April 2011

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www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 3
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Cover: FedEx Express Aircraft Maintenance Technician at work below aircraft. This month, we
profile FedEx’s avionics maintenance test and repair capabilities. Photo courtesy FedEx.
Editor’s Note
Cost Conundrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Departments
Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Ad Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
New Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
FedEx Delivers Maintenance ....................... 18
Cargo carrier and host airline of this year’s AMC, AEEC annual meetings in Memphis,
FedEx balances technological advances in avionics with maintaining a varied fleet
by Frances Fiorino
Airborne RFID .............................................. 27
Application of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags for component tracking on aircraft
is upon us, at least for tags that are “passive” or without an integral power supply
by Bill Carey
CH-53 Kilo Cockpit ...................................... 22
The new cockpit of the U.S. Marine Corps CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement helicopter will
feature “best pieces” from avionics updates developed for other military programs
by Frank Colucci
22
efciently and reliably
product focus
Aircraft Lighting ............................................ 31
The adoption of light-emitting diode (LED) technology in interior and exterior applications
in commercial and business aircraft is growing, but some challenges remain
by Ed McKenna
4 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
editor’s note
by Bi l l Ca r e y
Cost Conundrum
W
hen JetBlue Airways and FAA
announced their partnership to
equip JetBlue A320s for ADS-B
Out capability, subsidized by $4.2
million in federal dollars, the reporters in the
peanut gallery wanted to know how FAA —
or anybody — planned to outfit the rest of the
United States fleet.
It’s a troubling question that overshadows
all discussions of NextGen. By FAA’s own
calculation, industry’s cost to equip for ADS-B
Out will range from $2.5 billion to $6.2 billion,
making the laudable program with JetBlue,
a similar partnership with US Airways and
other efforts seem like the proverbial drop-in-
the-bucket. Estimates of the overall cost of
NextGen to airlines and other airspace users
range from $12 billion to $20 billion.
There are still other challenges of stan-
dardization, integration, harmonization and,
ominously, allocation of spectrum for pieces
like GPS and data communications. But for
now, cost intrudes upon every waking thought
of NextGen. And the prospect of a National
Infrastructure Bank notwithstanding, sub-
stantial federal government support seems
remote with the country $14 trillion in debt
and Congress in a cost-cutting mood.
It’s a similar situation in Europe, where
18 “pioneer” airlines have proven ADS-B
for air-traffic services, and the SESAR Joint
Undertaking has embarked on 29 validation
projects this year to further prime the pump.
But inevitably cost clouds the vision of the
Single European Sky.
Since my last dispatch, I’ve heard the cost
conundrum discussed on both sides of the
Atlantic. Here’s some perspectives:
Sharing his thoughts at the FAA Forecast
Conference in mid-February, Will Ris, senior
vice president of government affairs for AMR
Corp. and American Airlines, said, “I’ll tell
you how we think we should get there. It’s not
working so well, but I’ll give you the argu-
ment at any rate. We have an air-traffic control
system today that is largely ground based.
All we’re doing when we’re talking about
NextGen is we’re taking a known technology
— GPS technology — and moving part of the
equipment in the air and part of the equip-
ment will be on the ground.
“It is our view that that air-traffic control
system should continue to be financed and
supported by the federal government because
that’s after all, where all the ticket taxes are
going and that’s the format we’ve had for all
these years,” Ris argued. “We’re just chang-
ing the location of some of the equipment.
That is not a position that anybody is saluting
because that would mean the federal govern-
ment would be paying for equipage in the
airplanes. But that would be what we think
would be the right public policy.”
In a keynote speech at the conference,
Alaska Airlines CEO William Ayer cited his
company’s participation in the “Greener Skies
Over Seattle” project to implement Required
Navigation Performance (RNP) approaches
to each runway end at Seattle-Tacoma Inter-
national Airport. “The Greener Skies project
represents a microcosm of the various ele-
ments that must be met in order to truly mod-
ernize the National Airspace System,” Ayer
said. “We believe that what we’re doing in
Seattle can serve as a template for advancing
NextGen in other parts of the country. One of
the keys to this is the FAA shifting to a ‘best
equipped, best served’ standard, and we very
much applaud that philosophical shift.
“But to be candid, there are many skeptics
who aren’t sure the FAA can implement the
major overhaul that NextGen represents,” he
added. “So we’ve got a bit of a chicken-and-
egg problem with the funding and the equi-
page side. We’re advocates for doing more of
these demonstration projects, proving the ben-
efits and making the case that a substantial
long-term investment is going to be required.”
The cost to industry of NextGen and
SESAR came up weeks later in a panel
discussion at ATC Global in Amsterdam.
“I’m not the customer; I’m just paying the
enroute charges,” argued Capt. Michiel Van
Dorst, executive vice president, Flight Opera-
tions, with KLM. “This is a burden which
the airlines cannot take on by themselves,
pre-financing.” But Van Dorst said a best
equipped, best served approach is an incentive
for airlines to equip, because “we are fighting
for every 20 seconds (of) throughput time.”
An interesting reverse argument was
offered by Steve Fulton, technical fellow with
GE Aviation. “We’re grossly underestimating
what the cost of the current system is in its
underperformance,” said Fulton.
There are still
challenges of
standardization,
integration,
harmonization
and spectrum,
but cost
intrudes on
every waking
thought of
NextGen
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6 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
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The is a
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In the tradition of the world-
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designed for functionality and
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EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Bill Carey
301-354-1818
bcarey@accessintel.com
MANAGING EDITOR
Emily Feliz
301-354-1820
efeliz@accessintel.com
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Frank Alexander, Frank Colucci, Ron Laurenzo,
George Marsh, Ed McKenna,
James W. Ramsey, Jean-Michel Guhl
ADVERTISING & BUSINESS
PUBLISHER
Tish Drake
800-325-0156
tdrake@accessintel.com
SALES MANAGER
Susan Joyce
480-607-5040
sjoyce@accessintel.com
DESIGN & PRODUCTION
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Joy Park
PRODUCTION MANAGER Tony Campana
301-354-1689
tcampana@accessintel.com
AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Sarah Garwood
sgarwood@accessintel.com
FULFILLMENT MANAGER George Severine
gseverine@accessintel.com
SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES/BACK ISSUES 847-559-7314
LIST SALES
Statlistics
Jen Felling
203-778-8700
j.felling@statlistics.com
REPRINTS
Wright’s Media
1-877-652-5295
sales@wrightsmedia.com
Access Intelligence, LLC
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Don Pazour
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
Ed Pinedo
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES
& ADMINISTRATION
Macy L. Fecto
DIVISIONAL PRESIDENT
Heather Farley
VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER
Joe Rosone
VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING
Michael Kraus
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
Sylvia Sierra
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER
Robert Paciorek
VICE PRESIDENT FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INTERNAL AUDIT
Steve Barber
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Bill Carey
301-354-1818
bcarey@accessintel.com
MANAGING EDITOR
Emily Feliz
301-354-1820
efeliz@accessintel.com
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Frank Alexander, Frank Colucci, Ron Laurenzo,
George Marsh, Ed McKenna,
James W. Ramsey, Jean-Michel Guhl
ADVERTISING & BUSINESS
PUBLISHER
Tish Drake
800-325-0156
tdrake@accessintel.com
SALES MANAGER
Susan Joyce
480-607-5040
sjoyce@accessintel.com
DESIGN & PRODUCTION
GRAPHIC DESIGNER Joy Park
PRODUCTION MANAGER Tony Campana
301-354-1689
tcampana@accessintel.com
AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Sarah Garwood
sgarwood@accessintel.com
FULFILLMENT MANAGER George Severine
gseverine@accessintel.com
SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES/BACK ISSUES 847-559-7314
LIST SALES
Statlistics
Jen Felling
203-778-8700
j.felling@statlistics.com
REPRINTS
Wright’s Media
1-877-652-5295
sales@wrightsmedia.com
Access Intelligence, LLC
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Don Pazour
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
Ed Pinedo
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES
& ADMINISTRATION
Macy L. Fecto
DIVISIONAL PRESIDENT
Heather Farley
VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER
Joe Rosone
VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING
Michael Kraus
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT
Sylvia Sierra
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER
Robert Paciorek
VICE PRESIDENT FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INTERNAL AUDIT
Steve Barber
www.avionicstoday.com February 2011 Avionics Magazine 7
Aeroflex brings you the world’s
first portable RF radio altimeter
test set and the first truly
portable GPS and Galileo
positional simulator. These
hand-held, lightweight testers
come with a large 12-inch
color touch screen that makes
testing easier than ever.
The ALT-8000 is a universal
test set for 4.3 GHz FMCW,
CDF-FMCW and pulse radio
altimeters. The full RF loop test
quickly confirms faulty R/T,
cables or antennas, providing
measurement of TX power,
frequency and sweep rate.
The GPSG-1000 is a
GPS/Galileo satellite simulator,
supporting L1 C/A code and
the GPS modernization signals
L1C, L2C & L5, as well as
Galileo E1, E5, and E6 services.
The 6 or 12 channel
configurations provide dynamic
3D navigation simulation via a
waypoint entry scheme.
In the tradition of the world-
renowned Aeroflex IFR 4000
and IFR 6000, these units were
designed for functionality and
ease of operation.
Contact us today for data
sheets, a demo or quote.
For more information, visit
www.aeroflex.com/am0411
www.aeroflex.com
Aeroflex lines our skies again-
with NEW flightline testers
industry scan
8 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
COMMERCIAL
SESAR Validation
The public-private entity charged with
developing the Single European Sky
vision will conduct 29 validation projects
in Europe this year with the aim of intro-
ducing “pre-industrial” procedures, poli-
cies and products of the future European
air-traffic management (ATM) system.
Executives of the Single European
Sky ATM Research Joint Undertaking
(SESAR JU) described the SESAR “first
release” March 8 at the ATC Global
conference in Amsterdam. The valida-
tion projects will span the broad areas
of “green” terminal airspace operations;
four-dimensional (4D) trajectories; end-
to-end traffic synchronization and collab-
orative network management.
The first-release grouping resulted
from a review of the status of 300 active
SESAR work projects, to determine where
early results could be achieved.
“The aim of the release really is to put
together the final results of research and
development, to bring to the community
the results in terms of pre-industrializa-
tion solutions,” said Florian Guillermet,
SESAR JU chief program officer.
“Then a decision has to be made (as
to) whether they are going to be deployed
or not. … We have to control the expecta-
tions to a certain extent. We have, as well,
to remain humble with this first release.
It’s the very first time we are doing an
activity like this in Europe.”
There will be 16 specific operational
focus areas addressed by the 29 projects,
such as Optimized Required Navigation
Performance Structures; Point Merge in
Complex Terminal Control Area; and
initial 4D capability plus Controlled Time
of Arrival. A second release in 2012 will
be more aggressive in terms of the number
and types of activities, Guillermet said.
“This delivery activity is something
that we intend not only to start this year,
but to continue on a yearly basis in the
program, and that’s how the R&D activi-
ties are going to deliver the results in the
future,” he said.
FAA NGIP Update
Direction on the use of Automatic Depen-
dent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) In
and Data Communications will be forth-
coming this year and in 2012, according
to FAA’s latest NextGen Implementation
Plan (NGIP) update, released in March.
The initial recommendations of an
Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC)
formed last year to look into the applica-
tion of ADS-B In are due to FAA this fall,
according to the NGIP.
“Those findings are expected to pro-
vide a clear definition on how the aviation
community should proceed with ADS-B
In, while ensuring compatibility with the
ADS-B Out avionics standards detailed
in the ADS-B Out final rule published
in May 2010,” FAA said. The latter rule
mandates ADS-B Out capability by 2020.
Feedback to the ARC recommenda-
tions will be incorporated in an ARC final
report due by June 2012, FAA said.
“The ARC’s work will set the stage
for future ADS-B In applications, such
as spacing and merging aircraft using
flight deck interval management,” the
agency said. “This capability provides
more precise aircraft-to-aircraft position
information to the flight deck, enabling
flight crews to line up their aircraft more
efficiently on final approach, saving fuel
and maximizing runway capacity.”
FAA said it is “moving ahead” with
Data Communications development that
will enable the exchange of digital air-traf-
fic control information between control-
lers and pilots, and direct auto-load into
aircraft flight management systems.
The agency said a final investment
decision slated for 2012 will enable it to
contract with a vendor to provide the
VHF radio network that will carry Data
Comm messages.
Airport towers are expected to begin
offering departure clearances with revi-
sions to Future Air Navigation System
(FANS) 1/A+ equipped aircraft by 2015,
according to FAA. Enroute centers are
expected to be capable of issuing airborne
reroutes via Data Comm in 2018.
“This planning date has been adjusted
out two years as we continue to weigh the
complexity of integrating enhancements
into the National Airspace System as well
as budget adjustments,” FAA said.
FAA, EU Accord
The European Union and FAA signed
a memorandum of cooperation March 3
in the field of civil aviation research and
development, and a first annex covering
“cooperative activities and interoperabil-
ity aspects” of the SESAR and NextGen
air-traffic modernization programs.
The agreement was signed during a
high-level conference in Budapest orga-
nized by the Hungarian Presidency and
European Commission.
“The conference focused on identifying
tangible measures to finalize implementa-
Florian Guillermet, SESAR JU chief program officer, speaks March 8 at ATC Global
conference in Amsterdam. He described a ‘first-release’ program of 29 projects.
B
i
l
l

C
a
r
e
y

p
h
o
t
o
www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 9
tion of the Single European Sky,” accord-
ing to a summary. “Substantial benefits
are expected from enhanced cooperation
between the European bodies involved in
air-traffic management as well as from the
extension of the Single European Sky to
non-EU states.”
Carey Fagan, FAA executive director
for international affairs, signed the memo-
randum of cooperation for the U.S. Pal
Volner, state secretary for transport for
Hungary, and Siim Kallas, EU vice presi-
dent and commissioner for transport and
mobility, signed on behalf of the EU.
The agreement calls for both sides to
research the interoperability of avionics,
communication protocols and procedures,
as well as operational methods under
SESAR and NextGen.
ADS-B Second Supplier
Selex Systems Integration Inc., Overland
Park, Kan., announced the award of a
contract from ITT Corp., as the second
source radio supplier for ITT’s Auto-
matic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast
(ADS-B) system rollout.
Under the contract, Selex will deliver
more than 400 radios during a three-year
performance period. The radio is intended
for use in both ADS-B and multilatera-
tion (MLAT) applications. The contract
includes options for additional units and
for extended depot maintenance support
over the service life of the radios.
ITT in August 2007 was selected by
FAA to provide a nationwide ADS-B
ground infrastructure consisting of 794
ground-based transceivers. As part of
the ITT industry team, Thales North
America’s Air Traffic Management busi-
ness in Shawnee, Kan., was selected as the
first supplier of dual-link 1090 MHz and
UAT transceivers under a three-year, $40
million contract.
Last October, ITT said it successfully
completed the first segment of the ADS-B
contract following the implementation of
“critical services,” including the display of
down-linked ADS-B targets on controller
displays, at key sites in Alaska, the Gulf
of Mexico, Louisville and Philadelphia.
The company also installed 300 of the
ground-based terminals, clearing the way
for the segment 2 phase of the contract.
Selex Systems Integration is a wholly
owned subsidiary of Selex Sistemi Inte-
grati, SpA, of Italy. The ADS-B radios
will be manufactured in Overland Park.
‘Save GPS’ Coalition
Aviation industry associations and manu-
facturers were among initial members of
the “Coalition to Save Our GPS,” formed
to oppose the application by Light-
Squared LLC to use L-band spectrum for
a new nationwide broadband service.
Joining the coalition, announced
March 10 in Washington, D.C., were the
Aeronautical Repair Stations Association,
Air Transport Association, Aircraft Own-
ers and Pilots Association, Garmin and
General Aviation Manufacturers Associa-
tion, among companies and organizations
from other industries.
The coalition cites the “highly unusual
decision” by the Federal Communications
Commission (FCC) in January to issue
industry scan
10 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
a conditional waiver to LightSquared to
use L-Band spectrum adjacent to that of
GPS, potentially interfering with millions
of GPS receivers.
The FCC waiver allows LightSquared
to use spectrum in the 1525-1559 MHz
band for broadband transmissions if the
company can demonstrate that harmful
interference will be avoided. The GPS sys-
tem operates in the 1559-1610 MHz band.
“The usual FCC process of conducting
extensive testing followed by approvals
was not followed in this instance. Instead,
the process was approve first, then test,”
the GPS coalition stated.
It calls for FCC and the National
Telecommunications and Information
Administration to ensure LightSquared’s
license modification is contingent on
the outcome of a mandated study that is
“comprehensive, objective and based on
correct assumptions about existing GPS
uses rather than theoretical possibilities.”
VDL Mode 2
Air transport communications provider
SITA announced March 7 that its VHF
Digital Link Mode 2 (VDL Mode 2)
service is now available to airlines in the
United States.
SITA said it has added VDL radios
to 50 of the 300 VHF ACARS station
sites in the United States already used by
some U.S. airlines. The VDL coverage
expansion provides SITA customer air-
lines that have installed VDL radios with
a 20-fold increase in link capacity for
ACARS, the company said.
SITA has been FAA’s Oceanic data
communications service provider since
1999. Its service supports air-traffic con-
trol systems based at Air Route Traffic
Control Centers (ARTCCs) at Oakland,
Anchorage and Ronkonkoma, N.Y. as
part of the Advanced Technologies and
Oceanic Procedures (ATOP) and Flight
Data Processing-2000 systems.
VDL Mode 2 communications will
be required under FAA’s NextGen Data
Comm program, SITA said.
“SITA has been working on the
VDL services the FAA requires since
ICAO VDL standardization was first
launched,” said Philip Clinch, SITA Vice
President Aircraft Services. “The VDL
definition took advantage of emerging
digital radio technology to increase link
capacity by a factor of 20 compared to
the VHF ACARS link which has been
available up to now. Our VDL investment
U.S.-wide shows the FAA and the air-
craft operators that SITA has the VDL
network in place and ready for when air-
craft are equipped to use the FAA Data
Comm services.”
Flight Tracking
Available avionics used in flight-tracking
applications, coupled with new proce-
dures, would provide improved aircraft
tracking in oceanic and remote airspace.
These are recommendations of the
Oceanic Position Tracking Improvement
& Monitoring (OPTIMI) project, con-
ducted in the aftermath of the loss of Air
France Flight 447 in the Atlantic Ocean
in June 2009. The project was conducted
under the auspices of the Single Euro-
pean Sky ATM Research Joint Under-
taking (SESAR JU), the public-private
entity overseeing Europe’s SESAR air-
traffic modernization program.
According to the SESAR JU, the
project included in-flight demonstra-
tions involving commercial flights in
the North Atlantic, European and
African regions of the Atlantic Ocean.
The objective was to assess the value of
using existing Automatic Dependent
Surveillance-Contract (ADS-C) services
and Controller-Pilot Datalink Com-
munications (CPDLC), in combination
with new procedures and protocols, to
improve flight tracking. Products of the
Future Air Navigation System (FANS)
concept developed by Boeing and Airbus
for long-haul aircraft, ADS-C involves
the downlink of aircraft position reports
controlled by a ground station; CPDLC
is the exchange of data messages between
pilots and controllers.
“The consortium carrying out the
project on behalf of the SJU recom-
mended on a technological level to
encourage the equipage and use of
Future Air Navigation System products
for Oceanic Area Control Centers and
aircraft flying oceanic areas; this will
cover in particular ADS-C and CPDLC,”
the SESAR JU reported.
“At the same time, improvements of
procedures should be envisaged with the
automatic transmission of the aircraft
position in oceanic and remote areas in
an interval of 15 minutes. An automatic
transmission of the position should be
triggered whenever a deviation from the
planned route is detected.”
Stated Jose Calvo Fresno, SESAR
JU chief of Regulatory Affairs, “The
OPTIMI study shows that the technical
elements to improve aircraft tracking are
already available. It is now important to
make full use of this technology by pro-
posing the necessary regulatory changes.”
Based on the final report of the con-
sortium, the SESAR JU will propose
regulatory “initiatives” to the European
Commission in the first half of 2011.
“There are several possibilities, from a
purely prescriptive approach, in line with
datalink regulation, to the use of incen-
tive mechanisms exploring the perfor-
mance scheme,” the organization said.
ATM
ANSP Communications
Members of Functional Airspace Block-
Europe Central (FABEC), consisting
of the Air Navigation Service Providers
(ANSPs) of France, Belgium, Luxem-
bourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland,
signed a 10-year framework agreement
with SITA to provide an air/ground com-
munication infrastructure.
The agreement, announced March
8 at the ATC Global conference in
Amsterdam, will enable FABEC to meet
the European Union’s 2013 deadline
for implementation of controller-pilot
datalink communications (CPDLC)
across Europe, SITA said. The airspace
controlled by the FABEC ANSPs covers
55 percent of European air traffic.
SITA said the communication infra-
structure will support Aeronautical
Telecommunications Network (ATN)
protocol and VHF Digital Link Mode 2
(VDL Mode 2). The scope of agreement
includes VHF ground stations, SITA’s
Aircom Monitoring System (AMOS) to
supervise the equipment and test tools.
SITA said it is teaming with EGIS
Avia of France to provide ProATN
routers to FABEC. The agreement also
includes the sharing of the air/ground
infrastructure, allowing SITA to provide
operational communications to airlines.
The FABEC agreement adds to exist-
ing relationships between SITA and
ANSPs in Germany, Portugal and Spain
for ATN and VDL Mode 2.
www.avionicstoday.com
ONL I NE
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New U.S. Departures Terminal Dedicated At Bahamas Gateway Airport
NASSAU, The Bahamas – Bahamian
government and airport officials on Feb.
26 celebrated the completion of a new
United States Departures Terminal at
Nassau’s Lynden Pindling International
Airport (LPIA), describing the facility
as key to the economic revitalization of
The Bahamas.
Completion of the 247,000-square-
foot U.S. Departures Terminal is the
signature achievement of the first phase
of a planned, three-phase redevelop-
ment costing $409.5 million. The termi-
nal provides customs preclearance for
outbound flights to the United States,
allowing them to operate as domestic
flights upon arrival at their destinations.
It began operations in March.
With the completion of second and
third phases of the redevelopment in
2012-2013, the airport will have capacity
to serve 5 million passengers annually; it
served 3.2 million in 2008.
“Today, we are definitely on our way
to realizing the long-deferred national
aspiration for an attractive, modern
and efficient principal air gateway to
The Bahamas,” Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham told a crowd of 2,000 gath-
ered for the opening ceremony. “This
is befitting of our status as the premier
destination in our region.”
In an interview after the ceremony,
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister
of Tourism and Aviation, said LPIA
serves as the hub for other major islands
of The Bahamas. “If Nassau/Paradise
Island in The Bahamas was a country
by itself, it would be No. 4 in terms of
total air arrivals, it would be No. 2 in
terms of total visitors, and it’s No. 1 in
cruise passengers,” he said. “But Nas-
sau/Paradise Island is only 2 percent
of The Bahamas. So 98 percent of the
country has not been developed as yet.”
The plan is to grow intra-Bahamas
air travel, Vanderpool-Wallace said.
“What you will be shocked to hear is we
have on the order of eight scheduled air-
lines operating in The Bahamas today,”
he said. “The problem is that a lot of
them are not connected to the global
distribution system, so people from else-
where cannot book them directly, and
we’re working to fix that.”
Stage 2 of the LPIA redevelop-
ment will see renovation of the existing
U.S. departures terminal, which will
serve as a new International Arriv-
als Terminal opening in 2012. Stage 3
involves the design and construction of
a 112,000-square-foot domestic arrivals
and departures terminal, as well as an
International Departures Terminal. The
last facilities will open in 2013.
The Nassau Airport Development
Company is overseeing the LPIA proj-
ect, which is managed by Vancouver
Airport Services of Canada. Among
other projects, the latter company man-
aged a $120 million expansion of Sang-
ster International Airport in Montego
Bay, Jamaica, completed in 2009.
The LPIA redevelopment will result
in 585,000 square feet of terminal space,
a 21 percent increase over the current
footprint. The project includes 34 new
gates, with one capable of handling the
Airbus A380. — Bill Carey
Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace
Minister of Tourism and Aviation
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12 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
BUSINESS/GA
G1000H Cockpit
Garmin International on March 6
unveiled the G1000H integrated glass
cockpit for VFR Part 27 helicopters carry-
ing up to nine passengers. Bell Helicopter,
launch customer for the avionics suite, will
install the G1000H on its Bell 407GX.
Leveraging features of its G1000 fixed-
wing counterpart, the G1000H integrates
control and presentation of most flight
data, sensor and instrument functions on
large, high-resolution displays.
Optional features include Garmin’s
Helicopter Synthetic Vision Technology
(HSVT), Helicopter Terrain Awareness
and Warning System (HTAWS), GDL
69AH weather display and GSR 56H
Iridium datalink, the company said.
Garmin also announced that it has ini-
tiated work to obtain a supplemental type
certificate for installation of the Garmin
G500H glass cockpit in the Robinson R44
four-place, piston-engine helicopter.

