What is Veritas NetBackup? Veritas NetBackup is an enterprise level backup and recovery suite.

It provides cross platform backup functionality to Windows, Linux, OpenVMS, Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, IRIX, Tru64 and Mac OS X. NetBackup has the capability of communicating with various robotic libraries and tape drives. It is set up with a central master server that manages both media servers (containing the backup media) and clients. Multiple NetBackup environments can be managed by Net-Backup Operations Manager (NOM) which is bundled with the NetBackup 6.0 distribution, which replaces the Global Data Manager (GDM) component used in previous versions. NetBackup comes with support for many hardware devices like tape drives, tape libraries, disk units and supports, amongst many others, hot backups for major database products like Oracle, can use Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP), and has tape vaulting. NetBackup also enables LAN-Free and server-free backups in SAN fabric environments. NetBackup Directories and Files The figure below, “NetBackup Directories and Files - UNIX Servers and Clients” shows the NetBackup files and directory structure on UNIX servers and clients. If a host is only a client and not a server, then only the files in the lower part of the graphic “NetBackup Directories and Files - UNIX Servers and Clients” are present. If a host is both a client and a server, the client component shares files as necessary from those in the upper part of the graphic “NetBackup Directories and Files - UNIX Servers and Clients”. A Windows NetBackup server has equivalent files and directories that are located in the directory where NetBackup is installed (C:\Program Files\VERITAS by default). The table “NetBackup Directories and Files - Servers and UNIX Clients” describes the files and directories that are of special interest. NetBackup Directory Structure -- UNIX NetBackup Directories and Files - UNIX Servers and Clients

NetBackup Directories and Files - Servers and UNIX Clients

File or Directory Contents Bin: Commands, scripts, programs, daemons and files required for NetBackup Operation and Administration. On a server, there are two subdirectories under bin. admincmd: Contains various commands used internally by NetBackup. Use these commands ONLY if they are documented. Most of these commands are not documented and should not be used directly. goodies: (UNIX only) Contains scripts and information that may be useful to the administrator. These subdirectories are not present on clients. bp.conf: Configuration file where you can specify various options for NetBackup operation. On a Windows server, these options are set in the interface. Client: NetBackup client software that is installed on the clients during the installation process. Do not install this directory on a media server.

Db: NetBackup databases as described in the table “NetBackup Databases”. exclude_list: On UNIX clients, this file contains a list of files and directories to exclude from scheduled backups. The help, Help files used by NetBackup programs. These files are in ASCII format. include_list: On UNIX clients, this file contains a list where you can specify a subset of the exclude list to add back into scheduled backups. Logs: Detailed debug logs for NetBackup processes. You must create the necessary Sub directories in order for these log files to be written. release_notes: NetBackup release notes in ASCII format, so you can conveniently view or print them. Version: Version and release date of the software. NetBackup Programs and Daemons The table below, “NetBackup Daemons and Programs”, describes the programs and daemons that provide most of the control for backup, archive, and restore operations. The explanations include what starts and stops the program or daemon and the debug log subdirectory (if any) where it records its activities. (You must create the subdirectory manually.) Release notes: NetBackup release notes in ASCII format, so you can conveniently view or print them. version Version and release date of the software. bp On UNIX clients, this menu-driven, character-based interface program has options for starting user- directed backups, restores, and archives. Started By: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bp command on the client. Stopped By: Exiting the interface program. Debug Log: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/bp on the client. The debug logs for bpbackup, bparchive, bprestore, and bplist also have information about bp activities. bpadm On a UNIX master server, this administrator utility has a menudriven, character-based, interface with options for configuring and managing NetBackup. Started By: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpadm command on the master server. Stopped By: Quit option from within bpadm. Debug Log: admin.log on the server. On UNIX clients, this program communicates with bprd on the master server when a user starts an archive. Started By: Starting an archive by using the client-user interface or executing the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bparchive command on the client. Stopped By: Completion of operation.

bparchive

bpbackup On UNIX clients. Started By: Starting a backup by using the client-user interface or executing the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpbackup command on the client. bpbrm BPBKAR32 bpcd On UNIX clients.) Started By: inetd. On master and media servers. Started By: bpbrm on the server with the storage unit. bpcd is the NetBackup client daemon and lets NetBackup start programs on remote hosts (can be UNIX clients or other servers). Stopped By: Completion of operation. you can stop it by clicking on its icon and choosing Close. On Windows 95.log on both client and server.log on the client. Started By: When Windows starts if the daemon is in the Startup group. this program communicates with bprd on the master server when a user starts a backup.LOG file in the NetBackup logs directory on the client. and NetBackup BPCD later in this table. Otherwise. the Backup/Archive Manager generates the backup images. BPCDW32. The program is used when bpsched starts bpbrm and when bpbrm communicates with the client. For example. bpbkar On UNIX clients the Backup/Archive Manager generates the backup images. the server can connect to UNIX clients without requiring /. (For a description of the NetBackup client daemon on PC clients.log on the server. Debug Log: bpbkar. Started By: BPCDW32 on the client. you can stop it through the Services application in the Control Panel. see BPCDW32.rhosts entries on the remote host.log on the client. by double clicking on its icon. Debug Log: bpcd. On Windows 95 and NT/2000. the Backup/Restore Manager manages the client and media manager processes and uses error status from both to determine the final status of backup or restore operations. XP and 2003.Debug Log: bparchive. bpsched starts an instance of bpbrm on the server with the appropriate storage unit.EXE. Stopped By: Completion of operation. Stopped By: On Windows NT/2000. On Windows clients. this is the executable file that starts the NetBackup client daemon. BPCD.NLM. Stopped By: Completion of operation.log on the client. Stopped By: Completion of operation. Started By: For each backup or restore. Debug Log: BPBKAR. Stopped By: Completion of operation Debug Log: bpbackup. XP and Windows Server 2003 clients.EXE . Debug Log: bpbrm.

error. bpdbjobs On UNIX master servers. it runs this command automatically.log on the client. Debug Log: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/bpjava-msvc bpjavausvc NetBackup-Java user server application program.log on the server. on the server with the storage unit.Debug Log: BPCD.log on the server. bpjava-msvc NetBackup-Java master server application program. Started By: bprd (also by /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/initbpdbm on UNIX) Stopped By: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bpdbm -terminate command on UNIX and by stopping the NetBackup Database Manager service on Windows. The administrator can also execute it manually or with a cron job. the NetBackup database manager program that manages the configuration. Debug Log: bpdm. Stopped By: Completion of operation. This program runs on all NetBackup UNIX Systems and authenticates users that start the NetBackup-Java interface programs. . Started By: bpjava-msvc upon successful login through the Login dialog box that is presented when a NetBackup-Java interface is started. With NetBackup for Oracle. Stopped By: When the interface program is terminated. When bprd starts. Started By: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/admincmd/bpdbjobs. Debug Log: bpdbm. Stopped By: When authentication is complete. bpdbm bpdm On master and media servers. Stopped By: Completion of operation. Debug Log: bphdb. and file databases. This program services all requests from the NetBackup-Java user and Administration interfaces. bphdb On UNIX database-extension clients. bpbrm starts an instance of bpdm. Debug Log: bpdbjobs. bphdb starts the NetBackup hotdatabase-backup program.log on the server. this program is used to clean up the NetBackup jobs database. Started By: Client-user interface when the user starts a database backup or restore operation. bpdm is the disk-media manager and is used when the storage unit type is a disk. bphdb also writes to /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/obackup_tape.LOG file in the NetBackup logs directory on the client. Stopped By: There is no terminate option for this command outside of using kill. This program manages the transfer of images between the client and the operating-system disk manager on the server to which the disk attaches. Started By: For each backup or restore. On master servers. Started By: inetd during startup of the NetBackup Java interfaces.

