Easter Egg Hunt
FIND THESE WORDS
P U P P Y
K I T T E N
F O A L
C A L F
J O E Y
C U B
K I D
P I G L E T
C H I C K
TA D P O L E
š
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Canadian Publications Agreement Number 40659555
Please join our
Save The Animals Team today.
Hello, my name is Bea. Even though I’m just a young pup,
I’ve had a pretty rough time. I was taken in by someone
who saw me on the street being mistreated by my owner.
This nice person rescued me from this situation,
but was also unable to take care of me, so she brought
me to the THS. On top of all of that, in the past I was
hit by a car and sufered an injury to my hind leg, but it
doesn’t seem to be bothering me too much now after
the vets fixed me up. Oh, and one more thing – I came in
with some skin problems and an ear infection, but
they’ve improved with medication and the proper diet.
Whew. Such a big story for such a young dog!
Please consider joining as a monthly donor with
a gift of $18 a month (only 60 cents a day)!
www.TorontoHumaneSociety.com/give · 416-392-2273
Simply complete the donation form on page 15.
We helped Bea and found her a forever home where she is healthy and happy.
Because to the support of our kind donors, we are able to help pets like Bea – Thank you.
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 1
Interim CEO
Christopher Barry
Society Officers
Michael Downey, President
Marcie Laking, Vice President
Sydney L. Nezon, Treasurer
Linda MacKinnon, Chair
Board of Directors
Lisa Gibbens
Crystal Tomusiak
Ferne Sinkins
Jennifer Downe
Judi King
Johanna Booth
Dr. Karen Nasir
Kimberly Cohen
Peter Newell
Thomas Ungar
Wendy Strickland
Contributors
Chris Johnston
Claudette Turner
Glenda Neat
Hanna Booth
James Planck
Jan McCartney
Jennifer Dick
Liz Anderson
Joan Wedderburn-Spence
Mitch Ralph
Ruthann Drummond
Sara Russell
Shaswar Ahmadarahman
Stephanie Ratcliff
Art Direction
Untitled_Art Inc.
ISSN 1192-4861
3 Announcing the
THS Spay/Neuter Service
4 CEO’s Corner
6 Animal Welfare Report
8 Dog Training Classes
9 Volunteering
10, 20 Happy
& 25 Tails

11 THS Animal
Enrichment Programs
14 Save the Animals Team
16 Pet Photo Contest
17 & 24 Up For Adoption
18 Feral Cat Program
22 In Memory/In Honour
26 Humane Education
28 Fun for Kids
The Toronto Humane Society™ 11 River Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5A 4C2
T 416.392.2273 F 416.392.9978 E info@torontohumanesociety.com www.TorontoHumaneSociety.com
Contents
AnimalTalk
SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011
A publication for the friends
of The Toronto Humane Society.
3
14
26
AnimalTalk is distributed free of charge to
approximately 55,000 Society members and donors.
Canadian Charitable Registration Number
11925 9513 RR0001
10 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Happy Tails
O
rion was surrendered by
his owners to Toronto
Animal Services, and then
transferred to THS. Orion just
wanted to be close to people
and we were happy to see him
adopted in December of 2010
to a new forever home:
Just a little pre-holiday update
on Orion – he and we are very
happy! Orion’s quickly made
himself at home, still allowing
us to live here but only under
his watchful eye. Favourite
spots include the blanket
on the sofa, the blanket on
the bed and of course the
window seat that’s built on
top of the radiator in the
living room – that one’s a
given. He’s a really good cat,
absolutely no problems at
all and so loving.
JOHN & FRANCISCO
F
our month old Pretty
Penelope was brought to
the shelter after the kitten was
injured and needed emergency
surgery. Her front leg needed
to be amputated to save her
life. Pretty Penelope recovered
from her surgery and was
adopted in November of 2010.
Just wanted to send you an
update on Pretty Penelope (now
Sadie) who became part of our
family on November 27th.
Amazingly, it took no time
at all for Sadie to feel comfort-
able in our home. She was
playing and sleeping with her
new feline friends, Rio and
Izzy, within an hour of arriving.
Having only three legs has been
no hindrance for this sweet girl.
She easily jumps on the bed
to nap beside us and onto my
desk to ‘help’ with work. Balls
and springs are her favourite
toys and she finds innovative
ways to enjoy even the
scratching post.
Considering all she’s been
through, Sadie is an amazing
and resilient cat.
JENNIE PAYNE
Pretty
Penelope
Orion
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 11
T
he Toronto Humane Society’s new
cat enrichment program has been
designed to keep our felines as
happy, healthy, and as comfortable as
possible. Our program follows the BC
SPCA’s Cat Wellness Program which is a
component of their CatSense system.
The enrichment program is primarily driven
by volunteers and strives to ensure the
five animal freedoms are met, thus
promoting good emotional welfare for all
the cats during their stay at the shelter:
Currently, we have close to 100 trained
volunteers who dedicate their time to
making sure each cat has daily one-on-one
interaction with people. When a cat
is suffering from poor welfare such as fear,
anxiety, frustration or depression, these
trained volunteers provide ‘treatments’ to
relieve their negative emotional state. For
frustrated or depressed cats, we have an
enrichment room stocked with toys so they
can have a break from being in their cages
while enjoying human companionship.
For fearful or anxious cats, volunteers
provide cloths with Feliway on the bars of
their cage. Feliway is a synthetic copy of
the feline facial pheromone, used by cats
to mark their territory as safe and secure,
creating a state of familiarity and security
in the cat’s environment. Volunteers also
work on gaining the cat’s trust with fre-
quent, short visits throughout their shift.
For cats that suffer from chronic
frustration in their cages or who have been
here for a long time, we have a communal
adoption room where they can be loose
to play and socialize with other cats while
waiting to be adopted.
To help care for the cats staying at our
shelter, please donate today at
www.TorontoHumaneSociety.com or
call 416-392-2273 ext 2162.
THE FIVE ANIMAL FREEDOMS
1. Freedom from Hunger and Thirst
by ready access to fresh water
and a diet to maintain full health
and vigor.
2. Freedom from Discomfort
by providing an appropriate
environment including
shelter and a comfortable
resting area.
3. Freedom from Pain, Injury or
Disease by prevention
or rapid diagnosis and treatment.
4. Freedom to Express Normal
Behavior by providing
suf cient space, proper facilities
and company of the animal’s
own kind.
5. Freedom from Fear and Distress
by ensuring conditions
and treatment which avoid
mental sufering.
ENRI CHMENT
PROGRAM
*******************
Making Each Cat’s Stay at the Shelter More Comfortable
cAT
N
ew
!
When Oddie arrived at the shelter, he was extremely fearful in his cage. He would not eat and hissed and swatted
at anybody who approached him. Using the treatment for fear (short, frequent visits with a positive outcome),
he was receptive to receiving attention within a week. He did so well in the programme and was moved into the
communal adoption room, where he continues to thrive with his new feline friends, while he waits to be adopted.
Oddie
Oddie
12 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
W
hen a dog is left at a shelter
by their owner, they may feel
their life has been turned
upside down. A shelter can be very
stressful for dogs, as it is filled with
unfamiliar sounds and smells, and they
spend most of their time in social
isolation. This experience can affect a
dog’s well-being and may result in
behavioral deficits such as withdrawal,
inactivity, barking and in some cases
increased salivation and urination. At The
Toronto Humane Society, our new Canine
Enrichment Program ensures all dogs feel
safe, loved and not forgotten.