MILITARY
Multispectral Sensor
Northrop Grumman completed installa-
tion and testing of a multispectral intel-
ligence sensor housed in a new keel beam
accessory (KAB) bay on a modified E-8C
Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar
System (Joint STARS) aircraft.
The installation and test examined
the use of the 500-pound MS-177 mul-
tispectral camera, to see how the sensor
enhances combat identification in support
of Joint STARS’ battle management role.
While in test flights off the coast of
Florida, Joint STARS operators tasked
the MS-177 sensor to collect information
and streamed data into the battle man-
agement system already in place. Joint
STARS operators were able to simultane-
ously exploit ground moving target indica-
tion (GMTI) and high-resolution imagery.
Images also were transmitted to off-board
SIPRNET elements using beyond-line-of-
sight (BLOS) satellite communications.
“Flight tests on the Joint STARS
testbed aircraft proved the KAB, located
directly behind the APY-7 radar, can sup-
port an additional large sensor, or multiple
small sensors with no impact to the sys-
tem’s current battle management com-
mand and control and intelligence, surveil-
lance and reconnaissance capability,” said
Mike Mos, Northrop Grumman director
of Joint STARS architectures and concept
demonstrations.
Engineering Center
Boeing started hiring engineers and other
staff for its new engineering design cen-
ter in Oklahoma City that will produce
upgrades of the C-130 Hercules and B-1
Lancer aircraft, including new cockpits.
The company announced last August
that programs will begin to transition from
Long Beach, Calif., to Oklahoma City.
The transition will shift 550 jobs to Okla-
homa City by the end of 2012 and create
150 open positions this year, Boeing said.
Recruiting is targeted at engineering
disciplines, including embedded software,
structural, design and analysis; wire design
and installation; and systems. Business
support jobs for the C-130 and B-1 pro-
Using floppy disks and CDs to distribute
Software Parts to one plane after the
other wastes time and can lead to human
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verified instantly.
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www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 13
grams also are available, including business
planning and supply chain positions. Jobs
are posted at http://jobs-boeing.com/okc
The Oklahoma City center includes
50,000 square feet of space that is being
remodeled to accommodate the C-130
workers who will begin arriving in April.
UNMANNED SYSTEMS

UAS Refueling
A “major step forward” in demonstrat-
ing autonomous refueling between two
unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) at high
altitude has been accomplished.
Northrop Grumman announced
March 9 that its Proteus test aircraft and
a NASA Global Hawk flew as close as 40
feet apart at an altitude of 45,000 feet dur-
ing a risk-reduction test flight Jan. 21. Par-
ticipating with Northrop Grumman in the
demonstration were the Defense Advanced
Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and
NASA Dryden Flight Research Center,
located in Edwards, Calif.
DARPA’s $33 million KQ-X program
will demonstrate autonomous fuel trans-
fer between two Global Hawks, enabling
flights of up to one-week endurance.
KQ-X follows the 2006 DARPA Autono-
mous Aerial Refueling Demonstration
(AARD), a joint effort with NASA
Dryden that used an F-18 fighter as a
surrogate unmanned aircraft to autono-
mously refuel through a probe and drogue
from a Boeing 707 tanker.
Northrop Grumman said the January
demonstration flight was key to reducing
risks as the program prepares for autono-
mous aerial refueling of two Global
Hawks in the spring of 2012.
Wake turbulence between the Proteus
and Global Hawk aircraft as well as engine
performance and flight control responsive-
ness in the stratosphere were evaluated.
Simulated breakaway maneuvers were also
conducted, the company said.
BAMS Design Review
Northrop Grumman said it conducted
a critical design review of the MQ-4C
Broad Area Maritime Surveillance
Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS) with
the U.S. Navy in February.
The MQ-4C system CDR, which was
preceded by 10 subsystem and segment
CDRs, sets the initial product baseline
for the MQ-4C, a marinized version of
the U.S. Air Force RQ-4B Global Hawk.
Changes to the RQ-4B include a stronger
wing, an ice protection system and a sen-
sor suite based on components or entire
systems already fielded in the Department
of Defense inventory.
The program’s next major milestone,
Test Readiness Review, is planned this fall.
The first two fuselages of the BAMS
System Development and Demonstration
phase are under construction at Northrop
Grumman’s Moss Point, Miss., facility.
The first fuselage was slated to ship in
April to the company’s Palmdale, Calif.,
manufacturing center for final assembly
and first flight in 2012.
The BAMS program is managed by
the Navy’s Program Executive Office,
Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons
Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft
Systems Program Office (PMA-262) at
NAS Patuxent River, Md.
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14 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
people
Don Embt
CSSI, an engineering, IT and applied
research company based in Washington,
D.C., promoted Don Embt to program
manager for the company’s System
Engineering 2020 (SE2020) contract.
Embt has more than 20 years of
experience in engineering and project
management. For more than 15 years,
he has supported FAA technically and
as a manager and supervisor of various
projects and contracts.
CSSI was awarded a SE2020 prime contract in 2010 to pro-
vide systems engineering and program management of several
Next Generation Air Transportation System projects.
Doug Murri
Doug Murri has joined inflight entertainment supplier Row 44,
of Westlake Village, Calif., as director, Airline Solutions.
Murri was most recently with Southwest Airlines. In his 16
years with the airline, Murri designed, led and implemented
several key business-system and technology initiatives, includ-
ing the airline’s implementation of mission critical aircraft
messaging for both airborne and ground systems. He designed
and deployed Southwest’s first remote server infrastructure at
airport locations.
Murri also was instrumental in developing Southwest’s
Onboard Performance Computer, an early electronic flight bag.
Jerry Bemis
Nextant Aerospace, of Cleveland, appointed Jerry Bemis vice
president of manufacturing. Bemis has more than 25 years of
aviation experience. He has led worldwide maintenance efforts
for commercial carriers United and Delta Air Lines in addition
to the fractional aircraft provider Flight Options.
Capt. Jaime Engdahl
Capt. Jaime W. Engdahl was named head of the Naval Air
Systems Command Unmanned Combat Air System Demon-
stration Program, UCAS-D (PMA-268). Engdahl, who was
previously the deputy program manager for the E-6B Mercury
Block I/IA program, succeeded Capt. Jeffrey R. Penfield, who
was recently selected for promotion to rear admiral.
Engdahl completed flight training in Pensacola, Fla., and
was designated a Naval Flight Officer in 1984. His operational
assignments include Electronic Attack Squadrons 129 and
130. He has flown more than 80 combat sorties and logged 250
flight hours over Iraq and Bosnia. Engdahl also served as an
acquisition professional in PMA-265 and in the E-6B program.
Mark Andrews
Metron Aviation, of Dulles, Va., appointed Mark Andrews
weather principal subject matter expert.
Andrews has more than 30 years of experience in meteoro-
logical activities, including planning, budgeting and operation-
al execution and improvement of U.S. aviation-related services.
Andrews joins Metron Aviation from the National Oceanic
Don Embt
www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 15
and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), where he was the
assistant director, Department of Commerce, NextGen Joint
Planning and Development Office. He facilitated the creation
and evolution of all foundational weather documents related to
NextGen, including a weather concept of operations, integrated
work plans and policy development.
Moshe Tal
Aitech Rugged Group, based in Chats-
worth, Calif., named Moshe Tal as CEO,
succeeding Roger Rowe, who retired in
2010.
Tal has been with the company since
2009 working in several departments,
including business development, engi-
neering and and marketing. He has more
than 25 years of product design and engi-
neering experience, principally associated
with analog and digital signal processing technologies.
Previously, Tal was vice president of AudioCodes USA, a
Voice over Internet protocol company. He joined AudioCodes
USA in 2004 in connection with the acquisition of Ai-Logix.
Alan Norman
Alan Norman was named chief test pilot for the F-35 Lightning
II program. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 1999, Norman
served in the U.S. Air Force for 23 years as a fighter pilot and
test pilot. In 1999, he left active duty and became an experimen-
tal test pilot for Lockheed Martin on the F-22 program. He is
also Lockheed Martin’s chief pilot for the T-50 program.
Stuart Harvey
Integrated Microwave Technologies, of Mount Olive, N.J.,
appointed Stuart Harvey international sales director.
Harvey was most recently divisional director for Synetics
Surveillance Technology, a U.K. provider of security systems.
He previously worked for L-3 Communications TRL Technol-
ogy, Zener Designs and Motorola GSM Systems, Swindon.
Rick Stine
StandardAero named Rick Stine senior vice president of its
Components Sector in Cincinnati. Stine comes to StandardAero
from HEICO, where he was senior vice president, Technical
Operations.
Previously, Stine worked for GE Aircraft Engines, where he
served as team leader and design engineer for advanced exhaust
systems and hot section components for the Advanced Tactical
Fighter demonstrator program and civil aviation programs.
Jeff Miller
Landmark Aviation named Jeff Miller general manager of its
Dallas, Addison and Wichita Falls, Texas, locations.
Miller started his aviation career in the U.S. Air Force. He
spent time with Miller Aviation and Trajen Flight Support
before making the move to Atlantic Aviation in 2007, where he
was general manager of its El Paso, Texas, location.
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Moshe Tal
16 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
calendar
April
5-7 Aircraft Interiors Expo, Hamburg Messe, Hamburg, Germany. For infor-
mation, phone +44 (0)208 271 2174 or visit www.aircraftinteriorsexpo.com.
11-14 Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition, Gaylord National Resort &
Convention Center, National Harbor, Md. Visit www.seaairspace.org.
17-20 Quad A Annual Convention, Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention
Center, Nashville, Tenn. Visit www.quad-a.org.
18-21 AMC/AEEC Joint Meetings, Marriott Downtown, Memphis, Tenn.
Contact ARINC Industry Activities, phone 410-266-2008 or visit
www.aviation-ia.com/amc.
May
2-5 16th Annual International Symposium on Aviation Psychology, Wright
State University and Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. Visit
www.wright.edu/isap.
10-12 Integrated Communications Navigation and Surveillance (ICNS)
Conference, Westin Washington Dulles Airport, Dulles, Va. Visit http://i-cns.org.
17-19 European Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition (EBACE),
Geneva PALEXPO and Geneva International Airport, Geneva, Switzerland.
Visit www.ebace.aero.
17-19 Air Traffic Control Association/FAA/NASA Technical Symposium,
Resorts Hotel and Casino, Atlantic City, N.J. For information, contact ATCA at
703-299-2430 or visit www.atca.org/techsymposium.
June
15-16 RTCA 2011 Annual Symposium: Accelerating NextGen Through
Public-Private Partnership, Walter E. Washington Convention Center,
Washington, D.C. Visit www.aviationtoday.com/rtca.
20-26 Paris Air Show, Le Bourget, Paris. Visit www.paris-air-show.com.
July
20-23 Airborne Law Enforcement Association (ALEA) Annual Conference
and Exhibition, Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans. Contact
ALEA, phone 301- 631-2406 or visit www.alea.org.
August
16-19 Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International
Unmanned Systems North America, Walter E. Washington Convention
Center, Washington, D.C. Visit www.auvsi.org.
16-21 MAKS 2011 International Aviation & Space Salon, Zhukovsky,
Moscow Region, Russia. Visit www.aviasalon.com.
September
11-15 Airline Passenger Experience Association (APEX) Conference &
Exhibition, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle. Visit http://apex.aero.
12-15 Autotestcon 2011, Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore.
Visit http://autotestcon.com.
October
3-5 Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) Annual Conference &
Exposition, Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center, National Harbor,
Md. Contact ATCA, phone 703-299-2430 or visit www.atca.org.
10-12 National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) Annual Meeting &
Convention, Las Vegas. Contact NBAA, phone 202-783-9000 or visit
www.nbaa.com.
10-12 Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting & Exposition,
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C. Contact AUSA,
phone 703-841-4300 or visit www.ausa.org.
We’re on it.

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We’re on it.