On master servers. Started By: Starting restore by using the client-user interface (or by executing the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bprestore command on the client). Started By: Starting a search of the image database by using the client-user interface or executing The /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/bplist command on the client. bplist On UNIX clients. This program manages transfer of images between the client and the storage device.log on the client. Started By: bprd for the following operations: ◆ User-directed backups and archives ◆ Immediate manual backups (started through the option that is available in the NetBackup administrator interface) ◆ Scheduled automatic incremental or full backups. bptm manages the . bprestore On UNIX clients.log on the server. Stopped By: Completion of operation Debug Log: bprestore.log on the server. In this case. Stopped By: Completion of operation Debug Log: bplist.log on the client. this program communicates with bprd on the master server when a user starts a restore. bprd starts the scheduler at intervals determined by the wakeup interval global attribute.Debug Log: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/bpjava-usvc Bprd On master servers. Stopped By: Terminate Request Daemon option on the Special Actions menu in bpadm. bptm is the tape-media manager and is used when the storage unit type is Media Manager. bpsched bptm On master and media servers. ◆ Storage units to use for backups and archives. the Scheduler uses policy information from the NetBackup configuration databases to determine: ◆ Clients to start and when to start them. Debug Log: bprd. Debug Log: bpsched. Stopped By: Completion of all backups that are due. In addition. this program communicates with bprd on the master server when a user browses the database during a restore operation. It also handles communication between the backup and Media Manager software. the request daemon responds to client and administrative requests for the following: ◆ Restores ◆ Backups (scheduled and user-directed) ◆ Archives ◆ List backed up or archived files ◆ Manual immediate backups (started through the NetBackup administration interface manual backup option) Started By: Initiate Request Daemon option on the Special Actions menu in bpadm (also the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/initbprd command).

this is the NetBackup System Registry Replacement utility. Started By: Executing install_path/netbackup/bin/InstallNdmpMoverAgent path_of_NetBackup_binaries Stopped By:Executing install_path/netbackup/bin/InstallNdmpMoverAgent -r. jnbSA A Java-based administration utility for managing NetBackup and Media Manager on UNIX. jbpSA A Java-based program for performing backups. In addition. Debug Log: install_path/netbackup/logs/ndmpmoveragent NDMP Mover Agent .start. ndmpmoveragent On the NetBackup media server (UNIX). XP and Windows Server 2003 clients. Started By: On UNIX.EXE On Windows NT/2000. Debug Log: BPSYS. the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/jbpSA command. this daemon acts as an NDMP server in a type of three-way backup called Remote NDMP.log on the server. the /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/jnbSA command. bparchive. the logs for bpjava-msvc and bpjava-usvc can be helpful. Stopped By: Completion of operation.LOG file in the NetBackup LOGS directory on the client.stop. BPSYS. Also. and bprestore commands on the client can be useful. Debug Log: None. Started By: For each backup or restore. Started By: NetBackup as required. Debug Log: bptm. although the log for the bpbackup. the NetBackup .Java on host menu item on the Programs/NetBackup menu. Debug Log: None. although the logs for bpjava-msvc and bpjava-usvc can be helpful. bpbrm starts an instance of bptm on the server that has the storage unit. Started By: On UNIX. Stopped By: Exit option in jnbSA. Stopped By: Executing /usr/openv/volmgr/bin/ndmpmoveragent. administration of supported UNIX systems can be performed by using the NetBackup-Java Windows Display Console on a Windows system. this service acts as an NDMP server in a type of three-way backup called Remote NDMP. Stopped By: Completion of operation. Debug Log: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/ndmpmoveragent On the NetBackup media server (Windows).NetBackup media database and provides information for the media list report screen. archives and restores of UNIX clients. bplist. Started By: Executing /usr/openv/volmgr/bin/ndmpmoveragent. On a NetBackup-Java Windows Display console.

on UNIX clients. bpbrm starts an instance of tar on the client. describes the NetBackup databases. config Configuration information. NetBackup starts an instance of TAR32 on the client. it is very similar to the menu version. . Started By: For each restore. bp. this is the executable file that starts the client-user interface on Windows systems. Started By: /usr/openv/netbackup/bin/xbp command on the client. altnames: Contains information about client names for restores. Started By: For each restore. Debug Log: TAR. the TAR32 program is a special version of tar provided with NetBackup and used to restore images. Debug Log: tar. although the log for the bpbackup. TAR32 xbp NetBackup Databases The below are the “NetBackup Databases”. Stopped By: Quit option in xbp. error Error and status information about NetBackup operations. These databases contain information that is used internally by NetBackup and reside in the /usr/openv/netbackup/db directory on UNIX servers and in the install_path\NetBackup\db directory on Windows NetBackup servers. This database resides on the master server and has two parts: error: Contains information recorded during backup operations and used in the NetBackup reports. On Windows clients. Stopped By: Completion of restore operation. with options for starting user directed backups. and archives. storage units.LOG in the NetBackup logs directory on the client. config: Contains information about global attributes. restores. bparchive. Tar On UNIX clients. Functionally. Started By: From the Windows Start menu. failure_history: Contains daily history of backup errors. the Tape Archive program is a special version of tar provided with NetBackup and used to restore images. Graphical display based client-user interface.log file in the NBWIN directory on the client. and database backups.EXE For Windows clients. under Programs/NetBackup.log on the client. bplist. and bprestore commands on the client may also be useful for debugging problems with xbp. Debug Log: None. This database resides on the master server and has three parts: policy: Contains information about each NetBackup policy. Debug Log: mmddyy. Stopped By: Exiting the client-user interface. Stopped By: Completion of restore operation.NBWIN.

The media database also has an errors file that contains error history information for media and devices. categorization and troubleshooting Media Management Enterprise Media Manager Automatic robotic/tape drive configuration . Job information that is used by the NetBackup job monitor (UNIX NetBackup server) and activity monitor (Windows NetBackup server).images jobs Information about the backup images and resides only on the master server. The Jobs database is on the master server. Default NetBackup Processes: Default processes which must be running on NetBackup server are: Bprd Bpdbm Ltid Vmd Avrd On media server Ltid Vmd Avrd Major features of NetBackup Security Data Encryption Access Control Performance Synthetic Backups Disk Staging Checkpoint restart Multiplexed Backup Multi-streamed Backup Inline Copy Online NetBackup catalog backup Management and Reporting Web-based management reporting (VERITAS NetBackup Operations Manager) Tape volume. media Media related information used by bptm. The file database is the one that NetBackup accesses when a user browses for files to restore. Each master or media server has a media database with media information for the images stored on that server’s storage units. drive and library viewing Error message identification. One of the files in the images directory is the file database.