To relieve stress and feelings of anxiety
we have added mood enhancements to
each dog room. We use calming scents
like DAP (Dog Appeasing Pheromones),
aroma essential oils (lavender, vanilla or
chamomile) which all help to lessen some
of the stress the animals are feeling. We
also play music (classical, light jazz and
lullabies) which has a relaxing affect and
results in the dogs barking less.
We provide the dogs with a variety of
toys to keep themselves entertained.
Food-dispensing toys are a great way for
overweight dogs to expend more calories
and for active dogs who need more mental
stimulation. With these toys the dog must
manipulate it to get the food to come out.
Initially, some dogs may need the help of
volunteers to teach them how to get the
food to come out. Very palatable treats
are used until the dog learns to enjoy the
game and then we start to use the dog’s
daily amount of dry food.
Dogs are social creatures that are very
dependant on human contact. We strive to
give each dog at least two hours of human
companionship every day, through walks,
training sessions, and TLC. Our volunteers
play a big role in this by taking dogs to
one of our dog parks or on walks around
the neighborhood. Volunteers also hang
out with dogs in our real life rooms or help
with getting treats ready (stuffing Kong
toys, etc).
Our new Real Life rooms are of great
benefit to the dogs that have been in
the shelter for a short time and are really
important for dogs that have been here
longer. These rooms are set up to look like
any living room with a sofa or arm chair,
table, stereo and books. Volunteers can
brush the dogs, and read out loud to
them as it gives them a chance to sit
quietly while listening to a soft voice and
just relax.
By giving every dog time to play and
interact with people, we are able to keep
them happy and well adjusted. By reducing
the stress on an animal, we increase their
chance for adoption and decrease their
time in the shelter.
If you would like to donate to help
make a dog’s day, please call us at
416-392-2273 ext. 2162 or visit
www.TorontoHumaneSociety.com
Keeping a Dog’s Tail Wagging
ENRI CHMENT
PROGRAM
*******************
DOG
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 13
T
he Special Species Department
has been hard at work transforming
the lives of the hundreds of small
animals helped by the Society each year.
These include small mammals, birds and
herptiles. This transformation goes beyond
the basic needs of the animals, and
looks to their unique natural histories and
psychologies so that we can understand
how best to enrich their lives. We also help
animals who find it difficult to transition
from their past experiences, through the
shelter, and into their forever homes.
The enrichment program is comprised of
several key aspects:
: Appropriate, controlled diets
: Housing that not only meets the
minimum standards of care, but sets
an example for how the animals
might be cared for in their new homes
: Appropriate and varied toys to encourage
foraging behavior and stimulation
: Daily interaction and socialization to
prepare animals for positive relationships
with their new human families
: Real-life enrichment rooms that provide
a sanctuary for animals having
difficulty adjusting to life at the shelter.
Leading by example is the most effective
way of educating the public and adopters
about the best possible husbandry of
Special Species animals.
We now have larger, species-appropriate
habitats. Possibly the most significant of
these is the multi-faceted aquarium/cage
setup now in use for the hamsters and ger-
bils. This environment allows for the same
amount of climbing, running on wheels, toys
and enrichment activities as a traditional
hamster/gerbil cage, but also allows exten-
sive burrowing space. In the natural world,
hamsters and gerbils spend a significant
portion of their day digging their burrows
and running back and forth to store food in
them. Domesticated hamsters and gerbils
are generally not provided with enough (or
any) burrowing space, and can develop psy-
chologically damaging compulsive behaviors
(i.e. digging aimlessly at the corner of the
cage). The Society is enabling hamsters/
gerbils to express their natural behaviors,
one of the basic rights of every animal.
The Special Species Enrichment Rooms
also provide life-changing opportunities for
the rabbits in the shelter. These rooms are
set up similar to a home and help animals
who have a difficult time adjusting to shelter
life to relax and settle in. These rooms are
extremely beneficial to rabbits with behavior-
al issues who have been mishandled in the
past and do not trust humans. Take a look
at the bonded pair, Nestle and Gertie. When
they arrived, both rabbits were terrified of
peoples’ hands. They were likely trauma-
tized by past experiences – possibly when
they were chased or grabbed. The pair was
constantly nervous, and Nestle had become
aggressive, while Gertie was simply terrified.
When moved into an enrichment room, the
pair became very curious and more willing
to interact. With careful daily socialization by
staff, they learned to trust again. After only
a few weeks, this pair has completely trans-
formed. Now these rabbits, who initially had
little hope of finding an appropriate home,
are ready for adoption!
Your donations ensure that THS can
create programs to enrich the lives
of our Special Species guests. If you
would like to help one of our little
critters, please donate online today at
www.torontohumanesociety.com/give
or call 416-392-2273 ext. 2162.
Special Enrichment for Special Species
SPECIAL
SPECIES
ENRI CHMENT
PROGRAM
*******************
Nestle & Gertie
14 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Members of our SAVE THE ANIMALS TEAM provide the loyal and generous monthly support the animals
count on. With your help we are able to continue to feed, shelter and provide veterinary care for
thousands of animals each year. The Toronto Humane Society is a not-for-profit charitable organization and
we receive no government funding, however, we are here to help the animals because of your support.
Save The
Animals Team
Be an animal’s best friend by sending a gift every month!
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 15
Join the Save the Animals Team, today!
Please consider joining today with a gift of $18 a month (only 60 cents a day)!
Sign up today! www.TorontoHumaneSociety.com/give · 416.392.2273 ext 2162
For as little as 60 cents a day, you can sponsor an animal
at The Toronto Humane Society™. Your donation will help
feed, shelter, provide healthcare, and eventually adopt an
animal into a loving home.
N $18.00 per month (60 cents/day)
N $30.00 per month ($1.00/day)
N $___________________ per month
N Chequing Account: (Please enclose a cheque marked VOID.)
Deductions to start N 1st or N 15th
or
N Credit Card:
N VISA N MasterCard N American Express
Deductions to start N 15th or N 27th
Card Number Expiry Date
MONT HLY DONAT I ON
I understand that this amount will be deducted from my bank account or charged to my credit card
automatically on the 1st, 15th or 27th of each month or next business day.
I may revoke my authorization at any time, subject to providing notice to The Toronto Humane
Society™ allowing 30 days for processing. To obtain a sample cancellation form, or for more
information on my right to cancel a Pre Authorized Debit (PAD) Agreement, I may contact my financial
institution or visit www.cdnpay.ca.
I have certain recourse rights if any debit does not comply with this agreement. For example,
I have the right to receive reimbursement for any debit that is not authorized or is not consistent
with this PAD. Agreement. To obtain more information on my recourse rights, I may contact my
financial institution or visit www.cdnpay.ca.
I agree to waive my right to receive pre-notification of any debits under this agreement.
I acknowledge that I can request to make changes to the amount noted above simply by
contacting The Toronto Humane Society™.
Signature Date


Yes! The Animals Can Count On Me For Support!
Here is my gift of: $_________________________
N My cheque or money order is enclosed.
Please make cheque payable to
The Toronto Humane Society™.
N I prefer to charge my gift:
N VISA N MasterCard N American Express
Card Number
Signature Expiry Date
Please complete this form, and return it with
your donation using the reply envelope in the magazine:
The Toronto Humane Society
11 River Street, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4C2
T 416.392.2273 F 416.392.9978.
Charitable Reg. #11925-9513-RR0001
Receipts will be issued for gifts of $20 or more automatically – others on request.
11AT
S I NGL E GI F T
Thank you
on behalf of all the animals
you have helped today.
In order to keep you informed about important campaigns and to ask for support, we will from time
to time telephone and send mail to you. If you would prefer not to receive phone calls or mail please
call and let us know, our number is 416.392.2273.