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and a high-speed processor...have it ready to support both current
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integrated EFB package of hardware, software, and support services
that allows flight crews and flight ops to perform critical ground
and in-flight data management tasks faster and more efficiently.
• SmartDisplay™ EFB, configured as Class 2 or 3 platform
• Seamless wireless network and software compatibility
• Upgradable for future technologies, such as the FAA’s
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18 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
commercial
FedEx Delivers
Maintenance
By Frances Fiorino
C
argo carrier FedEx Express
operates a fleet of hundreds
of aircraft across a global
network, employs thousands
of pilots and maintenance
professionals and is responsible for
making sure packages arrive safely and
on-time. Keeping that fleet operating
efficiently and safely, and with the latest
avionics, is a mammoth job.
A look at the FedEx Express avion-
ics maintenance operation reflects the
overall trends and challenges facing the
industry — keeping pace with increasingly
sophisticated technologies and maintain-
ing a skilled workforce. These challenges
likely will be among topics discussed at
this year’s AMC/AEEC annual meetings,
April 18-21 in Memphis, Tenn. FedEx
Express is host airline of the event, which
brings together maintenance and engi-
neering personnel from more than 70 air-
lines, 200 suppliers and five airframers to
discuss and resolve technical solutions for
avionics maintenance and standards.
“Avionics” is described by the AMC as
“anything with a wire in it,” and FedEx
Express avionics maintenance person-
nel handle countless miles of wires. The
largest all-cargo airline’s 4,500 pilots fly
684 aircraft, from large jet transports to
turboprops at 375 airports worldwide. The
fleet includes Airbus A300-600s, A310-
200/300s, Boeing 727-200s, 757-200s,
777Fs, and MD10s, Cessna 208A/B and
ATR-72/42 aircaft.
Maintaining this varied fleet requires
a broad portfolio of avionics bench
capabilities, said FedEx Vice President
of Aircraft Engineering and Technical
Cargo carrier and host airline of this year’s AMC/AEEC balances new
technological advances in avionics with maintaining its varied fleet
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FedEx Express aircraft fleet awaits freight at company’s Memphis, Tenn., hub. FedEx operates a fleet of 684 aircraft, including
Airbus, Boeing, Cessna and ATR models. It handles about 3.5 million packages and 11 million pounds of freight on a daily basis.
www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 19
Planning Mark D. Yerger, ranging from
simple components, such as a small rud-
der trim indicator, to sophisticated boxes
such as Thales flight control computers
on the carrier’s Airbus fleet. FedEx’s test
equipment includes the Avitron UnivATE
to support the Boeing 727, MD-10 and
MD-11 and Airbus electrical power com-
ponents, and the Ametek aircraft interface
test unit (AIU) Test Station to support
MD-10 and MD-11 autopilot and flight
deck instrumentation.
Where avionics maintenance is
conducted is “pretty much a balance”
between internal and external sources,
said Yerger, and what percentage goes
where fluctuates with market availability
and system changes.
Internally, for example, the Mem-
phis Avionics Component Shop is a
40,000-square-foot facility where mainly
B or intermediate level checks are con-
ducted. It employs about 36 full-time Avi-
onics Maintenance Technicians (AMT)
plus support staff. The Memphis Avionics
Line operation employs 54 AMTs plus
support staff. The instrument shop at the
company’s Los Angeles facility, where C
checks are conducted, employs about 10
full-time AMTs.
Externally, FedEx Express has rela-
tionships with numerous partners around
the world performing component main-
tenance for avionics, as well as airframe,
engine and heavy maintenance services.
Five years ago, with a goal of ensur-
ing uniform workflow and quality results,
FedEx Express adopted the Kaizen tech-
nique, a lean processing philosophy, in
its maintenance organization. Kaizen is
Japanese for “continuous improvement.”
“We are working smarter, faster and
the AMTs are more empowered,” Yerger
said. Here, “‘empowered’ means the tech-
nicians, the parts organization staff that
supports them and engineers meet daily
to discuss where to eliminate waste in the
maintenance process. The workspace was
reorganized by looking at process flow
from receiving through dispatch out of
the facility. And they have been able to
radically improve productivity as well as
the quality of the product coming out of
the shop.”
As avionics systems and inventory
age, it becomes more obvious that every
box is making more and more trips to the
shop, said Yerger. The Memphis and Los
Angeles avionics and instrument shops,
for example, average 1,168 units returned
to service each month. Determined to bet-
ter identify failure conditions and prevent
FedEx Express Avionics Bench Capabilities
Make System System System
Honeywell
MD10 Versatile Integrated
Avionics
MD10 Display Unit Air Data Module
MD11 Ancillary Fuel Sys-
tem Controller
MD11 Centralized Fault
Display Interface Unit
Airbus Digital Air Data Com-
puter
MD11 Digital Air Data
Computer
MD11 Display Electronics
Unit
MD11 Environmental Sys-
tems Controller
MD10 Flight Control Com-
puter
MD11 Flight Control Com-
puter
MD10 Fuel System Control-
ler
MD11 Glareshield Control
Panel
MD11 Hydraulic Systems
Controller
MD11 Miscellaneous Sys-
tems Controller
Enhanced Ground
Proximity Warning System
Digital Flight Data Acquisi-
tion Unit
Digital Flight Data Recorder
Thales
Center of Gravity Control
Computer
Electronic Flight Control
Unit
Flight Augmentation
Flight Control Computer Feel Limitation Computer Maintenance Test Panel
Thrust Control Computer Thrust Rating Panel Display Unit
Aerospatiale Flight Warning Computer Indicator Light Dimmer
Jamming Detection Control
Unit
Remote Annunciator Light
Test Dimmer
Rudder Trim Indicator
Aircraft Braking
Systems
Anti-Skid Control Unit
Messier Bugatti Brake System Control Unit
ABG Semca Cabin Pressure Computer
Diehl ECAM Control Panel
ECAM Symbol
Generator Unit
EFIS Control Panel
EFIS Symbol Generator
Unit
Thompson–CSF
System Data Analog Con-
troller
Marconi Slat Flap Control Computer
Rockwell Collins VHF Communications VOR/ILS/MB Navigation GPS Navigation
DME/Transponder HF Radio Radio Altimeter
Doppler/Windshear Radar
TX/RX
Radar Antennas 727 Radar Indicators
ACSS TCAS/Mode S
AMETEK
MD10 Aircraft Interface
Unit
Hamilton Sund-
strand
MD11 Generator Control
Unit
MD11 Electrical
Power Control Unit
727 Generator Control
727 Bus Control Unit 727 Voltage Regulator 727 Load Controller
MD11 APU Generator
Control Unit
Airbus Generator Control
Unit
Airbus Ground Power Control
Unit
Gables/Team/
Thales/
Honeywell
Control Heads for the
above systems
them from occurring in aging systems, the
FedEx Avionics Bench in 2010 adopted a
predictive maintenance process. It replaces
the traditional test-fix-test method where
the time required to test a line replace-
able unit (LRU) might be one hour or
eight hours, depending on how far the test
procedure progresses before it isolates the
failure, Yerger said. A traditional repair
may involve finding the failed component,
replacing and testing it and returning it to
service. The new process tries to identify
the precursor condition and repair or
improve it before it is returned to service.
For example, the carrier will examine
the electronic circuit that degrades over
time. As components age, connectors
wear and solder joints are subjected to
the stresses of their operational environ-
ment. Yerger said the aging process can
cause “unreliable, intermittent and often
repeated failures on the same circuit.”
“The predictive process identifies
components that have been degraded with
time or are at risk of becoming obsolete.
They are then replaced with exact or
direct equivalents. Solder joints, for exam-
ple, are reworked and worn connectors are
replaced. This effectively means that the
life of the circuit is extended and the reli-
ability improved,” Yerger said.
“Undertaking a proactive analysis and
refurbishment of the circuit can provide
compelling results and improvements in
the circuit performance,” he said.
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NextGen Equipage
FedEx, like most carriers around the
world, is considering ways to adapt to the
avalanche of sophisticated technologies
entering the marketplace, particularly
with regard to the Next Generation Air
Transportation System (NextGen) in the
United States and Single European Sky
ATM Research (SESAR) program in
Europe. The transition is likely to be a key
topic at the AMC Open Forum.
As NextGen and its requirement for
Performance-Based Navigation technolo-
gies on aircraft advances, FedEx Express
is looking at preparing its pilots and air-
craft for Required Navigation Procedures
(RNP) approaches. “We have our eyes on
the prize and are making sure that we are
able to operate in an advanced RNP envi-
ronment,” Yerger said.
FedEx Express is retrofitting and
upgrading equipment on aircraft “as we
bring them in” to help position the fleet
for RNP capability, Yerger said. The 757s
the company is acquiring and convert-
ing to freighter service, for example, are
being configured for 0.15 nautical mile
RNP capability, meaning an aircraft on
approach must remain within 0.15 nm to
the right or left of center line 95 percent
of the time within a containment area.
The company is also taking delivery of
Boeing 777s that will be RNP-capable.
FedEx Express also has been proactive
in the development of new technologies,
executives advise. It was an early adopter
of computers in the cockpit, according to
Yerger, and one of the leaders in advanc-
ing both head-up display (HUD) and
Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS)
technologies. The company has equipped
a number of its large aircraft with EFVS
portrayed through the HUD system to
provide flight crews with the best possible
situational awareness as well as improve
safety of operations, says Yerger.
The company is also uses the Hon-
eywell-developed Runway Advisory and
Awareness System (RAAS), which pro-
vides pilots with aural and graphical advi-
sories of aircraft position on and near the
airport surface. In addition, certain FedEx
Express Boeing 777F international flights
are operating in a Future Air Naviga-
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4,900 nautical miles with payload of 225,200 pounds. FedEx is the largest user, with 12 in service and 13 on backlog with Boeing.
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www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 21
tion System (FANS) environment to take
advantage of oceanic datalink services.
This includes operations using the terres-
trial L888 Western China Route.
Yerger added that FedEx Express is
working with industry and government to
speed the process of getting moving map
technologies better defined and into its
aircraft. Most of FedEx’s trunk aircraft
are equipped with primarily Class 2 elec-
tronic flight bags (EFB).
“As we look at enhanced GPS-based
navigation,” said Yerger, “Aircraft will
continue to become more sophisticated
and more integrated; that is, each piece
of avionics or component on the aircraft
spends more time communicating with
other systems on the aircraft in order to
improve reliability and safety.”
As always, safety remains paramount
to the carrier. Yerger said FedEx Express-
supports a Safety Management System
(SMS) culture and hopes that environ-
ment will continue to flourish as the
program moves forward. The company is
moving from Level 2 SMS to Level 3.
In addition, valuable safety informa-
tion is now available and downloadable
from aircraft “faster than ever before,”
Yerger noted. “This gives FedEx’s flight
safety organization a much bigger pool
of data with which to identify precur-
sors and eliminate safety risks, as well as
learn more about how we operate our air-
planes,” he said.
“Twenty years ago, such information
was not available until it was pulled from
the (flight data recorder) after an acci-
dent,” Yerger added. “Today, a broader
range of information is stored digitally in
aircraft flight data acquisition units. And
the data from a flight can be downloaded
automatically into our system from our
MD-11s as the aircraft taxis to the gate.”
Cognizant of the increasing level of
sophistication in avionics packages it
works with, FedEx Express is taking the
necessary steps to make sure its mainte-
nance staff is well prepared and has “the
best tools, the best training to address
those higher expectations (of safety) and
manage very sophisticated pieces of test
equipment,” Yerger said.
FedEx Express offers technician train-
ing in-house and at various manufactur-
ers, including ATE manufacturers, for
specific types of equipment. The company
also wants to make certain the best avail-
able flow of information is available to
technicians around the world — “whether
the aircraft is in Memphis, where the com-
pany has lots of resources, or in Kuala
Lumpur, where there are fewer people
and parts to rely on, but where expecta-
tions for high performance are the same,”
Yerger said.
The carrier works with leading service
and technology providers to collect the
latest available information from OEMs,
previous operators of used aircraft,
ATE and component manufacturers and
FedEx’s own in-house engineering team.
That data is combined and loaded on the
company’s technical information manage-
ment and distribution system, which is
accessible to the maintenance workforce.
“Members of this industry — com-
ponent manufacturers, the airlines and
suppliers, OEMs — although bitter com-
petitors at certain levels, have overlapping
and very complex relationships,” Yerger
said. “And we have got to figure out how
to manage those relationships while rec-
ognizing that safety is the No. 1 priority
across all of our portfolios.”
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Airbus autopilot, Controller, Flight Deck
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Portable Mission Display
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military
T
he Naval Air Systems Command
(NAVAIR) considers the Marine
Corps CH-53K Heavy Lift
Replacement helicopter a deriv-
ative of the hard-flown CH-53E
in operation today. In fact, new avionics,
engines, transmission, structures, rotor
blades and fly-by-wire (FBW) controls
make the Sikorsky ’53 Kilo an ambitious
stretch of existing technology.
The Kilo integrated cockpit and open
system architecture build on the Rockwell
Collins Common Avionics Architecture
System (CAAS) in the U.S. Army CH-
47F and UH-60M Upgrade, and the
Avionics Management System (AMS) in
the commercial Sikorsky S-92 and Cana-
dian Forces CH148 helicopters. The new
“glass cockpit” also uses hardware and
software in the Marine Corps CH-53E
CNS/ATM (Communication Navigation
Surveillance/Air Traffic Management)
upgrade and German CH-53G.
“We’ve taken a lot of the best pieces
from other programs and put them
together for the ’53K,” said Sikorsky avi-
onics/electrical Integrated Product Team
lead Kyle Delong.
The Marine Corps plans 200 CH-
53Ks to retire CH-53Es and CH-53Ds.
The three-engined Heavy Lift Replace-
ment helicopter passed a Critical Design
Review last summer and should fly for
the first time in late 2013. To implement
Marine Sea Basing and Ship-to-Objective
Maneuver concepts, the Kilo version has
to sling-load 27,000 pounds over 110 nau-
tical miles at sea level — more than twice
the load of today’s CH-53E — yet fit the
same amphibious assault ships. The ’53K
is also expected to carry four times the
payload over the same distance at high
density altitudes like those in Afghani-
stan. For all its brute power, the Kilo with
fly-by-wire flight controls has to be easier
to fly than the ’53E and cost half as much
to operate and support.
Development of the CH-53K was
initially paced by the fatigue lives of
the CH-53E fleet. NAVAIR ultimately
Kilo Cockpit
The new cockpit layout of the U.S. Marine Corps CH-53K Heavy Lift
Replacement helicopter features ‘best pieces’ from other programs
By Frank Colucci
The CH-53K Avionics Management System borrows hardware from the Rockwell Collins Common Avionics Architecture System.
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accepted a ’53E Service Life Extension
Program and slipped Kilo Initial Opera-
tional Capability from 2015 to 2018 to
reduce development risk.
More measured development makes
the program more efficient in qualifica-
tion testing, according to Michael Torok,
Sikorsky vice president and chief engineer
for Marine Corps programs.
“I really think the key here is the
extent of the up-front work we’ve done
with the fleet customers, combined with
the lessons learned from the S-92, the
Canadian program, the Black Hawk M
and MU, and a real system engineering
focus to really get this right, right off the
bat,” Torok said. “The ’53 has the luxury
of following these other programs.”
Flight-worthy hardware and produc-
tion-representative software are now in
CH-53K Systems Integration Labs (SIL)
located at Sikorsky Aircraft in Stratford,
Conn., and Rockwell Collins in Cedar
Rapids, Iowa. Qualified hardware will be
delivered early next year for test aircraft.
The development program flies four
Engineering Development Models. Pro-
duction deliveries for the Marines stretch
from 2017 to 2028, and the new heavy
lifter has already drawn interest from
potential international customers.
Sikorsky chose principal subcontractor
Rockwell Collins in 2006 to give the CH-
53K an Avionics Management System
like that in the successful S-92. AMS con-
trols and displays and mission computing
resources themselves evolved from the
CAAS in Chinooks and other helicopters.
“We’re technically not a CAAS cock-
pit,” said Dan Toy, Rockwell Collins prin-
cipal marketing manager for rotary wing
aircraft. “We’re kind of a CAAS deriva-
tive based on the ’53E and ’53G.”
CNS/ATM Upgrade
The CH-53E CNS/ATM upgrade flown
last November mixes five portrait-format
Multi-Function Displays (MFD) and
dual center-console Control Display
Units (CDU) with some electromechani-
cal gauges.
“The Marines were trying to leverage
what had been developed for the Army
cargo helicopters, and we provided a very
affordable solution to upgrade the ’53E,”
said Toy, of Rockwell Collins. Production
of the CNS/ATM upgrade for Marine
CH-53Es has been deferred, but the par-
tial glass cockpit may be applied to Navy
MH-53E minesweepers around 2012.
Separate from the CNS/ATM
upgrade, Rockwell Collins gave the Ger-
man CH-53G cockpit landscape-format
cockpit displays and new performance
management functions. “It started close
to CAAS but evolved with a lot of Ger-
man-unique requirements for production
and certification,” said Toy. “The German
’53 system has headed off on its own path
largely, away from the ’53E and ’53K.”
Compared to the ’53E CNS/ATM and
’53G upgrade, the Kilo cockpit uses next-
generation MFD and CDU hardware
and customized software. Like the CAAS
in Army Chinooks, the Kilo AMS has
five 6-by-8 inch portrait-format MFDs,
compatible with night vision goggles,
to present integrated flight and naviga-
tion symbology for IFR operations at
night. The interchangeable displays can
show the embedded Harris digital map
and imagery from the Raytheon AN/
AAS-29A Forward Looking Infrared
(FLIR) gimbal. Together with the CDUs
and two Multi-Function Control Units,
they enable the crew to access UHF/
VHF/SATCOM communications and
Defensive Electronic Countermeasures
(DECM). Addition of a troop command-
er’s display planned for the Kilo cabin has
been deferred.
Marine CH-53K requirements call
for CNS/ATM compatibility to navigate
civil airspace, ETAWS (Enhanced Terrain
Avoidance Warning System) functionality
and embedded training capability.
They also call for the cargo helicopter
to exchange digital data in network-cen-
tric warfare scenarios. Rockwell Collins
provides the ARC-210 multi-band radios
that are standard for Navy/Marine Corps
aircraft. The fifth-generation ARC-210
in the CH-53K supports the latest Vari-
able Message Format waveforms and
SATCOM links. Link 16 capability for
CH-53 Super Stallion is the workhorse of the U.S. Marine Corps. The service plans 200 CH-53Ks to retire CH-53Es and CH-53Ds.
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the CH-53K has been deferred for now,
but the heavy lifter will have a Multifunc-
tional Information Distribution System
(MIDS) terminal to implement Link 16
with software. “All the network capability
is there as soon as they designate which
waveform they want to use and what
radio they want to run it through,” said
Brian Cyr, Rockwell Collins CH-53K
program manager.
Like CAAS, the CH-53K AMS uses
MFD 268 multifunction displays and
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The CH-53K will replace the CH-53E in Marine Heavy Lift helicopter squadrons, with initial operational capability slated in 2018.
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www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 25
Vehicle Interface) is different. We have a
lot of (software) re-use, but how it gets
presented to the pilot is different,” Cyr
explained.
Kilo displays, for example, show dial
formats rather than the vertical tape read-
outs in the ’53E CNS/ATM cockpit. The
CH-53K AMS will also perform Center-
of-Gravity calculations tied to fuel con-
sumption.
Sikorsky conducted 25 Crew Station
Working Group meetings with NAVAIR
and fleet operators to formulate CH-53K
flight displays. Marine pilots evaluated
external cargo/load, RNAV and other
symbology for the Kilo AMS on synop-
tic displays using desktop computers at
Stratford and Patuxent River, Md.
“They don’t have to have a mental
model of the system; they can actually see
it,” said Sikorsky’s Delong. The desktop
simulators continue to feed changes back
into Kilo cockpit requirements. “We keep
those up to date to make sure they’re see-
ing the same thing in the real aircraft,”
Delong said.
Desktop symbology migrated to
the Sikorsky motion-base simulator in
Stratford with CH-53K displays and fly-
by-wire cyclic and collective inceptors.
The new Marine helicopter capitalizes
on FBW hardware and software devel-
oped for the Army UH-6M Upgrade
and Canadian CH148. The triplex flight
control system has dual self-checking
processors on each of the three channels
working redundant hydraulic main and
tail rotor actuators. Hamilton Sundstrand
flight control computers interface with
BAE Systems active inceptors — a side-
arm cyclic and limited-travel collective
— that give the pilot tactile cues based on
control, power and structural limits.
The CH-53E CNS/ATM provides no
flight director and no direct interaction
between mechanical flight controls and
cockpit displays. The ’53K AMS takes
flight guidance cues from the FBW sys-
tem and embedded GPS, and runs system
diagnostics. “This is a fly-by-wire aircraft,
and our cockpit has major workload
reduction features integrating our fly-by-
wire system as well,” Delong noted.
Marine pilots have so far conducted
three part-mission evaluations with the
Kilo cockpit tied to FBW flight control
models. “We have high-fidelity flight
control laws that can be evaluated in our
facility. Where prudent, we modify the
design to meet their needs,” Delong said.
The Sikorsky motion-base simulator is
one of five SILs outfitted with actual CH-
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53K hardware and software. A ribbon-
cutting ceremony last October opened
the Sikorsky Avionics/Electrical SIL to
test the AMS with the DECM and other
Government Furnished Equipment.
An electrical SIL has the CH-53K
main generators and auxiliary power
unit and can run independently or with
the Avionics SIL. Rockwell Collins set
up its own Avionics SIL at Cedar Rapids
identical to that in Stratford. A Sikorsky
Flight Control SIL that was undergoing
system-level checkout ties the Kilo cock-
pit to actual aircraft servos to check FBW
software and hardware changes before
they go to the real aircraft.
Open Architecture
CAAS and AMS in all their forms use a
distributed processing architecture with
“smart” displays and controls. The CH-
53K AMS has 18 Power PC processors
in nine line replaceable units (Weapon
Replaceable Assemblies). A high-speed
Local Area Network carries AMS inter-
nal communications between processors.
Data Concentrator Units under develop-
ment by Curtiss Wright Controls in City
of Industry, Calif., will convert discrete
inputs from engine, transmission, fuel and
other aircraft sensors to digital signals for
databuses to feed the AMS.
Legacy equipment such as the radios
and MIDS terminal are controlled
through a Mil-Std-1553B databus. The
DECM suite has its own 1553B bus to
integrate the Northrop Grumman AN/
ALQ-24 Directed Infrared Countermea-
sures set, Northrop Grumman APR-
39B(V)2 radar warning receiver, Honey-
well AAR-47(V)2 missile/laser warning
receiver and BAE ALE-47 improved
countermeasures dispenser.
Like other Rockwell Collins Flight 2
avionics, the CH-53K AMS provides a
Modular Open System Architecture with
PCI backplane interfaces for hardware
and a Posix operating system for software
applications from different suppliers.
AMS displays show Raytheon FLIR
imagery from an analog video interface.
The system hosts Warning/Caution/Advi-
sory software from Sikorsky, digital map
software from Harris, and ETAWS soft-
ware developed by NAVAIR. Most soft-
ware is field-loadable to upgrade systems
without removing them from the aircraft.
CH-53K processors and databuses
also have room to grow. “Our customer
requirement is 50 percent for most sys-
tems,” Delong said. “For the AMS, we
have a 65 percent requirement for memory
and processor reserve. We have a lot of
software already accounted for in those
reserves, like Link 16.”
The CH-53K has been designed to
look after itself to reduce life cycle costs.
Design-for-the-maintainer working
groups helped optimize wire harness and
equipment installations for easy access.
The Kilo AMS hosts Integrated Vehi-
cle Health Management System (IVHMS)
software from Goodrich in Burnsville,
Minn., to generate comprehensive systems
information. “It’s certainly a carryover
from the S-92 with lessons learned,” said
Delong. “What’s new and significant is the
95 percent requirement for fault detection;
we also have a 90 percent requirement for
fault isolation.” The Kilo Integrated Sup-
portability System displays health data on
a maintainer’s handheld computer.
CH-53K AMS fault isolation/fault
detection functions are the same found
in CAAS. “We have one of our software
apps on every processor,” said Cyr, of
Rockwell Collins. The health monitor
application polls software and hardware
and feeds results to the IVHMS for main-
tenance decisions.
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Pg Advertiser Web Address
ad index
7 Aeroflex ..........................................www.aeroflex.com
13 AIM ............................................www.aim-online.com
36 Ballard Technology ...................www.ballardtech.com
9 Carlisle Interconnect/ECS ............www.carlisleIT.com
25 Dayton-Granger .................. www.daytongranger.com
20 EMS Aviation .......................... www.emsaviation.com
34 EMTEQ Inc. ..................................... www.emteq.com
21 Esterline/CMC Electronics .... www.cmcelectronics.ca
17 Goodrich Corp. ............................ www.goodrich.com
6 Holt Integrated Circuits .....................www.holtic.com
5 Honeywell .................................. www.honeywell.com
15 International Communications .. www.intcomgrp.com
26 Intro Corp. ................................... www.introcorp.com
24 L3 Com\Electrodynamics ........ www.l-3com.com/EDI
14 Nav-Aids Ltd................................ www.navaidsltd.net
25 Pickering Interfaces ...............www.pickeringtest.com
35 RTCA Symposium .....www.rtca2011symposium.com
11 Shadin Avionics ...............................www.shadin.com
16 Staco Systems .................... www.stacosystems.com
12 Teledyne Controls .......... www.teledyne-controls.com
2 Vector Informatik ....... www.avionics-networking.com
RFID SPECIAL SECTION
APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION 27
Era Of Airborne
RFID Begins
Anticipated
for the past several
years, the application of radio
frequency identication (RFID)
tags for component tracking
on commercial aircraft is
upon us, at least for tags that
are “passive,” or without an
integral power supply. Work on
a standard for battery-powered
“active” tags has begun.
A special section to Magazine
RFID SPECIAL SECTION
28 APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION
T
his was the message delivered
by industry experts in aerospace
RFID who spoke during the
recent Avionics Magazine webinar,
“Airborne RFID: Radio Frequency Iden-
tification Takes Off.”
Current guidance on applying RFID
tags on working aircraft is provided by
an FAA advisory circular, AC 20-162,
“Airworthiness Approval and Opera-
tional Allowance of RFID Systems,”
dated Sept. 22, 2008. The advisory
allows use of passive devices as long
as they are not interrogated in flight or
when an aircraft is on an active runway
or taxiway. It succeeded a foundational
FAA policy memo from May 2005 that
declared passive RFID tags acceptable
for use on civil aircraft under specified
conditions.
The advisory circular “gives us the
green light to start populating legacy
airplanes that have already been deliv-
ered and new deliveries with passive
RFID devices on the parts,” said Ken-
neth Porad, associate technical fellow
and RFID program manager with Boe-
ing Commercial Aviation Services.
“We will not have to recertify or
requalify them, because the regulatory
