ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE CINEMA 409 B COLORADO ST. AUSTIN, TX 78701 WWW.DRAFTHOUSE.

COM (512) 867-1839

In addition to the special events on the back side of this calendar, the Alamo also features the best in current release movies. These are hand picked by the Alamo for your enjoyment. All of the movies we show, we have seen ourselves and are proud to offer up for your enjoyment.

Upcoming Films

ME, MYSELF & IRENE

SHANGHAI NOON

CHICKEN RUN

ROAD TRIP

AMERICAN BEAUTY

Review excerpted from the Austin Chronicle The Farrelly Brothers have long been accused, pointedly at times, of intentionally “dumbing down” American cinematic and pop-cultural values. The fact that these two brothers get a kick out of excessively lowbrow toilet humor -- and the fact that their massive audiences also enjoy this sort of sub-sophomoric humor, in droves no less -- is taken as a signifier that the country is on some sort of massive mental downturn, with projected results of deflated math scores and wanton pie-throwing in the streets. Why can't Johnny read? It must be those darn Farrellys. Election year hysterics notwithstanding, I think detractors of the Farrellys' strain of rump 'n' bump humor are overlooking the fact that their four films -- the woefully underappreciated Kingpin, Dumb & Dumber, There's Something About Mary, and now Me, Myself & Irene -- are as zealously intellectual in their anti-intellectuality as the early Marx Brothers. It's smart, pro-artistic comedy masquerading as insipid farce, a wolf in clown's clothing, and rigorously Dadaistic in ways modern audiences aren't likely to note... From their first film to their newest, the Farrellys have shown a keen grasp of not only the subtle comedic principles involved in semen gags, but also the nuances of the traditional Hollywood romantic comedy. Drop them 60 years in the past and they'd likely have been helming Tracy and Hepburn or some bizarre riff on Bringing Up Baby. Me, Myself & Irene continues their love affair with bodily functions and mismatched lovers. Carrey, returning to the crazed physical comedy with which he made his name, plays Charlie, a repressed Rhode Island Highway Patrol officer badly in need of some therapy. In lieu of that, Charlie develops a split personality, which manifests itself in the form of Hank, a cantankerous alter-ego who surfaces when Charlie gets riled or forgets to take his meds. The plot, something about rogue FDA agents and bad cops, is so vague as to be downright vaporous. At any rate, it's merely a Hitchcockian MacGuffin to bring star-crossed lovers Charlie, Irene (former Austinite Zellweger), and bad-boy nonentity Hank together. It's also a showcase for some of the Farrellys' ripe, politically incorrect humor. In short order, the film's takes on little people, albinos, the state of New York, and even Woody Allen... If you think you can groove on the sight of an undead Holstein being shot through the head six times, not to mention Carrey's flapdoodle mug going through countless maxillary fluctuations, this may just be the best comedy/love story/PETA-protest of the summer.

(Review excerpted from The Austin Chronicle) After more than 70 films, Jackie Chan has finally met his match, and wouldn't you know, it's Owen Wilson (UT acting alum and Wes Anderson's writing partner). With his scruffy blond mane and that battered nose that looks as though he borrowed it from Gerard Depardieu and then ran it through a Cuisinart a few times before conveniently forgetting to return it, Wilson's as unlikely a movie star as you'll find. But there he is, stealing nearly every scene from the mugging international action star and turning what almost surely would have been a dry and dusty parody of the Western genre into a whole new breed of neurotic period comedy. There's no way to overstate just how good Wilson is in this film. As winningly inept train robber Roy O'Bannon, his goofy, laconic delivery matches his tired black chaps and fringed rawhide jacket to a tee: He's Robert Redford's Sundance Kid filtered through a hickory haze of Woody Allen quirks, hanging on to his last vestige of male pride as all those around him head off for greener pastures. Shanghai Noon opens with Roy and gang perched atop a butte overlooking the train trestles below. He's using a crude, hand-drawn map to patiently explain their plan of attack, but the grizzled trio is having none of it. Frustrated, he throws the map away, letting them “wing it” instead. Anyone who's seen Wes Anderson's first feature Bottle Rocket will recognize the allusion to Wilson's map-happy character Dignan from that film -- whether this was a planned homage or just one of those instances of great minds thinking alike, it works, and the film follows from there, gaining speed even as it trumps itself again and again with some of the best comedic dialogue (courtesy of Wilson's on-set rewriting skills) around... The fight scenes here were choreographed by Chan's old Peking Opera pal Biao Yuen, and although adherents of Chan's Drunken Master theatrics will no doubt be less than impressed, it's still head and shoulders (and arms and legs) above similar Hollywood skirmishes. It's Wilson's film all the way... When Wilson is on, ... he's brings an unexpected frisson of surfer-esque chutzpah to the role of Roy, a bad guy with good intentions, a cowboy who, dammit, just wants to be loved. If you enjoy Shanghai Noon, check out Owen Wilson's freshman effort, the cult-classic gut-buster Bottle Rocket, midnight at the Alamo, August 10-12.