5 6. Control Data formed the Automated Workstation Backup System (AWBUS) business unit.Broad tape device support Heterogeneous Support Broad platform support Support for leading networking topologies Advanced software and hardware snapshot support Major releases of Veritas Netbackup 6. the product and Control Data’s Storage Management 12-person team were acquired by Openvision.4 3. Then the data stored in the disk staging area is written to tape in a background process.4 6. The first version of AWBUS supported two tape drives in a single robotic carousel with the SGI IRIX operating system.0.Backup data is written to hard disk rather than directly to tape (usually a slower technology). This is why. · In 1993.0 1.0 2.0 5. the backup operation (which went into error due to failure) . a backup software solution was written by a small group of engineers at Control Data for Chrysler Corporation. Checkpoint Restart Minimum value of checkpoint in NetBackup is 5 minutes for backups. and later adopted by other customers of Control Data.) Support for media Volume Management and Server Migration/Hierarchical Storage Management was added. during backups checkpoint will be placed every 5 minutes.e. i. 1997 Veritas acquired Openvision. the 30th version of NetBackup was released as NetBackup 6. (This is why many NetBackup commands have a 'bp' prefix. Also in this year. Disk staging . Hence in case when system recovers from a failure. on UNIX platforms. · In the end of 1993. Open Vision renamed Backup Plus to NetBackup. During this time. · In 1990. · On May 6.6 was was was was was was was was was releases in 2007 releases in 2007 released in 2005 released in 2003 released in 2002 released in 2000 released in 1997 released in 1996 released in 1994 and the NetBackup name was coined History of Veritas NetBackup · In 1987. NetBackup formally became a Veritas product. · In 2005 Symantec acquired Veritas and NetBackup became a Symantec product. NetBackup installs into /usr/openv.0 4.0. Control Data renamed the product Aria*Backup Plus 1.5 3.

This is why it’s called a snapshot. A snapshot is a virtual copy of a device or a File system. Recovery Speed: This is the only reason you are backing up. You want something better bur aren’t yet ready for the cost of client-free backups. They boil down to two basic questions: how much data do you have to move. it merely took a “picture” of it.snapshot. When you create a snapshot. When it sees that a block of data is going to change. it doesn’t actually copy the data. it only needs to record the way it looked before the first change occurred. right? Many people fail to take recovery speed into consideration when designing a backup and recovery system when they should be doing almost the opposite. client-free backups that use a backup mirror are the only backup and recovery design that offers instantaneous recovery after the loss of multiple drives on the primary disk set. Sometimes people have a hard time grasping how the software can create a separate view of the device without copying it.can resume from a point which was at most 5 minutes prior failure. the recovery time is always a factor of the question in the previous section. and your recovery system is based on moving data from tape to disk. not do you need all the functionality they provide. you see diska exactly as it looked at the moment diska. You are therefore required to shut down the application during backups. Speed of tape drives . Creating the snapshot takes only a few seconds. Minimum value in case of restores is 1 minute. Therefore. An enterprise storage array that can create snapshots (that are visible from the host of which the snapshot was taken) also works fine in this situation. Even if a particular block changes several times.snapshot was created. and the loss of too many drives on the primary disk set results in a worthless snapshot.snapshot. However. the snapshot software records the time at which the snapshot was taken. It looks device or Filesystem. or a backup software add-on product that emulates this functionality. if you look at diska. this also results in a system that can backup the system within an acceptable window. a host-based volume manager. it gives you and your backup utility another name through which you may view the snapshot of the device or Filesystem. but it’s really a symbolic representation of the device. but it appears as if that’s exactly what happened. you need the type of snapshots that are available only from an advanced filesystem. Creating snapshot doesn’t actually copy data from disk a to disk a. If your backup system is based on moving data from disk to tape. In almost every case. Once the snapshot has been created most snapshot software (or firmware in the array) monitors the device for activity. Suppose you perform LAN free backups but have an application for which there is no API or can’t afford the API for an application. Therefore. Once the snapshot is taken. snapshots (that have not been backed up to tape) only protect against logical corruption. it records the “before” image or that block in a special logging area (often called the snapshot device). They should design a backup and recovery system in such a way that it can recover the system within an acceptable window. but it isn’t necessary. and what resources are available to move it? Snapshots are an alternate way to provide instantaneous recoveries.

To calculate what you expect to be the data rate for backups. RAID combinations Raid 0+1: (Mirrored Stripes) The server sees only the virtual hard disk. All data is replicated on a number of separate disks.• • • • • • • • • • • • DDS2 rated as being able to write 1. the RAID controller realizes the virtual disk in two states: in the first stage it brings together every four physical hard disk into one virtual hard disk that is only visible within the RAID controller by means of RAID ) (Striping). Level 4: Data blocks are distributed as with disk striping. In the second . DDS3 3. Level 5: Data blocks are distributed as with disk striping Parity check data is distributed across all members of the array. Uses extra drives to detect 2-bit errors and correct 1-bit errors on the fly.5 x 3600 / 1024 = 26. Internally. e.5) x 3600 / 1024 to give you your rate per hour in Giga Bytes.g.5GB/7GB per hour DDS4 10GB/20GB per hour DLT4000 5GB/10GB per hour DLT7000 18GB/36GB per hour DLT8000 21GB/42GB per hour SDLT 38GB/76GB per hour LTO 53GB/106GB per hour LTO (Gen1) 100GB/200GB per hour LTO (Gen2) 200GB/400GB per hour LTO (Gen3) 400GB/800GB per hour LTO (Gen4) 800GB/1600GB per hour Calculate data rate of backup: In order to understand the speed of NetBackup. you need to understand the hardware that you have. The redundant information enables regeneration of user data in the event that one of the array’s member disk or the access data path to it fails. Raid 10: The server sees only the virtual hard disk.4GB/hr. Parity check is stored in one disk. take the following calculation: Tape Drive MB/Sec x (Compression factor – Usually 1.2GB/hour compressed. A DLT7000 rated at 5MB/sec is: 5MB/sec x 1. In the second stage it consolidates these two virtual hard disk by means of RAID 1 (mirroring) to form the hard disk that is visible to the server. RAID Levels: Level Description RAID: A disk array in which part of the physical storage capacity stores redundant information about user data stored on the remainder of the storage capacity. Parity check is stored in one disk. A LTO will be 79GB/hr.6GB/hour native and 3. Level 2: Data is protected by Hamming code. Level 0: Disk striping without data protection. Internally the RAID controller realizes the virtual disk in two stages: The RAID controller initially brings together the physical hard disk in pairs by means of RAID 1 (mirroring) to form a total of four virtual hard disks that are only visible within the RAID controller. Interleaves by bit or block. Level 6: Like RAID 5 but with additional independently computed check data. Level 1: Mirroring. Level 3: Each virtual disk block is distributed as with disk striping.