agencies have proclaimed that they do
not impact form, fit or function of any
installed system or equipment on the
airplane,” Porad said.
“That is the industry position that’s
agreed upon by all the airframers in our
supplier base. And so we are good to
go at this very moment to put passive
devices on airplane parts. There’s no
barriers to enter that market.”
Boeing has about 65 people work-
ing full-time on RFID across the compa-
ny, with some 50 pilot projects in place,
Porad said. Those projects include
supply chain management of incoming
materials, tool tracking on the produc-
tion floor and identifying consumables
and perishables such as sealant used in
manufacturing aircraft.
Airbus last January placed a multi-
year order to equip its coming A350
XWB with RFID tags on some 1,500
parts to support aircraft configuration
management, line maintenance, ware-
house logistics, payload tracking and
life-limited parts monitoring.
The airframers and their airline
customers have cooperated on RFID
development. “We agreed early on
that this would be non-competitive
and so we’ve been working with Airbus
through the Air Transport Association
and other standards bodies, including
EPCglobal, so we could have non-con-
flicting requirements,” Porad said.
“To have inconsistent direction to
common suppliers would be costly and
foolish for both” Airbus and Boeing, he
explained. “We have lots of customers
that fly a mixed fleet. They fly some
Boeing products and some Airbus
products. And these airlines have told
us, ‘Please, please do not deploy a
solution that would require us to have
two sets of infrastructure for a Boeing
airplane or an Airbus airplane. And so
we’ve met with Bombardier, Embraer,
Airbus … and we are working together
so there’s benefits across the whole
supply chain.”
In the case of onboard, on-airplane
parts marking, discussions involving
Boeing and others have focused on
line replaceable units, parts that are
reparable as opposed to consumables,
spare parts, dispatch-critical items, life-
limited or time-controlled parts subject
to airworthiness directives, and emer-
gency equipment such as life jackets,
first aid kits and breathing apparatus.
Getting to the stage of deploying
RFID tags on “flyable” components has
taken several years.
Reacting to what Porad described
as an “explosion” of interest in RFID
across varying industries at the start
of the last decade, Boeing and FedEx
in 2003 conducted an on-board evalu-
ation of high frequency 13.56 MHz
passive tags on an MD-10 freighter.
While “that worked fine,” Porad said,
the tags afforded a maximum, one-foot
read range. The evaluation was repli-
cated using 915 MHz UHF tags, “and
lo and behold, we got 10 to 12-feet
read range,” he said.
“That worked for us, because no
matter where the mechanic was stand-
ing inside the fuselage, if he could go
12 feet either direction and up, he
could capture information off all of the
tags. We kind of proclaimed UHF pas-
sive, 860 to 960 MHz (as the frequency
range) … and that was in line with
EPCglobal’s thinking.” EPCglobal is a
standards organization for Electronic
Product Code and RFID technology.
Based on the results of the FedEx
evaluation and a petition to FAA,
Porad said, the agency released its pol-
icy memo of May 13, 2005, supporting
‘What we are adding with
extended memory ... is a sig-
nificant (parts) history under
the ruggedized conditions
for which aerospace exists.’
Timothy Butler
President and CEO, Tego Inc.
‘We are good to go at this
very moment to put passive
devices on airplane parts.
There’s no barriers to enter
the market.’
Kenneth Porad
Boeing Commercial Aviation Services
RFID SPECIAL SECTION
APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION 29
Current guidance on applying RFID tags on working aircraft is provided by FAA Advisory Circular 20-162.
The use of active RFID tags on aircraft is possible, but the qualification process is described as ‘onerous.’
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SAE G18 Technical Committee for RFID in Aerospace is in the process of drafting a new standard for the
use of active and battery-assisted tags in aircraft. Some of the technological considerations are described.
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RFID SPECIAL SECTION
30 APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION
on-board use of passive RFID tags.
Industry standards underpin RFID
development for flyable components.
Air Transport Association (ATA) Spec
2000 Chapter 9, “Automated Identifi-
cation and Data Capture,” which is part
of a set of e-business specifications
developed by airlines and suppliers,
provides industry guidelines for trace-
ability, including the use of RFID to
permanently identify parts and their
lifecycle status.
AS5678, “Passive RFID Tags Intend-
ed for Aircraft Use,” was published
in December 2006 by the Society of
Automotive Engineers (SAE). It pro-
vides a requirements document for the
manufacture of passive-only UHF RFID
tags for aerospace, identifies minimum
performance requirements for use on
aircraft parts and specifies test require-
ments, including compliance with
RTCA DO-160E environmental test
criteria.
SAE was in the early stages of draft-
ing a new standard, AS6023, “Active
and Battery-Assisted RFID Tags Intend-
ed for Aircraft Use.”
“Active RFID tags (those with a bat-
tery) are being widely promoted for air-
craft applications,” states the rationale
by SAE’s G18 Technical Committee for
RFID in Aerospace.
“Some of the applications include
sensing temperature, vibration, stress,
fatigue, cargo handling, etc. Because
these tags have a battery and transmit
RF, there is a possibility they could
interfere with safety of flight.”
Said G18 Committee Co-chairman
Barry Allen, “from a technical perspec-
tive, there’s two issues with active tags
that are of concern. The first is the
proximity to sensitive devices. [T]he tag
is physically attached to a device, and
because of that, a much lower power
has the potential to interfere. I’m not
saying it will; I’m saying it has the
potential. That’s what the concern is.
“And the second item is … the fail-
ure mode. What’s the worst-case sce-
nario? With the passive tag, basically
nothing can happen. It’s unpowered.
But because you put a tag on that
battery, is there a failure mode that
can cause that tag to broadcast con-
tinuously, or (at) higher power? In the
battery itself, we have to worry about
safety risks.”
In addition to passive devices, FAA
AC 20-162 also addresses use of Low-
power active and Battery assisted pas-
sive (BAP) RFID devices. Low-power
active devices consist of a low-power
RF transmitter, an integrated circuit
controller, memory, antenna and power
source, according to FAA. BAP, or
semi-passive, devices have their own
power source, but the battery pow-
ers only the microchip, and the device
transmits only when interrogated.
‘Onerous’ Process
While use of active tags on aircraft is a
possibility, the qualification process is
“onerous,” advised Allen. “It’s a very
expensive process and, to my knowl-
edge, nobody in the industry has actu-
ally gone through this entire process
yet and is actively deploying active tag
technology in flight,” he said.
“This is where most of the go-
forward work has to be,” Allen said.
“And there’s a lot of anecdotal evi-
dence available out in the market for
people who have tested and tried this.
We have some in-flight tests — FedEx
did an extended test, UPS has done it
(and) the U.S. Air Force has been flying
this technology for many years with the
Savi (tag) and now the ISO 18000-7”
standard. Savi Technology, a Lockheed
Martin subsidiary based in Mountain
View, Calif., is the primary provider
of active RFID technology to the U.S.
Department of Defense and allied
defense forces.
Added consultant Anthony T.
“Buzz” Cerino, who has participated
with the G18 committee, “One of
the things that was found out during
efforts to come up with the passive
standard was that several organizations
did look at active tags, battery-assisted
passive tags, and found that many of
them were very close to achieving the
DO-160 requirement and, in fact, some
did. That was one of the reasons why
the committee felt that it would be rea-
sonable and achievable to move for-
ward with a requirements definition.”
Memory chip developer Tego, Inc.,
of Waltham, Mass., is supplying the 8
Kbyte chip specified by Airbus for the
A350XWB, in an order announced Jan.
19, 2010. It will be contained in tags
designed by MAINtag SAS of Paris.
In November, Tego announced the
availability of aviation-grade RFID tags
developed by Marubeni Chemix Corp.,
of Tokyo, and containing “TegoChip”
technology. The Marubeni TAGAT tags,
available with 4 Kbyte of memory, are
tested to SAE AS5678 for flyable parts,
are compatible with ATA Spec 2000
and are interoperable with standard
UHF Gen2 readers, the company said.
“What we are really adding, with
extended memory capability, is a
whole history now, so that throughout
the value chain, you can have a sig-
nificant history over a long period of
time under the ruggedized conditions
for which aerospace exists, to have
visibility into a whole range of parts
and information that hasn’t existed
before,” said Timothy Butler, Tego
president and CEO.
Butler said his company can provide
a platform with up to 32 Kbytes of
memory, a multiple of those chips now
in volume production.
“The current chip today will hold up
to 35 to 40 pages of information. Think
of it less like a chip and a tag and more
as a USB device,” he said. There is “the
ability to actually now hold pictures,
data, encryption — all sorts of informa-
tion that you would never have thought
(possible) before.”
Butler offered a scenario of how
on-board RFID tracking will benefit
aerospace. An avionics manufacturer
“builds a part for a Boeing or an Air-
bus plane that gets deployed into an
Air France plane that gets service,”
he said. “But 10 years later, maybe in
Costa Rica or Milan, the information
about those assets and those parts that
are being replaced today doesn’t go
along with those assets, and people
have no idea what’s actually happen-
ing with that information. They don’t
even know for sure whether or not it’s a
counterfeit part, for instance.
“The ability to have visibility into
this, the ability to carry the information
with those assets and pull the informa-
tion off by each of those major players
has huge value across the industry.”
—Bill Carey
www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 31
product focus
Lighting
By Ed McKenna
T
he use of light emitting diode
(LED) technology on com-
mercial and business aircraft is
becoming more the norm than
the exception. LEDs can be
used to illuminate everything from airline
logos on the tail to switches on the flight
deck. The technology is being built or ret-
rofitted into aircraft to improve appear-
ance and boost energy efficiency. While
technology and market issues remain,
LED lighting is expected to supplant
much, if not all, current technology on
aircraft over the next few years.
“The pace of LED (technology)
migration into aircraft is ... accelerating
for both the OEM as well as aftermar-
ket,” said Andre Hessling, manager of
advanced product development, lighting
systems at Goodrich Interiors. “There is
hardly any consideration of conventional
lights anymore.” Goodrich makes a range
of lighting systems using LED technol-
ogy, including cabin wash lighting and
passenger lighting.
The benefits of LEDs are well known,
including weight savings, lower mainte-
nance costs, ruggedness and increased
system reliability. But now, the technolo-
gy is further evolving, thanks to advance-
ments in other industries, including auto-
motive and consumer lighting systems,
allowing for more applications of LED
lighting solutions in aviation.
“Home lighting is the Holy Grail for
LED manufacturers (and) while it is still
in its infancy,” it is gaining momentum,
said Rob Harshaw, president and CEO
of Heads Up Technologies, of Carrolton,
Texas. Developments in these markets
will drive not only technology improve-
ments but also customer expectations for
this type of lighting, said Harshaw.
“It is slowly but surely encroaching
everywhere,” said Bruce Maxwell, presi-
dent of Luma Technologies, of Bellevue,
Wash. “It used to be (thought) they
would never be bright enough for outside
lights.” But now LEDs are available for
all exterior lights, including high-powered
flood lights and landing light systems.
This use of the technology will con-
tinue to grow over the next several years
as airlines and regional carriers look for
ways to save on maintenance costs and
weight, while providing an aesthetically
appealing interior for their passengers,
said Scott Sweet, interior lighting product
manager at Emteq, of New Berlin, Wis.
The technology continues to improve
as LEDs are being developed “to ever
higher performance levels in terms of
flux per bucks,” lumens per emitter and
light output (flux) per watt, but the rate
is declining, showing that LEDs are
reaching a first level of maturity,” said
Hessling. “Also, the light quality — the
homogeneity of emitted spectrum –– of
white LEDs is improving.”
“Because we are seeing more (effica-
cious) light being emitted from the LEDs,
we can package them differently” than
earlier LED systems, which were mainly
just “a straight line of light,” said Stephen
Scover, vice president and general man-
ager of the lighting division of B/E Aero-
space, Wellington, Fla. “There are places
that you can now put light or use lighting
effects that you couldn’t in the past.”
B/E Aerospace is using these innova-
tions to provide LED lighting for the
new “Sky Interior” on Next Generation
Boeing 737s. “The system is somewhat
revolutionary,” said Scover. “It is a seam-
less type of product: You basically walk
on the aircraft and experience lighting
as opposed to (encountering) a bunch of
lights staring at you from different or odd
angles.”
The company has worked closely with
Boeing to develop the interior design.
“We just didn’t come in at the back
end of the program; we worked with
some of the bin structures and on where
light would be placed,” Scover said. “I
think what that indicates is that there is
an industry acceptance now that a LED
system is the way to go.”
On the flight deck, thanks to the qual-
ity of the lighting — its light, color and
contrast — “things are not quite so fuzzy
anymore; they are nice and crisp and
clear,” which translates to greater situ-
ational awareness and enhanced safety,
said Maxwell. Last year, Luma Tech-
nologies introduced the LT-4500 Series
Integrated LED Display System for King
Adoption of LED technology for interior and exterior aircraft applications
is growing, but challenges remain for manufacturers of these systems
Emteq is providing exterior anti-collision
light for Bombardier CRJ regional jets.
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32 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
Air and Beechcraft 1900D aircraft. The
system is designed to be a one-for-one,
drop-in replacement for existing incan-
descent units, with immediate plug-and-
play functionality.
With increases in power density and
improvements in optical efficiency, “LED
applications on the exterior that were
more difficult to do before are really
now becoming more realistic if they are
designed properly,” said Vera Fosnot,
Honeywell senior manager of product
marketing for lighting.
The transition to LED began with
lower-power products, such as position
lights, but is now progressing toward the
higher-power products, like landing light
systems, she said. Currently, the great-
est demand is for LED replacements for
those lights with poor reliability, high cost
or high impact of repair as well as “lights
that are dispatch critical for the operators,
such as navigation lights,” Fosnot said.
However, “all of the lights on the exte-
rior can now be LED, if they are designed
and integrated properly,” and Honeywell
is developing a full suite of exterior LED
applications that will be applicable on
many different platforms, she said.
The exterior lighting market includes
large and smaller niche companies offer-
ing LED products for a variety of aircraft
types. For example, Goodrich touts its
introduction last year of a product line of
supplemental type certification certified
exterior lights for the Airbus A320 series.
Hessling said the line of runway turn-off
lights, taxi lights and logo lights offers a
return on investment within a year or less.
Emteq offers a variety of exterior
LEDs including the combined tail posi-
tion and anti-collision lights for the Bom-
bardier CRJ. Designed to replace current
halogen and xenon products, the LED
products include an integrated power
supply, eliminating the need for an exist-
ing external power supply, said Sweet.
Heads Up Technologies has developed
and qualified high intensity LED exterior
lights for the Cessna Citation Jet series
including the landing lights, wing inspec-
tion lights, tail flood lights and overwing
exit lights, said Harshaw. He said the
landing light outperforms the incan-
descent source it replaced and provides
“huge weight savings.” Heads Up also
provides the LED cabin lighting for the
Beechcraft King Air 350i.
Emteq is capitalizing on technol-
ogy improvements, such as better color
control and greater intensity, developed
in other industries, said Sweet. “It has
opened up the possibility for significant
innovation with our most recent examples
being the Daylight Variable White Wash
lighting product and exterior landing
lights.” The Daylight system offers a vari-
able white LED lighting system capable
of outputting multiple shades of white
light and is controlled through a control
management system.
However, this surge in demand has
its downside. LED has “gone ballistic in
every market and anytime anything goes
ballistic there goes source of supply (and)
consistency,” said Maxwell. It is also a
challenge for component developers, like
Luma, to keep up with the changing tech-
nology. “It’s a good problem, but still a
challenge,” he said.
LED Challenges
For all the advancements, challenges of
LEDs, including heat management, color
consistency and cost remain.
“Thermal management is really the
key to the longevity of LEDs,” Fosnot
said. It is critical to design the LEDs
properly and seek “the full FAR compli-
Market Moves
Following are recent developments announced by lighting system manufacturers.
➤ Talon Aerospace, of Helena, Ala., in December was awarded an EASA supplemental type
certificate for its LED anti-collision lights for the Airbus A300-600, A310, A318, A319, A320,
A321, A330 and A340 and Boeing 757, 767, DC-10, MD-10 and MD-11.
➤ Northrop Grumman’s air-traffic management subsidiary, Northrop Grumman Park Air
Systems, in February was awarded a contract to provide a Runway Status Light (RWSL)
Control System for Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris.
The RWSL Control System is an automated system that warns aircraft and vehicles if it
is safe to enter or cross runways through a series of lights embedded in the pavement. The
contract is to be completed by end of 2011.
➤ The Venezuelan air force purchased a joint solar and AC-power airfield lighting system
from Carmanah Technologies Corp., of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, and ADB Airfield
Solutions, of Columbus, Ohio. The two companies have partnered to create a lighting system
that includes radio-controlled solar LED ADB-branded runway edge lights and SATO blue
taxiway lights manufactured by Carmanah, combined with an AC-powered ADB approach
system.
➤ Emteq, based in New Berlin, Wis., in February received an FAA supplemental type cer-
tificate for installation of its LED Anti-Collision/Position (Navigation) Light in the Bombardier
Regional Jet 100/200/440.
Also, in November 2010, the company was awarded a contract from the U.S. Department
of Defense for Phase I of a Small Business Innovation Research program to develop a rotor
blade tip lighting system. Emteq said the goal of the program is to design and build a reliable,
lightweight rotor blade tip lighting system that can be modulated to provide red, green and
white navigation lights at the appropriate positions on the azimuth; a hover mode to clearly
mark the complete rotor disk circumference to ground crew; and a low-observable, NVG-
compatible mode for night formation flight.
➤ In September, Rockwell Collins was selected by the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of
China (COMAC) to provide the cabin core system (CCS) for its C919. Rockwell Collins’ CCS,
which will leverage technology from the company’s Venue cabin management system, allows
flight attendants to control all subsystems on the aircraft including in-flight entertainment,
passenger connectivity, lavatory, heating/cooling and lighting.
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wash lighting and LED reading lights like those, above, retrofitted into an MD80.
www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 33
ance over their entire rated life.”
Companies use different approaches
to handle the excess heat from the lights,
including using plastic and metal heat
sinks. From early on, “our products had
metal or aluminum heat sinks (and) we
have made something like 20 miles of
LED lighting now and have had very few
failures,” said Harshaw.
With more airplanes being made of
composites, LED systems have to be
carefully designed “to withstand HERF
(high-energy radio-frequency) and light-
ning induced transience,” said Maxwell.
“LEDs are very delicate things. They have
all these great benefits, but they have to
be nurtured and packaged.”
“The physical integration remains a
challenge for our general cabin lighting
(indirect wash) from time to time,” said
Sweet. “We still have to be careful in
ensuring the angles and orientation of the
light is just right.”
Electrical integration, specifically con-
trol, can be a challenge, he said.
In addition, color consistency of the
LEDs “is a huge problem,” said Harshaw.
“Even on a single reel of 2,000 to 5,000
LEDs, there are subtle variations in all
the lights.” This requires techniques to
put them together, so the color variation
can’t be seen.
On the flight deck, a key remaining
challenge is getting human factors and
industrial design groups to craft a defini-
tion of “what light colors are required
in terms of cool work-lights and warm‚
ambient lights,” Hessling said.
Dimming groups of lights also might
pose a few challenges, since the differenc-
es between the current-driven LED and
easier-to-dim voltage controlled filament
lights must be accounted for, he said.
Cost is also a key issue, especially
when it comes to retrofitting. “Airlines
have really been watching their discretion-
ary funds. When you think of a retrofit
for lighting that certainly would be discre-
tionary,” said Fosnot.
The cost of the technology and imple-
mentation is coming down. “However, as
the technology improves costs may rise,”
advised Hessling.
The business case can differ from
application to application. For example,
“incandescent lights that fail often and
are annoying to replace, like reading
lights, allow for a fairly easily justifi-
able business case,” Hessling said. On
the other hand, replacing sophisticated
halogen reading lights with very different
electronic characteristics than LEDs may
not be so easy to justify.
Companies generally concede tech-
nology changes in the near future will be
more evolutionary than revolutionary, at
least for aircraft applications. However,
they are keeping an eye on the develop-
ment of organic LEDs.
“We have been a bit disappointed
by the slow progress in this area,” said
Hessling. “There are some (first) applica-
tions in sight for the business jet clients
now, which we will integrate in our VIP
product line-up, where performance and
lifetime is less of an issue and experience
is the key attribute.”
Next month: Synthetic Vision Systems
Avionics Magazine’s Product Focus is a
monthly feature that examines some of the
latest trends in different market segments of
the avionics industry. It does not represent a
comprehensive survey of all companies and
products in these markets. Avionics Product
Focus Editor Ed McKenna can be contacted
at emckenna@accessintel.com.
Companies
ADB Airfield Solutions ........................................www.adb-airfield.com
Aerospace Optics .................................................... www.vivisun.com
Airtechnics, Inc. ................................................. www.airtechnics.com
Astronics Corp. ................................................... www.astronics.com
Avtech Corp. .......................................................... www.avtcorp.com
B/E Aerospace .............................................. www.beaerospace.com
Bruce Aerospace Inc. ........................................... www.bruceind.com
Carmanah Technologies Corp. ............................ www.carmanah.com
Dallas Avionics, Inc. ...................................... www.dallasavionics.com
Day-Ray Products, Inc. ........................................... www.day-ray.com
DeVore Aviation Corp. of America ..................www.devoreaviation.com
Diehl Aerospace ...........................................www.diehl-aerospace.de
Ducommun Technologies ..................................www.ducommun.com
Eaton Aerospace .......................................................www.eaton.com
Electro-Mech Components, Inc. ..............www.electromechcomp.com
Emteq ..................................................................... www.emteq.com
Endicott Research Group ..................................... www.ergpower.com
Esterline Control Systems .......................................www.esterline.com
Goodrich .................................................. www.goodrich-lighting.com
Heads Up Technologies .......................................www.heads-up.com
Honeywell .......................................................... www.honeywell.com
IDD Aerospace .......................................www.iddaerospacecorp.com
Interface Displays & Controls ..................... www.interfacedisplays.com
Luma Technologies .............................................. www.lumatech.com
Northrop Grumman ................................. www.northropgrumman.com
Page Aerospace .......................................www.pageaerospace.co.uk
Panelight Components Group, LLC ....www.panelightcomponents.com
Precise Flight, Inc. ............................................ www.preciseflight.com
Rockwell Collins ............................................www.rockwellcollins.com
Sirio Panel S.p.A ....................................................... www.siriopanel.it
Spectralux ..........................................................www.spectralux.com
STG Aerospace ............................................ www.stgaerospace.com
Talon Aerospace ......................................... www.talonaerospace.com
Heads Up Technologies pro-
vides cabin wash lighting
systems for various aircraft
types, including the Hawker
Beechcraft King Air 350i.
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new products
OpenVPX Board
Curtiss-Wright Controls Embedded
Computing introduced the VPX3-1256,
a 3U OpenVPX single board computer
(SBC) based on the new Intel Core i7 next
generation quad-core processor.
The board is designed for harsh envi-
ronment, air and conduction-cooled aero-
space applications, including unmanned
aircraft systems, tactical aircraft and rug-
ged naval systems. It is available with up to
8GB of high-bandwidth DDR3 SDRAM
(1333 MHz) and comes with high-speed
I/O, including dual Gigabit Ethernet,
Gen2 PCIe or SRIO, four USB 2.0 ports,
and an XMC/PMC site supported with
eight lanes of PCI Express.
Visit www.cwembedded.com.
Recorder TSO
L-3 Aviation Recorders, of Sarasota, Fla.,
received FAA Technical Standard Order
(TSO) C197 Information Collection and
Monitoring Systems approval for its Light-
weight Data Recorder, Model LDR 1000.
The LDR 1000 is compliant with the
qualification and documentation require-
ments of EUROCAE Document ED-155,
Minimum Performance Specifications for
Lightweight Flight Recording Systems.
L-3 said the LDR is well-suited to
the law enforcement, air ambulance and
offshore oil and gas exploration aviation
markets, where Flight Operations Qual-
ity Assurance, Flight Data Monitoring
and Helicopter Operations Monitoring
Program initiatives are becoming more
prevalent.
Visit www.l-3ar.com.
Radar Display USB Interfaces
Ballard Technology, of Everett, Wash., intro-
duced the USB 708, a line of portable avionics
interfaces that enable computers to commu-
nicate with ARINC 708 and similar weather
radar display databuses.
The USB interfaces allow engineers and
technicians to test weather radar Control-Dis-
play Units (CDU) and Transmit-Receive units
using any available PC, according to the com-
pany. They also are used for monitoring, recording and playing back data, as well
as simulating weather radar systems. The system incorporates Plug and Play and
Hot Swap features for easy installation and movement between computers, accord-
ing to the company. Ballard said the USB 708 supports maximum data throughput
and simultaneous operation on all channels. Word length and pre-sync pulses are
software-selectable to support custom protocols that deviate from ARINC 708.
Two channel (1 receive, 1 transmit) and four channel (2 receive, 2 transmit)
models are available and each includes 8 avionics discrete I/O, 48-bit hardware
time-tag and IRIG synchronization/generation. Visit www.ballardtech.com.
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34 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.avionicstoday.com
www.avionicstoday.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 35
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inside
magazine
April 2011 • Vol. 35, No. 4