Review excerpted from the Los Angeles Times Road Trip marks the major studio debut for director Todd Phillipps and his co writer Scott Armstrong, and it’s an auspicious, sometimes outrageous way to start. They’ve come up with an uproarious college comedy for DreamWorks. Ivan Reitman produced National Lampoon’s Animal House 20 years ago, and Road Trip--which Reitman co-executive produced with Tom Pollock--continues that rowdy tradition. Phillips and Armstrong have cleverly set up a sturdy premise for all the shenanigans the protagonists will encounter in their journey--an adventure that for all its hi-jinks is not without a maturing effect on everyone concerned. Along for the ride is E.L. (American Pie’s Seann William Scott), a fearless and unabashed hedonist; Rubin (Paulo Costanzo), more brainy than zany; and Kyle (DJ Qualls), a skinny, unprepossessing outcast cajoled into joining in because he has a car (it works out nicely for him; he’s exuberantly liberated along the way). Meanwhile, Barry (MTV's Tom Green), who stays behind, has been charged with feeding white mice to Josh’s pet python. This duty sets up an elaborate and ultimately gratifying gag. It suffices to say that just about everything you might imagine happening to the travelers on the road does happen--and then some, much of it raunchy and inspired by films such as American Pie, There’s Something About Mary and even Porky’s. Road Trip is consistently funny, but, to be sure, it’s undergraduate-guy humor, hilariously gross and sometimes unfeeling. Yet on the whole it works because its over-the-top humor is supported by the filmmakers’ ability to view life with a clear-eyed lack of sentimentality. They recognize that life is full of treacherous villains and poke tart fun while cheering on those daring to overcome every obstacle in pursuit of their goals. Smartly produced and consistently lively, the film shows its young actors to terrific advantage, and there is every reason to expect that Road Trip will jump-start their screen careers. If you enjoy Road Trip, check out Todd Phillips' previous film Frat House, an behind the scenes look at the seedy underbelly of Frat culture, featured as September's Texas Documentary Tour on Sept 13, director in attendance

(Review excerpted from The Austin Chronicle) A couple of years ago, I was idly wondering when Aardman, the British animation studio, and their star director Nick Park would get around to making an animated feature when I heard the news that Chicken Run had finally gone into production... Park had already nailed three Academy Awards in the animation category for his work on two Wallace & Gromit shorts -- 1996's A Close Shave and 1994's The Wrong Trousers -- as well as an earlier work from 1991, the sublime talking-animal gag Creature Comforts. Clearly, this was an animator going places. The Wallace & Gromit shorts, featuring the discombobulated amateur inventor and cheese-fanatic Wallace, and his dog Gromit, a model of perspicacity in his own right, have since been collected in a couple of commercially available videotapes. If you're new to this whole Aardman Animation thing, I hereby urge you check them out as soon as possible. Chicken Run continues Park and Aardman head Peter Lord's fruitful partnership, and if anything, it's even better than the short works Park has come up with for the studio. The story follows the adventures of a group of hens trapped in Mrs. Tweedy's (Richardson) chicken farm, confined in tiny, claustrophobic barracks surrounded by imposing metal fences topped by nasty-looking ringlets of barbed wire. Head chicken Ginger (Sawalha, of Britcom Absolutely Fabulous) spends her time devising various ways to escape their eventual fate -- dinner... Chicken Run is absolutely delightful filmmaking, chock-full of gorgeously goofy animation and a storyline that cleverly echoes everything from Stalag 17 to Cool Hand Luke, with pit stops at Star Trek, The Great Escape, and even -- I kid you not -The Shawshank Redemption. Park and Lord's subtly ridiculous animation is, as usual, a wonder to behold, but it's the well-wrought comedics of the storyline that sustain the picture as a whole. Gibson's unplaceable Yank accent is, well, interesting at best, but that's less a quibble than an added touch of surrealism to the whole proceedings. Finally, an animated film without any explosions, pop-rock, product-placement soundtrack songs, or ill-defined sense of moral ineptitude ... that's actually and honestly fun for the whole family. 'Bout time, Nick, 'bout time. Only at the Alamo, see original Wallace and Gromit shorts before each show!

DRAGON'S LAIR COMICS

I LOVE VIDEO

4910 Burnet Rd 454-2399

comics games anime manga
and lots more!

www.dlair.net

467-WILD - 100 E. NORTH LOOP BLVD. - gohogwild.com

To book an event or for more information, call 476-1320.
Look inside for information on:

Our catering facilities are on-premise, and are equipped to satisfy every need and every budget, from buffet style hors d'oeuvres to full dinner service, or just movie snacks. Our bar serves beer and wine, a variety of sodas, Italian sodas and full espresso service. As an added bonus, the Alamo can offer a fun and unique way to unwind following the business at hand: a private showing of a movie of your choice on the big screen, making your event truly an affair to remember.

New Release Films Classic Titles Celebrity Guests Special Events Silent Films Midnight Movies and private parties!
All this and more is coming to the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema this Spring.

2-220

Daily specials are valid for regular films only! Specials are not valid for special event screenings.

THE VIRGIN SUICIDES
(Review excerpted from The Austin Chronicle)

Young Cecilia Lisbon, her old eyes staring vacantly from a face still puffy with baby fat, lies on a hospital bed, the gashes in her wrists newly sutured. “What are you doing here, honey?” the doctor asks her. “You're not even old enough to know how bad life gets.” To which Cecilia flatly responds, “Obviously, doctor, you've never been a 13-year-old girl.” At the root of this shimmering, confident debut from director Sofia Coppola is a profound sympathy for what it means to be an adolescent - the unspeakable pain and forbidden lust, the mystery and morbidity of it all. The Virgin Suicides follows a year in the short lives of the blond, toothsome, and impossibly complicated Lisbon sisters --Cecilia, the youngest, is followed by Lux, then Bonnie, Mary, and the eldest Therese (I'm not giving away anything to say that their lives end sadly; much like American Beauty, their fate is sealed at the film's outset). In their cozy 1970s Michigan suburb, the Lisbon girls live under what must feel like the suffocating supervision of their flighty science-teacher father (Woods) and their strict mother (Turner, who gained weight for the role), a severe woman whose dimples and occasionally bright eyes whisper of the great beauty buried under all the frump. Like the Jeffrey Eugenides novel from which Coppola faithfully adapted the film, The Virgin Suicides is narrated collectively by a group of men (given voice by Giovanni Ribisi) who remain, 25 years later, consumed by the petal-pink memories of the Lisbon sisters and haunted by the sadness that they could not penetrate...Coppola's film is darkly comic at times, but it is never ironic about the music of the Seventies or the feelings of the teenagers whose stories are being told. In an astonishingly assured film debut, Coppola captures the poetry and sweetness of Eugenides' novel without allowing any of the standard rites of passage -first dates, high-school dances -- to feel trite. The film unspools with such a rich and peculiar unpredictability that it feels as though we are seeing -- or dreaming -these things for the first time.