Backing up is faster than a full backup. Incremental Backup Incremental backup stores all files that have changed since the last Full. The storage space requirements are lower than for full backup. c. The previous full image and the incrementals are the component images. Differential OR Incremental backup. Differential Backup Differential backup contains all files that have changed since the last full backup. Disadvantages: Restore is the slowest. Synthetic Backup A synthetic backup is a backup image created without using the client. Advantages: Backing up is the fastest The storage space requirements are the lowest. restore jobs make take longer. Eg. d. Disadvantages: Backing up is the slowest. frequent full backups result in faster and simpler restore operations. Because the full backup stores all files and folders. When you choose other backup types. The new synthetic full image behaves like a backup created through the traditional process. This option enables the synthetic backup to exclude files that have been deleted from the client file system from appearing in the synthetic backup. Advantages: Restore is the fastest. The advantage of a differential backup is that it shorts restore time compared to a full backup or an incremental backup. b. Advantages: Restore is faster than restoring from incremental backup. The storage space requirements are the highest compared to incremental or differential backups. Instead. a synthetic backup process creates a full or a cumulative incremental image using only previously created backup images. The storage space requirements are higher than for incremental backup. . the RAID controller consolidates these four virtual hard disks into a virtual hard disk by means of RAID 0 (striping) to form the hard disk that is visible to the server. and contains all the data in the folders and files that are selected to be backed up.stage. called component images. Disadvantages: Restore is slower than restoring from full backup. Backing up is slower than incremental backup. A synthetic backup must be created in a policy with the True Image Restore with Move Detection option selected. Full Backup Is the starting point for all backups. The new synthetic full image is a backup of the client that is as current as the last incremental. An existing full image and subsequent differential incremental images may be synthesized to create a new full image. Backup Types a. The synthetic image is created by copying the most current version of each file from the most recent component image containing the file.

a synthetic backup is typically initiated by the scheduler.Like a traditional backup. In the data copy phase (2). Bpcoord starts a reader bptm (for tape) or bpdm(for disk) process for each component image on the media server where the component image was written. . additional debug log messages will be written to log files in those directories. (Input volumes are not suspended if they are already frozen or suspended. Bpsynth starts the writer bptm (for tape) or bpdm (for disk) on the media server to write the new synthetic image.) There will usually be a set of extents that need to be copied from each component image onto the new synthetic image. Bpsynth also “suspends” tape volumes containing the component images so that they will not be chosen for the output image. In phase 1 bpsynth makes a synthetic backup request to the database manager. and bpsynth starts bpcoord. Bpdbm uses the entries and the TIR information from the catalogs of the earlier component images to build the catalog for the new synthetic image and the extents to be copied from the component images to the synthetic image. The required extents for each component image are sent to bpcoord. bpdbm. The reader process will read all extents for the component image.) The tape volumes suspended in this step will be un-suspended after the data copy phase completes. Bpsynth makes a synthetic image in three phases: (1) preparation. bpsched. Bpsynth and bpcoord executed on the master server. Bpdbm returns the list of extents to bpsynth. (2) data copy. Bpsynth controls the creation of the synthetic backup image. bpsynth starts bpcoord. and bpcoord controls the reading of the files needed from the component images. and (3) validation. Bpsched starts bpsynth. (An extent is the starting block number and the number of contiguous blocks within a specific component image. If directories name bpsynth and bpcoord exist in the debug log directory.

The storage unit used is the one on which the component image was written. then all bpdm readers will be started immediately since disk is not a manageable resource. if there are three component images to read and only one drive is available in the storage unit. The child bptm/bpdm reader process sends the data in the shared buffers to the child bptm/bpdm writer process over a socket. The parent in turn starts a child process. The bpsynth process sends the extents (starting block and count) for each component image to the corresponding child bptm/bpdm reader process. The new image is now visible to NetBackup and can be used like any other full or cumulative incremental backup. The parent and child communicate via buffers in shared memory. The bpsynth process then validates the image. Note that if the component images reside on disk. The parent bptm/bpdm reader process reads the data from the appropriate media into the shared buffers. The parent bptm/bpdm writer process notifies bpsynth when the synthetic image is complete. For instance. Note that bpsynth/bpcoord only start the parent bptm/bpdm reader/writer process on the media server.bpcoord will start bptm on the media server only if a tape drive is available in the storage unit to be used to read the image. Synthetic backup requires: . The child bptm/bpdm writer process writes the data into the shared buffers. then all three reader processes will be started simultaneously. The parent bptm/bpdm writer process copies the data from the shared buffers to the media. if three drives are available in the storage unit. then the first bptm reader process will be started. The second reader process will be started after the first one completes and the third reader process will be started after the second one completes. However.

NDMP Storage Units: NDMP storage units are controlled by Media Manager but attach to NDMP hosts and require that you have the NetBackup for NDMP option installed. NetBackup permits an unlimited number of disk storage units. Types of Storage Units a. standalone tape drives. Without Move Detection. not the ASCII catalog format. client data is backed up to a disk staging storage unit. Additionally. a copy of the file is written to media. the directory restored will be brought to the same state as when it was backed up. c. or optical disk devices. A "True Image" backup is a snapshot of files done at the directory level at a certain point in time.◆ That True Image Restore (TIR) with move detection be selected for each component image. d. Media Manager controls the allocation and mounting of media (called volumes) in the storage devices. the data is relocated to another storage unit. when a "True Image" backup is restored. that are under control of Media Manager. a copy of the file is written to media and then the original file is deleted.0 or later clients. then. or that they are synthetic images. ◆ That the component images are made with NBU 5. Disk Storage Units: A disk type storage unit consists of a directory on a hard disk that stores the backup or archive data. In this process. A cumulative incremental backup and A differential incremental backup: A cumulative incremental backup is the backup of all files that have changed since the last full backup. Differences Between A backup and A "True Image" backup: A regular backup can backup and restore individual files. A backup and an Archive: When a backup is made. . Disk Staging Storage Units: A disk staging storage unit provides the first storage location in a two-stage process called Disk Staging. When an archive is made. ◆ That the component images use the binary catalog format. in the second stage. b. Media Manager Storage Units: A Media Manager storage unit uses tape robots. Turn on Move Detection when using True Image Recovery. Any files or sub-directories that did not exist at the time of backup will be deleted when the restore occurs if it is restored to the same location. TIR restores will not notice files that have moved within the filesystem (because they don't change their modification time).

The data is transferred via the SAN using the SCSI-3 protocol and thus doesn’t use the LAN> All that is needed is software that will act as a “traffic cop. You must be able to: 1. LAN – FREE BACKUPS: LAN free backups occur when several servers share a single tape / optical library and the drives within it. to expire backup images. Multiplexing and Multistreaming: Multiplexing sends data from multiple sources to a single tape or disk device. of course. There are 3 essential requirements of server-free backups. Catalog is also used to search for a backup image in order to verify the contents of media with what is recorded in the NetBackup catalog. to control the process. The catalog backups are set up and tracked separately from other backups to ensure recovery in case of a server crash. which is simply and additional copy of the primary disk set. Each server connected to the SAN can backup to tape drives it believes are locally attached. This is useful if you have a large system with multiple I/O devices and large amounts of data that need backing up. Map the blocks of data on the disk set to the files to which they belong. The storage consist of a primary disk set and the backup mirror.A differential incremental backup is the backup of all files that have changed since the last backup. Which is why it is referred to as clientfree backup. which (at this point) is just about every tape device. Present the backup application with a static view of the disk set. or to import expired backup images or images from another NetBackup server. from a single system to the backup server. or threads. 3. CATALOG: Use Catalog to create and configure a special type of backup NetBackup requires for its own internal databases—a catalog backup. These databases. Multistreaming establishes multiple connections. It uses a server. to duplicate a backup image. 2. called catalogs. In order to implement a client free backup there has to be a SAN connected storage that is available to at least two systems: the data server and the backup server. but the data moves directly from disk to tape without going through any server’s CPU including the backup server. This is useful if you have a tape or disk device that writes faster than a single system can send data. Move the data directly from disk to tape. a.” CLIENT FREE BACKUPS: The backup data is sent via the SAN to the backup server and doesn’t travel through the client at all. SERVER FREE BACKUPS: A truly server-free backup has a data path that doesn’t include a server. Catalog Files Masterserver: /usr/openv/netbackup/db/ Masterserver: /usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/masterserver Masterserver: /usr/openv/var Masterserver: /usr/openv/netbackup/db/media Masterserver: /usr/openv/volmgr/database . are on the NetBackup server's disk and have setup information as well as critical information on client backups. to promote a backup image from a copy to the primary backup copy.

