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K

E S L L E S S O N P L A N DECEMBER 2007

Spotting a Drunk
Language Function: discussing issues; reading comprehension, describing a drunk person

Vocabulary/Topic: alcohol drinking; police work

Vocabulary Focus: ways of walking

S T U D E N T W O R K S H E E T UPPER - INTERMEDIATE

focus on talking: discussion


activity 1. In pairs, ask and answer the questions below.
• What do people do when they are drunk? How would you
recognize that somebody consumed too much alcohol?

• Do you believe one can get drunk in style?

• To what extent is getting drunk accepted in your country?

• Is binge drinking common among young people in your


country?

focus on reading: comprehension


activity 2. Read the article on page 2 and list all the signs of drunkenness mentioned in
the text.
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Spotting a Drunk UPPER - INTERMEDIATE

Police given
bar staff who sell alcohol to ''drunk" has engulfed the pub
inebriated customers. trade - until now.

manual on Other tell-tale signs of


drunkenness, according to the
A spokesman for the Home
Office confirmed that undercover

how to spot guide, include being "careless


with money", exhibiting
police officers are being taught
how to spot a drunkard.
inappropriate sexual behaviour,
a drunk offensive language, bumping into
furniture, spilling drinks and
He said: ''As part of the
Responsible Sales of Alcohol
By Graham Tibbetts drinking quickly or competitively, Campaign, plain clothes police
"i.e down in one". Drunkenness officers have been issued
may also cause a loss of train of guidelines on monitoring the
thought, difficulty in paying sale of alcohol to intoxicated
attention, "not understanding individuals. The Home Office
what is said", glassy eyes or lack does not make a secret of the
of focus. guidelines it issues to police,
which are aimed at protecting
But the manual was condemned the public and staff working in
yesterday as "absolute licensed premises."
nonsense" by the pub trade,
which called on the Government Yesterday pub landlords ridiculed
to focus on the supermarkets the police guide.
that sell cheap alcohol.
David Wine, the licensee at the
A spokesman for the Licensed Six Bells in Felsham, Suffolk,
Victuallers' Association said: "It said: "This is an absolute
seems ridiculous that a trained nonsense. So what if someone is
police officer needs help in dishevelled?
identifying someone who is
drunk. If you apply all these ''Does that mean Bob Geldof will
guidelines in the average pub not be able to get served in
any customer could be classified pubs? They should be targeting
It may not make it on to the as drunk." supermarkets rather than the
best-seller list this Christmas but pub trade." Details of the Home
a Government manual offering The guide is being issued to 90 Office drunk guide were leaked
advice on how to tell if someone police teams across the country to pub trade journal The
is drunk could prove one of the taking part in the pre-Christmas Publican.
more humorous offerings of the Responsible Sales of Alcohol
festive season. Campaign, which started last Caroline Nodder, the editor, said:
night and will run until Christmas "Drunkenness is not something
From looking out for staggering Eve. that can be measured on a
or "dishevelled" pub-goers to scale.
listening for "rambling Undercover officers will mingle in
conversation" and offensive pubs and issue £80 fixed "It is so subjective, so vague
language, the Home Office penalties to staff who and open to misinterpretation as
publication covers it all in minute ''knowingly" sell alcohol to to be almost entirely useless.
detail. The guide is being issued someone who is drunk. Selling to And surely these criteria would
to thousands of police officers a drunk customer is an offence not stand up in court anyway."
who will work undercover in pubs under the Licensing Act but
and clubs this Christmas to catch confusion over what defines source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Spotting a Drunk UPPER - INTERMEDIATE

activity 3. Read the text on Page 2 again and decide whether the following statements
are true or false.

1. The manual on how to spot a drunk is bought as a Christmas present.


2. The manual will be used by plain clothes policemen trying to catch bar
staff who sell alcohol to drunk.
3. Pub owners support the idea because it will help them to identify
drunks.
4. Drunk people spotted by undercover policemen will be fined £80
5. According to Caroline Nodder, drunkenness cannot be objectively
measured.

activity 4. Answer these questions.

1. Who, according to the representatives of the pub trade, should the


Government focus their attention on in order to tackle the problem of alcohol overuse?
2. Why, according to David Wine, could Bob Geldof have problems getting served in a pub if the
guidelines are followed?





word focus
ways of walking
stagger - to walk with weak unsteady steps, as if about to fall
stumble - to walk or move in an unsteady way
hobble - to walk with difficulty, especially because your feet or legs hurt
hop - to move by jumping on one foot
clamber - to climb or move with difficulty or a lot of effort, using your hands and feet
crawl - to move on your hands and knees, with your body close to the ground
tiptoe - to walk using the front parts of your feet only, so that other people cannot hear you
creep - to move slowly, quietly and carefully, because you do not want to be seen or heard

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Spotting a Drunk UPPER -INTERMEDIATE

focus on vocabulary
activity 5. Write words and expressions activity 6. Here’s the list of drunkenness
for definitions. All the words and phrases signs used by British police. Can you
appear in the article on page 2. assign each of them to one of four
categories presented in the manual?
1. a book that tells you how to do or operate
something A) a noticeable change of behaviour
............................................................................ B) a lack of judgement
C) clumsiness & loss of coordination
2. very untidy D) appearance
............................................................................ • annoying other persons, employees, etc
3. drunk (formal) • becoming argumentative
• becoming bad tempered, aggressive
............................................................................ • becoming incoherent
• becoming loud, boisterous or disorderly
4. the connected series of thoughts that are in
• becoming physically violent
your head at a particular time • being careless with money
............................................................................ • being unkempt
• bumping into furniture
5. to move among people and talk to them, • decreased alertness
especially at a social event • difficulty in paying attention
• difficulty in picking up change
............................................................................ • difficulty with walking
• drinking quickly or competitively
6. to affect somebody/something very strongly
• drowsiness, dozing or sleeping
............................................................................ • exhibiting inappropriate sexual behaviour
• falling down
7. under the influence of alcohol or drugs • fumbling for cigarettes or other items
............................................................................ • glassy eyes
• lack of focus
8. the building and land near to it that a • lack of judgement
business owns or uses • looking dishevelled
• loss of train of thought
............................................................................ • not understanding what is said
9. a man who owns or manages a pub • rambling conversation
• slurring, or making mistakes in speech
............................................................................ • spilling drinks
10. having a strong interest in death • staggering
• swaying
........................................................................... • using offensive language

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