Banquet Service

The Alamo also serves as the most unique meeting and banquet room in Austin. The screening room seats 220 people. A lounge area makes socializing easy. Hundreds of groups and companies have already discovered that the Alamo offers a great setting and powerful audio-visual presentations. The Alamo is ideal for meetings, team building exercises, presentations, or just a fun night out for a group. It's a perfect site for parties of all sizes.

Meeting and Conference Facility

The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema has established itself as the premiere movie experience. As the action unfolds on the screen, waiters serve our version of theater snacks: stone-baked pizzas, zesty salads, pastas, sandwiches, burgers, beer, wine, and coffee with desserts. Movies, however, are just the beginning at the Alamo.

The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is unlike any movie theater in Austin

9 days of insane films hosted by Quentin Tarantino August 25-September 2

QT QUATTRO
the Austin Film Society presents

Presort Standard U.S. Postage PAID Austin, Texas Permit No. 2465

DINNER, DRINKS, MOVIES OCTOBER 1,
409 Colorado St. - 867-1839 - www.drafthouse.com - park for free at Guadalupe & 4th!

ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE CINEMA

Doors open 45 min before show - 21 and up - 18 and up on Thursdays and for AFS events "Best Theater in Austin" - Austin Chronicle & Entertainment Weekly

JULY 19

through

2000

The Austin Film Society and the Austin Chronicle present

Quentin Tarantino live in person presenting bad-ass movies from his personal archives Harry Knowles, overlord of Ain't It Cool News writes: "Hey film fans!!! Well the coolest film fest around is getting a bit cooler this year. The first fest was covered HERE!!! And the second one was covered HERE!!!! Why are these festivals cooler than any other in the world? Well... Quite simply because other film festivals don't allow drinking beer while watching the films. Other film festivals have 'art films' and here... well here are a sampling of some of the 'nightly' themes: CONTROLLED HYSTERIA, NEGLECTED 70's CRIME FILMS, CHUNG CHE KUNG FU, ALL NITE HORROR-THON, BIKER NIGHT, POMPOMS GONE AWRY, EPIC ADVENTURE and much more. This isn't a festival to get autographs... that's not on the agenda. Instead it's a mainline of film love straight into the jugular. It's not about pushing your scripts or hooking up with the 'in' people. It's about sitting and surviving and thriving on films for nine straight days. It's about forming spiritual friendships that can only be sealed through the flames of film. I'll be there through it all, you'll read the drunken ramblings of this pitiful soul... I CAN'T WAIT!!!" 9 to 5ers, request time off from work now; out-of-towners, book your flights now; and the rest of you with an unquenchable thirst for the most amazing cinema of the past 40 years, mark your calendars and start to get pumped up. Quentin Tarantino and a cargo truck filled with movies are headed to the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema on August 25. 9 day Festival passes are $125, 5 day passes are $75, single day passes are $30 for Fridays and Saturdays and $20 for Sunday through Thursday. Individual show tickets are also available for $10 on the day of the show, subject to availability. Tickets go on sale August 7. Call (512) 322-0145 for tickets and info. Additional information is availabe about this years fest and on the fests of years past on our website www.drafthouse.com.

AUGUST 25-SEPT 2

QT QUATTRO

Rent any two of Vulcan Video's 15000+ movies and get 2 episodes of the classic HBO comedy series Mr. Show Free! If you like it, please e-mail HBO at www.hbo.com or sign our petition urging them to release VULCAN all the Mr. Show episodes on VHS/DVD. Not valid with any other offer.
www.vulcanvideo.com (south) 112 W. Elizabeth - (north) 609 W. 29th. 326-2629 478-5325

JULY 19-OCT 1 2000
In addition to our regular new-release Hollywood features, the Alamo offers up the following special screenings this quarter. For our regular daily features, please check our ads in the Chronicle and the Statesman or our web page at www.drafthouse.com. For home delivery of this calendar, e-mail or send us your postal address. All dates and showtimes are subject to change. Please check our webpage (www.drafthouse.com), the Austin Chronicle, the Statesman or call 867-1839 to verify.
NEW 35MM SCOPE PRINT

HEATHERS
THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE, HUMANCODE, AINT IT COOL NEWS AND BIG BROTHERS/BIG SISTERS PRESENT THE
(1989, d. Michael Lehmann, 102 min, R, $4, 21 and up, 18 and up Thursday and matinees) Heathers is not pretty in pink, all pompoms and puppy love, but bodacious in black, chalkboard noir, the dark side of the wonder years. A cracked satire of the teen genre, it's as slangy, raunchy and gutsy as a prom date with Carrie. Caught somewhere between the numbing amorality of River's Edge and the heartfelt sap of John Hughes, Heathers chides the pursuit of popularity as it tackles the thornier topic of teen-age suicide. Wynona Rider plays Veronica, a bitch-warfare veteran and fringe dweller of the social elite club of Heathers who dominate the school and habitually degrade the fat and the geeky. Veronica teams up with Jason Dean, Christian Slater as a Nicholson-esque outsider with a penchant for firearms, "suicide"-rigging and bomb-building. They make a lethal team -- too lethal a team, in fact, as their handiwork turns Westerburg into the celebrated teenage-suicide capital of America. Heathers was a milestone in teenage cinema, dark, nasty and howlingly funny. Prints are now available for the first time in years, enjoy it first at the Alamo, before the release of Heathers 2 makes you act out your own angst-ridden rage.