Occasionally, we make our donor list available to reputable charitable organizations whose
mission may be of interest to you. It is also a very cost efficient way to attract new donors to support
The Toronto Humane Society™.
Please find my donation enclosed, but do not make my name available.
First Name Last Name Phone Number Email N Please email my tax receipt.
Address/Apt. No. City Province Postal Code
16 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
We are looking for 12 photogenic
pets to be featured in our
2012 New Beginnings calendar.
Submit your photo, including the name of your
pet and a short bio to:
petphotocontest@torontohumanesociety.com or
The Toronto Humane Society – Photo Contest
11 River Street, Toronto, Ontario M5A 4C2
TI PS FOR TAKI NG A GREAT PI CTURE
THE MODEL
: Make sure your pet is
content and comfortable.
: Take the picture with your pet’s safety
in mind – don’t try anything that
is dangerous just for creativity’s sake.
: The animal should be looking at
the camera, preferably at eye level.
THE SETTING
: Keep the background simple and
uncluttered so as not to distract from
the focus of the picture – your pet.
: If your pet is dark-coloured, take the
photo in front of a lighter background.
If your pet is light-coloured, take the
photo in front of a darker background.
: Photos representing the changing seasons
are desired, especially winter scenes.
: Natural light is most flattering. The more
light available, the more detail your
camera will catch. We cannot accept
photos of cats outdoors.
RULES OF THE CALENDAR CONTEST
1. All photos must be 9 x 12 or 8 x 10 in
colour, horizontal layout and contain
animals only.
2. Digital pictures are preferred over film.
Adjust digital image sizes to the highest
resolution and save pictures as a .jpg
3. Polaroid or copyrighted professional
photographs cannot be accepted.
4. Photos become property of The Toronto
Humane Society and will not be returned.
We also reserve the right to use
them for other fundraising purposes.
5. Contest closes April 12, 2011. Lights, Camera,
Action!
SEND YOUR PHOTOS TO:
petphotocontest@torontohumanesociety.com
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 17
Up For Adoption
Do you have room in your heart & home for one of us?
Hercules
ADOPTION NUMBER: 11099402
Small but mighty describes this little fella. Hercules has had a lot
to overcome in his 10 1/2 years of life. Before coming to us he
had ear canal surgery, he lost his home and familiar way of life.
Then, because of pain in his other ear, he had to undergo another
surgery here at THS. Despite all this, his spirit shines on. He’s
eager to be with people and has no shortage of energy for walks.
Maggie
ADOPTION NUMBER: A12026665
You’re probably wondering what a cute girl like me is doing in a
shelter. And I bet you’re thinking ‘with her looks and personality
she should be on T.V. helping sell gourmet dog food’. To tell you the
truth, I don’t care so much about all that fame and fortune. What
I really want is to go home with someone kind and patient who
will help me become the best dog I can be with lots of positive
reinforcement and affection. If you pick me to live with you I’ll take
you for lots of walks, I’ll let you enjoy the admiring glances and
‘she’s so cute’ comments, and I’ll even be o.k. sharing you with
another dog if you like. So, how about it? I’ll be waiting for you.
Lucia & Carmella
ADOPTION NUMBER: A12054863 & A12054888
Hello, my name is Lucia; I am a 4 year old chinchilla, and my
daughter Carmella is 4 months old. We are friendly girls,
but aren’t very used to being handled. We are upset that we are
at the shelter and would love to go to our new, forever home
soon. Carmella and I must be adopted together, as chinchillas
are very social animals and we would become very depressed
and possibly ill if we were split up.
Venus
ADOPTION NUMBER: 11175643
My name is Venus and I am longing for you to take me home …
forever this time. My poor heart has been broken more than
once by owners who didn’t understand me, and gave up on me.
My fans at THS have been helping me overcome my anxieties
and build my confidence. And amazingly I still know how to trust,
and once I trust you, I adore you!
I walk like a dream, know all my commands, and fetch ball like
a pro. But I also like to chill, so you’ll find me to be quiet, polite,
and low-maintenance. All I need is a relationship I can count on
with firm, consistent guidance.
Please ask Shas, our canine specialist, to introduce us.
If you adopt me, you will get free training and support from our
K9 department for as long as you need.
18 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
The THS TNR taskforce, Operation CatSNIP, has been working hard
for the past few months to improve the welfare of feral/homeless
cats in Toronto. We are working in conjunction with the city wide
Toronto Feral Cat TNR Coalition to spay and neuter the homeless
cats in our city.
There are an estimated 20,000 to 100,000 feral/abandoned
cats in Toronto. This is an animal welfare crisis! When you
consider that euthanasia due to homelessness is the largest
cause of death in cats and that an estimated 80% of kittens are
born from feral mothers, there is a desperate need for a city wide,
community approach to managing the feral cat overpopulation.
Research has shown that the only economical, effective and
humane approach to solving this problem is Trap/Neuter/Return
(TNR). TNR involves trapping, vaccinating, neutering, and
eartipping cats (to identify them as sterilized). Cats are then
re-released to their colonies where they are fed and monitored
daily by caretakers. Whenever possible, young kittens and
socialized adults are rescued from the streets and adopted.
With the establishment of a city-wide TNR coalition, great
strides have been made in the Toronto TNR movement. Toronto
Animal Services has opened a new spay neuter clinic, offering
free feral spay services. The Toronto Feral Cat Project is
registering and mapping the progress of managed colonies and
training caretakers in TNR. Many independent cat rescue groups
(including Toronto Cat Rescue, Annex Cat Rescue, Urban Cat
Relief, and Action Volunteers for Animals) are working tirelessly
to TNR feral colonies. These organizations, along with the THS
and other animal welfare organizations (Animal Alliance, RAIN)
have joined forces to work collaboratively to improve the welfare
of homeless cats and to limit the reproduction of hundreds of
thousands of unwanted cats and kittens.
VOLUNTEERS BUILD A WINTER SHELTER
*
*
*
*
OPERATION TORONTO
CatSNIP
THS VOLUNTEERS I MPROVI NG THE
WELFARE OF TORONTO’S FERAL CATS
— THE TORONTO HUMANE SOCIETY —
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 19
MORE ABOUT OPERATION TORONTO CatSNIP
WHO ARE WE?
In August 2010, we began a volunteer
taskforce to assist colony caretakers in
their efforts to TNR feral colonies and
improve the welfare of feral and homeless
cats in our city. This task force is made up
of a dedicated group of volunteers including
board, staff, members and the public.
WHAT ARE WE DOING?
: we have establlshed mcnthlv free feral
spav ollnlos. we have held slx verv
successful clinics (spaying over 140
cats) and are aiming for bi-weekly clincs
in 2011.
: we are creanlzlne public awareness
events and educating folks on how
they can get involved to help the feral
oats ln thelr ocmmunltv. we oelebrated
national feral cat awareness day
with an all day event at the shelter
including training seminars, educational
resources, adoption of colony cats,
and ereat fccd and prlzes! we have
also held public screenings of the
compelling documentary CAT CITY
(fcllcwed bv a 0&^ wlth TNR experts)
and we are currently selling copies
of CAT CITY at the shelter.
: Durlne the wlnter seascn we are hcldlne
regular shelter building workshops –
we have held 6 fun. hands cn.
community shelter building workshops
and have built over 130 over wintering
shelters for colonies in need.