This process runs only on Masterserver. When these directories exist. This program services all requests from the Java user interfaces on the NetBackup master or media server bpcoord bpdbjobs bpdbm bpjava-msvc bpjava-susvc .Netbackup Logs Debug Logs on Servers Debug logs directory UNIX: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs Windows: install_path\NetBackup\logs The table below lists the debug log directories that apply to servers. you can create all of the NetBackup debug log directories at once on a master or media server by running the following batch file: install_path\NetBackup\Logs\mklogdir.bat Debug Log Directories & Associated Processes: Debug Log Directory admin bpbrm bpcd Associated Process Administrative commands. On Windows systems. This process is started by the NetBackup Client service. NetBackup jobs database manager program. NetBackup-Java application server authentication service started by inetd on UNIX servers and by the Client Services service on Windows servers during startup of the NetBackup Java interface applications. bpdm NetBackup disk manager. On UNIX systems. bpcoord runs on the master server. This program authenticates the user that started the application. NetBackup client daemon/manager. NetBackup creates log files in the directory for the associated process. it is the NetBackup Database Manager service. On a Windows server. NetBackup program started by bpjava-msvc upon successful login through the Login dialog box that is presented when a NetBackup-Java interface is started. NetBackup process started by bpsynth to start and monitor the bptm/bpdm processes on the media servers to read the component images to be synthesized. NetBackup DB manager. also refer to the README file in the /usr/openv/netbackup/logs directory. Net backup and restore manager.

NetBackup retains debug logs for the number of days you specify with the Duration to Retain Logs global attribute (28 days by default) and then deletes them.mmddyy . Started by the inetd(1M) process. NetBackup retains debug logs for the number of days you specify with the Keep Logs for global attribute (28 days by default) and then deletes them. archive. On Windows systems. the file names created are of the form: log. used to create “firewall friendly” socket connections. this process is called the NetBackup Request Manager service. This process runs only on master servers. The following is a list of facts to be familiar with before using debug logs: ◆ On UNIX systems. System log. user_ops will contain a directory for every user that is using the Java programs. ◆ Debug logs can grow very large.(On all Windows platforms except 95/98) bprd NetBackup request daemon/manager. The user_ops directory is created during the install of NetBackup on all servers and clients. NetBackup tape or optical media management process. ◆ Each debug log is kept in a separate subdirectory under: UNIX: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs Windows: install_path\NetBackup\Logs Debug logging takes place only if you create the subdirectory where the process can store its logs. and restore program (jbpSA). NetBackup process started by bpsched for synthetic backup. The NetBackup Java interface programs use it for temporary files and for job and progress log files generated by the user backup. bpsched bpsynth bptm symlogs user_ops vnetd The VERITAS network daemon. This process runs on the master server.host where bpjava-msvc is running. Enable them only if unexplained problems exist and delete both the logs and the associated directory when they are no longer needed. On Windows systems. This directory must exist for successful operation of any of the Java programs and must have public read. NetBackup backup scheduler. On UNIX. write and execute permissions. ◆ A process creates one debug log file per day.

Debug Logs on UNIX Clients To enable debug logging on UNIX clients. set the Global Logging Level to a higher level. Archive program. you must create the directory for a debug log before the process starts. These debug logs are also useful for debugging xbp and bp processes. . bpjava-msvc NetBackup-Java application server authentication service started by inetd during startup of the NetBackup Java interface applications. VERBOSE by itself sets the verbose value to 1. ◆ On UNIX systems. ◆ On Windows systems. enter VERBOSE = 2 or a higher value. define the string VERBOSE in the /usr/openv/netbackup/bp.For example: log. These debug logs are also useful for debugging xbp and bp processes. the file names created are of the form: mmddyy. Therefore. Caution: High verbose values can cause debug logs to become extremely large. create the appropriate directories under: /usr/openv/netbackup/logs UNIX Client Debug Logs Directory bp bparchive bpbackup bpbkar bpcd Associated Process Menu driven client-user interface program. Program used to generate backup images. To get more logging detail. NetBackup client daemon/manager. This program authenticates the user that started the application. Backup program. ◆ To increase the amount of information that processes write in the logs. bphdb Program that starts a script to back up a database on a NetBackup database agent client. in the Logging dialog/tab under Master Server properties.log For example: 040198.log ◆ A debug log file is created when the process begins.140898 On Windows.conf file. ◆ Also note: You can use the Logging dialog/tab under Master Server Properties to set the logging level for individual processes.

These logs have information on the bpbkar32 process. Communicates with bprd on server. bplist Program that lists backed up and archived files.C:\Program Files\VERITAS\NetBackup\Logs\ ◆ NetWare clients . 95 WindowsNT/2000/2003 bpcd All Windows n NetWare clients . 98. bpmount bporaexp Program that determines local mount points and wildcard expansion for Multiple Data Streams.SYS:\OPENV\NETBACK\LOGS\ The following table lists the debug log directories that apply to the above clients: PC Client Debug Logs. Command-line program on clients to export Oracle data in XML format. Backup and archive manager.Java interface is started. 98.bpjava-usvc NetBackup program started by bpjava-msvc upon successful login through the Login dialog box that is presented when a NetBackup. Restore program. This program services all requests from the Java administration and user interfaces on the host where bpjava-msvc is running. NetBackup client daemon/manager. Backup program that is run from the command line. create the appropriate directories in the following locations: ◆ Windows clients . This debug log is also useful for debugging xbp and bp processes. Archive program that is run from the command line. Debug Log Directory bpinetd NetBackup Client WindowsNT/2000/2003 Associated Process Client service logs. These debug logs are also useful for debugging xbp and bp processes. These bparchive bpbackup bpbkar Windows NT/2000/2003. 95 Windows NT/2000/2003. These logs have information on the bpinetd32 process. bprestore Debug Logs on Windows and Netware Clients To enable detailed debug logging on Microsoft Windows or NetWare target clients.