AUGUST 17-19 MIDNIGHT ALSO 4:30 SEPT 19 & 20

SATURDAY MORNING FILM CLUB PETE'S DRAGON
THE AUSTIN FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS THE TEXAS DOCUMENTARY TOUR
"Enchanting Entertainment" - The Hollywood Reporter (1977, d. Don Chaffey, 128 min, Rated G, free admission for children and accompanying adults) A heartwarming musical adventure about the friendship between a young boy and his invisible pet, Pete's Dragon casts a magical spell with thrilling plot twists and a delightful blend of live action and enchanting Disney animation. Pete, a young orphan, flees from his cruel guardians to a Maine fishing town with a lovable but mischievous dragon named Elliott - his one true friend. Fortunately for Pete, they are taken in by a kind lighthouse keeper (Helen Reddy) and her father (Mickey Rooney). Both Elliott's flair for flying and disappearing at will continually gets Pete into trouble.
The Saturday Morning Film Club is a free children's cinema series which happens on the last Saturday of every month featuring the best of classic family programming. Admission is free for kids and their accompanying adults.

SAT, JULY 29, 12:00 NOON

EL VALLEY CENTRO
(1999, d. James Benning, NR, 90 min, free admission, all ages) In a media age dominated by rapid fire imagery and pounding soundtracks, it is rejuvenating to encounter a film that invites the viewer to find rapture and meaning in the details of a single, quiet frame. Veteran experimental filmmaker James Benning extends such an invitation as he turns his signature meditative gaze toward California's Central Valley in his exceptionally beautiful film, El Valley Centro. Employing natural sound and contemplative proscenium shots, Benning skillfully composes a series of pure and majestic images that at once evoke a sense of nostalgic splendor as well as deliver a subtle, yet penetrating, political commentary. El Valley Centro is the work of a master filmmaker at the top of his craft. -Shari Frilot (notes from SUNDANCE2000). Filmmaker James Benning will conduct a Q&A session following the screening.

WED, JULY 19, 7:00

VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN STARSHIP TROOPERS "THE ONLY GOOD BUG IS A DEAD BUG" FEST 2000 JULY 20-22, MIDNIGHT VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 ROBOCOP JULY 27-29 MIDNIGHT VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 SHOWGIRLS VERHOEVEN AUGUST 3-5, MIDNIGHT FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000 VERHOEVEN FEST 2000
Dutch filmmaker, philosopher and all-around maniac Paul Verhoeven is set to release his latest over-the-top magnum opus Hollow Man on August 3. We felt the time was right to delve into his projects past to raise the level of giddy anticipation for this next film orgy. Love him or despise him, one cannot dispute the fact that Verhoeven tackles a film project with the greatest of gusto, and to that spirit, we raise our glass and cheer.
(1997, d. Paul Verhoeven, $4, R, 129 min, 21 and up, 18 and up on Thursday, passes welcome) Paul Verhoeven's storm-troopers-with-a-heart extravaganza manages to be both funny and shocking -- sometimes in the same shot. Looks are everything in this exhilarating sci-fi adventure. On one side are the human beings of the distant future -- the men are square jawed and resolute, the women hourglass-figured and resolute, and everyone's teeth are as blindingly white as those of comic strip heroes. Then there are the bugs -- icky insects the size of automobiles with a seemingly unquenchable bloodlust. Government newsreels, reminiscent of the anti-Communist variety of the 1950s, act as a recruitment drive for a futuristic populace that's happy, gullible and unquestioningly patriotic. Verhoeven was wise to remember that hundreds of years from now, there will still be youth, smiles and gung-ho enthusiasm. See the "making of" documentary, screen tests and deleted scenes before the feature!

GOD SAVE THE PIXEL:
VULCAN VIDEO, DRAGON'S LAIR COMICS AND THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE PRESENT HONG KONG CINEMA AND CUISINE
Winner of both the Most Innovative Use of Medium Award and Best Online Community in the 2000 SXSW Web Awards, 16 color (www.16color.com) showcases minimalist animation and lets people create their own. Featuring the best of these movies with pixels bigger than your head, you're sure to be entertained by the pixel-packing power of these low-resolution creations. ($5, all ages)

THE 16 COLOR COLLECTION SUN, AUGUST 20 9:30

GOD OF COOKERY
(1996, d. Lik Chi Li, PG, 90 min., $6, $4.50 students, passes not valid) God Of Cookery takes the already over-the-top premise of the hit TV show Iron Chefs and revs it up to dangerous levels of Hong Kong insanity. The God Of Cookery is overthrown by his talented but backstabbing apprentice. Penniless and dejected, the God Of Cookery finds cloistered transcendence in the kitchen of Shaolin Kung-Fu temple where he learns broken-dog style chopping and ultimate kung-fu cooking techniques strong enough to warrant a right to challenge for his old God Of Cookery title. Of course this is only the main plotline. The story bulges out in all directions with subplots of violence, true love, kung-fu, betrayal, capitalism, tragic death, spiritual awakening, toilet humor and exploding pissing shrimp balls. Jim Carey has allegedly purchased the rights to this film and has plans to team with Stephen Chow to produce an American version of the film. And yes, true to form, the Alamo kitchen will be augmenting our regular Hong Kong Cinema menu with God of Cookery's exploding, pissing, shrimp balls. Hong Kong Cinema and Cuisine occurs the first Sunday of every month. We feature the best in contemporary Hong Kong action cinema and augment the experience by featuring a completely Chinese menu.