www.avionicstoday.com

22
commercial
FedEx Delivers Maintenance ....................... 18
Cargo carrier and host airline of this year’s AMC, AEEC annual meetings in Memphis, FedEx balances technological advances in avionics with maintaining a varied fleet by Frances Fiorino

Visit www.avionicstoday.com to begin a subscription to the digital edition of Avionics.

■฀E-Letters
• Review of top developments in the civil and military aircraft electronics industry

military

■฀Webinars
www.aviationtoday.com/webinars

CH-53 Kilo Cockpit...................................... 22
The new cockpit of the U.S. Marine Corps CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement helicopter will feature “best pieces” from avionics updates developed for other military programs by Frank Colucci

special section
Airborne RFID .............................................. 27
Application of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags for component tracking on aircraft is upon us, at least for tags that are “passive” or without an integral power supply by Bill Carey

product focus
Aircraft Lighting ............................................ 31
The adoption of light-emitting diode (LED) technology in interior and exterior applications in commercial and business aircraft is growing, but some challenges remain by Ed McKenna

• UAS Civil Airspace Integration: Progress and Challenges • Issues in Air Traffic Management • Business Jet Connections: In-Flight Connectivity Services and Solutions for Business Aircraft • Airborne RFID: Radio Frequency Identification Takes Off • ADS-B: Progress and Implementation • Airport Surface Management: Enhancing Safety, Situational Awareness on Runways

■฀Online Resources
• Aerospace Acronym Guide www.aviationtoday.com/av/acronym/a.html • White Papers, Tech Reports www.aviationtoday.com/at/otherdocs/ • Aviation Today’s Job Board www.aviationtoday.com/aviationjobs/

also in this issue
Editor’s Note Cost Conundrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Departments Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Ad Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 New Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Cover: FedEx Express Aircraft Maintenance Technician at work below aircraft. This month, we profile FedEx’s avionics maintenance test and repair capabilities. Photo courtesy FedEx.

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where 18 “pioneer” airlines have proven ADS-B for air-traffic services. I’ve heard the cost conundrum discussed on both sides of the Atlantic. “The Greener Skies project represents a microcosm of the various elements that must be met in order to truly modernize the National Airspace System. allocation of spectrum for pieces like GPS and data communications. By FAA’s own calculation. There are still other challenges of standardization. Since my last dispatch. Will Ris. Here’s some perspectives: Sharing his thoughts at the FAA Forecast Conference in mid-February. Flight Operations. Estimates of the overall cost of NextGen to airlines and other airspace users range from $12 billion to $20 billion. It’s a troubling question that overshadows all discussions of NextGen.com .” he added. executive vice president. but cost intrudes on every waking thought of NextGen going and that’s the format we’ve had for all these years. One of the keys to this is the FAA shifting to a ‘best equipped. We’re advocates for doing more of these demonstration projects. best served approach is an incentive for airlines to equip. “We’re grossly underestimating what the cost of the current system is in its underperformance. a similar partnership with US Airways and other efforts seem like the proverbial drop-inthe-bucket. industry’s cost to equip for ADS-B Out will range from $2. cost intrudes upon every waking thought of NextGen.editor’s note by Bill Carey Cost Conundrum hen JetBlue Airways and FAA announced their partnership to equip JetBlue A320s for ADS-B Out capability. “So we’ve got a bit of a chicken-andegg problem with the funding and the equipage side.” The cost to industry of NextGen and SESAR came up weeks later in a panel discussion at ATC Global in Amsterdam. best served’ standard.” Ris argued.2 million in federal dollars. there are many skeptics who aren’t sure the FAA can implement the major overhaul that NextGen represents. We have an air-traffic control system today that is largely ground based. senior vice president of government affairs for AMR Corp. But that would be what we think would be the right public policy.avionicstoday.” argued Capt. Alaska Airlines CEO William Ayer cited his company’s participation in the “Greener Skies Over Seattle” project to implement Required Navigation Performance (RNP) approaches to each runway end at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.” In a keynote speech at the conference. proving the benefits and making the case that a substantial long-term investment is going to be required. “We’re just changing the location of some of the equipment. “It is our view that that air-traffic control system should continue to be financed and supported by the federal government because that’s after all. Michiel Van Dorst. substantial federal government support seems remote with the country $14 trillion in debt and Congress in a cost-cutting mood.5 billion to $6. “But to be candid. with KLM. But for now. technical fellow with GE Aviation.2 billion. “We believe that what we’re doing in Seattle can serve as a template for advancing NextGen in other parts of the country. because “we are fighting for every 20 seconds (of) throughput time. integration. It’s a similar situation in Europe. 4 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.” But Van Dorst said a best equipped. where all the ticket taxes are W There are still challenges of standardization. and we very much applaud that philosophical shift. I’m just paying the enroute charges. ominously. the reporters in the peanut gallery wanted to know how FAA — or anybody — planned to outfit the rest of the United States fleet. “I’ll tell you how we think we should get there.” said Fulton. harmonization and spectrum. That is not a position that anybody is saluting because that would mean the federal government would be paying for equipage in the airplanes. “This is a burden which the airlines cannot take on by themselves. harmonization and. but I’ll give you the argument at any rate. All we’re doing when we’re talking about NextGen is we’re taking a known technology — GPS technology — and moving part of the equipment in the air and part of the equipment will be on the ground. making the laudable program with JetBlue. said. subsidized by $4. integration. But inevitably cost clouds the vision of the Single European Sky. and the SESAR Joint Undertaking has embarked on 29 validation projects this year to further prime the pump.” An interesting reverse argument was offered by Steve Fulton. And the prospect of a National Infrastructure Bank notwithstanding. pre-financing.” Ayer said. and American Airlines. “I’m not the customer. It’s not working so well.

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HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION Macy L.com 4 Choke Cherry Rd.com Access Intelligence.holtic. James W. Ramsey. Frank Colucci. Jean-Michel Guhl ADVERTISING & BUSINESS PUBLISHER Tish Drake 800-325-0156 tdrake@accessintel. Aviation Today has been your Internet-hub for market intelligence and business resources.com HI-6120 (PQFP-100) HI-6121 (QFN-64) REPRINTS Wright’s Media 1-877-652-5295 sales@wrightsmedia.com FULFILLMENT MANAGER George Severine gseverine@accessintel. 6 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www.felling@statlistics.com SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES/BACK ISSUES 847-559-7314 LIST SALES Statlistics Jen Felling 203-778-8700 j. LLC CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Don Pazour EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT/CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Ed Pinedo EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT.aviationtoday.com AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Sarah Garwood sgarwood@accessintel. offering up-to-the-minute news and expert analysis in all aspects of the world of aviation. MD 20850 Phone: 301/354-2000 Fax: 301/340-3169 Visit us today at www.com CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Frank Alexander..avionicstoday.com A STACK Certified Supplier ISO 9001: 2008 Registered For over ten years.com DESIGN & PRODUCTION GRAPHIC DESIGNER Joy Park PRODUCTION MANAGER Tony Campana 301-354-1689 tcampana@accessintel. PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING Michael Kraus SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT. 2nd Floor Rockville. George Marsh. Ron Laurenzo.com.com MANAGING EDITOR Emily Feliz 301-354-1820 efeliz@accessintel.MIL-STD-1553 Data Bus Solutions HI-6120: World’s Smallest Remote Terminal EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bill Carey 301-354-1818 bcarey@accessintel.com 17279 . CORPORATE AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Sylvia Sierra SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER Robert Paciorek VICE PRESIDENT FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INTERNAL AUDIT Steve Barber For further information on these and other Holt products contact: Tel: (949) 859-8800 E-mail: sales@holtic. For photocopy or reuse requests: 800-772-3350 or info@copyright. Ed McKenna. Fecto DIVISIONAL PRESIDENT Heather Farley VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Joe Rosone VICE PRESIDENT.com SALES MANAGER Susan Joyce 480-607-5040 sjoyce@accessintel.com Web: www.

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Executives of the Single European Sky ATM Research Joint Undertaking (SESAR JU) described the SESAR “first release” March 8 at the ATC Global conference in Amsterdam. FAA NGIP Update Direction on the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) In and Data Communications will be forthcoming this year and in 2012.” FAA said it is “moving ahead” with Data Communications development that will enable the exchange of digital air-traffic control information between controllers and pilots.avionicstoday. and initial 4D capability plus Controlled Time of Arrival. EU Accord The European Union and FAA signed a memorandum of cooperation March 3 in the field of civil aviation research and development. such as Optimized Required Navigation Performance Structures. to FAA’s latest NextGen Implementation Plan (NGIP) update. He described a ‘first-release’ program of 29 projects. … We have to control the expectations to a certain extent. “The ARC’s work will set the stage for future ADS-B In applications.industry scan COMMERCIAL SESAR Validation The public-private entity charged with developing the Single European Sky vision will conduct 29 validation projects in Europe this year with the aim of introducing “pre-industrial” procedures. Feedback to the ARC recommendations will be incorporated in an ARC final report due by June 2012. “This planning date has been adjusted out two years as we continue to weigh the complexity of integrating enhancements into the National Airspace System as well as budget adjustments. FAA said. The validation projects will span the broad areas of “green” terminal airspace operations. according 8 Avionics Magazine April 2011 Bill Carey photo Florian Guillermet.” FAA said. and that’s how the R&D activities are going to deliver the results in the future.” he said. FAA. It’s the very first time we are doing an activity like this in Europe. such as spacing and merging aircraft using flight deck interval management. as well.” FAA said. “The aim of the release really is to put together the final results of research and development. Enroute centers are expected to be capable of issuing airborne reroutes via Data Comm in 2018. “This delivery activity is something that we intend not only to start this year.” There will be 16 specific operational focus areas addressed by the 29 projects. The latter rule mandates ADS-B Out capability by 2020. to bring to the community the results in terms of pre-industrialization solutions. SESAR JU chief program officer. according to the NGIP. endto-end traffic synchronization and collaborative network management.com . Airport towers are expected to begin offering departure clearances with revisions to Future Air Navigation System (FANS) 1/A+ equipped aircraft by 2015. saving fuel and maximizing runway capacity. “Those findings are expected to provide a clear definition on how the aviation community should proceed with ADS-B In. released in March. The agreement was signed during a high-level conference in Budapest organized by the Hungarian Presidency and European Commission. and a first annex covering “cooperative activities and interoperability aspects” of the SESAR and NextGen air-traffic modernization programs. The agency said a final investment decision slated for 2012 will enable it to contract with a vendor to provide the VHF radio network that will carry Data Comm messages. but to continue on a yearly basis in the program. and direct auto-load into aircraft flight management systems. Point Merge in Complex Terminal Control Area.” the agency said. four-dimensional (4D) trajectories. “Then a decision has to be made (as to) whether they are going to be deployed or not. The first-release grouping resulted from a review of the status of 300 active SESAR work projects. according to FAA. enabling flight crews to line up their aircraft more efficiently on final approach. We have. “This capability provides more precise aircraft-to-aircraft position information to the flight deck.” said Florian Guillermet. to determine where early results could be achieved. policies and products of the future European air-traffic management (ATM) system. A second release in 2012 will be more aggressive in terms of the number and types of activities. SESAR JU chief program officer. to remain humble with this first release. The initial recommendations of an Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) formed last year to look into the application of ADS-B In are due to FAA this fall. Guillermet said. speaks March 8 at ATC Global conference in Amsterdam. while ensuring compatibility with the ADS-B Out avionics standards detailed in the ADS-B Out final rule published in May 2010. “The conference focused on identifying tangible measures to finalize implementa- www.

and Siim Kallas.. among companies and organizations from other industries. Air Transport Association.” formed to oppose the application by LightSquared LLC to use L-band spectrum for a new nationwide broadband service.C. Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. “Substantial benefits are expected from enhanced cooperation between the European bodies involved in air-traffic management as well as from the extension of the Single European Sky to non-EU states.. ITT in August 2007 was selected by FAA to provide a nationwide ADS-B ground infrastructure consisting of 794 ground-based transceivers. as well as operational methods under SESAR and NextGen. Under the contract. of Italy. Joining the coalition. state secretary for transport for Hungary.” including the display of down-linked ADS-B targets on controller displays. Selex Systems Integration is a wholly owned subsidiary of Selex Sistemi Integrati.. ADS-B Second Supplier Selex Systems Integration Inc. clearing the way for the segment 2 phase of the contract.. Selex will deliver more than 400 radios during a three-year performance period. was selected as the first supplier of dual-link 1090 MHz and UAT transceivers under a three-year. The contract includes options for additional units and for extended depot maintenance support over the service life of the radios. As part of the ITT industry team. The coalition cites the “highly unusual decision” by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in January to issue www.tion of the Single European Sky. Louisville and Philadelphia. were the Aeronautical Repair Stations Association. Kan. $40 million contract. Last October.” Carey Fagan.avionicstoday.. FAA executive director for international affairs. The agreement calls for both sides to research the interoperability of avionics.” according to a summary. at key sites in Alaska. The company also installed 300 of the ground-based terminals. Overland Park. announced the award of a contract from ITT Corp. Kan. Thales North America’s Air Traffic Management business in Shawnee.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 9 . The ADS-B radios will be manufactured in Overland Park. as the second source radio supplier for ITT’s Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system rollout. announced March 10 in Washington. D. Garmin and General Aviation Manufacturers Association. SpA. EU vice president and commissioner for transport and mobility. ITT said it successfully completed the first segment of the ADS-B contract following the implementation of “critical services.S. signed the memorandum of cooperation for the U. Pal Volner. signed on behalf of the EU. the Gulf of Mexico. The radio is intended for use in both ADS-B and multilateration (MLAT) applications. communication protocols and procedures. ‘Save GPS’ Coalition Aviation industry associations and manufacturers were among initial members of the “Coalition to Save Our GPS.

” said Philip Clinch. “The OPTIMI study shows that the technical elements to improve aircraft tracking are already available. SITA’s Aircom Monitoring System (AMOS) to supervise the equipment and test tools. SITA said it is teaming with EGIS Avia of France to provide ProATN routers to FABEC. VDL Mode 2 communications will be required under FAA’s NextGen Data Comm program.-wide shows the FAA and the aircraft operators that SITA has the VDL network in place and ready for when aircraft are equipped to use the FAA Data Comm services. The GPS system operates in the 1559-1610 MHz band. Our VDL investment 10 Avionics Magazine April 2011 U. SITA said the communication infrastructure will support Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN) protocol and VHF Digital Link Mode 2 (VDL Mode 2). ONLINE www. SESAR JU chief of Regulatory Affairs. SITA has been FAA’s Oceanic data communications service provider since 1999. “SITA has been working on the VDL services the FAA requires since ICAO VDL standardization was first launched. Belgium.” the organization said.industry scan a conditional waiver to LightSquared to use L-Band spectrum adjacent to that of GPS. It is now important to make full use of this technology by proposing the necessary regulatory changes.avionicstoday. ADS-C involves the downlink of aircraft position reports controlled by a ground station.com www.com . SITA said. the public-private entity overseeing Europe’s SESAR airtraffic modernization program. the project included in-flight demonstrations involving commercial flights in the North Atlantic. SITA said it has added VDL radios to 50 of the 300 VHF ACARS station sites in the United States already used by some U. “The usual FCC process of conducting extensive testing followed by approvals was not followed in this instance. SITA said. potentially interfering with millions of GPS receivers. The project was conducted under the auspices of the Single European Sky ATM Research Joint Undertaking (SESAR JU).” the SESAR JU reported. The scope of agreement includes VHF ground stations. the company said. Anchorage and Ronkonkoma. These are recommendations of the Oceanic Position Tracking Improvement & Monitoring (OPTIMI) project.” Based on the final report of the consortium. CPDLC is the exchange of data messages between pilots and controllers. The FABEC agreement adds to existing relationships between SITA and ANSPs in Germany. in combination with new procedures and protocols. from a purely prescriptive approach. According to the SESAR JU. conducted in the aftermath of the loss of Air France Flight 447 in the Atlantic Ocean in June 2009. to improve flight tracking. improvements of procedures should be envisaged with the automatic transmission of the aircraft position in oceanic and remote areas in an interval of 15 minutes. N. Its service supports air-traffic control systems based at Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs) at Oakland. The VDL coverage expansion provides SITA customer airlines that have installed VDL radios with a 20-fold increase in link capacity for ACARS. Instead. Products of the Future Air Navigation System (FANS) concept developed by Boeing and Airbus for long-haul aircraft.S. signed a 10-year framework agreement with SITA to provide an air/ground communication infrastructure.Y.” Stated Jose Calvo Fresno. It calls for FCC and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration to ensure LightSquared’s license modification is contingent on the outcome of a mandated study that is “comprehensive. “There are several possibilities. coupled with new procedures. objective and based on correct assumptions about existing GPS uses rather than theoretical possibilities. The agreement also includes the sharing of the air/ground infrastructure.” the GPS coalition stated.avionicstoday. the SESAR JU will propose regulatory “initiatives” to the European Commission in the first half of 2011. The objective was to assess the value of using existing Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Contract (ADS-C) services and Controller-Pilot Datalink Communications (CPDLC). Luxembourg. The agreement. The airspace controlled by the FABEC ANSPs covers 55 percent of European air traffic. would provide improved aircraft tracking in oceanic and remote airspace. this will cover in particular ADS-C and CPDLC.” Flight Tracking Available avionics used in flight-tracking applications. consisting of the Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) of France. ATM ANSP Communications Members of Functional Airspace BlockEurope Central (FABEC).S. An automatic transmission of the position should be triggered whenever a deviation from the planned route is detected. Portugal and Spain for ATN and VDL Mode 2. airlines. to the use of incentive mechanisms exploring the performance scheme. “The consortium carrying out the project on behalf of the SJU recommended on a technological level to encourage the equipage and use of Future Air Navigation System products for Oceanic Area Control Centers and aircraft flying oceanic areas. SITA Vice President Aircraft Services. European and African regions of the Atlantic Ocean. “At the same time. as part of the Advanced Technologies and Oceanic Procedures (ATOP) and Flight Data Processing-2000 systems.” VDL Mode 2 Air transport communications provider SITA announced March 7 that its VHF Digital Link Mode 2 (VDL Mode 2) service is now available to airlines in the United States. The FCC waiver allows LightSquared to use spectrum in the 1525-1559 MHz band for broadband transmissions if the company can demonstrate that harmful interference will be avoided. in line with datalink regulation. allowing SITA to provide operational communications to airlines. will enable FABEC to meet the European Union’s 2013 deadline for implementation of controller-pilot datalink communications (CPDLC) across Europe. announced March 8 at the ATC Global conference in Amsterdam. the process was approve first. the Netherlands and Switzerland. then test. “The VDL definition took advantage of emerging digital radio technology to increase link capacity by a factor of 20 compared to the VHF ACARS link which has been available up to now.

S.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 11 . The Nassau Airport Development Company is overseeing the LPIA project.avionicstoday.000-square-foot domestic arrivals and departures terminal. describing the facility as key to the economic revitalization of The Bahamas. the latter company managed a $120 million expansion of Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay. pitch and roll ARINC 429 heading to synchro ARINC 407 heading Hardware solution to any digital to synchro conversion Avionics Interface Systems (AIS) Technology and expertise to cost-effectively integrate diverse aircraft systems and protocols.” Stage 2 of the LPIA redevelopment will see renovation of the existing U. The project includes 34 new gates. The terminal provides customs preclearance for outbound flights to the United States. Vanderpool-Wallace said. which will serve as a new International Arrivals Terminal opening in 2012. 26 celebrated the completion of a new United States Departures Terminal at Nassau’s Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA). pitch and roll to synchro ARINC 407 heading. and it’s No. The last facilities will open in 2013.com or contact us at 1.” he said. “If Nassau/Paradise Island in The Bahamas was a country by itself. a 21 percent increase over the current footprint. departures terminal. it would be No.328. Departures Terminal Dedicated At Bahamas Gateway Airport NASSAU. The Bahamas – Bahamian government and airport officials on Feb. completed in 2009. and we’re working to fix that. Among other projects. the airport will have capacity to serve 5 million passengers annually. three-phase redevelopment costing $409.6500 www. It began operations in March. with one capable of handling the Airbus A380.800.New U. “Today.” he said. With the completion of second and third phases of the redevelopment in 2012-2013. “The problem is that a lot of them are not connected to the global distribution system. Completion of the 247. Stage 3 involves the design and construction of a 112. 4 in terms of total air arrivals. Minister of Tourism and Aviation. “But Nassau/Paradise Island is only 2 percent of The Bahamas. The LPIA redevelopment will result in 585.” In an interview after the ceremony. so people from elsewhere cannot book them directly. as well as an International Departures Terminal.927. allowing them to operate as domestic flights upon arrival at their destinations.000 gathered for the opening ceremony.5 million. we are definitely on our way to realizing the long-deferred national aspiration for an attractive. it served 3. modern and efficient principal air gateway to The Bahamas. Departures Terminal is the signature achievement of the first phase of a planned. which is managed by Vancouver Airport Services of Canada. air travel. Jamaica. ™ The Avionics Mediator Visit www. 2 in terms of total visitors.S.” The plan is to grow intra-Bahamas Synchronize Your Attitude with the Shadin AIS 450 Trident ARINC 429 heading.” Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told a crowd of 2.000 square feet of terminal space. “This is befitting of our status as the premier destination in our region. So 98 percent of the country has not been developed as yet. — Bill Carey Photo by Christian Kjelgaard Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace.S. said LPIA serves as the hub for other major islands of The Bahamas.shadin.000-squarefoot U. it would be No.2 million in 2008. “What you will be shocked to hear is we have on the order of eight scheduled airlines operating in The Bahamas today. 1 in cruise passengers.0584 or 952.