Restore program that is run from the command line. Media Manager Logs On UNIX: Media Manager on a UNIX system automatically records robotic and network errors in the system logs by using syslogd. Program used to collect drive names on the client for multistreaming clients.conf. acsd -v). Client-user interface program for Windows 98/95/NT/2000/2K3. 98.conf file if necessary). 95 List program that is run from the command line. enable debug logging to the system logs by including the verbose option (-v) on the command that you use to start a daemon. 98. This command can be: ◆ The ltid command that started the device management processes. On NetWare and Windows 98 and 95 clients. If a problem requires more information. 95 tar Windows NT/2000/2003 Media Manager Logs Media Manager logging is different on UNIX than on Windows. tar process. /usr/openv/volmgr/vm. See the syslogd(8) man page for information on setting up system logs. If the -v option is included on the ltid command. bplist bpmount WindowsNT/2000/2003. put a VERBOSE entry in the Media Manager configuration file. these logs also contain the log information for the backup and restore processes. 98. . all daemons started as a result also have the –v option in effect. System log entries are also made when robotically controlled drives change between UP and DOWN states. These logs have information about the tar32 process. bprestore nbwin Windows NT/2000/2003. 95 Windows NT/2000/2003.logs have information on communications between the server and client. or ◆ A command to start a specific daemon (for example. and restart ltid (create the vm. 95 Windows 98. Alternatively. Note: You must enable system logging to troubleshoot ltid or robotic software.

) Media Manager Logs On Windows: On Windows.To enable debug logging for the Media Manager Volume daemon (vmd).110894 To disable vmd debug logging. Log entries are also made when drives change between the UP and DOWN states. This directory continues to accumulate information until you either rename or delete it. Media Manager retains debug logs for the number of days you specify with the DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS = entry in the vm. If a problem requires more information. create the following directories before starting vmd (or stop and restart vmd after creating them): /usr/openv/volmgr/debug/daemon (Debug information on the daemon) /usr/openv/volmgr/debug/reqlib (Debug information on the process requesting the daemon) /usr/openv/volmgr/debug/tpcommand (Debug information on the tpconfig and tpautoconf commands) /usr/openv/volmgr/debug/ltid (Debug information on ltid) /usr/openv/volmgr/debug/acssi (Debug information on transactions between NBU and the Storage Tek ACSLS server) Media Manager creates one log per day in each of the debug directories with file names of the form: log. Media Manager records robotic and drive errors in the Event Viewer Application log. either delete the /usr/openv/volmgr/debug/daemon directory or rename it. increase the level of logging to the Event Viewer Application log by adding a VERBOSE entry to the following file: install_path\Volmgr\vm.conf In addition. (The default is infinite retention.mmddyy For example: log. you can enable debug logging for the NetBackup Volume Manager service by creating the following directories: install_path\Volmgr\debug\daemon (Debug information on the service) install_path\Volmgr\debug\reqlib (Debug information on the process requesting the service) install_path\Volmgr\debug\tpcommand (Debug information on the tpconfig and tpautoconf commands) install_path\Volmgr\debug\ltid (Debug information on ltid) .conf file.

* Read of an incomplete or corrupt file. either delete or rename the directories. Verify that the server list settings are correct on both the client and the server. This status code can also appear if the connection is broken between the master and media server during a backup. A socket read failure can be caused by a network problem or a problem with the process that is writing to the socket. verify that these entries are correct on both the master and media server. Error Code 13 A read of a file or socket failed. * On UNIX. * On Windows.log For example: 110894. To display this dialog.conf file.conf file. 3. Media Manager retains debug logs for the number of days you specify with the DAYS_TO_KEEP_LOGS = entry in the vm. If this is not possible. On Windows. Try pinging the client from the server. * Socket read failing. if a media server does not have a server list entry for the master.) SOME COMMON ERROR CODES: Error Code 40 The connection between the client and the server was broken. check for loose connections or other network problems. (The default is infinite retention. . For example. Status code 40 can also be due to the operator denying a mount request. Trouble-shoot: 1. * A problem specific to NetBackup Advanced Client (see recommended actions). and Macintosh systems.NetBackup creates one log per day in each of the above debug directories with file names of the form: mmddyy. Note the ping checks in section seven. the master server is the first SERVER entry in the bp. stop and restart the NetBackup Request Manager and NetBackup Database Manager services. Run the NetBackup Configuration Validation Utility (NCVU) -conf <media server option> and -conf <client option> checks for the associated NetBackup nodes. see "Using the Host Properties Window" in the Troubleshooting Guide.log To disable debug logging for the NetBackup Volume Manager service. If you change the server list on a UNIX master server. 2. the master server is designated on the Servers tab in the Master Server Properties dialog. If the backup involves a media server. Possible causes include: * I/O error reading from the file system. you must stop and then restart the NetBackup Request daemon (bprd) and NetBackup database manager daemon (bpdbm) for the changes to take effect. it does not accept connections from the master.

either reduce the number of concurrent backups by rescheduling some of them or reschedule the entire backup to a time when the file system is less active. retry the operation. check the /var/adm/messages log for errors like the following: Mar 24 01:35:58 bison unix: WARNING: sn_alloccache: cache /dev/rdsk/c0t2d0s3 full . Check the NetBackup Problems report for clues on where and why the problem occurred. 3. Errno = 25: Inappropriate ioctl for device and the following may appear in the /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/bpbkar log: bpbkar: INF . For a FlashBackup client.bpbkar FATAL exit status = 13: file read failed bpbkar: INF .Trouble-shoot: Try the following: 1. NetBackup may try to take a snapshot of the directory above the directory that was specified as the snapshot source. One instance when this code appears is if a NetBackup master or media server is shut down or rebooted when a backup or restore is in process. Trouble-shoot: . and the offhost backup method was set to either NetBackup Media Server or Third-Party Copy Device. and check the resulting debug log. the disk containing the client files must be a SCSI or Fibre Channel device.tpc_get_disk_info() failed: err 13 bpbkar: ERR .Processing /var bpbkar: ERR . Error Code: 50 The client backup aborted. if multiple backups are using the same cache. create a debug log directory for the process that returned this status code. For NetBackup Advanced Client only: Status code 13 may appear in the /usr/openv/netbackup/logs/bpbkar log. status 13 bpbkar: ERR . and can indicate the following: * The files to back up reside on an IDE drive as opposed to SCSI. 2. you may see the following in the /usr/openv/ netbackup/logs/online_util log: get_disk_info: FTL .get_disk_info() failed. If possible. If you are using offhost backup. If the disk is an IDE drive.all snaps using this cache are now unusable This indicates that the cache partition is not large enough. increase the size of the cache partition. The file system specified as the snapshot source must be mounted. If the snapshot source is not mounted but the mount point is present./var/tmp/caa026fEU disk_inquiry failed. Or. For detailed troubleshooting information. 4.EXIT STATUS 13: file read failed * The files to back up exist on a file system that is not mounted.