SUN, AUGUST 6 7:00 & 10:00

From pixel-sex to bloody rampages, late-night movie makers conjure up disturbing and tantilizing low-resolution desires in the glory of 16 colors. Come see what pixels do when nobody's looking. ($5 18 and up)

BLOOD SWEAT AND PIXELS: THE ADULT MOVIES OF 16 COLOR SUN, AUGUST 20 11:30

THE AUSTIN FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS

QT QUATTRO
At long last the time has come again for the single coolest film event in Austin: The Tarantino Film Fest in its fourth incarnation (QT QUATTRO). Each year, Quentin takes time out from his schedule to hang out in Austin with friends and watch movies, and you are invited to join in on the fun. Quentin is one of the foremost collectors of forgotten, lost, unsung and underrated film treasures of the past 40 years. This August he is tooling into town with a cargo van full of feature films, over 30 in all, all capable of blowing your mind. The films are organized by theme each night, you may or may not know the actual film titles before you sit in your seat, and there are always a host of fabulous surprises. Themes of years past range from pom poms gone awry to neglected 70's crime to Italian Gore to Exploitation. You'll have to have faith and trust in Mr. Tarantino to be your guide to some of the best films ever forgotten. Tickets go on sale for this year's QT Fest on August 7. Advance tickets are available at the Austin Film Society (322-0145) and are only available for film society members (this might be the opportunity you've been waiting for to join). Individual night tickets (subject to availability) will be sold at the door to non-members. 9 day festival badges are $125, 5 day passes are $75, single night tickets are $30 on Friday and Saturday and $20 during the week. Each Saturday the movies run all night long, Fridays are triple features and all other nights are double bills. Quentin Tarantino will guest host two Saturday Morning Film Club screenings at noon on Saturday, August 26 and again on September 1. These screenings are free for kids and their accompanying adults only (kid-less adult fanboys will only be allowed in if the event does not sell out!)

AUGUST 25-SEPT 2

BOTTLE ROCKET
"An offbeat crime caper that turns convention on its head, Bottle Rocket is the sort of endearingly oddball project that will be remembered for years to come...for the formidable talent it introduces to the world." Michael Medved, New York Post (1996, d. Wes Anderson, 92 min, R, $4, 21 and up, 18 and up on Thurs, passes welcome) My wife and I recently went to see Shanghai Noon. We went in with zero expectations and left happy, all due to the subtle, lovable comic charm of Owen Wilson. His character in Shanghai Noon is simply a slightly more together Dignan stripped of his yellow jumpsuit and dressed in cowboy gear. Within 24 hours, we had booked for the next calendar the film that started it all, Bottle Rocket. In Bottle Rocket, our lovable loser protagonist Dignan has dreams of becoming a big-time criminal, but you know just by looking at him that nothing is ever going to work out. The lovable ineptitude with which he executes his capers completely charms you. You laugh at Dignan and his gang, but by the same token, if you knew Dignan personally, you would be in the face of anyone else who dared to ever laugh at him.

AUGUST 10-12 MIDNIGHT

HOGWILD VINTAGE TOYS AND COLLECTIBLES PRESENTS

(1987, d. Paul Verhoeven, $4, R. 102 min., 21 and up, 18 and up on Thursday, passes welcome) When asked about Robocop, Paul Verhoeven, a former Pentecostal Christian, said he conceived the film as retelling of the story of Jesus Christ, stating that "Jesus is the greatest story ever told." You really have to hand it to Verhoeven to set out to make a Christ story and end up with Robocop. The movie opens in a run-down Detroit of the future (1994) in which the police department is run by a multinational corporation OmniCorp. They are looking for the future of law enforcement which definitely isn't the local police force that's on strike. Enter Peter Weller, an officer blasted to bits by the vilest and nastiest caricature baddies we have seen in a movie for a long time and then resurrected as the Robocop of the movie's title - sort of the comic book Judge Dredd crossed with The Terminator. Manic, fast-paced and outrageous, Robocop is a classic of its genre. See the "making of" Robocop before the feature!

THE DARK SIDE OF THE RAINBOW
PINK FLOYD'S 1973 SOUNDTRACK FOR THE WIZARD OF OZ.
"Jung, of course, prefers to regard it as synchronicity -- his own label for an alleged resonance in nature, or between nature and its various parts, including us -- a resonance which creates seeming 'coincidences' so startling that most of us, fundamentalists excluded, sense deeply that they require an explanation." - (The New Inquisition, by Robert Anton Wilson) (1939, d. Victor Flemming, G, 18 and up, $5, 112 min, passes welcome) Dark Side of the Rainbow is The Wizard of Oz played with no volume synched up to Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon played with much volume. When you start the Dark Side of the Moon album on the third roar of the MGM lion in the Wizard of Oz, all kinds of synchronicity hijinks ensue. We will provide you with a complete play by play list of all 100+ synchronicity "event" free with admission. Pink Floyd denies any premeditated scheme, but maybe that wily Roger Waters schemed the whole thing unbeknownst to the rest of the band. That's Dark Side of the Rainbow conspiracy theory #47.

AUGUST 11-17, 9:30 PM

VULCAN VIDEO, DRAGON'S LAIR COMICS AND THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE PRESENT HONG KONG CINEMA AND CUISINE

HIGH RISK
(1995, d. Jing Wong & Cory Yuen, 90 min. R, $6, $4.50 Students, 18 and up, passes not valid) High Risk is an irresistible action film along the lines of Die Hard. It's also, for those familiar with Hong Kong action star Jackie Chan, one of the funniest pictures you'll see all year. Chan doesn't appear in the film. High Risk stars Jet Li, the young superstar whose popularity in Asia rivals Chan's. Here he plays the bodyguard and stunt double for an internationally famous Hong Kong star (Frankie Lane) who is clearly intended as a Chan parody. Frankie does none of his stunts, though he claims to. He's a drunk, a womanizer and very nearly a coward. In the United States a similar send-up could never be made because it would cause a scandal. As Frankie, Cheung has several opportunities to imitate Chan's martial-arts style -- the clowning, the mugging, the slapstick touches, the exaggerated caterwauling. He's close enough to the real thing that at times High Risk feels like the best of both worlds: a Jet Li picture and a Jackie Chan picture combined. Excerpted from the San Francisco Chronicle Review (4 stars out of 4) Hong Kong Cinema and Cuisine occurs the first Sunday of every month. We feature the best in contemporary Hong Kong action cinema and augment the experience by featuring a completely Chinese menu.