WHAT ARE OUR FUTURE GOALS:
: lnoreaslne the frequenov
of our feral spay clinics
: Lxpandlne cur publlo awareness
campaigns to include community
seminars and school visits
: Lstabllshlne a fcrmal kltten
scolallzlne/fcster prceram
: Lstabllshlne a trapplne suppcrt
program (including trap
loan and trapping assistance)
: Ccntlnulne tc expand cur rcle ln
the Tcrcntc Feral Cat TNR Ccalltlcn
WANT TO LEARN
MORE ABOUT TNR?
Visit the following websites:
: www.nelehbcrhccdoats.ocm
: www.tcrcntcferal.ocm
: www.allvoatallles.ocm
: www.tcrcntchumanescoletv.ocm/
feral_cat_awareness
HOW CAN YOU HELP?
Donate:
: Buv a trap cr a trap dlvlder
: Buv supplles fcr bulldlne wlnter shelters
: Dcnate tc anv cf the TNR ocalltlcn crea-
nlzatlcns tc help spav/neuter feral oats
For more information on how your
donation will help and how you can
become involved you can visit
our website or email tnrths@gmail.com.
Volunteer to:
: Trap. transpcrt and reocverv
oats belne sterlllzed
: Scolallze/ fcster oclcnv klttens
: lnorease publlo awareness
and fundraise for TNR
: 1cln effcrts tc feed/mcnltcr
a feral colony
Please keep in mind that Operation Toronto CatSNIP is currently run by a small group of busy volunteers. We are doing as much as
we can with limited resources, but we are not always able to keep up with the public assistance demands. The severity of the feral
cat problem in Toronto is so serious that all coalition members are stretched thin and struggle to help all the compassionate folks
who care about the homeless cats in their community. In order for us to expand our CatSNIP programs we need funding. Please
donate to support this program.
“There are an estimated
20,000 to 100,000
feral/abandoned cats in Toronto.
This is an animal welfare crisis!”
TNR
Trap / Neuter / Return
DEFINITION:
2 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Dear Friend of the Animals,
It’s been a year of positive change here
at The Toronto Humane Society™.
I have personally enjoyed the opportunity
to contribute to helping animals in need,
since I began as the volunteer President
of the Society’s Board of Directors last
Summer. I hope you enjoy reading all about
the animals whose lives we have touched
in this issue of AnimalTalk. We are proud
of our work and simply couldn’t do it
without your support.
We have a lot of exciting new programs
to tell you about. If you haven’t heard yet,
planning is well underway for a high-volume
spay and neuter service. You can read all
about it on the next page.
Another way we are doing our part to
help with the plight of cat overpopulation
in our community is with our Feral Cat
TNR (trap/neuter/release) program.
This program will contribute to significantly
reducing the number of homeless cats
born onto our streets – find out about it
on pages 18/19.
We also see how much children love
animals, and enjoy helping them learn
more about caring for animals through our
education programs. We have visited many
schools and look forward to expanding
the Humane Education program – read
more on pages 26/27.
As you can see, The Toronto Humane
Society is growing in leaps and bounds by
reaching out to our community, and
continuing to provide a warm welcome to
animals in need. One of the best ways you
can support the animals who rely on us
24/7, is by joining our Save the Animals Team
monthly giving program – a special thank you
to all of our current donors who give so gener-
ously each and every month. If you would like
to sign up as our newest monthly donor, you’ll
find the form on page 15.
We truly appreciate everyone who gives
from their hearts to keep the shelter
running – our valued donors, members,
volunteers and dedicated staff.
Sincerely,
MICHAEL DOWNEY
President, Board of Directors
The Toronto Humane Society
P.S. Please be sure to visit our website
for the latest information on our work to
help animals, fundraising events, or to
make a donation – don’t forget to sign
up for our weekly email newsletter called
The Scratching Post.
Message from the President
Michael Downey
20 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Happy Tails
W
e came to the Humane
Society to look for a
canine addition to our family.
We never imagined we would
find a puppy. Week after week
we came to THS literally, until
the staff knew us by name and
greeted us with “you’re back
again?”. We saw several great
dogs; however, by the time we
returned the dog was adopted.
Then we saw “Clive” on the
website. Clive was an eight
week old puppy who was
recovering from Parvo …
Clive was renamed Olivier
(after the actor Sir Laurence
Olivier) and has been a joy
to our family ever since. He is
the greatest dog! No bias
here … he is outgoing and
friendly with both people and
other dogs. He loves the snow,
playing with other dogs and
to have his back rubbed.
We would like to give THS a big
thank you for saving Olivier’s
life and allowing us to take care
of him for the rest of his life.
We love him!
HEATHER, CHRIS & JESIAH
W
hen Gillian came to the Shelter,
we noticed she had an issue
with her eye. After a more thorough
examination, our vets learned that she
was blind in her left eye and it needed
to be removed.
Understandably Gillian was a little
nervous with all the changes in
her life but has adapted very well in
her forever home.
It was my wife Joyce’s decision to
adopt Gillian.
Immediately I went online to the
Toronto Humane Society to see what was
available. I spotted Gillian and when
I showed her picture to Joyce she said,
“Yes – that’s the one.” When I pointed out
that Gillian had only one eye Joyce was
not concerned, she still wanted Gillian.
Within a couple of hours we were
at the Toronto Humane Society asking
to see Gillian, and, after a brief meeting
and a few questions we were approved
to adopt her.
She turned out to be the sweetest,
most gentle dog we could have
imagined. Gillian and Joyce bonded
immediately and Gillian spent many
hours sleeping in Joyce’s lap,
quite content with an occasional
treat and belly-rub.
Joyce, who was ill with ALS, died on
the morning of January 3, 2011.
Gillian is aware that Joyce is not longer
here, and she mourns along with us.
We are very pleased to have Gillian
in our family.
JIM THOMPSON
Gillian
Olivier
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 21
22 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Adele
Andrea Hopson
Art & Audrey Waine
Christopher MacDonald
Connor
Donald Mulholland
Emily Elliott & Samantha Lebarron
Faith
Florence Sarah Curvo Richards
Florin Brinzan
Frances Murray
Grace Petrikowski
Helen Kucharska
Helmut Dressler
Jef Sanguin & Michele Stinson
Jennifer Downe
Julia Yeo
Karen Pim
Larry Schmidt
Leisa & Dario Macedo
Linda Dattner
Lisa Mueller
Marc Desjardins
Mark & Susan Barney
Marketa Russell Holtebrinck
May Wagadarikar
Michael Wise
Mr. & Mrs. Don Smith
Mrs. & Mr. Palmer
Ms. Catherine Mackin
Peter & Trudi Otto
Rochelle Cantor
Shelagh Rounthwaite
Simon Cheng & Jen Morawetz
Spy
Stella Vanderpost
Steven Dempsey
Suzane Lyn
Tobie
Tracy
Virginia Dalley
W T Rarebitt & Rabbie Rabbit
Wallace & Toni Cheng
Walter & Ricardo
In Honour of…
Tribute gifts are a thoughtful and meaningful way of expressing your good wishes or commemorating an occasion.
With a minimum donation of $80.00, The Toronto Humane Society will print the name of the friend or family member you
choose to honour. This is a great way to acknowledge a loved one and help the many animals in our care.