With the press of a button. Using floppy disks and CDs to distribute Software Parts to one plane after the other wastes time and can lead to human error. To find out how LoadStar® Server Enterprise from Teledyne will benefit your operation visit www. the G1000H integrates control and presentation of most flight data.” said Mike Mos. LoadStar ® Server Enterprise (LSE). Northrop Grumman director of Joint STARS architectures and concept demonstrations.com/lse or call +1-310-765-3600 No Floppy Back Office Integration Secure-Encrypted Data Wireless Technology Available Improved Compliance 12 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. design and analysis. loading can be verified instantly. Calif. Recruiting is targeted at engineering disciplines. Secure distribution. Teledyne’s scalable solution. reduced man hours. Images also were transmitted to off-board SIPRNET elements using beyond-line-ofsight (BLOS) satellite communications. can support an additional large sensor. including embedded software. high-resolution displays. will install the G1000H on its Bell 407GX. MILITARY Multispectral Sensor Northrop Grumman completed installation and testing of a multispectral intelligence sensor housed in a new keel beam accessory (KAB) bay on a modified E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Joint STARS) aircraft. and systems. “Flight tests on the Joint STARS testbed aircraft proved the KAB. Business support jobs for the C-130 and B-1 pro- Distributing… Nav Database Distribution at the Press of a Button Teledyne’s LoadStar® Server Enterprise is the most comprehensive. Optional features include Garmin’s Helicopter Synthetic Vision Technology (HSVT). and improved regulatory compliance: that’s what Teledyne’s LoadStar ® Server Enterprise delivers. to Oklahoma City. surveillance and reconnaissance capability. to see how the sensor enhances combat identification in support of Joint STARS’ battle management role. Bell Helicopter. including new cockpits.teledynecontrols.com . piston-engine helicopter. Leveraging features of its G1000 fixedwing counterpart. and seamlessly distribute them from desktop to data loaders across any size fleet. Boeing said. lower costs. you can configure and store software parts once. Joint STARS operators tasked the MS-177 sensor to collect information and streamed data into the battle management system already in place.industry scan BUSINESS/GA G1000H Cockpit Garmin International on March 6 unveiled the G1000H integrated glass cockpit for VFR Part 27 helicopters carrying up to nine passengers. launch customer for the avionics suite. structural.. The company announced last August that programs will begin to transition from Long Beach. sensor and instrument functions on large. Garmin also announced that it has initiated work to obtain a supplemental type certificate for installation of the Garmin G500H glass cockpit in the Robinson R44 four-place. The installation and test examined the use of the 500-pound MS-177 multispectral camera.avionicstoday. No more struggling with old media! And when a mechanic loads the distributed data. or multiple small sensors with no impact to the system’s current battle management command and control and intelligence. Engineering Center Boeing started hiring engineers and other staff for its new engineering design center in Oklahoma City that will produce upgrades of the C-130 Hercules and B-1 Lancer aircraft. automates the entire data distribution process. the company said. wire design and installation. While in test flights off the coast of Florida. Helicopter Terrain Awareness and Warning System (HTAWS). The transition will shift 550 jobs to Oklahoma City by the end of 2012 and create 150 open positions this year. located directly behind the APY-7 radar. GDL 69AH weather display and GSR 56H Iridium datalink. Joint STARS operators were able to simultaneously exploit ground moving target indication (GMTI) and high-resolution imagery. integrated and secure way to manage and distribute software parts and aircraft data to your airplanes.

Changes to the RQ-4B include a stronger wing. DARPA’s $33 million KQ-X program will demonstrate autonomous fuel transfer between two Global Hawks. Northrop Grumman announced March 9 that its Proteus test aircraft and a NASA Global Hawk flew as close as 40 feet apart at an altitude of 45.Trevose.. The first fuselage was slated to ship in April to the company’s Palmdale.com AIM GmbH . Miss. Northrop Grumman said the January demonstration flight was key to reducing risks as the program prepares for autonomous aerial refueling of two Global Hawks in the spring of 2012.grams also are available. Simulated breakaway maneuvers were also conducted. a joint effort with NASA Dryden that used an F-18 fighter as a surrogate unmanned aircraft to autonomously refuel through a probe and drogue from a Boeing 707 tanker. KQ-X follows the 2006 DARPA Autonomous Aerial Refueling Demonstration (AARD). is planned this fall.S. including business planning and supply chain positions. Participating with Northrop Grumman in the demonstration were the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. a marinized version of the U. Calif.avionicstoday. the company said. Test Readiness Review.High Wycombe Tel: +44 1494 446844 email: salesuk@aim-online.S. PC/104-Plus USB PMC/XMC ExpressCard PCI/PCIe cPCI/PXI VME VXI S NEW IU E OFF C AIM Office Contacts: US s new hia unche lp AIM la in Philade prise enter AIM USA .000 feet during a risk-reduction test flight Jan. Navy in February. facility. sets the initial product baseline for the MQ-4C. The BAMS program is managed by the Navy’s Program Executive Office. The program’s next major milestone. The MQ-4C system CDR. Wake turbulence between the Proteus and Global Hawk aircraft as well as engine performance and flight control responsiveness in the stratosphere were evaluated.000 square feet of space that is being remodeled to accommodate the C-130 workers who will begin arriving in April.com AIM UK .Freiburg Tel: +49 761 45 22 90 email: sales@aim-online.com www. Jobs are posted at http://jobs-boeing.München Tel: +49 89 70 92 92 92 email: salesgermany@aim-online. Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons Persistent Maritime Unmanned Aircraft Systems Program Office (PMA-262) at NAS Patuxent River. Md. manufacturing center for final assembly and first flight in 2012. PA Tel: 267-982-2600 email: salesusa@aim-online. Air Force RQ-4B Global Hawk. BAMS Design Review Northrop Grumman said it conducted a critical design review of the MQ-4C Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Aircraft System (BAMS) with the U. Calif.. UNMANNED SYSTEMS UAS Refueling A “major step forward” in demonstrating autonomous refueling between two unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) at high altitude has been accomplished. The first two fuselages of the BAMS System Development and Demonstration phase are under construction at Northrop Grumman’s Moss Point. 21.com AIM GmbH .com/okc The Oklahoma City center includes 50. which was preceded by 10 subsystem and segment CDRs. an ice protection system and a sensor suite based on components or entire systems already fielded in the Department of Defense inventory.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 13 . located in Edwards. enabling flights of up to one-week endurance.

For more than 15 years. Engdahl. D. Calif. an engineering.. as director. budgeting and operational execution and improvement of U. Bemis has more than 25 years of aviation experience. He has led worldwide maintenance efforts for commercial carriers United and Delta Air Lines in addition to the fractional aircraft provider Flight Options. including planning. Jaime W. appointed Jerry Bemis vice president of manufacturing. Mark Andrews Metron Aviation.. who was recently selected for promotion to rear admiral. Murri also was instrumental in developing Southwest’s Onboard Performance Computer. His operational assignments include Electronic Attack Squadrons 129 and 130. Capt. He has flown more than 80 combat sorties and logged 250 flight hours over Iraq and Bosnia. Murri designed. aviation-related services.. Jaime Engdahl Capt. an early electronic flight bag. CSSI was awarded a SE2020 prime contract in 2010 to provide systems engineering and program management of several Next Generation Air Transportation System projects.. He designed and deployed Southwest’s first remote server infrastructure at airport locations. of Dulles. including the airline’s implementation of mission critical aircraft messaging for both airborne and ground systems. IT and applied research company based in Washington. Doug Murri Doug Murri has joined inflight entertainment supplier Row 44. he has supported FAA technically and Don Embt as a manager and supervisor of various projects and contracts. Va. Embt has more than 20 years of experience in engineering and project management. UCAS-D (PMA-268). who was previously the deputy program manager for the E-6B Mercury Block I/IA program. Engdahl also served as an acquisition professional in PMA-265 and in the E-6B program.people Don Embt CSSI. succeeded Capt. of Cleveland.C. Jeffrey R. Jerry Bemis Nextant Aerospace. In his 16 years with the airline. Penfield. appointed Mark Andrews weather principal subject matter expert.com . led and implemented several key business-system and technology initiatives. Engdahl was named head of the Naval Air Systems Command Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration Program. Murri was most recently with Southwest Airlines. Engdahl completed flight training in Pensacola. promoted Don Embt to program manager for the company’s System Engineering 2020 (SE2020) contract. Andrews joins Metron Aviation from the National Oceanic 14 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. and was designated a Naval Flight Officer in 1984. of Westlake Village. Fla. Andrews has more than 30 years of experience in meteorological activities.avionicstoday. Airline Solutions.S.

Rick Stine StandardAero named Rick Stine senior vice president of its Components Sector in Cincinnati. Department of Commerce. He has more than 25 years of product design and engineering experience. Previously. locations. He facilitated the creation and evolution of all foundational weather documents related to NextGen. Swindon. Zener Designs and Motorola GSM Systems. a Voice over Internet protocol company.icg. assist with your ROI calculations or learn about our inexpensive avionics solutions. named Moshe Tal as CEO. provider of security systems. FANS 1/A. Be ready. Compliant with current and future ATC messaging. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin in 1999. where he was the assistant director. a U.and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). succeeding Roger Rowe. Texas.K. The time to begin preparing for the Link 2000 and NxtGen requirements and mandates is now! Contact ICG to discuss your technical requirements.J. Previously. appointed Stuart Harvey international sales director. where he was general manager of its El Paso. He spent time with Miller Aviation and Trajen Flight Support before making the move to Atlantic Aviation in 2007.. integrated work plans and policy development.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 15 ..avionicstoday. engineering and and marketing. Air Force for 23 years as a fighter pilot and test pilot. Stine worked for GE Aircraft Engines. support current and emerging Datalink messaging: ACARS. 100% Connected to Your Aircraft. Tal was vice president of AudioCodes USA. To nd out more. based in Chatsworth. Texas. Addison and Wichita Falls. location.S. Jeff Miller Landmark Aviation named Jeff Miller general manager of its Dallas. including business development. In 1999. Stuart Harvey Integrated Microwave Technologies. visit www. he left active duty and became an experimen- tal test pilot for Lockheed Martin on the F-22 program. as well as providing the ight crew and cabin with satellite voice services. He previously worked for L-3 Communications TRL Technology. where he was senior vice president. Stine comes to StandardAero from HEICO. Moshe Tal Aitech Rugged Group. Technical Operations. where he served as team leader and design engineer for advanced exhaust systems and hot section components for the Advanced Tactical Fighter demonstrator program and civil aviation programs. principally associated Moshe Tal with analog and digital signal processing technologies. He joined AudioCodes USA in 2004 in connection with the acquisition of Ai-Logix. Tal has been with the company since 2009 working in several departments. And to the Future. Alan Norman Alan Norman was named chief test pilot for the F-35 Lightning II program. NextGen Joint Planning and Development Office. N. who retired in 2010. He is also Lockheed Martin’s chief pilot for the T-50 program. CPDLC and ADS-C. Reliable and continuous communications with your aircraft and ight crew are paramount for e cient operations and ight safety. www. Miller started his aviation career in the U. SUPERIOR TECHNOLOGY. of Mount Olive. Air Force. Harvey was most recently divisional director for Synetics Surveillance Technology.aero or call +1 757 947 1055. INNOVATIVE COMMUNICATIONS. including a weather concept of operations. for whatever the future brings.S. ICG’s Iridium based ight Deck systems. Calif. Norman served in the U.

11-14 Navy League Sea-Air-Space Exposition. Md. contact ATCA at 703-299-2430 or visit www. Russia. 20-26 Paris Air Show. Wright State University and Wright Patterson Air Force Base.S.org. National Harbor. phone 301. phone +44 (0)208 271 2174 or visit www. Visit www. Baltimore. Hamburg.ausa.auvsi.nbaa. Walter E. Contact ALEA. Contact ARINC Industry Activities. 12-15 Autotestcon 2011. Visit www.C. Walter E. 10-12 Association of the U. Hamburg Messe. May 2-5 16th Annual International Symposium on Aviation Psychology.C. Visit www. Paris.org. Marriott Downtown. September 11-15 Airline Passenger Experience Association (APEX) Conference & Exhibition.org.paris-air-show.J. D. June 15-16 RTCA 2011 Annual Symposium: Accelerating NextGen Through Public-Private Partnership. Baltimore Convention Center. Visit http://autotestcon.aero.org. Westin Washington Dulles Airport.org.631-2406 or visit www. Tenn.com/rtca. National Harbor.com.org/techsymposium. Visit www. Le Bourget. Contact AUSA. Visit http://i-cns. Walter E. Va. Washington. Contact ATCA. New Orleans. Resorts Hotel and Casino.com. Geneva.aero. Atlantic City. Ernest N. Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center. Las Vegas. phone 202-783-9000 or visit www.aviasalon. July 20-23 Airborne Law Enforcement Association (ALEA) Annual Conference and Exhibition.avionicstoday.atca. For information. Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center.com . Zhukovsky. Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center. Memphis. Visit www.aviation-ia.com.wright. Washington Convention Center. Visit www. N. Ohio.ebace.org. Contact NBAA.com.calendar April 5-7 Aircraft Interiors Expo.atca. 10-12 Integrated Communications Navigation and Surveillance (ICNS) Conference. Washington Convention Center. Dulles. 16 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. Washington State Convention Center. For information. Washington Convention Center. Moscow Region.aviationtoday. phone 703-299-2430 or visit www. D. phone 703-841-4300 or visit www. Washington. Visit www. Morial Convention Center. 17-19 Air Traffic Control Association/FAA/NASA Technical Symposium.alea.com.org. 17-19 European Business Aviation Convention and Exhibition (EBACE). Nashville. Switzerland.quad-a. Washington. Germany. Visit www. Dayton. D. 18-21 AMC/AEEC Joint Meetings. August 16-19 Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Unmanned Systems North America.com/amc. Visit http://apex. 16-21 MAKS 2011 International Aviation & Space Salon. Geneva PALEXPO and Geneva International Airport. Seattle.C.seaairspace. Tenn. October 3-5 Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) Annual Conference & Exposition. Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting & Exposition.edu/isap. Md. 17-20 Quad A Annual Convention.aircraftinteriorsexpo. 10-12 National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) Annual Meeting & Convention. phone 410-266-2008 or visit www.

.. software. right attitude/right approach/right alongside www.. such as the FAA’s NextGen air transportation system.. It is shown for illustration purposes only and not to be used for navigation. ™ We’re on it. All rights reserved.goodrich. • • • SmartDisplay™ EFB.NEED A DIRECT FLIGHT TO A PAPERLESS COCKPIT? WE’RE RIGHT ALONGSIDE.com .. Chart is copyright Jeppesen Sanderson. and support services that allows flight crews and flight ops to perform critical ground and in-flight data management tasks faster and more efficiently. configured as Class 2 or 3 platform Seamless wireless network and software compatibility Upgradable for future technologies. including ADS-B Contact us at sis@goodrich.have it ready to support both current and future technologies…support it with full 24/7/365 technical services..include a high-resolution aerospace-grade display and a high-speed processor. Start with the EFB.and what have you got? The Goodrich Cockpit Data Management Solutions™—a turn-key. Inc.com for more information. integrated EFB package of hardware. ©2009 Goodrich Corporation.

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and MD10s. 757-200s. Boeing.. Maintaining this varied fleet requires a broad portfolio of avionics bench capabilities. Tenn.avionicstoday. FedEx Delivers Maintenance Cargo carrier and host airline of this year’s AMC/AEEC balances new technological advances in avionics with maintaining its varied fleet overall trends and challenges facing the industry — keeping pace with increasingly sophisticated technologies and maintaining a skilled workforce. A310200/300s. said FedEx Vice President of Aircraft Engineering and Technical By Frances Fiorino argo carrier FedEx Express operates a fleet of hundreds of aircraft across a global network.com . 777Fs. Tenn. and with the latest avionics. Cessna and ATR models. hub. “Avionics” is described by the AMC as “anything with a wire in it. A look at the FedEx Express avionics maintenance operation reflects the 18 Avionics Magazine April 2011 C Photo courtesy FedEx www.5 million packages and 11 million pounds of freight on a daily basis. Boeing 727-200s. The fleet includes Airbus A300-600s. Keeping that fleet operating efficiently and safely. 200 suppliers and five airframers to discuss and resolve technical solutions for avionics maintenance and standards.500 pilots fly 684 aircraft.commercial FedEx Express aircraft fleet awaits freight at company’s Memphis. which brings together maintenance and engineering personnel from more than 70 airlines. is a mammoth job. from large jet transports to turboprops at 375 airports worldwide. FedEx Express is host airline of the event. It handles about 3. These challenges likely will be among topics discussed at this year’s AMC/AEEC annual meetings. employs thousands of pilots and maintenance professionals and is responsible for making sure packages arrive safely and on-time. Cessna 208A/B and ATR-72/42 aircaft. including Airbus. FedEx operates a fleet of 684 aircraft. The largest all-cargo airline’s 4.” and FedEx Express avionics maintenance personnel handle countless miles of wires. April 18-21 in Memphis.

It replaces the traditional test-fix-test method where the time required to test a line replaceable unit (LRU) might be one hour or eight hours. FedEx Express has relationships with numerous partners around the world performing component maintenance for avionics. For example. www. The Memphis and Los Angeles avionics and instrument shops. for example. the parts organization staff that supports them and engineers meet daily to discuss where to eliminate waste in the maintenance process. FedEx Express adopted the Kaizen technique. the FedEx Avionics Bench in 2010 adopted a predictive maintenance process.” “The predictive process identifies components that have been degraded with time or are at risk of becoming obsolete. and the Ametek aircraft interface test unit (AIU) Test Station to support MD-10 and MD-11 autopilot and flight deck instrumentation. MD-10 and MD-11 and Airbus electrical power components. engine and heavy maintenance services.168 units returned to service each month. said Yerger. the Memphis Avionics Component Shop is a 40. Kaizen is Japanese for “continuous improvement. for example. connectors wear and solder joints are subjected to the stresses of their operational environment.” As avionics systems and inventory age. depending on how far the test procedure progresses before it isolates the failure. where C checks are conducted. “‘empowered’ means the technicians. employs about 10 full-time AMTs.” Yerger said. Yerger said the aging process can cause “unreliable. FedEx’s test equipment includes the Avitron UnivATE to support the Boeing 727. are reworked and worn connectors are replaced. Here. The workspace was reorganized by looking at process flow from receiving through dispatch out of the facility. The new process tries to identify the precursor condition and repair or improve it before it is returned to service. as well as airframe. Yerger.Planning Mark D. Five years ago. Determined to better identify failure conditions and prevent FedEx Express Avionics Bench Capabilities Make Honeywell System MD10 Versatile Integrated Avionics MD11 Ancillary Fuel System Controller MD11 Digital Air Data Computer MD10 Flight Control Computer MD11 Glareshield Control Panel Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System Center of Gravity Control Computer Flight Control Computer Thrust Control Computer Flight Warning Computer Remote Annunciator Light Test Dimmer System MD10 Display Unit MD11 Centralized Fault Display Interface Unit MD11 Display Electronics Unit MD11 Flight Control Computer MD11 Hydraulic Systems Controller Digital Flight Data Acquisition Unit Electronic Flight Control Unit Feel Limitation Computer Thrust Rating Panel Indicator Light Dimmer Rudder Trim Indicator System Air Data Module Airbus Digital Air Data Computer MD11 Environmental Systems Controller MD10 Fuel System Controller MD11 Miscellaneous Systems Controller Digital Flight Data Recorder Flight Augmentation Maintenance Test Panel Display Unit Jamming Detection Control Unit Thales Aerospatiale Aircraft Braking Systems Messier Bugatti ABG Semca Diehl Anti-Skid Control Unit Brake System Control Unit Cabin Pressure Computer ECAM Control Panel EFIS Symbol Generator Unit System Data Analog Controller Slat Flap Control Computer VHF Communications DME/Transponder Doppler/Windshear Radar TX/RX TCAS/Mode S MD10 Aircraft Interface Unit MD11 Generator Control Unit 727 Bus Control Unit MD11 APU Generator Control Unit Control Heads for the above systems ECAM Symbol Generator Unit EFIS Control Panel Thompson–CSF Marconi Rockwell Collins VOR/ILS/MB Navigation HF Radio Radar Antennas GPS Navigation Radio Altimeter 727 Radar Indicators ACSS AMETEK Hamilton Sundstrand 727 Load Controller Airbus Ground Power Control Unit Gables/Team/ Thales/ Honeywell them from occurring in aging systems. such as a small rudder trim indicator. intermittent and often repeated failures on the same circuit.000-square-foot facility where mainly B or intermediate level checks are conducted. Solder joints. A traditional repair may involve finding the failed component. replacing and testing it and returning it to service. faster and the AMTs are more empowered. It employs about 36 full-time Avionics Maintenance Technicians (AMT) plus support staff. And they have been able to radically improve productivity as well as the quality of the product coming out of the shop.” “We are working smarter.” he said. As components age. for example. This effectively means that the life of the circuit is extended and the reliability improved. Where avionics maintenance is conducted is “pretty much a balance” between internal and external sources.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 19 Courtesy FedEx Express MD11 Electrical Power Control Unit 727 Voltage Regulator Airbus Generator Control Unit 727 Generator Control . a lean processing philosophy. and what percentage goes where fluctuates with market availability and system changes. Externally. The instrument shop at the company’s Los Angeles facility. They are then replaced with exact or direct equivalents. the carrier will examine the electronic circuit that degrades over time.avionicstoday. it becomes more obvious that every box is making more and more trips to the shop. The Memphis Avionics Line operation employs 54 AMTs plus support staff. with a goal of ensuring uniform workflow and quality results. said Yerger. “Undertaking a proactive analysis and refurbishment of the circuit can provide compelling results and improvements in the circuit performance. Yerger said.” Yerger said. average 1. to sophisticated boxes such as Thales flight control computers on the carrier’s Airbus fleet. in its maintenance organization. ranging from simple components. Internally.

which provides pilots with aural and graphical advisories of aircraft position on and near the airport surface. are being configured for 0. with 12 in service and 13 on backlog with Boeing. like most carriers around the world. FedEx is the largest user. is considering ways to adapt to the avalanche of sophisticated technologies entering the marketplace. which can fly 4. executives advise. for example. The 757s the company is acquiring and converting to freighter service. The company has equipped a number of its large aircraft with EFVS portrayed through the HUD system to provide flight crews with the best possible situational awareness as well as improve safety of operations. It was an early adopter of computers in the cockpit. FedEx Express is retrofitting and upgrading equipment on aircraft “as we bring them in” to help position the fleet for RNP capability. The company is also uses the Honeywell-developed Runway Advisory and Awareness System (RAAS). To make your ISR platform a communications powerhouse.com . and one of the leaders in advancing both head-up display (HUD) and Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) technologies. Boeing in February celebrated two years in service of the freighter. meaning an aircraft on approach must remain within 0. www.avionicstoday. FedEx Express also has been proactive in the development of new technologies. The transition is likely to be a key topic at the AMC Open Forum.900 nautical miles with payload of 225. according to Yerger. “We have our eyes on the prize and are making sure that we are Photo courtesy FedEx able to operate in an advanced RNP environment. NextGen Equipage FedEx.200 pounds.” Yerger said. contact us.15 nm to the right or left of center line 95 percent of the time within a containment area. EMS Aviation offers rugged satellite-based solutions that deliver real-time video. says Yerger. storage and networking capabilities. In addition.Boeing 777 Freighter in livery of FedEx Express. voice and data with data management. certain FedEx Express Boeing 777F international flights are operating in a Future Air Naviga- Real-time Aerial Surveillance Video Anywhere your mission takes you Your mission requires a secure airborne communications link with BLOS capabilities. As NextGen and its requirement for Performance-Based Navigation technologies on aircraft advances.emsaviation. The company is also taking delivery of Boeing 777s that will be RNP-capable. FedEx Express is looking at preparing its pilots and aircraft for Required Navigation Procedures (RNP) approaches.15 nautical mile RNP capability. particularly with regard to the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) in the United States and Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program in Europe.com Visit us @ AAAA in Booth 359 20 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. Yerger said.