SUN, SEPTEMBER 3, 7:00 and 10:00

(1995, d. Paul Verhoeven, 131 min, Rated NC-17, $4, 21 and up, 18 and up Thursday, passes welcome) What movie is so sleazy that, after you see it, you have to go to a Times Square live-sex show to feel better about mankind? And what movie spent $40 million to produce live, bare-breast, Las Vegas follies shows that are actually CHEESIER and CHEAPER-LOOKING than the real thing? You guessed it: Showgirls. A reformed crackhead hooker goes to Vegas, lap-dances her way to the top, sleeps with the producer of a casino revue, shoves the star down a flight of stairs and becomes a diva. Add in a little lesbo action and a classic performance by Robert Davi as the slimy topless-bar owner, and we've got a movie that drips so much sleaze on your shoes you're liable to track it all over the linoleum. 170 breasts, four Vegas production numbers featuring volcanoes, S&M, motorcycles and simulated gang-rape, one brawl, one knee to the groin, five nekkid-dancer dressing-room scenes, multiple lap-dancing, one catfight, kung fu, and two thrilling, on-the-job, career-ending dance injuries. It might have been excruciating the first time you saw it on Showtime at 4 AM, but trust us, just like fine wine, Showgirls ripens with age. See the "making of" documentary before the film!

LUNCH & A STORY WITH MARIA GRACE
($8) Psychotherapist Dr. Maria Grace is using film to tell stories that aim at connecting you to basic, forgotten truths. Whether you are a movie fan, a spiritual seeker, a lover of art, or simply curious, you will be given some new tools to discover the storytelling and healing power of film. You will learn how to relate to symbols and myths as signs in your roadmap to self-discovery. You will be part of a forum that asks questions and looks for answers. This month's topic: The unbearable lightness of being in Love and War.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 13, NOON

CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 THE NAVIGATOR WITH CANNIBAL MYSTERY OF THE LEAPING FISH FILM FEST7:00 & 9:45 2000 THURS, SEPTEMBER 14 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL MOTEL HELL FILM FEST 2000 THURS, SEPT 14, MIDNIGHT CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL PARENTS FILM FEST 2000 FRI, SEPTEMBER 15, MIDNIGHT CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 LUNCH & A STORY WITH MARIA GRACE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, NOON CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL HUMAN FLESH FILM FEST 2000 AND ON CANNIBAL ON THE YOUR FILM FEST 2000 SCREEN? PLATE! CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FESTIVAL CANNIBAL I DRINK YOUR BLOOD ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE CINEMA - 2000 FILM FEST MIDNIGHT 2000 SEPTEMBER 14-16 SAT SEPTEMBER 16, CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000 CANNIBAL FILM FEST 2000
The holy trinity of old school hip hop classics, live breakdancing and live DJ battles before the show. Three day passes ($15) are available in advance, or buy individual night tickets ($6.50) at the door.
(1982, d. Charlie Ahearn, 82 min, R, 21 and up, $6.50, passes not valid) "At a point in the late 70's it struck me like lightning "This rapping, break dancing and graffiti scene is not happening anywhere else in the world!" So I got together with Charlie Ahearn and the end result was Wild Style. It was simple. Let's get the originators of hip-hop culture; give them roles close to what they're already doing, keep it raw and independent; and maybe if we're lucky it will play on 42nd st in Times Square for about a year. Those were our original intentions. We never expected anything like what has happened in the 15 years or so since it was made... Hip Hop, the voice of the ghetto, is now the voice of a generation, the voice of an era. And Wild Style's the earliest record of this culture on film. Yes, yes, yall and you don't stop!" -Freddie Brathwaite a.k.a Fab 5 Freddy

OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP WEEKEND! OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP BREAKIN THURSDAY, SCHOOL OLDSEPTEMBER 7, MIDNIGHT HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLDBEAT STREET SCHOOL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, MIDNIGHT HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLDWILD STYLE SCHOOL HIP HOP SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, MIDNIGHT OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP
(1984, d. Joel Silberg , PG, 90 min, $6.50, 18 and up, passes not valid) The first major breakdancing film, Breakin' has the twin advantages of freshness and boundless energy. Lucinda Dickey plays a dancing student who dislikes the hidebound regimen of her demanding teacher. She breaks free from terpischorean tradition when she befriends a bunch of street kids devoted to breakdancing. Yes, it's basic Mickey Rooney-Judy Garland stuff, right down to the Big Audition at the finale. Still, Breakin' is a most engaging time capsule, highlighting a wealth of top-ten musical hits as well as such stars-in-the-making as "Shabba-Doo" (Adolfo Quinones), "Boogaloo Shrimp" (Michael Chambers) and "Ice T" (Tracey Morrow). Within a year of its release, Breakin' spawned a sequel, Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo. -- Hal Erickson
(1984, d. Stan Lathan, 105 min, PG, 21 and up, $6.50, passes not valid) Brash Bold and breakin' all the rules, Beat Street is a powerful and gritty streetwise musical. Starring Rae Dawn Chong and Guy Davis, Beat Street features extraordinary break dancing, stunning graffiti art and the revolutionary rapping that launched a hip hop generation. "Featuring the New York City Breakers and the extreme sounds of Grandmaster Melle Mel and the Furious Five, Beat Street serves up an electrifying display of nonstop music and dancing" -New York Times