CALL 416. 392. 2273 EXT. 2162 / 2166
Art
Ch
Co
d M
Sa
a
h
Florin
Fran
ce Petrikowski
Helen Ku
He
anguin & Michele Stinson
Jennifer Downe
Julia Yeo
Karen Pim
arry Sc
Dario
nda Dattn
isa Mueller
L 416. 39
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 23
Al Thatcher
Allen Wassermuhl
Amber Landau
Andrea Fennell
Annette Kerr
Anni Krien
Ari & Loki
Athena
Audrey Petrie
Bailey
Becky
Beth & Eugene Wagner
Betty Clarkson
Bill Webber
Bonnie
Buttons
Bud & Tommy
Buddy
Buster
Carly Owen-Turner
Carrie
Carter
Casper
Cassius, Jasper & Rugby
Charles “Chuck” Hildrieth
Charly, Lady & Petie
Chevallo
Clause Hofschulte
Courtney
Cuddles
Dakota
D’arcy
Denise Berwick
Diane Page
Dorothy Yasuda
Earl Demmerling
Fergus Munster
Fred Prier
Gabby
General
Gloria Silbernagel &
her cat Tabby
Grey Puss Grif n
Grif n
Harry Stockton
Holly
Hugh Kivlichan
Jake
Jake Walton
Jakey
James Clydesdale
Jasper
Joan D. Logan
Joan Romita
John Ward
Kala
Kathleen Hawkes
Kimberly Dawn Spelmer
Kipp
Kitty
Kristal
Lacey
Layla Nankoosingh
Leis Willy Larsson
Len Chapman
Liam
Lil Bodnar
Lili Brown
Lori Ferrey
Louie Kuel
Lucky
Maggie & Zoe
Manjula V Pasta
Marjorie L. Grant
Maureen Wright & Clancy
Maxx Rehkopf
Melissa Krisman
Melissa Sara Krisman
Mia
Molly
Mona
Mr. Andrew Prachar
Mr. Boun Luong
Mrs. Bernice McGinn
Mrs. Eva Chan
Mrs. Lee Spiteri
Ms. Barbara Powell
Nick Hamilton
Oscar
Peggy Waddington
Peter
Peter Sutton Robert Dixon
Petey
Phaedrus
Pitou
Popcorn Goldin
Randall Vibert
Rob, Sami-Jo & Zero
Robert Love
Ross Cruickshank
Rover
Rufus
Rusty Fergus
Sarah
Sherri-James, Prudence &
Squeeker
Spike
Sock
Sonora Bay
Stephen Penley
Susan Tourond
Suzie
Sweet Jesse
Tabatha
Tai Crute
Tank
Teddy
Thomas
Tiger & Ginger
Tinka Dimitrova
TJ
Vera Wiles
Verna Marcia Small
Vicki
Willow
Wistera
Zack
Zebrah
Zeus & Claudius
In Memory of…
CALL 416. 392. 2273 EXT. 2162 / 2166
With a minimum gift of $80.00, The Toronto Humane Society
will print the name of the one to whom you wish to pay tribute. This is a great way
to acknowledge a loved one’s memory and help the animals.
C
s, J
Ch
ady
llo
hul
l
gel &
y
fn
Kala
Kathleen Ha
Kimberly Dawn Spelmer
Kipp
Kitty
istal
Lacey
Layla N
Leis Willy Larsson
Len Chapman
am
Lil Bodnar
Lili Brown
Lori Ferrey
Kuel
Maggie & Zoe
Manjula V Pasta
Marjorie L. Grant
Maureen Wright & Clancy
Maxx Rehkop
Melissa Krisman
a Sara Krisman
Mia
Molly
achar
ng
Gin
Chan
Lee Spiteri
s. Barbara Powell
Nick Hamilton
Oscar
ggy W
Peter S
R
b, Sami-
Rober
s
st
S
Sherri-Jam
qu
S
S
on
Stephen Penley
Susan Tourond
Suzie
Wile
CALL 416. 392. 2273 EXT. 2
The Toron
you wish to pay tribute. This is a great
s memory and
24 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Up For Adoption
Do you have room in your heart & home for one of us?
Robbie
ADOPTION NUMBER: A11690900
Robbie is a big, handsome, super-friendly cat. He has a bois-
terous purr that escalates to grunts and snores as he enjoys
attention. Robbie is diabetic, but a THS veterinarian will train his
adopter on the basic care a diabetic cat will require. Also, his
adopter will be given diabetic food, an alphatrak glucometer, &
insulin courtesy of THS! Diabetic cats have proven to be the most
difficult to find homes, though we are not sure why. The condition
is easy to manage once it is understood. If you want to help a
truly needy and truly deserving cat please consider Robbie. He
will give you many years of unconditional love in return.
Bunbun
ADOPTION NUMBER: 12091911
When I arrived to the shelter, it was discovered that my back was
broken in two places! As if by miracle, I can still hop, although
I am a little jerky and unsteady in my movements. I am the
sweetest bunny you will ever meet, but I’m looking for a very
special home that understands I will need special care for the
rest of my life. I will always be more delicate than other rabbits
may be, and I have a bit more trouble using a litter box. Other
than that, I get a little better every day and just want to be able
to retire to my forever home and soak up all the TLC I can get!
Batman
ADOPTION NUMBER: A11699964
Batman was brought to THS with a urinary blockage and then
dealt with a mean virus that tested his will to live … He chose to
fight, and is now completely recovered!
Batman is an inquisitive fellow, who is always alert and aware.
He also has an affectionate side that really shines when he
settles into your lap, purring with joy.
His bladder is still irritable, so he is takes medication and
will need to remain on a special diet. This might all sound
overwhelming, but don’t worry, one of our vets will happily explain
it all. This guy has been through so much, and he’s hoping to
find his forever Bat Cave soon!
Suzie Q
ADOPTION NUMBER: A10793696
Suzie prefers the company of humans over other animals.
She will look at you with her starlight eyes and give you kisses.
Suzie has osteoporosis and is sensitive when being picked up or
petted in the hind end, but she loves to be held. She will sleep
beside you and wake you up with kisses. She has no bad habits,
she is a Queen. Suzie would do best in a quiet home with no
small children. She had a history of Crystals and Kidney stones
and it is maintained with HILLS C/D wet and dry diet.
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 25
Happy Tails
A
lice was brought to the
THS in December of 2010
because her owners found
her to be more than a handful
and too active. She was soon
adopted to her forever home.
We have renamed Alice ‘Holly’
… This puppy is SMART, smart,
smart, and cuddlier than any
pup I’ve met before. She has
great character, and I can see
the gravity in her personality
when she looks at me in her
quiet moments. There’s such
a wonderful, wise girl in there,
just waiting to grow up into a
lovely, gracious companion …
We walked her for about
50 minutes upon leaving the
shelter with her that night, and
by the next day, her behaviour
was already improved, and
she had more self control …
I can’t say enough about what
a great dog she is. I’m just very
grateful that THS chose us to
home her with. I am so excited
to see what a fantastic dog
she grows into – she’s just so
full of promise.
She is, in a nutshell, a fantastic
dog – thank you again for
choosing us to home her with!
ERIN
J
ames, his mom Daisy, his
brother Henry and sister
Elizabeth were found in a rural
area. When they arrived in our
care they desperately needed
medical attention as they all
had contracted an unusual array
of diseases and parasites.
After they recovered, Henry
and Elizabeth were adopted
quickly, but James was not …
until the Cohen family came to
the shelter. They took one look
at James and knew he was the
dog for them.
He’s adapting to home life really
quickly. Right now, he’s snoozing
on the deck beside me. Yester-
day, I found him ensconced on
the couch looking very regal! He
loves to play in the backyard. We
play with a ball. He’s really, really
fast. He’s very responsive when
he sees Katie – his tail goes
wild. He really is quite joyous.
We took James to our vet to-
day for a check-up. He’s in great
health. As you can see, he loves
lying in the sun. He gets more
confident every day. He’s incredi-
bly fast when he runs and he just
doesn’t leap up on stuff, it’s like
he floats effortlessly. He’s such a
people person and very charm-
ing. Yesterday he participated in
the Terry Fox walk in High Park.