In addition. OEMs — although bitter competitors at certain levels. “Aircraft will continue to become more sophisticated and more integrated.” Yerger noted.” said Yerger. Flight Deck Instrumentation MD10 VIA. Braking. including ATE manufacturers. The company also wants to make certain the best available flow of information is available to technicians around the world — “whether the aircraft is in Memphis. Airbus Electrical Power Components MD11. The carrier works with leading service and technology providers to collect the latest available information from OEMs. MD10 Autopilot. where there are fewer people and parts to rely on. previous operators of used aircraft. valuable safety information is now available and downloadable from aircraft “faster than ever before. And the data from a flight can be downloaded automatically into our system from our MD-11s as the aircraft taxis to the gate.avionicstoday. the best training to address those higher expectations (of safety) and manage very sophisticated pieces of test equipment.” As always. MD10. That data is combined and loaded on the company’s technical information management and distribution system. “As we look at enhanced GPS-based navigation.” Cognizant of the increasing level of sophistication in avionics packages it works with. FedEx Express is taking the necessary steps to make sure its maintenance staff is well prepared and has “the best tools. each piece of avionics or component on the aircraft spends more time communicating with other systems on the aircraft in order to improve reliability and safety. have overlapping and very complex relationships. “Twenty years ago. such information was not available until it was pulled from the (flight data recorder) after an accident. “And we have got to figure out how to manage those relationships while recognizing that safety is the No. that is.” he said. where the company has lots of resources.” Yerger said. Most of FedEx’s trunk aircraft are equipped with primarily Class 2 electronic flight bags (EFB). safety remains paramount to the carrier. Display Units Airbus autopilot. FedEx Express offers technician training in-house and at various manufacturers.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 21 . MD11. This includes operations using the terrestrial L888 Western China Route. Yerger added that FedEx Express is working with industry and government to speed the process of getting moving map technologies better defined and into its aircraft. the airlines and suppliers. MD10 Aircraft Interface Unit 757 Inertial Systems Courtesy FedEx Express range of information is stored digitally in aircraft flight data acquisition units. 2 each AIU Test Station IRS 1200 Inertial Test Station Supports 727.” Yerger added. Flight Deck Indication. Yerger said FedEx Expresssupports a Safety Management System (SMS) culture and hopes that environment will continue to flourish as the program moves forward.” Portable Mission Display Improved Situational Awareness at Your Fingertips Our TacView ® Portable Mission Display facilitates airborne mission effectiveness. “Members of this industry — component manufacturers.” Yerger said. which is accessible to the maintenance workforce. as well as learn more about how we operate our airplanes. Controller. “This gives FedEx’s flight safety organization a much bigger pool of data with which to identify precursors and eliminate safety risks. ATE and component manufacturers and FedEx’s own in-house engineering team. for specific types of equipment.tion System (FANS) environment to take advantage of oceanic datalink services. or in Kuala Lumpur.” Yerger said. The company is moving from Level 2 SMS to Level 3. Photo: Air Force Link www. “Today. but where expectations for high performance are the same. 1 priority across all of our portfolios. a broader FEDEX EXPRESS ATE TEST RESOURCES Make Avtron Honeywell /EADS EADS EADS Ametek Aeroflex Model UnivATE STS1000 ATE ATEC Series 6 ATEC 5000.

Development of the CH-53K was initially paced by the fatigue lives of the CH-53E fleet. The Marine Corps plans 200 CH53Ks to retire CH-53Es and CH-53Ds. Marine Corps CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement helicopter features ‘best pieces’ from other programs By Frank Colucci the commercial Sikorsky S-92 and Canadian Forces CH148 helicopters. structures.S. rotor blades and fly-by-wire (FBW) controls make the Sikorsky ’53 Kilo an ambitious stretch of existing technology. new avionics. Army CH47F and UH-60M Upgrade. The three-engined Heavy Lift Replacement helicopter passed a Critical Design Review last summer and should fly for the first time in late 2013. The new “glass cockpit” also uses hardware and software in the Marine Corps CH-53E CNS/ATM (Communication Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management) upgrade and German CH-53G.avionicstoday. The ’53K is also expected to carry four times the payload over the same distance at high density altitudes like those in Afghanistan. transmission. engines. For all its brute power.com . and the Avionics Management System (AMS) in 22 Avionics Magazine April 2011 Courtesy Sikorsky Aircraft www.military The CH-53K Avionics Management System borrows hardware from the Rockwell Collins Common Avionics Architecture System.” said Sikorsky avionics/electrical Integrated Product Team lead Kyle Delong.S. the Kilo version has to sling-load 27. the Kilo with fly-by-wire flight controls has to be easier to fly than the ’53E and cost half as much to operate and support. Kilo Cockpit The new cockpit layout of the U. “We’ve taken a lot of the best pieces from other programs and put them together for the ’53K. In fact.000 pounds over 110 nautical miles at sea level — more than twice the load of today’s CH-53E — yet fit the same amphibious assault ships. NAVAIR ultimately T he Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) considers the Marine Corps CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement helicopter a derivative of the hard-flown CH-53E in operation today. The Kilo integrated cockpit and open system architecture build on the Rockwell Collins Common Avionics Architecture System (CAAS) in the U. To implement Marine Sea Basing and Ship-to-Objective Maneuver concepts.

Production deliveries for the Marines stretch from 2017 to 2028.. “We’re technically not a CAAS cockpit. Together with the CDUs and two Multi-Function Control Units. of Rockwell Collins. Addition of a troop commander’s display planned for the Kilo cabin has been deferred. Separate from the CNS/ATM upgrade. the Canadian program. Courtesy U.S.” Flight-worthy hardware and production-representative software are now in CH-53K Systems Integration Labs (SIL) located at Sikorsky Aircraft in Stratford. The fifth-generation ARC-210 in the CH-53K supports the latest Variable Message Format waveforms and SATCOM links. to present integrated flight and navigation symbology for IFR operations at night. the Kilo AMS has five 6-by-8 inch portrait-format MFDs.accepted a ’53E Service Life Extension Program and slipped Kilo Initial Operational Capability from 2015 to 2018 to reduce development risk. and Rockwell Collins in Cedar Rapids. Marine Corps www. Qualified hardware will be delivered early next year for test aircraft. Rockwell Collins principal marketing manager for rotary wing aircraft. Conn. Like the CAAS in Army Chinooks. Link 16 capability for CH-53 Super Stallion is the workhorse of the U. right off the bat. Sikorsky vice president and chief engineer for Marine Corps programs.” said Toy. and a real system engineering focus to really get this right. “The Marines were trying to leverage what had been developed for the Army cargo helicopters. The interchangeable displays can show the embedded Harris digital map and imagery from the Raytheon AN/ AAS-29A Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) gimbal. Sikorsky chose principal subcontractor Rockwell Collins in 2006 to give the CH53K an Avionics Management System like that in the successful S-92. ETAWS (Enhanced Terrain Avoidance Warning System) functionality and embedded training capability. compatible with night vision goggles. Production of the CNS/ATM upgrade for Marine CH-53Es has been deferred. AMS con- trols and displays and mission computing resources themselves evolved from the CAAS in Chinooks and other helicopters. They also call for the cargo helicopter to exchange digital data in network-centric warfare scenarios.” CNS/ATM Upgrade The CH-53E CNS/ATM upgrade flown last November mixes five portrait-format Multi-Function Displays (MFD) and dual center-console Control Display Units (CDU) with some electromechanical gauges. and the new heavy lifter has already drawn interest from potential international customers. “The German ’53 system has headed off on its own path largely. “I really think the key here is the extent of the up-front work we’ve done with the fleet customers. “It started close to CAAS but evolved with a lot of German-unique requirements for production and certification. away from the ’53E and ’53K.avionicstoday. but the partial glass cockpit may be applied to Navy MH-53E minesweepers around 2012.” said Toy. The service plans 200 CH-53Ks to retire CH-53Es and CH-53Ds. they enable the crew to access UHF/ VHF/SATCOM communications and Defensive Electronic Countermeasures (DECM). and we provided a very affordable solution to upgrade the ’53E.” Torok said.S. More measured development makes the program more efficient in qualification testing.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 23 .” said Dan Toy. combined with the lessons learned from the S-92. Marine CH-53K requirements call for CNS/ATM compatibility to navigate civil airspace.” Compared to the ’53E CNS/ATM and ’53G upgrade. the Kilo cockpit uses nextgeneration MFD and CDU hardware and customized software. “We’re kind of a CAAS derivative based on the ’53E and ’53G. Rockwell Collins provides the ARC-210 multi-band radios that are standard for Navy/Marine Corps aircraft. “The ’53 has the luxury of following these other programs. Iowa. the Black Hawk M and MU. Rockwell Collins gave the German CH-53G cockpit landscape-format cockpit displays and new performance management functions. Marine Corps. according to Michael Torok. The development program flies four Engineering Development Models.

and operational flexibility. now and in the future.avionicstoday.The CH-53K will replace the CH-53E in Marine Heavy Lift helicopter squadrons. Electrodynamics.com/edi.” said Brian Cyr. visit us at L-3com. Business Jet Values provides independent expert commentary on developments in corporate jet values. lender or operator. Paul Leighton by clicking here. The PVI (Pilot- SAFETY & ECONOMY — GET THE SRVIVR ® ADVANTAGE ANNOUNCING: The number of business jets in service continues to expand but the introduction of new types and availability of pre-owned examples means that it is vital to remain appraised of the development in values. “All the network capability is there as soon as they designate which waveform they want to use and what radio they want to run it through. but the heavy lifter will have a Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) terminal to implement Link 16 with software. with initial operational capability slated in 2018. Rockwell Collins CH-53K program manager. and an integrated processing cabinet.com Courtesy Sikorsky Aircraft . the CH-53K AMS uses MFD 268 multifunction displays and CDU-7000 control/display units. 18692 24 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. This is where the Aircraft Value News Business Jet Values newsletter becomes an invaluable resource in making the right investment decision for the owner. SRVIVR’s configurable architecture can be customized to support your specific aircraft data and audio requirements. Like CAAS.com Learn more from the editor. compact size. The Next Generation Has Landed. Inc. o ering a unique unbiased insight into this rapidly changing sector. the CH-53K has been deferred for now. To learn more. L-3com. “A lot of the software is different. The SRVIVR® Cockpit Voice & Flight Data Recorder combines the latest in recorder technology with the benefit of reduced weight.

rely on the industry leader.com sales@daytongranger. “We keep those up to date to make sure they’re seeing the same thing in the real aircraft.” Cyr explained. airline. 16 and 24 bit resistor modules: 40-290/291. go to yyy0rkemgtkpivguv0eqo. business and general aviation aircraft. trouble free service life. To learn more.” Delong said. The triplex flight control system has dual self-checking processors on each of the three channels working redundant hydraulic main and tail rotor actuators.1% Up to 18 Channels per slot Simple Software Interface with Direct Calibrated Resistance Calls 62/484 TVF"Ukowncvqt Oqfwng 62/4821483 Rtgekukqp"Rtqitcoocdng Tgukuvqt"Oqfwng Antennas & Static Dischargers Dayton-Granger manufactures a complete line of top quality aircraft antennas and static dischargers for military. 62/4. Where prudent. Sikorsky conducted 25 Crew Station Working Group meetings with NAVAIR and fleet operators to formulate CH-53K flight displays. The CH-53K AMS will also perform Centerof-Gravity calculations tied to fuel consumption. Tel: (954) 463-3451 Fax: (954) 761-3172 www. your test development just got easier as Pickering supports all major software environments and provides module support in an NZK or RZK modular chassis for LAN or PC-based control. “They don’t have to have a mental model of the system. “We have high-fidelity flight control laws that can be evaluated in our facility. Marine pilots evaluated external cargo/load."OC0"Vgn<""-3"9:3":."QT0"Vgn<""-3"763"693"2922 *Gcuv"Eqcuv"Tgikqpcn"Qhhkeg+"Yqdwtp. for example.com pickering Rkemgtkpi"Kpvgthcegu"Kpe0.” said Sikorsky’s Delong. or the Strain Gauge Simulator. DAYTON-GRANGER.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 25 Rkemgtkpi"Kpvgthcegu The simulation of sensors requires specialized programmable precision resistor modules. The desktop simulators continue to feed changes back into Kilo cockpit requirements. The ’53K AMS takes flight guidance cues from the FBW system and embedded GPS. RTD Simulators.avionicstoday. Desktop symbology migrated to the Sikorsky motion-base simulator in Stratford with CH-53K displays and flyby-wire cyclic and collective inceptors. The CH-53E CNS/ATM provides no flight director and no direct interaction between mechanical flight controls and cockpit displays. RTD.daytongranger. Thermistor. Then contact your local Pickering Sales person and get precisely what you need! When you want top performance and long. “This is a fly-by-wire aircraft.Vehicle Interface) is different.9"3932 G/ockn<"wuucnguBrkemgtkpivguv0eqo www. show dial formats rather than the vertical tape readouts in the ’53E CNS/ATM cockpit. Marine pilots have so far conducted three part-mission evaluations with the Kilo cockpit tied to FBW flight control models. they can actually see it. 40-292 and 40-295/296. we modify the design to meet their needs. RNAV and other symbology for the Kilo AMS on synoptic displays using desktop computers at Stratford and Patuxent River. and runs system diagnostics. 12. but how it gets presented to the pilot is different. and our cockpit has major workload reduction features integrating our fly-bywire system as well. Fuel Gauges and Photo-resistors Resolutions Down to 2 milliohm Accuracies Down to ±0. Only Pickering Interfaces has all the answers! By specifying our High Precision Resistor modules. "Ugpuqt"cpf"Uvtckp"Icwig" GowncvkqpA Rtgekugn{# RZK and NZK compliant Example Applications: Strain Gauge. We have a lot of (software) re-use. Md. Hamilton Sundstrand flight control computers interface with BAE Systems active inceptors — a sidearm cyclic and limited-travel collective — that give the pilot tactile cues based on control. Resistance Loads. The Sikorsky motion-base simulator is one of five SILs outfitted with actual CH- "Rtqitcoocdng"Tgukuvqt.” Delong noted. power and structural limits.9" Rtgekukqp"Tgukuvqt Oqfwng 62/487 Uvtckp"Icwig Ukowncvqt"Oqfwng For lower accuracy requirements please look at our established range of 8.” Delong said. The new Marine helicopter capitalizes on FBW hardware and software developed for the Army UH-6M Upgrade and Canadian CH148. yyy0rkemgtkpivguv0eqo . Kilo displays."Itcpvu"Rcuu.

www.www.pickeringtest..........com EMS Aviation ....www.... A high-speed Local Area Network carries AMS internal communications between processors..net Pickering Interfaces ............... An electrical SIL has the CH-53K main generators and auxiliary power unit and can run independently or with the Avionics SIL. Like other Rockwell Collins Flight 2 avionics. www. “For the AMS. The CH53K AMS has 18 Power PC processors in nine line replaceable units (Weapon Replaceable Assemblies)...........com Holt Integrated Circuits .............. www........daytongranger...honeywell..............com ..... Design-for-the-maintainer working groups helped optimize wire harness and equipment installations for easy access...com Dayton-Granger ....com Carlisle Interconnect/ECS ...... CH-53K AMS fault isolation/fault detection functions are the same found in CAAS.com Esterline/CMC Electronics..introcorp.......” The Kilo Integrated Supportability System displays health data on a maintainer’s handheld computer.. Minn....aim-online..rtca2011symposium.... www.... www..........teledyne-controls...... The health monitor application polls software and hardware and feeds results to the IVHMS for maintenance decisions. Legacy equipment such as the radios and MIDS terminal are controlled through a Mil-Std-1553B databus....avionics-networking.. Northrop Grumman APR39B(V)2 radar warning receiver. “We have one of our software apps on every processor...... Honeywell AAR-47(V)2 missile/laser warning receiver and BAE ALE-47 improved countermeasures dispenser.l-3com.......... .. to generate comprehensive systems information....... Rockwell Collins set up its own Avionics SIL at Cedar Rapids identical to that in Stratford.. www.. the CH-53K AMS provides a Modular Open System Architecture with PCI backplane interfaces for hardware and a Posix operating system for software applications from different suppliers..aeroflex.....emsaviation. “What’s new and significant is the 95 percent requirement for fault detection...... Data Concentrator Units under development by Curtiss Wright Controls in City of Industry. digital map software from Harris.. and ETAWS software developed by NAVAIR.. transmission. The system hosts Warning/Caution/Advisory software from Sikorsky.. www..com Advertiser Web Address Aeroflex.......carlisleIT.... ad index Pg 7 13 36 9 25 20 34 21 17 6 5 15 26 24 14 25 35 11 16 12 2 26 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www..avionicstoday......com RTCA Symposium ... www...holtic.....” said Cyr.... like Link 16........com L3 Com\Electrodynamics ........ Open Architecture CAAS and AMS in all their forms use a distributed processing architecture with “smart” displays and controls.... We have a lot of software already accounted for in those reserves......... “Our customer requirement is 50 percent for most sys- tems..........com EMTEQ Inc.stacosystems.. www.. The Kilo AMS hosts Integrated Vehicle Health Management System (IVHMS) software from Goodrich in Burnsville....com Vector Informatik ....com Ballard Technology .com International Communications ....... www....” The CH-53K has been designed to look after itself to reduce life cycle costs......intcomgrp...com Shadin Avionics .www...shadin.......navaidsltd......... of Rockwell Collins...www.......www. we have a 65 percent requirement for memory and processor reserve..........” said Delong.. CH-53K processors and databuses also have room to grow... Most software is field-loadable to upgrade systems without removing them from the aircraft... fuel and other aircraft sensors to digital signals for databuses to feed the AMS.............com Honeywell ..... www.......... A ribboncutting ceremony last October opened the Sikorsky Avionics/Electrical SIL to test the AMS with the DECM and other Government Furnished Equipment.com Staco Systems .....goodrich.........” Delong said.ca Goodrich Corp. The DECM suite has its own 1553B bus to integrate the Northrop Grumman AN/ ALQ-24 Directed Infrared Countermeasures set....emteq............. www..................com Teledyne Controls . Calif.....com Intro Corp. ..ballardtech.www.. www....... AMS displays show Raytheon FLIR imagery from an analog video interface............... will convert discrete inputs from engine... we also have a 90 percent requirement for fault isolation. “It’s certainly a carryover from the S-92 with lessons learned. A Sikorsky Flight Control SIL that was undergoing system-level checkout ties the Kilo cockpit to actual aircraft servos to check FBW software and hardware changes before they go to the real aircraft.com AIM ...53K hardware and software...........com/EDI Nav-Aids Ltd...............www........ ...www..cmcelectronics...............

RFID SPECIAL SECTION A special section to Magazine Era Of Airborne RFID Begins Anticipated for the past several years.” or without an integral power supply. at least for tags that are “passive. Work on a standard for battery-powered “active” tags has begun. the application of radio frequency identi cation (RFID) tags for component tracking on commercial aircraft is upon us. APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION 27 .

fit or function of any installed system or equipment on the airplane. he explained. “That is the industry position that’s agreed upon by all the airframers in our supplier base. The advisory circular “gives us the green light to start populating legacy airplanes that have already been delivered and new deliveries with passive RFID devices on the parts. “Airworthiness Approval and Operational Allowance of RFID Systems. associate technical fellow and RFID program manager with Boeing Commercial Aviation Services.” Boeing has about 65 people working full-time on RFID across the company. the agency released its policy memo of May 13.” In the case of onboard. 2008. And so we are good to go at this very moment to put passive devices on airplane parts.” dated Sept. ‘We are good to go at this very moment to put passive devices on airplane parts. please do not deploy a solution that would require us to have two sets of infrastructure for a Boeing airplane or an Airbus airplane. payload tracking and life-limited parts monitoring. We kind of proclaimed UHF passive. Embraer.” Porad said. And so we’ve met with Bombardier. The airframers and their airline customers have cooperated on RFID development. While “that worked fine. Airbus last January placed a multiyear order to equip its coming A350 XWB with RFID tags on some 1. The advisory allows use of passive devices as long as they are not interrogated in flight or when an aircraft is on an active runway or taxiway. first aid kits and breathing apparatus. because no matter where the mechanic was standing inside the fuselage.” Porad said. line maintenance.. discussions involving Boeing and others have focused on line replaceable units. Porad said. the tags afforded a maximum. 860 to 960 MHz (as the frequency range) … and that was in line with EPCglobal’s thinking. warehouse logistics. Those projects include supply chain management of incoming ‘What we are adding with extended memory .’ Kenneth Porad Boeing Commercial Aviation Services Airbus … and we are working together so there’s benefits across the whole supply chain. with some 50 pilot projects in place. if he could go 12 feet either direction and up. ‘Please. he could capture information off all of the tags. “We will not have to recertify or requalify them. including EPCglobal. Porad said. Tego Inc. There’s no barriers to enter the market. because the regulatory agencies have proclaimed that they do not impact form. Boeing and FedEx in 2003 conducted an on-board evaluation of high frequency 13. parts that are reparable as opposed to consumables. tool tracking on the production floor and identifying consumables and perishables such as sealant used in manufacturing aircraft. They fly some Boeing products and some Airbus products. There’s no barriers to enter that market. “We have lots of customers that fly a mixed fleet. “Airborne RFID: Radio Frequency Identification Takes Off. Getting to the stage of deploying RFID tags on “flyable” components has taken several years. spare parts. materials. The evaluation was replicated using 915 MHz UHF tags. supporting 28 APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION . Based on the results of the FedEx evaluation and a petition to FAA. we got 10 to 12-feet read range. And these airlines have told us.. “To have inconsistent direction to common suppliers would be costly and foolish for both” Airbus and Boeing. It succeeded a foundational FAA policy memo from May 2005 that declared passive RFID tags acceptable for use on civil aircraft under specified conditions. so we could have non-conflicting requirements. dispatch-critical items.56 MHz passive tags on an MD-10 freighter.” Porad said.RFID SPECIAL SECTION T his was the message delivered by industry experts in aerospace RFID who spoke during the recent Avionics Magazine webinar.” he said. “That worked for us. lifelimited or time-controlled parts subject to airworthiness directives. AC 20-162. Reacting to what Porad described as an “explosion” of interest in RFID across varying industries at the start of the last decade.” EPCglobal is a standards organization for Electronic Product Code and RFID technology. and emergency equipment such as life jackets.500 parts to support aircraft configuration management.” said Kenneth Porad. “and lo and behold.” Current guidance on applying RFID tags on working aircraft is provided by an FAA advisory circular. “We agreed early on that this would be non-competitive and so we’ve been working with Airbus through the Air Transport Association and other standards bodies.’ Timothy Butler President and CEO. 22. one-foot read range. on-airplane parts marking. 2005. is a significant (parts) history under the ruggedized conditions for which aerospace exists.