ALIEN RECORDS AND I LOVE VIDEO PRESENT AN

WILLIAM FRIEDKIN LIVE IN PERSON
WITH A BRAND NEW RESTORED PRINT OF

THE FRENCH CONNECTION
(1971, d. William Friedkin, 104 min, R, $15, 21 and up, passes not valid, tickets go on sale August 25) The French Connection is director William Friedkin's brilliant, fast-paced realistic police/crime film featuring an unsympathetic protagonist - the vulgar, brutal, tireless, unlikable, maniacal and sadistic Jimmy "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) as an undercover New York City narcotics cop who passionately and obsessively pursues drug pushers with his partner Buddy "Cloudy" Russo (Roy Scheider). French Connection was a multiple-Academy Award winning effort, taking accolades in five categories: Best Director, Best Actor (Hackman), Best Adapted Screenplay (Ernest Tidyman), Best Editing (Jerry Greenberg), and Best Picture. The authenticity of the film is accentuated by dozens of sordid, on-location NYC sets (the Lower East Side, Times Square, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Grand Central Station, among others), sub-titles for the French dialogue, rough police work, brutal winter scenes in the city, hand-held camera shots, and gutsy, nitty-gritty performances. Director William Friedkin will introduce the film and conduct a Q&A following the screening.

SAT, SEPTEMBER 16 7:00 PM

SILENT FILM CLASSICS WITH ALTERNATIVE LIVE SCORES

LIVE MUSIC BY SHORTY LONG

THE NAVIGATOR (1924) In The Navigator, Buster Keaton plays a character who, by freakish chance, gets set adrift in a ship with a woman -- neither one knowing the first thing about sailing or self-sufficiency. Solo-piloting the giant steamship, Keaton grounds the ship near shore, only to be pursued by a gang of enraged and hungry cannibals. THE MYSTERY OF THE LEAPING FISH (1916) The Mystery of the Leaping Fish is quite possibly the strangest short subject of the Silent Era. Master of the genre and co-founder of United Artists, Douglass Fairbanks Sr. plays Coke Ennyday, a happy, bouncy cocaine and narcotics addict on the trail of an opium smuggling ring. He literally consumes mountains of cocaine, tins of opium and gives himself constant injections wherever he may be. In fact, he overcomes every situation with drugs, consuming them to increase his energies. He also uses the drugs on his opponents to knock them silly - why not, it's a very silly movie. Live music for both films performed by Shorty Long, a ukulele-based novelty jazz act founded by former Asylum Street Spankers Mysterious John and Pop Bayless. Shorty Long implement all manner of 4-stringed instruments, from the smallest of ukuleles to the upright bass. (Advance tickets available, $10/$12 day of show, 18 and up, passes not valid

HOGWILD VINTAGE TOYS AND COLLECTIBLES PRESENTS

LABYRINTH
"I couldn't wish for a movie with more imagination or fun" Leonard Maltin, Entertainment Tonight (1986, d. Jim Henson, 101 min, PG, $4, 21 and up, 18 and up Thursdays, passes welcome) Sarah has just made a terrible wish. She wished her baby brother would be taken away by goblins - and her wish has come true. The Goblin King (David Bowie) has whisked the boy off to his castle to be goblinized. Now Sarah must rescue him, but that means getting into the Goblin Castle and facing the mighty Jareth. Between Sarah and the castle stands the labyrinth, a magically mesmerizing world of mazes, mystery and spill-binding excitement! A world where all sorts of endearing and tricky, delightfully mischievous creatures lurk around every corner! Enter with Sarah into a world of wonderment.. enter into the Labyrinth!

SEPTEMBER 21-23, MIDNIGHT SEPT 23 & 24 4:00 PM

(1980, d. Kevin Connor, 102 min, R, $6, 18 and up, advance tickets available. Passes not valid) Etymologist Thomas R. Malthus stated that population tends to increase at a faster rate than its means of subsistence and that unless it is checked, widespread poverty and degradation inevitably result. Farmer Vincent, played by longtime character actor Rory Calhoun, takes the Malthusian premise to heart and kills two birds with one stone. The social dregs who happen to check into his Motel Hell-o end up as human jerky for sale behind the merchandise counter. Sure, I know, cannibalistic philosopher farmers, you've seen this storyline a million times. What makes Motel Hell all the more special is the completely bizzare and off-the-wall dark comedy twists and turns. A few highlights are the harvesting process which utilizes flashing acid-house lights and injections of super-psychotropic pharmaceuticals and ultra-square Farmer Ida posing as an S&M dominatrix to lure in more potential meat. Enjoy extremely authentic Jerky and Smokey treats direct from Farmer Vincent before the screening of Motel Hell.

AINT IT COOL NEWS, HUMANCODE, THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE, HOGWILD AND BIG BROTHERS/BIG SISTERS PRESENTS

SATURDAY MORNING FILM CLUB JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS
(1963, d. Don Chaffey, 104 min, Rated G, free admission, all ages) The Saturday Morning Film Club returns to the mastery of special effects wizard Ray Harryhausen, a staple of the original 1970's Saturday Morning Film Club. Jason and the Argonauts, considered by many to be Harryhausen's finest achievement returns at last to Austin. Jason , rightful heir to the throne of Thessaly, is spared from death through the intervention of the goddess Hera. The other celestial inhabitants of Mount Olympus watch in amusement as Hera surreptitiously aids Jason in his search for the Golden Fleece. Obstacles to this goal include a giant come-to-life statue named Talos, the screeching harpies plaguing blind prophet Phineas, a set of huge clashing rocks, the seven-headed hydra, and an army of skeletons, a bravura climactic sequence which will assure Harryhausen a place in the hearts of 13-year-olds.
The Saturday Morning Film Club is a free children's cinema series which happens on the last Saturday of every month featuring the best of classic family programming. Admission is free for kids and their accompanying adults.

SAT, SEPT 30, 12:00 NOON

MORE VITAL THAN 100 FLASH DANCES

"We’ve been having leftovers since we came here. I just want to know what they were before they were leftovers."