bpbkar. and tar binaries.exe executables located in the install_path\NetBackup\bin folder on the client. which is currently unavailable.exe.conf file. Trouble-shoot: Try the following: 1. * On PC clients.exe. add the VERBOSE option to the /usr/openv/netbackup/bp. bpbkar32. Retry the operation and examine the resulting logs. Reinstall them if they are not the same as in the client directory under /usr/openv/netbackup/client on the server. Use bpps on UNIX and the Activity Monitor on Windows or the Services application in the Windows Control Panel. Error Code: 219 The policy or schedule for the backup requires a specific storage unit. Verify that the Maximum concurrent jobs attribute is not set to 0 (for a disk storage unit) and the Maximum concurrent drives attribute is not set to 0 (for a Media Manager storage unit). and tar32. Run the NetBackup Configuration Validation Utility (NCVU) for the associated NetBackup clients. use the UNIX sum command to check the bpcd. This error also occurs for other attempts to use the storage unit within the current backup session. 2. 3. 4. Verify that the schedule specifies the correct storage unit and the storage unit exists. check for core files in the / directory. 5.Try the following: 1. Reinstall the client if these executables are not the same size as on other Windows clients or are not at the same release level or do not have the same NetBackup patches applied as other Windows clients. 2. check the system log (/usr/adm/messages on Solaris) for system problems. 3. bpcd. This problem can sometimes be due to a corrupt binary. Note the client software checks in section two. * Create a bpcd debug log directory (this log is created automatically on Macintosh clients. On a Windows client.exe. located in /usr/openv/netbackup/bin on the client. On UNIX clients. On UNIX clients. Enable detailed debug logging: * Create a bpbkar debug log directory (UNIX or Windows only). Verify that the Media Manager device daemon (ltid) is running (if the server is UNIX) or the NetBackup Device Manager service is running (if the server is a Windows system).) * On UNIX clients. increase the debug or log level. On UNIX clients. . check the bpinetd.

a. executing: netstat -a prints out several lines of output. If bpcd is listening. perform some of the steps in "Resolving Network Communication Problems" in the Troubleshooting Guide. 7. it sets the number of available drives in that storage unit to 0 and further backups to that storage unit during this backup session will fail.rhosts file.rhosts file on the UNIX client. Check the IP address for the client. Error Code: 56 An error was returned that the host was unreachable by the client (WSAENETUNREACH on Windows systems.4. Error Code: 55 The UNIX client does not have the server's name in its /. the scheduler checks the storage unit to see how many drives are available (in case the backup caused a drive to be automatically downed). executing: netstat -a | grep bpcd should return something similar to the following: *. Verify that the master server can communicate with the bpcd process on the server that has the storage unit. If bpcd seems to be operating correctly. Check the resulting debug logs for records of an earlier failure. Trouble-shoot: Add the server name to the /. Note the policy. and the bpcd checks in section one.0.0:0 LISTENING Do this on the server where the storage unit is connected.* 0 0 0 0 LISTEN Do this on the server where the storage unit is connected. The number of available drives remains at 0 until the scheduler is initialized again. Run the NetBackup Configuration . If you still have problems. talk to your network administrator. or ENETUNREACH on UNIX systems) when performing a system call.0. c. one of those lines is similar to the following: TCP myhost:bpcd 0.bpcd *. On a UNIX server. 5. After each backup. create bpsched and bpcd debug log Directories and retry the operation. and tpconfig checks in section five. Verify that bpcd is listening on the port for connections. storage unit. Trouble-shoot: Try to ping the client from the server. Use the Device Monitor. b. If the cause of the problem is not obvious. verify that at least one of the drives is in the UP state. If bpsched cannot communicate with bpcd. Verify that the robot number and host in the storage unit configuration matches what is specified in the Media Manager device configuration. 6. If the storage unit is a tape or optical disk. Run the NetBackup Configuration Validation Utility (NCVU) -conf <media server option> on the master server for the associated NetBackup media servers. On a Windows NetBackup server.

on some UNIX systems. Trouble-shoot: Verify that the policy type attribute for the policy is correct. Note the client software checks in section two. For example. configure the drive for variable-mode block sizes and suspend media written on that device. Note the ping checks in section seven. the tape manager (bptm) or disk manager (bpdm) could not find a tar header at the offset it expected. if you do not configure the drive for variable-mode block size writes. You can choose to expire these media and regenerate the backups. Error Code: 72 The policy type attribute in the policy configuration indicates that the client is one type. Error Code: 121 NetBackup attempted to back up its internal catalogs and there were no media IDs defined in the catalog backup configuration. for example. backup images written to the media produce this error when an attempt is made to restore the image.Validation Utility (NCVU) -conf <media_server option> and -conf <client option> checks for the associated NetBackup nodes. . you see the following sequence of events: * Backup succeeds * Verify succeeds * Restore fails The bptm debug log shows an error similar to 00:58:54[2304]<16>write_data: write of 32768 bytes indicated only 29696 bytes were written. 4. 3. The images written to those media may be restorable (this is platform dependent). Error Code: 92 When performing a restore. or you can attempt to duplicate the images on these media to another device and then expire the original copy. Trouble-shoot: 1. but the installed software is for another type. but single file restores are almost guaranteed to fail. 2. create a debug log directory for either bpdm or bptm and retry the operation. Perform a bpverify of the affected image to determine if it is written correctly. errno=0 In this case. For example. 5. Check the NetBackup Problems report for additional information about the error. Error code 92 has been encountered on some relabeled and value-added 8-mm tape drives where the drive's microcode incorrectly processes a "forward space record" SCSI command. If the problem is not one of the above. See the NetBackup Device Configuration Guide. Run the NetBackup Configuration Validation Utility (NCVU) for the associated NetBackup clients. Check the resulting debug log file. Verify the Media Manager and system configuration for the drive.

but will not increment the retry count associated with the number of retries allowed. Run the NetBackup Configuration Validation Utility (NCVU) on the master server.CONF Entries: · ALLOW_MEDIA_OVERWRITE should be used on the server if you wish to overwrite previously used non-NetBackup media without prompting. No action is necessary. It can occur for a number of reasons in normal operation. Error Code: 134 Status code 134 is an informational message indicating that all drives in the storage unit are currently in use. remove it and place it in its designated slot. A 134 status is not logged in the error logs (as of versions 3. use a robot inventory option to reconcile the contents of the robot with the Media Manager volume configuration. Or. Trouble-shoot: * If volume is in a DOWN drive. If this occurs. * If the volume is in the wrong slot. Error Code: 164 A restore was attempted and the volume required for the restore was in a DOWN drive in a robot. · ALLOW_MULTIPLE_RETENTIONS_PER_MEDIA should be used if you have a limited supply of media and a large number of retention periods. NetBackup automatically tries another storage unit.5 MP2). Error Code: 127 The bprecover command was issued and the media ID specified does not have valid catalog backup data. retry the restore. NetBackup requeues the job with a status of 134 and retries it later. Note the NetBackup database configuration checks in section six.Trouble-shoot: Add the media IDs to the catalog backup configuration. · ALLOW_NON_RESERVED_PORTS will allow ports 1025 through 5000 to be used for data streams instead of 512 through 1024. Verify that the media IDs are in the NetBackup volume pool. A 134 status will cause a new try to show up in the Activity Monitor. the slot that should contain the volume is empty. Trouble-shoot: Validate that the correct media ID is being used. if one is not available. . Trouble-shoot: The 134 code is an informational message only and is not considered an error. The 134 status code can occur more frequently in an SSO environment.4 MP4 and 4. Then. BP.