’ Source: Society of Automotive Engineers SAE G18 Technical Committee for RFID in Aerospace is in the process of drafting a new standard for the use of active and battery-assisted tags in aircraft. APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION 29 .RFID SPECIAL SECTION Source: Society of Automotive Engineers Current guidance on applying RFID tags on working aircraft is provided by FAA Advisory Circular 20-162. Some of the technological considerations are described. but the qualification process is described as ‘onerous. The use of active RFID tags on aircraft is possible.

and the device transmits only when interrogated. There is “the ability to actually now hold pictures. devices have their own power source. for instance. and people have no idea what’s actually happening with that information. 2010. antenna and power source. battery-assisted passive tags. Because these tags have a battery and transmit RF.” which is part of a set of e-business specifications developed by airlines and suppliers.RFID SPECIAL SECTION on-board use of passive RFID tags.” In addition to passive devices. Tego president and CEO. including the use of RFID to permanently identify parts and their lifecycle status. “Automated Identification and Data Capture. It’s unpowered.” —Bill Carey .” he said. Added consultant Anthony T. is supplying the 8 Kbyte chip specified by Airbus for the A350XWB.” said Timothy Butler. is the primary provider of active RFID technology to the U. But because you put a tag on that battery. in an order announced Jan. cargo handling.” was published in December 2006 by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). What’s the worst-case scenario? With the passive tag. stress. an integrated circuit controller. ‘Onerous’ Process While use of active tags on aircraft is a possibility.. “One of the things that was found out during efforts to come up with the passive standard was that several organizations did look at active tags. I’m not saying it will. in fact. there is a possibility they could interfere with safety of flight. We have some in-flight tests — FedEx did an extended test. Tego announced the availability of aviation-grade RFID tags developed by Marubeni Chemix Corp. some did. Air Transport Association (ATA) Spec 2000 Chapter 9. Calif. That’s what the concern is. encryption — all sorts of information that you would never have thought (possible) before. [T]he tag is physically attached to a device. and containing “TegoChip” technology. “And the second item is … the failure mode. “The current chip today will hold up to 35 to 40 pages of information. “But 10 years later.” Butler offered a scenario of how on-board RFID tracking will benefit aerospace. a multiple of those chips now in volume production. is a whole history now. Department of Defense and allied defense forces.” he said.. “Active and Battery-Assisted RFID Tags Intended for Aircraft Use. “It’s a very expensive process and. An avionics manufacturer “builds a part for a Boeing or an Airbus plane that gets deployed into an Air France plane that gets service. That was one of the reasons why the committee felt that it would be reasonable and achievable to move forward with a requirements definition. The first is the proximity to sensitive devices. “from a technical perspective. Air Force has been flying this technology for many years with the Savi (tag) and now the ISO 18000-7” standard. of Tokyo. the ability to carry the information with those assets and pull the information off by each of those major players has huge value across the industry. 19. with extended memory capability. including compliance with RTCA DO-160E environmental test criteria. there’s two issues with active tags that are of concern. In November.” Said G18 Committee Co-chairman Barry Allen. and because of that.S. provides industry guidelines for traceability. or (at) higher power? In the 30 APRIL 2011 SPECIAL SECTION battery itself. data. SAE was in the early stages of drafting a new standard.” “Active RFID tags (those with a battery) are being widely promoted for aircraft applications. are compatible with ATA Spec 2000 and are interoperable with standard UHF Gen2 readers. Think of it less like a chip and a tag and more as a USB device. the information about those assets and those parts that are being replaced today doesn’t go along with those assets. Inc.” he said. you can have a significant history over a long period of time under the ruggedized conditions for which aerospace exists. memory. so that throughout the value chain. to have visibility into a whole range of parts and information that hasn’t existed before. UPS has done it (and) the U. Butler said his company can provide a platform with up to 32 Kbytes of memory. etc.” Allen said. nobody in the industry has actually gone through this entire process yet and is actively deploying active tag technology in flight. The Marubeni TAGAT tags. “The ability to have visibility into this. who has participated with the G18 committee. and found that many of them were very close to achieving the DO-160 requirement and. I’m saying it has the potential. They don’t even know for sure whether or not it’s a counterfeit part. is there a failure mode that can cause that tag to broadcast continuously. of Waltham. we have to worry about safety risks. the company said. Industry standards underpin RFID development for flyable components. “What we are really adding.” Memory chip developer Tego. identifies minimum performance requirements for use on aircraft parts and specifies test requirements.. maybe in Costa Rica or Milan. Low-power active devices consist of a low-power RF transmitter. a much lower power has the potential to interfere. fatigue. to my knowledge. It will be contained in tags designed by MAINtag SAS of Paris. AS5678. AS6023. “Some of the applications include sensing temperature. are tested to SAE AS5678 for flyable parts.S. but the battery powers only the microchip. FAA AC 20-162 also addresses use of Lowpower active and Battery assisted passive (BAP) RFID devices. “This is where most of the goforward work has to be. available with 4 Kbyte of memory. “Buzz” Cerino. according to FAA. a Lockheed Martin subsidiary based in Mountain View. It provides a requirements document for the manufacture of passive-only UHF RFID tags for aerospace. Mass. vibration. “Passive RFID Tags Intended for Aircraft Use. “And there’s a lot of anecdotal evidence available out in the market for people who have tested and tried this. basically nothing can happen. BAP. or semi-passive. Savi Technology.” states the rationale by SAE’s G18 Technical Committee for RFID in Aerospace. the qualification process is “onerous..” advised Allen.

including high-powered flood lights and landing light systems.” it is gaining momentum. vice president and general manager of the lighting division of B/E Aerospace. while providing an aesthetically appealing interior for their passengers.” On the flight deck. said Maxwell.” But now LEDs are available for all exterior lights. LEDs can be used to illuminate everything from airline logos on the tail to switches on the flight deck. accelerating for both the OEM as well as aftermarket. The technology is being built or retrofitted into aircraft to improve appearance and boost energy efficiency. “It is slowly but surely encroaching everywhere. of Bellevue. the technology is further evolving. thanks to the quality of the lighting — its light.” said Scover. showing that LEDs are reaching a first level of maturity. if not all. “The system is somewhat revolutionary. LED lighting is expected to supplant much.” “Because we are seeing more (efficacious) light being emitted from the LEDs.” said Andre Hessling. but the rate is declining. “Home lighting is the Holy Grail for LED manufacturers (and) while it is still in its infancy. manager of advanced product development. including automotive and consumer lighting systems. “It used to be (thought) they would never be bright enough for outside lights.product focus Lighting Adoption of LED technology for interior and exterior aircraft applications is growing. we worked with Emteq is providing exterior anti-collision light for Bombardier CRJ regional jets.” said Hessling. thanks to advancements in other industries. current technology on aircraft over the next few years. “We just didn’t come in at the back end of the program. including cabin wash lighting and passenger lighting. But now.” said Stephen Scover. Texas.. president and CEO of Heads Up Technologies. we can package them differently” than earlier LED systems. some of the bin structures and on where light would be placed. Wis. Last year. The technology continues to improve as LEDs are being developed “to ever higher performance levels in terms of flux per bucks.” said Bruce Maxwell. While technology and market issues remain. lower maintenance costs. This use of the technology will continue to grow over the next several years as airlines and regional carriers look for ways to save on maintenance costs and weight. “It is a seamless type of product: You basically walk on the aircraft and experience lighting as opposed to (encountering) a bunch of lights staring at you from different or odd angles. “Also.” Scover said. Fla.” The company has worked closely with Boeing to develop the interior design. of New Berlin. said Rob Harshaw. they are nice and crisp and clear. said Harshaw. but challenges remain for manufacturers of these systems By Ed McKenna T he use of light emitting diode (LED) technology on commercial and business aircraft is becoming more the norm than the exception. of Carrolton. The benefits of LEDs are well known. Wash.” Goodrich makes a range of lighting systems using LED technology. said Scott Sweet.” B/E Aerospace is using these innovations to provide LED lighting for the new “Sky Interior” on Next Generation Boeing 737s. color and contrast — “things are not quite so fuzzy anymore.. Luma Technologies introduced the LT-4500 Series Integrated LED Display System for King April 2011 Avionics Magazine 31 www.” lumens per emitter and light output (flux) per watt.” which translates to greater situational awareness and enhanced safety. “There are places that you can now put light or use lighting effects that you couldn’t in the past. including weight savings. interior lighting product manager at Emteq. the light quality — the homogeneity of emitted spectrum –– of white LEDs is improving. lighting systems at Goodrich Interiors. president of Luma Technologies. Developments in these markets will drive not only technology improvements but also customer expectations for this type of lighting. “The pace of LED (technology) migration into aircraft is . which were mainly just “a straight line of light. ruggedness and increased system reliability. “There is hardly any consideration of conventional lights anymore.avionicstoday.com Photo courtesy Emteq . allowing for more applications of LED lighting solutions in aviation. “I think what that indicates is that there is an industry acceptance now that a LED system is the way to go. Wellington.

Rockwell Collins was selected by the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) to provide the cabin core system (CCS) for its C919. The exterior lighting market includes Goodrich makes a range of lighting systems using LED technology. Also. ➤ Emteq. The system is designed to be a one-for-one. in December was awarded an EASA supplemental type certificate for its LED anti-collision lights for the Airbus A300-600.” said Maxwell. The RWSL Control System is an automated system that warns aircraft and vehicles if it is safe to enter or cross runways through a series of lights embedded in the pavement. in February received an FAA supplemental type certificate for installation of its LED Anti-Collision/Position (Navigation) Light in the Bombardier Regional Jet 100/200/440. of Columbus. A320. heating/cooling and lighting. It is also a challenge for component developers.avionicstoday. The contract is to be completed by end of 2011. Northrop Grumman Park Air Systems. Department of Defense for Phase I of a Small Business Innovation Research program to develop a rotor blade tip lighting system.” Heads Up also provides the LED cabin lighting for the Beechcraft King Air 350i. He said the landing light outperforms the incandescent source it replaced and provides “huge weight savings.Air and Beechcraft 1900D aircraft. and ADB Airfield Solutions. color consistency and cost remain. 32 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. such as better color control and greater intensity. Emteq is capitalizing on technology improvements. 767. like landing light systems. Emteq said the goal of the program is to design and build a reliable. Canada. “LED applications on the exterior that were more difficult to do before are really now becoming more realistic if they are designed properly. the greatest demand is for LED replacements for those lights with poor reliability. NVGcompatible mode for night formation flight. retrofitted into an MD80. However. Heads Up Technologies has developed and qualified high intensity LED exterior lights for the Cessna Citation Jet series including the landing lights. to keep up with the changing technology. ➤ The Venezuelan air force purchased a joint solar and AC-power airfield lighting system from Carmanah Technologies Corp. green and white navigation lights at the appropriate positions on the azimuth. lightweight rotor blade tip lighting system that can be modulated to provide red. “Thermal management is really the key to the longevity of LEDs. high cost or high impact of repair as well as “lights that are dispatch critical for the operators. drop-in replacement for existing incandescent units. in November 2010. such as navigation lights.com halogen and xenon products.. of Victoria. DC-10. A321. MD-10 and MD-11. It is critical to design the LEDs properly and seek “the full FAR compli- Photo courtesy Goodrich . British Columbia..” said Vera Fosnot. Designed to replace current Market Moves Following are recent developments announced by lighting system manufacturers. but is now progressing toward the higher-power products. such as position lights.” Fosnot said. this surge in demand has its downside. of Helena. The two companies have partnered to create a lighting system that includes radio-controlled solar LED ADB-branded runway edge lights and SATO blue taxiway lights manufactured by Carmanah. lavatory. developed in other industries.S. A310. in February was awarded a contract to provide a Runway Status Light (RWSL) Control System for Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris.. With increases in power density and improvements in optical efficiency. challenges of LEDs. she said. “It’s a good problem. A330 and A340 and Boeing 757. the LED products include an integrated power supply. with immediate plug-andplay functionality. and a low-observable. Hessling said the line of runway turn-off lights. wing inspection lights. including cabin wash lighting and LED reading lights like those. For example. ➤ In September. “It has opened up the possibility for significant innovation with our most recent examples being the Daylight Variable White Wash lighting product and exterior landing lights.” and Honeywell is developing a full suite of exterior LED applications that will be applicable on many different platforms. eliminating the need for an existing external power supply. said Sweet. A318. Wis. allows flight attendants to control all subsystems on the aircraft including in-flight entertainment. LED has “gone ballistic in every market and anytime anything goes ballistic there goes source of supply (and) consistency. taxi lights and logo lights offers a return on investment within a year or less. ➤ Talon Aerospace. Ohio. ➤ Northrop Grumman’s air-traffic management subsidiary. Currently. Ala. combined with an AC-powered ADB approach system. However. a hover mode to clearly mark the complete rotor disk circumference to ground crew. The transition to LED began with lower-power products. including heat management.” Fosnot said. above. Rockwell Collins’ CCS. tail flood lights and overwing exit lights.” he said. if they are designed and integrated properly. said Harshaw. large and smaller niche companies offering LED products for a variety of aircraft types.” The Daylight system offers a variable white LED lighting system capable of outputting multiple shades of white light and is controlled through a control management system. LED Challenges For all the advancements. but still a challenge. which will leverage technology from the company’s Venue cabin management system. based in New Berlin. like Luma. passenger connectivity. Emteq offers a variety of exterior LEDs including the combined tail position and anti-collision lights for the Bombardier CRJ. Goodrich touts its introduction last year of a product line of supplemental type certification certified exterior lights for the Airbus A320 series. A319. Honeywell senior manager of product marketing for lighting. the company was awarded a contract from the U. she said. “all of the lights on the exterior can now be LED. said Sweet.

..eaton..iddaerospacecorp.. For example.. allow for a fairly easily justifiable business case....... which we will integrate in our VIP product line-up.........www..” said Fosnot.. like reading lights.....spectralux. www........................lumatech.www................... ........uk Panelight Components Group...bruceind........com Emteq ........ ... “Even on a single reel of 2...........astronics...com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 33 Photo courtesy Heads Up Technologies Heads Up Technologies provides cabin wash lighting systems for various aircraft types. Companies generally concede technology changes in the near future will be more evolutionary than revolutionary..................www......... www............devoreaviation................” Hessling said...ance over their entire rated life. ...........com Electro-Mech Components....... LLC ..........p......goodrich-lighting................... “There are some (first) applications in sight for the business jet clients now....... they are keeping an eye on the development of organic LEDs..... The business case can differ from application to application....com Eaton Aerospace ....................com Page Aerospace ......000 to 5........www....” said Maxwell...northropgrumman................airtechnics...... ADB Airfield Solutions ..... www.....” Next month: Synthetic Vision Systems Avionics Magazine’s Product Focus is a monthly feature that examines some of the latest trends in different market segments of the avionics industry..... a key remaining challenge is getting human factors and industrial design groups to craft a definition of “what light colors are required in terms of cool work-lights and warm‚ ambient lights... .................... .” Companies use different approaches to handle the excess heat from the lights. Inc.................com Rockwell Collins ....www........ but they have to be nurtured and packaged....... “We have been a bit disappointed by the slow progress in this area........ www........ergpower................com IDD Aerospace ............. Inc..com www...ducommun..... www..................... From early on..” said Harshaw....www. Inc..” advised Hessling........ On the other hand........ www..... www..” “The physical integration remains a challenge for our general cabin lighting (indirect wash) from time to time..................carmanah....vivisun. including using plastic and metal heat sinks............... as the technology improves costs may rise.... at least for aircraft applications...dallasavionics...com Esterline Control Systems ..........com Endicott Research Group ............... In addition. especially when it comes to retrofitting.......... Avionics Product Focus Editor Ed McKenna can be contacted at emckenna@accessintel. “our products had metal or aluminum heat sinks (and) we have made something like 20 miles of LED lighting now and have had very few failures.. www.com Avtech Corp... www..com Carmanah Technologies Corp.. “incandescent lights that fail often and are annoying to replace.............. Companies Cost is also a key issue.com Northrop Grumman .... color consistency of the LEDs “is a huge problem..... www.....000 LEDs........ Inc... www.........com Luma Technologies ............day-ray.....” said Harshaw.... It does not represent a comprehensive survey of all companies and products in these markets............. They have all these great benefits..........www..pageaerospace. LED systems have to be carefully designed “to withstand HERF (high-energy radio-frequency) and lightning induced transience........com Precise Flight.......com Day-Ray Products.” Hessling said... ................com Dallas Avionics.. With more airplanes being made of composites.www..................................................co...............beaerospace... he said.............www........A .....interfacedisplays...... of America .www...................... Inc.” This requires techniques to put them together...........it Spectralux ..... “However............www.talonaerospace.........www..........com Honeywell .................www...........esterline................com Aerospace Optics ................... since the differences between the current-driven LED and easier-to-dim voltage controlled filament lights must be accounted for.com............panelightcomponents....... can be a challenge....................” Electrical integration. “We still have to be careful in ensuring the angles and orientation of the light is just right.....emteq..........com Heads Up Technologies .siriopanel....honeywell. The cost of the technology and implementation is coming down.............avionicstoday.............. www.stgaerospace.. .com Interface Displays & Controls ...avtcorp................com DeVore Aviation Corp......electromechcomp................. so the color variation can’t be seen.............. www..........................................rockwellcollins...... www.........................com Sirio Panel S.... When you think of a retrofit for lighting that certainly would be discretionary.......................... replacing sophisticated halogen reading lights with very different electronic characteristics than LEDs may not be so easy to justify.................. he said.. However...........com B/E Aerospace ..............” said Hessling.................. including the Hawker Beechcraft King Air 350i............www................ “Airlines have really been watching their discretionary funds...” said Sweet.com Goodrich ...... www........... www... www......... .. www........com Astronics Corp. www... . there are subtle variations in all the lights...........................com Diehl Aerospace .... On the flight deck................... where performance and lifetime is less of an issue and experience is the key attribute......preciseflight......com Airtechnics...................diehl-aerospace...... Dimming groups of lights also might pose a few challenges.. “LEDs are very delicate things......com Bruce Aerospace Inc..........com Talon Aerospace ......heads-up..de Ducommun Technologies ...........................com STG Aerospace ......... specifically control...........adb-airfield.......... ...

Minimum Performance Specifications for Lightweight Flight Recording Systems.com. where Flight Operations Quality Assurance. received FAA Technical Standard Order (TSO) C197 Information Collection and Monitoring Systems approval for its Lightweight Data Recorder. Reduce inventory and maintenence costs while modernizing your aircraft’s interior. Flight Data Monitoring and Helicopter Operations Monitoring Program initiatives are becoming more prevalent. air and conduction-cooled aerospace applications. according to the company. introduced the USB 708. The LDR 1000 is compliant with the qualification and documentation requirements of EUROCAE Document ED-155. It is available with up to 8GB of high-bandwidth DDR3 SDRAM (1333 MHz) and comes with high-speed I/O. Visit www. according to the company. a 3U OpenVPX single board computer (SBC) based on the new Intel Core i7 next generation quad-core processor.ballardtech. The system incorporates Plug and Play and Hot Swap features for easy installation and movement between computers. 2 transmit) models are available and each includes 8 avionics discrete I/O.emteq. c o m LED LIGHTING | AVIONICS UPGRADES | ENGINEERING 34 Avionics Magazine April 2011 www. The board is designed for harsh environment. and an XMC/PMC site supported with eight lanes of PCI Express. Ballard said the USB 708 supports maximum data throughput and simultaneous operation on all channels. four USB 2. air ambulance and offshore oil and gas exploration aviation markets.cwembedded.. They also are used for monitoring. tactical aircraft and rugged naval systems. w w w. a line of portable avionics interfaces that enable computers to communicate with ARINC 708 and similar weather radar display databuses.new products Radar Display USB Interfaces Ballard Technology. including unmanned aircraft systems.l-3ar. Visit www.com/cleartheair. as well as simulating weather radar systems. Recorder TSO L-3 Aviation Recorders.avionicstoday. Two channel (1 receive. including dual Gigabit Ethernet. 48-bit hardware time-tag and IRIG synchronization/generation.. of Everett. L-3 said the LDR is well-suited to the law enforcement.com .0 ports.com. Gen2 PCIe or SRIO. recording and playing back data. Word length and pre-sync pulses are software-selectable to support custom protocols that deviate from ARINC 708. 1 transmit) and four channel (2 receive. Fla. OpenVPX Board Curtiss-Wright Controls Embedded Computing introduced the VPX3-1256. Wash. Model LDR 1000. of Sarasota. Visit www. The USB interfaces allow engineers and technicians to test weather radar Control-Display Units (CDU) and Transmit-Receive units using any available PC. Clear the air at www. RE-INTRODUCING NON SMOKING FLIGHTS Don’t let smoking ballasts keep your aircraft on the ground – upgrade your fleet with EMTEQ’s certified 115VAC LED wash light.com. e m t e q .

This is a great opportunity to: Keynote Speaker Advisory Committee.16.C.avionicstoday.RTCA2011Symposium. Washington Convention Center Washington D. the future of aviation in the US and around the world! Dave Barger President & CEO JetBlue Airways and Chair NextGen Advisory Committee Register today with VIP Code: AVIONICS to qualify for discounts on the Symposium! Premier Partner www. Accelerating NextGen Through Public-Private Partnership Attend the RTCA 2011 Annual Symposium and explore the challenges associated with implementing NextGen.2011 Annual Symposium June 15 .com www. 2011 Walter E.com April 2011 Avionics Magazine 35 18514 .

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