($8) Psychotherapist Dr. Maria Grace is using film to tell stories that aim at connecting you to basic, forgotten truths. Whether you are a movie fan, a spiritual seeker, a lover of art, or simply curious, you will be given some new tools to discover the storytelling and healing power of film. You will learn how to relate to symbols and myths as signs in your roadmap to self-discovery. You will be part of a forum that asks questions and looks for answers. This month's topic: Cinderella in the Wonderland.

(1984, d. Bob Balaban, R, 81 min, $6, 18 and up, passes not valid) The story is told through the eyes of young Michael Laemle, who is played by Bryan Madorsky, a skinny kid with a head too big for his body and eyes too big for his face. It is from Michael’s perspective that we see his parents, who on the surface would seem to be a perfect fifties couple: he works, she cooks; he practices golf, she dances; they have bridge parties, and occasionally drink too much. The one fly in their ointment is Michael himself, who is a picky eater, a bad sleeper, and constantly depressed and silent. Everything worries Michael, but most of all his parents. What exactly is in the food his mother prepares so obsessively? What does his father do during the day? What are his parents really doing after he goes to bed? All of these things, normal childhood anxieties, are turned into paranoiac nightmares by clever camera work and some wonderfully nasty dream sequences. The film’s ambiguities work best in the sequence where Michael gets out of bed in the middle of the night and catches his parents together. Is it a sexual act he is witnessing, or is it something monstrous? Michael is never quite sure what he is seeing, or what is real. Consequently, neither are we. The Alamo will be serving "leftovers" for the screening of Parents.

DRUGSTORE COWBOY
(1989, d. Gus Van Sant, 100 min, R, $4, 21 and up, 18 and up on Thursdays, passes welcome) Set under the oppressive, overcast skies of Portland, Oregon, in 1971, Drugstore Cowboy boldly stakes out a piece of cinematic fringe territory, as seemingly remote as the chilly little corner of the world in which this dead-end road movie takes place. In a late-'80s America obsessed with winners, and a contemporary climate of anti-drug sentiment verging on hysteria, Van Sant has made a devastatingly funny, melancholy but unromanticized picture about a bedraggled band of doped-up losers -- with no apologies to (or excuses for) anybody. See the "making of" documentary before the film.

SEPT 28-30, MIDNIGHT

Regional premiere, fully remastered director's cut,

PRESENTED BY HOGWILD AND C.A.R.E.

"I may not know about that L stuff that drives you crazy, but I know about rabies"

VULCAN VIDEO, DRAGON'S LAIR COMICS AND THE AUSTIN CHRONICLE PRESENT HONG KONG CINEMA AND CUISINE

CHINESE GHOST STORY
(1987, d. Siu-Tung Ching, 98 min, R, $6, $4.50 students 18 and up, passes not valid) "I hear the Village Voice said it 'combined the best elements of The Princess Bride and Evil Dead II,' and recommended that no amphetamines be taken before viewing it. This is a *wise move*. A Chinese Ghost Story has more energy in it then last year's entire summer film season, and a damn site more adventure than the last four LucasFilm entries. It also combines romance, horror, adventure, martial arts, comedy and satire and does each one well. We have a foolish young tax collector who's in bad with the local yokels and decides to spend the night at a haunted shrine. We have a beautiful young thing he falls in love with but who has a terrible secret. We got a bad-ass old samurai who's sharing the shrine with the lad; he bounces off of trees, fires rays from his hands, does a rap number right in the middle of the film, and gets to say the kind of great things that Warren Oates always got to say in his films. We got zombies, ghosts, hags, stupid warrior types and a 40-foot animated tongue. Ho-boy! This is my kind of neighborhood! Damndest thing is, it works great as a love story, as a folk tale, and as an adventure." Jeff Meyer, Internet Movie Database

The cinematic event for which generations young and old have been waiting, nay praying, has finally returned. The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is proud to present the 2ND ANNUAL CANNIBAL FILM FESTIVAL. Our crack research staff has scoured the globe to bring you the finest cannibal film offerings ever produced. This year's festival selections showcase the many facets of the film genre that dares not speak it's name: cannibalism. Everyone knows, however, that at the Alamo, movies are just the beginning. During the entire run of the Cannibal Film Festival, the Alamo will be serving dishes made with actual human flesh. From an ingredient pool of volunteers and the recently deceased, the Alamo will be offering such delectable oddities as handburgersTM, Texas Chili with Cowboy, German sausages, and more! Vegetarians can enjoy the festivities as well; we will serve veggie handburgersTM, made from free-range, corn fed vegetarians. Buy a pass for all four screenings and receive a limited edition cannibal film fest goodie bag, complete with cannibal news items, cannibal history, cannibal trivia, cannibal recipes, a CD of cannibal tunes, a cannibal film fest T-Shirt, and coupons and special offers from Austin Cannibal-friendly merchants. Advance tickets go on sale September 1 at 5:00, so mark your calendars now!

(1971, d. David E. Durston, X, 83 min., $6, 18 and up, passes not valid) Fans of the cannibalism get a bit teary-eyed when remembering the golden age of the genre, the 1970's. Attendance was waning at drive-ins and bottom-feeder producers redefined the lowest common denominator to draw in the crowds. Cannibalism flooded the market and flesh-eating was practically a sanctioned national pasttime. We are proud to offer the Cannibal fest 2000 golden era film: I Drink Your Blood. A gang of fun-loving, naked, devil-worshipping hippies descends upon a small mountain town and among other general havoc-wreaking, doses all the locals with LSD. In retaliation to gramps and sis getting dosed, little Petey injects the gang's luncheon meat pies with rabies. Much frothing at the mouth and good old fashioned cannibalism ensues. Our flesh-hungry friends at Grindhouse Releasing, who previously remastered Cannibal Ferox, have completely restored and remastered this forgotten gem of cannibal culture. All the gore cut from the original drive-in release has been lovingly restored.

SUN, OCTOBER 1, 7:00 AND 9:45

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