He had a fun time with the other
dogs and very much enjoyed the
attention of all the people.
THE COHEN FAMILY
James
Alice
26 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
Humane
Education Program
ver the past year many changes have
come to The Toronto Humane Society.
We are fully embracing our mission
statement: to promote the humane
care and protection of all animals and to prevent cruelty
and suffering. We are working hard to achieve this through
the guiding principles of Leadership, Learning, Partnerships,
Responsibility, Accountability and Transparency. Our new
Humane Education Program addresses these principles and
supports them within the community.
The experiences one has as a child influence their
behavior throughout the rest of their life. It is well documented
in research that children who are cruel towards animals are
at a higher risk of engaging in human-focused aggression
once they reach adulthood. This is one of the things Humane
Education programs hope to address and prevent. Margaret
Mead, a well known anthropologist, has spoken extensively
of the importance of teaching children acceptable and
unacceptable treatment of animals as it relates to their future
development stating; “One of the most dangerous things
that can happen to a child is to kill or torture an animal and
get away with it.”
Socialization is the system through which societal norms,
values and behaviors are established. Throughout history
these have been passed, generation to generation, with
relative ease as human communities were small and
tight-knit. As we are becoming larger, more disconnected
and anonymous as a society, the societal structures which
typically transmit these norms are eroding. Children are
becoming less likely to obtain an adequate understanding
of acceptable behaviors without organized social programs.
Humane education programs hope to fill this need in society.
It is the goal of any Humane Education Program to foster
within its student a greater understanding of empathy,
compassion and respect. These are the qualities that, if
learned at an early age, can assist in prevention of violence
later in life. Through a well developed Humane Education
program, it is hoped that those who participate gain an
understanding and appreciation for the welfare of all other
living things, not only animals.
Here at The Toronto Humane Society, following our new
guiding principles of leadership, learning and partnerships,
we are becoming an active supporter of humane education
throughout Toronto. At this time we do not have a formal
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 27
Humane Education program in place but in recent months
we have visited a number of different schools and a seniors’
home, at their request. Our visits have focused on allowing
those involved to meet the animals and learn about them.
We also are hoping to educate people about our work as a
charitable organization.
It has also been our pleasure to welcome children into
the shelter to provide them the opportunity to see what
we do here. In August of last year, a group of children from
Thorncliffe Elementary School’s summer program came
to visit us. They were given a tour of the shelter and along
the way they asked many questions. During their visit the
children were provided with a greater understanding of
the commitment and responsibility involved in owning
a pet. It was very encouraging to see such inquisitive minds
in young children. Both the children and staff here at the
shelter were happy to share in our love of animals.
Our first visit to a school came on October 7th when
we visited the staff and students of Beverley Public
School. The Beverley school provides a highly specialized
education to students who have developmental and/or
physical disabilities. We took a number of animals with us to
the school including Rosie, the rabbit, kittens Eddie and Leftie
and Sylvie, the pug. Under the guidance of their teachers
and parents the children were able to interact with and touch
the animals in a safe and secure environment. Seeing
the wonder and pleasure on the faces of the students was
a wonderful experience.
One of the most rewarding trips was when we were invited
to visit Brookhaven Public school. We were asked to be
part of an assembly where students were being awarded for
showing compassion to school mates as well as showing and
learning about responsibility in their lives. On this trip we took
with us a dog and some ferrets. At the assembly we were
asked if we would give a speech in which we focused on the
promotion of responsible pet ownership. We were delighted
to be able to give the students information on a number of
different species of animals and what is involved with having
them as a pet.
In the coming months, we have trips planned to visit more
educational organizations, including Vic Park Collegiate
Institute. It is our hope that through past visits and the visits
to come that we can foster a greater understanding and
tolerance not just for animals but for one another as well. In
our rebirth as an organization what we have done is returned
to our roots. The Toronto Humane Society was founded as
an organization championing the humane treatment of both
animals and children. The name ‘humane society’ was
chosen “because its mission was to be broadly educational –
better laws, better methods and development of the humane
spirit in all affairs of life.”
If you would like to find our more about our
Humane Education program, please contact us at
communications@torontohumanesociety.com.
As we receive no government funding, your donations
will help us to continue and expand important
community programs, such as Humane Education.
28 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
AnimalTalk Kids Activity
THS Crossword Puzzle
AnimalTalk Fun Facts
ƌ The eyesight of dogs is better than that of human beings.
ƌ On average, a hen lays 19 dozen eggs in a year.
ƌ Cats and humans have been associated for nearly 10,000 years.
ƌ Horses and cows sleep while standing up.
ƌ Rats breed so quickly that in just 18 months,
2 rats could have created over 1 million relatives.
ƌ Dog have superior hearing to humans,
capable of hearing sounds at four times the distance.
ƌ No right turn! The bats do not need any boards,
for it’s always the left turn for them when exiting a cave.
ƌ Sharks are the only known species to never sufer from cancer.
ƌ Music lovers! Make a cow listen to music
and there will be more milk in the bucket!
ƌ Even when a snake has its eyes closed,
it can still see through its eyelids.
ACROSS
4. Pet with a bark?
5. Small pet that likes to burrow
7. This pet carries its house
10. _ _ _ _ _ _ pig
11. A fish lives in this
12. This pet can fly
DOWN
1. House for a dog
2. Pet with nine lives?
3. You can ride this pet
6. Indoor home for a bird
8. This pet lives in a terrarium
9. This pet lives in water
1
2
4
5
6
10
11
12
7
9
8
3
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 3
Coming Soon…
A Toronto Humane Society
Spay/Neuter Service
The Toronto Humane Society
is planning for a high volume
spay/neuter service at our
downtown River Street facility
in spring 2012. We feel it is
important to do our part to
help our community solve
the pet overpopulation crisis.
There are thousands of stray cats living
on the streets of Toronto and they are
reproducing rapidly. City-wide authorities
place the number of homeless cats
in the city in the hundreds of thousands.
Thousands of these animals are
killed each year simply because they
are homeless.
In addition to the serious plight of
homeless cats, there are many unwanted
animals born to family pets. In the GTA,
one in two families have pets in their
homes, and many lower-income families
cannot afford to spay/neuter their pets,
leaving our community bursting at the
seams with unwanted cats and dogs.
This pet over-population puts a strain
on shelters, rescues and animal control.
The only proven solution to pet
homelessness and pet overpopulation
is to ensure all animals are spayed
and neutered.
A U.S. study found that where a spay/
neuter service operated over a 15 year
period, the homeless pet population
decreased by 75%! For the homeless pets
of our city, this service will change their
world. It has been seen that a neutered
pet is more likely to be kept in the home
and not abandoned to the streets to
face grave dangers alone and unprotected.
The Humane Alliance, a charitable
organization, is helping The Toronto
Humane Society to prepare and plan for
our proposed Spay/Neuter Service.
The Humane Alliance is supported by
PetSmart™ Charities who donate funds
and finance the training of service
personnel. The Humane Alliance will work
with us in business planning, and will
train our veterinarians and technicians in
rapid spay/neuter techniques. In turn, The
Toronto Humane Society is developing a
relationship with Toronto Animal Services
so that this service will provide even
greater benefits to the community.
The Toronto Humane Society will need to
raise $400,000 to cover alterations to the
River Street building, purchase equipment,
and provide start-up veterinary salaries
and supplies. Once the service is open,
it will be a sustainable, self-financing
not-for-profit business.