· Use BPBACKUP_CLASS to set the default class used for client initiated backups. . · Use BUSY_FILE_ACTION to send email notification. · Use DISALLOW_CLIENT_RESTORE to prevent clients from restoring files backed up on their systems. · Use BPSTART_TIMEOUT to increase the amount of time bpstart scripts have to finish (don~Rt forget CLIENT_READ_TIMEOUT must be greater than or equal to BPSTART_TIMEOUT). · Use LIMIT_BANDWIDTH to throttle network saturation to a specified number of KB per client.conf. · INITIAL_BROWSE_SEARCH_LIMIT is used to set the default number of days that NetBackup will search to find files for restore. · BUSY_FILE_NOTIFY_USER tells NetBackup whom to notify when busy file email is sent. or ignore files that cannot be accessed. · BUSY_FILE_DIRECTORY sets the working temp directory when using busy file processing. try again. · Use LOCKED_FILE_ACTION to skip files that have mandatory locking. · Use DISALLOW_SERVER_FILE_WRITES to prevent server initiated restores or server initiated updates to bp. · Use BPBACKUP_SCHED to set the default schedule used for client initiated backups. · DO_NOT_RESET_FILE_ACCESS_TIME can be used if you do not care about atime but do not want your ctime messed with. · BUSY_FILE_PROCESSING turns on busy file processing. · Use BPEND_TIMEOUT to increase the amount of time bpend scripts have to finish (don~Rt forget CLIENT_READ_TIMEOUT must be greater than or equal to BPEND_TIMEOUT). · CLIENT_NAME specifies the exact name that the client is known as to the NetBackup server(s) it is served by. · Use CLIENT_READ_TIMEOUT to give bpstart and bpend scripts enough time to finish. · Use DISALLOW_CLIENT_LIST_RESTORE to prevent clients from listing and restoring files backed up on their systems. · Use KEEP_LOGS_DAYS to specify the number of days to keep client logs.

· USEMAIL will specify the user to notify for NetBackup events. NDMP: The Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP) defines a mechanism and protocol for controlling backup and recovery between primary and secondary storage. and SCSI service. What are the client type values. Data services provide and abstracted interface to the filesystem or primary storage on the NDMP server. NDMP SERVICES The daemon or server on the NDMP host that is controlled using the NDMP protocol. Tape Service. · USE_CTIME_FOR_INCREMENTALS will cause NetBackup to check both the ctime and the mtime when determining which files should be backed up for incrementals. The purpose of NDMP is to allow a network backup application to control the backup and recovery of an NDMP-compliant server without installing third-party software on the server. There are three types of NDMP Services: Data Service. . A. as used in bpbackup -t client type? standard = 0 apollo = 3 auspex = 12 afs = 22 msnt = 13 netware = 10 os2 = 14 SAP = 17 MS-SQL = 15 SQL-Backtrack = 11 Sybase = 7 DB2 = 18 Oracle = 4 MS-Exchange = 16 Informix = 6. A data service is the source of data during backup operations and the destination during recovery operations. · Use the VERBOSE option to log additional information in NetBackup~Rs logs.· Use REQUIRED_INTERFACE to override the operating systems choice of network interface for server to client communications. DATA SERVICES (SOURCE OF DATA DURING BACKUP AND DESTINATION RECOVERY OPERATION) A NDMP Service that transfers data between primary storage and the Data Connection. You MUST also enable DO_NOT_RESET_FILE_ACCESS_TIME when using this option. · Use SERVER to specify the NetBackup server(s) the client should use.

. Configuring NetBackup to work with NDMP This answer assumes the hostname of your NDMP box is "HPNAS" and the hostname of your Master Server is "HPMASTER". and install the NDMP packages (SUNWnbdmp). and enter HYDNAS password. SCSI SERVICES (MANIPULATE SCSI OR FC ATTACHED MEDIA CHANGER) A NDMP Service that passes low-level SCSI commands to a SCSI device typically used by the DMA to manipulate a SCSI or Fibre Channel attached Media Changer. just enter ndmpd. Use the norewind device nrst0a. C. 2) Set your NDMP authorization: HPMASTER# /usr/openv/volmgr/bin/set_ndmp_attr -auth HPNAS root It will ask you for a Password. select/provide the following information: DRIVE TYPE: DLT (or whatever type your drive is) DRIVE INDEX: 0 (or any number of your choice) DRIVE NAME: HPNAS_jukeboxname_drive# (or what ever you like) NO REWIND DEVICE: HPNAS:nrst0a DRIVE STATUS: UP CLEANING FREQUENCY: 300 (or what ever you like) . The tape service also provides a mechanism for tape positioning and I/O on behalf of the DMA. 6) Come back to master server (HPMASTER). Do the following: 1) Login to HPMASTER as root. A tape library may implement its own NDMP server and associated tape service or may be connected through an external NDMP server. (or b. In that window.conf: ALLOW_NDMP 4) Connect HPNAS to one of the drives in your Jukebox. and add the NDMP drive: Pull up xdevadm. select DRIVES -> ADD DRIVE. TAPE SERVICES (TRANFERS DATA BETWEEN SEC STORAGE AND NDMP SERVERS) A NDMP service that transfers data between secondary storage and the Data Connection and allows the DMA to manipulate and access secondary storage. start the ndmpd daemon. To start ndmpd. 3) Put the following line in /usr/openv/netbackup/bp. and all device files you can use with it. Check to make sure the drive is recognized after reboot: HPNAS % sysconfig –t This will show you the drive. do HPNAS % ndmpd on To see the usage of ndmpd. A tape service is the source of data during recovery operations and the data destination during backup operations. whatever comes up in sysconfig's output) 5) On HPNAS. Tape services provide an abstracted interface to tape devices or other types of secondary storage attached tot he NDMP server.B. This will pull up the ADD DRIVE window. and reboot it so it can recognize the drive.

and start a manual backup of that NDMP class for HPNAS and see how it goes. E. THE TYPES OF NDMP BACKUPS There are 5 types of NDMP Backups: A. and a sample directory under file list. SERVER TO FILER If the DMA-routed backup data coming for a non-NDMP backup client is routed to an NDMP tape server. Even if you have multiple filers sharing a tape library via a SAN. This configuration is extremely rare. If a filer was being backed up via a NDMP to a Unix of NT Backup server running a commercial backup product. . this might be referred to as Filer to Filer. You want to put that in its rc file so its started every time its rebooted. Use xbpadm to create a class of type NDMP. I'd like to use the term Filer to Library. this is referred to as Filer to Server. Eg. You do not have to install any software on HPNAS. FILER TO LIBRARY A variation on Filer to Filer is when the tape service is running on an NDMPcompatible tape library. Create a schedule "manual_backup" dont put any regular dates on it. you're ready to test NDMP backups. and the tape service is running on a non-filer server controlled by the DMA. D. C. this is referred to as Filer to Self. it's called Filer to Server. Since the tape drives appear as a filer to the DMA.ROBOTIC DRIVE: YES ROBOT TYPE: TLD (or what ever type your Jukebox is) ROBOT NUMBER: <your robot's number> ROBOT DRIVE: <drive number of the drive thats connected to HPNAS> At this point. B. FILER TO SELF If the data service and tape service are both running within a single filer. Each tape drive within such a tape library has a small computer running the NDMP tape service. However. and include HPNAS as client. FILER TO SERVER If the data service is on filer. FILER TO FILER If the data service is on one filer. All you need to do is start ndmpd. this is referred to as Filer to Filer. and the tape service is on another filer. this is referred to as filer to self. it's referred to as server to filer.

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