If you are interested in making a
significant, one-time gift towards building this
very worthy community cause please contact
us at 416-392-2273. All proceeds for the
new service are being held in a special
investment fund. We would ask that existing
donors continue with your current donations
to the shelter as we desperately need your
gifts to continue to function and grow.
Visit our special website at
www.ThsSpayNeuter.com for more
information about the service’s plans
and progress.
4 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
CEO’s Corner
This is my first
message as
interim CEO of The
Toronto Humane
Society and I
should like to
begin by thanking
everyone in the
THS community
(our membership
and donors, our employees and volunteers,
the Board of Directors, and the public) for
their warm welcome and many expressions
of support.
I assure you I will do my utmost during
the brief time I am in this role to lead the
THS forward in its continuing mission
to provide care and humane treatment
for animals at risk. Our vision is to be
Canada’s leading animal advocacy, animal
care, and adoption agency.
I would also like to pay tribute to our
wonderful employees. They are our most
valuable resource, and it would be impos-
sible to deliver against our mission without
the daily effort of these hardworking and
extremely dedicated men and women.
Thank you, folks, for what you do every day.
Today, visitors to The Toronto Humane
Society will find us on our journey towards a
new and revitalized shelter. New innovations
include a dedicated intake area for incoming
animals. This provides an airlock system
against infectious disease and helps ensure
employee and public safety. Our new
communal cat room gives our feline friends
a chance to stretch their legs and mix with
their neighbors – in a supervised manner,
of course! Many of our dog runs have been
enlarged to provide more space for larger
and energetic types. Our re-modeled small
species rooms are the envy of the shelter
community and many shelters have asked
for advice and tips on producing their own
similar rooms.
We have embarked on a judicious
recruitment and training plan for new
and existing employees, have radically
over-hauled cleaning and hygiene practices
as well as streamlining budgeting and
inventory processes to maximize cash flow
and ensure liquidity.
In September 2010, we launched a
Strategic Plan that outlines our goals and
plans for the next two years. This plan
will provide a road map for our future
and brings together key objectives that
will define the bright future of The Toronto
Humane Society.
Animal capacity at 11 River Street
remains modest and controlled. We are
determined to build capacity and aim to
help more animals. In order to do this,
the Society must ensure that it remains
an outcome based shelter. Our first
priority is to ensure that we secure more
homes for animals. This in turn will
drive increased intake and subsequently
improve overall animal welfare metrics.
As I wrote earlier, our mission remains
firm and steady: a dedication to providing
a shelter for all animals in need and
the chance to find a new forever home.
In order to accomplish this, the Society
will need to look to new ways to increase
its base of adoptive and foster care
homes. This is a challenging task. Every
year, more and more homeless animals
find their way to animal shelters and
animal control organizations throughout the
city – and resources are being stretched
ever thin. The Society will need to preserve
and nurture our community relations in
order to do this.
We are dedicated to providing a united
front; a partnered, cohesive approach
to securing the future of all animals in our
city, big and small. We are committed to
better and improved customer and client
service. The Society will soon roll out an
employee-initiated client care program
that has only one key objective: to make
The Toronto Humane Society the adoption
agency of choice in the city and beyond.
We want our clients and customers to
have a welcoming, happy experience when
they adopt a pet from us.
Our further plans include an ambitious
project to build and open a high volume
spay and neuter clinic at 11 River Street.
This project, for which fundraising
has already begun, is expected to be
TOP: LARGER CAT HOUSING BOTTOM: BIRD ROOM COMMUNAL CAT ROOM
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 5
CEO’s Corner
Our newly launched Question and Answer section of the
www.torontohumanesociety.com has brought us some interesting questions from
our members, donors and the general public. Here is a selection of some of them:
Q: I donate monthly to the
Society, so doesn’t
that mean I’m a member?
– Anonymous
A: Dear Friend,
Under the Society’s by-law, donors are
not automatically members. Members
can vote for the Board of Directors
under the Society’s by-law if they live
or work within a 60 km radius of
11 River Street in Toronto. Members
also approve the financial statements
and the appointment of auditors.
The Society’s members receive Animal
talk magazine and the calendar. If you
are already a member, you will have
a membership card, and we will
let you know when it is time to renew
your membership.
If you are not sure if you are a
member, please call our membership
department at 416-392-2273,
Ext. 2123 or 2117, or email
exec_admin@torontohumanesociety.com.
Q: I’m wondering what happens
if someone brings a pitbull
to the Humane Society under
Ontario’s law for them. Are
they euthanized because they
can’t be adopted out again?
– Rylie
A: Dear Rylie,
The THS is required to comply with
all provincial animal legislation,
in particular, the Breed Specific
Legislation of the Province of Ontario.
There are several steps that are
undertaken when a ‘pitbull’ breed dog
is brought to the shelter.
These include verification of date of
birth and breed by obtaining accurate
veterinary records from the animal’s
veterinarian or owner and investigation
of the existence of a license or
municipal tag for the dog. If these
records cannot be obtained, a Society
Veterinarian will conduct a detailed
examination of the dog to verify age,
breed and health status. If the dog is
deemed ‘legal’ in terms of the Dog
Owners Liability Act, he will be accepted
and prepared for adoption. If the dog
is deemed an ‘illegal’ pitbull breed, by
virtue of birth date and breed, then the
THS will, through available resources,
attempt to place the dog with a suitable
Pitbull Rescue Group. The THS will,
through all legal available means,
advocate against all forms of Breed
Specific Legislation in the province
of Ontario and throughout Canada.
Q: Why is the THS not accepting
stray animals any more,
as it used to do so in the past?
– Sue
A: Dear Sue,
In order for a Humane Society to
be able to accept stray animals,
one of two requirements are needed.
The Society must be a full affiliate
member of the OSPCA. This gives the
Society powers under the OSPCA Act,
Bill 50, to accept, hold and take
ownership of stray animals. Alternatively,
the Society must be designated as
a pound and receive formal permission
from a local municipal body, such
as the City of Toronto, to do so.
The THS currently has neither of these.
We are, however, working to resolve
both of these matters as soon as
is possible.
completed by spring 2012.
Education of the youth about kindness to
animals is key to ensuring that the Society
remains a force to be reckoned with, in
keeping with John Kelso’s early aims. Our
new school visit program is gaining momen-
tum and we will keep up our presence, by
invitation, to visiting primary and secondary
schools throughout the city, to press home
the humane movement message. After all,
these are the pet owners of the future.
Much of our planning is dependent on
resources and this is where we turn to you,
our solid and faithful donors. We will be
unable to meet our objectives without the
valuable support of all of you. Your dollars
are used to help animals in need, every
day. In order to meet the ambitious plans
for 2011 and 2012, the Society will need to
raise some $10 million in annual revenue,
year upon year. We need your help.
It only remains for me to thank you
for your ongoing support of The Toronto
Humane Society. The shelter is open every
day from 12pm until 7pm. Please come
down and say hello to the animals and our
employee team – you are welcome anytime!
CHRISTOPHER BARRY
Interim CEO
LARGER DOG RUNS
Q&A
6 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
INTAKE AND OUTCOME JULY TO DECEMBER 2010 (ALL SPECIES)
THS Animal Welfare Report
JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
LINTAKE 334 415 388 344 367 250
LADOPTION 178 192 204 250 229 190
LEUTHANASIA 41 31 29 33 16 1
MONTH
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F

A
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M
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YEAR ENDING
DECEMBER 2010
Animal Welfare Metrics
The shelter re-opened on June 28, 2010,
with some 115 animals already in its care,
some of whom were in foster homes. Since
July 1, 2010, the Society has admitted 2,098
animals. When we re-opened the shelter,
we planned to place around 3,500 animals
in homes, per year, in 2011 and 2012. As
our capacity for care has improved in the
past 7 months, we expect that our annual
adoption rate will be around 4,000 animals
per year. Some 1,243 animals were placed
in new, forever homes, between July and
December 2010.
Animals housed at The Toronto
Humane Society, remain in our care for a
much shorter period of time. Between July
and December 2010, the average length of
stay for a cat at the THS was 27 days. For
cats younger than 1 year, the length of stay
was 12 days. The average length of stay for
a dog at the THS, is 4.5 days!
In addition, the THS uses its available
capacity for care, to determine how many
animals can be maintained in the shelter
at any one time. The Society supports a
mixed population of ‘Slow Track’ animals
(those who require long-term care) and
‘Fast Track’ animals, who move through
the shelter very quickly. In order to
ensure that all these animals are cared
for correctly, the population must be
maintained at a suitable level. Currently,
the THS maintains approximately
300 animals in the River Street shelter.
National Animal Control Association
statistics show that the THS could move
to a population of 360 animals in the
coming months.
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 7
ANIMAL OUTCOME (BY OUTCOME TYPE)
ANIMAL INTAKE (BY INTAKE TYPE)
Outcomes 2010
(May to December)
Percentage of Outcome
(2010)
2009
(May to December)
Adoption 1,243 65% 2,242
Animal Transfers Out – Partners
(other humane societies, rescue groups and foster care)
217 11% 11
Animal Transfers Out – Strays
(stray animals transferred to animal control)
129 6% 0
Lost Animals Returned to Owners 34 1% 194
Died in Care, Owner
Requested Euthanasia or Cremation Services
131 6% (594) Only deaths
in care reported
Euthanasia – Medical
(animals euthanized for medical – veterinary reasons)
146 7% 549 Reasons
not stated
Euthanasia – Behaviour 5 0.1% Not stated
Release to Foster Care 4 See also:
Transfers Out
0.2% 244
Other 10 0.5% 32
Trap-Neuter-Release
(feral cats sterilized and released by the Society)
48 2% 0
Total Outcome 1,909 3,859
Intake 2010
(May to December)
Percentage of Intake
(2010)
2009
(May to December)
Owner / Guardian / Custodian Surrenders 1,101 52% 2,242
Animal Transfers In
(other humane societies and animal control)
454 22% 61
Return Adoptions
(animals returned to the shelter)
36 2% 260
Clinic Services
(includes cremation services
and owner requested euthanasia)
194 9% 7
Animals Born in Shelter 0 0% 126
Strays and Abandoned Animals 313 15% 799
Total Intake 2,098 3,859
Some 129 stray animals were sent to Toronto Animal Service for stray holding.
114 animals were returned to the Society under the “pet partnership” initiative with the City. These animals are entered under “Transfers In”.
The Release to Foster Care statistics are incomplete as the shelter is in the process of
compiling accurate data from its prior Chameleon database. This information will update in due course.
Trap-Neuter-Release Initiatives are being spearheaded by the T-N-R Committee.
These clinics take place monthly at the Society and are predominantly driven by volunteers.
Owner / Guardian surrenders represent the bulk (52%) of intake for The Toronto Humane Society.
Clinic Services include Owner Requested Euthanasia statistics. These are animals that are brought to the Society by an owner and where
humane euthanasia is requested and deemed appropriate by a veterinarian. This is a free service offered by the Society to the public.
THS Animal Welfare Report
You can have a confident dog that is well-behaved.
As a dog owner you should be able to protect your
dog, keep your dog safe, guide them through life
and make sure you don’t set them up for failure.
Breaking a dog’s spirit by forcing them to roll on
their back, having them submit and showing them
whose boss, is not the way to raise a dog.
It’s our job to condition our dogs, desensitize
them to the source of stress (noise, other
dogs, strangers, etc) and prepare them for any
possible stressful situation in the future. If your
dog doesn’t feel comfortable with having other
dogs around, don’t take him to a dog park or if
you know your dog will be scared of loud noises,
don’t take them to watch the fireworks.
We want to help to build a stronger
relationship by learning to become a leader
without being domineering, and as a result have
a reliable dog that you are proud to have. The
Toronto Humane Society is pleased to announce
the start of our dog training classes. These
classes include basic obedience, advanced
obedience, dealing with different types of
aggression, separation anxiety, raising a puppy,
problem-solving and agility classes. Our goal is
to help new and experienced dog owners, as well
as those who’d like to do more with their dogs
(such as competing in CKC trials, achieving
canine good citizen certificate).
Training your dog is one way to make your
bond stronger and further your relationship with
your dog.
For more information on THS’s dog training
classes, please contact: Shaswar at email
sahmadarahman@torontohumanesociety.com
or 416-392-2273 ext 2145.
DogTraining
CREATING A STRONGER BOND BETWEEN YOU & YOUR DOG
8 SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 ANI MALTALK
ANI MALTALK SPRI NG & SUMMER 2011 9
O
ur volunteers are a highly valued
resource here at The Toronto
Humane Society as they make a
such positive difference to the lives of the
animals in our care.
Volunteers are a vital link to our commu-
nity and help to build positive relationships.
They add much needed companionship and
socialization to our animals while they stay
with us and wait for their forever homes.
Volunteers have a genuine commitment
to the welfare of animals, and our animals
need that friendship.
Volunteers contribute in many different
ways to The Toronto Humane Society and
the animals we help.
During the majority of the year, our kitten
volunteers are the primary caregivers
to the many tiny little kittens that arrive at
the shelter. This work includes feeding and
socializing kittens to get them ready for a
new home.
Many of our cats can become fearful,
frustrated and depressed being in a
shelter environment, so our volunteers
play an important role with our adult
cats too. Volunteers spend time with
the cats to keep them socialized, give
companionship and, of course, love.
Dog volunteers interact with the pups
at least four times a day. Mainly this
includes taking dogs out for walks so that
they can stretch, run and play. Volunteers
also provide friendship, love and of course
scratches behind the ears, which helps to
brighten their stay in the shelter.
We have volunteers who work with all of
our special species animals. This includes
rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, rats and
many others. These volunteers help
with feeding and socializing the many pets
we care for.
Other volunteers help with animal adop-
tions, client care and administration duties.
These volunteers help to supplement our
regular staff, which is a huge asset, and helps
make things at THS run more smoothly.
Last, but not least, fostering is another
flexible, fun, and rewarding volunteer job.
Foster parents provide temporary homes
for animals who need the extra love and
attention of a home environment to be
able to recover from illness, injury, surgery
or have other special needs.
Thank you to all of our current
volunteers – we appreciate the time you
give to help the animals!
Share Your Love of Animals
by Volunteering!
HOW TO BECOME
A VOLUNTEER:
1. Attend an information session
We post the dates/times on our website
at www.torontohumanesociety.com/
volunteer. The sessions are usually
about 45 minutes long and give a
general overview of the volunteer
program here at the THS. At the end
of the session volunteer applications
are distributed.
2. Complete the volunteer application
and call to set an appointment for
an interview. Interviews are
conducted within a few days of
the information session.
3. Attend the volunteer interview
which usually takes about 15 minutes.
After a successful interview, training
will be arranged.
4. After all of the necessary training
sessions are completed, our
volunteers will be well-informed and
ready to work with the animals.
To learn more about becoming a
volunteer, visit us online at
www.torontohumanesociety.com/
volunteer

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